Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1965-1966

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1965-1966
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text


View of Denver Civic Center area.
Arrow points to Metropolitan State College office and classroom building.


1*1 mP OF DO' '.'TO' V LEMPER
Buildings Used By
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE
Forum Building (College Headquarters) University of Denver
250 West Fourteenth Avenue ' College of Business Administration
1445 Cleveland Place
Emily Griffith Opportunity School 1250 Welton Street
Kentucky Central Life Insurance Building 333 West Colfax Avenue
( 5J Denver Public Library 1357 Broadway
E. 20TH AVE.
E. 1 9TH AVE.
E. 1 7TH AVE.
HOSPITALITY
CENTER
E. COLFAX AVE.
W COLFAX AVE.
E 14TH AVE.
W. t 3TH AVE.
HOTCHKISS
in I w- J 5 Ui z 1 13 < < W\V\ iw UJ £ 3 a i : s. s| 8 z m J


ARCHIVES COPY
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE


BULLETIN
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF COLORADO
250 West 14th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
Catalog Issue 1965-66
The provisions contained in this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. Information presented herein is based on commonly accepted practices at Colorado state colleges and plans developed to date for Metropolitan State College, but the College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the students term of attendance.
Vol. 1 August 1965 No. 1
Application to mail at second-class postage rate is pending at Denver, Colorado. Published four times each year in August, December, March and June.


CALENDAR FOR 1965
JANUARY 1965 MAY 1965 SEPTEMBER 1965
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 1 1 2 3 4
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29 26 27 28 29 30
FEBRUARY 1965 JUNE 1965 OCTOBER 1965
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 1 2
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
28 27 28 29 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
MARCH 1965 JULY 965 NOVEMBER 1965
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 28 29 30
APRIL 1965 AUGUST 1965 DECEMBER 1965
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31
CALENDAR FOR 1966
JANUARY 1966 MAY 1966 SEPTEMBER 1966
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
FEBRUARY 1966 JUNE 1966 OCTOBER 1966
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
27 28 26 27 28 29 30 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29
MARCH 1966 JULY 1966 NOVEMBER 1966
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 27 28 29 30
APRIL 1966 AUGUST 1966 DECEMBER 1966
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


COLLEGE CALENDAR
Fall Quarter 1965
September 27, 28, and 29, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, Placement Tests, 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p. September 30, Thursday, Student Orientation
October 1, Friday, Registration, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
October 4 Monday, Classes Begin
October 4, Monday, Late Registration, 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
November 5, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports November 11, Thursday, Veterans Day Holiday November 24, Wednesday noon, Thanksgiving Vacation November 29, Monday, Classes resume, 8:00 a.m.
December 23, Thursday, Fall Quarter Ends Winter Quarter 1966
December 28 and 29, Tuesday and Wednesday, Placement Tests, 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m.
January 3, Monday, Registration, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
January 4, Tuesday, Classes Begin
January 4, Tuesday, Late Registration, 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
February 4, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports March 18, Friday, Winter Quarter Ends Spring Quarter 1966
March 15 and 16, Tuesday and Wednesday, Placement Tests, 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m,
March 21, Monday, Registration, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
March 22, Tuesday, Classes Begin
March 22, Tuesday, Late Registration, 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
April 8, Friday, Easter Vacation
April 12, Tuesday, Classes Resume, 8:00 a.m.
April 22, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports May 30, Monday, Memorial Day Holiday June 3, Friday, Spring Quarter Ends Summer Quarter 1966
June 7, Tuesday, Placement Tests, 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m.
June 10, Friday, Registration, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
June 13, Monday, Classes Begin
June 13, Monday, Late Registration, 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
July 4, Monday, Independence Day Holiday July 5, Tuesday, Classes Resume, 8:00 a.m.
July 15, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports August 19, Friday, Summer Quarter Ends


4.
CONTENTS
Page
Administration .................................................... 5
Instructional Staff ............................................... 6
General Information on the College ................................ 9
Admission and Registration ....................................... 11
Costs..............................................................13
Student Services ................................................. 15
Student Life and Activities........................................16
Academic Information ............................................. 16
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements ........................ 19
Division of Arts and Sciences......................................20
Division of Business ............................................. 32
Division of Technologies ......................................... 39
Alphabetical Index ............................................... 47
Map with Building Locations........................................49


ADMINISTRATION
Board of Trustees for the State Colleges (Appointed by the Governor of the State of Colorado)
* v- V Date of First Appointment Present Term Expires
Stuart W. McLaughlin, Rangely President 1963 1969
Phillip M. Lorton, B.S., Alamosa Vice President 1961 1967
Robert W. Bartley, LL.B., Pueblo 1961 1967
L. Richard Bratton, LL.B., Gunnison 1963 1969
Betty I. Naugle, A.B., Denver 1964 1971
C. Gale Sellens, A.B., Lakewood 1965 1971
William H. Southard, LL.B., Greeley 1965 1971
H. Grant Vest, Ed.D., Denver Secretary and Treasurer
Executive Committee for Metropolitan State College Betty I. Naugle, Chairman Phillip M. Lorton C. Gale Sellens
Curtis Wright, Assistant Secretary and Treasurer for Metropolitan State College
Officers of Administration
Kenneth Phillips, Ph.D. President
Keats R. McKinney, Ed.D. Dean of Instruction
F. D. Lillie, M.P.S. Dean of Student Services
Curtis Wright, B.S. and B.A. Business Manager


6.
Heads of Divisions
Keats R. McKinney, Ed.D., Acting ......................................... Arts and Scienci
Irvine H. Forkner, Ph.D............................................................ Busine!
Gail J. Phares, Ed.D...................................................... Applied Science
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
Adcock, Lorene ........................................... Assistant Professor of Businei
B.S., M.B.A. and M.A.,West Texas State University; advanced study, Univ. of Denver.
Alexis, Charlene .......................................... Instructor in Library
B.A., Southwestern State College; M.L.S., University of Oklahoma.
Allbee, Charles E........................................ Assistant Professor of
B.A. and M.A., Adams State College; advanced study, University of Colorado.
Baldwin, Donald N........................................ Assistant Professor of
B.S., University of Maryland; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Denver.
Benn, Harold W...................................................... Professor of
B.S. and M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Cornell University.
Bowles, Jean A........................................... Assistant Professor of
B.S. and M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
Boxer, Phillip .......................................... Assistant Professor of
B.S., University of Kansas; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Denver.
Scienc
Englis
Histoi
Biolog
Biolog
Englis
Brooke, George M................................................. Professor of Psycholog
B.A., Parsons College; M.S., Drake University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.
Cook, W. Thomas ........................................... Assistant Professor of Speec
B.A. and M.A., Colorado State College; Ph.D., University of Denver.
Edwards, Walker S................................ Associate Professor of Political Scienc
B.A., University of Denver; M.A., Stanford University; advanced study, Univ. of Colo.
Fair, Jeane D............................................. Professor of French and Spanis
B.A. and M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Northwestern University.
Forkner, Irvine H......................................... Associate Professor of Busines
B.S., M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University.
Gauthier, Perlita ...................
A.B., Western State College; M.A.
................. Assistant Professor of
University of Chicago; M.S., University of
Busines
Colorac
Graham, Ronald P............................
B.A. and M.B.S., University of Colorado.
Assistant Professor of Mathematic
Iazzetta, Vernie ..................................... Associate Professor of Psycholog
B.A. and M.A., University of Denver; Ed.D., University of Colorado.


7.
Lillie, F. D........................................... Assistant Professor of Psychology
A. B., Colorado State College; M.P.S. and advanced study, University of Colorado.
McKinney, Keats R................................................. Professor of Education
B. A. and Ed.M., Phillips University; Ed.D., University of Oklahoma.
McLallen, Millard D....................................... Assistant Professor of English
B.S., Wayland College; M.A., West Texas State University; Ph.D., University of Denver.
Mangold, Robert L............................................. Assistant Professor of Art
A. B. and M.F.A., Indiana University.
Mulvihill, Peggy M........................................ Associate Professor of History
B. Ph. and M.A., DePaul University; Ph.D., University of Chicago.
Ohlson, Morton K....................................... Associate Professor of Economics
B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
Parker, James F......................................................... Instructor in Art
B.A., Columbia University; advanced study, Instituto Hispano-Americano, Madrid, Spain.
Phares, Gail J......................................... Professor of Technical Education
A. B. and M.A., Chico State College; Ed.D., University of Southern California.
Phillips, Kenneth ................................................ Professor of Education
B. S., State University of New York; M.A. and Ph.D., Ohio State University.
Plachy, Jon M.......................................... Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A. and M.Ed., Adams State College; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University.
Rhodes, Robert E.......................................... Assistant Professor of English
A. B., University of Florida; M.A. and advanced study, University of New Mexico.
Rollins, Wayne D.......................................... Assistant Professor of English
B. A., Westmont College; M.A. and advanced study, University of Denver.
Roper, Keith I............................................ Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Southern Methodist University; M.Ed., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; Ed.D., University of Colorado.
Spurlin, Melvin D......................................... Assistant Professor of Biology
B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., University of Denver; advanced study, University of Colorado.
Sullenberger, Robert A.............................. Instructor in Mechanical Technology
B.S., Utah State University; advanced study, Colorado State College.
Temmer, Harry A..................................... Instructor in Electronics Technology
B.S., Drury College; advanced study, University of Denver.
Thomas, Gwendolyn A....................................... Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Bennett College; M.A., Temple University; advanced study, Cambridge University and University of Denver.


8.
Thonssen, Lester W................................................... Professor of Speei
A. B., Huron College; A.M. and Ph.D., State University of Iowa; D.Lit., Huron College
Wahl, Ronald R..................................... Instructor in Mathematics and Geoloj
B. S., Colorado School of Mines; M.S., Stanford University.
Willms, Raymond D...................................... Assistant Professor of Socioloj
A. B., Loras College; M.A., University of Notre Dame; advanced study, University of Colorado.
Wilson, Jerry H.......................................... Assistant Professor of Physic
B. A., M.S. and advanced study, University of Colorado.


9.
GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE COLLEGE
The college was founded by an act of the Colorado General Assembly, signed into law (House Bill 349) by the Governor May 5, 1963, which instructed the Trustees of the State Colleges of Colorado to provide "a comprehensive plan for the long-range development of Metropolitan State College." With regard to development into a four-year degree granting institution, the act stated: "Such plans shall contemplate full activation of the upper-division program no later than the fall of 1970, but such upper-division program shall in no event be activated until authorized by the general assembly." Funds were appropriated by the General Assembly in 1965 (funded May 17, 1965, Senate Bill 344) for establishment of the college and for initiation of instruction in the fall of that year.
The 1963 act states that Metropolitan State College shall be a part of the state higher education system, and that its objects shall be:
(1) To provide and offer programs of undergraduate instruction in the liberal arts and sciences, as determined by the trustees in the manner hereinafter specified;
(2) To provide and offer programs of instruction in semi-professional technical education in science and engineering technology on a terminal basis, either on its own campus or through contracts with public school districts in the city and county of Denver and in the counties of Adams, Arapahoe and Jefferson:
(3) To encourage other state institutions of higher learning to offer at the college, by extension, such credit courses as are beyond its scope and function, and to cooperate with such other state institutions of higher learning in the offering of such courses;
(4) To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the state of Colorado generally.
Metropolitan State College, along with Western State College at Gunnison, Adams State College at Alamosa, Southern Colorado State College at Pueblo and Colorado State College at Greeley, is under the management and control of a seven-member Board of Trust ees appointed by the Governor. The term of appointment is six years. From the seven members of the Board, an executive committee of three members is appointed to work directly with Metropolitan State College.
Finances for the college come from two sources: (1) a direct appropriation by the General Assembly from the general state revenue, and (2) tuition and fees collected from students.
Purposes
Metropolitan State College is a multi-purpose regional institution, and offers a variety of undergraduate curriculums and vocational-technical programs which recognize the special needs of the Denver metropolitan area, while also serving the needs of higher education in Colorado as a whole. Its basic mission is to provide post-high school education which will help individuals obtain vocational proficiency and develop as responsible citizens in a democratic society. Within the framework of legislation vhich created the college, specific programs of instruction and service have been delineated as follows:


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1. A two-year undergraduate curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences which provides a well-rounded general education, while at the same time preparing students for transfer to another institution if they wish to continue work towards a baccalaureate degree.
2. One or two-year terminal programs to prepare students for careers in the business world.
3. One or two-year terminal programs of vocational-technical training to prepare students for occupations in various technological fields.
4. Opportunities for individuals to take selected courses to improve their general education, obtain more competency for their present jobs, or prepare for new ones.
5. Cooperative efforts involving public school systems in the area, universities and colleges in Colorado, business, industry and government in providing on-the-job training, extension courses and other programs, in addition to those listed above, to meet the educational needs of the community.
Accreditation
The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, which is respc sible for accrediting all institutions of higher education in this region, has been advised that Metropolitan State College wishes to become a candidate for accreditation, and has received assurance that the evaluation process will be started as soon as possi ble. Although a newly founded institution is not eligible for candidacy status until after one year of operation, the instructional program of Metropolitan State College he been developed to meet the standards of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, as well as those of other accrediting organizations, such as the Engineers Council for Professional Development. The academic program will be of a qua] ity which will enable a student to transfer his credits to other state institutions of higher education, so that he may continue his work towards a baccalaureate degree.
Location
Metropolitan State College is located in Denver, one of the nation's finest cities. It is the capitol of Colorado, and a state and regional commercial and financial center. Excellent transportation from all parts of the United States is provided by six railroads, seven airlines and numerous buses. Although the metropolitan area population is now more than one million, Denver still retains the friendliness and romantic appeal of the Old West.
The "Mile High City," situated at the foot of the snow-capped Rocky Mountains, enjoys a mild, sunny, semi-arid climate. There are 100 parks, five 18-hole municipal golf courses and numerous other recreational facilities in Denver. Within easy driving distance are breathtaking mountain heights, old mining towns and places to picnic, hike fish, hunt, boat and ski.
Outstanding music, drama and art programs are provided by the Denver Symphony Orchestra, Denver Civic Theatre, Bonfils Memorial Theatre, Denver Art Museum and other organizations. The Colorado State Historical Museum has numerous Indian and western re ics and exhibits. World-famous displays of animals, birds and flowers in their natural habitats are found in the Denver Museum of Natural History.


11.
Denver is a city of excellent schools and fine churches. There are 690 Protestant md Orthodox churches, 60 Catholic churches and a number of Jewish synagogues and community :enters.
Facilities
The college headquarters is located in the central part of the Denver metropolitan irea. It is adjacent to the downtown business section and at the edge of the impressive livic Center--a ring of public buildings around a beautifully landscaped mall. Structures if special interest to MSC students include the Colorado State Museum, Greek Amphitheatre :nd Voorhees Memorial. All of the following buildings which will be used by the college re either in this immediate area or only a few blocks away.
Administrative, faculty and service offices are in the new ten-story Forum Build-ng, 250 West 14th Avenue, at the Civic Center. General information on the college and nstructions on applying for admission may be obtained there. In the fall, students are
0 report to the Forum Building for orientation and registration. At that time, they will eceive class schedules providing detailed information on the location of offices and of ooms where each class will meet. Several classrooms, a student lounge, reading room and ood service unit are located in the Forum Building.
Another modern structure, the Kentucky Central Life Insurance Building at 333 West olfax Avenue, houses classrooms and laboratories.
Other classes will be held in the University of Denver College of Business Admin-stration building at 1445 Cleveland Place.
Arrangements have been made with the Denver Public School Systems to use the out-tanding facilities of the Emily Griffith Opportunity School, 1250 Welton Street, for in-truction and training in certain vocational-technical fields.
Through arrangements with the Denver Public Library, 1357 Broadway, approximately le million books and various other resource materials are available to students enrolled
1 the college.
Smoking Regulations
Smoking is permitted only in hallways of buildings where classes are held, the :udent lounge and the food service unit. Smoking is prohibited in elevators, classrooms id laboratories, and persons violating this regulation of the City and County of Denver e subject to disciplinary action.
ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to the philosophy that educational oppor-nities should be provided for all who have the will and ability to benefit from the inruction offered.
Admission Requirements
Minimum entrance requirements for Colorado high school graduates are at least 15 its of acceptable work from a high school accredited by a state or regional accrediting


12.
association. An applicant who has been accepted for admission must submit a pre-entranc physical examination completed by a qualified physician to finalize his admission. A ce tificate of health form will be included in the applicant's acceptance materials. This certificate of health signed by both the physician and the applicant must show that the latter is in good physical and mental health, has no communicable diseases, and has no defects or deficiencies which would hinder satisfactory progress in his studies. Other factors which will be considered are intelligence, personality, character and comments by secondary school officials.
Applicants who are not residents of the state must meet the same admission requirements as Colorado residents and must, in addition, rank in the upper half of their graduating class in order to be admitted.
Mature persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an indivi dual basis. They may be admitted as regular students after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test which show that they have the ability to pursue satisfactorily programs of instruction which the college offers.
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited universities or colleges, a statement of good standing from the institution last attended, and an overall grade average of "C" (2.00 based on a four-point system where an "A" grade is 4 points) in all college courses attempted at any college or university are required. Failure to report correctly any previous college or university record before enrolling at Metropolitan State College may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
Admission Procedures
Applications for admission will be considered in the order in which they are received. Therefore, applications should be submitted at the earliest feasible date after completion of the first semester of the senior year in high school, and on file at the college not later than two weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
Admission of Freshmen (Applicants who have not attended college):
1. Obtain the uniform Application for Admission form used by Colorado collegia^ institutions from a Colorado secondary school or from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204.
2. Part I (pages 1 and 2) of this form should be completed and submitted with Part II to the student's high school for record and test data. The high school will seni the completed application directly to the college's Office of Admissions and Records.
3. It is recommended that all entering freshmen take either the Scholastic AptT tude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board, or the American College Test (ACT), and have the scores forwarded to the college.
4. A $5.00 application fee, which is not refundable, but which will apply on tu tion for the first quarter of enrollment, must be sent with the application.
5. Upon receipt of the above credentials, the applicant will be informed of his admission status.


13.
Admission of Transfer Students (Applicants who have attended a college or university) :
1. Request an application for admission from Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records.
2. Complete Part I of the "Application for Admission to Colorado Collegiate Institutions" and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records.
3. A $5.00 application fee, which is not refundable, but which will apply on tuition for the first quarter of enrollment, must be sent with the application.
4. Part II of the application should be submitted for completion to an appropriate personnel officer of the college or university where you are now attending or were last in attendance.
5. Request that one official transcript from each college or university attended be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicant's record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
6. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete information about the applicant's high school record.
(b) The applicant has completed less than a full quarter's work in college.
Registration Procedures
Registration for the Fall quarter starts with orientation (see college calendar in the front of this catalog) which is required for all freshmen and transfer students.
\t this time, new freshmen and transfer students with less than one year of college will De required to take appropriate placement tests. These test results will be used for academic advising and class section placement. During this period, students also are assigned to faculty advisors according to their educational interests, assistance is given in making out course programs, individual photographs are taken for identification cards and records purposes, registration is completed and tuition and fees paid, and other necessary processing is carried out. Various activities are arranged to acquaint each student with the college, the faculty and other students. Registration schedules for other juarters are given in the front of the catalog.
COSTS
All tuition and fees for each quarter (there are four quarters in a year, each consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction) are payable at the time of registration, and a student will not be admitted to classes until full payment has been made. Ihe Trustees of the State Colleges of Colorado, the governing board of the college, re-lerves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of registra-:ion for any quarter.


14.
The schedule of tuition and fee charges is as follows:
Residents of Colorado Non-Residents
Tuition
Students taking 9 or more quarter hours, per quarter $67.00 $150.00
Students taking less than 9 quarter hours, per quarter hour 8.00 16.00
Application Fee (To apply on first quarter tuition) 5.00 5.00
Student Services Fee
Full-time Student, per quarter 10.00 10.00
Part-time Student, per quarter hour 1.00 1.00
Laboratory Fee, per quarter (For technology courses) 10.00 10.00
Breakage Deposit, per quarter (for science laboratory courses) 5.00 5.00
Photograph and Record Fee (Charged at first registration) 2.00 2.00
Late Registration Fee 5.00 5.00
Change of Schedule Fee, per course change 1.00 1.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00 1.00
Residence status (classification as in-state or out-of-state students) is deter' mined by college officials solely for the purpose of assessing tuition. All rulings art made strictly in accord with the provisions of a 1961 state statute (C.R.S. 1953 as amended, 124-19-1) which applies uniformly to all registrants in the state institutions of higher education in Colorado. Additional information on regulations pertaining to residence status will be provided upon request.
Part-time students who are residents of Colorado pay tuition of $8.00 per quart* hour. Those who are not classified as Colorado residents are charged $16.00 per quarte: hour. Part-time students pay a $1.00 per quarter hour student services fee. All other charges are the same as for full-time students.
The late registration fee of $5.00 must be paid when a student enrolls after th< last scheduled day of registration for each quarter. A service charge of $1.00 is made for each change in course schedule after the original registration. Official transcript of academic work done at the college may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records after payment of a fee of $1.00 for each transcript.


15.
Refunds of tuition only are made to students officially withdrawing from the col-ege on a pro rata basis. After deducting the $5.00 application fee, authorized refunds re made as follows:
Upon Withdrawal
Percent of Tuition Refunded
During first week of classes .................................... 75
During second week of classes ................................... 50
During third week of classes .................................... 25
No refund will be made after the third week of classes .........
The cost of books and supplies averages about $90 per academic year with the high-st cost during the first quarter of attendance. Other costs, such as, board and room, ncidentals, transportation, clothing and other personal expenses will vary with the indi-idual student.
STUDENT SERVICES
The constant goal of the college is to provide educational opportunities adapted d the interests, needs and abilities of the individual student. To this end, each stu-jnt is assigned a faculty advisor who becomes conversant with his background, aptitudes id educational objectives, and who takes a personal interest in his education and welfare.
The Dean of Student Services coordinates a wide range of student assistance prorams, such as, orientation, faculty advising, educational and vocational testing, voca-Lonal and special counseling, financial aid and student activities. Special help is pro-Lded for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a per->nal nature. More information on various services is given below:
Financial Aid. Because authorization to start operation of Metropolitan State allege was received so recently, there has not been sufficient time to develop a compre-msive student aid program. Plans are being worked out to make financial assistance callable for qualified students through scholarships, grants, loans and part-time em-Loyment. Financial awards will be made on the basis of factors, such as, academic achieve-;nt, financial need, competence in a particular field or distinctive contribution to some lase of the total life of the college.
Part-Time Employment. Numerous opportunities for part-time employment exist in le metropolitan area. The college will maintain a file of job openings and give assis-mce in every way possible to students who need part-time employment to help defray their >llege expenses. The extent to which students may work is governed by their course load id ability to maintain a satisfactory grade record.
Placement. The college will serve as a clearinghouse for information on job op-irtunities, and will help students find employment in occupations for which they have pre-ired at Metropolitan State College.
Housing. Since the majority of the students come from the metropolitan area, the illege does not operate dormitories. Students not living at home will be given assis-


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tance in finding suitable off-campus living quarters. Lists of available housing will b< maintained in the Office of Student Services.
Health Services. The college does not maintain an infirmary; however, a student accident and sickness insurance program is available at a nominal cost. Students are not required to have this coverage as the program is offered on a voluntary basis, but it is recommended that they have this or some other type of health and accident insurance during the time they are in college.
Books. At the time of registration, information on procedures for purchasing books at the University of Colorado Denver Center will be provided.
Military Information. A student wishing academic deferment from Selective Service should contact the Office of Student Services concerning required forms. The usual requirement to be eligible for Selective Service deferment is that a student is enrolled full time and is making satisfactory progress toward a degree; however, local draft boards vary in their requirements for deferment.
All ex-service personnel entering under the veteran's education and training program must present a Certificate of Eligibility for use at Metropolitan State College at the time of registration.
STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES
The metropolitan area offers a wealth of opportunities to enrich classroom learning experiences. Students are encouraged to take advantage of theatrical and musical per formances, public lectures, museum displays, art exhibits and other cultural and educational endeavors. In addition, there will be various college activities organized and conducted largely on the students' own initiative, such as, debates, art exhibits, a college newspaper, a yearbook, clubs and social affairs.
Student government and activities are administered by the Associated Students of Metropolitan State College in cooperation with the Dean of Student Services and members of the faculty. Student clubs with special interests or objectives which contribute to the purposes of the college may be organized with the approval of the Associated Students and the college administration.
The college recognizes the value of religious life and encourages students to attend churches of their choice. With the large number of churches and synagogues in Denver, individuals are virtually certain to find their denomination represented.
The Forum Building has a reading room, food service unit and student lounge.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
The college operates on the quarter system with each quarter--Fall, Winter, Sprin and Summer--consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction. The Summer quarter is integrated with the three quarters of the usual academic year, so that it is possible for a student to carry on almost continuous study.
In order to serve people who are employed, evening as well as day classes are sch uled, and enrollment can be on either a full or part-time basis.


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Quarter Hour
Course credit is based on units designated "quarter hours." One quarter hour represents one fifty-minute class period per week which normally also requires two hours of outside preparation on the part of the student. Laboratory courses give one quarter hour of credit for each two or three hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week.
Course Load
The normal load per quarter is 16 quarter hours. Registration for additional quarter hours depends on the ability of the student. Taking up to a total of 18 hours requires the approval of the student's faculty advisor. Total quarter hours undertaken may not exceed 18 unless approved by both the advisor and the Dean of Student Services. The maximum permitted with such authorization is 20 quarter hours per quarter.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of quarter hours of credit earned. Students who have earned less than 45 quarter hours of credit are classified as freshmen. Those who have passing grades in 45 quarter hours or more are classified as sophomores.
Grades and Status Symbols
Alphabetical grades are used to indicate quality of academic work: "A" superior; "B" above average; "C" average; "D" below average but passing; and "F" failure.
Status symbols are given at the end of a course instead of letter grades to identify special situations in which a course was not completed for credit: "NC" (no credit) used for students who do not want to receive a grade or credit for a course; "IC" (incomplete) when a student has not completed the course, but the work which has been done has received a passing grade, and he will be permitted to complete the course within the time limit. An "IC" must be removed by the end of the following quarter (excluding the summer quarter) or it will be changed to an "F." Students may receive an "F" if they are not passing at the time they drop a course or completely withdraw from the college. See section "Change of Registration and Complete Withdrawal" for details.
Quality Points
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours earned. Quality points are awarded as follows: A course in which the student receives a grade of "A" provides four quality points for each hour of credit; A grade of "B" three quality points for each hour of credit; A grade of "C" two quality points for each hour of credit; A grade of "D" one quality point for each hour of credit. No quality points are given for grades below "D." The cumulative grade point average is calculated by multiplying the number of credit hours for each course by the number of quality points given, and dividing the total number of hours attempted into the total number of points accumulated.


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Advanced Placement
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions for consideration for college credit. The Registrar determines the amount and nature of the credit granted in consultation with the division chairman concerned.
Credit by Examination
Credit by examination may be obtained by students with knowledge of a subject which is equivalent to that which would be provided by organized class work. Students must consult the division chairman concerned as to their qualifications for taking such examinations and obtain official approval to do so. The maximum amount of credit which will be accepted by this means is 15 quarter hours.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. The college places the responsibility of attendance upon the student. In most cases, both tardiness and absences are dealt with by the individual instructor; however, in case of illness or other emergencies which make absence unavoidable, the Dean of Student Services may verify the reasons and issue an authorized absence slip. For such officially authorized absences, the faculty member teaching a course will permit the student to make up work missed, but when an absence is not so excused, the opportunity to make up work is at the discretion of the instructor. No matter what the reason for the absence, the student is held responsible for doing the full work of the course.
Change of Registration and Complete Withdrawal
During the first two weeks of the quarter, a student may adjust his class schedul by making appropriate and necessary additions or deletions to his schedule. Proper forms for accomplishing class adjustments may be secured in the Office of Admissions and Record A $1.00 service charge is made for each change in schedule from the original registration Unless these forms are properly completed, the courses added or dropped are not official, and a penalty of an "F" grade for each course not properly dropped will be recorded.
If the student wishes to withdraw completely from all classes, the proper form ma be secured in the Office of Admissions and Records. After securing this form, the studen must consult with the Dean of Student Services, obtain the necessary signatures, and submit the completed form to the Office of Admissions and Records. Unless this form is prop erly completed, the complete withdrawal is not official, and a penalty of an "F" grade fo each course not properly withdrawn from will be recorded. Normally, withdrawal will not be permitted during the last two weeks of a quarter.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, except in the case of semin courses or special projects. A student receiving a final grade of "F," may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charg for each registration.


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Academic Probation and Dismissal
In general, academic good standing means that a student has earned a number of quality points double the number of quarter hours attempted. The student whose quality point falls below 2.0 in any quarter may be placed on academic probation, and he becomes liable for dismissal if he d6es not show improved scholarship by the end of his probationary quarter. Requests for readmission will be considered only when a student dismissed for academic reasons presents evidence which supports a judgment that he will be capable of making an acceptable grade record.
Student Conduct and Dismissal
A student is expected to conduct himself, both within and outside the college, in a manner reflecting favorably on himself and the college. A student may be dismissed at any time for misconduct of such a nature as to make his continued attendance detrimental to the best interests of the student and/or the college. In the event of such a dismissal, no part of the tuition and fees will be refunded.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Metropolitan State College was initiated as a two-year college with expansion to a four-year institution granting baccalaureate degrees scheduled for no later than the fall of 1970 and dependent upon authorization from the General Assembly of the State of Colorado. Therefore, for the present, degrees which it may confer are Associate in Arts, Sciences, Business and Applied Science. The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward the following objectives: (1) earn an Associate degree in two years; (2) follow a curriculum planned to meet degree requirements of a senior college or university; (3) take terminal programs to prepare for careers in business or technological fields; or (4) enroll for selected courses to improve their general or specialized education. Some students may wish to fulfill more than one of these objectives, such as, earning an Associate degree and, at the same time, preparing for continuation of their studies to meet requirements for a Bachelor's degree.
Requirements for Associate Degrees
Several curricula have been designed to provide a well-rounded education and the >pportunity for specialization, if the student desires this. To earn an Associate degree, :he student must complete 93 quarter hours with a cumulative grade average of 2.00 or tigher, and meet the specific course requirements of the curriculum under which he is reg-.stered. Curricula are presented in the introductory sections for each division Arts md Sciences, Business and Technologies.
With approval of the administration, variation in Associate degree course programs lay be made to conform with the course requirements of a senior college or university to Thich the student plans to transfer. Such a student should be familiar with the rules of he institution concerned regarding transfer of credit and courses required under the cur-iculum in which he intends to major and complete requirements for a baccalaureate or ther degree. With regard to Colorado institutions of higher education, the Dean of Stu-ent Services' office has information on recommended programs for students planning to ransfer, and advisors will assist them in developing a program of studies.


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Course Numbers and Descriptions
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for inf< mation on level of instruction, credit, course sequence, contents and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Freshmi level courses are numbered 100 through 199, and sophomore level courses are numbered 20( through 299. Normally freshmen may not take sophomore level courses, but in special caf and with the consent of the instructor, this may be permitted. Only courses numbered 1( or above will be included in credits towards a degree.
The complete number indicates the nature of the course. Those with two zeros, such as, Art 100 Art Appreciation, are general or survey courses which are completed in one quarter. Courses which continue for more than one quarter have a third number whicl is in a series, such as, English 101, 102 and 103. Usually, a student must take a sequence course in the proper order; i.e., he cannot register for English 102 until he he taken and passed English 101. The second digit may have significance as regards subject matter; for example, Anthropology 221 is a course presenting subject matter in the fie] of archaeology.
After each course number is a figure specifying the quarter hours of credit. As an example, English 101-3 is a three credit course.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the material which is covered. If thei is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for t course, this information is listed at the end of the course description.
DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
This division offers a variety of courses with the aim of giving students the op portunity to obtain a broad and varied education, as well as to specialize in a liberal arts or science field. Its courses also form the foundation for programs of study in tl other divisions.
Associate in Arts
This curriculum is designed for individuals who wish to cover the fundamentals c broad fields of knowledge and, at the same time, have the opportunity for intensive stud of a particular field of the humanities or social sciences. The basic subject matter re quirements listed below parallel lower division programs of many arts and sciences colleges, and thus prepare the student to continue his work toward the baccalaureate degree Such a student should decide upon a major field of study, and choose electives to confoi with the degree requirements of the institution to which he plans to transfer.
To meet requirements for the Associate in Arts degree, a student must complete the program listed below with an average of 2.00 or higher. Where several courses are listed under a subject matter field, he may choose any which bring his total credit hour earned up to the minimum specified for that field. In addition to meeting the specific course requirements, he must take up to the minimum specified in elective courses appro\ by his advisor.


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1. English 101-103. Basic Communication 9
2. Physical Education 3
3. Biological Sciences 9
Biology 100. Introduction to Plant and Animal Life. 4
Botany 111-112. General Botany. 8
Zoology 121-122. General Zoology. 8
Psychology 101-103. General Psychology. 9
4. Physical Sciences or Mathematics 9
Chemistry 100. Introductory General Chemistry 5
or Chemistry 101-103. General Chemistry. 15
Physics 100. Introduction to Physics 5
or Physics 101-103. General Physics. 15
Geology 100. Geology and Man 3
or Geology 101-103. General, Physical and Historical Geology. 13
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics 5
or Mathematics 101-102. College Algebra and Trigonometry. 10
5. Humanities 9
Art 100. Art Appreciation. 3
Art 101-103. Art Survey. 9
English 111-112. Introduction to Literature. 8
French 101-103. Elementary French. 15
or French 201-203. French Composition. 6
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish. 15
or Spanish 201-203. Spanish Composition. 6
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3
6. Social Sciences 9
Anthropology 101-102. Introduction to Anthropology. 10
Economics 100. Introduction to Economics 3
or Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics. 9
History 101-103. World Civilization. 9
Political Science 100. Introduction to Political Science. 3
Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology. 5
7. Approved electives 45
93
Associate in Science
This curriculum is offered for the student who wishes to obtain a general education and also have the opportunity for intensive study of mathematics, biological sciences, physical sciences or related fields. The basic subject matter requirements listed below provide the foundation for continuation of studies toward baccalaureate degrees in mathematics or science, or for work toward degrees in professional fields involving the application of knowledge in these disciplines. Such a student should decide upon a major field of study, and choose electives to conform with the degree requirements of the institution to which he plans to transfer.
To meet the requirements for the Associate in Science degree, a student must complete the program listed below with an average of 2.00 or higher. Where several courses are listed under a subject matter field, he may choose any which bring his total credit


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hours earned up to the minimum specified for that field. In addition to meeting the specific course requirements, he must take up to the minimum specified in elective courses approved by his advisor.
1. English 101-103. Basic Communication. 9
2. Physical Education 3
3. Biological Sciences 12
Biology 100. Introduction to Plant and Animal Life. 4
Botany 111-112. General Botany. 8
Zoology 121-122. General Zoology. 8
Psychology 101-103. General Psychology. 9
4. Physical Sciences 12
Chemistry 101-103. General Chemistry. 15
Physics 101-103. General Physics. 15
Geology 101-103. General, Physical and Historical Geology. 13
5. Mathematics 101-102. College Algebra and Trigonometry. 10
6. Humanities 9
Art 100. Art Appreciation. 3
Art 101-103. Art Survey. 9
English 111-112. Introduction to Literature. 8
French 101-103. Elementary French 15
or French 201-203. French Composition. 6
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish 15
or Spanish 201-203. Spanish Composition. 6
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3
7. Social Sciences 9
Anthropology 101-102. Introduction to Anthropology. 10
Economics 100. Introduction to Economics 3
or Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics. 9
History 101-103. World Civilization. 9
Political Science 100. Introduction to Political Science. 3
Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology. 5
8. Approved Electives 29
93
Anthropology
Anthro. 101-5. Introduction to Anthropology. The development of man and his cultures through the early metal ages. Covers human evolution, race, prehistory and the rise of early civilization.
Anthro. 102-5. Introduction to Anthropology. Survey of the world's major culture areas; culture and its major components, such as, subsistence, social organization, religion and language.
Anthro. 221-4. Old World Archaeology. Prehistory and protohistory of Eurasia and Africa emphasizing growth of culture and spread of civilization.


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Anthro. 222-4. New World Archaeology. Prehistory of North, Middle and South America, emphasizing peopling of the New World, earliest American Indian cultures and later regional developments.
Art
Art 100-3. Art Appreciation. Designed primarily for people who are not art majors but who are interested in acquiring information on various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening their knowledge and appreciation of the subject. Study of the world's art masterpieces and visits to art exhibits and museums in Denver will be included.
Art 101-3. Art Survey. High points in the development of Western art from prehistoric times to the present are studied to reveal the range of artistic purpose and method; previous styles and periods are related historically and stylistically to contemporary art.
Art 102-3. Art Survey. Continuation of Art 101.
Prerequisite: Art 101.
Art 103-3. Art Survey. Continuation of Art 102.
Prerequisite: Art 102.
Art 111-2. Drawing. A course in basic drawing aimed at developing graphic skills and familiarity with traditional drawing media; still life and figure are used as points of departure. Payment of model fee required.
Art 112-2. Drawing. Continuation of Art 111.
Prerequisite: Art 111.
Art 113-2. Drawing. Continuation of Art 112.
Prerequisite: Art 112.
Art 121-3. Basic Design. A study of basic design principles in relation to possibilities and limitations of the two-dimensional surface; color is approached as a functional design element.
^rt 122-3. Basic Design. Continuation of Art 121.
Prerequisite: Art 121.
\rt 123-3. Basic Design. Continuation of Art 122.
Prerequisite: Art 122.
^rt 211-2. Drawing--the Figure. Using the figure as a point of departure; graphic skills ire further developed with emphasis on linear quality and style. Payment of model fee is required.
Prerequisite: Art 113, or permission of instructor.
Irt 212-2. Drawing--the Figure. Continuation of Art 211.
Prerequisite: Art 211.
irt 213-2. Drawing--the Figure, hrerequisite: Art 212.
Continuation of Art 212.


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Art 231-3. Painting. Basic oil painting principles and methods are presented in terms of specific composition problems. Payment of model fee is required.
Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123, or permission of instructor.
Art 232-3. Painting. Continuation of Art 231.
Prerequisite: Art 231.
Art 233-3. Painting. Continuation of Art 232.
Prerequisite: Art 232.
Art 241-3. Sculpture. Historical and contemporary approaches to spacial concepts are explored in terms of sculpture; technical skills are developed in clay and plaster. Pa} ment of model fee is required.
Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123, or permission of instructor.
Art 242-3. Sculpture. Continuation of Art 241.
Prerequisite: Art 241.
Art 243-3. Sculpture. Continuation of Art 242.
Prerequisite: Art 242.
Art 251-2. Lettering. The design and execution of finished lettering for reproduction; lettering approached as a design function.
Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123.
Art 252-2. Lettering. Continuation of Art 251.
Prerequisite: Art 251.
Art 253-2. Lettering. Continuation of Art 252.
Prerequisite: Art 252.
Art 261-3. Advertising Art Studio. Actual advertising problems are solved in terms of authentic studio procedures and techniques with particular reference to printing methods. Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123.
Art 262-3. Advertising Art Studio. Continuation of Art 261.
Prerequisite: Art 261.
Art 263-3. Advertising Art Studio. Continuation of Art 262.
Prerequisite: Art 262.
Biology
Biol. 100-4. Introduction to Plant and Animal Life. Covers the broad fundamentals of plant and animal life and the relationship of man to other organisms. Provides a survey of the field as well as a foundation for more intensive instruction in botany and zoolog}
Biol. 101-3. Natural Resources and Conservation. Study of natural resources--water, soi forest, range and wildlife--their conservation and utilization, including government programs and private efforts.
Bot. 111-4. General Botany. Structure and functions of the higher plants including cel] plant parts, growth, physiology, reproduction, genetics and ecology.
Prerequisite': Biology 100.


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Bot. 112-4. General Botany. Study of the nature, structure and functions of lower plant forms, such as, algae and fungi.
Prerequisite: Botany 111.
Zool. 121-4. General Zoology. Study of representative types of invertebrate animals with special emphasis on their structure, functions, classification, distribution, evolution and other characteristics.
Prerequisite: Biology 100.
Zool. 122-4. General Zoology. Study of vertebrates with special emphasis on their anatoir functional organization, physiology, evblution, genetics, distribution and other character istics.
Prerequisite: Zoology 121.
Zool. 231-3. Human Physiology. An introduction to the principles of human physiology wit emphasis on the cells, tissues, organs and care of the human body.
Prerequisite: Biology 100.
Chemistry
Chem. 100-5. Introductory General Chemistry. First course in principles of chemistry for students with no high school chemistry. Covers the same material as Chemistry 101, but re quires an extra hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or Mathematics 100.
Chem. 101-5. General Chemistry. Fundamental principles and laws of chemistry illustrated by descriptive study of the important metals and non-metals and their compounds. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry, and one year of high school algebra or
Mathematics 100.
Chem. 102-5. General Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 101.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 100 or 101.
Chemistry 103-5. General Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 102.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 102.
Chem. 221-5. Quantitive Analysis. Principles and laboratory procedures in volumetric and gravimetric analysis.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 103.
Education
Educ. 100-3. Introduction to Education. Designed to acquaint students with opportunities and responsibilities in the teaching profession, provide a broad understanding of the nature, purposes and organization of the American education system, and advise on educational requirements to qualify as teachers in elementary and high schools.
English
Eng. 99-3. Remedial English. A review course required of students who show serious lack of preparation in English on the basis of placement tests and demonstrated ability. Correct sentence structure, spelling, vocabulary, composition and reading are stressed. The


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course serves two purposes: to prepare students with deficiences in English for taking the regular freshman English course, 101-102-103; and to provide other individuals with the opportunity to improve their use of English through a short period of concentrated instruction in fundamentals of the language.
Eng. 101-3. Basic Commuilication. The course objective is development of competency in the basic skills of reading, writing and speaking. Instruction in the fundamentals of cor rect English usage is accompanied by extensive practice in written and oral expression.
Eng. 102-3. Basic Communication. Continuation of English 101.
Prerequisite: English 101.
Eng. 103-3. Basic Communication. Continuation of English 102.
Prerequisite: English 102.
Eng. 104-3. Improvement of Reading. The course is designed for individuals who wish to improve their reading efficiency. A diagnosis is made of each student's reading ability, and training is given to improve reading rate and comprehension. Assistance is also avail able for the development of other study skills. Individual counseling and guidance is an integral part of the program.
Eng. 111-4. Introduction to Literature. A course to introduce students to literature and acquaint them with outstanding short stories, novels and non-fiction prose.
Eng. 112-4. Introduction to Literature. Reading and analysis of outstanding poems and plays.
Eng. 200-3. English Grammar. An advanced review of the elements of grammar for individuals who have good basic knowledge of the language but want to develop a high degree of proficiency. Rigorous practice is provided in spelling, punctuation, grammar and diction. Recommended especially for those who expect to teach or do secretarial work.
Prerequisite: English 101-103, or demonstrated proficiency equal to that obtained in
passing these courses in basic communication.
Eng. 201-3. Advanced Composition. Continuation of instruction and training in the use of English with emphasis on effective organization of material, refinements of style, and other skills involved in good writing.
Prerequisite: English 103.
Eng. 221-3. American Literature. Study of American literary classics of the 19th and 20t' centuries: novels, poems, plays and essays.
Prerequisites: English 111 and 112.
Eng. 231-3. Survey of English Literature. Chronological study of English literature from the beginning of the 18th century to modern times.
Prerequisites: English 111 and 112.
French
French 101-5. Elementary French. Beginning French with emphasis on grammar, pronunciatio: reading, conversation and written composition.
French 102-5. Elementary French. Continuation of French 101. Prerequisite: French 101.


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French 103-5. Elementary French. Continuation of French 102.
Prerequisite: French 102.
French 201-2. French Composition. Review of grammar, advanced study of grammatical forms and idioms, and intensive practice in translation and writing.
Prerequisite: French 103 or two years of high school French, and passing a placement test.
French 202-2. French Composition. Continuation of French 201.
Prerequisite: French 201.
French 203-2. French Composition. Continuation of French 202.
Prerequisite: French 202.
French 211-3. French Reading and Conversation. Review of principles of the language, selecting French literature, and practice in reading and conversation.
Prerequisite: French 103 or two years of high school French, and passing a placement test.
French 212-3. French Reading and Conversation. Continuation of French 211.
Prerequisite: French 211.
French 213-3. French Reading and Conversation. Continuation of French 212.
Prerequisite: French 212.
Geology
Geol. 100-3. Geology and Man. A general course designed to provide broad knowledge of materials, structures, and surface features of the earth and the geologic processes which have developed them. Special attention is given to the geology of Colorado. Those who complete Geology 101 are not allowed credit for this course.
Geol. 101-5. General Geology. The materials of the earth, its structure, surface features, and the geologic processes involved in their development. Includes an introduction to geologic history.
Geol. 102-4. Physical Geology. The processes that form rocks, geologic structures and landscapes illustrated by examples from local areas.
Prerequisite: Geology 101.
Geol. 103-4. Historical Geology. The development of the earth and its features from origin to the present, and the accompanying evolutionary changes as revealed in the fossil record.
Prerequisite: Geology 102.
History
Hist. 101-3. World Civilization. The political, economic and cultural history of the ancient world and the Middle Ages, including a study of Byzantine and Moslem civilizations, and the origins of Christianity.
Hist. 102-3. World Civilization. History of the West from the Renaissance to the end of the Napoleonic era. Emphasis is given to the origins and development of modern political, economic and cultural institutions.
Prerequisite: History 101.


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Hist. 103-3. World Civilization. History of the West from 1815 to the present, including a study of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political and cultural history, ai the problems of the 20th century.
Prerequisite: History 102.
Hist. 111-3. History of Colorado. History of the growth and development of Colorado: dian influence; Spanish, French and American exploration; mining and trapping; early settlements and pioneer life; development of agriculture, ranching and industry; economi social and cultural progress; and government.
Hist. 221-3. Early American History. The European background to American history, the colonial period, the Revolution and development of the United States from Washington to Jackson (1607-1837).
Hist. 222-3. The Middle Period in American History. The slavery controversy, the Civil War, reconstruction, the growth of industry and the awakening interest in world affairs (1837-1898).
Prerequisite: History 221.
Hist. 223-3. The United States and the Modern World. A study of American history from the Spanish-American War to the present day.
Prerequisite: History 221.
Hist. 231-2. History of England. This series covers social, economic, political, religious, colonial and imperial developments from earliest times to the present. Covers his tory to 1603.
Hist. 232-2. History of England. Covers 1603-1837.
Prerequisite: History 231.
Hist. 233-2. History of England. Covers 1837 to present.
Prerequisite. History 232.
Mathematics
Math. 99-5. Remedial Mathematics. A course for students who do not have an adequate bac ground for taking either Mathematics 100 or 101, as shown by placement tests and demonstrated ability. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of mathematics. Instruction is given in arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry.
Math. 100-5. Basic Mathematics. A course for students who do not need the intensive cov erage provided by the Mathematics 101-103 series. Covers certain arithmetic concepts and algebra and trigonometry.
Prerequisites: One and one-half years of high school algebra and one year of plane geom-
etry, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 101-5. College Algebra. Standard course in college algebra; binomial theorem, in equalities, theory of equations, quadratic systems, determinants, probability, partial fractions.
Prerequisites: One and one-half years of high school algebra and one year of plane geom-
etry, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 102-5. College Trigonometry. Trigonometry analysis, solution of triangles, graphing, inverse functions, complex numbers, polar coordinates, trigonometric series, hyperbolic functions.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101.


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Math. 103-5. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. An integrated course in analytic geometry and calculus: the straight line, conic sections, limits, differentiation, applications of the derivative, introduction to definite integral.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102.
Math. 104-4. Topics in Mathematics. A course in applied mathematics which provides opportunities for specialization to meet the needs of students majoring in business, data processing and engineering technologies.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 or 101.
Philosophy
Phil. 101-3. Introduction to Philosophy. Designed to acquaint students with the meaning of philosophy and the "philosophic approach." Surveys philosophic inquiries, theories and concepts which aid in understanding the world in which man lives and works.
Phil. 111-3. Logic. An introduction to the nature and techniques of deductive reasoning. Covers methods of formulating valid deductions from experience with particular emphasis on the relationship between logic and mathematics and science.
Phil. 121-3. Ethics. An introduction of major ethical theories and consideration of their relevance to man's moral problems and decisions.
Physics
Physics 100-5. Introduction to Physics. A survey course which provides an understanding of the underlying principles of physics and their practical application. Credit cannot be received for this course, and for Physics 101, 102 and 103.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra, or Mathematics 100 or 101.
Physics 101-5. General Physics. Basic principles and concepts of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, electricity and modern physics.
Prerequisite: High school algebra and trigonometry, or Mathematics 100 or 101.
Physics 102-5. General Physics. Continuation of Physics 101.
Prerequisite: Physics 101.
Physics 103-5. General Physics. Continuation of Physics 102.
Prerequisite: Physics 102.
Physics 110-3. Engineering Physics. Principles of physics applied to practical situations In mechanics. A practical course designed for engineering technology students. Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 100 or 101, and one year
>f high school physics or equivalent.
Physics 111-3. Engineering Physics. Principles of physics applied to practical situations In heat, wave, motion, sound and light. A practical course designed for engineering tech-lology students.
rerequisite: Physics 110.


30.
Political Science
Pol. Sci. 100-3. Introduction to Political Science. Principles of political science ai government, including the general nature of government, political concepts, institutions and practices.
Pol. Sci. 111-3. National Government in the United States. Study of the constitution c the United States and of the philosophy, history, principles, organization, powers and functions of the national government.
Prerequisite: Political Science 100.
Pol. Sci. 121-3. American State and Local Government. A fundamental course dealing wit the organization, powers, functions and practical workings of state, county, town and ci governments of the United States. Special attention is given to federal-state and inter state relations. The Colorado state government and constitution are studied. Prerequisite: Political Science 100.
Pol. Sci. 131-3. American Political Parties. History and practice of political parties in the United States nature, structure, organization and functions.
Prerequisite: Political Science 100.
Pol. Sci. 241-3. Introduction to International Relations. A study of the forces of int national politics, law and organization in the nation-state system.
Prerequisite: Political Science 100.
Pol. Sci. 251-5. Governments of Western Europe. Covers philosophical and historical fc dations and survey of government and politics in Great Britain, France and West Germany. Prerequisite: Political Science 100.
Psychology
Psych. 100-3. Personality and Adjustment. Application of principles of psychology to a sist individuals in understanding factors which influence human development, help them make personal improvements and adjustments and provide knowledge useful in social and pr fessional relationships.
Psych. 101-3. General Psychology. Introduction to basic principles and methods involve in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. Attention is given to perc tion, learning, motivation, maturation and emotions.
Psych. 102-3. General Psychology. Continuation of Psychology 101.
Prerequisite: Psychology 101.
Psych. 103-3. General Psychology. Continuation of Psychology 102.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 111-4. Educational Psychology. Application of principles of psychology to learn ing and teaching.
Prerequisite: Psychology 101.


31.
Sociology
ioc. 101-5. Introduction to Sociology. Basic principles of sociology and sociological analysis. Man is studied as a participant in group life man and culture, social insti-zutions, social interaction and social change. Consideration is given to applications of sociological concepts to adjustments necessitated by life in a changing world.
ioc. 110-3. Marriage and the Family. A functional approach to the subject of marriage and family life. Deals with courtship and preparation for marriage, contemporary marital and domestic problems, adjustments between husband and wife, the family in the community, relationships between parents and children, and other factors involved in successful family Life.
ioc. 221-3. Introduction to Social Work. A study of public and private welfare agencies md social services with an emphasis on the basic techniques and functions of the professional social worker in handling and working with people on an individual and direct basis, rerequisite: Sociology 101.
Spanish
Spanish 101-5. Elementary Spanish. Beginning Spanish with emphasis on grammar, pronuncia-
:ion, reading, conversation and written composition.
Spanish 102-5. Elementary Spanish. Continuation of Spanish 101.
'rerequisite: Spanish 101.
Spanish 103-5. Elementary Spanish. Continuation of Spanish 102.
'rerequisite: Spanish 102.
Spanish 201-2. Spanish Composition. Review of grammar, advanced study of grammatical
:orms and idioms, and intensive practice in translation and writing.
rerequisite: Spanish 103 or two years of high school Spanish, and passing a placement
:es t.
Spanish 202-2. Spanish Composition. Continuation of Spanish 201.
'rerequisite: Spanish 201.
Spanish 203-2. Spanish Composition. Continuation of Spanish 202.
rerequisite: Spanish 202.
panish 211-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation. Review of principles of the language, elected Spanish literature, and practice in reading and conversation.
rerequisite: Spanish 103 or two years of high school Spanish, and passing a placement
est.
panish 212-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation. Continuation of Spanish 211. rerequisite: Spanish 211.
panish 213-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation. Continuation of Spanish 212. 'rerequisite: Spanish 212.


32.
Speech
Spch. 101-3. Public Speaking. General introductory course giving fundamental theory an* practice in public speech preparation and delivery.
Spch. 110-2. Parliamentary Procedure. Principles and applications of parliamentary pro cedure in the conduct of meetings.
Spch. 120-3. Argumentation and Debate. The foundation of argumentative discourse with emphasis on the construction and delivery of logical argument and the development of ski in critical thinking. Methods of formal debate are discussed, and work with specific de bate topics is included.
Prerequisite: Speech 101.
Spch. 201-3. Voice and Diction. Elementary course for improvement and effective use of the voice. Includes study of phonetics and standard speech. Provides opportunity for ci rection of minor speech difficulties.
Prerequisite: Speech 101.
Spch. 230-3. Introduction to Radio and Television. The evolution, organization and fum tion of broadcasting. Introduction to the techniques used in radio and television broadcasting.
Prerequisite: Speech 101.
DIVISION OF BUSINESS
The programs offered by this division are designed to give students a background of general education, and to develop knowledge and skills for entering the business fieli as a profession.
Associate in Business
This Associate degree presents options for specialization under the Business Adm istration, Office Administration or Executive Secretary curricula. The basic subject ma ter requirements listed under these curricula provide a sound background for continuatioi for the baccalaureate degree or for the attainment of considerable vocational competency Students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university should choose electiv> to conform with the degree requirements of that institution.
To meet requirements for the Associate in Business degree, a student must comple one of the programs listed below with an average of 2.00 or better. Where several coursi are listed under a subject matter field, he may choose any which bring his total credit hours earned up to the minimum specified for that field. In addition to meeting the spe cific course requirements, he must take up to the minimum specified in elective courses approved by his advisor.
Business Administration
The Business Administration program is designed to help students learn and under stand business principles and procedures, attain skill in carrying out management functions, and develop initiative and attitudes of leadership to the end that they may succe as administrators of commercial, industrial and other enterprises.


33.
1. English 101-103. Basic Communication. 9
2. Physical Education 3
3. Biological Sciences 7
Psychology 100. Personality and Adjustment 3
and additional hours needed for a total of 7 from the following:
Biology 100. Introduction to Plant and Animal Life. 4
Psychology 101-103. General Psychology. 9
4. Physical Sciences 3
Chemistry 100. Introductory General Chemistry 5
or Chemistry 101-103. General Chemistry. 15
Physics 100. Introduction to Physics 5
or Physics 101-103. General Physics. 15
Geology 100. Geology and Man 3
or Geology 101-103. General, Physical and Historical Geology. 13
5. Mathematics 9
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics 5
or Mathematics 101. College Algebra. 5
Mathematics 104. Topics in Mathematics. 4
6. Humanities 9
Art 100. Art Appreciation. 3
Art 101-103. Art Survey. 9
English 111-112. Introduction to Literature. 8
French 101-103. Elementary French 15
or French 201-203. French Composition. 6
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish 15
or Spanish 201-203. Spanish Composition. ' 6
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3
7. Social Sciences 12
Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics. 9
Political Science 100. Introduction to Political Science. 3
8. Business 26
Accounting 101-103. Elementary Accounting. 9
Business 100. Introduction to Business. 3
Business 201. Principles of Management. 4
Business 111. Principles of Marketing. 4
Business 221-222. Business Law. 6
). Approved Electives 15
93
Office Administration
The purpose of the Office Administration program is to prepare students for posi-:ions involving supervision of office employees. It provides a general background of knowledge and skills needed by the person who will direct the work of others rather than performing specialized jobs himself.


34.
1. English 101-103. Basic Communication.
2. Physical Education
3. Biological Sciences
Psychology 100. Personality and Adjustment 3
and additional hours needed for a total of 7 from the following:
Biology 100. Introduction to Plant and Animal Life. 4
Psychology 101-103. General Psychology. 9
4. Physical Sciences ;
Chemistry 100. Introductory General Chemistry 5
or Chemistry 101-103. General Chemistry. 15
Physics 100. Introduction to Physics 5
or Physics 101-103. General Physics. 15
Geology 100. Geology and Man 3
or Geology 101-103. General, Physical and Historical Geology. 13
5. Mathematics
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics 5
or Mathematics 101. College Algebra. 5
Mathematics 104. Topics in Mathematics. 4
6. Humanities '
Art 100. Art Appreciation. 3
Art 101-103. Art Survey. 9
English 111-112. Introduction to Literature. 8
French 101-103. Elementary French 15
or French 201-203. French Composition. 6
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish 15
or Spanish 201-203. Spanish Composition. 6
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3
7. Social Sciences l.
Economics 100. Introduction to Economics 3
or Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics 9
and any additional hours needed for total of 9 from following:
Anthropology 101-102. Introduction to Anthropology. 10
History 101-103. World Civilization. 9
Political Science 100. Introduction to Political Science. 3
Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology. 5
8. Business 3(
Accounting 101-103. Elementary Accounting. 9
Business 100. Introduction to Business. 3
Business 200. Business Communications. 3
Business 201. Principles of Management. 4
Secretarial Science 101-103. Typewriting, or high school type- 9
writing, plus additional of above series equal to competency acquired with completion of 103.
Secretarial Science 223. Operation of Office Machines. 2
Data Processing courses. 6
9.
Approved Electives
J
9!


35.
The Executive Secretary program provides the opportunity for individuals to attain excellence in stenographic skills, and to acquire a broad background of business and general knowledge so that they are qualified for upper level positions, such as, executive
Executive Secretary
The Executive Secretary program provides the opportunity for individuals to attain excellence in stenographic skills, and to acquire a broad background of business and general knowledge so that they are qualified for upper level positions, such as, executive secretaries and administrative assistants.
With the approval of the student's advisor, variations may be made in the executive secretary curriculum to provide more opportunity for specialization, such as, for medical secretarial or legal secretarial work.
Individuals not planning to work for a degree but who want to obtain proficiency in office skills and procedures may obtain assistance from secretarial science faculty members in working out programs of study.
1. English 101-103. Basic Communication. 9
2. Physical Education 3
3. Biological Sciences 7
Psychology 100, Personality and Adjustment 3
and additional hours needed for a total of 7 from the following:
Biology 100. Introduction to Plant and Animal Life. 4
Psychology 101-103. General Psychology. 9
t. Physical Sciences 3
Chemistry 100. Introductory General Chemistry 5
or Chemistry 101-103. General Chemistry. 15
Physics 100. Introduction to Physics 5
or Physics 101-103. General Physics. 15
Geology 100. Geology and Man 3
or Geology 101-103. General, Physical and Historical Geology. 13
i. Mathematics 5
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics 5
or Mathematics 101. College Algebra. 5
i. Humanities 9
Art 100. Art Appreciation. 3
Art 101-103. Art Survey. 9
English 111-112. Introduction to Literature. 8
French 101-103. Elementary French 15
or French 201-203. French Composition. 6
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish 15
or Spanish 201-203. Spanish Composition. 6
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3
. Social Sciences 9
Economics 100. Introduction to Economics 3
or Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics. 9
and any additional hours needed for total of 9 from following:
Anthropology 101-102. Introduction to Anthropology. 10
History 101-103. World Civilization. 9
Political Science 100. Introduction to Political Science. 3
Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology. 5


36.
8. Business 43
Accounting 101-103. Elementary Accounting. 9
Business 100. Introduction to Business. 3
Business 200. Business Communications. 3
Secretarial Science 101-103. Typewriting, 9
or high school typewriting plus additional of above series equal to competency acquired with completion of 103.
Secretarial Science 111-113. Shorthand, or high school short- 12
hand plus additional of above series to equal competency acquired with completion of 113.
Secretarial Science 214. Advanced Dictation. 3
Secretarial Science 222. Secretarial Practices and Procedures. 2
Secretarial Science 223. Operation of Office Machines. 2
9. Approved Electives
_5
93
Accounting
Acct. 101-3. Elementary Accounting. Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the double entry system. In addition to providing practice in accounting, the course deals with transaction analysis and other uses of accounts in single proprietorship and partnership types of business organizations.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra, or Mathematics 99, and Mathematics 100 o
101.
Acct. 102-3. Elementary Accounting. Continuation of the development of accounting prin ciples and practices and emphasis on measurement and presentation of financial data and its use in planning and control of enterprise resources and operations.
Prerequisite: Accounting 101.
Acct. 103-3. Elementary Accounting. Further development of accounting as a tool for ma agement. Emphasis is given to the corporate type of business organization.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102.
Acct. 110-3. Income Tax Accounting. Application of the Internal Revenue Code to the de termination of income taxes for individuals and, to a limited extent, of corporations. Prerequisite: Accounting 101, or permission of instructor.
Acct. 201-5. Intermediate Accounting. Continuation of the study of basic accounting pr ciples with application to corporations and other types of business enterprises. Prerequisite: Accounting 103.
Business
Bus. 100-3. Introduction to Business. A realistic survey of the business world and the place of business in contemporary society. Other topics include discussion of types of business organizations and introduction to basic principles of general and personnel man agement.
Bus. 111-4. Principles of Marketing. Principles, methods and problems found in distribi tion activities in marketing products and services.
Prerequisite: Business 100.


37.
us. 116-3. Salesmanship and Advertising. A study of techniques and psychological fac-ors involved in business transactions with emphasis on personal salesmanship. Includes rief coverage of use of various advertising media, rerequisite: Business 111.
us. 200-3. Business Communications. A course for both secretarial and business majors lich presents essential principles involved in preparing business letters and other types E communications purpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful English, rerequisite: English 103 or equivalent.
as. 201-4. Principles of Management. Analysis of managerial functions and processes re-iired for operating any type of business organization effectively, rerequisite: Business 100.
as. 221-3. Business Law. Introduction to ordinary legal aspects of business transac-Lons, including such topics as contracts, agency and negotiable instruments. Designed to Lve a general understanding of the subject, and to provide information useful in deciding len a lawyer should be consulted for aid in avoiding legal mistakes, rerequisite: Business 100, or permission of instructor.
is. 222-3. Business Law. Continuation of Business 221. Includes legal aspects of busi-:ss and review of examples involving partnerships, corporations, sales, negotiable instru-:nts and so forth, rerequisite: Business 221.
is. 231-3. Business Statistics. Covers methods of organizing and presenting data and in-.lligent interpretation of data. The student will become familiar with the theory of prob-lility, applications of the theory, random fluctuation, the use of mathematical models to iterpret physical phenomenon, and prediction of outcomes of experiments in business problems erequisite: Mathematics 100 or 101.
Economics
on. 100-3. Introduction to Economics. Designed for individuals who want a brief survey principles of economics followed by application to practical aspects of personal and nsumer problems, such as, taxes, insurance, business cycles and personal accounting and dgeting. No credit will be allowed for this course in case any quarter of the series onomics 101-103 is completed.
on. 101-3. Principles of Economics. Principles of production, exchange, distribution d consumption; functioning of economic institutions; factors involved in economic pro-ess; business cycles.
on. 102-3. Principles of Economics. Continuation of Economics 101. erequisite: Economics 101.
;
on. 103-3. Principles of Economics. Continuation of Economics 102. erequisite: Economics 102.
on. 211-3. Labor-Management Relations. Study of problems attendant on the emergence and owth of the working class, with special reference to recent developments and current prac-ces in wages, hours, working conditions, employment, unionism, labor legislation and reted matters.


38.
Econ. 221-3. Economics of Public Finance. Taxation, public expenditure, debts and fisc£ policy. National, state and local taxation with some special attention to the situation in Colorado.
Prerequisite: Accounting 103 and Economics 103, or permission of instructor.
Secretarial Science
Sec. Sci. 101-3. Beginning Typewriting. Introduction to the keyboard and parts of the typewriter, and development of minimum skills. Designed for those who have had no high school training in typewriting and wish to obtain sufficient skill for personal use, or t take intermediate typewriting. No credit will be allowed students who have received cred for one year of high school typewriting.
Sec. Sci. 102-3. Intermediate Typewriting. Continuation of typewriting skill developmen Includes instruction and practice in business letters, tabulations and manuscripts. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for two years of high school typ writing.
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 101, or one year of high school typewriting.
Sec. Sci. 103-3. Advanced Typewriting. Special attention is given to increasing speed and accuracy, and to typing a variety of materials.
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 102, or two years of high school typewriting.
Sec. Sci. 111-4. Beginning Shorthand. A course in basic shorthand for those who have ha no previous training. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for on year of shorthand in high school.
Sec. Sci. 112-4. Intermediate Shorthand. Continuation of shorthand training. No credit will be allowed for students who have received credit for two years of shorthand in high school.
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 111 or equivalent.
Sec. Sci. 113-4. Advanced Shorthand. Continuation of shorthand training for those who are advanced in the fundamental principles of Gregg shorthand. Emphasis is on the development of dictation and transcription skills. Students must be proficient in typewriting Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 112, or permission of instructor.
Sec. Sci. 214-3. Advanced Dictation. Practice in advanced skill for those who have mastered the fundamental principles of Gregg shorthand.
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 113, or permission of instructor.
Sec. Sci. 222-2. Secretarial Practices and Procedures. Study and practice of duties com monly carried out by secretaries, such as, general office management and routine, filing, human relations in business, handling mail, telegraph and telephone communications and so forth.
Sec. Sci. 223-2. Operation of Office Machines. Proficiency is developed in the use of various machines commonly found in offices, such as, duplicationg, dictating, adding, cal culators.


39.
DIVISION OF TECHNOLOGIES
An important function of Metropolitan State College is to provide training to qualify individuals for employment, or to operate their own businesses in various technological fields. The course programs emphasize giving students an understanding of principles of nathematics and science, and practice in applying these principles as owners, supervisors or technicians in our constantly expanding industrial economy. Courses in such fields as English, the humanities and social sciences are included to broaden the individual's general education.
The Division of Technologies is an integral and unified part of the college.
Courses carry credit and provide instruction and training of a different nature and at a considerably higher level than that attained by craftsmen, mechanics and other skilled workers. It should be pointed out, however, that although credit for many of the basic and general subject matter courses will be accepted by a four-year college or university, this is usually not true with respect to the application courses. The technology programs are terminal in nature with the aim of training students for immediate employment. They are lot pre-engineering curricula to prepare students for transfer to four-year institutions.
Since technological education aims at preparing students for employment, the iasis for selecting programs which should be offered is existing and potential occupational leeds and opportunities. Shortage of time prevented making a complete determination of leeds and opportunities in the Denver metropolitan area during the few months before the scheduled opening date for the college. It was, therefore, decided to limit courses during ;he first year to Executive Secretarial (see curriculum on page 35), Data Processing and Engineering Technology fields. A detailed study of the situation is being conducted so ;hat in 1966-67 additional programs to meet the most extensive of the technological employ-lent needs can be organized. Some of the possibilities being considered as fields of specialization are: instrumentation, aeronautical, civil, and building and contracting tech-lologies. Programs may also be introduced in fields such as, health services, public ser-rices, hotel and restaurant occupations and visual arts.
Associate in Applied Science
This Associate degree presents programs for specialization in Data Processing, Engineering Technology--electronics, electrical, mechanical, design-drafting, architectural Irafting, and other fields which will be added after the first year of the college's opera-:ion.
To meet requirements for the Associate in Applied Science degree, students must :omplete a two-year program of specified courses and have a total of 93 quarter hours of redit with a cumulative average of 2.00 or better. Where several courses are listed under t subject matter field, he may choose any which bring his total credit hours earned up to he minimum specified in that field.
The course programs presented below are designed for individuals who want inten-ive training in preparation for employment upon receiving the Associate in Applied Science egree. They are not planned for students who intend to continue college attendance with i baccalaureate degree as their objective.


40.
Data Processing
The field of data processing offers almost unlimited opportunities from the star point of unfilled demand and the variety of jobs available. Business and industry want machine operators, machine supervisors, installation supervisors, programmers and specia ists in the use of computers and other data processing equipment.
1. English 101-103. Basic Communication. 9
2. Physical Education 3
3. Biological Sciences 3
Psychology 100. Personality and Adjustment. 3
4. Mathematics 9
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics 5
or Mathematics 101. College Algebra. 5
Mathematics 104. Topics in Mathematics. 4
5. Humanities 3
Art 100. Art Appreciation. 3
Art 101. Art Survey. 3
English 111. Introduction to Literature. 4
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy. 3
6. Social Sciences 3
Economics 100. Introduction to Economics. 3
Anthropology 101. Introduction to Anthropology. 5
History 101. World Civilization. 3
Political Science 101. Introduction to Political Science. 3
Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology. 5
7. Business 17
Accounting 101-103. Elementary Accounting. 9
Business 100. Introduction to Business. 3
Business 231. Business Statistics. 3
Secretarial Science 223. Operation of Office Machines. 2
8. Data Processing 39
Data Processing 101. Introduction to Data Processing. 3
Data Processing 102. Control Panel Wiring. 3
Data Processing 103. Control Panel Wiring. 5
Data Processing 201. Accounting Machines. 5
Data Processing 202. Computer Programming. 5
Data Processing 203. Computer Programming. 5
Data Processing 204. Random Access Programming and Other Computers. 5
Data Processing 205. Systems Design. 5
Data Processing 206. Field Project. 3
9. Electives 7
93


41.
Engineering Technology
This Associate degree program is built around a core of courses required of all Engineering Technology students. In addition to fulfilling the engineering core curriculum requirements and some of the general education requirements, during the first year specialization may be started in the fields of electronics, electrical, mechanical, design-drafting or architectural drafting.
To meet requirements for the Associate in Applied Science degree, students must complete a two-year program of specified courses (a complete list of these courses will be developed in 1965-66) totaling at least 93 quarter hours of credit with a cumulative average of 2.00 or better.
During 1965-66 other programs of specialization in engineering technology will be developed. The student who follows the general education and core programs listed below will be prepared to go on with more intensive specialization.
General Education Requirements
1. English 101-103. Basic Communication.
2. Physical Education
3. Biological Sciences
Psychology 100. Personality and Adjustment.
4. Physical Sciences
Physics 110-111. Engineering Physics.
5. Mathematics
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics
or Mathematics 101-102. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Mathematics 104. Topics in Mathematics.
6. Humanities
Art 100. Art Appreciation.
Art 101. Art Survey.
English 111. Introduction to Literature.
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy.
7. Social Sciences
Economics 100. Introduction to Economics.
Anthropology 101. Introduction to Anthropology.
History 101. World Civilization.
Political Science 101. Introduction to Political Science. Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology.
Core Program of Engineering Technology Courses
3
6
9
3
3
6
5
10
4
3
3
4 3
3
5
3
3
5
9
3
3
This core program required of all Engineering Technology students, along with mathematics and engineering physics courses listed above, provides the foundation for specialization in the various options.


42.
Engineering Technology 100. The Engineering Technology Profession. 1 Engineering Technology 101. Basic Engineering Drawing or equivalent. 3 Engineering Technology 102. Elementary Machine Drawing. 3 Engineering Technology 103. Manufacturing-Processes Laboratory. 3
In addition to completing the general education and core engineering technology curriculum listed above, students choose one of the following options and take the courses listed under the option. Additional courses in these fields will be introduced during the second year of the college's operation.
Electronics Option
With the electronics field constantly expanding, there is a steadily increasing de mand for qualified technicians. The Electronics Technology program is offered to provide an optimum of specialized training for work in a variety of occupations in the field of electronics. Those who complete the two-year course of study satisfactorily are qualified for positions as technicians engaged inmanufacturing, testing, installing and maintaining electronic equipment of all kinds, and as research and development technicians. With experience and further training, graduates may advance to positions such as, production fore man, sales engineer, customer engineer, electronics field engineer and test engineer.
Engineering Technology 104. Direct- and Alternating-Current Circuit Analysis. 5
Engineering Technology 105. Direct- and Alternating-Current Circuit Analysis. 5
Engineering Technology 106. Electronics. 6
Electrical Option
The Electrical Technology option is designed to provide a sound working knowledge of electrical theory and considerable experience in industrial practices and procedures. Students who complete the two-year program satisfactorily are qualified for employment as engineering aides, engineering assistants, field engineering technicians, and design draft men in the fields of electrical construction, design, manufacturing, maintenance, merchandising and operation. With experience and further training, graduates may advance to posi tions such as, detail designer and assistant engineer, to supervisory positions and to positions in engineering management.
Engineering Technology 104. Direct- and Alternating-Current Circuit Analysis. 5
Engineering Technology 105. Direct- and Alternating-Current Circuit Analysis. 5
Engineering Technology 108. Alternating-Current Circuits. 6
Mechanical Option
Modern industry has created an ever-increasing demand for mechanical technicians well grounded in engineering principles. The Mechanical Technology curriculum provides training to qualify students for employment in industries dealing with mechanical design


43.
and development, metals, machines or manufacturing processes. Typical positions include machine-design draftsman; stationary engineer; engineering aide in mock-up departments, model shops and testing laboratories; production-control technician; and engineering
sales representative.
Engineering Technology 109. Manufacturing Processes. 3
Engineering Technology 110. Engineering Drafting. 5
Engineering Technology 111. Advanced Machine-Shop Practice. 5
Engineering Technology 112. Direct- and Alternating-Current and
Electronic Circuits. 6
Design-Drafting Option
The Design-Drafting curriculum trains students for employment as draftsmen in the fields of civil engineering or mechanical-electrical engineering. Graduates who have followed this option may qualify for both private and civil service positions. Typical employment opportunities include draftsmen and reinforced concrete and steel detailers on construction projects, mappers and computers with civil engineers, industries designing, and jobs with city and county engineers, state highway commissions and the Federal govern-
ment .
Engineering Technology 113. Descriptive Geometry for Design-Drafting 3
Engineering Technology 109. Manufacturing Processes. 3
Engineering Technology 110. Engineering Drafting. 5
Engineering Technology 111. Advanced Machine-Shop Practice. 5
Engineering Technology 112. Direct- and Alternating-Current and
Electronic Circuits. 6
Architectural Drafting Option
Students who take the curriculum in Architectural Drafting may prepare for work In numerous capacities in the building industries or with companies having construction lepartments. They will be qualified for employment as junior draftsmen, general detailers, lill and cabinet detailers, layout men, materials men, expediters, estimators' assistants ind field supervisors for architects and builders. With experience and further training, ;raduates may become senior draftsmen, specifications writers, building inspectors and job foremen.
Ingineering Technology 115. Architectural Creative Drawing. 3
Ingineering Technology 114. Descriptive Geometry for Architecture. 3
ngineering Technology 116.
Architectural Drafting.
21


44.
Data Processing
D.P. 101-3. Introduction to Data Processing. Covers machine operation of data processii equipment, character representation, logic of data processing problems, proficient use o: the key punch and basic machine operation of the 082, 077, 514, 548, 402 and 407.
D.P. 102-3. Control Panel Wiring. Introduction to control panel wiring includes IBM tyj 077, 514 and 548. Students operate the machines and wire basic panel problems for printing, punching, counters, comparing and selection.
D.P. 103-5. Control Panel Wiring. Continuation of Data Processing 102.
D.P. 201-5. Accounting Machines. Covers control panel wiring of the IBM 402 and 407 accounting machines with applications in the field of business.
D.P. 202-5. Computer Programming. Covers the basic principles common to all digital coi puters. Machine language, SPS, and Fortran for the IBM 1620 are dealt with in detail, ii eluding the use of macro-instructions, sub-routines and loops.
D.P. 203-5. Computer Programming. Continuation of Data Processing 202.
D.P. 204-5. Random Access Programming and Other Computers. Covers programming for magn< ic disks and tape systems, programming the Burroughs B-250, IBM 1410 and the Univac 80, and other computers in the area. Purpose of the course is to help students apply their knowledge of one computer to the programming of others.
D.P. 205-5. Systems Design. Covers the design and preparation of complete data processing systems utilizing all electronic data processing equipment available. Real and hypothetical problems are used as a core for this course.
D.P. 206-3. Field Project. Field trips are arranged and students assigned to a business or industry in the area to obtain experience in establishing and operating a data process ing center.
Engineering Technology
Engr. Tech. 100-1. The Engineering Technology Profession. History and development of tl fields of engineering and technology; educational requirements, employment opportunities and trends in the various fields.
Engr. Tech. 101-3. Basic Engineering Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, lettering, orthographic sketching and drawing, pictorial sketching and drawing.
Prerequisites: High school algebra and plane geometry or Mathematics 99.
Engr. Tech. 102-3. Elementary Machine Drawing. Fundamentals of orthographic projection applied to engineering drawings, pictorial representation, delineation and dimensioning of simple machine parts in detail and assembly drawings.
Prerequisites: Engineering Technology 101 or equivalent.
Engr. Tech. 103-3. Manufacturing-Processes Laboratory. Elementary machine-tool practice Prerequisites: High school algebra and plane geometry or Mathematics 99.


45.
Engr. Tech. 104-5. Direct- and Alternating-Current Circuit Analysis. Principles of direct and alternating-current circuits. Familiarization with tools, components, instruments and measurement techniques. Elementary circuitry for control and switching.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 100 and 104 completed or taken concurrently.
Engr. Tech. 105-5. Direct- and Alternating-Current Circuit Analysis. Continuation of Engineering Technology 104.
Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 104.
Engr. Tech. 106-6. Electronics. Includes study of theory and laboratory work covering voltage and power amplifiers using tubes and transistors; rectifiers, diodes, two-port network theory, radio-frequency coupled circuits and use of testing equipment.
Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 105.
Engr. Tech. 107-6. Electronics. Continuation of Engineering Technology 106.
Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 106.
Engr. Tech. 108-6. Alternating-Current Circuits. Mathematical and vector analysis of single-phase and polyphase circuits, amperes, watts, vars and power factor.
Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 107.
Engr. Tech. 109-3. Manufacturing Processes. A study of modern manufacturing methods; an introduction to ferrous metallurgy; a survey of hot and cold working, casting, powder metallurgy, welding and metal-cutting processes.
Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 103.
Engr. Tech. 110-5. Engineering Drafting. Designed to familiarize students with the various branches of engineering drawing. Work centers on a series of problems in machine, welding, electrical and piping drawings. Sheet-metal layouts and graphical representation of data also used. Instruction in modern commercial drafting-room practices. Stress on proficiency in lettering, sketching and drafting techniques. Use of professional drafting aids, such as, drafting machines, lettering guides and templates.
Prerequisites: Engineering Technology 102 and 103.
Engr. Tech. 111-5. Advanced Machine-Shop Practice. Advanced machine-shop practice, milling-machine and shop work, gear and cam cutting, hardening and tempering procedures, and nonferrous metal work.
Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 103.
Engr. Tech. 112-6. Direct- and Alternating-Current and Electronic Circuits. Offered primarily for students majoring in the engineering technology curricula other than those in electrical or electronic engineering technology. Topics studied include fundamentals of direct-current, alternating-current, and electronic circuits; principles of electrical measuring instruments and their application; magnetic circuits; and elementary circuitry for control and switching.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 and 104.
Sngr. Tech. 113-3. Descriptive Geometry for Design-Drafting. Fundamental principles of iescriptive geometry and their applications to engineering problems; graphical analysis, Including vector quantities and diagrams; graphical mathematics; functional scales; md nomography.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Engineering Technology 102.


46.
Engr. Tech. 114-3. Descriptive Geometry for Architecture. Problem solution in orthographic projection, with particular relation to architectural forms. Includes lectures and drafting practice.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Engineering Technology 102.
Engr. Tech. 115-3. Architectural Creative Drawing. Theory and practice in creative drav ing and composition, including freehand perspective of primarily architectural subjects. Prerequisite: High school algebra and plane geometry or Mathematics 99.
Engr. Tech. 116-7 to 21. Architectural Drafting. Building nomenclature, orientation, planning, construction, detailing and sketching. Buildings in various stages of construe tion are visited for critical analysis. Newer building materials are discussed and incoi porated in building plans when feasible. Throughout the course consideration is given tc building codes. Course provides for 7 hours of credit per quarter, with a maximum total for the course of 21 quarter hours.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Engineering Technology 102.


47.
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
Page
Absences, Student......................... 18
Academic Information ..................... 16
Academic Probation and Dismissal ......... 19
Accreditation of the College.............. 10
Administration and Government.............. 5
Admission of Freshmen .................... 12
Admission of Transfer Students............ 13
Admission Procedures ..................... 12
Admission Requirements.................... 11
Advisors, Faculty ........................ 13
Board of Trustees ......................... 5
Calendar, College.......................... 3
Change of Registration.................... 18
Class Attendance.......................... 18
Costs, Student ........................... 13
Counseling, Student....................... 15
Courses of Instruction:
Accounting............................. 36
Anthropology .......................... 22
Archaeology ........................... 22
Art ................................... 23
Biology................................ 24
Botany ................................ 24
Business .............................. 36
Chemistry.............................. 25
Data Processing........................ 44
Economics ............................. 37
Education.............................. 25
Engineering Technology................. 44
English................................ 25
French ................................ 26
Geology ............................... 27
History ............................... 27
Mathematics ........................... 28
Philosophy ............................ 29
Physics................................ 29
Political Science ..................... 30
Psychology............................. 30
Secretarial Science ................... 38
Sociology ............................. 31
Spanish ............................... 31
Speech................................. 32
Zoology................................ 25
Course Load, Maximum ..................... 17
Course Numbers and Descriptions,
Explanation of ........................ 20
Credits by Advanced Placement............. 18
Credit by Examination.................... 18
Curricula:
Associate in Arts ..................... 20
Associate in Science .................. 21
Associate in Business.................. 32
Business Administration ............... 32
Office Administration ................. 33
Executive Secretary.................... 35
Page
Associate in Applied Science............ 39
Data Processing...................... 40
Engineering Technology............... 41
Electronics........................ 42
Electrical .........................42
Mechanical......................... 42
Design-Drafting ................... 43
Architectural Drafting............. 43
Degrees:
Associate in Arts ...................... 20
Associate in Science.................... 21
Associate in Business................... 32
Associate in Applied Science............ 39
Degrees, Requirements ..................... 19
Dismissal, Academic ....................... 19
Dismissal, Student Conduct................. 19
Division of:
Arts and Sciences ...................... 20
Business ............................... 32
Technologies ........................... 39
Employment, Part-Time ..................... 15
Executive Committee for
Metropolitan State College............... 5
Facilities ................................ 11
Final Examinations......................... 18
Financial Aid ............................. 15
General Information on the College........ 9
Grades and Status Symbols.................. 17
Health Services ........................... 16
History of the College...................... 9
Housing for Students....................... 15
Instructional Staff ........................ 6
Late Registration Fee...................... 14
Library ................................... 11
No Credit, Taking Courses for.............. 17
Officers of Administration ................. 5
Out-of-State (Residence) Classification .... 14
Part-Time Students ........................ 14
Placement after Graduation................. 15
Purposes of the College..................... 9
Quality Points............................. 17
Quarter Hour .............................. 17
Quarter System ............................ 16
Readmission after Academic Dismissal...... 19
Refunds of Tuition ...................... 15
Registration Procedures.................... 13
Smoking Regulations........................ 11
Student Conduct and Dismissal.............. 19
Student Government ........................ 16
Student Life and Activities................ 16
Student Services .......................... 15
Transcript Fee ............................ 14
Tuition and Fees........................... 14
Withdrawal from College.................... 18


UNIVERSITY OF DENVER COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE INSURANCE BUILDING
FORUM BUILDING
DENVER PUBLIC LIBRARY
EMILY GRIFFITH OPPORTUNITY SCHOOL