Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1968-1969

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1968-1969
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text
Bulletins
(Metropolitan State College)
METROPOLITAN
ARCHIVES COPY
metropolitan state college
00 Nor REMOVE


View of Denver Civic Center area. Arrow points to Metropolitan State College office and classroom building.


1AP OF DOWNTOWN DENVER
Buildings Used By METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE

Forum Building (College Headquarters) 250 West Fourteenth Avenue

Double A Building 1300 Glenarm Place
College Center and Bookstore 1345 Bannock Street
Glenarm Building 1222 Glenarm
Emily Griffith Opportunity School
1250 Welton Street
Three Thirty Three Building 333 West Colfax Avenue

Cherokee Building i non rko,ni,an___




BULLETIN
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF COLORADO
250 West 14th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
Catalog Issue 1968-69
Vol. IV April 1968 No. 1
This publication has been authorized by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. The provisions contained herein are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The information presented is based on commonly accepted practices at Colorado state colleges and plans developed to date for Metropolitan State College, but the College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the students term of attendance.
4-68-25M


2 Yearly Calendar
JANUARY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 ........
FEBRUARY
S M T W T F S
.........12 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 -
MARCH
S M T W T F S
.............1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
APRIL
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ..........
JANUARY
S M T W T F S
.....12 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 -
FEBRUARY
S M T W T F S
.................1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 -
MARCH
S M T W T F S
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 .............
APRIL
5 M T W T F S -- 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ....
1968
MAY
S M T W T F S
.....12 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 -
JUNE
S M T W T F S
................1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30.................
JULY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 .......
AUGUST
S M T W T F S
..........1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
1969
MAY
S M T W T F S
.......12 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
JUNE
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 .............
JULY
5 M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 -
AUGUST
S M T W T F S
.............1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31.................
SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 .............
OCTOBER
5 M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 -
NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S
.............1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 ..........
SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ..........
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S
.....12 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 -
NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S
................1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30.................
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 .......


College Calendar 3
COLLEGE CALENDAR
FALL QUARTER 1968
September 9, 10 and 11, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday Placement Tests (ACT), 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m.
September 16 and 17, Monday and Tuesday, New Student Orientation September 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday, Registration September 23, Monday, Classes Begin
September 25-27, Wednesday-Friday, Late Registration and Class Changes (Late registration fee applies)
September 27, Friday, Last Day to Add Courses, or Drop Courses Without Prejudice
November 1, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports
November 11-15, Monday-Friday, Registration Advising for Winter Quarter, A-L November 18-22, Monday-Friday, Registration Advising for Winter Quarter, M-Z November 27, Wednesday Noon, Thanksgiving Vacation Begins December 2, Monday, Classes Resume, 8:00 a.m.
December 9, 10 and 11, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Final Examinations December 11, Wednesday, Fall Quarter Ends
WINTER QUARTER 1969
December 16, Monday, Placement Tests (ACT), 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m.
December 18, Wednesday, New Student Orientation January 2 and 3, Thursday and Friday, Registration January 6, Monday, Classes Begin
January 8-10, Wednesday-Friday, Late Registration and Class Changes (Late registration fee applies)
January 10, Friday, Last Day to Add Courses, or Drop Courses Without Prejudice February 14, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports
February 17-21, Monday-Friday, Registration Advising for Spring Quarter, M-Z February 24-28, Monday-Friday, Registration Advising for Spring Quarter, A-L February 28, Friday, Last Day for Filing Graduation Card in Registrars Office for June Graduation
March 17, 18 and 19, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Final Examinations March 19, Wednesday, Winter Quarter Ends
SPRING QUARTER 1969
March 21, Friday, New Student Orientation
March 22, Saturday, Placement Tests (ACT), 9:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m.
March 26 and 27, Wednesday and Thursday, Registration March 31, Monday, Classes Begin
April 2-4, Wednesday-Friday, Late Registration and Class Changes (Late registration fee applies)
April 4, Friday, Last Day to Add Courses, or Drop Courses Without Prejudice May 9, Friday, Mid-Quarter Reports
May 12-16, Monday-Friday, Registration Advising for Summer and/or Fall Quarter, A-L
May 19-23, Monday-Friday, Registration Advising for Summer and/or Fall Quarter, M-Z
June 6, 9 and 10, Friday, Monday and Tuesday, Final Examinations June 10, Tuesday, Spring Quarter Ends June 11, Wednesday, Commencement
SUMMER QUARTER 1969
June 12, Thursday, Placement Tests (ACT), 6:00 p.m.
June 13, Friday, New Student Orientation
June 16, Monday, Registration for Ten Week and Five Week Sessions June 17, Tuesday, Classes Begin
June 18-20, Wednesday-Friday, Late Registration and Class Changes (Late registration fee applies)
June 20, Friday, Last Day to Add Courses, or Drop Courses Without Prejudice
July 4, Friday, Independence Day Holiday
July 7, Monday, Classes Resume
July 17, Thursday, Placement Tests (ACT), 6:00 p.m.
July 18, Friday, First Five Week Session Ends and Mid-Quarter for Ten Week Session
July 21, Monday, Registration for Second Five Week Session July 22, Tuesday, Classes Begin for Second Five Week Session July 23-25, Wednesday-Friday, Late Registration and Class Changes for Second Five Week Session (Late registration fee applies)
July 25, Friday, Last Day to Add Courses, or Drop Courses Without Prejudice for Second Five Week Session August 22, Friday, Summer Quarter Ends


4 Contents
CONTENTS
Page
Administration ......................................... 5
Faculty and Staff....................................... 6
General Information on the College......................13
Admission ..............................................16
Costs ..................................................17
Student Personnel Services..............................19
Student Life and Activities.............................21
Academic Information ...................................21
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements...............25
Arts and Sciences Section...............................29
Division of Humanities .................................31
Division of Science and Mathematics ....................53
Division of Social Sciences ............................64
Applied Sciences Section................................81
Division of Business....................................84
Division of Health Services ............................95
Division of Public Services.............................98
Division of Technology ................................104
Alphabetical Index.....................................117
Map with Building Locations..............Inside Back Cover


Administration 5
ADMINISTRATION
Board of Trustees for the State Colleges
(Appointed by the Governor of the State of Colorado)
Date of First Present Term
Appointment Expires
STUART W. McLAUGHLIN, L.H.D., Rangely 1963 1969
President
ROBERT W. BARTLEY, LL.B., Pueblo 1961 1973
Vice President
L. RICHARD BRATTON, LL.B., Gunnison 1963 1969
MRS. WILLIAM B. (Betty) NAUGLE, A.B., Denver 1964 1971
C. GALE SELLENS, A.B., Lakewood 1965 1971
WILLIAM H. SOUTHARD, LL.B., Greeley 1965 1971
PHILLIP M. LORTON, B.S., Alamosa 1961 1973
H. GRANT VEST, Ed.D., Denver Secretary and Treasurer
Executive Committee for Metropolitan State College
MRS. WILLIAM B. (Betty) NAUGLE, Chairman PHILLIP M. LORTON C. GALE SELLENS
CURTIS WRIGHT, Assistant Secretary and Treasurer for Metropolitan State College
Officers of Administration
President....................................Kenneth Phillips, Ph.D.
Administrative Dean.......................Robert D. ODell, Ed.D.
Dean of College..............................Keats R. McKinney, Ed.D.
Dean of Summer Quarter and College Services. .Harold W. Benn, Ph.D.
Dean of Arts and Sciences.................Merle W. Milligan, Ed.D.
Dean of Applied Sciences.....................Gail J. Phares, Ed.D.
Dean of Students................................F. D. Lillie, M.P.S.
Business Manager........................Curtis Wright, B.S. and B.A.
Chairmen of Divisions
Arts and Sciences
Humanities................................Lloyd K. Herren, Ed.D.
Science and Mathematics......................Jon M. Plachy, Ed.D.
Social Sciences...........................George M. Brooke, Ph.D.
Applied Sciences
Business...................................Irvine H. Forkner, Ed.D.
Health Services.....................................To be appointed
Public Services............................David M. Abbott, B.B.A.
Technology.....................................Calvin E. Evans, M.A.
Library
Interim Librarian..........................Charlene Alexis, M.L.S.
Department Chairman
English.........................................Phillip Boxer, Ph.D.
Other Administrative Personnel
Student Services
Director of Admissions and Records.......Donald R. Griffis, M.A.
Registrar............................Austin T. Glover, Jr., M.B.A.
Director of Counseling Center............Don L. Swickard, Ph.D.
Director of Financial Aid and Placement......Dennis L. Farhar, M.A.
Business Office
Director of Purchasing and Plant Coordination. .Eugene R. Roon, M.A.


6 Faculty and Staff
FACULTY AND STAFF
ABBOTT, DAVID M.................Assistant Professor of Public Services
B.B.A., University of Nebraska.
ADCOCK, LORENE...........................Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., M.B.A. and M.A., West Texas State University.
ALEXIS, CHARLENE.........................Instructor in Library Science
B.A., Southwestern State College; M.L.S., University of Oklahoma.
ALLBEE, CHARLES E........................Assistant Professor of English
B.A. and M.A., Adams State College.
ANGELETTI, CHARLES E.....................Assistant Professor of History
A. B. and A.M., University of Tulsa.
ANGUS, CHARLES K.........................Assistant Professor of Business
B. B.A., University of Minnesota; M.B.A., Western Reserve University.
BAGLEY, HENRY L...................................Professor of English
B.S., Kansas State College; M.A., Colorado State College; Ed.D., University of Colorado.
BALAY, RICHARD H....................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A. and M.A., Wichita State University.
BECKER, GEORGE C.........................Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin.
BENN, HAROLD W......................t.............Professor of Biology
B.S. and M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Cornell University.
BIEBER, MARLENE J........................Assistant Professor of Health
and Physical Education
A. B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; Ed.M. and Ed.D,, University of Nebraska.
BLANSETT, BARBARA........................Associate Professor of English
B. S. and M.A., University of Houston; Ph.D., University of Texas.
BOWLES, JEAN A...........................Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S. and M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
BOXER, PHILLIP...........................Assistant Professor of English
B.S., University of Kansas; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Denver.
BRINKER, ORASON L...................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Denver.
BROOKE, GEORGE M...............................Professor of Education
B.A., Parsons College; M.S., Drake University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.
BURKS, G. E....................................Instructor in Journalism
A. B., George Washington University.
BURSIEL, CHARLES A.......................Assistant Professor of English
B. A. and M.A., University of Colorado.
CLIFTON, ROBERT L...............Assistant Professor of Political Science
A. B., Colorado State College; M.P.A., University of Denver.
COOK, W. THOMAS..........................Assistant Professor of Speech
B. A. and M.A., Colorado State College.
COOPER, GARRETT J.................................Instructor in History
B.A., Southwestern College; Th.M., Iliff School of Theology.
COULSON, ROBERT H........................Assistant Professor of Speech
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.A., University of Illinois.
CUMMINS, JACK D.......................Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.A., Western State College; Ph.D., University of New Mexico.
DANIEL, HARLAN F...........Assistant Professor of Aerospace Technology
B.S., Indiana University; M.A., Colorado State College.
DEHNING, LYLE E.......................Assistant Professor of Accounting
B.S., University of Colorado; C.P.A., Colorado.


Faculty and Staff 7
DOE, SANDRA M.....................................Instructor in English
B.A., Doane College; M.A., University of Denver.
DUCKWORTH, PATRICIA L...................Associate Prof essor of Business
B.S., University of Colorado; M.S., Colorado State University; D.B.A., University of Colorado; C.P.A., Colorado.
EDWARDS, WALKER S...............Associate Professor of Political Science
B.A., University of Denver; M.A., Stanford University.
EL WELL, H. KAY..............................Instructor in Psychology
B.A., University of Redlands.
EVANS, CALVIN E...........Associate Professor of Aerospace Technology
B.S., University of Colorado; M.A., Colorado State College.
FAIR, JEANE D........................Professor of French and Spanish
B.A. and M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Northwestern University.
FARHAR, DENNIS L.....................Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A. and M.A., University of Colorado
FENGER, GERALD J........................Assistant Professor of English
B.S., Mankato State College.
FITZGERALD, ANN L.......................lnstTxctor in Library Science
A. B., Loretto Heights College; M.A., University of Denver.
FORKNER, IRVINE H.......................Associate Professor of Business
B. S., M.A. and Ed.D., Columbia University.
GAUTHIER, PERLITA.......................Assistant Professor of Business
A. B., Western State College; M.A., University of Chicago; M.S., University of Colorado; C.P.A., Colorado.
GLOVER, JR., AUSTIN T...................Assistant Professor of Business
B. B.A., University of Texas; M.B.A., Southern Methodist University.
GRAHAM, RONALD P.....................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A. and M.B.S., University of Colorado.
GRIFFIS, DONALD R.......................Assistant Professor of Music
B.A. and M.A., Baylor University.
HARMON, SHIRLEY.........................Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S., Union University; B.A., University of California at Berkeley; M.A., University of Denver.
HARPER, MARY A..........................Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S., Union College; M.S., Loma Linda University.
HASZ, ELAINE P...............................Instructor in Mathematics
B.S., Southern Methodist University; M.A., University of Colorado.
HERREN, LLOYD K...................................Professor of Music
B.S. and M.M., George Peabody College; Ed.D., University of Texas.
HILDRETH, RICHARD A...............................Professor of Speech
B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Southern California.
HINDERMAN, ROY A................................Professor of Education
B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin.
HOUMARD, MARK E......................Instructor in Drafting Technology
B.F.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Purdue University.
HUDEK, ALBERT D......................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Iowa State University; M.B.S., University of Colorado.
HUGDAHL, DONALD L.......................Assistant Professor of Reading
B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.A., Washington State University.
IAZZETTA, VERNIE.....................Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A. and M.A., University of Denver; Ed.D., University of Colorado.
IBRAHIM, MUNIR F..................................Instructor in English
B.A. and M.A., Adams State College.
INGRAHAM, RICHARD C..................Assistant Professor of Psychology
A.B., University of Nebraska; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Missouri.


8 Faculty and Staff
KIRTLAND, JAMES M.............................Instructor in Psychology
B.S., University of Colorado.
KRENETSKY, JOHN C........................Assistant Professor of Biology
B.A., Montclair State College; M.A., University of New Mexico.
LEONARD, STEPHEN J.......................AssistaJit Professor of History
A.B., Regis College; M.A., University of Wyoming.
LILLIE, F. D..........................Assistant Professor of Education
A. B., Colorado State College; M.P.S., University of Colorado.
LOGAN, JOHN T.................................Assistant Professor of Art
B. A., San Fernando Valley State College; M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art.
LOW, M. EDWIN....................................Instructor in English
B.A., Indiana State Teachers College; M.A., Indiana State University. McCARTNEY, GLENN R.......................Assistant Professor of English
A. B. and M.A., University of Denver; M.A., University of Washington.
McKINNEY, KEATS R................................Professor of Education
B. A. and Ed.M., Phillips University; Ed.D., University of Oklahoma.
McHARGUE, MARCIA.................................Instructor in Nursing
B.S., University of Nebraska.
MacLACHLAN, JAMES C......................Assistant Professor of Geology
A.B., Wayne University; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University. MANGOLD, ROBERT L.............................Assistant Professor of Art
A. B. and M.F.A., Indiana University.
MARCOM, BETTY R..........................Assistant Professor of Nursing
B. A., University of Denver; M.S., University of Colorado.
MARTIN, JOHN L...................................Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Southern Methodist University; M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Texas A & M University.
MARYE, FRANCES S.........................Instructor in Library Science
B.A. and M.A., University of Denver.
MASH, JEAN E.............................Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S., Loretto Heights College; M.S., University of Colorado.
MAY, JAMES T.....................................Instructor in English
B.B.A., Baylor University; M.A., Montana State University.
MEHN, DUANE B.................Associate Professor of Physical Education
B.S., North Central College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ed.D., Colorado State College.
MERRIN, JAMES T..................................Professor of English
B.A., Southwestern University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago.
MILLIGAN, MERLE W.............................Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Monmouth College; M.A., University of Illinois; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University.
MIRICH, JOHN J........................Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., M.A. and Ed.D., Colorado State College.
MOODY, VERNON W..........................Associate Professor of Music
B.M., and M.M.Ed., North Texas State University.
MOSS, ROBERTA R.......................Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan; M.A., University of Denver.
NORICK, CHARLES M.....................Assistant Professor of Accounting
B.S., University of Colorado; C.P.A., Colorado.
ODELL, ROBERT D.................................Professor of Education
A. B. and M.A., San Diego State College; Ed.D., University of California at Los Angeles.
OHLSON, MORTON K......................Associate Professor of Economics
B. A., University of Colorado; M.A., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., University of Colorado.


Faculty and Staff 9
PEARSON, GREGORY L.......................Assistant Professor of English
A.B., University of San Diego; M.S., Columbia University.
PHARES, GAIL J......................Professor of Technical Education
A. B. and M.A., Chico State College; Ed.D., University of Southern California.
PHILLIPS, KENNETH...............................Professor of Education
B. S., State University of New York; M.A. and Ph.D., Ohio State University.
PLACHY, JON M.......................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A. and M.Ed., Adams State College; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University.
RAGER, KENNETH A....................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Monmouth College; M.S., University of Illinois.
RATLIFF, MICHAEL P..................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A. and M.S., Texas Technological College.
REED, CARLETON H............................Professor of Police Science
B.A., M.A. and LL.B., University of Colorado.
RHODES, WILLIAM E...............................Professor of Philosophy
A. B., Wesleyan University; B.D., M.A. and Ph.D., Yale University.
ROBNETT, JR., HARRIS H... ...............Instructor in Library Science
B. S. and M.A.L.S., University of Denver.
ROLLINS, WAYNE D.........................Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Westmont College; M.A., University of Denver.
ROON, EUGENE R..................................Instructor in Education
B.S., Western Michigan University; M.A., Michigan State University.
ROPER, KEITH I...........................Assistant Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Southern Methodist University; M.Ed., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; Ed.D., University of Colorado.
ROTNER, ARNOLD H.........................Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Duke University; M.A., University of Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
RUSHTON, JOHN B..........................Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., Purdue University; M.S., University of Colorado.
SAXE, EUGENE W...........................Assistant Professor of English
A. B. and M.A., Indiana State University.
SHAW, KENNETH D.................................Instructor in Business
B. A., Nebraska State Teachers College; M.A., Colorado State College.
SMITH, JR., RUSSELL E...........................Instructor in English
A. B., University of Denver; M.A., University of Washington.
SNOWDEN, JR., ROBERT P..............Assistant Professor of Psychology
B. A., St. Benedicts College; M.A., University of Denver.
SPRADLEY, JOHN O.........................Associate Professor of English
B.S., Regis College; A.M. and Ph.L., St. Louis University; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
SPURLIN, MELVIN D........................Assistant Professor of Biology
B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., University of Denver; Ed.D., University of Colorado.
STEELE, JAMES B..........................Assistant Professor of English
A. B., Nebraska State Teachers College; M.A., University of Nebraska.
STROHMEIER, ROBERT C........................Assistant Professor of Art
B. F.A. and M.F.A., California College of Arts and Crafts.
STROUF, RALPH E..........................Assistant Professor of Music
B.M. and M.M., Michigan State University.
SULLENBERGER, ROBERT A..............Instructor in Mechanical Technology
B.S., Utah State University.


10 Faculty and Staff
SVENSSON, ERIC H. F......................Associate Professor of History
B.S., U.S. Military Academy; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Denver.
SWAIN, MALENA J..........................Assistant Professor of English
B.A., and B.F.A., Bethany College; M.A., Wichita State University.
SWICKARD, DON L....................Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Denver.
TATNALL, EDITH C.........................Assistant Professor of History
B.S., New York University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
TAYLOR, JAMES W....................Associate Professor of Psychology
A. B. and Ph.D., Washington University.
TEMMER, HARRY A....................Instructor in Electronics Technology
B. S., Drury College; M.Ed., Colorado State University.
THOMAS, GWENDOLYN A......................Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Bennett College; M.A., Temple University.
THOMPSON, RUSSELL E..........................Instructor in Technology
B.S. and M.A., Colorado State University.
THONSSEN, LESTER W...............................Professor of Speech
A. B., Huron College; A.M. and Ph.D., State University of Iowa; D.Lit., Huron College.
TUPPER, JANET E..........................Associate Professor of Music
B. M. and M.M., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Indiana.
VALDES, DANIEL T.................................Professor of Sociology
B.A., Adams State College; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
VAN EVEREN, BROOKS.......................Assistant Professor of History
B.A. and M.A., Boston University.
VAN VOORST, PHILIP J.........................Assistant Professor of Art
B.F.A., Southwestern Missouri State College; M.F.A., University of Kansas.
WAHL, RONALD R..................Instructor in Mathematics and Geology
B.S., Colorado School of Mines; M.S., Stanford University.
WALSH, PEGGY M...........................Associate Professor of History
B.Ph. and M.A., DePaul University; Ph.D., University of Chicago.
WENSTROM, DAVID D................................Professor of English
B.Ed., Mankato State College; M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., University of Utah.
WHITTEKIN, RONALD D................Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S. and M.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute.
WILLIAMS, AVALON M...............................Instructor in English
B.A. and M.A., University of Denver.
WILLMS, RAYMOND G........................Assistant Professor of Sociology
A. B., Loras College; M.A., University of Notre Dame.
WILSON, JERRY H..........................Assistant Professor of Physics
B. A., M.S. and Ph.D., University of Colorado.
WRIGHT, CURTIS E.........................Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., University of Colorado; B.A., American Institute for Foreign Trade.
WRIGHT, M. ELIZABETH.....................Associate Professor of English
B.A., Colorado State College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., Columbia University.
YUNKER, JOANNA O.........................Assistant Professor of English
A. B., Syracuse University; M.S., University of Illinois.
YUTHAS, JACK A...............................Professor of Psychology
B. A., University of Wyoming; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Purdue University.
YUTHAS, LADESSA J........................Assistant Professor of Reading
B.S., Colorado State University; M.S., Purdue University.


rai
Light the lamp. Books
Become fires, And you Ignited.
Anon.




General Information on the College 13
GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE COLLEGE
The college was founded by an act of the Colorado General Assembly, signed into law (House Bill 349) by the Governor May 5, 1963, which instructed the Trustees of the State Colleges of Colorado to provide a comprehensive plan for the long-range development of Metropolitan State College. Funds were appropriated by the General Assembly in 1965 (funded May 17, 1965, Senate Bill 344) for establishment of the college and for initiation of instruction in the fall of that year.
Fall quarter enrollment has grown from 1,189 in 1965 to 3,591 in 1967, and student numbers are expected to continue increasing at the rate of at least 1,000 per year.
In 1967 the Colorado General Assembly passed Senate Bill 314 authorizing activation of the upper division. Junior courses were added in the fall of that year and senior courses will be started in the fall of 1968.
Purposes
The chief purposes of Metropolitan State College were set forth in the act which founded it as follows:
Purpose. The General Assembly hereby declares that this act is passed in conformity with the plan for the development of higher education in this state which includes a system of state general colleges, whose functions shall principally be those of undergraduate education, a system of universities and special-purpose institutions conducting extensive graduate and research programs, as well as providing courses in undergraduate education, and a system of junior colleges. In conformity with such general plan, Metropolitan State College shall be a part of the state general college system.
Control, objects, and purposes. Metropolitan State College shall be under the control and management of the trustees of the state colleges in Colorado and its objects shall be:
1. To provide and offer programs of undergraduate instruction in the liberal arts and sciences, as determined by the trustees in the manner hereinafter specified;
2. To provide and offer programs of instruction in semi-professional technical education in science and engineering technology on a terminal basis, either on its own campus or through contracts with public school districts in the City and County of Denver and in the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Jefferson;
3. To encourage other state institutions of higher learning to offer at the college, by extension, such credit courses as are beyond its scope and function, and to cooperate with such other state institutions of higher learning in the offering of such courses;
4. To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the State of Colorado generally.
In analyzing, interpreting, and implementing these provisions, the college administration and teaching staff consider that the following objectives, which are completely consistent with the purposes of the institution, as defined above, and with the preliminary planning for the establishment of the college, should prevail:
1. To provide, in the Denver metropolitan area, a multi-purpose, urban-type, four-year college dedicated to emphasis on excellence in teaching and serving the community and the state of Colorado. The faculty will be selected primarily on the basis of interest and effectiveness in teaching, as well as on academic preparation and special qualifications. Faculty research, although welcomed, will not be an essential qualification for a teaching position or promotion.


14 General Information on the College
2. To open the door to an inexpensive, readily-accessible college education to all who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered: the recent high school graduate; the less recent graduate who has worked for several years and now sees the importance of a college education; the person working full-time who wishes to pursue college studies after working hours; the mature adult facing the necessity of upgrading or retraining for a changing economy; and the person of any age who is seeking pleasure and stimulation in the development of his intellectual and artistic interests. The college program thus complements the work of agencies for adult education already existing in the metropolitan area.
3. To provide educational opportunities adapted to the interests, needs, and abilities of individual students. The level and nature of instruction will attract and challenge top-ranking high school students; on the other hand, special assistance will be given to serious students who, because of under-achievement in high school, poor study habits, economic and cultural disadvantages, or other factors, experience difficulty in meeting the academic standards and adjusting to college. To accomplish this purpose, close contact will be maintained with students, upon whom all efforts are focused, in the instructional program, in faculty advisement, and in counseling and testing. Co-curricula activities will be instruction-oriented; they will be developed mutually by staff and students to create a comprehensive academic environment.
4. To make available to the student a comprehensive, two-year undergraduate curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences which will give him the well-rounded, general education necessary for him to function as a responsible citizen in a democratic society. This curriculum shall be composed of courses of high quality for which credits can be transferred to other institutions of higher learning.
5. To offer two-year terminal programs leading to the Associate in Applied Science degree. These programs will be designed to provide students with the occupational competence needed for employment or to operate a business in their chosen field. Other vocational-technical curricula of various lengths will be developed to meet particular occupational needs. The college will maintain liaison with the business and industrial community, and curricula will be responsive to the needs of the metropolitan area.
6. To offer specialized education in various major and minor subject matter areas, leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees, and occupation-oriented programs for baccalaureate degrees in applied sciences fields.
7. In summation, the paramount aim of Metropolitan State College is to provide men and women with the education to achieve cultural, social, and economic goals; to open the door to personal fulfillment in a worthwhile, productive life; and to develop skills which contribute to the welfare and improvement of the community.
Accreditation
The instructional program has been developed to meet the standards of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools which is responsible for accrediting all institutions of higher education in this region. A newly founded institution cannot become eligible for accreditation until it has graduated one class. North Central consultants and an examination team have visited the college, status reports have been submitted, Candidate for Accreditation status has been granted and the college has progressed as far toward accreditation as is possible under the Associations timetable.
Credits earned at Metropolitan State College are regularly accepted by other colleges and universities.


General Information on the College 15
Location
Metropolitan State College is located in Denver, one of the nations finest cities. It is the capital of Colorado, and a state and regional commercial and financial center. Excellent transportation from all parts of the United States is provided by six railroads, seven airlines and numerous buses. Although the metropolitan area population is now more than one million, Denver still retains the friendliness and romantic appeal of the Old West.
The Mile High City, situated at the foot of the snow-capped Rocky Mountains, enjoys a mild, sunny, semi-arid climate. There are 100 parks, five 18-hole municipal golf courses and numerous other recreational facilities in Denver. Within easy driving distance are breathtaking mountain heights, old mining towns and places to picnic, hike, fish, hunt, boat and ski.
Outstanding music, drama and art programs are provided by the Denver Symphony Orchestra, Denver Civic Theatre, Bonfils Memorial Theatre, Denver Art Museum and other organizations. The Colorado State Historical Museum has numerous Indian and western relics and exhibits. World-famous displays of animals, birds and flowers in their natural habitats are found in the Denver Museum of Natural History.
Denver is a city of excellent schools and fine churches. There are 690 Protestant and Orthodox churches, 60 Catholic churches and a number of Jewish synagogues and community centers.
Facilities
The college headquarters is located in the central part of the Denver metropolitan area. It is adjacent to the downtown business section and at the edge of the impressive Civic Center a ring of public buildings around a beautifully landscaped mall. All of the buildings in which classes are held are concentrated in this general area (see map on back cover).
Administrative and service offices are in the new ten-story Forum Building, 250 West 14th Avenue, at the Civic Center. General information and instructions on applying for admission may be obtained at the Office of Admissions and Records.
A library and audio-visual center located in the Cherokee Building provides a study area and books, current periodicals and newspapers, back files on periodicals on microfilm, maps, records, pamphlets, microprints and tapes.
A building adjacent to the Forum Building has been remodelled extensively to provide an excellent student center and bookstore.
Space in other buildings used by the college is modem and has been designed for instructional purposes. Technology courses are taught in the outstanding facilities of the Emily Griffith Opportunity School.
Smoking Regulations
Smoking is permitted only in hallways of buildings where classes are held, and in the College Center. Smoking is prohibited in elevators, classrooms and laboratories, and persons violating this regulation of the City and County of Denver are subject to disciplinary action.


16 Admission
ADMISSION
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to the philosophy that educational opportunities should be provided for all who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered.
Admission Requirements
Minimum entrance requirements for Colorado high school graduates are at least 15 units of acceptable work from a high school accredited by a state or regional accrediting association. An applicant who has been accepted for admission must submit a pre-entrance physical examination completed by a qualified physician in order to enroll. A certificate of health form will be included in the applicants acceptance materials. This certificate of health signed by both the physician and the applicant must show that the latter is in good physical and mental health, has no communicable diseases, and has no defects or deficiencies which would hinder satisfactory progress in his studies. Other factors which will be considered are intelligence, personality, character and comments by secondary school officials.
Applicants who are not residents of the State must meet the same admission requirements as Colorado residents and must, in addition, rank in the upper half of their graduating class in order to be admitted.
Mature persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an individual basis after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test which show that they have the ability to pursue satisfactorily programs of instruction which the college offers.
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited universities or colleges, an official transcript from each institution attended, and an overall grade average of C (2.00 based on a four-point system where an A grade is 4 points) in all college courses attempted at any college or university are required. Failure to report correctly any previous college or university record before enrolling at Metropolitan State College may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
Admission Instructions and Procedures
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received for each quarter. Therefore, applications should be submitted at the earliest feasible date after completion of the first semester of the senior year in high school. They must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records at the college not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought. All credentials which are submitted become the property of Metropolitan State College, and will not be returned to the student.
Admission of Freshmen (Applicants who have not attended college):
1. Obtain the uniform Application for Admission form used by Colorado collegiate institutions from a Colorado secondary school or from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204.
2. Part I (pages 1 and 2) of this form should be completed and submitted with Part II to the students high school for record and test data. The high school will send the completed application directly to the Colleges Office of Admissions and Records.
3. It is required that all entering freshmen take the American College Test (ACT) prior to registration and have the scores forwarded to the college. Admissions decisions are not influenced by ACT scores, but test results are used as a basis for assignment to classes and for counseling. Therefore, if a students test scores have not been received, he will be required to take the ACT at Metropolitan State College before he can register for classes (see College Calendar for testing dates).


Admission and Costs 17
4. A $5.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply on tuition, must be sent with the application for admission.
5. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after an evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of his admission status.
Admission of Transfer Students (Applicants who have attended a college or university):
1. Request an application for admission and transfer application form from Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records.
2. Complete Part I of the Application for Admission to Colorado Collegiate Institutions and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records.
3. A $5.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply on tuition, must be sent with the application for admission.
4. The transfer application form must be submitted for completion to an appropriate personnel officer at the college or university where you are now attending or were last in attendance.
5. Request that one official transcript from each college or university attended be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicants record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
6. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete information about the applicants high school record.
(b) The applicant has completed less than a full years work in college.
7. It is required that all transfer students must have taken the American College Test (ACT) prior to registration and had the scores forwarded to the college if they have not satisfactorily completed freshman English with a grade of C or better, and/or one year of college. Admissions decisions are not influenced by ACT scores, but test results are used as a basis for assignment to classes and for counseling. Therefore, transfer students who do not meet the above requirements and for whom test scores have not been received must take the ACT at Metropolitan State College before they will be permitted to register for classes (see College Calendar for testing dates).
Orientation
New student orientation (see College Calendar) is a program designed to assist all new and transfer students in becoming acquainted with their college, its programs, activities and facilities. During this time, students also have an opportunity to meet members of the college administration, faculty and student association. This program is required for all new freshmen and transfer students.
COSTS
All tuition and fees for each quarter (there are four quarters in a year, each consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction) are payable at the time of registration, and a student will not be admitted to classes until full payment has been made. The Trustees of the State Colleges of Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of registration for any quarter.


18 Costs
The schedule of tuition and fee charges is as follows:
Standard Fee Charges for All Students
Application Fee $ 5.00
(Required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied on tuition.)
Placement Test Fee 6.00
(Charged only when the student has not taken the ACT prior to enrollment at Metropolitan State College.)
Student Services Fee
Students taking 7 or more quarter
hours, per quarter 30.00
Students taking less than 7 quarter
hours 2.50
per quarter hour
Late Registration 5.00
Change of Schedule Fee, per transaction 4.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00
Tuition In-State Status Out-of-State Status
Full-Time Students (those taking 7 or
more quarter hours), per quarter $85.00 $235.00
Standard Tuition Charges
_ , ,-,1 , , , . . for All Part-Time Students
Part-Time Students (those taking less
than 7 quarter hours) $12.00
per quarter hour
In assessing tuition and student services fees for the Summer Quarter, the total hours for which a student registers in the ten and five week sessions will be used to determine whether these charges are based on the flat rate or on the quarter hour rate.
The cost of books and supplies averages about $90 per academic year with the highest cost during the first quarter of attendance. Other costs such as board and room, incidentals, transportation, clothing and other personal expenses will vary with the individual student.
A student is initially classified as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for the purpose of assessing tuition at the time he is granted admission or registers at Metropolitan State College. The classification is based on information provided by the student and from other relevant sources. Administrative procedures adopted by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado are followed, and all rulings are made in accordance with the provisions of a state statute (Chapter 124-18, CRS 1963, as amended by Sessions Laws of Colorado 1965, Chapter 266) which applies uniformly to all registrants at state institutions of higher education in Colorado. After a students tuition status is determined, it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary. The student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of immediately informing the Office of Admissions and Records of this circumstance in writing. Final decisions regarding tuition status rest with the institution. Changes in tuition status will be effective at the time of the students next registration. Additional information on regulations pertaining to tuition status will be provided upon request.
Students officially withdrawing from the college, or reducing the quarter hour load to a lower tuition, will receive a refund of tuition charges only on the pro rata basis shown below. No refund of fees will be authorized.
Upon Withdrawal or quarter hour reduction to lower Percent of Tuition
tuition Refunded
During first week of classes................................... 75
During second week of classes................................ 50
During third week of classes...................................... 25
No refund will be made after the third week of classes


Student Personnel Services 19
STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
The constant goal of the college is to provide educational opportunities adapted to the interests, needs and abilities of the individual student. To this end, each student is assigned a faculty advisor who becomes conversant with his background, aptitudes and educational objectives, and who takes a personal interest in his education and welfare. Generally this advisor is associated with the students major field of study.
The Dean of Students coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as, admissions, records, registration, orientation, faculty advising, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, placement, veterans affairs, student health services and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature. More information on various services is given below.
Counseling Center. A professional staff is available to assist students with educational, emotional, personal, social, vocational or scholastic problems which may arise during their years of study at Metropolitan State College. When it seems desirable, tests are used to assist students in appraising their interests and aptitudes and to help them evaluate their personal and social effectiveness.
Special emphasis is placed on helping all students with any problems which may have a bearing on their success at the college; however, the student is expected to take the initiative in availing himself of the services of the Counseling Center.
Financial Aid. There are a number of possibilities for the person who needs financial aid in order to attend Metropolitan State College- scholarships, loans and part-time employment. The college is a full participant in the National Defense Student Loan Program, the Federal College Work-Study Program and the Economic Opportunity Grant Program through which funds are made available to qualified students. Other programs have been developed to assist needy students with demonstrated academic ability. Some financial awards may be made on the basis of competence in a particular field or distinctive contribution to some phase of the total life of the college.
The basis of selection for a financial award is academic achievement and performance as evidenced by the high school record and/or college record, plus demonstrable need, when this is a qualification factor, as calculated from a statement furnished by the applicant and his parents.
More detailed information on scholarships, loans or student employment may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid and Placement at the college. The deadline for submitting financial aid applications for the Fall quarter is August 15, 1968.
Placement. The college serves as a clearing house for information on job opportunties and helps students find full-time employment in occupations for which they have prepared at Metropolitan State College. Also, the college maintains a file of job openings and gives assistance in every way possible to students who need part-time work to help defray their college expenses. The extent to which students may work is governed by their course load and ability to maintain a satisfactory grade record. The Office of Financial Aid and Placement should be contacted for further information on employment opportunities.
Housing. Since the majority of the students come from the metropolitan area, the college does not operate dormitories. Students not living at home are given assistance in finding suitable off-campus living quarters. Lists of available housing are maintained in the office of the Dean of Students.
Health Services. Student Health Services provides professional care for any student attending the college. Registered nurses, college physicians and a psychiatrist are available during scheduled hours. Services


20 Student Personnel Services
include treatment of illness and injuries, physical therapy, first aid, medications, T.B. detection tests, health counseling, information on medical problems and a comprehensive drug library. These services are financed by a portion of the student services fee.
All students, regardless of the number of quarter hours being taken, must have a complete medical examination performed by their doctor and submitted to Student Health Services in order to enroll at the college. A health history form must also be completed by the applicant.
Insurance Program. All full-time students are members of the student insurance program which provides comprehensive medical insurance for accidental injury and/or hospitalization expenses. Part-time students or dependents of students may also participate in the insurance program for a nominal fee each quarter.
Books. Metropolitan State College students may purchase books in the College Center and Bookstore at 1345 Bannock Street.
Military Information. The college, through the Office of Admissions and Records, furnishes information about a students enrollment to his local board when the student supplies his Selective Service number, his local board address, and other required information at registration time. Generally, the criteria for deferment applied by local boards for an undergraduate student are a score of 70 or more on the Selective Service College Qualification Test, or appropriate class rank, plus acceptance by the college for the following year of his course of study.
The office of the Dean of Students assists students who are eligible to receive federal educational benefits under the War Orphans Act, provision for disabled veterans or the new Cold War G.I. Bill. Students entering under the various categories of the veterans education and training program must present a certificate of eligibility for use at Metropolitan State College at the time of registration.


Student Life and Activities 21
STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES
The metropolitan area offers a wealth of opportunities to enrich classroom learning experiences. Students are encouraged to take advantage of theatrical and musical performances, public lectures, museum displays, art exhibits and other cultural and educational endeavors.
A representative student government administered by the Associated Students of Metropolitan State College is in operation. Numerous student clubs with special interests and objectives which contribute to the purposes of the college have been organized under the sponsorship of faculty members. Publications include a student newspaper and a campus magazine New Campus Review.
The college recognizes the value of religious life and encourages students to attend churches of their choice. With the large number of churches and synagogues in Denver, individuals are virtually certain to find their denomination represented.
The College Center at 1345 Bannock is the community center of Metropolitan State College. It has been developed as the focal point of the college with emphasis on student activities and programs. This facility has an attractive student lounge designed for relaxation, an extensive food service operation, student organization offices and the college bookstore. The College Center and the student activities programs are financed entirely from the student services fee which all students pay each quarter.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
The college operates on the quarter system with each quarter Fall, Winter and Spring consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction. The Summer quarter is integrated with the three quarters of the


22 Academic Information
usual academic year so that it is possible for a student to carry on almost continuous study.
In order to serve people who are employed, evening as well as day classes are scheduled, and enrollment can be on either a full or part-time basis.
Quarter Hour
Course credit is based on units designated quarter hours. One quarter hour represents one class period of fifty to sixty minutes per week which normally also requires two hours of outside preparation on the part of the student. Laboratory courses give one quarter hour of credit for each two or three hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week.
Course Load
The normal load per quarter is 15 to 16 quarter hours. Registration for additional quarter hours depends on the ability of the student. Taking up to a total of 18 hours requires the approval of the students faculty advisor. Total quarter hours undertaken may not exceed 18 unless approved by both the advisor and the office of the Dean of Students. The maximum permitted with such authorization is 20 quarter hours per quarter.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of quarter hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 45; sophomores 45 or more but fewer than 90; juniors 90 or more but fewer than 135; seniors 135 or more.
Grades and Status Symbols
Alphabetical grades are used to indicate quality of academic work: A superior; B above average; C average; D below average but passing; P passing; F failure; WF withdrawn failing; and WP withdrawn passing.
Status symbols are given at the end of a course instead of letter grades to identify special situations in which a course was not completed for credit: NC (no credit) used for students who do not want to receive a grade or credit for a course; I (incomplete) when a student has not completed the course, but the work which has been done has received a passing grade, and he will be permitted to complete the course within the time limits. An I must be removed by the end of the following quarter (excluding the Summer quarter) or it will be changed to an F. Students may receive an F if they are not passing at the time they drop a course or completely withdraw from the college. See Section Change of Registration or Complete Withdrawal for details.
Quality Points
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours earned. Quality points for each hour of credit are awarded as follows: A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = l, F and WF = 0. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by multiplying the number of credit hours for each course by the number of quality points given, and dividing the total number of hours attempted into the total number of points accumulated. Grades earned in remedial courses are not considered in computing grade point averages.


Academic Information 23
Presidents and Deans Honor Lists
Each quarter students with outstanding academic achievement are recognized by being named to Metropolitan State College honor lists.
The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who attempted 12 or more quarter hours of course work and achieved a perfect average of 4.0.
The Deans Honor List carries the names of students who attempted 12 or more quarter hours of course work and achieved an average of 3.5 or higher.
Advanced Placement
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. The Registrar, in consultation with the appropriate division chairman, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
Credit by Examination
Credit by examination may be obtained by students who demonstrate superior knowledge of a subject by achieving a grade of B or above on the special examination. Students must consult the chairman of the division in which the subject is taught to obtain official approval to take such examinations. The maximum amount of credit which will be accepted by this means is 15 quarter hours. A fee of $10.00 per course is charged for each examination.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If a student anticipates a prolonged absence because of illness or for other justifiable reasons, or if such an absence is due to an emergency situation, he should contact the office of the Dean of Students concerning authorization for absence. If the absence is authorized, the instructors involved will be notified and he will be permitted to make up work missed.
Written excuses are not issued for short-term illnesses or other brief periods of absence from classes. In such cases determination of the validity of the students absence and decisions on whether he will be allowed to make up work missed rests with his instructors.
Late Registration, Change of Registration or Complete Withdrawal
Students may not initiate registration after the first week of classes. During the first week of each quarter, students may adjust their class schedules by making appropriate additions or deletions, and courses may be dropped without prejudice. No course may be dropped passing thereafter, unless the student is withdrawing completely from the college, or for reasons beyond his control. If a student is withdrawing from the college, he will be subject to an evaluation by his instructors and a grade of WP or WF given for courses in which he is enrolled.
Forms for accomplishing class adjustments may be secured in the Business Office. A $4.00 service charge is made for each form secured and each form is good for one add and/or drop. Unless these forms are properly completed, the courses added or dropped are not official, and a penalty of F grade for each course not properly dropped will be recorded.


24 Academic Information
If a student wishes to withdraw completely from all classes, the proper form may be secured in the Office of Admissions and Records. Unless this form is properly completed, the complete withdrawal is not official, and a penalty of an F grade for each course not properly withdrawn from will be recorded.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, except in the case of seminar courses or special projects. A student receiving a final grade of F may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charged for each registration.
Probation-Suspension Policy
In keeping with the goals and objectives of Metropolitan State College, a probation-suspension policy has been adopted which allows most students 45 quarter hours to adjust to the academic requirements of college. The policy is further formulated to suspend those students who clearly show no prediction for successful college work.
A cumulative grade average of C or better indicates satisfactory progress toward a degree. A cumulative grade average of less than C indicates unsatisfactory progress and will result in probation or suspension.
Students whose minimum grade point average after attempting 12 through 23 quarter hours is below 0.5 (1.0 = D) will be suspended for one academic year. A minimum grade point average of 1.25 is required after attempting 24 through 35 quarter hours and a minimum grade point average of 2.00 is required after attempting 36 through 45 quarter hours in order for a student to remain in good standing at Metropolitan State College.
After attempting 45 or more hours, a student is expected to maintain a C average to qualify for graduation. When a student falls below a C average and becomes deficient in grade points, he will be placed on probation if his deficiency does not exceed 10 grade points. Students whose grade point deficiency is greater than 10 points below a C average (2.00) will be suspended for unacceptable academic progress. If the student is readmitted, he will be required to reduce his deficiency to the extent that satisfactory progress is indicated.
A student who has been admitted on probation will have this probationary status removed when he has attempted a minimum of 12 hours and maintained at least a C average for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. Until the student has been removed from probation, he will be suspended when his cumulative average falls below C, regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation, the student will be subject to the standard probation-suspension policy outlined above.
Deficiency reports will be made available to students earning less than C grades at the mid-point of each quarter. This warning should help the student to recognize and identify the source of his academic difficulty and, through counseling with faculty and administrative personnel, bring his work to a passing level by the end of the quarter.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Academic Standards Committee. No student may re-enter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Academic Standards Committee.
Conduct of Students
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to give students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. Each student is expected to conform to high standards of conduct at the college and elsewhere. The college reserves the right to determine whether or not a particular act conforms to such standards and to exclude from the college any student whose conduct does not conform to high standards.


Programs of Study and Degree Requirements 25
PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) earning an associate degree in arts, sciences or applied sciences in two years; (2) following a curriculum in arts, sciences or applied sciences to meet requirements for bachelor of arts or science degree; (3) taking vocational-technical programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in fields such as business, health services, public services and technology; or (4) enrolling for selected courses to improve their general education or vocational competency.
Requirements for AH Degrees
Since offering a well-rounded education is one of the objectives of the college, each curriculum specifies certain minimums in basic studies. Stipulated requirements for areas of emphasis, majors, minors and options recognize the significance of opportunities for specialization.
To earn a degree, a student must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which he is registered and must complete the minimum number of quarter hours for each degree 90 for the associate and 180 for the baccalaureate with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
In addition, three quarter hours of credit in physical education activities courses, a different activity for each hour of credit, is required for all degrees, unless the student is over 25 years of age when he matriculates or is a veteran with at least one year of active military service and obtains authorization for waiver of the physical education requirement from the Dean of Students. Any student with a physical condition which would restrict his participation in the regular program is requested to secure a medical evaluation form from the college Student Health Services and have this filled out by a physician of his choice. Students with a physical limitation should enroll in the physical education activities adapted class in which activities are modified according to a students particular physical limitation. Exemptions for health reasons will be granted only upon recommendation of the college Student Health Services.
If changes are made in requirements for graduation, or for a major or minor, during the time a student is enrolled he has the choice of meeting the requirements stated in the catalog in effect when he entered the college or those stated in a subsequent catalog in effect when he is enrolled.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, he is responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to his program, and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume that he has approval to deviate from the stated requirements unless he possesses a properly signed statement to that effect. In any case, he should check with his dean or divisional office when he has reached 135 quarter hours to make certain that his program plans are complete.
Requirements for All Associate Degrees
To earn an Associate in Arts, Associate in Science or Associate in Applied Sciences, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 90 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher and comply with the requirements on physical education activities courses stated above.
2. Complete a minimum of 30 quarter hours, excluding physical


26 Programs of Study and Degree Requirements
education activities courses, at Metropolitan State College with the last 15 quarter hours completed in residence.
3. Meet the basic studies requirements stipulated for a degree and the minimum required for an area of emphasis which is defined as not less than 30 quarter hours within any single division, or the basic studies requirements for a bachelors degree program at Metropolitan State College.
4. Make grades of 2.00 or better in all courses in the students field or area of emphasis.
5. Not more than six quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward an associate degree for students who are not specializing in music.
With the approval of the administration, variation in associate degree course programs may be made to conform with the course requirements of a senior college or university to which a student plans to transfer. Such a student should be familiar with rules of the institution concerned regarding transfer of credit and courses required under the curriculum in which he intends to major and complete requirements for a baccalaureate or other degree. With regard to Colorado institutions of higher education, the office of the Dean of Students has information on recommended programs for students planning to transfer, and advisors will assist them in developing a course plan.
Requirements for All Bachelors Degrees
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 180 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher and the requirements on physical education activities courses stated above.
2. Complete a minimum of 45 quarter hours at Metropolitan State College, including the last 15 quarter hours applicable to the degree.
3. Not more than 45 quarter hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelors degree.
4. Not more than 12 quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not specializing in music.
5. At least 60 quarter hours in upper division courses; i.e., junior and senior level, must be included in the 180 required for graduation.
6. All students must have one major subject consisting of not less than 45 nor generally not more than 60 quarter hours and at least one minor consisting of at least 27 quarter hours.
7. At least 12 quarter hours of the major and 6 quarter hours of the minor must be taken at Metropolitan State College.
8. Course requirements for state certification of elementary school teachers in Colorado will satisfy the major/minor requirements for a degree.
9. All basic studies requirements listed for a degree must be completed.
10. All other course requirements of a section, division or department must be satisfied.
Course Numbers, Descriptions and Offerings
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, contents and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction.


Programs of Study and Degree Requirements 27
Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although normally a student should not take courses above the level of his class (based on quarter hours earned), he may do so at one level above if he has the specified prerequisites and his advisors approval as shown by signature on the students registration form. In special cases a student may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for his class, if in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites and advisors approval, written permission of the faculty member teaching the course is obtained.
The complete number indicates the nature of the course. Those with two zeros, such as, Art 100, Art Appreciation, are general or survey courses which are completed in one quarter. Courses which continue for more than one quarter have a third number which is in a series, such as, English 101, 102 and 103. Usually, a student must take a sequence course in the proper order; i.e., he cannot register for English 102 until he has taken and passed English 101. If registration in sequence for a course continuing for more than one quarter is not required, completion of the preceding quarter is not listed as a prerequisite for taking the next quarter of a course. The second digit may have significance as regards the subject matter; for example, English 181 is a course presenting subject matter in the field of journalism, and this is shown by the 8 for journalism.
After each course number is a figure specifying the quarter hours of credit. As an example, English 101-3 is a three credit course.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the material which is covered. If there is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed at the end of the course description.
Courses in topics, seminar and independent study may be offered in subject matter fields in which majors are authorized, and in topics in subject matter fields in which minors are authorized, with approval of the head of the division concerned, dean of the section and dean of the college. The course numbers will be the same in all divisions: 390 for topics, 490 for seminars and 498 for independent study. These may vary in credit from one to three quarter hours per quarter. Not more than nine quarter hours in each of these courses will be applicable towards a degree.
Decisions on which of the courses listed in this catalog are taught during the year will be based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
The instructional program is organized under two sections Arts and Sciences, and Applied Sciences with several divisions in each section. Any additional degree requirements, information on programs of study and course offerings are listed under the sections.


28


Arts and Sciences Section 29
ARTS AND SCIENCES SECTION
This section offers a variety of courses with the aim of giving students the opportunity to obtain a broad and varied education, as well as to specialize in a liberal arts or science field. Its courses also provide the foundation for programs of study in the Applied Sciences Section.
Requirements for the Associate in Arts and Associate in Science
Candidates for either the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree are required to meet the basic studies minimums listed below in addition to satisfying all other requirements for an associate degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. Any courses listed under the Divisions of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social Sciences which a student is qualified to take may be used to satisfy basic studies requirements. The purpose of the basic studies program is to help students develop understanding and appreciation of broad fields of basic knowledge. Also, a degree candidate must complete a program planned with a definite educational objective, including an area of emphasis consisting of not less than 30 quarter hours within any single division, which has been approved by his advisor.
Basic Studies and Other Course Requirements for an Associate in Arts or Science Degree
Quarter Hours
English 101-103. Basic Communication 9
Mathematics 5
Laboratory Sciences 4-5
Humanities 6
Social Sciences 6
Electives in at least two of the subject matter fields listed above; i.e., mathematics, laboratory sciences, humanities, social sciences 9
39-40
Approved electives 51-50
90
Health, Physical Education and Recreation 100. Physical
Education Activities 3
93
Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the basic studies minimums listed below in addition to satisfying all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. Since the purpose of the basic studies program is to help students develop understanding and an appreciation of broad fields of basic knowledge, a degree candidate must complete the three-quarter course in basic communication and 15 quarter hours of courses in each of the three Arts and Sciences divisions as per the listing below. Not more than 10 quarter hours taken in any one of the sub-disciplines listed under the Divisions of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, or Social Sciences will be counted toward meeting the basic studies requirements.


30 Arts and Sciences Section
Quarter Hours
English 101-103. Basic Communication 9
Humanities 15
Fine Arts (art, music, theater)
Language (foreign, English)
Literature
Philosophy
Speech
Science and Mathematics 15
Biological Science Earth Science (geology)
Physical Science (chemistry, physics)
Mathematics
Social Sciences 15
Anthropology and Sociology Economics and Geography History and Political Science Psychology
Arts and Sciences baccalaureate programs are being developed in accordance with plans established for Metropolitan State College. Currently authorized are a program of professional courses for teacher preparation and the majors and minors listed below. As needs are verified and authorization received, some minors will be expanded to majors, and other majors and minors will be added.
Majors and Minors
Applied Music Art
Behavioral Science Biology Chemistry English
Foreign Languages Spanish
Health and Recreation
History
Mathematics
Music Education
Psychology
Speech
Minors Only
Economics
Foreign Languages French
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science Sociology Speech Pathology


Division of Humanities 31
DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Disciplines within the Division of Humanities offering majors for baccalaureate degrees are applied music, art, English, music education, Spanish and speech. In addition, minors are also available in French, philosophy and speech pathology.
Course requirements for these majors and minors are listed above the respective course descriptions.
Art Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art 111-113. Drawing I, II, III 6
Art 121-123. Basic Design I, II, III 9
Electives
A minimum of 27 quarter hours of lower division courses and 36 quarter hours of upper division courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in art.
Art Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art 100. Art Appreciation 3
Art 111-113. Drawing I, II, III 6
Art 121-123. Basic Design I, II, IH 9
Art 201-203. Art Survey I, II, III 9
Electives
A minimum of 9 quarter hours in upper division art courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in art.
Art 100-3. Art Appreciation. Designed primarily for people who are not art majors but who are interested in acquiring information about various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening their knowledge and appreciation of the subject. Study of the worlds art masterpieces and visits to art exhibits and museums in Denver are included.
Art 111-2. Drawing I. A basic drawing course intended to develop graphic skills and familiarity with traditional drawing media; still life and figure are used as points of departure.
Art 112-2. Drawing II. Continuation of Art 111.
Prerequisite: Art 111, or permission of instructor.
Art 113-2. Drawing III. Continuation of Art 112.
Prerequisite: Art 112, or permission of instructor.
Art 121-3. Basic Design I. An introduction to the fundamental principles of design and color organization as a basis for all creative work in the visual arts.
Art 122-3. Basic Design II. Continuation of Art 121.
Prerequisite: Art 121, or permission of instructor.
Art 123-3. Basic Design HI. Continuation of Art 122.
Prerequisite: Art 122, or permission of instructor.
Art 141-3. Sculpture. Creative approach to the problems of three-dimensional design in sculpture: modeling, molding, work in cold casting materials. Construction in wood, plastics and metals.
Art 200-3. Materials and Techniques for the Elementary School. Introduces the student to the possibilities, limitations and implications of art materials used in the elementary school.
Art 201-3. Art Survey I. Major trends in the development of Western art from prehistoric times to the present are studied to reveal the range of artistic purpose and method and to show the stylistic and historic development of contemporary art.


32 Division of Humanities
Art 202-3. Art Survey II. Continuation of Art 201.
Prerequisite: Art 201.
Art 203-3. Art Survey III. Continuation of Art 202.
Prerequisite: Art 202.
Art 211-3. Drawing and Painting I. The student is taught to relate design and drawing as a basis for painting. A variety of styles and techniques is explored.
Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123, or permission of instructor.
Art 212-3. Drawing and Painting II. Continuation of Art 211.
Prerequisite: Art 211.
Art 213-3. Drawing and Painting III. Continuation of Art 212. Prerequisite: Art 212.
Art 221-3. Intermediate Design I. The principles and theories learned in the Basic Design course are applied to a wide variety of problems simulating actual situations in many different design fields.
Prerequisite: Art 123.
Art 222-3. Intermediate Design II. Continuation of Art 221.
Prerequisite: Art 221.
Art 223-3. Intermediate Design III. Continuation of Art 222. Special attention is devoted to acquainting the student, through guest lectures and field trips, with various career opportunities in the applied design field. Prerequisite: Art 222.
Art 241-3. Volume Design I. Development of basic knowledge and techniques needed for the solution of three-dimensional design problems. Processes involved in the understanding and solution of theoretical and applied problems in architecture, sculpture and commercial design are stressed.
Prerequisite: Art 123.
Art 242-3. Volume Design II. Continuation of Art 241.
Prerequisite: Art 241.
Art 243-3. Volume Design III. Continuation of Art 242.
Prerequisite: Art 242.
Art 270-3. Printmaking. Introduces the student to the possibilities and limitations of silk screen as a fine and applied art.
Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123, or permission of instructor.
Art 280-3. Crafts. Design quality as a fundamental part of good craftsmanship is emphasized through the basic techniques involved in ceramics, textiles, woodworking and metalwork.
Prerequisite: Art 123, or permission of instructor.
Art 311-3. Drawing IV. An advanced drawing course intended to develop graphic skills to a higher level, while focusing attention upon the aesthetic nature of drawing.
Prerequisite: Art 113.
Art 312-3. Drawing V. Continuation of Art 311.
Prerequisite: Art 311.
Art 313-3. Drawing VI. Continuation of Art 312.
Prerequisite: Art 312.
Art 321-3. Graphic Design I. Designed to acquaint the art student with advertising studio procedures and problems. The student applies design to specific media and graphic problems.
Prerequisite: Art 223, or permission of instructor.
Art 322-3. Graphic Design II. Continuation of Art 321.
Prerequisite: Art 321.
Art 323-3. Graphic Design III. Continuation of Art 322.
Prerequisite: Art 322.


Division of Humanities 33
Art 324-3. Lettering and Typography I. Designed to acquaint the student with the design aspects and potentials of lettering and typography. In addition to developing lettering skills, the course familiarizes students with the historical development of type faces, their terminology and systems of measurement.
Prerequisite: Art 223, or permission of instructor.
Art 325-3. Lettering and Typography II. Continuation of Art 324. Prerequisite: Art 324, or permission of instructor.
Art 326-3. Lettering and Typography III. Continuation of Art 325. Prerequisite: Art 325, or permission of instructor.
Art 331-3. Illustration I. A highly disciplined approach to drawing aimed at developing those special techniques and skills required of the illustrator today. Special attention is given to the most widely used media in the contemporary advertising studio.
Prerequisite: Art 213.
Art 332-3. Illustration II. Continuation of Art 331.
Prerequisite: Art 331.
Art 333-3. Illustration III. Continuation of Art 332.
Prerequisite: Art 332.
Art 351-3. Painting I. A study of materials and techniques used in painting. Control of form and space is approached through the use of color, and design structure is applied to the problem of creating visual expressions. Prerequisites: Art 113 and 123.
Art 352-3. Painting II. Continuation of Art 351.
Prerequisite: Art 351.
Art 353-3. Painting III. Continuation of Art 352.
Prerequisite: Art 352.
Art 421-3. Graphic Design IV. Continuation of Graphic Design I, II, and III with emphasis on production techniques in advertising design. Field trips to printing establishments in the area are conducted to acquaint students with reproduction methods used in advertising. The student is encouraged to build a portfolio of finished work prepared for various methods of reproduction.
Prerequisite: Art 323, or permission of instructor.
Art 422-3. Graphic Design V. Continuation of Art 421.
Prerequisite: Art 421, or permission of instructor.
Art 423-3. Graphic Design VI. Continuation of Art 422.
Prerequisite: Art 422, or permission of instructor.
Art 431-3. Graphic Illustration IV. Continuation of Illustration I, II, and III. Exposes students to specific illustration production techniques through field trips and guest lectures. In addition, the student is urged to build a portfolio of finished work prepared for reproduction in various techniques. Prerequisite: Art 333, or permission of instructor.
Art 432-3. Graphic Illustration V. Continuation of Art 431.
Prerequisite: Art 431, or permission of instructor.
Art 433-3. Graphic Illustration VI. Continuation of Art 432.
Prerequisite: Art 432, or permission of instructor.
Art 451-3. Painting IV. Intended to develop the possibilities of personal expression inherent in the painting media and in drawing and design controls.
Prerequisite: Art 353, or permission of instructor.
Art 452-3. Painting V. Continuation of Art 451.
Prerequisite: Art 451, or permission of instructor.
Art 453-3. Painting VI. Continuation of Art 452.
Prerequisite: Art 452, or permission of instructor.


34 Division of Humanities
Art 454-3. Advanced Painting I. A studio course for the advanced painting student capable of developing his own ideas in a workshop atmosphere with faculty advice and criticism.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Art 455-3. Advanced Painting II. Continuation of Art 454.
Prerequisite: Art 454, or permission of instructor.
Art 456-3. Advanced Painting III. Continuation of Art 455.
Prerequisite: Art 455, or permission of instructor.
English Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
English 141-143. World Literature 9
English 221-223. American Literature 6
English 231-233. British Literature 6
English 200,251-253. English Grammar, Advanced Com-) position, Creative Writing, or Technical Writing > 6
English 301. Structure of the English Language )
Structured Electives
English 323-326. American Literature \
English 331-336. British Literature I
English 340. Classics in Translation \ 12
English 423, 427, 429. American Literature /
English 431-434,437,439. British Literature 1
English 440. Modern Drama '
English 352,452-453. Techniques of Creative Writing, or Advanced Creative Writing 3
English 391, 392. Techniques and Practice of Research, or Survey of Materials and Resources 3
English 460. Literary Criticism 3
Electives
A minimum of 12 quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in English.
English Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
English 141-143. World Literature 6
English 221-223. American Literature
English 231-233. British Literature 9
English 200, 301. English Grammar, or Structure of English Language 3
English 352. Techniques of Creative Writing 3
English 391. Techniques and Practice of Research 3
English 460. Literary Criticism 3
Electives
A minimum of 6 quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in English.
Eng. 98-3. Remedial Reading. Recommended for students wishing to improve reading comprehension, speed and study skills. Low scorers on the entrance test must take this course before they will be permitted to register for English 104-3. Credit does not apply toward graduation.
Eng. 99-3. Remedial English. A review course required of students who show a lack of preparation in English. Participation is determined by


Division of Humanities 35
test results or recommendation of the instructor. Sentence structure, spelling, vocabulary and composition are stressed. Credit does not apply toward graduation.
Eng. 101-3. Basic Communication I. The course objective is development of the basic skills of reading, writing and speaking. Instruction in the fundamentals of English usage, with practice in written and oral expression, is given.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on English entrance examination, or a passing grade in English 99.
Eng. 102-3. Basic Communication II. Continuation of English 101. Prerequisite: English 101.
Eng. 103-3. Basic Communication III. Continuation of English 102. Includes instruction in types of research, with emphasis on a supervised term paper.
Prerequisite: English 102.
Eng. 104-3. Improvement of Reading. An advanced course for the average or above-average reader, to improve reading comprehension, rate, and study skills. Individual work in the Reading Laboratory is required. Prerequisite: English 98, or satisfactory score on the entrance examination.
Eng. 105-3. Advanced Reading. Designed to enable the student to develop a minimum rate of 400 words per minute with at least 70 percent comprehension on college level material.
Prerequisite: English 104, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 141-3. World Literature I. Masterpieces of world literature through the Renaissance.
Eng. 142-3. World Literature II. Masterpieces of world literature from the Renaissance through the 19th century.
Eng. 143-3. World Literature III: Twentieth Century. Studies in contemporary world literature.
Eng. 181-3. Introduction to Journalism. A course to acquaint students with information media and to provide practice in writing news and feature material.
Eng. 182-3. News Reporting. Practice for proficiency in collecting and writing the news.
Prerequisite: English 181, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 200-3. English Grammar. A study of modern English grammar. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 206-3. Techniques of Reading. Study of the reading process from kindergarten to college, methods and materials, tests and diagnostic procedures, for those considering a career as teachers or reading specialists.
Prerequisite: English 104, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 221-3. American Literature I. Development of the American literary tradition as shown in writings from the beginnings to the Civil War. Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 222-3. American Literature II. Development of American literature from the Civil War to the early part of the present century.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 223-3. American Literature III: Twentieth Century. Studies in contemporary American Literature.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 231-3. British Literature I. Development of British literature through the 18th Century.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.


36 Division of Humanities
Eng. 232-3. British Literature II. Development of British literature in the 19th Century.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 233-3. British Literature III: Twentieth Century. Studies in contemporary British literature.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 251-3. Advanced Composition. A course in writing critical and expository prose.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 252-3. Creative Writing. A course in writing stories, poems, plays and essays.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 253-3. Technical Writing. Practice in presentation of technical information in standard format.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 254-3. Business Communications. See course description for Business 200.
Eng. 283-3. News Editing and Copyreading. Experience in copyreading the news, writing headlines, proof-reading and layout.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 301-3. Structure of the English Language. A background of the English language, with a linguistic approach to sounds, forms, syntax, and usage.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 323-3. Early American Literature. Foundations of the American literary tradition in the Puritan, Revolutionary and early national periods, with emphasis on the poetry and prose of principal writers from Bradford through Cooper.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 324-3. American Literature of the Romantic Period. Poetry and prose of representative writers of the American Renaissance, including Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson. Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 325-3. Realism and Naturalism in American Literature. Backgrounds and foundations of literary realism and naturalism as reflected in the writings of Twain, Howells, James, Adams, Crane, Norris, Dreiser. Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 326-3. Modern American Poetry and Prose. Critical study of poetry and prose of major American writers, including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Pound, Stevens and later contemporaries.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 331-3. Early Renaissance and Sixteenth Century British Literature.
Poetry and prose of representative writers, including More, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Raleigh, Spenser and Marlowe.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 332-3. British Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Poetry, prose, and selected plays of representative writers, including Donne, Jonson, Milton, Bacon, Browne, Dryden and Congreve.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.


Division of Humanities 37
Eng. 333-3. British Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Poetry, prose and plays of representative writers, including Pope, Swift, Boswell, Johnson, Sheridan.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 334-3. British Literature of the Romantic Period. Poetry and prose of representative writers, including Blake, Burns; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Keats and Shelley; Hazlitt, DeQuincy and Lamb.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 335-3. British Literature of the Victorian Period. Poetry and prose of representative writers, including Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Huxley and Darwin.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 336-3. Modern British Poetry and Prose. Poetry and prose of representative writers, including Hardy, Yeats, Lawrence, Shaw and Joyce. Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, .or permission of instructor.
Eng. 340-3. Classics in Translation. Studies of world literature, including Greek, Roman and Renaissance masterpieces.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 352-3. Techniques of Creative Writing. Theory and practice of writing fiction, poetry and drama. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 391-3. Techniques and Practice of Research. Detailed study of the major types of research used in various disciplines.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 392-3. Survey of Materials and Resources. A course to acquaint students with various available sources and to provide criteria for evaluation.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 423-3. Development of American Poetry. Theory and practice of American poetry from Taylor to Frost.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 427-3. Development of the American Novel. A critical survey of the American novel from its beginnings to the present.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 429-3. Major American Writers. Studies in depth of selected American writers. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 431-3. Chaucer. Reading of The Canterbury Tales and selected minor poems.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 432-3. Shakespeare I: The Comedies. A study of representative comedies, including A Midsummer Nights Dream, The Merchant of


38 Division of Humanities
Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida and The Tempest.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 433-3. Shakespeare II: The Historical Plays and the Sonnets. A
study of Richard III, Richard II, Parts 1 and 2 of Henry IV, Henry V and selected sonnets.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 434-3. Shakespeare III: The Tragedies. A study of the major tragedies, including Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 437-3. Development of the British Novel. A critical survey of the British novel from Defoe to Hardy.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 439-3. Major British Writers. Studies in depth of selected British writers. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 440-3. Modern Drama. Important plays from Ibsen to the present, including American, British and continental selections.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 452-3. Advanced Creative Writing I. Supervised projects in writing fiction, poetry and drama.
Prerequisite: English 352, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 453-3. Advanced Creative Writing II. Workshop in individual writing projects. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: English 452.
Eng. 460-3. Literary Criticism. Studies in the major schools of literary criticism from Aristotle to the Twentieth Century.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Foreign Languages
The elementary course in foreign languages, 101-103, is a sequential unit; i.e., the student must successfully complete all three quarters to receive credit.
Spanish Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish 15
Spanish 211-213. Spanish Reading and Conversation 9
Spanish 231-233. Spanish Composition 6
Spanish 251-253. Survey of Spanish Literature 9
Spanish 331-333. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition 9
Spanish 351-353. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro 9
Spanish 411. Spanish Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries 3
Spanish Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Spanish 101-103. Elementary Spanish 15


Division of Humanities 39
Spanish 211-213. Spanish Reading and Conversation Spanish 231-233. Spanish Composition Spanish 251-253. Survey of Spanish Literature Spanish electives
Quarter Hours
9
6
9
3
French Minor
Required Courses
French 101-103. Elementary French French 211-213. French Reading and Conversation French 231-233. French Composition French 251-253. Survey of French Literature French electives
Quarter Hours
15
9
6
9
3
French
French 101-5. Elementary French I. Beginning French with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking and understanding, supplemented by grammar, reading and writing.
French 102-5. Elementary French II. Continuation of French 101. Prerequisite: French 101, or one year of high school French.
French 103-5. Elementary French III. Continuation of French 102. Prerequisite: French 102.
French 211-3. French Reading and Conversation I. Intermediate French, with emphasis on reading and conversation, including also vocabulary building, use of idiom and grammar.
Prerequisite: French 103, or two years of high school French.
French 212-3. French Reading and Conversation II. Continuation of French 211.
Prerequisite: French 211, or permission of instructor.
French 213-3. French Reading and Conversation III. Continuation of French 212.
Prerequisite: French 212, or permission of instructor.
French 231-2. French Composition I. Review of grammar, advanced study of grammatical forms and idioms and intensive practice in translation and writing.
Prerequisite: French 103, or two years of high school French.
French 232-2. French Composition II. Continuation of French 231. Prerequisite: French 231, or permission of instructor.
French 233-2. French Composition III. Continuation of French 232. Prerequisite: French 232, or permission of instructor.
French 251-3. Survey of French Literature I. A general history of French literature from its beginnings to the present. Includes the reading of representative works, lectures on biography and criticism and recitation. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: French 213 or 233, or four years of high school French.
French 252-3. Survey of French Literature II. Continuation of French 251. Prerequisite: French 251, or permission of instructor.
French 253-3. Survey of French Literature III. Continuation of French 252.
Prerequisite: French 252, or permission of instructor.
French 351-3. Renaissance and Classicism I: Prose. A rapid survey of medieval and contemporary backgrounds, a look at French humanism, and a study of the chief prose writers of the period, especially in the novel. Prerequisite: French 213, or permission of instructor.


40 Division of Humanities
German
German 101-5. Elementary German I. An introductory course in German, including pronunciation, grammar and reading, with emphasis on speaking and understanding.
German 102-5. Elementary German II. Continuation of German 101. Prerequisite: German 101, or one year of high school German.
German 103-5. Elementary German III. Continuation of German 102. Prerequisite: German 102.
German 211-3. German Reading and Conversation I. An intermediate course in German, including conversation and the reading of representative texts.
Prerequisite: German 103, or two years of high school German.
German 212-3. German Reading and Conversation II. Continuation of German 211.
Prerequisite: German 211, or permission of instructor.
German 213-3. German Reading and Conversation III. Continuation of German 212.
Prerequisite: German 212, or permission of instructor.
Spanish
Spanish 101-5. Elementary Spanish I. The basic course in Spanish, with emphasis primarily on pronunciation, understanding and speaking and secondarily, on grammar, reading and writing.
Spanish 102-5. Elementary Spanish II. Continuation of Spanish 101. Prerequisite: Spanish 101, or one year of high school Spanish.
Spanish 103-5. Elementary Spanish III. Continuation of Spanish 102. Prerequisite: Spanish 102.
Spanish 211-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation I. Intermediate Spanish, with emphasis on reading and conversation, and also some systematic vocabulary building and review of grammar.
Prerequisite: Spanish 103, or two years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 212-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation II. Continuation of Spanish 211.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 213-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation III. Continuation of Spanish 212.
Prerequisite: Spanish 212, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 231-2. Spanish Composition I. Review of grammatical forms and idioms and practice in translation and writing.
Prerequisite: Spanish 103, or two years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 232-2. Spanish Composition II. Continuation of Spanish 231. Prerequisite: Spanish 231, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 233-2. Spanish Composition III. Continuation of Spanish 232. Prerequisite: Spanish 232, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 251-3. Survey of Spanish Literature I. A comprehensive history of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present, including the reading of representative works, lectures on biography and criticism and recitation. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 213, or four years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 252-3. Survey of Spanish Literature II. Continuation of Spanish 251.
Prerequisite: Spanish 251, or permission of instructor.


Division of Humanities 41
Spanish 253-3. Survey of Spanish Literature III. Continuation of Spanish 252.
Prerequisite: Spanish 252, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 331-3. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition I. Advanced work in vocabulary, idiom and syntax, as observed in representative readings.
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish through 233, or four years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 332-3. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition II. Continuation of Spanish 331.
Prerequisite: Spanish 331, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 333-3. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition III. Continuation of Spanish 332.
Prerequisite: Spanish 332, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 351-3. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro I: Novel. After a rapid survey of philosophical, political, economic, social and literary backgrounds, a study of the period in general and of one important genre, the novel. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 213, or four years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 352-3. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro II: Drama. Continuation of Spanish 351.
Prerequisite: Spanish 351, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 353-3. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro III: Poetry and Miscellaneous Genres. Continuation of Spanish 352. Prerequisite: Spanish 352, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 411-3. Spanish Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries I: Novel. A study of the chief works of the period, with additional biographical and critical material. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 213, or four years of high school Spanish.
The music program provides opportunities (1) for students majoring in other fields to enhance their appreciation and enjoyment of music and to participate in group music activities or obtain individual instruction in voice, piano or instrumental music, and (2) for students to prepare for music teaching or performance.
All students minoring in music must enroll in at least one music ensemble each quarter and six quarter hours in this field are required. Not more than six quarter hours for music ensemble will be counted toward an associate degree and 12 toward a bachelors degree for students who are not specializing in music.
Applied music individual instruction courses may be taken for one quarter hour of credit which requires a half hour lesson and a minimum of six hours of practice per week or two quarter hours of credit requiring two one-half hour lessons and a minimum of 12 hours of practice per week. Students taking applied music as a part of their degree requirements are not charged an applied music lessons fee.
Music
Music Education Major
Required Courses
Introduction to Music
Music Theory
Harmony
Music Literature
Music History
Conducting
Quarter Hours
3
12
12
3
6
3


42 Division of Humanities
Quarter Hours
Orchestration 3
Form and Analysis 3
Music Methods (Public School Teaching) 6
Music Techniques and Pedagogy 8
Applied Music (Voice, Keyboard, Strings and Band Instruments) 16
Music Ensemble 8
Music electives 6
Applied Music Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Introduction to Music 3
Music Theory 12
Harmony 12
Music Literature 6
Music History 6
Orchestration 3
Form and Analysis 3
Pedagogy 4
16th Century Counterpoint 3
18th Century Counterpoint 3
Applied Music (Major Field) (Voice, Keyboard, Strings and Band Instruments) 24
Piano (or applied elective for piano majors) 6
Music electives 7
Music Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Music 101-103. Theory of Music I, II, III 12
Music 200. Music Literature 3
Music 201-203. Harmony I, II, III 12
Music 301-302. History of Music 6
Applied Music 7
Piano* 2
Music Ensemble 6
Music elective (above Music 209 in nonapplied courses) 3
Applied Music
Vocal and Instrumental Ensemble
Music 111-1. Choral Union. Open to students who wish to sing in a large chorus. Designed for singing Oratorio literature and large works.
Music 112-1. Concert Band. For an instrumental group selected on the basis of auditions.
Music 113-1. Orchestra. For an instrumental group selected by the director.
Music 114-1. Concert Choir. For a choral group of mixed voices selected on the basis of auditions.
Music 115-1. Mens Choir. For a choral group of men selected on the basis of auditions.
Music 116-1. Womens Choir. For a choral group of women selected on the basis of auditions.
Music 117-1. Metropolitan Singers. For a small choral group of mixed voices selected on the basis of auditions.
Voice
Music 161-1 or 2. Applied Voice. Preparatory study in vocal techniques.
Students electing piano as their major applied field take seven hours of piano credit and two hours of elective credit in applied music other than piano.


Division of Humanities 43
Vocalization emphasizing breath control and tone production. Study of songs according to the needs of the student.
Music 162-1 or 2. Applied Voice. Study of the vocal mechanism; problems of diction, placement, range and breath control. Art songs of simple structure.
Music 163-1 or 2. Applied Voice. Continuation of Music 162.
Music 261-1 or 2. Applied Voice. Study of Italian art songs, early English songs, songs of English and American composers. Emphasis is placed on tone production, diction, vowel formation and placement.
Music 262-1 or 2. Applied Voice. Continuation of Music 261.
Music 263-1 or 2. Applied Voice. Study of Handelian arias and airs of early Italian composers: Oratorio solos of Handel and Mendelssohn, English and American art songs.
Piano
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Applied Piano. Applied music majors enroll for two hours of credit, and secondary study or music education majors enroll for one hour of credit. Designed to meet piano proficiency requirement with study of beginning or intermediate adult piano course. Study coordinated with the keyboard requirements of Music 102 and 103 in improvised accompaniments and transposition. Intermediate repertoire. Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Applied Piano. Applied Music majors enroll for two hours of credit, and secondary study or music education majors enroll for one hour of credit. Designed to meet proficiency requirements. Involves examination in techniques and repertoire for secondary piano students by a faculty board and an upper division hearing for concentration and majors.
Violin
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Major and minor scales. Etudes and Studies; solos in the first five positions; sonatas and concertos by Corelli, Handel, Seitz, Nardini and DeBeriot.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Major and minor scales in three octaves. Etudes and Studies, concertos and sonatas by Handel, Viotti, Tartini, Grieg, Mozart and Spohr.
Viola, Violoncello, String Bass
Technical and musical proficiencies required in these instruments are equivalent in difficulty to those required in violin.
Flute
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Harmonic minor scales. Harmonic fingerings. Progressive Studies and Etudes. Solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Melodic minor scales; Bergigvier, 18 Exercises for Flute; Anderson, Etudes Op. 33; solos. Band-orchestra-small ensemble.
Tuba
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. All major scales, arpeggios. Studies by Eby, Bell, Arban. Special studies in tone production, articulation, lip flexibility. Solos.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. All harmonic and melodic minor scales. Arpeggios. Studies by Eby, Arban, Cimera, Bell. Special studies in tone production, articulation, lip flexibility. Solos.
Percussion
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Advanced studies for the snare drum and tympani. Studies for the cymbals and bells. Band-orchestra. Solos.


44 Division of Humanities
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Study of xylophone or marimba. Instruction in all percussion accessories. Snare drum solos. Band-orchestra.
French Horn
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. All major scales and arpeggios. Alphonse Etudes, Books I, II. Specialized embouchure and tone production studies. Solos. Band. Orchestra. Ensemble.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Selected minor scales. Selected studies. Solos. Transposition to remote keys. Band. Orchestra. Ensemble.
Trombone-Baritone
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. All major scales. Arpeggios. Studies and Etudes. Double and triple articulations. Solos.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. All harmonic and melodic minor scales. Arpeggios. Studies and Etudes. Special studies in tone production and lip flexibility. Solos.
Oboe
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Harmonic minor scales. Reed making. Progressive Studies and Etudes. Solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Melodic minor scales. Sellner method for oboe. Labate, daily exercises for oboe. Band-orchestra.
Clarinet
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Klose 11 Scales, Scales in 3rds; arpeggios; Etudes and Studies, solos: Concertino-Weger; Arabesque-Jeanjean Concerto-Mozart; Sonatas: Teleman and Hindemith.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Klose II continued work in technique. Etudes and Studies. Solos: Masterworks for Clarinet and Piano Weger concertos 1 and 2; Introduction and Danse by Tomasi; Brahms Sonatas 1 and 2.
Saxophone
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. Harmonic minor scales. Progressive Studies and Etudes. Solos. Band.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. Melodic minor scales. Labanchi, 33 Concert Etudes, Vol. I. Supplementary studies. Solos. Band-orchestra-small ensemble.
Trumpet-Cornet
Music 161-1 or 2 through 163-1 or 2. All major scales. Etudes and Studies. Solos comparjble to Barat, Orientale; Ropartz, Andante et allegro. Special exercises, including Walter Smith, lip flexibility on the cornet and trumpet.
Music 261-1 or 2 through 263-1 or 2. All major and melodic minor scales. Etudes and selected studies. Solos comparable to Bozza, Badinage; Handel, Aria con variazioni. Special exercises. Transposition.
Nonapplied Music
Music 100-3. Introduction to Music. Non-technical in nature and designed for students who are not music majors to develop competence in understanding music through guided listening. The elements of music are studied, discussed and demonstrated.
Music 101-4. Theory of Music I. A thorough groundwork is laid in the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic elements of music through study, discussion, demonstration and the applied music concepts of sight singing, ear training and keyboard harmony.
Music 102-4. Theory of Music II. Continuation of Music 101.


Division of Humanities 45
Music 103-4. Theory of Music III. Continuation of Music 102.
Music 200-3. Introduction to Music Literature. A presentation of examples representing the principal forms in the literature of music. Listening examples as well as material found in musical scores are used for study. Prerequisites: Music 100, except for music majors.
Music 201-4. Harmony I. A study of harmonic technique based on the style of the 18th and 19th centuries of musical writing and style. Stress is placed on the interpretation of music through analysis, study of chords and writing.
Prerequisite: Music 103.
Music 202-4. Harmony II. Continuation of Music 201.
Prerequisite: Music 201.
Music 203-4. Harmony III. Continuation of Music 202.
Prerequisite: Music 202.
Music 209-2. Vocal Pedagogy. Designed to give students who will teach private voice a general survey of materials and methods employed in the teaching of private voice.
Music 210-2. Piano Pedagogy. Designed to give students who will teach private piano a general survey of materials and methods used in the teaching of private piano.
Music 211-2. Woodwind Techniques and Materials. Practical instruction in playing the woodwind instruments. Materials for instrumental music in the public schools are studied.
Music 212-2. Brass Techniques and Materials. Practical instruction in playing the brass instruments. Materials for instrumental music in the public schools are studied.
Music 213-2. Percussion Techniques and Materials. Practical instruction in playing the percussion instruments. Materials for instrumental music in the public schools are studied.
Music 301-3. History of Music. The development of the history of music and style from ancient Greece to the early 18th century.
Music 302-3. History of Music. The development of music history and style in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
Music 303-3. Conducting. Designed to give the student a background in the basic principles of conducting and to allow him to become confident in the use of standard conducting techniques.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 304-3. Orchestration. A study of scoring for the various instrumental choirs, small instrumental ensembles and large performing groups. Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 305-3. Form and Analysis. Study in different musical styles. Analysis of small and large forms of composition.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 306-3. Elementary School Music Methods. Activities stressed are singing, listening, creative rhythmic, instrumental and reading. Emphasis is given to modern elementary level music teaching methods.
Music 307-3. Secondary School Choral Methods. Instruction and practice in the methods of teaching and techniques used in directing school choral groups.
Prerequisite: Music 303.
Music 308-3. Instrumental Music Methods. A study of the organization and administrative skills with methods and materials for the instrumental teacher. Stress is placed on modern teaching methods for a well-rounded instrumental program.
Prerequisite: Music 303.


46 Division of Humanities
Music 401-3. Sixteenth Century Counterpoint. Study of plain-song modal counterpoint and vocal polyphony of the 16th century.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 402-3. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. Study of Bach style, 2-, 3-, and 4-part invention, double counterpoint, chorale-preludes, canon and fugue.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
The preceding course descriptions serve as a guide for the determination of performance proficiency. Actual performance proficiency required for applied music and music education degrees is determined by the faculty in music.
Applied courses required for a bachelors degree in music education are as follows: major instrument or voice nine quarter hours plus proficiency requirement; piano (piano major may take electives) three quarter hours; minor instrument or voice three quarter hours; applied elective one quarter hour.
Philosophy Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy 3
Philosophy 121. Ethics 3
Philosophy 122. World Religions 3
Philosophy 211. Introduction to Logic 3
Philosophy 301. History of Philosophy 6
Electives
A minimum of 9 quarter hours in philosophy courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in philosophy.
Phil. 101-3. Introduction to Philosophy. Designed to introduce the beginning student to the fundamental issues of man, his cultural and physical environment, and problems of a philosophical nature.
Phil. 121-3. Ethics. Introduction to major ethical theories and a consideration of their relevance to mans moral problems and decisions. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 122-3. World Religions. Mans religious experience and beliefs, with emphasis on historical origins, developments, and philosophical problems. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 123-3. Aesthetics. An examination of theories of the nature of artistic experience, creativity, and critical evaluation from the historical and evaluative point of view.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor. (Philosophy 123 is offered alternately with Philosophy 121 and 122.)
Phil. 202-3. Contemporary Philosophy. An examination and criticism of leading contemporary philosophy in Europe and America: Pragmatism, Existentialism, Analytical Philosophy.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 211-3. Introduction to Logic I. Deductive logic, with emphasis upon logic of classes and propositions. The application of deductive logic to practical argumentation and reasoning is considered.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Phil. 212-3. Introduction to Logic II. Inductive logic and scientific method, with emphasis upon the use of inductive inference in daily life. Prerequisite: Philosophy 211, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 301-3. History of Philosophy: Ancient. Pre-socratics through Aristotle.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor.


Division of Humanities 47
Phil. 302-3. History of Philosophy: Medieval. Augustine to Descartes. Prerequisite: Philosophy 301.
Phil. 303-3. History of Philosophy: Modem. Descartes to the present. Prerequisite: Philosophy 302.
Phil. 321-3. Metaphysics. An intensive examination of the major systems of philosophy Idealism, Empiricism, Monism, etc.
Prerequisites: Philosophy 101, 211 and junior standing.
Phil. 411-3. Symbolic Logic. Modern symbolic logic with emphasis on its relation to mathematics and science and on practical applications to problems in communication systems.
Prerequisites: Philosophy 101, 211 and 212.
Philosophy 422-3. Philosophy of Science. An examination of the logic of science and a consideration of philosophical problems of methodology. Prerequisites: Philosophy 101, 211 and senior standing.
Speech Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Speech 101. Public Speaking 3
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Speech 211. Discussion Methods 3
Speech 220. Oral Interpretation 3
Speech 221. Introduction to Theater 3
Speech 222. Techniques of Acting I 3
Speech 230. Voice and Diction 3
Speech 240. Introduction to Radio and Television 3
Speech 301. Advanced Public Speaking 3
Speech 328. Stage Directing 3
Speech 374. Psychology of Communication 3
Speech 410. Techniques of Persuasion 3
Electives
A minimum of 12 quarter hours in speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in speech.
Speech Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Speech 101. Public Speaking 3
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Speech 220. Oral Interpretation 3
Speech 221. Introduction to Theater 3
Speech 222. Techniques of Acting I 3
Speech 230. Voice and Diction 3
Speech 240. Introduction to Radio and Television 3
Electives
A minimum of 6 quarter hours in speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in speech.
Speech Pathology Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Speech 230. Voice and Diction 3
Speech 250-252. Speech Pathology 9
Speech 353. Audiology 3
Speech 450. Clinical Practice in Speech Correction 5
Speech 453. Practicum in Audiology 3
Electives
A minimum of 9 quarter hours in speech courses selected from the


48 Division of Humanities
following list in consultation with and approved by the faculty in speech:
Quarter Hours
Speech 330. Phonetics 3
Speech 374. Psychology of Communication 3
Speech 455. Programming of Speech Correction in the Public Schools 3
Psychology 311. Statistics in Psychology and Education 3
Psychology 315. Introduction to Psychological Testing 3
Psychology 425. Psychology of Exceptional Children 3
Speech
Speech 101-3. Public Speaking. An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the basic theory of the art of public speaking, and to provide experience in the preparation and delivery of short talks.
Speech 201-3. Business and Professional Speaking. An introduction course designed for the undergraduate student or the business person interested in the problems of oral communication in business and industry. Study and application is made of basic principles of communication theory in business and industrial reporting, demonstration, motivating and publicizing.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 210-3. Argumentation and Debate. Acquaints the student with the complexity of social problems, methods of research, methods of logical analyses and development, construction of briefs, and techniques of refutation. Practice in preparation and delivery of sustained arguments. Specific work on selected debate topics.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 211-3. Discussion Methods. Deals largely with the processes of decision-making in small groups and conferences; research and investigation, analysis of social problems, use of evidence and argument, and social interaction among participants. Practice in actual discussions, both in the role of participant and of leader.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 215-1. Intercollegiate Forensics. For those students participating extensively in competitive intercollegiate speech activities. A maximum of three credits in this course may be applied toward a degree.
Speech 220-3. Ora' Interpretation. A study of traditional and contemporary theories of interpretation of prose, poetry and dramatic literature for the purpose of making that literature come alive for the listener and the audience. Emphasis is placed on reading all forms of literature aloud for the purpose of improving oral communicative skills and gaining experience in the interpretive form of artistic expression.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 221-3. Introduction to Theater. A comprehensive view of theatrical art, providing an understanding of the living stage, its players and craftsmen, and its place as a cultural force in society from antiquity to contemporary times.
Speech 222-3. Techniques of Acting I. An introduction to the basic principles of acting including improvement of voice, body and mind in the discipline of the theater. Particular emphasis is placed on the principles of stage movement and stage business.
Prerequisite: Speech 221, or permission of instructor.
Speech 224-3. Introduction to Stagecraft. An introduction to the methods and materials of play production including design and construction of sets, lighting practices, techniques of costuming, stage management and staging methods.
Prerequisite: Speech 221, or permission of instructor.
Speech 230-3. Voice and Diction. Elementary course for improvement of articulation and training in the effective use of the voice. Includes


Division of Humanities 49
study of phonetics and acceptable standards of American usage. Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 240-3. Introduction to Radio and Television. The evolution, organization and function of broadcasting. Introduction to the techniques used in radio and television broadcasting.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 250-3. Speech Pathology I. An introduction to the causes, diagnoses and therapies of articulatory and voice defects.
Prerequisites: Speech 230 and Biology 231.
Speech 251-3. Speech Pathology II. Continuation of Speech 250. Introduces the etiologies and therapies of more serious speech disorders including stuttering, cerebral palsy, hearing impairment and aphasia. Prerequisite: Speech 250.
Speech 252-3. Speech Pathology III. Continuation of Speech 251. Prerequisite: Speech 251.
Speech 301-3. Advanced Public Speaking. Preparation, presentation and appraisal of speeches on challenging subjects. Advanced inquiry into rhetorical analysis, the intensification of ideas and style. Emphasis upon persuasive speaking. Attention to specialized forms of address, including speeches of praise and of critical evaluation.
Prerequisite: Speech 101 or 201, or permission of instructor.
Speech 308-3. Great American Speakers. A study of selected American speakers. Critical examination of ideas developed in major speeches: analysis of the orators rhetorical skills; estimates of the influence of speech-making. Notes on the use of great speeches in current instruction. Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 311-3. Conference Leadership. A course designed for the person desiring to develop practical leadership techniques for business and professional conferences. Both the theory and application of conference leadership methods are stressed.
Prerequisites: Speech 101 or 201 and Speech 211, or permission of instructor.
Speech 328-3. Stage Directing. The principles and techniques of directing for the theater, including the selecting, casting, rehearsing and mounting of plays; student-directing projects.
Prerequisites: Speech 211, 222 and 224, or permission of instructor.
Speech 330-3. Phonetics. Advanced instruction in the International Phonetic Alphabet including the science of speech sounds. Particular emphasis is placed on the application of phonetics to the fields of speech pathology, theater arts, radio-television and the teaching of foreign languages.
Speech 343-3. Radio-Television Announcing. An advanced course designed to meet the specific needs of the radio-television announcer. Instruction includes drills designed to develop pleasing and effective vocal communication as a means of improving radio-television presentation, delivery and interpretation.
Prerequisite: Speech 240, or permission of instructor.
Speech 353-3. Audiology. A study of the anatomy and neurology of the ear, acoustics, audiometric tests and techniques, interpretations of hearing tests, hearing conservation programs and referral procedures. Practice in testing hearing acuity.
Speech 374-3. Psychology of Communication. Critical examination of the psychological factor underlying speech comprehension, the speakers adjustment to an audience, the listeners sets and responses, and the attitudes, beliefs and predispositions of hearers toward the appeal of the spoken word.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.


50 Division of Humanities
Speech 410-3. Techniques of Persuasion. A study of the factors which influence, positively and negatively, the responses of listeners to oral discourse; inquiry into the dynamics of human motivation. The course is designed to refine critical sensitivity to the role of the spoken word in the social process; to examine the role of advocacy in public life; and to indicate guidelines to the establishment of standards of ethical responsibility in public address. Practice in the application of the theory of persuasive speaking.
Prerequisite: Speech 210, or permission of instructor.
Speech 415-1. Advanced Intercollegiate Forensics. For students participating extensively in competitive intercollegiate speech activities. A maximum of three credits in this course may be applied toward a degree.
Speech 427-3. Community Theater. Specific application of theater arts to amateur semi-professional and professional theater of the urban area. Prerequisite: Speech 221, or permission of instructor.
Speech 449-3. Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life. Examination of current research concerning the effect of radio-television on the contemporary American scene. Particular attention is paid to the possible future trends indicated by the research.
Prerequisite: Speech 240, or permission of instructor.
Speech 450-5. Clinical Practice in Speech Correction. Methods of administration of clinical tests of speech and the application of the principles of speech correction are included. Students are introduced to supervised clinical practice.
Prerequisites: Speech 252, 353, or permission of instructor.
Speech 453-3. Practicum in Audiology. Supervised application of the principles and techniques of audiology in administering and interpreting hearing tests in the speech and hearing clinic.
Prerequisite: Speech 353.
Speech 455-3. Programming Speech Correction in the Public School. A
survey of the development and organization of speech correction in the elementary and secondary schools. Attention is focused on problems related to therapy, clinical practice and administration of programs of speech correction in the public schools.
Prerequisite: Speech 252, 450 and 453.


51


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Division of Science and Mathematics 53
DIVISION OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Disciplines within the Division of Science and Mathematics offering majors for baccalaureate degrees are biology, chemistry and mathematics. In addition, a minor is also available in physics.
Course requirements for these majors and minors are listed above the respective course descriptions.
Biology Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Biology 101-103. General Biology 12
Biology 111-112. General Botany or
Biology 121-122. Invertebrate Zoology 8
Biology 354. Ecology 5
Biology 364. Genetics 3
Biology 374. Developmental Biology 4
Biology 384. Evolution 3
Chemistry 431. Biochemistry 5
Electives
A minimum of 21 quarter hours of biology courses selected from the 200, 300 and 400 series.
Biology Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Biology 101-103. General Biology 12
Biology 111-112. General Botany or
Biology 121-122. Invertebrate Zoology 8
Biology 354. Ecology 5
Biology 364. Genetics 3
Biology 384. Evolution 3
Biol. 101-4. General Biology. An introductory course emphasizing common problems of all forms of life and how these problems are met in order to survive. Interrelationship between various organisms and their environment is stressed. The course is designed to provide both science and non-science majors with overall understanding and appreciation of general principles underlying all living things and the means by which man has gained such information.
Biol. 102-4. General Biology. Continuation of Biology 101.
Prerequisite: Biology 101.
Biol. 103-4. General Biology. Continuation of Biology 102.
Prerequisite: Biology 102.
Biol. 105-3. Natural Resources and Conservation. This single quarter course does not carry laboratory credit. Emphasis is upon the relation of man to the earths resources and how he is attempting to replace or conserve them.
Biol. 111-4. General Botany. Designed for students who are particularly interested in pursuing work in botany after completing Biology 101. Investigates the non-vascular plant kingdom in terms of the type and diversity of plant forms, processes which plants carry out and the structures which are utilized to accomplish these tasks.
Prerequisite: Biology 101.
Biol. 112-4. General Botany. Continuation of Biology 111, with emphasis upon the vascular plants.
Prerequisite: Biology 111.


54 Division of Science and Mathematics
Biol. 121-4. Invertebrate Zoology. Designed for students who are particularly interested in animals their anatomy, classification and functioning. Involves comparative study of invertebrate animal structure and functions with emphasis on basic principles of organization and adaptation. Prerequisite: Biology 101.
Biol. 122-4. Vertebrate Zoology. Designed for students who are particularly interested in animals their anatomy, classification and functioning. Involves comparative study of vertebrate animal structure and functions with emphasis on basic principles of organization and adaptation. Prerequisite: Biology 121.
Biol. 131-4. Human Anatomy and Physiology. Designed for students wishing to enter paramedical professions. This course is concerned with the human being in terms of the structure and function of the systems that comprise the body. Does not fulfill biology major requirements. Prerequisite: Biology 101.
Biol. 132-4. Human Anatomy and Physiology. Continuation of Biology 131.
Prerequisite: Biology 101.
Biol. 231-3. Human Physiology. Introduction to principles of human physiology with emphasis on cells, tissues, organs and the role each plays in the function of the human body.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 241-4. General Microbiology. Designed for students interested in the microbial world with particular emphasis on bacteria.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 242-4. Environmental Microbiology. The influence and use of the
natural groups of bacteria by society.
Prerequisite: Biology 241 and concurrent enrollment in Organic Chemistry, or permission of instructor.
Biol. 304-4. Histology. A study of the specialized cells and tissues of organisms and their function is emphasized.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 314-4. Plant Physiology. Emphasizes the structure and function of plants.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 316-4. Morphology of Vascular Plants. A study of the comparative morphological and functional aspects of vascular plants.
Prerequisite: Two quarters of botany.
Biol. 318-4. Vascular Plant Taxonomy. The naming and classification of vascular plants.
Prerequisite: Biology 316.
Biol. 324-4. General Animal Physiology. Designed to synthesize the students zoological knowledge with the principles of animal physiology. Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 325-4. Biology of the Arthropods. A more detailed study of the arthropods than was possible in the general zoology course.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 344-4. Virology. An introduction to viruses with emphasis on animal and bacterial host forms.
Prerequisites: Three quarters of freshman biology and Organic Chemistry. Biol. 345-4. Parasitology. A study of specialized invertebrate forms which take on importance as parasites of man and his domestic animals. Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 354-5. Ecology. Animals and plants in relation to the environment. Lectures are supplemented with laboratory demonstrations and field trips. Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.


Division of Science and Mathematics 55
Biol. 364-3. Genetics. Designed to provide the student with a background in the principles of heredity.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 374-4. Developmental Biology. The differentiation of biological organism from a causal, functional and evolutionary viewpoint. Prerequisite: Biology 364.
Biol. 384-3. Evolution. An examination of the history, evidence and processes of evolution.
Prerequisite: Three quarters of freshman biology.
Biol. 424-4. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. A study of the most important trends in the evolution of the basic structures of vertebrates. Prerequisite: Biology 364.
Chemistry Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Chemistry 121-123. General Chemistry 15
Chemistry 210. Quantitative Analysis 3
Chemistry 221-223. Organic Chemistry 12
Chemistry 321-323. Physical Chemistry 15
Electives
A minimum of 12 quarter hours in chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in chemistry.
Chemistry Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Chemistry 121-123. General Chemistry 15
Chemistry 221-223. Organic Chemistry 12
Chemistry 210. Quantitative Analysis 3
or
Chemistry 321. Physical Chemistry 5
Chem. 101-5. Introductory General Chemistry. A study of the fundamentals of chemistry. Subject matter and laboratory exercises include general, organic and biochemistry.
Prerequisite: One year high school algebra, or Mathematics 100.
Chem. 102-5. Introductory General Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 101.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, or permission of instructor.
Chem. 121-5. General Chemistry. A comprehensive study of the facts, concepts, and laws of chemistry including the principles and theory of ionic equilibria and techniques of qualitative analysis.
Prerequisites: High school chemistry or Chemistry 100, and one year of high school algebra or Mathematics 100.
Chem. 122-5. General Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 121. Prerequisite: Chemistry 121.
Chem. 123-5. General Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 122. Prerequisite: Chemistry 122.
Chem. 210-3. Quantitative Analysis. Theory of quantitative analysis, principles and application in gravimetric and volumetric measurement of typical elements and compounds.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 123.
Chem. 221-4. Organic Chemistry. Broad study of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, their structure, reactions and properties. Laboratory work consists mainly of the preparation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 123.


56 Division of Science and Mathematics
Chem. 222-4. Organic Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 221. Prerequisite: Chemistry 221.
Chem. 223-4. Organic Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 222. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222,
Chem. 321-5. Physical Chemistry. A thorough study of structural and phase properties including the principles of thermodynamics and thermochemistry.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 223 and Mathematics 203.
Chem. 322-5. Physical Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 321. Prerequisite: Chemistry 321.
Chem. 323-5. Physical Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 322. Prerequisite: Chemistry 322.
Chem. 410-5. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Advanced study of the principles and instrumentation in chemical separation and analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 323.
Chem. 411-5. Inorganic Chemistry. Study of the classification of chemical compounds presented in wave mechanical terms of atomic structure and valency.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 323.
Chem. 412-5. Inorganic Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 411. Prerequisite: Chemistry 411.
Chem. 420-3. Advanced Laboratory Techniques. Theory and techniques of chemical analysis by optical, electrical and x-ray methods.
Chem. 431-5. Biochemistry. Study of metabolism in biological systems. Includes carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, enzymes, vitamins and hormones. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222.
Geology
It is not possible to receive a minor in geology, and only lower division courses are offered.
Geol. 101-4. General Geology. This course, designed for non-science students as well as geology students, covers general facts about the earth and its relation with other astronomical bodies, and basic geologic terms and concepts using examples of geologic features in Colorado.
Geol. 102-4. Physical Geology. Continuation of Geology 101 which examines more closely the geologic processes that have shaped the earth: geologic structures and surface features, and those processes that have formed minerals and rocks.
Prerequisite: Geology 101, or permission of instructor.
Geol. 103-3. Historical Geology. Covers the geologic history of the earth from its origin to the present time. Includes changes of the earths surface structure, and the development and changes found in life forms as revealed from the records found in rock structures and fossils formed throughout geologic time.
Prerequisite: Geology 102.
Geol. 201-4. Mineralogy I. An introduction to the study of crystallography that includes crystal lattices, crystal symmetry and stereo net representations. The genesis and identification of deposits of elements, oxides and carbonates are studied. Laboratory work includes work with crystal models and mineral samples.
Prerequisites: Geology 103, Mathematics 102, and Chemistry 123; or equivalents.
Geol. 202-4. Mineralogy II. Continuation of Geology 201. The sulphides and the rock-forming minerals, primarily the silicates, are examined. Prerequisite: Geology 201.


Division of Science and Mathematics 57
Geol. 210-4. Principles of Stratigraphy of Sedimentation. The study of sources of sedimentary material transportational processes, and depo-sitional environments. Nomenclature, classification and correlation of stratigraphic units are studied. Laboratory periods investigate sedimentation problems and include the investigation for and preparation of stratigraphic charts and sections.
Prerequisite: Geology 103.
Mathematics Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Mathematics 103. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
Mathematics 201-203. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II,
m, iv 15
Mathematics 301. Abstract Algebra I 3
Mathematics 311. Linear Algebra I 3
Mathematics 321. Mathematical Statistics I 3
Electives
A minimum of 27 quarter hours in mathematics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in mathematics.
Mathematics Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Mathematics 103. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
Mathematics 201-203. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II,
III, IV 15
Mathematics 301. Abstract Algebra I 3
Mathematics 311. Linear Algebra I 3
Mathematics 321. Mathematical Statistics I 3
Electives
A minimum of 3 quarter hours in mathematics consisting of 210, 231 or any upper division course must be selected.
Math. 99-3. Remedial Mathematics. A course for students who do not have an adequate background for taking either Mathematics 100 or 101, as shown by placement tests and demonstrated ability. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of mathematics. Instruction is given in arithmetic and algebra. Credit does not apply toward graduation.
Math. 100-5. Basic Mathematics. A course for students who do not need the intensive coverage provided by the Mathematics 101-103 series. Covers certain algebraic concepts including function theory, logarithms, mathematical formulas, linear programming with related applications to various fields.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on mathematics entrance examination and one year of high school algebra, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 101-5. College Algebra. Advanced topics in quadratic equations, variation, inequalities, progressions, simultaneous equations, permutations and combinations.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on mathematics entrance examination and one and one-half years of high school algebra, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 102-5. College Trigonometry. Trigonometric functions, equations and identities; solution of triangles; and trigonometric representation of complex numbers.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101.


58 Division of Science and Mathematics
Math. 103-5. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I. The first of a four-quarter course in unified calculus and analytics, including the rate of change of a function, derivatives, algebraic and trigonometric functions, curve plotting, maxima and minima, integration, areas and volumes as limits and applications of integration.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102, or two years of high school algebra and one semester of trigonometry.
Math. 104-4. Topics in Mathematics. A course in applied mathematics which provides opportunities for specialization to meet the needs of students majoring in business, data processing and engineering technologies.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on mathematics entrance examination and one year of high school algebra, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 170-1. Slide Rule. Multiplication, division, squares and square roots, cubes and cube roots, trigonometric functions, log and log-log scales, folded scales and reciprocal scales.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102, or permission of instructor.
Math. 201-5. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II. Continuation of Mathematics 103. Covers formal integration, determinants, transcendental functions, hyperbolic function and solid analytic geometry and vectors. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103.
Math. 202-5. Calculus and Analytic Geometry III. Continuation of Mathematics 201. Covers vectors and parametric equations, and partial differentiation with application of these principles.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 201.
Math. 203-5. Calculus and Analytic Geometry IV. Last quarter of the four-quarter sequence in unified calculus and analytic geometry. Includes multiple integration, infinite series, complex numbers and functions and elementary differential equations.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 202.
Math. 210-3. Differential Equations. Introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations; differential equations of the first order and first degree, first order and higher degree; linear differential equations; differential equations of order higher than the first; and applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203, or equivalent.
Math. 231-3. Computer Science. Theory and application of electronic computers in solving specific mathematical and scientific problems. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration or credit in Mathematics 103, or permission of instructor.
Math. 281-3. Concepts in Mathematics I. The structure and concepts of arithmetic as a system of thought, measurement and brief introduction of simple geometric concepts and algebraic formulas. None of the credits in this course (Mathematics 281-283) will count towards a mathematics major or minor.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 282-3. Concepts in Mathematics II. Continued emphasis on the structure of the real number system and its subsystems, on rational and irrational numbers, and on the nature of mathematical proofs. Prerequisite: Mathematics 281.
Math. 283-3. Concepts in Mathematics III. Emphasis is placed on the elements of geometry. The subject is studied from the intuitive approach with some time being devoted to elementary proofs.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra, or Mathematics 99.
Math. 301-3. Abstract Algebra I. Introduction to the concepts of modern abstract algebra through topics in the number system, groups, rings, fields and related areas.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203 (may be taken concurrently).


Division of Science and Mathematics 59
Math. 302-3. Abstract Algebra II. Continuation of Mathematics 301. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental theory of groups.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 301.
Math. 303-3. Abstract Algebra III. Continuation of Mathematics 302. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental theory of rings and fields.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 302.
Math. 311-3. Linear Algebra I. Systems of linear equations; vector spaces; basic operations pertaining to matrices.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203 (may be taken concurrently).
Math. 312-3. Linear Algebra II. Theory of determinants; bilinear and quadratic functions and forms; linear transformations on a vector space. Prerequisite: Mathematics 311.
Math. 321-3. Mathematical Statistics I. Probability; frequency distributions of one variable; theoretical frequency distributions of one variable; large-sample theory of one variable.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203.
Math. 322-3. Mathematical Statistics II. Frequency distributions of two variables; theoretical frequency distributions of two variables; frequency distributions of more than two variables; small-sample distributions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 321.
Math. 323-3. Mathematical Statistics III. Non-parametric methods; testing goodness of fit; testing statistical hypotheses; statistical design in experiments.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 322.
Math. 341-3. College Geometry. Geometric constructions, elements of the triangle and their relations, similitude and homothecy, harmonic division and inversion.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Math. 342-3. Modern Geometry. Elementary theory in foundations of geometry and logical systems; basic theory in the fields of Euclidean, non-Euclidean, and synthetic and coordinate projective geometry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Math. 401-3. Advanced Differential Equations. Advanced techniques in solving higher order differential equations.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 210.
Math. 411-3. Numerical Analysis. Computational methods for solving algebraic, transcendental, ordinary differential, partial differential, finite difference, and integral equations with emphasis on the use of analog and digital computers.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 401.
Math. 421-3. Vector Analysis. Vector algebra, line vectors, vector functions of one variable, differential invariants, integral theorems and vector spaces.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Math. 431-3. Complex Variable. Intended for students of mathematics and physics and other cognate subjects. Complex numbers, analytic functions, geometry of elementary functions, power series and integrals. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Math. 441-3. Advanced Calculus I. Limits and continuity, functions of several variables, multiple integrals, infinite series, and power series. Implicit functions and special functions.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203.
Math. 442-3. Advanced Calculus II. Continuation of Mathematics 441. Applications to geometry; line and space integrals; vector notation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 441.




61


62 Division of Science and Mathematics
Math. 443-3. Advanced Calculus III. Continuation of Mathematics 442. A study of such special functions as the gamma and beta functions, Bessel functions and elliptic integrals.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 442.
Math. 451-3. Advanced Computer Science I. Advanced computer programming techniques utilizing problems from numerical analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 411.
Math. 452-3. Advanced Computer Science II. Continuation of Mathematics 451. Analysis and computation of problems selected from various subject matter fields. Programming the problem for machine solution is emphasized.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 451.
Electives
A minimum of 9 quarter hours in upper division physics courses must be selected.
Physics 100-5. Introduction to Physics. Survey of the principles and concepts of physics. The accompanying laboratory work is designed to illustrate the material discussed in lecture. Credit in the course counts toward the basic studies laboratory science requirement for a degree. Prerequisite: High school algebra, or Mathematics 100.
Physics 111-4. Technical Physics I. Covers principles of physics applied to practical situations and is designed for students taking two-year technology programs.
Prerequisite: Physics 100.
Physics 112-4. Technical Physics II. Continuation of Physics 111. Prerequisite: Physics 111.
Physics 121-5. College Physics I. First quarter of a three-quarter sequence which covers the principles and concepts of mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. An elementary but thorough presentation of these areas is covered with a combination of lecture, discussion, problem-solving and laboratory work.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102 (may be taken concurrently).
Physics 122-5. College Physics II. Continuation of Phyics 121.
Prerequisite: Physics 121 or equivalent.
Physics 123-5. College Physics III. Continuation of Physics 122. Prerequisite: Physics 122 or equivalent.
Physics 221-3. Analytical Mechanics I. Concepts of vector calculus in physics, statics, kinematics and dynamics of particle motion are covered. Prerequisites: Physics 123 (may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 103.
Physics 311-3. Introduction to Modern Physics. Introduction to the basic phenomena of modem physics such as the photoelectric effect, x-rays, radioactivity and relativity.
Prerequisite: Physics 123.
Physics 322-3. Analytical Mechanics II. Course covers the dynamics of rigid body motion and central forces.
Prerequisite: Physics 221.
Physics Minor
Required Courses
Physics 121-123. College Physics I, II, III Physics 221. Analytical Mechanics I Physics 311. Introduction to Modern Physics
Quarter Hours
15
3
3


Division of Science and Mathematics 63
Physics 323-3. Analytical Mechanics III. Continuation of Physics 321. Course covers oscillations and waves and an introduction to Lagranges equations.
Prerequisites: Physics 322 and Mathematics 210 (may be taken concurrently).
Physics 341-3. Electricity and Magnetism I. First quarter of a three-quarter sequence which includes the principles and mathematical theory of electrostatics, magnetostatics, dielectrics and an introduction to electromagnetic fields.
Prerequisites: Physics 123 and Mathematics 210 (may be taken concurrently).
Physics 342-3. Electricity and Magnetism II. Continuation of Physics 341. Prerequisite: Physics 341.
Physics 343-3. Electricity and Magnetism III. Continuation of Physics 342. Prerequisite: Physics 342.
Physics 381-3. Quantum Mechanics. Origin of the quantum theory, wave nature of matter, uncertainty and Schroedingers equation are discussed. Prerequisites: Physics 311 and Mathematics 210.


64 Division of Social Sciences
DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Disciplines within the Division of Social Sciences offering majors for baccalaureate degrees are health and recreation, history, psychology and behavioral science. In addition, minors are also available in economics, political science and sociology. Professional courses in teacher education are available for meeting certification requirements at the elementary and secondary education levels.
Course requirements for these programs of study are listed with the respective course descriptions.
Anthropology
It is not possible to receive a minor in anthropology, and only lower division courses are offered.
Anthro. 101-5. Introduction to Anthropology. The development of man and his cultures through the early metal ages. Covers human evolution, race, prehistory and the rise of early civilization.
Anthro. 102-5. Introduction to Anthropology. Continuation of Anthropology 101. Survey of the worlds major culture areas; culture and its major components, such as, subsistence, social organization, religion and language.
Anthro. 201-3. Stone Age Cultures.'Introductory archeological course. Methods, dating techniques and Pleistocene chronology are covered. A survey of main European Stone Age Cultures is also included.
Anthro. 202-3. Archeology of the Old World. Survey of main cultures of Asia and Africa from the earliest archeological evidence up to the historical times.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 201.
Anthro. 203-3. Archeology of the New World. Peopling of the New World and development of cultures up to the contact times.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 202.
Economics Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics 9
Economics 301-303. Intermediate Economic Theory 9
Electives
A minimum of 9 quarter hours in economics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in economics.
Econ. 101-3. Principles of Economics I. Introduction to the fundamental principles of economics to open the way to further study, and to give those not intending to specialize in the subject an outline of the field. Econ. 102-3. Principles of Economics II. Continuation of Economics 101. Prerequisite: Economics 101.
Econ. 103-3. Principles of Economics III. Continuation of Economics 102. Prerequisite: Economics 102.
Econ. 301-3. Intermediate Economic Theory I. Production, price, and distribution theory. Value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market structures with special reference to the contributions of modern economic theorists. National income and employment theory; primary emphasis placed upon national income analysis and contemporary theories of consumption, investment and employment.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 302-3. Intermediate Economic Theory II. Continuation of Economics 301.
Prerequisite: Economics 301.


Division of Social Sciences 65
Econ. 303-3. Intermediate Economic Theory III. Continuation of Economics 302.
Prerequisite: Economics 302.
Econ. 310-3. Money and Banking. History of money and its relation to the economy. Survey of major monetary and financial institutions from the standpoint of how their operation affects the money supply and its circulation.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 320-4. Public Finance. Taxation, public expenditures, debts and fiscal policy. Role of public finance in times of peace and war. National, state and local taxation.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 330-4. Economic History of Europe. Evolution of industrial society, with emphasis upon the growth and development of English industry and commerce.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 332-4. Economic History of the United States. American economic organization and institutions and their development from colonial times to the present.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 360-4. History of Economic Thought. Survey of the development of economic thought from ancient to modern times.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 370-4. Labor Economics. Study of problems associated with determination of wages, hours and working conditions in the American economy. Includes history and analysis of economic effects of trade unionism and other social institutions, including agencies of fprmal government which have been developed to promote equality of bargaining power between labor, management and the public.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Econ. 380-4. Industrial Organization and Public Policy. Structure and performance of important American industries as measured against the yardstick of the public interest. Alternative methods of serving the public interest.
Prerequisite: Economics 103.
Education
The purpose of the program in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students under this program must meet the basic studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. The following requirements must be met for formal admission to the education program:
1. A minimum 2.5 grade point average which must be maintained to continue in the program.
2. Completion of 75 to 90 quarter hours of college work.
3. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and one other person who is not a member of the students family.
4. A physical examination report, including negative chest x-ray, on file with the Student Health Services.
5. An application for admission to the program on file in the colleges education office.
6. Approval by the screening committee composed of a minimum of three members of the Teacher Education Advisory Committee.


66 Division of Social Sciences
Certification at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program:
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 101-102. General Psychology I, II 6
Psychology 211. Educational Psychology 4
Psychology 221. Psychology of Human Development 3
Psychology 325. Child Psychology 3
Education 100. Introduction to Education 3
Education 311-313. Materials and Techniques for
Elementary School Teachers 15
Education 410. Student Teaching in the Elementary School 15 Education 490. Seminar on Teaching 1
Candidates for an elementary certificate are required to complete the minimum in each of four areas of concentration as stipulated below. Students shall include, but will not be limited to, the subjects and hours listed. They are encouraged to earn a major and/or minor in at least one of these areas of concentration.
Division of Science and Mathematics. Minimum of 18 to 21 quarter hours which must include courses in biological science, earth science, physical science and concepts in mathematics.
Division of Social Science. Minimum of 18 to 21 quarter hours, exclusive of courses required in the professional education sequence, which must include courses in local government7 national government and American history.
Division of Humanities. Minimum of 18 to 21 quarter hours, exclusive of courses in English, which must include courses in art, music and speech. Department of English. Minimum of 18 to 21 quarter hours, excluding 9 quarter hours in the basic communication course, which must include courses in language, literature and reading.
Certification at the secondary level requires completion of the following professional course program, and a minimum of one of the majors and one of the minors offered by the college.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 101-102. General Psychology I, II 6
Psychology 211. Educational Psychology 4
Psychology 221. Psychology of Human Development 3
Education 100. Introduction to Education 3
Education 321-323. Materials and Techniques of
Instruction for Secondary School Teachers 9
Education 420. Student Teaching in the Secondary School 15 Education 490. Seminar in Teaching 1
Educ. 100-3. Introduction to Education. Designed to acquaint students with opportunities and responsibilities in the teaching profression, provide a broad understanding of the nature, purposes and organization of the American education system, and advise on educational requirements to qualify as teachers in elementary and high school.
Educ. 131-3. Early Childhood Education. Deals with specific teaching techniques as related to principles of child development and educational psychology. Areas covered include ways of promoting good human relationships and healthy physical, social and emotional development in the preschool child. Emphasis is on both individual and group dynamics. Educ. 135-3. History and Theory of Nursery School and Kindergarten Education. Introduction to key theories, practices, trends and problems in the development of preschool education in the U.S. Critical consideration is given to the contributions by Comenius, Froebel, Elliott, Montessori, Dewey, Freud and others.
Educ. 231-3. Child Development. Assigned reading, laboratory work and class discussion designed to give the student an understanding of the


Division of Social Sciences 67
patterns of development of children from birth to six years. The student is introduced to the major developmental theories of Freud, Piaget, Erickson, Sears and others, and to the research literature in this field. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Educ. 232-3. Laboratory in Child Development. Must be taken concurrently with Education 231. Techniques of child study are reviewed and applied to real life settings. Observation and recording of normal and abnormal childrens behavior in a variety of non-school settings. Individual child study includes consideration of parent-child, child-child and child-group interactions.
Educ. 235-3. Human Relations. This course is constructed on the assumption that a teachers knowledge of himself may well influence the way he teaches. The intent is to develop an understanding of the relationship between systematically gained self-knowledge and the teachers work. Opportunity is provided for the student to explore his own attitudes, values and behavior in a group under the leadership of a trained psychologist. The focus is on developing a positive and constructive attitude towards self-appraisal and the appraisal of others.
Educ. 311-5. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Elementary School Teachers. A comprehensive consideration of the materials of instruction, including teaching aids, newer media, audio-visual, programmed instruction and team teaching. Techniques and methods of teaching the language arts, social sciences, mathematics, science, art, music and physical education are presented by members of the academic area represented. The latest techniques in the evaluation of learning, reporting and test construction are presented, as well as the opportunity to develop lesson plans and learn of general school organization and operation.
Prerequisites: Education 100 and Psychology 211.
Educ. 312-5. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Elementary School Teachers. Continuation of Education 311.
Prerequisite: Education 311.
Educ. 313-5. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Elementary School Teachers. Continuation of Education 312.
Prerequisite: Education 312.
Educ. 321-3. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Secondary School Teachers. In general this course includes the same materials as Education 311-313, but covers areas of interest to secondary school teachers. Students study techniques and methods of teaching their major and minor fields.
Prerequisites: Education 100 and Psychology 211.
Educ. 322-3. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Secondary School Teachers. Continuation of Education 321.
Prerequisite: Education 321.
Educ. 323-3. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Secondary School Teachers. Continuation of Education 322.
Prerequisite: Education 321.
Educ. 410-15. Student Teaching in the Elementary School. Directed observation and guided classroom teaching in the appropriate grades. Includes preparation of lesson plans, participation in various phases of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers and frequent conferences with critic teachers and supervisors.
Prerequisites: Education 311, 312, 313 and approval of Chairman of Social Sciences Division.
Educ. 420-15. Student Teaching in the Secondary School. Directed observation and guided classroom teaching in the appropriate subjects. Prerequisites: Education 321, 322, 323 and approval of Chairman of Social Sciences Division.


68 Division of Social Sciences
Educ. 490-1. Seminar in Teaching. In conjunction with his student teaching, the student attends a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the education and psychology faculty, subject matter advisors and supervising teachers. Consideration of the problems met and solved by student teachers highlight these sessions.
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
The Health, Physical Education and Recreation program provides the physical education activities courses which students must take to earn a degree (see Requirements for All Degrees for details and information on exemptions). In choosing activities to fulfill the requirements, students should concentrate on types in which they have had the least experience. It is suggested that everyone attain sufficient skill in swimming to enjoy aquatic sports with safety and develop some skill in individual and dual activities. Students who have not had team activities experience in extracurricular competition should take one course in this area.
Courses are also offered for students interested in a professional program which will prepare them for careers in such fields as physical education, health and safety, and recreation.
Health and Recreation Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
HPER 111-113. Professional Activities (men) or
HPER 121-123. Professional Activities (women) 6
HPER 130. Introduction to Health, Physical
Education and Recreation 3
HPER 200. Kinesiology 3
HPER 211-213. Professional Activities (men) or
HPER 221-223. Professional Activities (women) 6
HPER 304. Physiology of Human Activity 3
HPER 321-323. Analysis and Techniques of Sports I, II, III 6 HPER 330. History and Principles 3
HPER 335. Curriculum in Physical Education 3
HPER 340. Materials and Techniques of Physical
Education 3
HPER 350. Physical Education in Elementary Schools 3
HPER 364. Secondary School Health and Safety 3
HPER 400. Adaptive Physical Education 3
HPER 430. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education 2 HPER 435. Organization and Administration of Physical
Education 3
HPER 478. Outdoor Education and the School Camp
Program 3
Electives
A minimum of 7 quarter hours in health, physical education and recreation courses selected in consultation with and approved by the health, physical education and recreation faculty.
Health and Recreation Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
HPER 130. Introduction to Health, Physical
Education and Recreation 3
HPER 111-113. Professional Activities (men) or
HPER 121-123. Professional Activities (women) 6


Division of Social Sciences 69
Quarter Hours
HPER 211-213. Professional Activities (men) or
HPER 221-213. Professional Activities (women) 6
Electives
A minimum of 15 quarter hours in health, physical education and recreation courses selected in consultation with and approved by the health, physical education and recreation faculty.
HPER 100-1. Physical Education Activities. Three quarter hours of credit in this course, or at least three quarter hours in the professional activities sequence HPER 111-113 or 121-123, are required for all students who are not exempt. Instruction and practice are provided in a variety of activities designed to contribute to the recreational, physical, social and emotional growth of the student. A different activity must be taken each quarter. There is an adapted class for students with physical limitations.
HPER 111-2, 112-2, 113-2. Professional Activities (Men). For professional students. Substitutes for three quarter hours in HPER 100. Instruction and practice. Fall: fundamental skills and exercise, conditioning, fundamental movements, stunts and tumbling, posture and body mechanics. Winter: aquatics and gymnastics. Spring: rhythms and dance activities (folk, square, and social), bowling and badminton.
HPER 121-2, 122-2, 123-2. Professional Activities (Women). For professional students. Substitutes for three quarter hours in HPER 100. Instruction and practice. Fall: fundamental skills and exercise, conditioning, fundamental movements, stunts and tumbling, posture and body mechanics. Winter: aquatics and gymnastics. Spring: rhythms and dance activities (folk, square, and social), bowling and badminton.
HPER 130-3. Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Designed to orient and acquaint students with the origin, development, scope and purposes of this field.
HPER 200-3. Kinesiology. The application of anatomical, physiological and physical forces to human movement in physical activity situations. Analysis of basic mechanical patterns of form for increased efficiency in skill, speed, endurance, balance and force.
Prerequisites: Biology 131 and 132.
HPER 206-2. First Aid. Emergency treatment for various types of injuries. Course leads to Red Cross Standard and Advanced First Aid Certificates.
HPER 211-2, 212-2, 213-2. Professional Activities (Men). For professional students. Instruction and practice. Fall: team sports football, softball, soccer, basketball, volleyball. Winter: low organization games, individual and group contests, relays, wrestling and weight lifting. Spring: individual and dual sports archery, golf, tennis, track and field.
HPER 221-2, 222-2, 223-2. Professional Activities (Women). For professional students. Instruction and practice. Fall: team sports field hockey, speedball, softball, volleyball, basketball. Winter: modern dance, low organization games, individual and group contests, relays. Spring: individual and dual sports track and field, tennis, archery, golf.
HPER 304-3. Physiology of Human Activity. Effect of muscular movement on the various systems and organs of the body.
Prerequisite: HPER 200.
HPER 321-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports I. Equipment and facilities, rules, team organization and techniques of field hockey, speedball and basketball.
Prerequisite: HPER 221.


70 Division of Social Sciences
HPER 322-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports II. Equipment and facilities, rules, team organization and techniques of volleyball, softball, and track and field.
Prerequisites: HPER 221 and 223.
HPER 323-3. Analysis and Techniques of Sports III. Techniques, composition, interpretation and organization of folk, square, social and modern dance.
Prerequisites: HPER 123 and 222.
HPER 330-3. History and Principles. An interpretative study and analysis of the philosophy, principles and practices of physical education through their historical development and in their present application and significance.
HPER 335-3. Curriculum in Physical Education. Factors in selecting activities, program variations, planning instructional units, program standards and evaluation. Considers both ideal and problematic situation.
HPER 340-3. Materials and Techniques of Physical Education. Instructional materials and procedures for conducting junior and senior high school student experience in physical education class activities. Includes lesson planning, record keeping and grading, motivation and discipline, and teaching techniques.
HPER 350-3. Physical Education in Elementary Schools. Emphasizes the purposes and contributions of physical education to the growth and development of the elementary school child. Includes study of the activity areas which make up the program, development of teaching units and organization of learning activities.
HPER 360-3. Safety Education. Provides the student with knowledge about accident prevention in many areas: home, school, physical and recreational activities, traffic and community.
HPER 362-3. Elementary School Health and Safety. Designed to give the prospective elementary teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living and an understanding of the health services program.
HPER 364-3. Secondary School Health and Safety. Designed to give the prospective junior and senior high school teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living and an understanding of the health services program.
HPER 366-3. Basic Driver Education. Study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasizes methods, materials and resources for effective teaching, including discussion, demonstration and techniques basic to on-the-street instruction.
HPER 368-3. Advanced Driver Education. Advanced study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasizes administration, instructional aids, evaluation and research.
Prerequisite: HPER 366.
HPER 380-2. Rhythms for the Elementary School. Participation and instruction in the fundamental movements, forms and patterns of creative rhythms, folk dance and singing games for children.
HPER 399-1 or 2. Field Experience. Provides opportunities for students to gain practical experience assisting in the conduct of sports-type activities with community agencies, schools and the college. Credit is determined by the quality of the experience and hours of time required. Registration for this course requires prior approval of the instructor for the course and the cooperating agency. It cannot be repeated for credit in the same area of concentration.


Division of Social Sciences 71
HPER 400-3. Adaptive Physical Education. The field of adaptive and corrective physical education and its relationship to the regular curriculum. Covers suitable skills, activity, game and sports programs.
HPER 430-2. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education. Use of tests and measurements in physical education. Evaluation of objectives, programs and student achievement through measurement techniques.
HPER 435-3. Organization and Administration of Physical Education.
Organization and administrative policies and procedures for conducting the required physical education and elective intramural and athletic programs. Includes personnel relationships, legal provisions, budgets, purchase and care of equipment, facilities, schedules and activities, public relations and related problems.
HPER 478-3. Outdoor Education and the School Camp Program. Development of outdoor education and school camping. Principles of programming, constructing and relating camp programs to other subjects.
History Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
History 101-103. Western Civilization 9
History 121. Early American History 3
History 122. The Middle Period in American History 3
History 123. The United States and the Modern World 3
Electives
A minimum of 30 quarter hours in history courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in history.
History Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
History 101-103. Western Civilization 9
History 121. Early American History 3
History 122. The Middle Period in American History 3
History 123. The U.S. and the Modern World 3
Electives
A minimum of 9 quarter hours in history courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in history.
Hist. 101-3. Western Civilization I. The political, economic and cultural history of the ancient world and the Middle Ages, including a study of Byzantine and Moslem civilizations and the origins of Christianity.
Hist. 102-3. Western Civilization II. History of the West from the Renaissance to the end of the Napoleonic era. Emphasis is given to the origins and development of modem political, economic and cultural institutions. Hist. 103-3. Western Civilization III. History of the West from 1815 to the present, including a study of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political and cultural history and the problems of the 20th century.
Hist. 111-3. History of Colorado. History of the growth and development of Colorado: Indian influence; Spanish, French and American exploration; mining and trapping; early settlements and pioneer life; development of agriculture, ranching and industry; economic, social and cultural progress; and government.
Hist. 121-3. Early American History. The European background to American history, the colonial period, the Revolution and development of the United States from Washington to Jackson (1607-1837).
Hist. 122-3. The Middle Period in American History. The slavery controversy, the Civil War, reconstruction, the growth of industry and the awakening interest in world affairs (1837-1898).


72 Division of Social Sciences
Hist. 123-3. The United States and the Modern World. The Spanish-American War, the Progressive Movement, World War I and its after-math, the New Deal and World War II.
Hist. 204-3. Ancient History I. History and culture of the ancient Near East: Egypt, Mesopotamia and Palestine. Sumerian beginnings c. 4000 B.C. through the Egyptian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Chaldean and Persian empires. Ancient Israel.
Hist. 205-3. Ancient History II. History and culture of Ancient Greece from the beginnings of Aegean civilization to the death of Alexander.
Hist. 20G-3. Ancient History III. History and culture of ancient Rome from the foundation of the city of Rome to the fall of the Roman Empire.
Hist. 231-3. History of England I. The social, economic, political, religious, colonial and imperial developments from earliest times to 1603.
Hist. 232-3. History of England II. Covers 1603-1815.
Hist. 233-3. History of England III. Covers 1815 to present.
Hist. 311-3. History of the Middle Ages I. History and culture of Europe c. 325-1050: the transition from ancient to medieval civilization, Latin Christianity, the Carolingian empire and Renaissance, the development of feudal society.
Hist. 312-3. History of the Middle Ages II. History and culture of Europe c. 1050-1300: the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy, England and France, the Crusades, the high middle ages.
Hist. 313-3. Europe in Renaissance. History and culture of Europe c. 1300-1500: The Italian Renaissance; the Northern Renaissance; the Avignon Papacy and the Great Schism; the conciliar epoch; the Empire, Spain, France and England in the later middle ages.
Hist. 314-3. Europe in Reformation. History and culture of Europe c. 1500-1648: The Protestant Reformation; the Roman Catholic Reformation, the Council of Trent, the Age of Exploration, Hapsburg-Valois rivalry, the Wars of Religion, the Thirty Years War.
Hist. 316-3. French Revolution and Napoleon. Analyzes the political and economic failure of the Old Regime, the influence of the philosophers, the rise and fall of revolutionary idealism, the spread of revolutionary principles, the development of imperialism, dictatorship under Napoleon, and the settlement of Europe at the Congress of Vienna.
Hist. 317-3. Europe, 1815-1870. The decline of the aristocratic-clerical order, the emergence of capitalism, the appearance of liberal states and the rise of nationalism in Italy and Germany are studied. Also considers Europes search for equilibrium from 1815 to 1870.
Hist. 318-3. Europe, 1870-1914. Deals with Europes maintenance of equilibrium in the Age of German Ascendancy. Continental culture, the development of imperial rivalries, the failure of internationalism, and the coming of the First World War are studied.
Hist. 319-3. Europe, 1914 to the Present. Internal developments in the major European nations are analyzed, and the history of Western and Central Europe since the First World War is viewed from the perspective of Europes rapidly changing role in world history, with emphasis on the dynamics of power politics.
Hist. 321-3. Colonial America. Considers the political, economic and social development of the colonies. The colonies are also viewed against their European background and studied as a problem of imperial administration within the British Empire.
Prerequisite: History 121, or permission of instructor.


Division of Social Sciences 73
Hist. 325-3. Civil War and Reconstruction. The underlying causes of the Civil War are considered, but this course concentrates on the actual conflict between North and South, its development, and the major problems of the peace.
Prerequisite: History 122, or permission of instructor.
Hist. 329-3. Recent America, 1914 to the Present. Includes a study of World War I and U. S. participation in it, the disillusionment and ferment of the Twenties, the Great Depression, U. S. foreign policy in the Thirties, World War II, and the postwar world. The interaction between U. S. policies and those of the Great Powers are emphasized.
Prerequisite: History 123, or permission of instructor.
Hist. 415-3. The Age of Absolute Monarchy. History and culture of Europe c. 1648-1789: The age of Louis XIV and the Old Regime, the Stuart era in England, the rise of Prussia and Russia, the Age of Enlightenment and the Age of Reason.
Hist. 431-3. History of Russia to 1917. Considers the controversial interpretations of the formation of the Russian State, the emergence of modem Russia, Nineteenth Century autocracy, the rise of the Intelligentsia, and the 1905 and 1917 Revolutions.
Prerequisites: History 101, 102, 103.
Hist. 432-3. History of Russia, 1917 to the Present. The theoretical foundations of the Soviet State are considered, as well as the actual organizational structure of the state and the Communist Party. Soviet domestic and foreign policies are traced through the Lenin-Stalin era, and an effort is made to assess the U.S.S.R.s position and objectives in the postwar world.
Prerequisite: History 431.
Political Science Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Political Science 101-102. Introduction to Political Science or
Political Science 111-112. American National Government 6 Electives
A minimum of 21 quarter hours in political science courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in political science.
Pol. Sci. 101-3. Introduction to Political Science I. A survey of the field of political science with emphasis on the origins, basic concepts, procedures and problems of modern government. Comparative systems of government are studied.
Pol. Sci. 102-3. Introduction to Political Science II. Continuation of Political Science 101.
Prerequisite: Political Science 101.
Pol. Sci. 111-3. American National Government I. A study of the constitution of the United States and of the origin, philosophy, principles, powers and problems of the national government.
Pol. Sci. 112-3. American National Government II. Continuation of Political Science 111.
Prerequisite: Political Science 111.
Pol. Sci. 221-4. American State and Local Government. A fundamental course dealing with the organization, powers, functions and practical workings of state, county, town and city governments of the United States. Special attention is given to federal-state and interstate relations. The Colorado state government and constitution are studied.
Prerequisites: Political Science 101 or 111.


74 Division of Social Sciences
Pol. Sci. 251-5. Comparative Government. A study of the history, philosophy, current organization and functioning of the governments of Great Britain, France, West Germany and the Soviet Union.
Prerequisites: Political Science 101 and 102, or 111 and 112.
Pol. Sci. 331-4. American Political Parties. An analysis of the political party system in the United States and of the nature, history and organization of parties, with emphasis on their part in the process of government. Prerequisites: Political Science 101 and 102, or 111 and 112.
Pol. Sci. 341-3. Introduction to International Relations I. A study of the western state system and of the forces and conflicts operating in world affairs. International organization and diplomatic procedures are considered.
Prerequisites: Political Science 101 and 102, or 111 and 112.
Pol. Sci. 342-3. Introduction to International Relations II. Continuation of Political Science 341.
Prerequisite: Political Science 341.
Pol. Sci. 361-4. Political Theory. A survey of the principal schools of political thought, from Plato to the present.
Prerequisites: Political Science 101 and 102, or 111 and 112.
Psychology Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 101-102. General Psychology 6
Psychology 311. Statistics in Psychology and Education 3
Psychology 327. The Psychology of Individual Differences 3
Psychology 331-332. Experimental Techniques in Psychology 6
Psychology 351. History and Systems of Psychology 3
Electives
A minimum of 27 quarter hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in psychology.
Psychology Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 101-102. General Psychology 6
Electives
A minimum of 21 quarter hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in psychology.
Psych. 100-3. Introduction to Psychology. A brief look at the several branches of psychology and survey of general psychology to acquaint the student with factors which influence human development.
Psych. 101-3. General Psychology I. Presentation of basic principles and methods involved in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. Attention is given to perception, learning, motivation, maturation and emotion.
Psych. 102-3. General Psychology II. Continuation of Psychology 101. Prerequisite: Psychology 101.
Psych. 200-3. Personality and Adjustment. Application of principles of psychology to assist individuals in understanding factors which influence human development, help them make personal improvements and adjustments, and provide knowledge useful in social and professional relationships.
Psych. 211-4. Educational Psychology. Application of principles of psychology to learning and teaching.
Prerequisite: Psychology 101.


Division of Social Sciences 75
Psych. 221-3. Psychology of Human Development. Presents the development of behavior from infancy through maturity, and is intended to help the student understand the problems that confront him by a clearer insight into his own behavior.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 231-3. Mental Hygiene. Study of psychological principles underlying mental and emotional health with emphasis on positive approaches to mental health.
Psych. 241-3. Social Psychology. Study of social behavior and social action from a psychological point of view.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 311-3. Statistics in Psychology and Education. Application of basic statistics to measurement in psychology and education covering central tendency variability, probability, sampling and reliability. Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 312-3. Intermediate Statistics. Continuation of Psychology 311. Covers correlation, regression, prediction, reliability and validity, partial and multiple correlation, introduction to analysis of variants and co-variants.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311.
Psych. 315-3. Introduction to Psychological Testing. Presents the basis for psychological tests including the selection of test to use, administration, scoring, validation. Provides a survey of the individual and group administered tests of intelligence, interest, personality types.
Psych. 321-3. Abnormal Psychology. A study of the varieties of abnormal behavior found in man. Such disorders as the neuroses, psychotic conditions, alcoholism, drug addiction, the personality disorders and sexual deviation are considered.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 325-3. Child Psychology. A study of growth, adjustments and capacities of children from conception through elementary school years. Emphasis is placed upon what to do in the guidance and counseling of normal children.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 326-3. The Psychology of Adolescence. Development, behavior, special problems and characteristics of adolescents.
Prerequisite: Psychology 325.
Psych. 327-3. The Psychology of Individual Differences. The nature and extent of measurable differences.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311.
Psych. 331-3. Experimental Techniques in Psychology I. A basic consideration of the experimental techniques used as an approach to investigation and classification of problems involved in understanding the psychological nature of man.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311.
Psych. 332-3. Experimental Techniques in Psychology II. Continuation of Psychology 331.
Prerequisite: Psychology 331.
Psych. 341-3. Psychology and Management. Study of applied psychology at the management level.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102 and junior standing.
Psych. 345-3. Industrial Psychology. Presents psychological material relevant to the industrial setting including employee selection, training, evaluation, assumptions of management about human motivation, job satisfactions, work efficiency, fatigue and human engineering. Prerequisite: Psychology 102.


76 Division of Social Sciences
Psych. 351-3. History and Systems of Psychology. The major viewpoints in earlier systematic psychology and their relations to contemporary trends.
Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of psychology.
Psych. 362-3. Interviewing Techniques. In this course the student is introduced to a wide variety of interviewing techniques. He is given the opportunity both to observe and practice various types of interviewing.
Psych. 400-3. Psychology of Personality. Development of personality, individual differences and similarities, personality change and techniques for improvement.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 411-3. Individual Mental Tests. Survey of the field of mental testing with practice in the use of several widely known instruments. Prerequisites: Psychology 311 and 315.
Psych. 425-3. Psychology of Exceptional Children. Psychology of atypical children gifted, mentally subnormal, physically handicapped, chronically ill and socially maladjusted.
Prerequisite: Psychology 325.
Psych. 431-3. Physiological Psychology. A study of the physical, neurological and chemical bases of behavior.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 439-3. Psychology of Learning. A general study of the psychology of learning, including leading theories and principal empirical findings in learning.
Prerequisites: Psychology 102 and 312.
Psych. 461-3. Introduction to Psychopathology. An intensive introductory course in the area of personality theory and behavioral disorders with a survey of diagnostic and treatment procedures.
Prerequisite: Psychology 102.
Psych. 463-3. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. Survey of behavioral disorders with emphasis on diagnostic and therapy procedures, techniques and theories.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours of upper divison psychology courses.
Psych. 499-3 to 6. Experience with Children. Furthering the understanding of child psychology through working with children under appropriate supervision.
Prerequisite: Psychology 325.
Sociology Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Sociology 101-103. Introduction to Sociology 9
Electives
A minimum of 18 quarter hours in sociology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in sociology.
Soc. 101-3. Introduction to Sociology. A study of the major concepts of sociology, such as, groups, culture, stratification, social change, socialization, etc. Some consideration is given to the question of methodology and to the question of the validity of sociological viewpoint.
Soc. 102-3. Introduction to Sociology. Continuation of Sociology 101. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.
Soc. 103-3. Introduction to Sociology. Includes readings in sociology covering articles and excerpts from the more important writers in the field. It is intended for the interested student who wishes to pursue in greater depth the subject matter covered in Sociology 101 and 102. Prerequisite: Sociology 102.


Division of Social Sciences 77
Soc. 110-3. Marriage and the Family. A theoretical and empirical study of the American family as a social institution and as a system of interacting personalities. Emphasis is placed on historical and cross-cultural data in an attempt to broaden the students perspective and to make him more sensitive to the variations and similarities found in this most basic of mans social institutions.
Soc. 201-3. Social Problems. A theoretical-sociological analysis of the causes and consequences of the major social problems of contemporary American society, such as, crime, family disorganization, race relations and urban congestion. The empirical approach is highlighted, and cross-cultural and historical data are used in order that the student may develop a broader perspective from which to view his world.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 202-3. Social Problems. Continuation of Sociology 201.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 210-3. Urban Sociology. A study of social and cultural patterns in the modem metropolis. Examines patterns of interaction, social institutions, ecological and demographic variables, growth and change, deviance, etc., in modern urban communities.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 211-3. Urban Sociology. Continuation of Sociology 210.
Prerequisite: Sociology 210.
Soc. 301-3. Ethnic and Minority Groups. Race and racism; facts and myths about great populations, including psychological, social, and cultural sources of bias and discrimination.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 302-3. Ethnic and Minority Groups. Continuation of Sociology 301. Prerequisite: Sociology 301.
Soc. 311-3. Crime and Delinquency. Nature and causes of crime and delinquency as social phenomena. The processes of making laws, breaking laws and reaction toward the breaking of laws. General sociological concepts are used in the analyses.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 312-3. Crime and Delinquency. Continuation of Sociology 311. Prerequisite: Sociology 311.
Soc. 321-3. Comparative Social Structures. An analysis of the diverse types of social arrangements that man has lived with. Attention is given to both contemporary and historical societies.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 322-3. Comparative Social Structures. Continuation of Sociology 321. Prerequisite: Sociology 321.
Soc. 331-3. History of Social Thought. Major social writers from early time until the present, including such writers as Aristotle, Plato, Comte, Spencer and Marx.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 332-3. History of Social Thought. Continuation of Sociology 331. Prerequisite: Sociology 331.
Behavioral Science Major
The behavioral science major groups courses from several disciplines in a related and organized manner with the objective of preparing students for positions in this field at public and private institutions.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Anthropology 101. Introduction to Anthropology 5
Psychology 101-102. General Psychology 6
Psychology 200. Personality and Adjustment 3


78 Division of Social Sciences
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 241. Social Psychology 3
Psychology 311. Statistics in Psychology and Education 3
Psychology 315. Introduction to Psychological Testing 3
Psychology 362. Interviewing Techniques 3
Psychology 439. Psychology of Learning 3
Psychology 463. Introduction to Clinical Psychology 3
Sociology 101-102. Introduction to Sociology 6
Sociology 201-202. Social Prolems 6
Sociology 210-211. Urban Sociology 6
Sociology 301-302. Ethnic and Minority Groups 6
Behavioral Science 290. Behavioral Science Seminar 3
Behavioral Science 490. Behavioral Science Seminar 3
BH 290-3. Behavioral Science Seminar. Surveys opportunities in the field of behavioral science and explores in depth the field each student chooses.
BH 490-3. Behavioral Science Seminar. Relates the students academic training to his chosen field of endeavor.


79


80


Applied Sciences Section 81
APPLIED SCIENCES SECTION
This section implements an important function stipulated in the act which created Metropolitan State College to provide training to qualify individuals for employment or to operate their own businesses. The programs emphasize broadening the individuals general education, teaching knowledge and understanding of basic principles, and developing the competence required for success in an occupation. Supervised on-the-job training through work or field experience supplements classroom instruction.
Since the purpose is to prepare students for occupations, programs are developed on the basis of detailed study of existing and potential needs of business, industry and government. Industry liaison committees are formed to aid in determining what trained personnel are needed in a particular occupational field and to assist in planning programs of study and training.
The Section of Applied Sciences is an integral and unified part of the college. Basic studies, which form the foundation for courses of an applied nature, are provided through courses offered in the Arts and Sciences Section of the college. The emphasis in the Applied Sciences courses is preparing students to enter an occupation immediately upon completion of a program of study rather than to continue college attendance, and some courses may not be accepted by other colleges and universities to meet baccalaureate or other degree requirements.
A variety of vocational-technical programs from two to four years in length has been developed. Others will be added as needs are verified and the necessary approvals obtained. Those authorized to date are listed under the associate and bachelors degree headings. The extent to which these programs can be implemented in 1968-69 will depend upon student demand, facilities and available funds.
Requirements for the Associate in Applied Sciences Degree
Students elect one of the curricula listed below as an area of major specialization for an associate degree.
Business
Accounting
Business Data Processing Management Marketing Office Management Secretarial Technology Aerospace Technology Professional Pilot Airframe and Powerplant Civil Engineering Technology Drafting Engineering Technology
Technology Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology
Quality Assurance Engineering Technology Health Services Medical Assistant Nursing
X-Ray Technology Public Services Helping Services Law Enforcement
Candidates for the Associate in Applied Sciences degree are required to meet the basic studies minimum listed below in addition to satisfying all other requirements for an associate degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. Curricula listed under the Applied Sciences divisions may specify basic studies courses to be taken, but if not, any courses listed under the Divisions of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, or Social Sciences may be used to satisfy basic studies requirements. Also, a degree candidate must complete one of the programs for specialization listed under the Divisions of Business, Health Services, Public Services, and Technology, or some other program planned with a definite educational


82 Applied Sciences Section
objective, including an area of emphasis consisting of not less than 30 quarter hours within any single division, which has been approved by his advisor.
Basic Studies and Other Course Requirements for an Associate in Applied
Sciences Degree
Quarter Hours
English 9
English 101-102. Basic Communication 6
and English 103. Basic Communication 3
or English 253. Technical Writing 3
or Business 200. (English 254). Business Communications 3
Mathematics Laboratory Science Humanities Social Sciences
5
4-5
3
3
24-25
Other courses, either required under a curriculum or as approved electives 66-65
90
Health, Physical Education and Recreation 100.
Physical Education Activities 3
93
Requirements for Bachelor of Science
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the basic studies minimums listed below in addition to satisfying all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. Since the purpose of the basic studies program is to help students develop understanding and appreciation of broad fields of basic knowledge, a degree candidate must complete the three-quarter course in basic communications and 15 quarter hours of courses in each of the three Arts and Sciences divisions as per the listing below. Curricula under the Applied Sciences divisions may specify required courses in the various basic studies areas. Not more than 10 quarter hours taken in any one of the sub-disciplines listed under the Divisions of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, or Social Sciences will be counted toward meeting the basic studies requirements.
Quarter Hours
English 101-103. Basic Communication 9
Humanities 15
Fine Arts (art, music, theater)
Language (foreign, English)
Literature
Philosophy
Speech
Science and Mathematics 15
Biological Science Earth Science (geology)
Phyical Science (chemistry, physics)
Mathematics
Social Sciences 15
Anthropology and Sociology Economics and Geography History and Political Science Psychology


Applied Sciences Section 83
Applied Sciences baccalaureate programs are developed in accordance with plans established for Metropolitan State College which included offering four-year curricula in technologies and in such fields as business, industry, governmental services and welfare. Those currently authorized are as follows:
Business Management Major Accounting Minor Data Processing Minor
Law Enforcement Major
A proposal for a baccalaureate program in technology with options in mechanical technology and electronic technology has been recommended by the Trustees of the State Colleges for approval by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education, but this program cannot be offered unless authorized by the Commission. Other Applied Sciences programs based on occupational needs and opportunities will be introduced when authorized.


84 Division of Business
DIVISION OF BUSINESS
The curricula of this division are designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The Division offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
Associate in Applied Sciences
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is terminal in nature and is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment. To be awarded this degree, a student must satisfactorily complete the colleges basic studies and other general requirements for the associate degree, the general business requirements, and the courses listed for any one of the options shown below:
Basic Studies
All students majoring in business whose objective is an Associate in Applied Sciences degree must satisfy the following basic studies requirements:
Quarter Hours
English 101-102. Basic Communication I, II 6
English 254 (Business 200). Business Communications 3
Physics 100. Introduction to Physics 5
Mathematics 100. Basic Mathematics (or equivalent) 5
Speech 101. Public Speaking 3
Economics 101. Principles of Economics I 3
25
HPER 100. Physical Education Activities 3
28
General Business
All students majoring in business must satisfactorily complete the following general business requirements:
Quarter Hours
Business 111. Principles of Marketing 3
Business 221. Business Law I 3
Business 231. Business Statistics I 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Accounting 101. Principles of Accounting I 5
Data Processing 101. Introduction to Data Processing 3
20
Accounting Option
This option is designed to equip the student to maintain the financial records of a small enterprise or to perform various accounting functions within a larger organization. The courses required for the accounting option are:


Division of Business 85
Quarter Hours
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 201-202. Intermediate Accounting I, II 8
Accounting 210. Income Tax Accounting I 3
or
Accounting 220. Principles of Governmental Accounting and Budgeting
Accounting 330. Introduction to Accounting Systems 3
Accounting 340. Cost Accounting 3
Data Processing 110-111. Computer Programming I, II 8
Data Processing 305. Data Processing Systems 3
Data Processing 311. COBOL 4
Approved electives 5
45
Grand Total 93
Business Data Processing Option
This option is designed to prepare students for initial employment as technicians in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing. The general education and broad business training provided in this option will enable the student to advance rapidly to supervisory and operational management positions. The courses required for this option are:
Quarter Hours
Business 354. Office Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 330. Introduction to Accounting Systems 3
Accounting 340. Cost Accounting 3
Data Processing 102. Punch Card Data Processing I 3
Data Processing 110-111. Computer Programming I, II 8
Data Processing 210. FORTRAN 3
Data Processing 305. Data Processing Systems 4
Data Processing 311. COBOL 4
Mathematics 101. College Algebra 5
Approved elective 1
45
Grand Total 93
Management Option
This option is designed to prepare students for careers in general management of modem business and public enterprises. The courses required in this program are:
Quarter Hours
Business 352. Marketing Management 3
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business 354. Office Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5


86 Division of Business
Quarter Hours
Accounting 330. Introduction to Accounting Systems 3
Accounting 340. Cost Accounting 3
Data Processing 110. Computer Programming I 4
Data Processing 305. Data Processing Systems 3
Economics 102-103. Principles of Economics II, III 6
Approved electives 9
45
Grand Total 93
Marketing Option
This option is designed to prepare a student for employment in retailing, advertising, personal selling, industrial selling, and sales management. The courses required for the marketing option are:
Quarter Hours
Business 116. Salesmanship 3
Business 210. Retailing 3
Business 211. Advertising 3
Business 212. Industrial Sales 3
Business 352. Marketing Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Economics 102-103. Principles of Economics II, III 6
Psychology 200. Personality and Adjustment 3
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Approved electives 15
45
Grand Total 93
Office Management Option
This option is designed to prepare students for positions such as executive assistants, office managers, and office systems analysts. The courses required for this option are:
Quarter Hours
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business 354. Office Management 3
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 201-202. Intermediate Accounting I, II 8
Accounting 330. Introduction to Accounting Systems 3
Accounting 340. Cost Accounting 3
Data Processing 110-111. Computer Programming I, II 8
Data Processing 305. Data Processing Systems 3
Data Processing 311. COBOL 4
Office Administration 105. Operation of Office Machines 3
Approved electives 2
45
Grand Total 93


Division of Business 87
Secretarial Option
This option provides the opportunity for individuals to attain excellence in stenographic skills and to acquire the broad knowledge necessary for upper-level positions. The student may further specialize as a medical or legal secretary, or develop proficiency in a foreign language in preparation for an executive secretarial position requiring bilingual skills. The courses required for the secretarial option are:
Quarter Hours
Office Administration 101. Beginning Typewriting 3
Office Administration 102. Intermediate Typewriting 3
Office Administration 103. Advanced Typewriting 3
Office Administration 105. Operation of Office Machines 3
Office Administration 111. Beginning Shorthand 4
Office Administration 112. Intermediate Shorthand 4
Office Administration 113. Advanced Shorthand 4
Office Administration 214. Advanced Dictation 3
Office Administration 222. Office Practices and Procedures 3
Accounting 210. Income Tax Accounting I 3
Business 354. Office Management 3
Approved electives 9
45
Grand Total 93
A student may substitute Office Administration 121, Forkner Shorthand, for Office Administration 111 and 112.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The Division of Business offers a major in business management which is general in nature and provides a foundation upon which further education may be added, such as specialization in a particular area of business, either on the undergraduate or the graduate level. In order to be awarded this degree, the student must conform to the colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Programs of Study and Degree Requirements. A summary of the course program which he must complete is as follows:
Quarter Hours
Basic Studies as described below 57
Business Management Major as described below 60
Minor 30
Free electives 36
Grand Total 183
To provide undergraduate specialization in business, a student may minor in accounting or data processing and thereby achieve a high level of occupational competency, or he may choose a minor which the college offers in any other subject matter area. Students electing a minor in accounting or data processing will be expected to devote at least 15 hours of free elective credits to courses in Humanities or Social Sciences.
Basic Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in business must complete the following basic studies requirements:
Quarter Hours
English 101-103. Basic Communication I, II, III 9
Humanities
Speech 101. Public Speaking
3


88 Division of Business
Quarter Hours
English 254 (Business 200). Business Communications 3
Electives 9
Science and Mathematics
Mathematics 101. College Algebra 5
Physics 100. Introduction to Physics 5
Electives 5
Social Sciences
Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics I, II, III 9
Electives 6
54
HPER100. Physical Education Activities 3
57
Business Management Major
The courses required for the business management major are:
Quarter Hours
Accounting 101-102. Principles of Accounting I, II 10
Business 111. Principles of Marketing 3
Data Processing 101. Introduction to Data Processing 3
Accounting 340. Cost Accounting 3
Business 221, 321. Business Law I, II 6
Business 231,331. Business Statistics I, II 6
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Business 341. Principles of Finance 3
Business 352. Marketing Management or
Business 354. Office Management 3
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Business 490. Business Policies 4
Approved electives 10
60
Accounting Minor
The accounting minor is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, or governmental accounting.
Quarter Hours
Accounting 201-202. Intermediate Accounting I, II 8
Accounting 210. Income Tax Accounting I 3
Accounting 220. Principles of Governmental Accounting
and Budgeting 3
Accounting 301. Advanced Accounting 3
Accounting 341. Advanced Cost Accounting 3
Approved upper division electives 10
30
Data Processing Minor
Upon completion of this program, students will be eligible to sit for the Certificate in Data Processing sponsored by the Data Processing Management Association.
Business 332. Business Statistics III
Data Processing 102. Punch Card Data Processing I
Quarter Hours
3
3


Division of Business 89
Quarter Hours
Data Processing 110-111. Computer Programming I, II 8
Data Processing 210. FORTRAN 4
Data Processing 311. COBOL 4
Data Processing 401. Advanced Programming 4
Data Processing 405. Systems Design 3
29
Business Management Minor
The business management minor is designed to afford majors in other areas with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the business world and sufficient familiarity with business skills to work in a business environment. Business management majors may not elect this minor. A knowledge of basic typing is requisite.
Quarter Hours
Business 111. Principles of Marketing 3
Business 221. Business Law I 3
Business 231. Business Statistics I 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Accounting 101. Principles of Accounting I 5
Data Processing 101. Introduction to Data Processing 3
Approved upper division electives 10
30
Accounting
Acct. 101-5. Principles of Accounting I. Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the double entry system: theory and practice in transaction analysis; familiarization with the accounting cycle and preparation of basic financial statements of all types of business enterprises; recording changes in equity and analysis of financial statements. Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 or 101 (may be taken concurrently).
Acct. 102-5. Principles of Accounting II. Continuation of Accounting 101, emphasizing procedures for specialized situations and financial statements for management analysis.
Prerequisite: Accounting 101.
Acct. 201-4. Intermediate Accounting I. Continuation of the study of basic accounting principles as applied to business, concentrating on special problems in specific areas of the balance sheet.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102.
Acct. 202-4. Intermediate Accounting II. Continuation of Accounting 201 with practice in accounting for exceptional situations. Emphasis on managerial role of accountant.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102.
Acct. 210-3. Income Tax Accounting I. Practice in the application of the Internal Revenue Code to the determination of income taxes for individuals. Familiarization with Code provisions for businesses, with Colorado income tax laws and with resources available for use in preparation of returns.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 100 or 101 and Accounting 101.
Acct. 220-3. Principles of Governmental Accounting and Budgeting. Orientation in the concepts of budgetary control as a matter of law and public administration theory. Accounting principles and procedures necessary to implement budgetary controls.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102.


90 Division of Business
Acct. 301-3. Advanced Accounting. Includes partnerships, branch accounting, consolidated statements, receivership statements and fiduciary accounting statements.
Prerequisite: Accounting 201 or 202.
Acct. 310-3. Income Tax Accounting II. Continuation of Accounting 210 with emphasis on partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts. Prerequisite: Accounting 210.
Acct. 320-3. Advanced Governmental Accounting. Continuation of Accounting 220 with greater emphasis on problem solving in state and municipal government.
Prerequisite: Accounting 220.
Acct. 330-3. Introduction to Accounting Systems. Installation and control of systems of accounting in various organizations and situations. Analysis of cases and research in types of tools available for implementation of an accounting system or procedure.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Data Processing 101.
Acct. 340-3. Cost Accounting. Concepts and procedures applicable to job order and process cost accounting. Emphasis is placed on the use and interpretation of cost data for managerial decision-making.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102.
Acct. 341-3. Advanced Cost Accounting. Continuation of Accounting 340. Emphasis is on standard cost and direct costing for managerial decisionmaking and planning.
Prerequisite: Accounting 340.
Acct. 410-3. Budgeting and Control I. Principles and procedures for the installation and administration of a budgetary control system, analysis of results, and the use and interpretation of cost data as a means of managerial control. Emphasis is on manufacturing concerns.
Prerequisites: Accounting 340 and Business 355.
Acct. 411-3. Budgeting and Control II. Principles and procedures for installation and maintenance of a budgetary control system in a non-profit organization. Emphasis will be on budgeting in a governmental unit. Prerequisite: Accounting 410.
Acct. 420-3. Auditing. Auditing techniques and principles applied by certified public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and verifying underlying data.
Prerequisite: Accounting 301, or permission of instructor.
Acct. 440-3. Advanced Problems and Techniques. Provides review and reinforcement of students accounting training. CPA examination problems are used.
Prerequisite: 24 quarter hours of accounting.
Business
Bus. 100-3. Introduction to Business. A survey of the American business system and its place in contemporary society. The relationships between economic theory and business decision-making are considered as well as types of business organizations and an introduction to marketing, production, financial, personnel and administrative management. Credit for this course will not apply toward any degree in Business.
Bus. 101-3. Mathematics of Finance. Includes fundamental operations of arithmetic and algebra, ratios, interests and discounts, data processing mathematics, charts and graphs. Course will be adapted to needs of current students.
Bus. 111-3. Principles of Marketing. Principles, methods and problems found in distribution activities in marketing products and services.
Bus. 116-3. Salesmanship. A study of techniques and psychological factors


Division of Business 91
involved in business transactions with emphasis on personal salesmanship. Prerequisite: Business 111.
Bus. 200-3. Business Communications. (Same as English 254.) A course for both secretarial and business majors which presents essential principles involved in preparing business letters and other types of communications purpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful English. Prerequisite: English 102 or equivalent, and ability to type.
Bus. 210-3. Retailing. A survey of retail store operation which considers executive control, profit planning, merchandising, store location, layout, organization, policies, system and coordination of store activities. Prerequisite: Business 111.
Bus. 211-3. Advertising. Theory, practices and techniques in advertising. Layout, copy writing, selection of media, costs, research and problems are included.
Prerequisite: Business 111.
Bus. 212-3. Industrial Sales. A study of the major activities involved in the sale of products to private industry and government agencies through the development and demonstration of effective sales techniques. Prerequisite: Business 116.
Bus. 221-3. Business Law I. Introduction to ordinary legal aspects of business transactions including such topics as contracts, agency and negotiable instruments. Designed to give a general understanding of the subject and to provide information useful in deciding when a lawyer should be consulted for aid in avoiding legal mistakes.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Bus. 231-3. Business Statistics I. Organization and presentation of data, computation of descriptive constants, normal and binomial distributions, normal probability functions, tests of hypotheses and statistical inference. Prerequisite: Business 101 or equivalent.
Bus. 251-3. Principles of Management. 'Analysis of managerial functions and processes required for operating any type of business organization effectively.
Prerequisites: Business 111 and Data Processing 101.
Bus. 321-3. Business Law II. Continuation of Business 221. Legal aspects of business and review of examples involving partnerships, corporations, sales and negotiable instruments.
Prerequisite: Business 221.
Bus. 322-3. Advanced Business Law. A review of the general principles of business law and the provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Extensive practice in responding to CPA law questions.
Prerequisite: Business 321.
Bus. 331-3. Business Statistics II. Continuation of Business 231. Includes t, x2 and F distributions. Quality control, correlation and regression, time series analysis and index numbers are approached from the decisionmaking point of view.
Prerequisite: Business 231.
Bus. 332-3. Business Statistics III. A continuation of Business 331. Designed to develop the students ability to make business decisions under uncertainty. Includes construction of pay-off tables and extensive use of computer in solving realistic business problems.
Prerequisite: Business 331.
Bus. 341-3. Principles of Finance. General principles of financial management in business enterprises with some reference to financial institutions. Major emphasis is on making decisions pertaining to capital structure, fixed assets, working capital and other areas of financial decision-making. Prerequisite: Accounting 102.


92 Division of Business
Bus. 342-3. Principles of Insurance. Concept of risk, insurance coverages available, organizational structure of insurance companies, prevention of loss and claims settlement.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Business 111.
Bus. 343-3. Investments. Analysis and evaluation of various types of securities from the viewpoint of the individual investor. Principles of sound investment policies will be discussed.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Business 111.
Bus. 352-3. Marketing Management. Analysis of the management of the marketing function with emphasis on the adjustment of marketing policy to changes in the economic and social environment.
Prerequisite: Business 251, or permission of instructor.
Bus. 353-3. Personnel Management. Principles, methods and procedures related to the effective utilization of human resources in organizations. Historical development and objectives of personnel management, individual differences, labor budgeting, job analyses, recruitment, selection, placement, training, wage and salary administration, hours of work and employee health.
Prerequisite: Business 251, or permission of instructor.
Bus. 354-3. Office Management. A study of the principles and practices employed in the organization, operation and control of modern business offices, including problems of layout, equipment and functions. Prerequisite: Business 251, or permission of instructor.
Bus. 355-3. Industrial Organization and Management. Organization and operation of the industrial enterprise, including techniques underlying modern management methods.
Prerequisite: Business 251, or permission of instructor.
Bus. 411-3. Marketing Research. Collection and interpretation of marketing data with emphasis on the application of scientific techniques and its relevance to decision-making ii> market selection, product development and promotional efforts.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Bus. 412-3. Retail Management. An integrated management approach to diverse retail store problems including store organization, store location, merchandise policy, buying and pricing, merchandise control, sales promotion, advertising, display, department location, customer services, personnel management, accounting, credit and finance.
Prerequisites: Business 111 and 352.
Bus. 490-4. Business Policies. A senior seminar for business majors in which the various areas previously studied are integrated and related to policy level decision-making in the business enterprise.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Division of Business.
Bus. 499-15. Internship-Business. Supervised work experience in business, industry, or government, with employers and job assignments approved by Division of Business. Interns will engage in work requiring the skills of their major option of study and will be required to participate in seminar discussions evaluating their experiences.
Prerequisite: Business 490.
Data Processing
D.P. 101-3. Introduction to Data Processing. An introduction to basic methods, techniques, and systems of manual, mechanical and electronic data processing. Covers the history and development of data processing, manual and machine accounting equipment and systems, punched card data processing, punched tape or integrated data processing, and electronic or automatic data processing.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 or 101 (may be taken concurrently).


Division of Business 93
D.P. 102-3. Punch Card Data Processing I. Basic operation and control of unit record machines. The machines include IBM card punch, sorter, collator, reproducer and tabulator. Course includes the wiring of the control panels for all machines.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 101.
D.P. 103-3. Punch Card Data Processing II. Continuation of Data Processing 102.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 102.
D.P. 110-4. Computer Programming I. A basic course in programming of electronic computers for those who plan to be programmers, or those whose work may be closely related to computer applications in business and industry. Covers problems of data processing, characteristics of computers, and SPS (Symbolic Programming System) and Autocoder languages.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 101.
D.P. 111-4. Computer Programming II. Continuation of Data Processing 110. Emphasis is on problem identification, flow charting, computer logic, using the problem-oriented program language, COBOL. Prerequisite: Data Processing 110.
D.P. 210-4. FORTRAN. FORTRAN (Formula Translator) is a data processing language useful in mathematical, scientific and business applications. Students learn the basic conventions governing FORTRAN programming and the mechanical process by which a FORTRAN program is prepared for submission to the computer for compiling and subsequent execution.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 101, or permission of instructor.
D.P. 305-3. Data Processing Systems. A study of data processing systems and procedures including analysis of various existing data processing applications in business and industry. Includes a study of integrated or total management information and data processing systems. Emphasis is given to procedure writing and work simplification.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 110.
D.P. 311-4. COBOL. Presents the basic nature of COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language) in such a way that the student gains an understanding of the languages use as well as its composition. A conceptual rather than a procedural approach is used.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 111.
D.P. 401-4. Advanced Computer Programming. Designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the development and implementation of scientific and/or business data processing problems. Each student completes several projects in which he applies the principles and techniques learned from previous business, mathematics, science and data processing courses.
Prerequisite: Data Processing 210 or 311.
D.P. 405-3. Systems Design. This course examines decision systems as communications networks; evaluation of information from cost-value standpoint; design of systems according to logic of feasible equipment; electromechanical and electronic devices as logic elements in the system. Prerequisite: Data Processing 305.
Office Administration
O.A. 101-3. Beginning Typewriting. Introduction to the keyboard and parts of the typewriter and development of minimum skills. Designed for those who have had no high school training in typewriting. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of typewriting in high school. Laboratory practice is expected of all students.


94 Division of Business
O.A. 102-3. Intermediate Typewriting. Continuation of typewriting skill development. Includes instruction and practice in business letters, tabulation and manuscripts. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for two years of typewriting in high school. Laboratory practice is expected of all students.
Prerequisite: Office Administration 101, or one year of high school typewriting.
O.A. 103-3. Advanced Typewriting. Special attention is given to increasing speed and accuracy and to typing a variety of materials. Laboratory practice is expected of all students.
Prerequisite: Office Administration 102, or two years of high school typewriting.
O.A. 105-3. Operation of Office Machines. Proficiency is developed in the use of various machines commonly found in offices, such as duplicating, dictating, adding, calculating.
O.A. 111-4. Beginning Gregg Shorthand. A course in basic Gregg shorthand for those who have had no previous training. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of Gregg shorthand in high school.
Prerequisite: English 101 (may be taken concurrently).
O.A. 112-4. Intermediate Gregg Shorthand. Continuation of Office Administration 111. Emphasis is upon speed dictation and transcription. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for two years of shorthand in high school.
Prerequisite: Office Administration 102 or equivalent.
O.A. 113-4. Advanced Shorthand. Continuation of Office Administration 112. Emphasis is on the development of dictation and transcription skills, vocabulary building, spelling improvement and other skills needed for vocational competence.
Prerequisite: Office Administration 112 or 121, or equivalent.
O.A. 121-4. Forkncr Shorthand. Designed to develop vocational stenographic competence in about one-half the time required with traditional shorthand systems. Forkner Shorthand combines the easy-to-write letters of the alphabet with a few scientifically selected symbols.
Prerequisite: Typing proficiency and English 101 (may be taken concurrently).
O.A. 214-3. Advanced Dictation. The development of special skills needed by medical, legal and technical secretaries.
Prerequisite: Office Administration 112 or 121, or equivalent (80 wpm dictation rate).
O.A. 222-3. Office Practices and Procedures. Study and practice of duties commonly carried out by secretaries, such as general office management and routine filing, human relations in business, handling mail, telegraph and telephone communications.


Division of Health Services 95
DIVISION OF HEALTH SERVICES
Colorado is one of the nations major health and medical centers and metropolitan Denver is the hub for health services and facilities in the Rocky Mountain region. Recognizing the steadily increasing needs for paramedical personnel, Metropolitan State College has developed two-year terminal programs in the following fields:
Medical Assistant
Nursing
X-Ray Technology
Also, a student may follow a program which is a combination of courses offered by the Divisions of Health Services and Business to prepare for medical secretarial work.
Students specializing in health services must meet the Colleges general requirements for an associate degree, complete basic studies approved by their advisor (see Requirements for an Associate in Applied Sciences Degree) and follow a prescribed program of courses in one of the fields listed above. Detailed information on these programs is available from the Division of Health Services.
HS 100-3. Introduction to Health Services. A course for all students seeking employment in one of the allied medical occupations. Analysis is made of health career programs offered by the college.
HS 104-2. Medical Terminology. Acquaints students with how medical words have been built from Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, word roots and combining forms. Emphasis is placed on the correct usage and spelling of medical words and the use of medical dictionaries.
HS 204-2. Nutrition. Study of the essential nutrients and their function in promoting total well-being of the individual. Necessary food requirements are evaluated, and ways of satisfying these requirements are studied.
Medical Assistant
Medicare, expanded health insurance programs and population growth have increased the need for qualified personnel in doctors offices and clinics. The medical assistant curriculum combines courses offered by the Divisions of Health Services and Business to prepare students for employment in this field.
MA 100-3. Introduction to Medical Assistant. Designed to introduce the student to health services relating to the medical assistant, physician and patient. Emphasis is placed on understanding the roles of health occupations and the responsibility of the medical assistant for establishing congenial relationships with allied workers and patients. Interviewing and problem solving techniques are discussed.
MA 101-6. Medical Assisting I. A course to develop fundamental skills in aiding the physician in his office or clinic. Methods and principles of aseptic techniques, assisting with physical examinations and beginning first aid measures are introduced. Laboratory work includes opportunities for the student to perform demonstrations in the college laboratory, observe in/out patient departments and clinics, and to have actual experiences in physicians offices where medical and clerical skills may be perfected.
Prerequisite: MA 100, or equivalent.
MA 201-6. Medical Assisting II. Continuation of Medical Assisting 102 with emphasis on special diagnostic tests which may be made in the office or clinic setting. Techniques of performing laboratory, X-ray and minor surgical procedures are included. Laboratory periods provide opportunities for further development of medical and clerical skills.
Prerequisites: MA 101 and HS 104.


96 Division of Health Services
MA 202-6. Medical Assisting III. Covers advanced techniques of interviewing, recognition and management of patients problems, emotional expressions in illness and special teaching measures.
Prerequisite: MA 201.
Registered Nurse
For many years there has been a widening gap between the number of nurses needed and number available. The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education estimated in 1959 that the West would need to double the number of nurses in active practice by 1970 to maintain the 1959 ratio of nurses to population.
To help fill the shortage of professional nurses, Metropolitan State College has developed a two-year program of nurse training. The program is designed to qualify the student for taking the licensing examination of the State of Colorado to become a registered nurse. Contracts have been made with hospitals, clinics and health centers in the area to provide the clinical experience. Interim accreditation of the program has been granted by the Colorado State Board of Nursing and the National League for Nursing.
RN 101-5. Fundamentals of Nursing I. An introduction to nursing designed as a foundation for all clinical nursing courses. Provides students with beginning understanding of the basic needs in health and illness and of methods of providing comfort and safety for the patient. Emphasis is placed on the nurses role in meeting physical and psychological needs of patients through the application of scientific principles, communication and observational skills. Problem solving is taught as the process by which behavior is assessed and plans for nursing care are evaluated. Laboratories aim at the development of skills in the nursing care of patients who do not present complex nursing care problems.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in nursing program.
RN 102-6. Fundamentals of Nursing II. Continuation of Registered Nurse
101.
Prerequisite: RN 101.
RN 104-9. Psychiatric Nursing. Planned to help students develop an understanding of general principles of psychiatric nursing and the role of the health team and the community in prevention, recognition, cure and care of the mentally ill.
Prerequisite: RN 102.
RN 201-9. Nursing Care of Adults I. The focus is on the nursing care of patients with acute and chronic illnesses. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of nursing needs in relation to the patients behavior and the nature of his illness. Principles of physical and behavioral sciences, diet therapy, pharmacology and operating room are included. Clinical laboratory experiences are selected and guided so that the student has an opportunity to utilize problem solving in planning, implementing and evaluating nursing care.
Prerequisites: RN 102 and Biology 131-132.
RN 202-9. Nursing Care of Adults II. Continuation of Registered Nurse
201.
Prerequisite: RN 201.
RN 211-9. Maternal Child Nursing I. Designed to help students gain understanding of the normal health needs of mothers during the maternity cycle and of infants and children from birth through adolescence. Consideration is also given to the various health problems encountered in mother and child and their impact on the family. Principles of physical, biological, and behavioral sciences, and of diet therapy, pharmacology and operating room are included. Various community agencies and hospitals are used for clinical laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: RN 102.