Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1971-1972

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1971-1972
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text
DENVER COLO


AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A7D1 T7531A1
INQUIRIES AND CORRESPONDENCE
The administrative offices for the College are located in the Forum Building, 250 West 14th Avenue. Visitors are welcome.
For specific information, inquiries should be addressed as follows:
Admission to the College and Student Academic Records . Dr. Kenneth C. Curtis Director of Admissions and Records
Admission of Foreign Students. . . Mrs. Roberta Moss Foreign Student Counselor
Applications for Faculty and Staff Positions . Dr. Keats R. McKinney Dean of the College
Business Affairs . Mr. Curtis Wrieht Business Manager
Counseling and Testing . Dr. W. Michael Johnson Director of Counseling and Testing
Employment of Students and Graduates . Mr. Edward L. Schenck Placement Coordinator
Financial Aid . Mr. Garrett J. Cooper Director of Financial A id
News Bureau . Mr. Robert A. Schenkein News Editor
Non-Academic Employment . . Mr. Kenneth L. Thurston Budget and Personnel Officer
Publications . Mr. Sherman W. Spear Publications Editor
Purchasing . Mr. Eugene R. Roon Director of Purchasing and
Physical Plant
Student Activities . Mr. James M. Kirtland Director of the College Center
Student Affairs . Dr. Robert V. Thompson Dean of Students
Summer Sessions . Dr. Harold W. Benn Dean of Summer Quarter and Information Services
Weekend and Evening College. . . Mr. Charles E. Allbee Coordinator


METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE BUILDINGS
Forum Building (Administration Building) 250 West Fourteenth Avenue 7 Three Thirty Three Building 333 West Colfax Avenue 13 Library 1421 Elati Street
Bannock College Center 1345 Bannock Street 8 Cherokee Building 1090 Cherokee Street 14 Colfax College Center and Bookstore 520 West Colfax Avenue
Emily Griffith Opportunity School 1250 Welton Street 9 Aaron Building 1447 Tremont Place 15 Press Building 1340 Glenarm Ploce
Double A Building 1300 Glenarm Place 10 Woodmen Building 1440 Speer Boulevard 16 Student Activities Center 710 West Colfax Avenue
Glenarm Building 1222 Glenarm Place 11 Fox Building 1443 Fox Street 17 Child Core Center 1038 and 1044 Cherokee
Zook Building
431 West Colfax Avenue
12 Gold Building 1440 Fox Street
18 Classroom and Office Building 1330 Fox Street



BULLETIN
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF COLORADO
I
250 West 14th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
Catalog Issue
Volume VII April 1971 Number 2
This publication has been authorized by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. The provisions contained herein are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The information presented is based on commonly accepted practices at Colorado state colleges and plans developed to date for Metropolitan State College, but the College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the students term of attendance.
4-71-30M


The Forum Building, right, is headquarters for the college. Location is adjacent to the beautiful Civic Center shown above.


CONTENTS
Page
General Information on the College........................................... 1
Admission.................................................................... 5
Costs....................................................................... 10
Student Personnel Services.................................................. 13
Student Activities.......................................................... 19
Academic Information........................................................ 21
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements................................... 29
Arts and Sciences Section................................................... 33
Division of Behavioral Sciences............................................ 39
Division of Education...................................................... 47
Division of Humanities..................................................... 59
Division of Science and Mathematics........................................101
Division of Social Sciences................................................119
Applied Sciences Section....................................................131
Division of Business........................................................135
Division of Health Services.................................................155
Division of Public Services.................................................157
Division of Technology......................................................165
Administration .............................................................203
Faculty and Staff...........................................................205
Alphabetical Index..........................................................217
Map with Building Locations..................................Inside Back Cover
mi


1971
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 28 28 29 30 31
MAY JUNE JULY
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
30 31
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
12 3 4 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30
31
1972 JANUARY S M T W T F S FEBRUARY S M T W T F S MARCH S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 12 3 4
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 27 28 29 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY JUNE JULY
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
APRIL
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
AUGUST
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
APRIL
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
AUGUST
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
IV


COLLEGE CALENDAR
SUMMER QUARTER 1971
June 14, Monday..............................Registration for ten-week and five-week sessions
June 15, Tuesday..............................................................Classes begin
June 16, Wednesday.......................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
July 5, Monday...................................................Independence Day holiday
July 7, Wednesday...................Last day for dropping courses for first five-week session
July 16, Friday..............First five-week session ends and mid-quarter for ten-week session
July 19, Monday....................................Registration for second five-week session
July 20, Tuesday...................................Classes begin for second five-week session
July 21, Wednesday...........Late registration and class changes for second five-week session
(late registration fee applies)
August 4, Wednesday.......................Last day for dropping courses for ten-week session
August 11, Wednesday................Last day for dropping courses for second five-week session
August 19, Thursday....................................................... Commencement
August 20, Friday.....................................................Summer quarter ends
Final examinations will be given during the last class periods of each summer session
FALL QUARTER 1971
September 14 and 15, Tuesday and Wednesday............................... Registration
September 16, Thursday...................................................Classes begin
September 17, Friday..................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
October 22, Friday....................................................... Mid-quarter
November 15, Monday.......................................Last day for dropping courses
November 25, Thursday.....................................Thanksgiving vacation begins
November 29, Monday..........................................Classes resume, 8:00 a.m.
November 30, December 1, 2, and 3, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday......................................................Final examinations
WINTER QUARTER1972
January 3 and 4, Monday and Tuesday ....................................Registration
January 5, Wednesday.................................................... Classes begin
January 6, Thursday..................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
February 11, Friday..................................................... Mid-quarter
February 28, Monday......................................Last day for dropping courses
March 14, 15, 16 and 17, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday...Final examinations
SPRING QUARTER1972
March 23 and 24, Thursday and Friday...................................Registration
March 27, Monday.......................................................Classes begin
March 28, Tuesday....................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
April 28, Friday ...................................................... Mid-quarter
May 15, Monday..........................................Last day for dropping courses
May 29, Monday..................................................Memorial Day holiday
June 4, Sunday..................................................... Commencement
June 5, 6, 7 and 8, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday........Final examinations
V


SUMMER QUARTER 1972
June 12, Monday...............................Registration for ten-week and five-week sessions
June 13, Tuesday..............................................................Classes begin
June 14, Wednesday.........................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
July 4, Tuesday...................................................Independence Day holiday
July 5, Wednesday.....................Last day for dropping courses for first five-week session
July 14, Friday...............First five-week session ends and mid-quarter for ten-week session
July 17, Monday.....................................Registration for second five-week session
July 18, Tuesday....................................Classes begin for second five-week session
July 19, Wednesday............Late registration and class changes for second five-week session
(late registration fee applies)
August 4, Friday......................Last day for dropping courses for ten-week session and
second five-week session
August 17, Thursday ..........................................................Commencement
August 18, Friday......................................................Summer Quarter ends
Final examinations will be given during the last class periods of each summer session
VI


GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE COLLEGE
The college was founded by an act of the Colorado General Assembly, signed into law (House Bill 349) by the Governor May 5, 1963. The law instructed the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado to provide a comprehensive plan for the long-range development of Metropolitan State College. Funds were appropriated by the General Assembly in 1965 (funded May 17, 1965, Senate Bill 344) for establishment of the college and for initiation of instruction in the fall of that year.
Fall quarter enrollment has grown from 1,189 in 1965 to 7,212 in 1970, and student numbers are expected to continue increasing at the rate of at least 1,000 per year.
In 1967 the Colorado General Assembly passed Senate Bill 314 authorizing activation of the upper division. Junior courses were added in the fall of that year and senior courses in the fall of 1968.
The chief purposes of Metropolitan State College were set forth in the act which founded it as follows:
Purpose. The General Assembly hereby declares that this act is passed in conformity with the plan for the development of higher education in this state which includes a system of state general colleges, whose functions shall principally be those of undergraduate education, a system of universities and special-purpose institutions conducting extensive graduate and research programs, as well as providing courses in undergraduate education, and a system of junior colleges. In conformity with such general plan, Metropolitan State College shall be a part of the state general college system.
Control, objects, and purposes. Metropolitan State College shall be under the control and management of the trustees of the state colleges in Colorado and its objects shall be:
1. To provide and offer programs of undergraduate instruction in the liberal arts and sciences, as determined by the trustees in the manner hereinafter specified;
2. To provide and offer programs of instruction in semi-professional technical education in science and engineering technology on a terminal basis, either on its own campus or through contracts with public school districts in the City and County of Denver and in the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Jefferson;
3. To encourage other state institutions of higher learning to offer at the college, by extension, such credit courses as are beyond its scope and function, and to cooperate with such other state institutions of higher learning in the offering of such courses;
Purposes
l


2 GENERAL INFORMATION
4. To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the State of Colorado generally.
In analyzing, interpreting and implementing these provisions, the college administration and teaching staff consider that the following objectives are consistent with these purposes and with the preliminary planning for the establishment of the college:
1. To provide, in the Denver metropolitan area, a multipurpose, urban-oriented, four-year college dedicated to emphasis on excellence in teaching and serving the community and the State of Colorado. Faculty members are selected primarily on the basis of interest and effectiveness in teaching, as well as on academic preparation and special qualifications. Faculty research, although welcomed, is not an essential qualification for a teaching position or promotion.
2. To open the door to an inexpensive, readily-accessible college education to all who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered: the recent high school graduate; the less recent graduate who has worked for several years and now sees the importance of a college education; the employed person who wishes to pursue college studies after working hours; the mature adult facing the necessity of educational upgrading or retraining for a changing economy; and the person of any age who is seeking pleasure and stimulation in the development of his intellectual and artistic interests.
3. To provide educational opportunities adapted to the interests, needs, and abilities of individual students. The level and nature of instruction can attract and challenge top-ranking high school students; however, special assistance is given to serious students who, because of under-achievement in high school, poor study habits, economic, cultural and other disadvantages, experience difficulty in meeting the academic standards and adjusting to college. To accomplish these purposes, avenues for close contact with students are maintained in the instructional program, in faculty advisement, and in counseling and testing. Co-curricular activities supplement the instructional program and are developed by staff and students to create a comprehensive academic environment.
4. To offer both degree and non-degree Applied Sciences programs of various lengths designed to provide students with occupational competence. The college maintains liaison with the business, industrial and governmental community, and curricula are responsive to the needs of the metropolitan area.
5. To offer Arts and Sciences degree programs which provide the opportunity for students to specialize in various major and minor subject matter areas.


GENERAL INFORMATION 3
6. In summation, the paramount aim of Metropolitan State College is to provide men and women with the education to achieve their cultural, social, and economic goals; to open the door to personal fulfillment in a worthwhile, productive life; and to develop skills which contribute to the welfare and improvement of the community.
Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the North Accreditation Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
Metropolitan State College is located in Denver, one of the Location nations finest cities. It is the capital of Colorado, and a state and regional commercial and financial center. Excellent transportation from all parts of the United States is provided by six railroads, eight major airlines and numerous buses. Although the metropolitan area population is now more than one million, Denver still retains the friendliness and romantic appeal of the Old West.


4 GENERAL INFORMATION
The Mile High City, situated at the foot of the snow-capped Rocky Mountains, enjoys a mild, sunny, semi-arid climate. There are 100 parks, five 18-hole municipal golf courses and numerous other recreational facilities in Denver. Within easy driving distance are breathtaking mountain heights, old mining towns, and places to picnic, hike, fish, hunt, boat and ski.
Outstanding music, drama and art programs are provided by the Denver Symphony Orchestra, Denver Civic Theatre, Bonfils Memorial Theatre, Denver Art Museum and other organizations. The Colorado State Historical Museum has numerous Indian and western relics and exhibits. World-famous displays of animals, birds and flowers in their natural habitats are found in the Denver Museum of Natural History.
Denver is a city of excellent schools and fine churches. There are 690 Protestant and Orthodox churches, 60 Catholic churches and a number of Jewish synagogues and community centers.
Facilities The college headquarters is located in the central part of the
Denver metropolitan area. It is adjacent to the downtown business section and at the edge of the impressive Civic Center a ring of public buildings around a beautifully landscaped mall. All of the buildings used by the college are in this general area (see map on back cover).
Administrative and service offices are in the ten-story Forum Building, 250 West 14th Avenue, at the Civic Center. General information and instructions on applying for admission may be obtained at the Office of Admissions and Records.
Smoking Metropolitan State College conforms with the fire regulations
Regulations of the City and County of Denver as well as those of the State of Colorado.


ADMISSION
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to the philosophy that educational opportunities should be provided for all who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, age or sex.
Minimum entrance requirements for Colorado high school graduates are at least 15 units of acceptable work from a high school accredited by a state or regional accrediting association. An applicant who has been accepted for admission must submit a pre-entrance physical examination completed by a qualified physician in order to enroll. A certificate of health form will be included in the applicants acceptance materials. This certificate of health signed by both the physician and the applicant must show that the latter is in good physical and mental health, has no communicable diseases, and has no defects or deficiencies which would hinder satisfactory progress in his studies. Other factors which will be considered are intelligence, personality, character and comments by secondary school officials.
Applicants who are not residents of the State must meet the same admission requirements as Colorado residents and must, in addition, rank in the upper two-thirds of their graduating class in order to be admitted.
Mature persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an individual basis after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test which show that they have the ability to pursue satisfactorily programs of instruction which the college offers.
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited universities or colleges, an official transcript from each institution attended must be submitted. Transfer applicants are expected to present an overall average of C (2.00 based on a four-point system where an A grade is 4 points) on all college work previously attempted and must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college or university attended. Failure to report correctly any previous college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received for each quarter. Therefore, applications should be submitted at the earliest feasible date after completion of the first semester of the senior year in high school. Applications for admission must be received at the College not later than six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission
A dmission Requirements
Admission
Instructions
and
Procedures
5


otininr nr AfTlftW
PilWH- 111- aiTTiON
6 ADMISSION
is sought, or four weeks prior to the beginning of a summer session. All credentials must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter or session for which admission is sought. All credentials must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records at the college not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought. All credentials which are submitted become the property of Metropolitan State College, and will not be returned to the student.
Admission of Freshmen (Applicants who have not attended college):
1. Obtain the uniform Application for Admission form used by Colorado collegiate institutions from a Colorado secondary school or from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204.
2. Part I (pages 1 and 2) of this form should be completed and submitted along with the application fee directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. Applications for admission must be received at the college not later than six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought, or four weeks


ADMISSION 7
prior to the beginning of a summer session. Ail credentials must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter or session for which admission is sought. Part II of the application should be submitted to the students high school for record and test data. The high school will send Part II of the application directly to the Office of Admissions and Records.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply on tuition, must be sent with Part I of the application for admission. The application fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. It is required that all entering freshmen take the American College Test (ACT) prior to registration and have the scores forwarded to the college. Admissions decisions are not influenced by ACT scores, but test results are used as a basis for assignment to classes and for counseling. Therefore, if a students test scores have not been received, he will be required to take the ACT at Metropolitan State College before he can register for classes. Contact the Counseling and Testing Center for test dates.
5. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after an evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of his admission status.


8 ADMISSION
Admission of Transfer Students (Applicants who have attended a college or university):
1. Request an application for admission form from Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records.
2. Complete Part 1 of the Application for Admission to Colorado Collegiate Institutions and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. This must be mailed so that it will reach the college at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply on tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. Request that one official transcript from each college or university attended be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicants record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
Transfer credits are normally accepted if they meet the following conditions:
(a) Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent. Grades of D, F, WF, TF and similarly graded courses will not transfer.
(b) Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
(c) Not more than 90 quarter hours will be accepted in transfer from two-year colleges. In the event a student attends a four-year institution prior to attendance at the two-year college, only a maximum of 90 hours from the combined college work will be allowed.
5. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete information about the applicants high school record.
(b) The applicant has completed less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours in college.
6. It is required that all transfer students must have taken the American College Test (ACT) prior to registration and had the scores forwarded to the college if they have not satisfactorily completed freshman English with a grade of C or better, and/or one year of college. Admissions decisions are not influenced by ACT


ADMISSION 9
scores, but test results are used as a basis for assignment to classes and for counseling. Therefore, transfer students who do not meet the above requirement and for whom test scores have not been received must take the ACT at Metropolitan State College before they will be permitted to register for classes. Contact the Counseling and Testing Center for test dates.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students (Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for one or more quarters):
1. Request an application for readmission from the Office of Admissions and Records.
2. Complete the application for readmission and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records so that it will be received at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
3. No application fee is required.
4. An applicant who has attended another collegiate institution since last enrollment at MSC must request that one official transcript be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records so that it will be received at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought. This is the only situation in which a transcript is necessary for the admission of previously enrolled students.
New Student Orientation is a required program designed to New Student assist all new and transfer students in becoming part of the college Orientation life. The program is planned to give each student personal attention through small group discussions which acquaint them with the college, its programs, activities and facilities. During this time, students have the opportunity to meet members of the college administration, faculty and student association. Invitation to the orientation program will be sent prior to registration.


COSTS
Full-time and Part-time Students
Tuition and College Service Fees
Standard Fees
All tuition and fees for each quarter (there are four quarters in a year, each consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction) are payable at the time of registration, and a student will not be admitted to classes until full payment has been made. The Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of registration for any quarter.
Full-time students are defined as those taking 7 or more quarter hours per quarter. Part-time students are defined as those taking 6 or fewer quarter hours per quarter.
Full-Time Students In-State Out-of-State
Tuition per quarter $ 85.00 $235.00
College Service Fee per quarter 30.00 30.00
Total Part-Time Students* $115.00 $265.00
Tuition per quarter hour $ 12.00
College Service Fee per quarter hour 2.50
Total $ 14.50
All Students
Application Fee $10.00
(Required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied on tuition.)
Placement Test Fee 10.00
(Charged only when the student has not taken the ACT prior to enrollment at Metropolitan State College.)
Late Registration 5.00
Change of Schedule Fee, per transaction 2.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00
In assessing tuition and student services fees for the Summer Quarter, the total hours for which a student registers in the ten- and five-week sessions will be used to determine whether these charges are base'd on the flat rate or on the quarter hour rate.
The cost of books and supplies averages about $150 per academic year with the highest cost during the first quarter of
All part-time students are considered as having resident or in-state status for tuition and fee purposes.
10


COSTS 11
attendance. Other costs such as board and room, incidentals, transportation, clothing and other personal expenses will vary with individuals.
Upon Withdrawal or quarter hour reduction to lower tuition and college services fee
Percent Refunded
During first week of classes........................... 75
During second week of classes.......................... 50
During third week of classes........................... 25
No refund will be made after the third week of classes.
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for tuition purposes at the time he is granted admission. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and other pertinent evidence. Once determined, the residency status is changed only on the basis of conclusive evidence submitted by written petition to the Director of Admissions and Records.
Residency classification of students under 21 years of age is determined by the residence of their parents. Students 21 years of age or over are classified by the following general residency criteria:
1. Qualification for in-state tuition status requires, (a) adoption of the State as a fixed and permanent home, and involves personal presence within the State at the time of such adoption, together with the intention of making Colorado the true home; and (b) living within the State while not enrolled for more than 8 hours per term at any Colorado institution of higher learning for at least 12 consecutive months prior to enrollment. Any question requiring clarification of resident status should be resolved with the Office of Admissions prior to registration.
2. A student from another state or country who comes to Colorado and enrolls for more than 8 hours per term prior to completing 12 consecutive months of residency in the State is presumed to be in Colorado primarily for educational purposes and will be classified as a non-resident.
Colorado Law permits a student to enroll for, and carry, a maximum of 8 hours per term while establishing resident status. Residence in the State while an active member of the armed forces does not necessarily qualify a student for resident tuition status. Any question requiring clarification of resident status should be reviewed with the Office of Admissions prior to registration.
Residence
Qualifications




STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
The constant goal of the college is to provide educational opportunities adapted to the interests, needs and abilities of the individual student. To this end, each student is assigned a faculty advisor who becomes conversant with his background, aptitudes and educational objectives, and who takes a personal interest in his education and welfare. Generally this advisor is associated with the students major field of study.
The Dean of Students coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as, admissions, records, registration, orientation, faculty advising, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, placement, veterans affairs, student health services and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
The Counseling and Testing Center is committed to helping students make personal-social adjustments. A highly qualified professional staff is available for exploration of a wide variety of concerns such as personal problems, vocational choices, academic weaknesses, marriage counseling, vocational, personality and psychological testing, growth and encounter groups, and psychotherapy. When deemed necessary, students are referred out to additional mental health facilities available in the community.
The Counseling Center is an entirely confidential service and operates under ethical codes established by the American Psychological Association and the American Personnel and Guidance Association. Confidential information is never given to anyone outside agencies or the college administration without consent from the student involved.
Any student enrolled at Metropolitan State College for at least one course may avail himself of these services. Emphasis is placed on helping all students with any problems that interfere with achieving success at the college. Since the service is entirely voluntary, the student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff, in order to receive assistance. Students seeking assistance may contact the Counseling and Testing Center.
Admission of foreign students is initiated in the office of the Foreign Student Administrator, located in the Counseling and Testing Center. Specific requirements for all foreign students must be met before admission can be granted. Complete information is available from the Foreign Student Administrator. Tuition and fee charges are the same as for an out-of-state registrant.
Counseling
Center
Foreign
Students
13


14 STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
Financial Aid
Eligibility for all financial assistance is based on financial need, and any student with a demonstrated need will receive consideration. Scholastic ability, however, is a consideration in all programs and is of equal importance to need with respect to the state tuition scholarships. The application for financial aid at Metropolitan State College includes an estimated budget for tuition, fees, books, travel and personal needs together with an itemized statement of resources that must include parental contributions, spouses earnings and outside income such as veterans benefits and Social Security. This information enables the Office of Financial Aid to analyze needs and help the student develop a financial plan for college attendance.
Participants in the federal aid programs must be citizens of the United States, or nationals, maintain good academic records and attend the college on a full-time basis.
Duration of Awards
All financial aid awards are made for one academic year or less. To continue receiving an award, a student must meet the following requirements: (1) be in good standing with the college, (2) maintain a cumulative grade average of C (2.00) or better and (3) submit the Family Financial Statement (FFS) and an institutional application annually demonstrating need.
Application Procedures
Individuals requesting financial assistance must submit the forms listed below in order to receive consideration.
Freshmen. Required forms, which may be obtained from either the Office of Financial Aid or local high schools are: (1) the Colorado Preliminary Application for Financial Aid and (2) the Family Financial Statement of the American College Testing Program (FFS).
Transfer Students. (1) A statement of all forms of financial aid received from other institutions and the official transcript from other colleges or universities attended, (2) the Metropolitan State College Institutional Application (write to the Office of Financial Aid) and (3) the Family Financial Statement.
Continuing Metropolitan State College Students. (1) The Metropolitan State College Institutional Application and (2) the Family Financial Statement (FFS).
Financial Aid Application Dates for the 1971-72 Academic Year. Fall Quarter high school graduates or equivalent, March 1; continuing and transfer students, April 15. Summer Quarter all applicants, April 1. Winter Quarter all applicants, October 24. Spring Quarter all applicants, February 15.


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 15
Applicants for financial aid are strongly advised to submit their applications for aid before the dates given. Although applications will be accepted and processed after these dates, late applications have considerably less chance of receiving aid.
Scholarships
State Tuition Scholarships. Available to high school graduating seniors who rank in the upper one-third of their graduating classes and submit the Family Financial Statement to prove need. Also available to continuing Metropolitan State College students and transfer students (after one quarter of attendance at the college) provided they have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and submit the Family Financial Statement to demonstrate need.
Teacher Scholarships. This program is designed to encourage members of ethnic minorities to enter the teaching profession. For additional information, contact the Office of Financial Aid.
Grants
Educational Opportunity Grants. Amounts vary from $200 to $1,000 annually, depending on financial need and funds allotted to the college by the federal government. Grants are renewable subject to continued financial need, a satisfactory academic record and availability of funds. These grants were established for students from low income families by the Fligher Education Act of 1965.
Economic Motivation Grants-In-Aid. Based on need as determined by the Family Financial Statement. The economic and cultural background of the student is also taken into consideration.
Talent Grants-In-Aid. These are based either on academic standing (3.5 cumulative grade point average) or on specific skills and/or abilities and a recommendation from the academic department involved in evaluating the specific skill.
Long-Term Loans
Justified when financial aid from parents plus the students earnings will not cover the cost of his education. To qualify, a student must show financial need and be in good standing.
National Defense Student Loans (NDSL). Undergraduate students may borrow up to $1,000 in a single year, but not more than $5,000 during their undergraduate career. These loans, both principal and interest, must be repaid over a period beginning nine months after the date the borrower ceases to be a full-time student and ending ten years and nine months after such date. Interest at three percent accrues from the beginning of the repayment period.


16 STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
Applications are accepted throughout the year if funds are available. Freshmen must apply by March 1 if they wish full consideration for the academic year beginning in September.
Federally Insured Loans. The college cooperates with banks in making information available to students. Undergraduates may borrow up to $1,500 in a single year, but not more than $7,500 during their undergraduate career. These loans are made at the option of the lender and the bank determines the amount. Applications are initiated by the student, processed in the Office of Financial Aid and forwarded to the student or his bank. Applications are accepted throughout the school year. Forms and information are available at the Office of Financial Aid.
Short-Term Loans
Full-time students in good standing may, in an emergency, apply for a short-term loan up to $50. Loan must be repaid in full by the end of the quarter in which it is made or the borrower will not be permitted to register for the following quarter. Loan is not to be used to pay tuition and fees or as a regular method of financing college attendance.
College Work-Study Program
The Federal College Work-Study Program assists needy students through employment. The Colorado program promotes part-time employment on the basis of needs of the student and the college.
Special Programs
Nursing Program Scholarship and Loan Funds. To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements: (1) status as a full-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a full-time student, (2) enrollment in a course of study leading to an associate degree in nursing, (3) demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement (extreme financial need must exist to receive a scholarship) and (4) good standing in the college. Preference will be given to applicants who enter the nursing program as first-year students; however, second-year students will also be considered.
Law Enforcement Program Loans. Loans up to $1,800 per year are available to full-time students enrolled in study programs related to law enforcement. Special consideration is given to police and personnel employed by correctional institutions who take leaves of absence to study for degrees. Repayment is cancelled at the rate of 25 percent for each year spent in full-time law enforcement work.
Law Enforcement Program Grants. Personnel working fulltime in law enforcement are eligible for grants up to $200 per


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 17
academic quarter while studying part-time for degrees. Repayment is not required if individuals remain with their present employer for two years after completing the courses.
If loan or grant requirements are not fulfilled, the balance must be repaid with interest at the rate of seven percent per year.
Approved study programs include those offering degrees or certificates in law enforcement, police administration, corrections, criminology or public safety administration.
Other Sources of Financial Aid
Scholarships and low interest loans from sources such as churches and foundations are available through the Office of Financial Aid. Two scholarships are provided for secretarial students and one for a student specializing in civil technology. The Sidney Keller Fund and the Metropolitan State College Faculty Memorial Student Loan Fund are sources of short-term emergency loans. Also, many private lending agencies have developed attractive loans for college students. High school counselors and libraries are sources of additional information.
Part-time placement for students is coordinated by the Office of Financial Aid. Information on part-time job openings with local firms and agencies is continually updated to provide students with the greatest opportunity to work.
The Placement Office assists students and alumni of Metropolitan State College in securing employment which will best utilize their preparation, experience and abilities. Placement personnel also help graduates further their progress toward positions of responsibility and personal satisfaction. These services involve working closely with the various departments of the college and with potential employers (school districts, businesses, industries, governmental and private agencies). A library of vocational literature is maintained and information is provided regarding supply and demand of personnel, requirements, salaries, trends and other relevant data. Graduate interview schedules are arranged for prospective employers to meet with interested candidates.
Although the college does not operate dormitories, it assists students in finding adequate off-campus housing. Upon request, students are provided lists of apartments, rooms, houses for rent or sale, and boarding accommodations. All listings are subject to the Colorado and Denver Fair Housing Laws. Students seeking housing assistance should contact the Housing Information Center.
Placement
Housing


22 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Pass-Fail
Option
Quality
Points
in which to remove an I, but if not removed by the end of that time period, it will remain an I on the students record. Students may receive an F if they are not passing at the time they drop a course or completely withdraw from the college. See section Late Registration or Complete Withdrawal for details.
The pass/fail option encourages the student to venture out of his major and minor fields and thereby broadens his educational experience. The pass grade has no effect on the grade point average; the fail grade is equivalent to the grade of F.
Students with 45 quarter hours of transcript credit, or more, and with at least a 2.00 grade point average, may enroll for pass or fail rather than letter-grade credit recording; courses in the students major and minor fields, teacher education courses required for certification and required basic studies courses are specifically excluded from this option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 27 credit hours, earned in no more than nine courses, limited to no more than one course per quarter.
A student must declare for the pass-fail option no later than his registration and must so indicate on his official registration card. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade for the course on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. If the student exercises the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the quarter that he will receive letter-grade recording in the course.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass grade is given under policies stated above. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work may wish to ascertain in advance of registering for courses under the pass-fail option whether the institution of their choice will accept credits for courses in which they receive a pass grade.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours earned. Quality points for each hour of credit are awarded as follows: A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, F, TF and WF = O. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by multiplying the number of credit hours for each course by the number of quality points given, and dividing the total number of hours attempted into the total number of points accumulated. Grades earned in remedial courses are not considered in computing grade point averages.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 23
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity.
The Presidents Award is given to one junior or senior who has excelled in both academics and service to the college.
The Deans Award is given to one Associate Degree student who has exhibited superior scholastic ability, personal integrity and campus leadership.
Outstanding Student Awards are presented to approximately fifteen students each year on the basis of scholastic ability, personal integrity and campus leadership.
Junior and senior students receiving the above awards are among those selected for publication in Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized each quarter by being named to Metropolitan State College Honor Lists.
The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who attempted 12 or more quarter hours of course work and achieved a perfect average of 4.0.
The Deans Honor List carries the names of students who attempted 12 or more quarter hours of course work and achieved an average of 3.5 or higher.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability while attending Metropolitan State College.
Graduation With High Distinction is awarded to students who have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.75 to 4.0.
Graduation With Distinction is awarded to students who have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 to 3.74.
In special cases, a department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses in which he requests and passes special college examinations. Under this provision a maximum of 45 quarter hours of credit may be obtained. A fee of $10.00 per course will be charged for each examination.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a course offered by the college, and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided it is unduplicated in, and applicable toward, the students curriculum. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chairman, no later than the first week of classes in a quarter. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department and
Honors and A wards
Examination for Credit


24 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
division chairman. Examination for credit will be taken during the first four weeks of classes in a quarter at a time specified by the department but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to 2.5 grade points or higher must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the students permanent record. Grades in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degreeseeking curriculum in the college, or, having been in residence, is within 15 credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for college courses attended as a listener or visitor or auditor. It cannot be taken by students having received credit for more than one quarter of work in the subject in advance of the course in which the examination is to be taken. It cannot be taken to raise grades or to remove failures. It is not considered as interrupting residence, nor applicable toward residence requirements.
Attainment Any student may take attainment examinations in certain
Examination departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles the student to substitute a subject of his own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the corresponding freshman course.
Advanced Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-
Placement level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate division or department chairman, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
CLEP The college participates in the College Level Examination
Program (CLEP). Information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 25
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If a student anticipates a prolonged absence because of illness, he should contact his instructors, if possible. If he finds that he cannot do this, he should contact the Dean of Students who will inform his instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor feels that a student's absences are interfering with his academic progress, he may request a letter from the Dean of Students informing him of the situation.
Written excuses are not issued for short-term illnesses or other brief periods of absence from class. In such cases determination of the validity of the students absence and decisions on whether he will be allowed to make up work missed rests with his instructors.
All continuing students at Metropolitan State College in good standing are eligible to register each quarter. The colleges definition of a continuing student is one who was enrolled during the preceding quarter. The exception is the student who did not register for the Summer Quarter but was enrolled during the Spring Quarter and plans to continue in the Fall. This student would be classified as a continuing student.
Students who have been enrolled for at least one quarter, but not during the preceding quarter are eligible to register providing they submit an application for readmission six weeks prior to registration. The exception is the student who did not register for the Summer Quarter but was enrolled during the Spring Quarter and plans to continue in the Fall. This student would be classified as a continuing student.
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College are expected to submit an application for admission and ALL credentials so that they reach the college at least six weeks before registration. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible to register.
Students from participating Colorado institutions of higher education are eligible to register for any courses offered on an inter-institutional basis. Each quarter these courses are listed in the class schedule under the heading of Cooperative Inter-Institutional Offerings. The registration is handled at the home institution of the student. The proper registration form for the courses is available at the Registrars office or during registration.
Class
Attendance
Registration
Inter-
Institutional
Ojjerings


Late Registration, Change of Registration or Complete Withdrawal
Students may not initiate registration after the second day of classes. During the second day of each quarter, students may adjust their class schedules by making appropriate additions or deletions, and courses may be dropped without grade penalty. Thereafter and until two weeks before the beginning of final examinations, which is the deadline for dropping a course passing, a faculty member has the right to assign a grade of WP, TF or WF. If a student is withdrawing officially from the college, or drops courses for reasons beyond his control, he will be subjected to an evaluation by his instructors and a grade of WP or WF given for courses in which he is enrolled. The day before the beginning of final examinations is the last day for withdrawal from the college.
If a student wishes to withdraw completely from all clas'ses, the proper form may be secured in the Office of Admissions and Records. Unless this form is properly completed, the complete withdrawal is not official and a penalty of technical failure TF grade will be recorded for each course.
Final It is the general policy of the college to require final exami-
Examinations nations of all students in all courses in which they are registered
for credit, except in the case of seminar courses or special projects. A student receiving a final grade of F may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charged for each registration.
Probation- In keeping with the goals and objectives of Metropolitan State
Suspension College, a probation-suspension policy has been adopted which Policy allows most students three quarters to adjust to the academic requirements of college. The policy is further formulated to suspend those students who are not prepared for successful college work.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 27
A cumulative grade point average of C (2.00) or better indicates satisfactory progress toward a degree. A cumulative grade point average of less than C indicates unsatisfactory progress and will result in a warning, probation or suspension.
A student is expected to maintain a C average to qualify for graduation. When a student falls below a C average and becomes deficient in quality points, he will be placed on warning providing his deficiency does not exceed 10 quality points. Students whose grade point deficiency exceeds 10 quality points below C average (2.00) will be placed on academic probation subject to decreasing this deficiency each quarter until satisfactory progress is indicated. Students failing to reduce the quality point deficiency after having been placed on probation will be subject to review by the appropriate subcommittee of the Academic Standards Committee for possible suspension due to unacceptable academic progress. If the student is re-admitted, he will be required to reduce his deficiency each quarter until satisfactory progress is achieved.
A student who has been admitted on probation will have this probationary status removed when he has attempted a minimum of 12 quarter hours and maintained at least a C average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. Until the student has been removed from probation, he will be suspended when his cumulative average falls below C, regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation, the student will be subject to the standard probation-suspension policy outlined above.
Deficiency reports will be made available to students earning less than C grades at the mid-point of each quarter. This warning should help the student to recognize and identify the source of his academic difficulty and, through counseling with faculty and administrative personnel, bring his work to a passing level by the end of the quarter.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Academic Standards Committee. No student may re-enter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Academic Standards Committee.
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to give students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. Each student is expected to conform to high standards of conduct at the college and elsewhere. The college reserves the right to determine whether or not a particular act conforms to such standards and to exclude from the college any student whose conduct does not conform to high standards.
Conduct of Students


28 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
RIGHTS M CONFLICT
IMAGES OK DIGN Y
The Drawings of ( harks II one
WESTERS 1
" Tester.eays i
CLEAUER
ALGIERS


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) earning an associate degree in applied sciences in two years; (2) following a curriculum in arts, sciences or applied sciences to meet requirements for bachelor of arts or science degree; (3) taking vocational-technical programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in fields such as business, health services, public services and technology; or (4) enrolling for selected courses to improve their general education or vocational competency.
Since offering a well-rounded education is one of the objectives of the college, each curriculum specifies certain minimums in basic studies. Students with an ACT test score of 85 percentile, or above, using college-bound percentile norms, or equivalency in any category, may, on the approval of the department concerned, fulfill the basic studies requirements through the substitution of equivalent credit hours of study in approved advanced courses in the same category. Stipulated requirements for areas of emphasis, majors, minors and options recognize the significance of opportunities for specialization.
To earn a degree, a student must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which he is registered and must complete the minimum number of quarter hours for each degree 90 for the associate and 180 for the baccalaureate with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
No more than 45 quarter hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
In addition, three quarter hours of credit in physical education activities courses, a different activity for each hour of credit, is required for all degrees, unless the student is over 25 years of age when he matriculates or is a veteran with at least one year of active military service and obtains authorization for waiver of the physical education requirement from the Dean of Students. Any student with a physical condition which would restrict his participation in the regular program is requested to secure a medical evaluation form from the college Student Health Services and have this filled out by a physician of his choice. Students with a physical limitation should enroll in the physical education activities adapted class in which activities are modified according to a students particular physical limitation. Exemptions for health reasons will be granted only upon recommendation of the college Student Health Services.
Requirements for All Degrees
29


30 PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Requirements for All Associate Degrees
A student must satisfy all of the requirements stated in a single catalog in effect during the time of his enrollment. The catalog used to determine compliance with graduation requirements may not be more than eight years old for a baccalaureate degree or four years old for an associate degree.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, he is responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to his program, and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume that he has approval to deviate from the stated requirements unless he possesses a properly signed statement to that effect. In any case, he should check with his dean or divisional office when he has reached 135 quarter hours to make certain that his program plans are complete.
A student should make application for graduation when within three quarters of actually completing degree requirements. The Graduation Request Card may be obtained in the Office of Admissions and Records.
After a student receives his graduation evaluation and feels justified in deviating from the colleges requirements for his degree, he may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee for such a change provided his petition cannot be handled by an appropriate department and/or division chairman. Petition forms may be obtained in the Registrars office.
Participation in graduation exercises is the final requirement for all degrees. It is compulsory for all graduating students to participate in these exercises unless formally excused. Graduating students may obtain forms in the Office of Admissions and Records for requesting an excuse from graduation exercises.
To earn an Associate in Applied Sciences, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any other stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 90 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher and comply with the requirements on physical education activities courses stated above.
2. Complete a minimum of 30 quarter hours, excluding physical education activities courses, at Metropolitan State College with the last 15 quarter hours completed in residence.
3. Meet the basic studies requirements stipulated for a degree and the minimum required for an area of emphasis.
4. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses in the students field or area of interest.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 31
5. Not more than six quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward an associate degree for students who are not specializing in music.
With the approval of the administration, variation in associate degree course programs may be made to conform with the course requirements of a college or university to which a student plans to transfer. Such a student should be familiar with rules of the institution concerned regarding transfer of credit and courses required under the curriculum in which he intends to major and complete requirements for a baccalaureate or other degree. With regard to Colorado institutions of higher education, the office of the Dean of Students has information on recommended programs for students planning to transfer, and advisors will assist them in developing a course plan.
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 180 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher and the requirements on physical education activities courses stated above.
2. Complete a minimum of 45 quarter hours at Metropolitan State College, including the last 15 quarter hours applicable to the degree.
3. Students majoring in areas other than Physical Education may elect to enroll in PE 100 beyond the required 3 quarters, but no more than 6 credits in such courses can be applied as electives toward the minimum 180 hours required for baccalaureate degrees.
4. Not more than 12 quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not specializing in music.
5. At least 60 quarter hours in upper division courses; i.e., junior and senior level, must be included in the 180 required for graduation.
6. All students must have one major subject consisting of not less than 45 nor generally not more than 60 quarter hours and at least one minor consisting of at least 27 quarter hours.
7. Achieve a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher in all courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and also for the minor.
8. At least 12 upper division quarter hours of the major and 6 upper division quarter hours of the minor must be taken at Metropolitan State College.
Requirements for All Bachelors Degrees


32 PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Course Numbers, Descriptions and Offerings
9. Course requirements for state certification of elementary school teachers in Colorado will satisfy the major/minor requirements for a degree.
10. All basic studies requirements listed for a degree must be completed.
11. All other course requirements of a section, division or department must be satisfied.
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, contents and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although normally a student should not take courses above the level of his class (based on quarter hours earned), he may do so at one level above if he has the specified prerequisites and his advisors approval as shown by signature on the students registration form. In special cases a student may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for his class, if in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites and advisors approval, written permission of the faculty member teaching the course is obtained.
After each course number is a figure specifying the quarter hours of credit. As an example, English 101-3 is a three credit course.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the material which is covered. If there is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed at the end of the course description.
Decisions on which of the courses listed in this catalog are taught during the year will be based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
The instructional program is organized under two sections Arts and Sciences, and Applied Sciences with several divisions in each section. Any additional degree requirements, information on programs of study and course offerings are listed under the sections.


ARTS AND SCIENCES SECTION
This section offers a variety of courses with the aim of giving students the opportunity to obtain a broad and varied education, as well as to specialize in a liberal arts or science field. Its courses also provide the foundation for programs of study in the Applied Sciences Section.
Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the basic studies minimums listed below in addition to satisfying all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. Since the purpose of the basic studies program is to help students develop understanding and an appreciation of broad fields of basic knowledge, a degree candidate must complete the three-quarter course in basic communication and 15 quarter hours of courses in each of the groupings listed below. Not more than 10 quarter hours taken in any one of the disciplines listed under Humanities, Science and Mathematics, or Social Sciences and/or Behavioral Sciences will count toward basic studies requirements.
Quarter Hours
English 101-103. Basic Communication 9
Humanities 15
Fine Arts (art, music, theater)
Language (foreign, English)
Literature
Philosophy
Speech
Science and Mathematics 15
Biological Science
Earth Science (geology, geography*)
Physical Science (chemistry, physics)
Mathematics
Social Sciences and/or Behavioral Sciences 15
Anthropology and Sociology Behavioral Science Economics
History and Political Science Psychology
~54
* See course descriptions for applicable courses.
Arts and Sciences baccalaureate programs are being developed in accordance with plans established for Metropolitan State College. Currently available is a program of professional courses for teacher preparation and the majors and minors listed below. All majors are applicable toward the B.A. degree only unless otherwise indicated.
Majors
Applied Music Art
Behavioral Science
Biology (B.A., B.S.)
Chemistry (B.A., B.S.)
Early Childhood Education
Economics
English
History
Mathematics (B.A., B.S.) Modern Languages Music Education Philosophy Physical Education Physics (B.A., B.S.) Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Minors
Anthropology
Art
Biology
Chemistry
Communications: Writing
Earth Science
Economics
English
French
Geography
German
Health and Safety
Hispano Studies
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science Psychology
Public Communications: Journalism Reading Recreation Sociology Spanish Speech
Speech Pathology Urban Studies
33


34 ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAMS
ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAMS
Afro-American Studies
The purpose of the Afro-American Studies program is to assess the experience of the Black Man in America and Africa. The wide range of problems pertaining to the history, present setting and future aspirations and needs of Black America runs across a variety of disciplines, including history, social science, literature, religion and the arts.
In addition to the courses listed below, there are various courses offered by other disciplines which deal with materials closely related to the Afro-American experience. It is not possible at the present time to receive a major or minor in Afro-American Studies.
AAS 101-3. Introduction to
Afro-American Studies.
Introduction to Afro-American Studies purposes, structure and goals, and basic preparation in the rudiments and methodology of the Afro-American Studies program.
AAS 102-3. Introduction to
Afro-American Studies.
Continuation of Afro-American Studies
101.
Prerequisite: Afro-American Studies 101, or permission of instructor.
AAS 113-3. Survey of African History I.
Covers the geographical and ethnological background of African history, concentrating on the data of pre-history and early history, archaeology and on the ancient and medieval history of Africa (through the 15th century).
AAS 114-3. Survey of African History II.
Continuation of Afro-American Studies 113. Covers the history of the period of European contact with African peoples, and of European exploration and expansion in Africa, from 1500 to the partition of Africa (1885).
AAS 123-3. Politics of Black Revolution: USA I.
Purpose is to analyze the black/white conflict in the United States society in the context of the politics of revolution. To that purpose, the course is designed to identify and analyze parties to the conflict, their ideologies, and points of conflict; black
organizations and tactics purported to maximize black interests', and ecological factors affecting the course of the conflictual process. Moreover, an attempt is made to assess the probable future course of the conflict and its implication for pluralistic democracy in the United States.
AAS 124-3. Politics of Black
Revolution: USA II.
Continuation of Afro-American Studies
123.
AAS 127-3. Introduction to the History of Afro-American Music.
See course description for Music 127.
AAS 133-3. Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice.
A survey of tensions between racial, ethnic and religious groups with emphasis on psychological factors that condition such tensions. Topics covered include nature of group differences, origins of social group awareness and of prejudice in early life, impact of majority and of minority in early life, forms of discrimination which prejudicial attitudes dictate, nature of the prejudiced personality, effects of prejudice and discrimination on both the exerters and the victims, conditions of attitude change and methods of reducing intergroup tensions.
AAS 150. Survey of African Literature.
Survey of the main currents, figures and trends in contemporary African writings. Concentration on the works of African novelists, dramatists and poets such as Chinua Achebe, James Ngugi, Alex la Guma, Ayi Kwei Armah, Duro Ladipo, J. P. Clark, Wole Soyinka, Christopher Okigbo, Dennis Brutus, Kofi Awoonor and others. Discussion and analysis of their work in context of the literary and intellectual movements they initiated.
AAS 153-3. Modern Currents in
African-French Culture.
African culture; discussion of African literature and its cultural background; exploration of the universality of human experience through the study of a specialized experience.
AAS 201-3. Survey of African Arts South of the Sahara.
Meets the demand for knowledge of world arts, the background and understand-


ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAMS 35
ing of Afro-American Art and understanding of influences on modern European Art.
Prerequisite: Some knowledge of art history, or permission of instructor.
AAS 213-5. The Black Community I.
Uses the sociological approach and field observation experiences to help students learn about the Denver Black community its makeup, problems and concerns. Planned at an introductory or beginning level of inquiry and knowledge of this community so that students will begin development of techniques and information relative to learning about or becoming familiar with other communities in which they may live and work. Wherever possible, Denvers Black community is related to the national community of Black people.
AAS 214-5. The Black Community II. Continuation of Afro-American Studies
213.
AAS 230-3. Peoples and Cultures of Africa.
Meets the demand for knowledge of African peoples and cultures. Gives added understanding of a culture and people in relation to human problems and experience.
Prerequisite: Some knowledge of anthropology or social science, or permission of instructor.
AAS 301-3. African Literature: Novels of Disillusion.
Meets the demand for intensified knowledge of a specialized subject, introduces the
student to seminar studies, and builds towards a solid understanding of a specialized subject area.
AAS 313-3. Comparative Black Literature.
Designed for students who have some knowledge of Black literature. A seminar type course devoted to a systematic and functional study comparing Black African poetry, drama and fiction with the writings of Black Americans. Provides a basic understanding of contemporary developments in the literature and thoughts of Black Africans as expounded by Wole Soyinka. Chinua Achibe, Cyprian Ekwensi, Amos Titmola Diop, Senghor, Mphalhele and others; W. E. B. DuBois and other Black Americans whose contributions are of significant dimensions.
AAS 327-3. History of Afro-American Music.
See course description for Music 327.
AAS 357-3. Afro-American History I. See course description for History 357.
AAS 358-3. Afro-American History II. See course description for History 358.
AAS 361-3. Afro-American Literature. See course description for English 361.
AAS 362-3. Modern Black Poetry.
See course description for English 362.
Hispano Studies
(Division of Behavioral Sciences)
The Hispano Studies program provides opportunities and motivation for understanding and emphasizing the Hispanic cultural heritage. Courses have been developed to deal with the Hispanic aspects of a variety of topics involving several academic disciplines and the contributions made by Hispanos to the American culture. Opportunities are provided for students to utilize the community as a laboratory in the context of these studies.
Minor
Required Courses
Hispano Studies 101. History of Pre-Columbian Meso-America Hispano Studies 102. History of Meso-America, European Influence, 1500-1848
Hispano Studies 103. History of the American Southwest, 1848-Present
Quarter Hours
3
3
3


36 ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAMS
Electives
A minimum of 21 quarter hours in Hispano Studies selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Hispano Studies.
HSP 99-3. Hispano Higher Education Preparation.
Provides the underprepared student with study and social skills to deal adequately with higher education.
HSP 101-3. History of Pre-Columbian Meso-America.
Covers the indigenous cultures of Meso-America during the period referred to as the Pre-Columbian Era which grew from simplest beginnings to a social and political organization considered by many authorities as more advanced than European cultures of the same time period. Includes study of artifacts, art and architecture of this ancient culture and of vocabulary relevant to this period.
HSP 102-3. History of Meso-America. European Influence, 1500-1848.
Deals with the history and geography of Spain and events which led to discovery, conquest and occupation of the New World, and evaluates Spains role in the New World. Covers life in New Spain and indepth studies on Indian labor, Mexican War of Independence, role of the Church, and Mexican-American War. Evaluates the lives of such men as Miguel Hidalgo, Jose Maria Morelos and Santa Anna. Emphasizes the results of the blending of Indian and Spanish cultures.
Prerequisite: Hispano Studies 101, or permission of instructor.
HSP 103-3. History of the American Southwest, 1848-Present.
Includes study of foreign explorers and settlers the Spanish, Indian and Mestizo people who came North from Mexico and established patterns of life which formed the basis for the culture of the Southwest.
Prerequisite: Hispano Studies 102, or permission of instructor.
HSP 104-3. Living Cultures of the People of Mexico.
Sociological and historical approach to understanding the culture of Mexico together with an analysis of the various cultures that have produced it.
HSP 105-3. Living Cultures of the People of the American Southwest.
Anthropological approach to the fusion of cultures in the Southwest. Definitions of cultural characteristics are used to describe the culture of the Southwest.
Prerequisite: Hispano Studies 103, or permission of instructor.
HSP 202-3. Literature of the Mexican Revolution.
A brief historical frame of reference is presented, and the student analyzes the various ideologies of the Revolution through literature.
HSP 301-3. Economic History of the Southwest.
Analyzes the three basic cultures of the Southwest with the objective of arriving at an understanding of the synthesis of these. Economic factors such as land, labor and capital are utilized in analyzing institutions operating through the Southwest. The effect of technological change on indigenous people is studied.
Prerequisite: Economics 103, or permission of instructor.
HSP 302-3. Analysis of Hispano Community.
Analysis of the Hispano community provides students with an opportunity to view society through the eyes of the Hispano poor. Purpose is to set a general frame of reference based on historical and sociological data. With this background, attention is focused on institutions which affect the Hispano community in an urban setting. Arrangements are made for students to become participant observers and utilize the community as a laboratory.
Prerequisite: Sociology 202, or permission of instructor.
HSP 303-3. Community Agencies and the Barrio.
Study of community agencies in the Hispano community. Attitudes of the community and the agencies are learned through exposure within the community.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102, 201-
202.


HSP 310-3. The Barrio Culture.
Analysis of the assimilation and acculturation of the urban Hispano community. An historical and sociological frame of reference is set prior to utilization of the community as a laboratory.
HSP 315-3. Education of Hispano Children.
Provides the student an opportunity to
view and to understand the Hispano perspec-
tive regarding current public educational and related public services.
Prerequisite: Hispano Studies 99, or Education 100, or permission of instructor.
HSP 400-5. Barrio Community Action.
An integration of the various disciplines, such as those included in the behavioral and social sciences, that permits the student to understand the processes that affect the barrio resident.
Prerequisite: Sociology 301.


38 URBAN STUDIES
Urban Studies
Minor
Changing urban problems and life styles are of increasing significance and require both formal and informal opportunities for study of the urban milieu. The Urban Studies program provides opportunities for students to examine such issues through understandings based upon a variety of interdisciplinary courses. The minor in Urban Studies is designed to be supportive of any disciplinary major selected by a student, and not as a primary preparation for any specific career.
Required Courses
Urban Studies 200. Urban Studies Choose one course from the following:
Urban Studies 101. Survey of Institutions Urban Studies 210-211. Urban Sociology Urban Studies 221. American State and Local Government Urban Studies 350. Education in Urban Crisis Urban Studies 356. American Urbanization since the Civil War Choose one course from the following:
Urban Studies 250. Geography of Urban Environments Urban Studies 355. Urban Ecology Choose one course with the approval of the faculty advisor in Urban Studies from the Afro-American Studies or Hispano Studies course offerings
Quarter Hours 5 3-6
3 6
4
5
3
4
4 4
___3
15-18
Electives
A minimum of 10 to 13 additional hours of electives, to make a total of 28 credits, are to be taken from a list of courses related to urban studies selected in consultation with and approved by the designated faculty in Urban Studies.
It is recommended that Urban Studies 200 be the first course taken by all potential minors.
US 101-3. Survey of Institutions.
See course description for Helping Services 101.
US 200-5. Urban Studies.
An interdisciplinary approach to urban issues and problems in the urban environment. The course will be an overview of the urban studies program, e.g., history of urbanization, sociological and political implications, ethnic studies, educational issues, geography, ecology, environmental technology, etc. Specialists from each area will approach issues not only from their own vantage point, but also from the standpoint of the interrelationship among the various fields.
US 210-3. Urban Sociology.
See course description for Sociology
210.
US 211-3. Urban Sociology.
See course description for Sociology
211.
US 221-4. American State and Local Government.
See course description for Political Science 221.
US 250-4. Geography of Urban Environments.
See course description for Geography
250.
US 350-5. Education in Urban Crisis.
See course description for Education
350.
US 355-4. Urban Ecology.
See course description for Biology 355.
US 356-3. American Urbanization Since the Civil War.
See course description for History 355.


DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
Disciplines within the Division of Behavioral Sciences include anthropology, psychology, sociology and Hispano studies. Majors for the Bachelor of Arts are offered in behavioral science, psychology and sociology. Minors are offered in anthropology, psychology, sociology, and Hispano studies.
Course requirements for the majors and minors are listed above the respective course descriptions.
Anthropology
Minor
Required Courses
Anthropology 101. Introduction to Physical Anthropology Anthropology 102. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Anthropology 310. Archeology of North America
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional quarter hours in anthropology, of which at least three quarter hours must be at the 400 level, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology.
Quarter Hours 3 3 3
Anthro. 101-3. Introduction to Physical Anthropology.
An introduction to the science of anthropology. The goals and methods of physical anthropology are stressed. Mans position in nature, survey of fossil records and human evolution.
Anthro. 102-3. Introduction to
Cultural Anthropology.
The goals and methods of cultural anthropology are stressed. The concept of culture and its importance for man. Culture development and major cultural components, such as: subsistence, technology and language.
Anthro. 201-3. Man and Evolution.
Genetic basis for human evolution and variation, including variation of modern man, with evolution of today and the future. Prehistory up to the rise of early civilizations. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101.
Anthro. 202-3. Man and Culture.
Selected areas of cultural anthropology, such as: primitive socio-political structures, education, art and a survey of major culture areas. Application to field studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201.
Anthro. 210-3. Introduction to Archeology.
Introductory course on the goals, methods, and techniques of modern archeology. Dating techniques and chronological frameworks.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102.
Anthro, 211-3. Prehistory of Europe.
Survey of main European prehistoric culture from the earliest cultural evidence to the Mesolithic. Stone age technology of main prehistoric cultures and periods.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 220-3. Ethnography of the Old World.
Survey of the major culture areas of the Old World, their cultures and achievements, including environmental relationships. Both present and past cultures.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102.
Anthro. 221-3. Ethnography of the
North American Indian.
Survey of the major Indian cultures of North America. Environmental and historical relationships are part of the course.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102.
Anthro. 222-3. Indian Cultures of Meso and South America.
Ethnographic survey of the major Indian cultures of Meso and South America, including environmental and historical relationship.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102.
Anthro. 301-3. Prehistory of Africa.
Prehistory of Africa from the first ache-ological evidence to historic times. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 302-3. Archeology of Asia.
Prehistoric cultures of Asia from the earliest archeological evidence to the emer-
39


40 DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
gence of civilizations. Emphasis on cultural growth and regional relationship. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 310-3. Archeology of North America.
Prehistory of North America, emphasizing the peopling of the New World, earliest Indian cultures and later regional developments.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 311-3. Archeology of Meso America.
Survey of archeology of Meso America from earliest culture existence up to 16th century. Emphasis on culture growth, relationship with adjacent areas, and influence on development of cultures in southwestern and eastern United States.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 312-3. Archeology of South America.
Survey of the cultural development of South America from the earliest archeological evidences up to the collapse of the Inca civilization.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 320-3. Primitive Religion.
Survey of religious beliefs and practices of nonliterate peoples.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 202.
Anthro. 380-3. Archeology of the
Rocky Mountain Region.
Culture development of the Rocky Mountain Region. Emphasis on culture origins, growth, relationship and ecology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 385-3. Archeology of the Middle East.
Survey of cultural development from the earliest archeological evidence up to the development of civilizations. Emphasis on the investigation of domestication and its consequences for culture development. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 386-3. Archeology of the Mediterranean.
Archeology of the countries of the Mediterranean Basin from the earliest cultures. Their growth and developments leading to the emergence of first European civilizations.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 401-3. History of
Anthropology.
History of the growth of anthropology from the earliest times, various schools of thought, outstanding contributors and their works, to the mid-20th century.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Anthro. 410-3. Recent Trends in Anthropology.
Major trends in contemporary anthropology since the mid-20th century. Materials from current publications will be examined. Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Anthro. 470-2-4. Archeological Field Research.
Field work consists of excavation of archeological sites. Offered summer quarter only. Two credit hours for first five-week session, and four quarter hours for ten-week session.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.


DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 41
Behavioral Science
Major for Bachelor of Arts
The behavioral science major groups courses from several disciplines in a related and organized manner with the objective of preparing students for positions in this field at public and private institutions, and also for the purpose of preparing students for graduate work in
interdisciplinary programs.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Anthropology 102. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
Psychology 101-102. General Psychology 6
Sociology 101-102. Introduction to Sociology 6
Sociology 201-202. Social Problems 6
Behavioral Science 290. Behavioral Science Seminar 3
Behavioral Science 499. Advanced Internship 3
Electives
A minimum of 28 additional hours in the Division, but not more than 12 hours in any one discipline nor less than 3, selected in consultation with an approved by the Division of Behavioral Sciences. Not less than 20 of these units must be for upper division courses.
BH 290-3. Behavorial Science Seminar.
Experiential study and involvement with various agencies and institutions, some traditional, many non-traditional, operating in broad area of social welfare and the urban crisis as viewed from the perspectives of agency staffs, clients and critics.
BH 362-3. Interviewing Techniques.
Introduction to a wide variety of interviewing techniques. Opportunity both to observe and practice various types of interviewing.
Psychology
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 201-202. General Psychology 6
Psychology 311. Statistics in Psychology and Education 3
Psychology 327. The Psychology of Individual Differences 3
Psychology 331-332. Experimental Techniques in Psychology 6
Psychology 351. History and Systems of Psychology 3
Biology 101-102. General Biology 8
or
Biology 108. Introduction to Biology and
Biology 131. Human Anatomy and Physiology Electives
A minimum of 27 additional quarter hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology, making a total of 48 hours in psychology.
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 201-202. General Psychology 6
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional quarter hours in psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology, making a total of 27 hours in psychology.


42 DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
Psych. 100-4. Introduction to Psychology.
A brief look at the several branches of psychology and survey of general psychology to acquaint the student with factors which influence human development.
Not applicable toward major.
Psych. 200-3. Personality and Adjustment.
Application of principles of psychology to assist individuals in understanding factors which influence human development, help them make personal improvements and adjustments, and provide knowledge useful in social and professional relationships.
Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or 202, or permission of instructor.
Psych. 201-3. General Psychology I.
Presentation of basic principles and methods involved in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. Attention is given to perception, learning, motivation, maturation and emotion.
Psych. 202-3. General Psychology II.
Continuation of Psychology 201. Prerequisite: Psychology 201.
Psych. 211-4. Educational Psychology.
Application of principles of psychology to learning and teaching.
Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or 201.
Psych. 221-3. Psychology of Human Development.
Presents the development of behavior from infancy through maturity, and is intended to help the student understand the problems that confront him by a clearer insight into his own behavior.
Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or 202.
Psych. 241-3. Social Psychology.
Study of social behavior and social action from a psychological point of view. Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or 202.
Psych. 311-3. Statistics in Psychology and Education.
Application of basic statistics to measurement in psychology and education covering central tendency variability, probability, sampling and reliability.
Prerequisites: Psychology 202 and Mathematics 121.
Psych. 312-3. Intermediate Statistics.
Continuation of Psychology 311. Covers correlation, regression, prediction, reliability and validity, partial and multiple correlation, introduction to analysis of variants and covariants.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311.
Psych. 315-3. Introduction to
Psychological Testing.
Presents the basis for psychological tests including the selection of test to use, administration, scoring, validation. Provides a survey of the individual and group administered tests of intelligence, interest, personality types.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311, or permission of instructor.
Psych. 321-3. Abnormal Psychology,
A study of the varieties of abnormal behavior found in man. Such disorders as the neuroses, psychotic conditions, alcoholism, drug addiction, the personality disorders and sexual deviation are considered.
Prerequisite: Psychology 200.
Psych. 325-3. Child Psychology.
A study of growth, adjustments and capacities of children from conception through elementary school years. Emphasis is placed upon what to do in the guidance and counseling of normal children.
Prerequisite: Psychology 202 or 221.
Psych. 326-3. The Psychology of Adolescence.
Development, behavior, special problems and characteristics of adolescents.
Prerequisite: Psychology 221 or 325. May not be taken concurrently with Psychology 325.
Psych. 327-3. The Psychology of
Individual Differences.
The nature and extent of measurable differences.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311.
Psych. 331-3. Experimental Techniques in Psychology I.
A basic consideration of the experimental techniques used as an approach to investigation and classification of problems involved in understanding the psychological nature of man.
Prerequisite: Psychology 311.


DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 43
Psych. 332-3. Experimental Techniques in Psychology II.
Continuation of Psychology 331. Prerequisites: Psychology 311 and 331.
Psych. 345-3. Industrial Psychology.
Presents psychological material relevant to the industrial setting including employee selection, training, evaluation, assumptions of management about human motivation, job satisfactions, work efficiency, fatigue and human engineering.
Prerequisites: Psychology 202 and permission of instructor.
Psych. 351-3. History and Systems of Psychology.
The major viewpoints in earlier systematic psychology and their relations to contemporary trends.
Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of psychology.
Psych. 400-3. Psychology of Personality.
Development of personality, individual differences and similarities, personality change and techniques for improvement. Prerequisite: Psychology 200 or 321.
Psych. 411-3. Individual Mental Tests.
Survey of the most widely used individual mental tests with emphasis on rationale and their general assets and limitations. Prerequisites: Psychology 311 and 315.
Psych. 425-3. Psychology of
Exceptional Children.
Psychology of atypical childrengifted, mentally subnormal, physically handicapped, chronically ill and socially maladjusted. Prerequisite: Psychology 221 or 325.
Psych. 431-3. Physiological Psychology.
A study of the physical, neurological and chemical bases of behavior.
Prerequisites: Psychology 202, 9 quarter hours of upper division psychology courses and senior standing. Eight hours in biology are desirable.
Psych. 439-3. Psychology of Learning.
A general study of the psychology of learning, including leading theories and principal empirical findings in learning.
Prerequisites: Psychology 311 and nine quarter hours of upper division psychology courses, or permission of instructor.
Psych. 441-3. Psychology and Management.
Study of applied psychology at the management level.
Prerequisite: Psychology 345.
Psych. 461-3. Introduction to Psychopathology.
An intensive introductory course in the area of personality theory and behavioral disorders with a survey of diagnostic and treatment procedures.
Prerequisite: Psychology 321. Psychology 400 is desirable.
Psych. 463-3. Introduction to
Clinical Psychology.
Survey of behavioral disorders with emphasis on diagnostic and therapy procedures, techniques and theories.
Prerequisites: Psychology 321 and 400.
Psych. 489-3 to 6. Experience with Children.
Furthering the understanding of child psychology through working with children under appropriate supervision.
Prerequisites: Psychology 221 or 325 and permission of instructor.


44 DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
Sociology
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Sociology 101-102. Introduction to Sociology 6
Sociology 201-202. Social Problems 6
Sociology 210-211. Urban Sociology 6
Sociology 307-308. Sociological Research Methods 6
Sociology 331. Development of Social Thought 3
Sociology 332. Modern Social Theory 3
Sociology 411-412. Community Development and Urban Planning 6
Electives
A minimum of 24 additional quarter hours in sociology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology.
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Sociology 101-102. Introduction to Sociology 6
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional quarter hours in sociology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology.
Soc. 101-3. Introduction to Sociology.
A study of the major concepts of sociology, such as groups, culture, stratification, social change, socialization, etc. Some consideration is given to the question of methodology and to the question of the validity of sociological viewpoint.
Soc. 102-3. Introduction to Sociology.
Continuation of Sociology 101. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.
Soc. 110-3. Preparation for Marriage and Family.
Considers factors during infancy, childhood and adolescence which are important to marriage and marriage adjustment. The social factors of dating, courtship, engagement, marriage, honeymoon, marital adjustment and family. Special consideration is given to processes and factors in mate selection.
Soc. 111-3. Preparation for Marriage and Family.
Continuation of Sociology 110. Prerequisite: Sociology 110.
Soc. 201-3. Social Problems.
A theoretical-sociological analysis of the causes and consequences of the major social problems of contemporary American society, such as, crime, family disorganization, race relations and urban congestion. The empirical
approach is highlighted, and crosscultural and historical data are used in order that the student may develop a broader perspective from which to view his world.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 202-3. Social Problems.
Continuation of Sociology 201. Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 210-3. Urban Sociology.
(Same as Urban Studies 210.) A study of social and cultural patterns in the modern metropolis. Examines patterns of interaction, social institutions, ecological and demographic variables, growth and change, deviance, etc., in modern urban communities. Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 211-3. Urban Sociology.
(Same as Urban Studies 211.) Continuation of Sociology 210.
Prerequisite: Sociology 210.
Soc. 221-3. Social Stratification.
Class Theory as basis of social stratification; functional theories; class differences in behavior, values, beliefs, social participation and social mobility.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 301-3. Sociology of Dominant and Minority Relations.
Race and racism; facts and myths about great populations, including psychological,


DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 45
social, and cultural sources of bias and discrimination.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 302-3. Sociology of Dominant and Minority Relations.
Continuation of Sociology 301. Prerequisite: Sociology 301.
Soc. 305-3. Industrial Sociology.
Contrasting types of industrial organization, industrial organizations as social systems, human relations in industry; union-management relations; labor movements; the changing focus and trends in the field of industrial sociology.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 306-3. Industrial Sociology.
Continuation of Sociology 305. Prerequisite: Sociology 305.
Soc. 307-3. Sociological Research Methods.
A general survey of the principal methods of research used in sociology, and the special issues and problems in methodology. Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 308-3. Sociological Research Methods.
Continuation of Sociology 307. Prerequisite: Sociology 307.
Soc. 311-3. Criminology.
Nature and causes of crime and delinquency as social phenomena. The processes of making laws, breaking laws and reaction toward the breaking of laws. General sociological concepts are used in the analyses. Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 312-3. Criminology.
Continuation of Sociology 311. Prerequisite: Sociology 311.
Soc. 315-3. Socialization of the Child.
Socialization of the young individual. Interaction between children and groups. Childhood in primitive, traditional and modern society with emphasis on contemporary United States. The relation of the child to "social climates.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 321-3. Social Structures.
An analysis of the diverse types of social arrangements that man has lived with. Attention is given to both contemporary and historical societies.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 323-3. The Teaching of Sociology.
A materials and technique course in teaching sociology for secondary teachers. Students learn skills, attitudes and techniques which will give them confidence and enable them to have success experiences in their student and later teaching of sociology to adolescents.
Prerequisites: Education 100 and 321, Psychology 211.
Soc. 331-3. Development of Social Thought.
Major social writers from early time until the present, including such writers as Aristotle, Plato, Comte, Spencer and Marx. Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 332-3. Modern Social Theory. Continuation of Sociology 331. Prerequisite: Sociology 331.
Soc. 341-3. The Family.
An historical and analytical study of the structure, the basic and derived functions, the intergenerational relations and familial disorganization of the family. The familys place in the socializing agencies. The family in various cultures and societies with emphasis on the American family.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 345-3. Sociology of Knowledge and Ideas.
An analysis of how and why social conditions cause selection or use of certain ideas rather than others from the accumulated stockpile of human knowledge. Emphasis on the correlation of ideas and knowledge in use with the varying conditions of society. Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 371-3. Political Sociology.
An analysis of the political order by means of specific sociological theory and method. Relation of power to social context, structural forms and behavioral forms.
Prerequisites: Sociology 101-102, Political Science 201.


46 DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
Soc. 381-3. Demography.
The sociological importance of population study. Population analysis and population theories. Natality, fertility, fecundity and mortality. International and intranational migrations, population policy, and aspects of population planning and control.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 382-3. Demography.
Continuation of Sociology 381. Prerequisite: Sociology 381.
Soc. 387-3. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.
Control, structure and functioning of mass media of communication as a force in social life. Studies of voting, opinion formation and popular taste. The democratic theory and the logic of collective action in modern mass society.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 388-3. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.
Continuation of Sociology 387. Prerequisite: Sociology 387.
Soc. 395-3. Social Change.
Presents the processes and conditions of social change with an examination of ideas,
old and new, concerning the desirability of social change, the ways it comes about, and its consequences to the welfare of mankind. Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 411-3. Community Development and Urban Planning.
The administrative, professional, technical and public relations functions that are involved in mans attempt to rationally and consciously build an urban society, and those that -will serve his deepest needs and aspirations.
Prerequisite: Sociology 102.
Soc. 412-3. Community Development and Urban Planning.
Continuation of Sociology 411. Prerequisite: Sociology 411.
Soc. 415-3. Sociology of the Urban Poor.
Considers the sociological method of analyzing the very complex problems of urban poverty.
Prerequisite: Sociology 101-102.
Soc. 416-3. Sociology of the Urban Poor.
Continuation of Sociology 415. Prerequisite: Sociology 415.


DIVISION OF EDUCATION
The disciplines within the Division of Education offering majors for the baccalaureate degree are physical education and early childhood education. In addition, minors are available in health and safety, and recreation. Professional courses in teacher education are available for meeting certification requirements at the elementary and secondary education levels.
Course requirements for these programs of study are listed with the respective course descriptions.
Education
The purpose of the program in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students under this program must meet the basic studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. The following requirements must be met for formal admission to the education program:
1. A minimum of 2.5 grade point average (in all work attempted) which must be maintained to continue in the program.
2. Completion of 75 to 90 quarter hours of college work.
3. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and one other person who is not a member of the students family.
4. A physical examination report, including negative chest X-Ray, on file with the Student Health Services.
5. An application for admission to the program on file in the Division of Education office.
6. Approval by the screening committee composed of a minimum of two members of the Teacher Education Advisory Committee.
The completed application for student teaching, together with the student teaching folder, must be submitted to the Department of Education by the following deadlines: for student teaching in the Fall Quarter, March 30; for student teaching in the Winter Quarter, September 15; for student teaching in the Spring Quarter, December 15. To be eligible for student teaching, the following must be completed: all items in the personal student teaching folder, 135 quarter hours of college courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50; required courses for certification; courses to qualify under requirements of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
Elementary Level
Certification at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program, minor in one discipline (English or reading suggested) and the minimums in each of the four areas of concentration stipulated below. Credit earned in appropriate courses in the areas of concentration may count toward the minor. Certification at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program and the minimum number of hours in each of the four areas of concentration stipulated below. Additional work must be taken in a discipline (English or reading suggested) which will give the student the number of hours equivalent to the number of hours required for a minor. Substitutions for any of these requirements must be approved by the chairman of the specific department and of the Division of Education.
Required in Education Quarter Hours
Education 110. The Elementary Child I 3
Education 210. The Elementary Child II 3
Education 315. Children and Youth in Urban Schools 3
Education 314. Children and Youth in Urban Schools Laboratory 3
Education 316. Learning and Teaching I: Teaching Auxiliaries 5
Education 411. Learning and Teaching II: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade Two 9-15 or
Education 412. Learning and Teaching III: Intermediate and Upper Grades 9-15
47


48 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
Recommended
HPER 362. Elementary School Health and Safety 3
Required in English (in addition to English 101-103. Basic Communications
I, II, III) 21
English 201-3. English Grammar or
English 301-3. Structure of the English Language English 304-3. The Reading Process
English 305-3. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Primary or
English 306-3. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Intermediate English 346-3. Childrens Literature
Minimum of nine additional quarter hours in English courses (obtain approved lists from Division of Education)
Required in Humanities 18
Art 310-3. Art Instructional Methods for Elementary School Music 306-3. Elementary School Music Methods Speech 101-3. Public Speaking
Minimum of nine additional quarter hours in humanities courses (obtain approved list from Division of Education)
Required in Science and/or Mathematics 18
Mathematics 261-3. Concepts in Mathematics I (required for K-6)
Mathematics 262-3. Concepts in Mathematics II (required for 3-6)
Minimum of 12 quarter hours in science courses (obtain approved list from Division of Education)
Required in Social and/or Behavioral Sciences 18
History 100-3. American Civilization
Political Science 221-4. American State and Local Government Psychology 201-3. General Psychology
Minimum of eight additional quarter hours in social science courses (obtain list from Division of Education)
All candidates for the certificate to teach in the elementary schools will declare their intentions at the earliest possible date and make arrangements in the Division of Education office for the following:
1. One hundred hours of volunteer service during the freshman year. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church and Sunday school groups, as well as other boys and girls clubs.
2. One hundred hours of volunteer service during the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church and Sunday school groups, as well as other boys and girls clubs.
3. Evidence of proficiency in handwriting and spelling.
4. Completion of a battery of elementary achievement tests.
Secondary Level
Certification at the secondary level requires completion of the following professional course program, and a minimum of one of the majors and one of the minors offered by the college.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 201-202. General Psychology I, II 6
Psychology 211. Educational Psychology 4
Psychology 221. Psychology of Human Development 3
Education 100. Introduction to Education 3
Education 321. Materials and Techniques of Instruction for
Secondary School Teachers 4
Education 420. Student Teaching in the Secondary School 9-15
Education 490. Seminar in Teaching 1


DIVISION OF EDUCATION 49
Early Childhood Education
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Education 131. Early Childhood Education (Curriculum I) 3
Education 132. Laboratory in Early Childhood Education 3
Helping Services 202. Group Dynamics 3
Education 231. Chilld Development I 3
Education 232. Laboratory in Child Development I 3
Education 233. Facilitation of Creativity and Learning (Curriculum II) 4
Education 236. Cultural and Ethnic Influences on Family and Child 4
Education 314. Children and Youth in Urban Schools Laboratory 3
Education 315. Children and Youth in Urban Schools 3
Education 316. Learning and Teaching I: Teaching Auxiliaries 5
Education 338. History and Theory of Nursery School and
Kindergarten Education 3
Education 339. Laboratory in History and Theory of Nursery School and
Kindergarten Education 3
Education 340. Facilitation of Language and Learning (Curriculum III) 4
Education 411. Learning and Teaching II (Practice teaching and seminar;
Early Childhood practice teaching at two levels or in varying socio-economic situations) 15
59
Those individuals wishing to be licensed to operate nursery schools should enroll in Health Services 204.
Educ. 100-3. Introduction to Education.
Designed to acquaint students with opportunities and responsibilities in the teaching profession, provide a broad understanding of the nature, purposes and organization of the American education system, and advise on educational requirements to qualify as teachers in elementary and high school.
Educ. 110-3. The Elementary Child I.
Designed to acquaint students with opportunities and responsibilities in the teaching profession, and to provide a broad understanding of the nature, purposes and organization of the American education system and of the requirements to qualify as teachers in the elementary schools. The development of behavior from infancy through age twelve is presented to prepare the student for problms that confront him in the classroom.
Educ. 111-3. Introduction to Early Childhood.
Basic courses designed to acquaint the student with growth and development of the infant and child. Emphasis is placed on emotional, social, physical and intellectual needs, and on individual guidance of the child.
Educ. 131-3. Early Childhood Education.
Deals with specific teaching techniques as related to principles of child development and educational psychology. Areas covered include ways of promoting good human relationships and healthy physical, social and emotional development in the preschool child. Emphasis is on both individual and group dynamics.
Educ. 132-3. Laboratory in Early Childhood Education.
Must be taken concurrently with Education 131. Observations and volunteer participation in a variety of preschool centers. Participation is coordinated with instruction in the field of early childhood education (Education 131) with emphasis on curriculum areas and individual learning styles.
Educ. 210-3. The Elementary Child 11.
Continuation of Education 110. Growth adjustment and capacities of the elementary school child are studied. Attention is directed to learning in terms of a process for producing a desirable behavior change in children within a school setting with the goal of maximizing the process and its product. The stu-


52 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
Educ. 381-3. The Use of Media in Education.
Designed to acquaint the prospective teacher with uses of educational media in the teacher-learning process. Includes operation of the most commonly used items of audiovisual equipment and construction of materials that are within the capabilities of ordinary classroom teachers and within the budget limitations of most schools. Provides an overview of the field of instructional technology, including the application of such advanced media as television, computer-assisted instruction, dial-access information retrieval systems and simulated environments, all within the framework of a systems approach to instruction.
Educ. 411-9 to 15. Learning and Teaching II: Pre-Kindergarten to Second Grade.
Directed observation and guided classroom teaching in the pre-primary and primary grades, designed to bring together what the student has gained in background from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. Includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various phases of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers and frequent conferences with critic teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public school districts. Education
490-1 to 3, Seminar, must be taken concurrently with Education 411 and these two courses should be regarded as a full load for the quarter.
Prerequisite: Education 316 and approval of Chairman, Division of Education.
Directed observation and guided classroom teaching in the intermediate and upper grades, designed to bring together what the student has gained in background from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. Includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various phases of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers and frequent conferences with critic teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public school districts. Education 490-1 to 3, Seminar, must be taken concurrently with Education 412 and these two courses should be regarded as a full load for the quarter.
Directed observation and guided classroom teaching in the appropriate subjects.
Prerequisites: Education 321, 322, 323 and approval of Chairman, Division of Education.
Educ. 420-9 to 15. Student Teaching in the Secondary School.
Educ. 412-9 to 15. Learning and Teaching III. Intermediate and Upper Grades.


DIVISION OF EDUCATION 53
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
The Health, Physical Education and Recreation program provides the physical education activities courses which students must take to earn a degree (see Requirements for All Degrees for details and information on exemptions). In choosing activities to fulfill the requirements, students should concentrate on types in which they have had the least experience. It is suggested that everyone attain sufficient skill in swimming to enjoy aquatic sports with safety and develop some skill in individual and dual activities. Students who have not had team activities experience in extracurricular competition should take one course in this area.
Courses are also offered for students interested in a professional program which will prepare them for careers in such fields as physical education, health and safety, and recreation.
An intercollegiate program is also provided for interested students including physical education majors and minors. Included are soccer, basketball, swimming, wrestling, tennis, golf, baseball and track and field.
Physical Education
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for All Students Quarter Hours
HPER 130. Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation 3
HPER 200. Kinesiology 3
HPER 206. First Aid 2
HPER 304. Physiology of Human Activity 3
HPER 330. History and Principles 3
HPER 335. Curriculum in Physical Education 3
HPER 340. Materials and Techniques of Physical Education 3
HPER 350. Physical Education in Elementary Schools 3
HPER 364. Secondary School Health and Safety 3
HPER 400. Adaptive Physical Education 3
HPER 430. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education 2
HPER 435. Organization and Administration of Physical Education 3
HPER 478. Outdoor Education and the School Camp Program 3
Required Courses for Men
HPER 111-113. Professional Activities (Men) 6
HPER 211-213. Professional Activities (Men) 6
HPER 306. Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 2
HPER 311-315. Analysis and Techniques of Sports (Men)
(any 3 of the 5 quarters offered) 6
Required Courses for Women
HPER 121-123. Professional Activities (Women) 6
HPER 221-223. Professional Activities (Women) 6
HPER 321-323. Analysis and Techniques of Sports (Women) 6
Electives
A minimum of 5 additional quarter hours in health, physical education and recreation courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.
Minor
Required Courses for All Students Quarter Hours
HPER 111-113. Professional Activities (Men) or
HPER 121-123. Professional Activities (Women)
6


54 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
HPER 130. Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation 3
HPER 211-213. Professional Activities (Men) or
HPER 221-223. Professional Activities (Women) 6
Required Courses for Emphasis on Elementary School Physical Education
HPER 206. First Aid 2
HPER 350. Physical Education in Elementary Schools 3
HPER 362. Elementary School Health and Safety 3
HPER 380. Rhythms for the Elementary School 2
HPER 478. Outdoor Education and the School Camp Program 3
Required Courses for Secondary School Physical Education (Men)
HPER 306. Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 2
HPER 311-315. Analysis and Techniques of Sports (Men)
(any 3 of the 5 quarters offered) 6
HPER 340. Materials and Techniques of Physical Education 3
HPER 435. Organization and Administration of Physical Education 3
Required Courses for Emphasis on Secondary School Physical Education (Women)
HPER 206. First Aid 2
HPER 321-323. Analysis and Techniques of Sports (Women) 6
HPER 340. Materials and Techniques of Physical Education 3
HPER 435. Organization and Administration of Physical Education 3
Electives
From 1 to 3 additional quarter hours of health, physical education and recreation courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.
Health and Safety Minor
Required Courses for All Students Quarter Hours
HPER 206. First Aid 2
HPER 360. Safety Education 3
Required Courses for Emphasis on Health Education
Biology 131-132. Human Anatomy and Physiology 8
HPER 362. Elementary School Health and Safety 3
HPER 364. Secondary School Health and Safety 3
Health Services 204. Nutrition 2
Law Enforcement 114. Narcotics and Drugs 3
Psychology 231. Mental Hygiene 3
Psychology 325. Child Psychology or
Psychology 326. The Psychology of Adolescence 3
Required Courses for Emphasis on Driver and Traffic Safety
HPER 366. Basic Driver Education 3
HPER 368. Advanced Driver Education 3
Law Enforcement 101. Introduction to Law Enforcement 3
Law Enforcement 110. Administration of Justice 3
Law Enforcement 117. Traffic Control and Investigation 3
Psychology 211. Educational Psychology 3
Psychology 326. The Psychology of Adolescence 3
Approved electives 3


DIVISION OF EDUCATION 55
Recreation Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art 130. Crafts Design 3
HPER 111-113. Professional Activities (Men) or
HPER 121-123, Professional Activities (Women) 6
HPER 130. Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation 3
HPER 211-213. Professional Activities (Men) or
HPER 221-223. Professional Activities (Women) 6
HPER 370. Social Recreation Leadership 3
HPER 372. Community Recreation 3
HPER 374. Camp and Outdoor Recreation 3
HPER 470. Organization and Administration of Recreation 3
Music 306. Elementary School Music Methods 3
Speech 224. Introduction to Stagecraft 3
HPER 100-1. Physical Education Activities.
Three quarter hours of credit in this course, or at least three quarter hours in the professional activities sequence HPER 111-113 or 121-123, are required for all students who are not exempt. Instruction and practice are provided in a variety of activities designed to contribute to the recreational, physical, social and emotional growth of the student. A different activity must be taken each quarter. There is an adapted class for students with physical limitations.
HPER 111-2,112-2,113-2. Professional Activities (Men)
For professional students. Substitutes for three quarter hours in HPER 100. Instruction and practice. Fall: fundamental skills and exercise, conditioning, fundamental movements, stunts and tumbling, posture and body mechanics. Winter: aquatics and gymnastics. Spring: rhythms and dance activities (folk, square, and social), bowling and badminton. Lecture and laboratory.
HPER 121-2, 122-2, 123-2. Professional Activities (Women).
For professional students. Substitutes for three quarter hours in HPER 100. Instruction and practice. Fall: fundamental skills and exercise, conditioning, fundamental movements, stunts and tumbling, posture and body mechanics. Winter: aquatics and gymnastics. Spring: rhythms and dance activities (folk, square, and social), bowling and badminton. Lecture and laboratory.
HPER 130-3. Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation.
Designed to orient and acquaint students with the origin, development, scope and purposes of this field.
HPER 200-3. Kinesiology.
The application of anatomical, physiological and physical forces to human movement in physical activity situations. Analysis of basic mechanical patterns of form for increased efficiency in skill, speed, endurance, balance and force.
Prerequisites: Biology 131 and 132.
HPER 206-2. First Aid.
Emergency treatment for various types of injuries. Course leads to Red Cross Standard and Advanced First Aid Certificates.
HPER 211-2,212-2,213-2. Professional Activities (Men).
For professional students. Instruction and practice. Fall: team sports football, softball, soccer, basketball, volleyball. Winter: low organization games, individual and group contests, relays, wrestling and weight lifting. Spring: individual and dual sports archery, golf, tennis, track and field. Lecture and laboratory.
HPER 221-2,222-2,223-2. Professional Activities (Women).
For professional students. Instruction and practice. Fall: team sports field


56 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
hockey, speedball, softball, volleyball, basketball. Winter: modern dance, low organization games, individual and group contests, relays. Spring: individual and dual sports track and field, tennis, archery, golf. Lecture and laboratory.
HPER 304-3. Physiology of Human Activities.
Effect of muscular movement on the various systems and organs of the body. Prerequisite: HPER 200.
HPER 306-2. Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries.
Recognition, cause, prevention, treatment and various physical therapeutic procedures for sports injuries.
Prerequisite: HPER 206.
HPER 311-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports I (Men).
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of football. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 211.
HPER 312-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports II (Men).
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of basketball. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 211.
HPER 313-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports III (Men).
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of track and field. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 213.
HPER 314-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports IV (Men),
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of wrestling. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 212.
HPER 315-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports V (Men).
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of baseball. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 211.
HPER 321-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports I (Women).
Equipment and facilities, rules, team organization and techniques of field hockey, speedball and basketball. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 221.
HPER 322-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports II (Women).
Techniques, composition, interpretation and organization of folk, square, social and modern dance. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: HPER 123 and 222.
HPER 323-2. Analysis and Techniques of Sports III (Women).
Equipment and facilities, rules, team organization and techniques of volleyball, softball, and track and field. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: HPER 221 and 223.
HPER 328-2. Officiating Techniques for Women.
Includes practice in theory and techniques of officiating womens basketball and volleyball. Practical experience and tests for DGWS ratings are emphasized. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: HPER 221.
HPER 330-3. History and Principles.
An interpretative study and analysis of the philosophy, principles and practices of physical education through their historical development and in their present application and significance.
HPER 335-3. Curriculum in Physical Education.
Factors in selecting activities, program variations, planning instructional units, program standards and evaluation. Considers both ideal and problematic situation. Prerequisite: HPER 130.
HPER 340-3. Materials and Techniques of Physical Education.
Instructional materials and procedures for conducting junior and senior high school student experience in physical education class activities. Includes lesson planning,


DIVISION OF EDUCATION 57
record keeping and grading, motivation and discipline, and teaching techniques. Prerequisite: HPER 321 and 322.
HPER 350-3. Physical Education in Elementary Schools.
Emphasizes the purposes and contributions of physical education to the growth and development of the elementary school child. Includes study of the activity areas which make up the program, development of teaching units and organization of learning activities.
HPER 360-3. Safety Education.
Provides the student with knowledge about accident prevention in many areas: home, school, physical and recreational activities, traffic and community.
HPER 362-3. Elementary School Health and Safety.
Designed to give the prospective elementary teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living and an understanding of the health services program.
HPER 364-3. Secondary School Health and Safety.
Designed to give the prospective junior and senior high school teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living and an understanding of the health services program.
HPER 366-3. Basic Driver Education.
Study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasizes methods, materials and resources for effective teaching, including discussion, demonstration and techniques basic to on-the-street instruction.
HPER 368-3. Advanced Driver Education.
Advanced study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasizes administration, instructional aids, evaluation and research.
Prerequisite: HPER 366.
HPER 370-3. Social Recreation Leadership.
Experience in the selection of materials, and leadership techniques in group work in social and recreational games, skits, singing, dance and craft activities for use in recreation programs.
HPER 372-3. Community Recreation.
History and development, scope, programs and importance of community recreation. Covers the functions of various agencies with responsibilities in recreation.
HPER 374.-3. Camp and Outdoor Recreation.
History and trends, objectives, programs, and skills and techniques of activities common to camp and outdoor recreation.
HPER 380-2. Rhythms for the
Elementary School.
Participation and instruction in the fundamental movements, forms and patterns of creative rhythms, folk dance and singing games for children.
Prerequisite: HPER 350, or permission of instructor.
HPER 399-1 or 2. Field Experience.
Provides opportunities for students to gain practical experience assisting in the conduct of sports-type activities with community agencies, schools and the college. Credit is determined by the quality of the experience and hours of time required. Registration for this course requires prior approval of the instructor for the course and the cooperating agency. It cannot be repeated for credit in the same area of concentration.
HPER 400-3. Adaptive Physical Education.
The field of adaptive and corrective physical education and its relationship to the regular curriculum. Covers suitable skills, activity, game and sports programs.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
HPER 430-2. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education.
Use of tests and measurements in physical education. Evaluation of objectives, pro-


58 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
grams and student achievement through measurement techniques.
HPER 435-3. Organization and Administration of Physical Education.
Organization and administrative policies and procedures for conducting the required physical education and elective intramural and athletic programs. Includes personnel relationships, legal provisions, budgets, purchase and care of equipment, facilities, schedules and activities, public relations and related problems.
Prerequisite: HPER 130.
HPER 470-3. Organization and Administration of Recreation.
Problems in organizing and establishing public recreation and park services. Consideration of legislative provisions, controls, budgeting and finance, personnel, public relations, in-service training, records and reports, and administrative practices.
HPER 478-3. Outdoor Education and
the School Camp Program.
Development of outdoor education and school camping. Principles of programming, constructing and relating camp programs to other subjects.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Disciplines within the Division of Humanities offering majors for Bachelor of Arts degrees are 1. art; 2. English; 3. modern language, Spanish; 4. applied music, music education; 5. philosophy; 6. speech.
Minors are available in 1. art; 2. English, communications (writing), public communications (journalism), reading; 3. French, German, Spanish; 4. music; 5. philosophy; 6. speech, speech pathology.
Course requirements for these majors and minors are listed above the respective course descriptions.
Art
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art 111-113. Drawing I, II, III 9
Art 121-123. Basic Design I, II, III 9
Art 201-203. Art Survey I, II, III 9
Art 211-213. Drawing and Painting I, II, III 9
Art 241-243. Three Dimensional Design I, II, III _9^
45
Upper division requirements include study in the following sub-areas:
A. FINE ARTS Drawing Painting Printmaking Sculpture
C. CRAFTS
Ceramics
Metalwork and Jewelrymaking
D. ART HISTORY
B. APPLIED ARTS
Advertising Design
Graphic Communications Design
Photography
Product Design
Eighteen quarter hours required within a specific area, A, B, C, or D. 18
Six quarter hours elected within each of the remaining areas A, B, C or D. 18
Electives
Nine additional quarter hours in art courses selected in consultation with
and approved by the Department of Art. _9_
45
Art Education
Students seeking elementary or secondary credentials must in addition satisfy the teacher education program of Metropolitan State College, including art methods courses.
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art 111-113. Drawing I, II, III 9
Art 121-123. Basic Design I, II, III 9
Art 201-203. Art Survey I, II, III 9
Art 211-213. Drawing and Painting I, II, III 9
Art 241-243. Three Dimensional Design I, II, III _9
45
59


60 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Art 100-3. Art Appreciation.
Designed primarily for people who are not art majors but who are interested in acquiring information about various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening their knowledge and appreciation of the subject. Study of the worlds art masterpieces and visits to art exhibits and museums in Denver are included.
Art 110-3. Basic Drawing Methods.
A studio course in drawing which introduces basic drawing media and materials, covering varied techniques for free hand drawing, including principles of perspective drawing. For non-art majors, particular orientation to education students.
Art 111-3. Drawing I.
A basic drawing course intended to develop graphic skills and familiarity with traditional drawing media; still life and figure are used as points of departure.
Art 112-3. Drawing II.
Continuation of Art 111.
Prerequisite: Art 111, or permission of instructor.
Art 113-3. Drawing III.
Continuation of Art 112.
Prerequisite: Art 112, or permission of instructor.
Art 120-3. Basic Design Methods.
A studio course which is oriented to examining and exploring the elements and principles of design, expressed in abstract form. There is emphasis on use of various media and materials as well as on exploring both two and three dimensional form. For non-art majors, particular orientation to education students.
Art 121-3. Basic Design I.
An introduction to the fundamental principles of design and color organization as a basis for all creative work in the visual arts.
Art 122-3. Basic Design II.
Continuation of Art 121.
Prerequisite: Art 121, or permission of instructor.
Art 123-3. Basic Design III.
Continuation of Art 122.
Prerequisite: Art 122, or permission of instructor.
Art 130-3. Methods in Crafts.
A shop oriented course in crafts in which wood, metal, fiber and plastics are worked directly to design and craft objects as an expression of the individual student involved. For non-art majors, particular orientation to HPER and education students.
Art 201-3. Art Survey I.
Major historical trends in the development of Western art including prehistoric art, with emphasis on Egyptian, Greek and Roman Classical art periods.
Art 202-3. Art Survey II.
Continuation of Art 201, with emphasis on medieval, renaissance and 18th century periods in art.
Prerequisite: Art 201.
Art 203-3. Art Survey III.
Continuation of Art 202, with emphasis on 19th and 20th century art.
Prerequisite: Art 202.
Art 211-3. Drawing and Painting I.
The student is taught to relate design and drawing as a basis for painting. A variety of styles and techniques is explored. Prerequisite: Art 113.
Art 212-3. Drawing and Painting II.
Continuation of Art 211.
Prerequisite: Art 211.
Art 213-3. Drawing and Painting III.
Continuation of Art 212.
Prerequisite: Art 212.
Art 241-3. Three Dimensional Design I.
Development of basic knowledge and techniques needed for the solution of three dimensional design problems. Processes involved in the understanding and solution of problems of space, form, light and motion. Prerequisite: Art 123.
Art 242-3. Three Dimensional Design II.
Continuation of Art 241.
Prerequisite: Art 241.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 61
Art 243-3. Three Dimensional Design
III.
Continuation of Art 242.
Prerequisite: Art 242.
Art 301-3. History of Primitive and Ethnic Art.
A historical and contemporary look at significant contributions in primitive painting, sculpture, crafts and adornment by cults, tribes, sects and individuals throughout the world, during both ancient and modern times.
Prerequisite: Art 203.
Art 302-3. History of Modern Art.
An analysis and study of trends and styles of 20th century art, including both painting and sculpture. Emphasis is upon the movements in art since World War II.
Prerequisite: Art 203.
Art 303-3. History of 19th and 20th Century Architecture and Furnishings.
Significant buildings and their decor throughout Europe and America are studied in relationship to the culture of their time. Included are famous modern architects and significant buildings.
Prerequisite: Art 203.
Art 310-3. Art Instructional Methods for Elementary Schools.
Introduces the student to possibilities, limitations and implications of art materials used in the elementary school.
Art 311-3. Drawing IV.
An advanced drawing course intended to develop graphic skills to a higher level, while focusing attention upon the aesthetic nature of drawing.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 312-3. Drawing V.
Continuation of Art 311.
Prerequisite: Art 311.
Art 313-3. Drawing VI.
Continuation of Art 312.
Prerequisite: Art 312.
Art 320-3 Art Instructional Methods for Secondary Schools.
A thorough study of adolescent development in the visual arts; evaluation of methods and processes to motivate and stimulate art capabilities of junior and senior high school students.
Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division art courses.
Art 321-3. Graphic Communications Design 1.
Designed to acquaint the art student with typography and visual communication symbols. The student applies design to specific media and graphic problems.
Prerequisites: Art 203, 213 and 243.
Art 322-3. Graphic Communications Design II.
Continuation of Art 321.
Prerequisite: Art 321.
Art 323-3. Graphic Communications Design III.
Continuation of Art 322.
Prerequisite: Art 322.
Art 324-3. Photography I.
Photography is treated as an art form and a discipline of significance to every art major. The first quarter deals with the history of photography and familiarizes the student with basic darkroom procedures.
Prerequisites: Art 123, 203 and 213.
Art 325-3. Photography II.
Continuation of Art 324.
Prerequisite: Art 324.
Art 326-3. Photography III.
Continuation of Art 325.
Prerequisite: Art 325.
Art 341-3. Sculpture I.
Creative approach to the problems of three dimensional design in sculpture; modeling, molding, working in cold casting materials. Construction in wood, plastics and metals.
Prerequisite: Art 203 and 243.
Art 342-3. Sculpture II.
Continuation of Art 341.
Prerequisite: Art 341.




DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 63
Art 343-3. Sculpture III.
Continuation of Art 342.
Prerequisite: Art 342.
Art 351-3. Painting I.
A study of materials and techniques used in painting. Control of form and space is approached through the use of color, and design structure is applied to the problem of creating visual expressions.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 352-3. Painting II.
Continuation of Art 351.
Prerequisite: Art 351.
Art 353-3. Painting III.
Continuation of Art 352.
Prerequisite: Art 352.
Art 361-3. Ceramics I.
Introducing clay as an art and craft media, the instruction includes use of the potters wheel as well as hand methods for building pottery and sculpture forms. Also involves preparing pottery for glazing and firing.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 243.
Art 362-3. Ceramics II.
Continuation of Art 361 with added emphasis upon competent use of the potters wheels and additional study of glaze formulas.
Prerequisite: Art 361.
Art 363-3. Ceramics III.
Continuation of Art 362; further development in the craft technique and form expression of ceramic art. Development of low and high firing methods plus emphasis on glaze decorating.
Prerequisite: Art 362.
Art 371-3. Printmaking I.
Introduces the student to the possibilities and limitations of silk screen as a fine and applied art.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 372-3. Printmaking II.
Covers the fundamentals of lithography as a fine art; includes colored work on stones.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 373-3. Printmaking III.
Covers the fundamentals of intaglio, including etching, engraving, dry point and aquatint.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 374-3. Printmaking IV.
Built upon the fundamentals and unique characteristics of relief printmaking as a fine art medium. Students are introduced to printing from linoleum, plank-grain wood, end-grain wood, and from exploratory materials. Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 381-3. Product Design I.
Students investigate the various areas of utilitarian design. Analytical and unbiased examination of the need, function and resultant visual expression is applied with the greatest directness possible.
Prerequisite: Art 203 and 243.
Art 382-3. Product Design II.
Continuation of Art 381.
Prerequisite: Art 381.
Art 383-3. Product Design III.
Continuation of Art 382.
Prerequisite: Art 382.
Art 391-3. Metalwork and Jewelrymaking I.
Design quality as a fundamental part of good craftsmanship is emphasized through the basic techniques involved in working nonferrous and precious metals, plus utilizing rare woods, fibers and plastics.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and Art 243.
Art 392-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking II.
Continuation of Art 391.
Prerequisite: Art 391.
Art 393-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking III.
Continuation of Art 392.
Prerequisite: Art 392.
Art 411-3. Advanced Drawing and Illustration I.
Advanced studio drawing oriented to interpreting subject matter for purpose of illustration, whether for fine arts expression or for commercial application.
Prerequisite: Art 313.


64 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Art 412-3. Advanced Drawing and Illustration II.
Continuation of Art 411.
Prerequisite: Art 411.
Art 413-3. Advanced Drawing and Illustration III.
Continuation of Art 412.
Prerequisite: Art 412.
Art 421-3. Advertising Design I.
Continuation of Art 323 with emphasis on production techniques in advertising design. Field trips to printing establishments in the area are conducted to acquaint students with reproduction methods used in advertising. The student is encouraged to build a portfolio of finished work prepared for various methods of reproduction.
Prerequisite: Art 323.
Art 422-3. Advertising Design II.
Continuation of Art 421.
Prerequisite: Art 421.
Art 423-3. Advertising Design III.
Continuation of Art 422.
Prerequisite: Art 422.
Art 441-3. Advanced Sculpture I.
Permits students to explore the problems of sculpture with emphasis on development of techniques and personal expression in self chosen media for sculpture.
Prerequisite: Art 343.
Art. 442-3. Advanced Sculpture II. Continuation of Art 441.
Prerequisite: Art 441.
Art 443-3. Advanced Sculpture III. Continuation of Art 442.
Prerequisite: Art 442.
Art 451-3. Painting IV.
Intended to develop the possibilities of personal expression inherent in the painting media and in drawing and design controls.
Prerequisite: Art 351, and permission of the instructor.
Art 452-3. Painting V.
Continuation of Art 451.
Prerequisite: Art 451.
Art 453-3. Painting VI.
Continuation of Art 452.
Prerequisite: Art 452.
Art 454-3. Advanced Painting I.
A studio course for the advanced painting student capable of developing his own ideas in a workshop atmosphere with faculty advice and criticism.
Prerequisite: Art 453 and permission of instructor.
Art 455-3. Advanced Painting II.
Continuation of Art 454.
Prerequisite: Art 454.
Art 456-3. Advanced Painting III.
Continuation of Art 455.
Prerequisite: Art 455.
Art 471-3. Advanced Printmaking I.
Advanced work in relief printing with wood and linoleum block in which students are directed toward individual expression in the media used.
Prerequisite: Art 374.
Art 472-3. Advanced Printmaking II.
Advanced work in lithography as a fine art in which students are allowed to develop individuality in this media of printmaking. Prerequisite: Art 372.
Art 473-3. Advanced Printmaking III.
Advanced work in the art of intaglio, whereby students are allowed to concentrate in a specialized area such as etching, engraving, dry point or aquatint for individualized art expression.
Prerequisite: Art 373.
Art 491-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking IV.
Advanced craft work in metal raising and forming; jewelrymaking is included. Students required to develop a philosophy on style and methods developed for individuality of artistic expression.
Prerequisite: Art 393.
Art 492-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking V.
Continuation of Art 491.
Prerequisite: Art 491.
Art 493-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking VI.
Continuation of Art 492.
Prerequisite: Art 492.


English
Major for Bachelor of Arts
DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 65
Grouped Requirements English 211-213. World Literature 1 At least two Quarter Hours
English 221-223. American Literature > English 231-233. British Literature ) courses in each sequence. 1 21
English 201, 251-252, 255-256. English Grammar, Advanced Composition, Introduction to Creative Writing, Introduction to Technical Writing, Introduction to Communication Theories
English 323-327. American Literature English 331-337. British Literature English 341-343, 345. World Literature
English 361, 362. Afro-American Literature, Modern Black Poetry
English 423, 427, 429. American Literature
English 431-435, 437, 439. British Literature
English 441-442. Modern Drama, Medieval Epic and Romance
English 461,462. Literary Criticism, Modern Literary Criticism
6
15
English 301-303, 351-353, 452-453. Structure of English Language,
History of English Language, Semantics, Modern Rhetoric in Writing. Creative Writing Workshop, Techniques of Critical Writing,
Advanced Creative Writing I, II
English 391-392. Techniques and Practice of English Research, Communications Materials and Resources
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Minor
Required Courses
English 211-213. World Literature
English 221-223. American Literature (At least 3 quarter hours) English 231-233. British Literature (At least 3 quarter hours) English 201, 251. English Grammar, Advanced Composition
Quarter Hours 6
) 9 3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Communications Minor: Writing
Required Courses
English 256. Introduction to Communication Theories (Printed Media) English 303. Semantics
English 392. Communications Materials and Resources
Quarter Hours 3 3 3


66 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 67
Electives chosen from the following courses:
English 183. Issues of the Day
Improvement of Reading II Advanced Composition Introduction to Technical Writing Communications in Arts and Industry (Printed Media) Modern Linguistic Studies in Writing Literature from Writings in the Sciences English 353. Techniques of Critical Writing English 354. Radio-Television Script Writing English 355. Advanced Technical Writing
Projects in Communication Theories (Printed Media) Technical Editing and Production Technical Communications Writing for Films Public Relations Writing
English 388. Copyright, Libel and Slander (Printed Media)
English 393. Communication in Education (Printed Media)
Projects in Technical Writing News Media in an Urban Society Speech 343. Radio-Television Announcing Speech 374. Psychology of Communication Speech 410. Techniques of Persuasion
Speech 449. Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life Sociology 387. Mass Communication and Public Opinion I Sociology 388. Mass Communication and Public Opinion II
English 205. English 251. English 255. English 257. English 309. English 345.
English 356. English 357. English 358. English 359. English 382.
English 455. English 483.
15
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper-division Communications, English, Journalism or cognate area courses in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Public Communications Minor in Journalism
Required Courses
English 181. Introduction to Journalism English 182. News Reporting English 183. Issues of the Day
English 201, 251, 255, 256. English Grammar, Advanced Composition, Introduction to Technical Writing, Introduction to Communication Theories
English 281. English 282. English 381. English 382. English 392. English 483.
News Reporting Projects News Editing and Copyreading Feature Article Writing Public Relations Writing Communications Materials and Resources News Media in an Urban Society
Quarter Hours 3 3 3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Electives
A minimum of 6 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in journalism.
To begin the journalism minor, students must qualify for English 101, Basic Communication I.


68 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Required Courses
Reading Minor
English 205. English 304.
English 305. English 306. English 307.
English 308. English 403. English 405. English 406. English 408.
Improvement of Reading II The Reading Process
Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Primary Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Intermediate Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Secondary
Practicum in Reading Remedial Reading Theories Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities Development of Reading Materials Practicum in Remedial Reading
Quarter Hours 3 3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper division courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in reading. Appropriate courses from other departments may be considered for this purpose.
Eng. 100-3 or 6. Elements of Communication.
A review course required of students who show a lack of preparation in English. Participation is determined by test results, writing samples, or the recommendation of the English Department staff. Students who complete the course with a grade of C or better may substitute this course for English 101 in the Basic Communications requirement and proceed directly to English 102. A student passing with a D is eligible for English 101.
When offered for six hours, the course includes a reading improvement component conducted by a reading specialist working with the writing instructor in a team. Students may enroll for the six-hour program when counseled to do so by the English and reading staff.
This course may not be counted for the humanities basic studies requirement.
Eng. 101-3. Basic Communication I.
Study of the basic skills of reading, writing and speaking, with instruction in the fundamentals of English usage, and practice in written and oral expression.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on English entrance examination, or a passing grade in English 100. (Note prerequisite for English 102.)
Eng. 102-3. Basic Communication II.
Continuation of English 101.
Prerequisite: English 101 or a grade of C in English 100.
Eng. 103-3. Basic Communication III.
Continuation of English 102. Includes instruction in types of research, with emphasis on a supervised term paper.
Prerequisite: English 102.
Eng. 104-3. Improvement of Reading I.
A course for the improvement of reading comprehension, reading speed, vocabulary and general performance in all college courses. Individual work in the reading laboratory is required in the course.
Eng. 106-3. English for Speakers of Other Languages.
Development of the basic skills of reading, writing and speaking for native and foreign speakers of other languages who can profit from supplementary preparation in English. Instruction in the fundamentals of English usage.
Eng. 111-3. Introduction to Literature: Fiction.
A critical introduction to selected short stories and short novels, with emphasis on twentieth century British and American writings. Recommended for the humanities basic studies requirement.
Eng. 112-3. Introduction to Literature: Drama.
Modern modes of drama with emphasis on American and British works, including plays of Albee, Beckett and other contemporaries. Recommended for the humanities basic studies requirement.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 69
Eng. 113-3. Introduction to Literature: Poetry.
An introduction to modern American and British poetry through study of prosody, including methods of determining the voice of the poet, meaning and form in the poem, and simple explication approaches. Recommended for humanities basic studies requirement.
Eng. 181-3. Introduction to Journalism.
A course to acquaint students with information media and to provide practice in writing news and feature material.
Eng. 182-3. News Reporting.
Practice for proficiency in collecting and writing the news.
Prerequisite: English 181, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 183-3. Issues of the Day.
Examination of current topics on local, national and international levels, using current reference materials and the mass media.
Eng. 201-3. English Grammar.
Study of the elements of modern English grammar.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 205-3. Improvement of Reading II.
Study of techniques of critical reading and development of flexible reading rates.
Prerequisite: English 104, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 211-3. World Literature I.
Literature of the Ancient East, Greece. Rome and the Middle Ages.
Eng. 212-3. World Literature II.
World literature from the early Renaissance through the late Romantic Period.
Eng. 213-3. World Literature III.
World literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Eng. 221-3. American Literature I.
Foundations of American literature from the beginnings to Poe.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 222-3. American Literature II.
Development of American literature from Poe to Whitman.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 223-3. American Literature III: Modern Era.
Studies in modern American literature from Whitman to the present.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 231-3. British Literature I.
British literature from the beginnings to the Restoration.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 232-3. British Literature II.
British literature from the Restoration to the Victorian Age.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 233-3. British Literature III: Modern Era.
British literature from the Victorian Age to the present.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 251-3. Advanced Composition.
Writing and critical study of expository prose, with emphasis on essays and documented papers.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 252-3. Introduction to Creative Writing.
Beginning course in the writing of short stories, poetry and other forms.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 254-3. Business Communications. See course description for Business 200.
Eng. 255-3. Introduction to Technical Writing.
Practice in a variety of basic techniques used in the presentation of technical and scientific information.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of Basic Communication, or permission of instructor.


70 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Eng. 256-3. Introduction to Communication Theories.
Elements of communication theories, as applied in communication analysis, technical and scientific writing, and writing for the mass media.
Eng. 257-3. Communications in Arts and Industry (Printed Media).
Analysis and evaluation of communication processes of dynamics, and of problems in fine arts, cinematic arts, advertising, management and industry.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of Basic Communication, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 281-3. News Reporting Projects.
News gathering and writing techniques in specific fields, including political, judicial, civic and sports.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 282-3. News Editing and Copyreading.
Experience in copyreading the news, writing headlines, proofreading and layout.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 301-3. Structure of the English Language.
Background and structure of American English, based on the current linguistic approaches to sound, form, syntax and usage.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 302-3. History of the English Language.
History of the language, including a brief survey of the scientific principles involved in linguistic evolution, changes in grammatical forms and vocabulary development.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 303-3. Semantics.
Practical studies and investigations into theories of word meaning.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 304-3. The Reading Process.
An analytical treatment of the reading process, including theories, research and issues related to all stages of reading. The course emphasizes scope and sequence and skill development.
Eng. 305-3. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Primary.
Approaches to the teaching of reading in the primary (Kindergarten-3) grade levels. Prerequisite: English 304.
Eng. 306-3. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Intermediate.
Approaches to the teaching of reading at the intermediate (4-6) grade levels. Prerequisite: English 304.
Eng. 307-3. Methods and Techniques of Reading: Secondary.
Approaches to the teaching of reading at the secondary (Junior-Senior High School) grade levels.
Prerequisite: English 304.
Eng. 308-3. Practicum in Reading.
Classroom observation and application of reading techniques on the primary, intermediate, or secondary grade levels.
Prerequisite: English 305, 306 or 307.
Eng. 309-3. Modern Linguistic Studies in Writing.
General study of the present state and trends of language science and its relation to contemporary communication and culture. Analysis and exploration of content, uses and techniques of modern linguistics.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 323-3. Early American Literature.
Foundations of the American literary tradition in the Puritan, Revolutionary, and early national periods, with emphasis on the writings of Taylor, Mather, Edwards, Franklin, Jefferson and Paine.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 71
Eng. 324-3. American Literature of the Romantic Period.
Poetry and prose of representative writers of the "American Renaissance, including Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman. Dickinson.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 325-3. Realism and Naturalism in American Literature.
Backgrounds and foundations of literary realism and naturalism as reflected in the writings of Twain, Howells, James, Adams, Crane, Norris, Dreiser.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, orpermission of instructor.
Eng. 326-3. Modern American Poetry and Prose.
Critical study of poetry and prose of major American writers, including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Pound, Stevens and later contemporaries.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 327-3. Development of American Drama.
Backgrounds of the American Theatre from the beginnings to the present with emphasis on 20th century American plays, including ONeill, Anderson, Heilman, Rice, Williams, Miller, Albee.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 331-3. Early Renaissance and
Sixteenth Century British Literature.
Poetry and prose of representative writers, including More, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Raleigh, Spenser and Marlowe.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 332-3. British Literature of the Seventeenth Century.
Poetry, prose, and selected plays of representative writers, including Donne, Jonson, Milton, Bacon, Browne, Dryden and Congreve.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 333-3. British Literature of the Eighteenth Century.
Poetry, prose, and plays of representative writers, including Swift, Addison, Pope, Johnson, Boswell and Sheridan.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 334-3. British Literature of the Romantic Period.
Poetry and prose of representative writers, including Blake, Burns; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Shelley and Keats; Hazlitt, DeQuincy and Lamb.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 335-3. British Literature of the Victorian Period.
Poetry and prose of representative writers, including Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Huxley and Darwin.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 336-3. Modern British Poetry and Prose.
Poetry and prose of representative modern writers, including Conrad, Forster, Lawrence, Yeats, Woolf and Joyce.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 337-3. Development of British Drama.
Selected works from medieval, sixteenth-and seventeenth-century drama to acquaint students with the origin and development of major kinds of plays.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 341-3. Masterpieces of
Continental Literature.
Major works by European writers, from the classics to the present.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 342-3. The Continental Novel.
Novels by European writers, including Flaubert, Dostoevski, Proust, Mann, Kafka and Camus.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.


72 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Eng. 343-3. The English Bible as Literature.
Study of the King James Bible, with emphasis on the literary forms and the cultural traditions of the Old and New Testaments.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 344-3. Classical Mythology.
A study of the origin of Greek and Roman myths and parallels in the Nordic, with emphasis on their occurrence in literature and criticism.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 345-3. Literature from Writings in the Sciences.
Study of scientific works of literary merit written by eminent scientists for the general reader.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Eng. 346-3. Childrens Literature.
Critical survey and comparative study of literature for young people.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 351-3. Modern Rhetoric in Writing.
Current theory and practice in the field of written rhetoric. Recommended for future teachers of English.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 352-3. Creative Writing Workshop.
Individual projects in fiction, poetry, drama and other creative writing, with discussions of theory and practice related to work-in-progress.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 353-3. Techniques of Critical Writing.
Methods and practice in writing expository analyses of poetry, prose and drama.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, orpermission of instructor.
Eng. 354-3. Radio-Television Script Writing.
Study of broadcasting media script forms and principles. Preparation of creative and dramatic radio and television program materials, formats and scripts.
Prerequisite: One 200 level composition, communication or radio-TV speech course.
Eng. 355-3. Advanced Technical Writing.
Supervised opportunities for developing the technical writing ability required for reports and proposals, using formats common to government, science, business and industry.
Prerequisite: English 255, or equivalent experience.
Eng. 356-3. Projects in Communication Theories (Printed Media),
Research into the theoretical basis and applicability of specific communications theories. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: English 256, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 357-3. Technical Editing and Production.
Layout and design related to publishing technical matter.
Prerequisite: English 255 or permission of instructor.
Eng. 358-3. Technical Communications.
Analysis and development of various media for technical communication, including graphics, photography, caption writing, and pictorial elements of technical editing as related to print media.
Prerequisite: English 255 and/or English
256.
Eng. 359-3. Writing for Films.
Principles of film writing. Organizing and writing brief outlines, treatments, and scripts; training in the fundamentals of cinematic vision and listening as applied to the film writer. Analysis of relevant short films.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of 200 or higher level composition/communication courses, or equivalent experience.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 73
Eng. 361-3. Afro-American Literature.
(Same as Afro-American Studies 361.) An effort is made to distinguish racial and universal qualities in both form and content. Social and historical aspects of the literature are included in lectures and discussions. Supplementary material from essays, speeches and other works is made available to students.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 362-3. Modern Black Poetry.
(Same as Afro-American Studies 362.) Begins with the study of post-World War I Harlem poets and ends with poets writing and publishing today. Traces traditional elements and techniques together with development of Black awareness and efforts to define a Black aesthetic.
Eng. 371-3. Teaching English in the Secondary Schools.
Current materials and techniques for teaching English in the secondary schools. Prerequisite: Education 321.
Eng. 381-3. Feature Article Writing.
Study of feature writing styles of newspapers and magazines, with practice in writing communications features intended for media publication.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 382-3. Public Relations Writing.
Practice in writing institutional news, features and editorials for public information productions, relating news and feature writing to institutional publications.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of journalism or English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 388-3. Copyright, Libel and
Slander (Printed Media).
Study of the legal responsibilities of the writer and the legal protection of the writer.
Prerequisite: Six hours of writing or communications courses 200 level or above.
Eng. 391-3. Techniques and Practice of English Research.
Detailed study of the major types of research related to scholarship in the field of English.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 392-3. Communications Materials and Resources.
Major types of research and methods in the field of communications.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 393-3. Communication in Education (Printed Media).
Study of the impact of modern communication theory and technology on education and its place in instruction. Evaluation, practical applications of educational communications, perception and learning theory, and human and mechanic communication in the classroom.
Eng. 403-3. Remedial Reading Theories.
A study of the causes of remedial reading difficulties together with the materials and techniques of remediation.
Prerequisites: English 305, 306, or 307
Eng. 405-3. Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities.
Practice in administration of individual reading inventories and in writing recommendations for remediation of reading difficulties.
Prerequisite: English 403, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 406-3. Development of Reading Materials.
Organization and development of reading materials for use in remedial and corrective reading programs.
Prerequisite: English 405, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 408-3. Practicum in Remedial Reading.
Practice in diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties, including individual or small group tutoring experiences.
Prerequisite: English 406, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 423-3. Development of American Poetry.
A critical survey of American poetry: Colonial through contemporary.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.


74 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Eng. 427-3. Development of the American Novel.
A critical survey of the American novel from its beginnings to the present.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 429-3. Major American Writers.
Advanced studies of the works of selected American writers. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 431-3. Chaucer.
Reading and interpretation of the Canterbury Tales and selected minor poems.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 432-3. Shakespeare I: The Comedies.
A study of representative comedies, including A Midsummer Nights Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida and The Tempest.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 433-3. Shakespeare II: The
Historical Plays and the Sonnets.
A study of Richard III, Richard II, Parts 1 and 2 of Henry IV, Henry V and selected sonnets.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 434-3. Shakespeare III: The Tragedies.
A study of the major tragedies, including Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth and Anthony and Cleopatra.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 435-3. Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama.
A study of the comedies, tragedies, and sentimental plays (1660-1800), including those of Dryden, Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Steele, Goldsmith and Sheridan.
Prerequisite: English 337, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 437-3. Development of the British Novel.
A critical survey of the British novel from Defoe to Hardy.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 439-3. Major British Writers.
Advanced studies of the works of selected British writers. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 441-3. Modern Drama.
Important plays from Ibsen to the present. including American, British and continental selections.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 442-3. Medieval Epic and Romance.
A study of selected epics and romances to show their relationships to each other and to medieval thought.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 452-3. Advanced Creative Writing I.
Supervised projects in writing fiction, poetry, drama and criticism.
Prerequisite: English 352, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 453-3. Advanced Creative Writing II.
Independent projects in writing fiction, poetry, drama and criticism intended for publication. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: English 452.
Eng. 455-3. Projects in Technical Writing.
Individual students contribute to group projects involving the writing and production of technical reports needed by and prepared for the college and the community.
Prerequisite: Advanced Technical Writing, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 461-3. Literary Criticism.
Studies in the major schools of literary criticism from Aristotle to the Twentieth Century.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 75
Eng. 462-3. Modern Literary Criticism.
20th century critical theories and philosophies of contemporary critics, including readings which define and amplify historical, formalist, sociocultural, psychological and mythopoeic approaches in the study of literature.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 483-3. News Media in an Urban Society.
Examination of role, nature and function of mass media in an urban society, using community sources and the community itself as a workshop. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of Journalism or English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Modern Languages
Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will register for foreign language courses as follows: no previous study, or less than one year in high school-101; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak 101; one quarter or semester in college 102; one year in college 211 and/or 231; two years in high school 211 and/or 231, or 102 or 103, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college 212 or 213 and/or 232 or 233, or 211 and/or 231, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college 300 level courses, or 213 and/or 233, if needed. A student who feels that he has insufficient preparation for a level stipulated above should strengthen his background by auditing the course recommended by his modern language advisor.
Spanish
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Spanish 211-213. Spanish Reading and Conversation 9
Spanish 231-233. Spanish Composition 6
Spanish 311-313. Survey of Spanish Literature 9
Spanish 331-333. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition 9
Spanish 351-353. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro 9
Spanish 411. Spanish Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries 3
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Spanish 211-213. Spanish Reading and Conversation 9
Spanish 231-233. Spanish Composition 6
Spanish 311-313. Survey of Spanish Literature 9
Spanish 331. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition 3


76 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
French
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
French 211-213. French Reading and Conversation 9
French 231-233. French Composition 6
French 311-313. Survey of French Literature 9
French elective 3
German
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
German 211-213. German Reading and Conversation 9
German 231-233. German Composition 6
German 311-313. Survey of German Literature 9
German elective 3
Modern Foreign Languages
Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
The following courses are to be taken in any two languages offered:
211,212,213. Reading and Conversation 9
231,232,233. Composition 6
311, 312, 313. Survey of Literature 9
331, 332. Advanced Grammar and Composition (Spanish)
Other advanced courses as recommended by the department 6
30*
French
French 101-4. Elementary French I.
Beginning French, with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking and understanding, supplemented by grammar, reading and writing.
French 102-4. Elementary French II.
Continuation of French 101. Prerequisite: French 101, or one or two years of high school French.
French 103-4. Elementary French III.
Continuation of French 102. Prerequisite: French 102, or two years of high school French.
French 211-3. French Reading and Conversation I.
Intermediate course in French involving conversation and the reading of several interesting modern novels.
Prerequisite: French 103, or two or three years of high school French.
French 212-3. French Reading and Conversation II.
Development of oral proficiency with discussions drawn from assigned contemporary readings.
Prerequisite: French 211, or permission of instructor.
French 213-3. French Reading and Conversation III.
Reading of French short stories and conversation based on stimulating everyday French-life subjects.
Prerequisite: French 212, or permission of instructor.
*30 hours in each language.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 77
French 231-2. French Composition I.
Strengthens the students grammatical background and improves his writing ability.
Prerequisite: French 103, or two or three years of high school French.
French 232-2. French Composition II.
Basic principles of writing; social and commercial correspondence included.
Prerequisite: French 231, or permission of instructor.
French 233-2. French Composition III.
Original composition in French based on the study of outstanding literary texts.
Prerequisite: French 232, or permission of instructor.
French 311-3. Survey of French Literature I.
Survey course in French literature involving the reading and study of the short story and poetry, from the beginnings to the present. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: French 213 or 233, or four years of high school French.
French 312-3. Survey of French Literature II.
Analysis of the main literary forms through novels and other representative works.
Prerequisite: French 213 or 233, or permission of instructor.
French 313-3. Survey of French Literature III.
Development of the drama, essay and great French letters through the centuries. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: French 213 or 233, or permission of instructor.
French 351-3. Renaissance and
Classicism I: Prose.
Brief look at medieval antecedents. Study of the novel from Rabelais to the end of the classical period. Chief writers of other prose. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: French 312, or permission of instructor.
French 352-3. Renaissance and
Classicism II: Drama.
Lecture and study of selected major dramas of the period. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: French 313, or permission of instructor.
French 353-3. Renaissance and Classicism III: Poetry and Miscellaneous Genres.
Lecture and discussion of the literature of the period with special attention to poetry and miscellaneous genres. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: French 311, or permission of instructor.
German
German 101-4. Elementary German I.
An introductory course in German, including pronunciation, grammar and reading, with emphasis on speaking and understanding.
German 102-4. Elementary German II.
Continuation of German 101. Prerequisite: German 101, or one or two years of high school German.
German 103-4. Elementary German III.
Continuation of German 102. Prerequisite: German 102, or two years of high school German.
German 211-3. German Reading and Conversation I.
Intermediate course involving conversational practice on functional topics and reading of contemporary short stories.
Prerequisite: German 103, or two or three years of high school German.
German 212-3. German Reading and Conversation II.
Reading of articles and stories reflecting life in Germany today; conversation and discussion on related topics.
Prerequisite: German 211, or permission of instructor.
German 213-3. German Reading and Conversation III.
Contemporary German novel as basis for reading and discussion; intensive conversation on a more advanced level.
Prerequisite: German 212, or permission of instructor.


78 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
German 231-2. German Composition I.
Intermediate course to review and strengthen the knowledge of the structure of the German language as a basis for more advanced work in all language skills.
Prerequisite: German 103, or two or three years of high school German.
German 232-2. German Composition II.
Advanced vocabulary and idiom as a basis for composition; practice in writing.
Prerequisite: German 231, or permission of instructor.
German 233-2. German Composition III.
Advanced work in structure and grammar leading to original composition in German, inspired by literary readings.
Prerequisite: German 232, or permission of instructor.
German 311-3. Survey of German Literature I.
General history of German literature from its beginnings to the period of enlightenment. Reading of representative works, lectures on biography and criticism and recitation. Conducted in German.
Prerequisite: German 213 or 233, or four years of high school German.
German 312-3. Survey of German Literature II.
Comprehensive history of German literature, concentrating on the periods of enlightenment, storm and stress, classicism and romanticism. Conducted in German.
Prerequisite: German 213 or 233, or permission of instructor.
German 313-3. Survey of German Literature III.
Comprehensive history of German literature from romanticism to modern times including realism, naturalism and post World War II literature.
Prerequisite: German 213 or 233, or permission of instructor.
German 351-3. Enlightenment and
Classical Period I: Prose.
Survey of the historical and philosophical backgrounds of the period and a detailed study of the principal authors as revealed in their philosophical essays and novels. Conducted in German.
Prerequisite: German 213 or 233, or four years of high school German.
Spanish
Spanish 101-4. Elementary Spanish I.
The basic course in Spanish, with emphasis primarily on pronunciation, understanding and speaking, and secondarily, on grammar, reading and writing.
Spanish 102-4. Elementary Spanish II.
Continuation of Spanish 101. Prerequisite: Spanish 101, or one or two years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 103-4. Elementary Spanish III.
Continuation of Spanish 102. Prerequisite: Spanish 102, or two years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 211-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation I.
Intermediate course involving the reading of several of the best modern Spanish American novels, conversation in Spanish, and related exercises in vocabulary, idioms and grammar.
Prerequisite: Spanish 103, or two or three years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 212-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation II.
Reading of several outstanding modern Spanish novels, conversation in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 213-3. Spanish Reading and Conversation III.
Reading of Spanish American short stories illustrative of different aspects of the life and culture of the people of this region.
Prerequisite: Spanish 212, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 231-2. Spanish Composition I.
Intermediate course to review and strengthen knowledge of the structure of the Spanish language as a basis for more advanced work in speaking, understanding, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: Spanish 103, or two or three years of high school Spanish.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 79
Spanish 232-2. Spanish Composition II.
Spanish composition oriented toward the art of social commercial correspondence.
Prerequisite: Spanish 231, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 233-2. Spanish Composition III.
Original composition in Spanish inspired by valuable literary readings.
Prerequisite: Spanish 232, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 311-3. Survey of Spanish Literature I.
Survey of Spanish Medieval and Renaissance literature from El Cid to the Mystic Poets. Reading of representative works, lectures on biography and criticism, and recitation will be included. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 213 or 233, or four years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 312-3. Survey of Spanish Literature II.
General survey of the literature of Spain from Cervantes through the Romantic era, including the Siglo de Oro, Neoclassicism and Romanticism.
Prerequisite: Spanish 213 or 233, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 313-3. Survey of Spanish Literature III.
Spanish literature since 1870, including Realism. Regionalism, Naturalism, the Generation of 1898, the genero chico and more recent works.
Prerequisite: Spanish 213 or 233, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 331-3. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition I.
Course in the structure of the language to prepare the student for advanced work in conversation, reading and writing.
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish through 233, or four years of high school Spanish.
Spanish 332-3. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition II.
Advanced study in vocabulary, idioms and grammatical structure of the language.
Prerequisite: Spanish 331, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 333-3. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition III.
Study of Spanish morphology and syntax, as exemplified in texts of literary level.
Prerequisite: Spanish 332, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 351-3. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro I: Novel.
After consideration of the medieval antecedents of the novel and of the historical and cultural background of the Renaissance, the reading, literary analysis and discussion of the romance of chivalry, La Celestina, the picaresque, pastoral, and Moorish novels and Don Quixote will be the principal aim of the course.
Prerequisite: Spanish 313, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 352-3. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro II: Drama.
Literary study of the drama in this period. Profound study of the genre from Lope de Vega to Calderon de la Barca. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 313, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 353-3. Spanish Literature of the Renaissance and Siglo de Oro III: Poetry and Miscellaneous Genres.
Poetry and other miscellaneous genres of the period. Survey of the influences, concepts and traditions of the era, as they relate to the study of poetry. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 313, or permission of instructor.
Spanish 411-3. Spanish Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries I: Novel.
After a brief review of the literature of the preceding centuries, the course will involve the study of the chief works of the period, with additional biographical and critical material. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish 313, or permission of instructor.




DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 81
Music
The music program provides opportunities 1. for students to prepare for careers in music teaching or performance, and 2. for students majoring in other fields to enhance their appreciation and enjoyment of music and to participate in group music activities or obtain individual instruction in voice, piano or instrumental music.
All students majoring in music must enroll in at least the minimum ensemble credits required for their respective degrees. Students minoring in music must enroll in at least six quarter hours of music ensembles. Not more than twelve quarter hours of music ensemble will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not specializing in music.
Students electing degree programs which require applied music (individual lessons) shall receive first priority for enrollment in these courses. Students who wish to elect applied music lessons which would not count as degree requirements will receive last priority, and if teaching time is not available, they must drop the course (if already enrolled) and wait until the time becomes available during future quarters. A student majoring or minoring in music must be enrolled in the basic required courses, (Theory I, II, III, IV, etc.), before being considered officially a major or minor in music.
Applied music may be taken for one quarter hour of credit (the requirements of which includes one half-hour lesson and a minimum of six hours of practice per week) or two quarter hours of credit (including a one-hour lesson and requiring a minimum of twelve hours of practice per week). Students taking applied music as a part of their degree requirements are not charged an applied music lesson fee.
All students majoring or minoring in music must meet a minimum proficiency level in piano relative to their degree program, satisfying a faculty committee during the jury examinations. Detailed proficiency requirements for all majors and minors are available at the department of music. Examinations before a faculty jury will be held at the end of each quarter for students taking applied music. The individual instructor may waive this examination at his discretion. Music majors must perform an upper-divisional hearing before the faculty in their chosen applied music specialty at the end of the sophomore year. Transfer students will be auditioned during the jury examinations following their first quarter of study in the Department of Music.
Course descriptions of applied music serve only as a guide for the determination of the levels of performance proficiency. Actual performance ability required for applied music and music education degrees is determined by the faculty in the Department of Music.
Recital Performance Requirements for Music Majors. All Music Education majors are required to perform as a minimum, thirty minutes of music in public recital during the junior or senior year. All Applied Music majors are required to perform thirty minutes of music in public recital during the junior year and fifty minutes of music in public recital during the senior year. Students scheduled to perform junior and/or senior recitals are required to perform the entire recital repertoire, as a preview, before the music faculty at least three weeks in advance of the scheduled recital.
Recital Attendance Requirements. It is agreed that listening to live music performances is of paramount importance in the training of musicians. For that reason, the music department asks that a specific number of concerts be attended by the student before a degree in music can be conferred. At each registration, the music department will announce the exact number of concerts required for that particular quarter.


82 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
In all, for graduation, ten quarters of satisfactory recital attendance are required of all entering freshman music majors. (Satisfactory recital attendance for transfer music majors is computed according to the following formula: the total remaining quarters before graduation, minus two.)
Failure to meet the recital requirement will result in a delayed graduation. A student whose graduation has been delayed by a recital attendance deficiency may make up the total deficiency during the quarter immediately following the original graduation date. Further details concerning the recital requirement may be obtained at the music department office.
Music Education
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Music 101-103. Music Theory I, II, III 12
Music 201-203. Music Theory IV, V, VI 12
Music 200. Music Literature 3
Music 301-302. Music History 6
Music 303 and 406. Conducting 6
Music 304. Orchestration 3
Music 305. Analysis of Music 3
Music 306, 307 and 308. Music Methods 6
Music 320 to 325. Music Techniques and Pedagogy 8
Applied Music 16
Ensemble 8
Electives (music) 6
Music Education Major Applied Music Requirements Secondary Vocal
Major area to recommendation for Music 461 9
Electives (keyboard or instrumental) 2
Piano through proficiency examination 5
Secondary Instrumental
Major area to recommendation for Music 461 9
Piano through proficiency examination 3
One hour each: violin, trumpet, clarinet 3
Elective 1
If major instrument is clarinet, trumpet, or violin, secondary requirement in that area will be waived and electives may be substituted.
Keyboard-vocal
Piano or organ to Music 461 9
Voice 5
Electives 2
Keyboard-instrumental
Piano or organ to Music 461 9
Instrument other than keyboard 3
One hour each: violin, trumpet, clarinet 3
Elective (voice suggested)
If the secondary instrument is clarinet, trumpet, or violin, the requirement in that area will be waived and electives may be substituted.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 83
Elementary Music Major
Any single applied performance through Music 263 8
Piano: pass proficiency before senior year student teaching 4
Voice 4
If the single performance medium is voice or piano, substitution for the secondary requirement may be made in other approved areas.
Applied Music
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Music 101-103. Theory of Music I, II, III 12
Music 201-203. Theory of Music IV, V, VI 12
Music 200. Music Literature 3
Music 301-302. Music History 6
Music 304. Orchestration 3
Music 305. Analysis of Music 3
Music 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325. Pedagogy 2
Music 401-402. Counterpoint (16th and 18th Century) 6
Applied Music 24
Piano (or applied elective) 6
Ensemble 4
Electives (music) 9
Music Minor
Required Courses
Music 100-103. Theory of Music I, II, III Music 201-203. Theory of Music IV, V, VI Music 200. Music Literature Music 301-302. History of Music Applied Music Piano*
Music Ensemble
Music Elective (Music 100 suggested)
NONAPPLIED MUSIC
Music 100-3. Introduction to Music.
Non-technical in nature and designed for students who are not music majors to develop competence in understanding music through guided listening. The elements of music are studied, discussed and demonstrated.
Quarter Hours 12 12 3 6 7 2 6 3
Music 101-4. Theory of Music I.
A thorough groundwork is laid in the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic elements of music through study, discussion, demonstration and the applied music concepts of sight singing, ear training and keyboard harmony.
Music 102-4. Theory of Music II.
Continuation of Music 101.
Prerequisite: Music 101.
Students electing piano as their principal applied field in the music minor take seven hours of piano credit and two hours of elective credit in applied music other than piano.


84 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Music 103-4. Theory of Music III.
Continuation of Music 102.
Prerequisite: Music 102.
Music 104-3. Fundamentals of Music.
Designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of principles of notation, basic rhythmics, singing, reading of music, and the use of the piano as an accompanying instrument.
This course is a prerequisite for Music 306-3, and may also be taken by music majors and minors needing additional study in the fundamentals of music.
Music 127-3. Introduction to the
History of Afro-American Music.
(Same as Afro-American Studies 127.) General introductory course designed to present an awareness of the source and origin of Afro-American Music. The course will be presented quarterly with discussions, films, and recording of Afro-American music and musicians.
Music 200-3. Introduction to Music Literature.
A presentation of examples representing the principal forms in the literature of music. Listening examples as well as material found in musical scores are used for study.
Prerequisites: Music 100, except for music majors.
Music 201-4. Theory of Music IV.
Advanced musical concepts and training in aural, visual and keyboard skills. Study of chromatic music through the late nineteenth century: Stress is placed on analysis and writing.
Prerequisite: Music 101-103, or equivalent.
Music 202-4. Theory of Music V.
Continuation of Music 201.
Prerequisite: Music 201.
Music 203-4. Theory of Music VI.
Continuation of Music 202.
Prerequisite: Music 202.
Music 301-3. History of Music.
The development of the history of music and style from ancient Greece to the early 18th century.
Music 302-3. History of Music.
The development of music history and style in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
Music 303-3. Conducting.
Designed to give the student a background in the basic principles of conducting and to allow him to become confident in the use of standard conducting techniques.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 304-3. Orchestration.
A study of scoring for the various instrumental choirs, small instrumental ensembles and large performing groups.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 305-3. Analysis of Music.
Advanced analytical techniques applied to various musical styles. Study of twentieth century methods of analysis by Allen Forte, Edward Cone, and Paul Hindemith. Exceptional formal procedures examined. Contemporary music literature stressed.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 306-3. Elementary School Music Methods.
The six activities stressed are singing, listening, creative, rhythmic, instrumental and reading. Stress is given to modern elementary level music teaching methods.
Prerequisite: Music 104, or permission of instructor.
Music 307-3. Secondary School Choral Methods.
Instruction and practice in the methods of teaching and techniques used in directing school choral groups.
Prerequisite: Music 303.
Music 308-3. Instrumental Music Methods.
A study of the organization and administrative skills with methods and materials for the instrumental teacher. Stress is placed on modern teaching methods for a well-rounded instrumental program.
Prerequisite: Music 303.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 85
Music 312-3. Band Literature.
A survey of original band works and selected transcriptions, suitable for school bands of various sizes, instrumentation and levels of proficiency. Course content includes a brief history of bands; a study of graded band repertoire; interpretation of specified band scores, emphasis on original band works; an evaluation of band transcriptions; and a balanced concert program for symphonic band resulting in musical growth and good listening. Further study includes specific styles of music and rehearsal procedures necessary to produce proper results; wind and percussion ensembles and their repertoire; and listening and analysis of transcription with recordings and score study.
Music 316-3. Piano Literature.
A survey of piano literature from the pre-Baroque era to the present day. Performance and study of the concert repertoire which exists for solo, duet, two-piano, and concerto mediums. Performance practices of each period examined in regard to dynamics, tempo, ornamentation and improvisation. Various editions of the standard works criticized. Discussion of the historical, stylistic, formal and aesthetic features of the works performed in class.
Music 318-3. Choral Literature.
A study of the chronological and stylistic development of choral music from the later middle ages to the present.
Music 320-2. String Techniques and Materials.
Practical instruction in the technique of playing and teaching the string instruments. Lecture periods are devoted to the organization of string programs in the public schools.
Music 321-2. Vocal Pedagogy.
Designed to give students who will teach private voice a general survey of materials and methods employed in the teaching of private voice.
Music 322-2. Piano Pedagogy.
Study of techniques and literature used in teaching piano, both privately and in group lessons. Survey of books dealing with piano technique and interpretation.
Music 323-2. Woodwind Techniques and Materials.
Practical instruction in playing the w'oodwind instruments. Materials for instru-
mental music in the public schools are studied.
Music 324-2. Brass Techniques and Materials.
Practical instruction in playing the brass instruments. Materials for instrumental music in the public schools are studied.
Music 325-2. Percussion Techniques and Materials.
Practical instruction in playing the percussion instruments. Materials for instrumental music in the public schools are studied.
Music 327-3. History of Afro-American Music.
(Same as Afro-American Studies 327.) Designed as an introduction to the history of black music and musicians in America. The course will be presented quarterly with lectures on the development and contribution of black music to American musical culture.
Music 401-3. Sixteenth Century Counterpoint.
Study of modal counterpoint and vocal polyphony of the sixteenth century. Composition in the style of Palestrina.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 402-3. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint.
Study of textures from two to eight strata. Analysis of invention, sinfonia, chorale-prelude, preludes, and fugues by J. S. Bach. All contrapuntal techniques of development studied in detail, including textural inversion.
Prerequisite: Music 203.
Music 403-3. Composition.
Private lesson (30 minutes) plus composition workshop meeting each week for discussion and performance of student compositions. Understanding of musical structure and idioms gained by writing in traditional and contemporary practice for voice, various instrumental ensembles and solo media. Smaller forms for solo, duo or small ensembles. Advanced study (according to the ability of the student) in the larger forms includes study of contemporary techniques of writing and new notational processes for both chamber and orchestral ensembles. Prerequisite: Music 305.


86 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Music 406-3. Score Reading and
Advanced Conducting.
A study of conducting problems as they relate to analysis, marking, reading and conducting of musical scores. The areas of choral literature, band literature, orchestra literature and oratorio literature are studied.
Prerequisite: Music 303.
Music 407-3. Contemporary Music.
European and American music since 1910 to the present. A study of the techniques of composition as well as the literature that is based on the use of serialized tones, avant garde experiments, nationalistic schools of thought and electronic means of composition. Stress placed on the works by composers now living and on the standard works of the recent past. Class participation in contemporary music ensembles for class performances required.
APPLIED MUSIC
Ensembles
Music 231-1. Large Music Ensemble I.
Choral Union, Concert Band, Stage Band, Orchestra, Concert Choir, Metropolitan Singers, Mens Choir, Womens Choir. Participation in these ensembles is open to all students who wish to perform in a large ensemble by audition or permission of the instructor. Open only to freshman-sophomore level students. May be repeated for credit for six quarters at the same course number.
Music 232-1. Small Music Ensemble I.
Small vocal and instrumental ensembles meeting on a regularly scheduled basis to rehearse and perform music under the direction of a qualified faculty member of the Department of Music. May be repeated for credit for six quarters at the same course number.
Music 331-1. Large Music Ensemble II.
Choral Union, Concert Band, Stage Band, Orchestra, Concert Choir, Metropolitan Singers, Mens Choir, Womens Choir. Participation in these ensembles is open to all students who wish to perform in a large
ensemble by audition or permission of the instructor. Open to junior-senior level students. Students are eligible for this course number after they have completed six quarters of small music ensemble at the 231 level. May be repeated for credit for six quarters at the same course number.
Music 332-1. Small Music Ensemble II.
Small vocal and instrumental ensembles meeting on a regularly scheduled basis to rehearse and perform music under the direction of a qualified faculty member of the Department of Music. May be repeated for credit for six quarters at the same course number.
Voice
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Preparatory study in vocal techniques. Vocalization emphasizing breath control and tone production. Study of songs according to the needs of the student. Study of the vocal mechanism; problems of diction, placement, range and breath control. Art songs of simple structure.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Study of Italian art songs, early English songs, songs of other English and American composers. Emphasis is placed on tone production, diction, vowel formation and placement. Study of Handelian arias and airs of early Italian composers; Oratorio solos of Handel and Mendelssohn.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2.
Bach oratorio, the aria and recitative; selections from Italian art songs; easier Mozart arias and contemporary songs. Study of Lieder (Wolf, Brahms, Mozart) and study of French songs (Faure, Debussy, Duparc).
Music 363-1 or 2.
Partial recital (30 minutes), and continuation of Music 362.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Study of 19th Century opera by German, French or Italian composers; study of contemporary art songs.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 87
Music 463-2.
Full recital (50 minutes of memorized music) in which the student will perform vocal works using the Italian, French, German and English languages.
Piano
Music 120-1, 121-1, 122-1.
Basic Piano. All music majors and minors, regardless of their areas of musical concentration, must meet a minimum piano proficiency level. The basic piano course is designed to meet the needs of those students for whom their college studies represent a first introduction to piano playing. Class lessons with six members in an electronic piano laboratory provide the necessary training for beginning and elementary pianists to qualify for taking the proficiency examination required for all music majors.
Music 161-1, 162-1, 163-1. Secondary Study or Concentration.
Music education major. Designed to meet the piano proficiency requirement with study of beginning and intermediate adult piano course and technic. Study coordinated with the keyboard requirements of Music 101 through Music 203 in improvised accompaniments and transposition. Intermediate repertoire. Examination before a faculty board in technic and repertoire for secondary piano students. Upper-divisional hearing for concentration.
Music 261-2, 262-2, 263-2. Applied Major Study.
Individually designed private lessons for those students with preparatory backgrounds of several years of private lessons. Specific attention given technical advancement (detailed requirements available from the Department of Music office) and wide acquaintance with various musical styles in the standard repertoire. Performance in public of solo concert literature stressed. Upper-divisional hearing before a faculty board, during Music 263-2.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2. Applied Major Study.
(2 hours credit.) Applied Concentration (Music Education major), (1 hour credit). Continuation of Music 263-1 or 2. Private lessons designed to meet the students needs
of technique and repertoire emphasizing artistic maturity. Preparation for the required partial recital (30 minutes of memorized music) with representative selections from pre-Bach through the contemporary period.
Music 363-1 or 2.
Junior recital.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2. Applied Major Study.
(2 hours credit.) Continuation of Music 363-2. Concerto or large forms such as the sonata in the advanced concert literature. Stylistic interpretation emphasized.
Music 463-2.
Senior recital.
Organ
Music 161-1 or 2. 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2. Manual and Pedal Exercises.
Trio studies for manuals and pedals. Selected works by Bach, Dupre and Mendelssohn.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or piano proficiency on level of 261.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Bach, selected works from orgelbuch-lein, Eight Little Preludes and Fugues, selected pieces from Bonnet, Historical Organ Recitals, Vol. I; selected short pieces by modern composers.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Selections from pre-Bach composers, Bach, selected chorale preludes, preludes and fugues, and concertos; compositions by Franck, Karg-Elert, Reger and Contemporary writers. Music majors required partial recital (30 minutes of memorized music).
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Advanced works of Bach, Franck, Vierne, Widor, Messiaen, Karg-Elert, Sower-by and Mulet.
Music 463-2.
Senior recital.


88 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Violin
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales, at least two octaves. Etudes of Kreutzer and Sevcik, Doflein Method Books 4 and 5. Study of basic problems of bow and left hand technique. Solos in the first five positions; sonatas of Handel, Corelli, Telemann; concertos of Nardini and Accolay.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales in three octaves. Etudes by Sevcik, Shradieck, study of upper positions, Doflein Method Book 5. Sonatas by Mozart, Handel, Schubert; sonatinas, concertos by Vivaldi, Viotti, Spohr, Bach, and the Romance by Beethoven.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales and arpeggios in three octaves. Etudes by Sevcik, Rode, Dou-nis, study of double stops and chromatic fingering. Sonatas by Bach, Beethoven, Greig, concertos by Mozart, Mendelssohn, Vieux-temps, Bruch. Study of basic chamber music and symphonic repertoire. Viola study. Prepare group of pieces for public recital.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Advanced study in scales, arpeggios, and etudes. Sonatas by Bach, Beethoven. Brahms, and modern works. Concertos by Wieniawski, Lalo, Beethoven, Tchaikowsky, or of other suitable difficulty. Orchestral studies, including solo parts, Strauss and Wagner, and advanced chamber music.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Viola
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales, at least two octaves. Etudes by Kreutzer, Campagnoli. Study of basic problems of bow and left hand techniques. Concertos or sonatas by Telemann, Marcelo, Eccles.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales in three octaves; etudes; Handel and Samitz concertos; transcriptions by Bach, works for violin and cello. Chamber music literature.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales and arpeggios, etudes, study of double stops and chromatic fingering. Study of chamber music and standard symphonic repertoire. Solo works by Bach, Marais, Vaughan-Williams, Schumann, Bloch, viola parts by Mozart Symphonic Concertante, and duos for violin and viola.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Advanced scales, arpeggios, etudes. Advanced chamber music parts and orchestral parts including solo viola parts, and parts from Strauss and Wagner scores. Sonatas by Brahms, Hindemith, Reger, Schubert, and modern compositions.
Music 463-1 or 2. Senior recital.
Cello
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales in two octaves. Etudes by Duport, Schroeder, Lee, and Deak, of medium difficulty. Basic bow and left hand technique. Marcello and Corelli sonatas, Goltermann and Romberg concertos.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales in three octaves. Continuation of etudes and technical studies and above. Sonatas by Vivaldi, Eccles, Sam-martini, Handel, early Beethoven. Chamber music and orchestral parts of suitable difficulty.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales and arpeggios. Etudes by Popper and others. Sonatas by Bach (2nd and 3rd), Brahms (E minor), Rachmaninoff. Concertos by Lalo, Dohnanyi, Saint-Saens. Suitable chamber music and orchestral parts.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Advanced scale and etude study (Popper, Piatti). Sonatas by Breval, Boccherini, Beethoven, Brahms, Schubert. Concertos by Boccherini and Haydn, also study of modern works. Advanced chamber music and orchestral studies, including solo parts and Strauss and Wagner excerpts.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 89
Music 463-1 or 2. Senior recital.
Double Bass
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Major and minor scales in two octaves. Etudes (such as Simandl or Bille Method). Study of basic bow and left hand technique. Solos by Corelli, Marcello, Vivaldi, Capuzzi.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Continuation of scales and etudes. Excerpts from Bach works, cello sonatas, and Galliard sonata. Study of orchestral parts of standard repertoire.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Scales and etudes. Study of orchestral parts and chamber music parts in the repertoire. Hindemith. Handel solo works, Ditters-dorf concerto.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Advanced technique. Orchestral studies including Strauss and Wagner and solo parts in the repertoire. Concertos by Dragonetti, Koussevitzky, Storch, and modern works for bass.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Flute
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Harmonic minor scales. Harmonic fingerings. Progressive studies and etudes. Solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Melodic minor scales; Bergigvier, 18 Exercises for Flute; Anderson, Etudes Op. 33; solos. Band-orchestra-small ensemble.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
All major and minor scales and arpeggios. Donjon, Modern Flutist; Anderson, Etudes Op. 15; Sonata or concerto. Band-orchestra-ensemble.
Music 461-1 or 2 through 462-1 or 2.
Popp-Soussman, Flute Method, Part III; Modern Flutist; Anderson, Etudes Op. 21 & 60; Sonata or concerto. Band-orchestra, ensemble.
Music 463-1 or 2. Senior recital.
Oboe
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Harmonic minor scales. Reed making. Progressive studies and etudes. Solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Melodic minor scales. Sellner method for oboe. Labate, daily exercises for oboe. Band-orchestra.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
All major and minor scales and arpeggios. Sellner etudes. Mayer, Oboe Passages; sonata or concerto. Band-orchestra-small ensemble.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Sellner etudes. Selected studies for oboe. Ferling studies. Sonata or concerto. Band-orchestra-ensemble.
Music 463-1 or 2. Senior recital.
Clarinet
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Applied Clarinet. Klose 11 Scales, scales in 3rds; arpeggios; etudes and studies, solos; Concertino-Weger; Arabesque-Jeanjean Con-certo-Mozart; Sonatas: Telemann and Hindemith.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Klose II continued work in technique. Etudes and Studies. Solos: Master-works by Clarinet and Piano Weger concertos 1 and 2; Introduction and Danse by Tomasi; Brahms Sonatas 1 and 2.


90 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Klose II continued work in technique; Orchestral studies by Bonade; Premier Rhapsody by Debussy; Duo Concertante by Milhaud: Rhapsody by Osborne; Sonata by Bernstein; Sonatina by Szalowski; Trios by Glinka and Brahms.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Etudes and Studies. Orchestral Studies by Bonade; Concertos by Tomasi-Bozza and Nielson; 3 pieces Stravinski; Quintet by Brahms.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Bassoon
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Placement of reed and tongue for correct embouchure; practice on attacks, long tones, production of dynamics; beginning of scale studies. J. Weissenborn, Studies, Book I, Op. 8; exercises in simple articulation and rhythm; extension of range through increase of scale studies; simple melodies.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Exercises in tenor clef; major and minor scales, intervals and arpeggios up to four flats and four sharps, with emphasis on intonation; elementary solos. Completion of Weissenborn, Studies, Book I; all scales and arpeggios in fluent legato and stacatto played with wide dynamic range; more advanced solos; reed-making.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Review of basic principles; F. Oubra-dous, Daily Scales and Exercises; J. Weissenborn, Studies, Book II, Op. 8; solos; lancourt, 26 Melodic Studies and 32 Progressive Exercises; Flament, Studies and Reed-Making; Milde, Concert Studies, Book I, Op. 26; orchestral studies; I. B. Gambaro, 18 Studies; sonatas by Hindemith, Longo, and others; Giampieri, 16 Daily Studies.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
A. Orefici, Bravura Studies; Milde, Concert Studies, Books I and II, Op. 26; advanced solos; Weller, Orchestra Studies; Bourdeau, 3 Solos de Concert; Saint-Saens, Sonata; concertos and solos by Mozart,
Weber, and modern American composers; Gumbert-Wiegand, Orchestral Studies (6 Vols.); Stadio, Orchestral Studies; Wagner, Orchestral Studies; Strauss, Orchestral Studies.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Saxophone
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Harmonic minor scales. Progressive studies and etudes. Solos. Band.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Melodic minor scales. Labanchi, 33 Concert Etudes, Vol. I. Supplementary studies. Solos. Band-orchestra-small ensemble.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
All major and minor scales and arpeggios. Bassi, 27 Virtuoso Studies for Saxophone, Vol. I. Labanchi, 33 Concert Etudes, Vol. II. Sonata or concerto. Band-small ensemble.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Labanchi, 33 Concert Etudes, Vol. III. Virtuoso Studies. Sonata or concerto. Band-small ensemble.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
French Horn
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2. 163-1 or 2.
Technical requirements: All major scales and arpeggios. Emphasis on fundamentals of horn playing; development of strong embouchure; control of tongue; correct breath control and hand position in bell of horn; simple transposition and hand muting. Studies: Kopprasch Book I, Mueller 22 Etudes, Alphonse Books I and II, Krol Natural Horn Studies. Solo Material; Saint-Saens Romance; Corelli Sonatas; Mozart Concerto No. 1; band, orchestra, and ensemble literature.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Continuation of transpositions; orchestral excerpts; minor scales and arpeggios; extension of range. Kopprasch Book II, Max-


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 91
ime Alphone Books III and IV; Gallay 30 Etudes; Mozart Concerto No. II; R. Strauss Concerto No. I; Beethoven Sonata; Rosetti Concerto in E-flat; etc. Band, orchestral, and ensemble literature.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
All tranpositions; lip trills; emphasis on facility and dynamic ranges. Alphonse Books V and VI; Cugnot Studies; Gallay 12 Brilliant Etudes; Belloli 8 Studies. R. Strauss Concerto No. 2; Hindemith Sonata; Mozart Concerto No. 3; Haydn Concerto No. 1; Saint-Saens Concert Piece; Cherubini Etude. Band, orchestra, and ensemble literature.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Verne Reynolds Etudes; Gunther Schuller Etudes; Gliere Concerto; Mozart Concerto No. IV; Gordon Jacobs Concerto; Hindemith Concerto; Schumann Adagio and Allegro Heiden Sonata. Ensemble: Brahms Trio Op. 40 Mozart Quintet; Heiden Quintet.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Trumpet-Cornet
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
All major scales. Etudes and studies. Solos comparable to Barat, Orientale; Ro-partz, Andante et allegro. Special exercises, including Walter Smith, lip flexibility on the cornet and trumpet.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
All major and melodic minor scales. Etudes and selected studies. Solos comparable to Bozza, Badinage; Handel, Aria con varia-zioni. Special exercises. Transposition.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Maxime-Alphonse, Etudes nouvelles pour trompette, Bks. I and II. Solos comparable to Hindemith, Sonata; Concertos by Torelli, Vivaldi, and Haydn. Special exercises. Transposition. Orchestral passages.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Continuation of Music 361, 362 and
363.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Trombone-Baritone Horn
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
All major scales. Arpeggios. Studies and Etudes. Double and triple articulations. Solos.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2. 263-1 or 2.
All harmonic and melodic minor scales. Arpeggios. Studies and Etudes. Special studies in tone production and lip flexibility. Solos.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Arpeggios. Studies from Arban, Blazhe-vich, Kopprasch, Schloddberg. Melodious Etudes, Book III, Rochut. Baritonists Studio, Wagner. Solos.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Continuation of Music 361, 362 and
363.
Music 463-1 or 2. Senior recital.
Baritone Horn
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
All major scales. Arpeggios. Studies and Etudes. Double and triple articulations. Solos.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
All harmonic and melodic minor scales. Arpeggios. Studies and Etudes. Special studies in tone production and lip flexibility. Solos.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Arpeggios. Studies from Arban, Blazhe-vich, Kopprasch, Schloddberg. Melodious Etudes, Book III, Rochut. Baritonists Studio, Wagner. Solos.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Continuation of Music 363.
Music 463-1 or 2. Senior recital.


92 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Tuba
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
All major scales, arpeggios. Study of etudes by Eby, Bell, Arban. Special studies in tone production, articulation, lip flexibility. Solos.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
All harmonic and melodic minor scales. Arpeggios. Studies by Eby, Arban, Cimera, Bell. Special studies in tone production, articulation, lip flexibility. Solos.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Transcriptions. Arpeggios. Studies by Arban, Dimera, Kopprasch. Orchestral and band passages. Solos.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Continuation of Music 363.
Percussion
Music 161-1 or 2, 162-1 or 2, 163-1 or 2.
Advanced studies for the snare drum and tympani. Studies for the cymbals and bells. Band-orchestra. Solos.
Music 261-1 or 2, 262-1 or 2, 263-1 or 2.
Study of xylophone or marimba. Instruction in all percussion accessories. Snare drum solos. Solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 361-1 or 2, 362-1 or 2, 363-1 or 2.
Intermediate studies for xylophone or marimba. Continuation of all phases of the percussion accessories. Solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 461-1 or 2, 462-1 or 2.
Solo work for xylophone or marimba. Thorough knowledge of all types of percussion instruments. Snare drum solos. Band-orchestra.
Music 463-1 or 2.
Senior recital.
Philosophy
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy 4
Philosophy 211. Logic I 5
Electives
A minimum of 48 additional quarter hours in philosophy grouped at least as follows: 6 at the 100 level, 9 at the 200 level, 20 at the 300 level, 9 at the 400 level; selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy.
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Philosophy 101. Introduction to Philosophy 4
Philosophy 102. Western World Religions 3
Philosophy 211. Logic I 5
Philosophy 216. Ethics I 3
Philosophy 301. History of Philosophy 6
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional quarter hours in philosophy courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 93
Phil. 101-4. Introduction to Philosophy.
Designed to introduce the beginning student to the fundamental issues of man, his cultural and physical environment, and problems of a philosophical nature.
Phil. 102-3. Western Religions, of the World.
Introductory study of mans religious experience, beliefs, practices and institutions in Europe, Mediterranean lands and the Western Hemisphere, particularly Judaism, Islam and Christianity.
Phil. 103-3. Eastern Religions of the World.
Introductory study of mans religious experience, beliefs, practices and institutions in Africa and the Orient, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism and tribal faiths.
Phil. 202-3. Contemporary Philosophy.
An examination and criticism of leading contemporary philosophy in Europe and America: Pragmatism, Existentialism, Analytical Philosophy.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 211-5. Introduction to Logic I.
Deductive logic, with emphasis upon logic of classes and propositions. The application of deductive logic to practical argumentation and reasoning is considered.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 214-3. Problems of Philosophy.
Introduction to philosophical research designed to deepen the students insight, skill and command in philosophy, particularly in regard to the classical problems: Truth. Reality, God, Law, Substance, Freedom, Causation, Mans Nature, Responsibility, Value, History, etc.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101.
Phil. 215-3. Aesthetics.
An examination of theories of the nature of artistic experience, creativity, and critical evaluation from the historical and evaluative point of view. Field trips, guest speakers and projects in arts criticism are included.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 216-3. Ethics.
Introduction to major ethical theories and a consideration of their relevance to mans moral problems and decisions. Students participate in projects to test and observe ethical principles.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 218-3. Philosophies of Education.
Evaluation and study of the development of the philosophies of education historically and in terms of contemporary needs.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101.
Phil. 219-3. Philosophies of History.
Critical examination of traditional and contemporary philosophies of history, particularly as related to selected current history-making.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or permission of instructor.
Phil. 301-5. Introduction to Logic II.
Logic of the sciences and mathematics, including the statement calculus, abstract mathematical systems, the restricted predicate calculus, applications of modern symbolic logic in mathematics.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 211.
Special note on 310-340 series.
Aims and Procedures: The 310-340 series are designed to give students opportunity to work intensively in selected writings within the great traditions of philosophy. Selection is made from approved bibliographies as worked out by students and faculty at the beginning of each course upon review of the preparation and interests of the members of thp particular class. Research papers are presented by students and faculty in class. These courses are to train students in traditional philosophical disciplines with the hope that these insights, models and skills will be used productively in the departmental courses focused on contemporary action, in other collegiate studies, and in all of life.
Phil. 310-5. Epistemological Traditions.
Concentration on problems of knowledge and truth as described by sophists, cynics, skeptics, hedonists, epicureans, nominalists, positivists, psychoanalysts and existentialists.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in Philosophy.


94 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Phil. 320-5. Metaphysical Traditions.
Concentration on problems of the structure and meaning of reality as understood by Plato, Aristotle, neoplatonists, Zen, stoics, gnostics, Augustine, Thomas, idealists, realists and contemporary ontologists.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in philosophy.
Phil. 330-5. Ethical Traditions.
Concentration on philosophies mainly oriented to right action, e.g., Socrates, Plato, Jesus, Aristotle, stoics, humanists, romantics, common sense realists, puritans, utilitarians, Marx, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Tillich, Ayer, Hare.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in philosophy.
Phil. 340-5. Intuitive Traditions.
Concentration on para-rational philosophies such as theism, mysticism, soul, ideologies, romanticism and art, plus critiques of ways of studying intuited assumptions.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in philosophy.
Special note on 350-370 series.
Aims and Procedures: The 350-370-series courses are designed to provide urban-oriented students major opportunity in a metropolitan environment to examine specific current social and individual problems from a variety of philosophical viewpoints. Selection of the particular problems to be examined intensively within any given class will be made by the individual students subject to approval by the instructor. Design of the studies will be constructed by class and instructor during the first week of the course. Philosophical examination of problems will be accompanied by supervised individual participation in local programs illustrating the selected problems. Major community persons working with such programs will assist in examination, project design and supervision of students in their projects. Selected literature in the specific problem field will be studied. Research papers will be presented for critique in class. The current media will be a special resource. Members of the faculty outside the department will be invited to participate where appropriate. Practical judgments, i.e., wisdom, will constantly be emphasized.
Phil. 350-5. Social Philosophy I.
Selected concentration on problems profitably approached from a personal point of view: e.g., the good life, authenticity, success, freedom, responsibility, sexuality, family, leadership, rebellion, generation gap, alienation, mental health, pacifism, role of woman or man, the new morality, creativity.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in philosophy.
Phil. 360-5. Social Philosophy II.
Selected concentration on social problems from a philosophical point of view whose dimensions are generally less than national or global; e.g., urbanization, dehumanization through technology, justice for minorities, housing, education, juvenile delinquency, law enforcement, employment, invasion of privacy, censorship, eugenics, the establishment, the new militancies, business practices, ownership, transportation, decline of ruralism, the central city, suburbanism.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in philosophy.
Phil. 370-5. Social Philosophy III.
Selected concentration on social problems of more than regional scope from a philosophical point of view; e.g., war, peace, disarmament, industrial-military complex, role of Congress, role of national courts, role of Presidency, bureaucracy, national scientific programs, foreign policy, developing nations, CIA, FBI, FCC, law, the making of history, dissent, political ideologies, the American dream, federalism, states rights, organized crime, conservation, poverty, capitalism, communism, socialism.
Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours lower division studies in philosophy.
Phil. 411-3. Symbolic Logic.
Modern symbolic logic with emphasis on its relation to mathematics and science and on practical applications to problems in communication systems.
Prerequisites: Philosophy 101, 211 and
301.
Phil. 423-3. Philosophy of Science: Physical.
Advanced examination of the logic and methodologies of the physical sciences. Special emphasis is placed on general systems theory, information theory and cybernetics.
Prerequisite: 10 quarter hours upper division studies in philosophy, science or mathematics.


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 95
Phil. 424-3. Philosophy of Science: Biological.
Advanced examination of the logic and methodologies of the biological sciences. A continuation of Philosophy 423.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 423.
Phil. 425-3. Philosophy of Science: Social.
Advanced examination of the logic and methodologies of modern sciences, especially the social sciences. A continuation of Philosophy 424.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 424.
Phil. 431-3. History of Philosophy: Greece.
Pre-socratics through Aristotle. Prerequisite: 9 quarter hours in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Phil. 432-3. History of Philosophy: Roman and Medieval.
Augustine to Descartes.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 431.
Phil. 433-3. History of Philosophy: Modern.
Descartes to the present.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 432.


96 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Speech
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Speech 101. Public Speaking 3
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Speech 211. Discussion Methods 3
Speech 220. Oral Interpretation 3
Speech 221. Introduction to Theater 3
Speech 222. Techniques of Acting I 3
Speech 224. Introduction to Stagecraft 3
Speech 230. Voice and Diction 3
Speech 240. Introduction to Radio and Television 3
Speech 301. Advanced Public Speaking 3
Speech 328. Stage Directing 3
Speech 374. Psychology of Communication 3
Speech 410. Techniques of Persuasion 3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
Speech Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Speech 101. Public Speaking 3
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Speech 220. Oral Interpretation 3
Speech 221. Introduction to Theater 3
Speech 222. Techniques of Acting I 3
Speech 230. Voice and Diction 3
Speech 240. Introduction to Radio and Television 3
Electives
A minimum of 6 additional quarter hours in speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
Speech Pathology Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Speech 230. Voice and Diction 3
Speech 350-352. Speech Pathology 15
Speech 353. Audiology 3
Speech 450. Clinical Practice in Speech Correction 5
Speech 453. Practicum in Audiology 3


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 97
Electives
A minimum of 3 additional quarter hours in courses selected from the following list in
consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
Speech 330. Phonetics 3
Speech 374. Psychology of Communication 3
Speech 455. Programming of Speech Correction in the Public Schools 3
Psychology 311. Statistics in Psychology and Education 3
Psychology 315. Introduction to Psychological Testing 3
Psychology 425. Psychology of Exceptional Children 3
Speech 101-3. Public Speaking.
An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the basic theory of the art of public speaking, and to provide experience in the preparation and delivery of short talks.
Speech 201-3. Business and Professional Speaking.
An introductory course designed for the undergraduate student or the business person interested in the problems of oral communication in business and industry. Study and application is made of basic principles of communication theory in business and industrial reporting, demonstration, motivating and publicizing.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 210-3. Argumentation and Debate.
Acquaints the student with the complexity of social problems, methods of research, methods of logical analyses and development, construction of briefs, and techniques of refutation. Practice in preparation and delivery of sustained arguments. Specific work on selected debate topics.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 211-3. Discussion Methods.
Deals largely with the processes of decision-making in small groups and conferences; research and investigation, analysis of social problems, use of evidence and argument, and social interaction among participants. Practice in actual discussions, both in the role of participant and of leader.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission
of instructor.
Speech 215-1. Intercollegiate Forensics.
For those students participating extensively in competitive intercollegiate speech activities. A maximum of three credits in this course may be applied toward a degree.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 220-3. Oral Interpretation: Prose.
A study of traditional and contemporary theories of interpretation of prose, poetry and dramatic literature for the purpose of making that literature come alive for the listening audience. Emphasis is placed on reading all forms of literature aloud for the purpose of improving oral communicative skills and gaining experience in the interpretive form of artistic expression.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 221-3. Introduction to Theater.
A comprehensive view of theatrical art, providing an understanding of the living stage, its players and craftsmen, and its place as a cultural force in society from antiquity to contemporary times.
Prerequisite: Speech 101, or permission of instructor.
Speech 222-3. Techniques of Acting I.
An introduction to the basic principles of acting including improvement of voice, body and mind in the discipline of the theater. Particular emphasis is placed on the principles of stage movement and stage business.
Prerequisites: Speech 220 and 221, or permission of instructor.