Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1972-1973

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1972-1973
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text
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--753m
ERRATA
The following information was received too late to make changes in the appropriate sections of the catalog.
1. The number of quarter hours required for the Associate degree has been reduced from 93 to 90.
2. The number of quarter hours required for the Baccalaureate degree has been reduced from 183 to 180.
3. The above changes are necessary since the requirement of three quarter hours of physical education for the Associate degree and the Baccalaureate degree has been eliminated.


METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE BUILDINGS
Forum Building (Administration Building) 250 West Fourteenth Avenue 7 Three Thirty Three Building 333 West Colfax Avenue 13 Library 1421 Elati Street
innock College Center 45 Bannock Street 8 Cherokee Building 1090 Cherokee Street 14 Colfax College Center and Bookstore 520 West Colfax Avenue
Emily Griffith Opportunity School '250 Welton Street 9 Aaron Building 1447 Tremont Place 15 Press Building 1340 Glenarm Place
ruble A Building .00 Glenarm Place 10 Woodmen Building 1440 Speer Boulevard 16 Student Activities Center 710 West Colfax Avenue
Glenarm Building 222 Glenarm Place 11 Fox Building 1443 Fox Street 17 Child Care Center 1038 and 1044 Cherokee
ook Building 12 Gold Building 18 Olympic Building
10k Building




METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE
BULLETIN
250 West 14th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
Volume VIII 1972-1973 Number 2
Published monthly except January. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Denver, Colorado.
This publication has been authorized by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. The provisions contained herein are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The information presented is based on commonly accepted practices at Colorado state colleges and plans developed to date for Metropolitan State College, but the College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the students term of attendance.
4-72-32M


1 .
1 y
The Forum Building, right, is headquarters for the college. Location is adjacent to the beautiful Civic Center shown above.


CONTENTS
Page
General Information on the College........................................... 1
Admission.................................................................... 3
Costs....................................................................... 12
Student Personnel Services.................................................. 15
Student Activities.......................................................... 18
Academic Information ....................................................... 21
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements................................... 29
School and Center Organization.............................................. 35
Basic Studies .............................................................. 36
Omnibus Courses............................................................. 37
School of Business ......................................................... 39
School of Engineering Technology ........................................... 59
School of Liberal Arts ..................................................... 79
School of Professional Studies .............................................137
School of Science and Mathematics ..........................................165
Center for Education .......................................................183
Center for Urban Studies....................................................195
Center for Experimental Studies ............................................201
Administration .............................................................203
Faculty ....................................................................206
Alphabetical Index..........................................................217
Map with Building Locations..................................Inside Back Cover
hi


1972
JANUARY
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
1973
JANUARY
S M T W T F S
~TTTTL-SJe
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
FEBRUARY
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
JUNE
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
FEBRUARY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
JUNE
S M T W T F S 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 29 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MARCH
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
JULY
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
MARCH
S M T W T F S
1 2 3
45678 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25(7577^28 29 30 31
JULY
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
APRIL
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 T9 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
AUGUST
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 T 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
APRIL
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
AUGUST
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
IV


COLLEGE CALENDAR
SUMMER QUARTER 1972
June 12, Monday..........................Registration for ten-week and five-week sessions
June 13, Tuesday........................................................Classes begin
June 14, Wednesday...................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
July 4, Tuesday.............................................Independence Day Holiday
July 14, Friday............First five-week session ends and mid-quarter for ten-week session
July 17, Monday................................Registration for second five-week session
July 18, Tuesday...............................Classes begin for second five-week session
July 19, Wednesday.........Late registration and class changes for second five-week session
(late registration fee applies)
August 17, Thursday ....................................................Commencement
August 18, Friday...............................................Summer Quarter Ends
Final examinations will be given during the last class periods of each summer session
FALL QUARTER 1972
September 21 and 22, Thursday and Friday .................................Registration
September 25, Monday....................................................Classes begin
September 27, Wednesday..............................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
October 27, Friday .......................................................Mid-quarter
November 23, Thursday.......................................Thanksgiving vacation begins
November 27, Monday ..........................................Classes resume, 8:00 p.m.
November 28, 29, 30 and December 1, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday...........................................Final Examinations
WINTER QUARTER 1973
January 4 and 5, Thursday and Friday .........................................Registration
January 8, Monday.......................................................Classes begin
January 10, Wednesday................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
February 9, Friday ............................................................Mid-quarter
March 13, 14, 15 and 16, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday...Final Examinations
SPRING QUARTER 1973
March 26 and 27, Monday and Tuesday ..........................................Registration
March 28, Wednesday ....................................................Classes begin
March 30, Friday.....................................Late Registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
April 27, Friday ..............................................................Mid-quarter
May 28, Monday..................................................Memorial Day holiday
June 3, Sunday ...............................................................Commencement
May 29, 30, 31 and June 1, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.Final Examinations
V


SUMMER QUARTER 1973
June 11, Monday.............................Registration for ten-week and five-week sessions
June 12, Tuesday............................................................Classes begin
June 14, Thursday........................................Late registration and class changes
(late registration fee applies)
July 4, Wednesday................................................Independence Day holiday
July 13, Friday............First five-week session ends and mid-quarter for ten-week session
July 16, Monday...................................Registration for second five-week session
July 17, Tuesday..................................Classes begin for second five-week session
July 19, Thursday............Late registration and class changes for second five-week session
(late registration fee applies)
August 16, Thursday ........................................................Commencement
August 17, Friday...................................................Summer quarter ends
Final examinations will be given during the last class periods of each summer session
VI


GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE COLLEGE
The college was founded by an act of the Colorado General Assembly, signed into law by the Governor May 5, 1963. The law instructed the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado to provide a comprehensive plan for the long-range development of Metropolitan State College. Funds were appropriated by the General Assembly in 1965 for establishment of the college and for initiation of instruction in the fall of that year.
In 1967 the Colorado General Assembly authorized activation of the upper division. Junior courses were added in the fall of that year and senior courses in the fall of 1968.
The chief purposes of Metropolitan State College were set forth in the act which founded it as follows:
Purpose. The General Assembly hereby declares that this act is passed in conformity with the plan for the development of higher education in this state which includes a system of state general colleges, whose functions shall principally be those of undergraduate education, a system of universities and special-purpose institutions conducting extensive graduate and research programs, as well as providing courses in undergraduate education, and a system of junior colleges. In conformity with such general plan, Metropolitan State College shall be a part of the state general college system.
Control, objects, and purposes. Metropolitan State College shall be under the control and management of the trustees of the state colleges in Colorado and its objects shall be:
1. To provide and offer programs of undergraduate instruction in the liberal arts and sciences, as determined by the trustees in the manner hereinafter specified;
2. To provide and offer programs of instruction in semi-professional technical education in science and engineering technology on a terminal basis, either on its own campus or through contracts with public school districts in the City and County of Denver and in the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Jefferson;
3. To encourage other state institutions of higher learning to offer at the college, by extension, such credit courses as are beyond its scope and function, and to cooperate with such other state institutions of higher learning in the offering of such courses;
4. To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the State of Colorado generally.
Purposes
l


2 GENERAL INFORMATION
Accreditation Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the North
Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
Facilities The college headquarters is located in the central part of the
Denver metropolitan area. It is adjacent to the downtown business section and at the edge of the Civic Center.
Administrative and service offices are located at 250 West 14th Avenue. General information and instructions on applying for admission may be obtained at the Office of Admissions and Records.


ADMISSION
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to the philosophy that educational opportunities should be provided for all who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, age or sex.
Minimum entrance requirements for Colorado high school graduates are at least 15 units of acceptable work from a high school accredited by a state or regional accrediting association. Other factors considered are intelligence, personality, character and comments by secondary school officials. Mature persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an individual basis after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test which show they have the ability to pursue satisfactorily programs of instruction which the college offers.
High school students may apply for admission and register while concurrently completing high school graduation requirements through the high school. Students must have prior consent from the high school and Metropolitan State College. Students must be awarded the high school diploma to validate the collegiate credits.
Applicants who are not residents of the State must meet the same admission requirements as Colorado residents and must, in addition, rank in the upper two-thirds of their graduating class in order to be admitted.
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited universities or colleges, an official transcript from each institution attended must be submitted. Transfer applicants are expected to present an overall average of C (2.00 based on a four-point system where an A grade is 4 points) on all college work previously attempted and must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college or university attended. Students who do not meet these standards are encouraged to contact the Office of Admissions and Records for individual consideration. Failure to report correctly any previous college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received for each quarter. Therefore, applications should be submitted at the earliest feasible date after completion of the first semester of the senior year in high school. Applications for admission must be received at the College not later than six v/eeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission
Admission
Requirements
Admission
Instructions
and
Procedures
3


4 ADMISSION
is sought, or four weeks prior to the beginning of a summer session for guaranteed processing. All credentials must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter or session for which admission is sought. All credentials which are submitted become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student.
Admission of Freshmen (Applicants who have not attended
college):
1. Obtain the uniform Application for Admission form used by Colorado collegiate institutions from a Colorado secondary school or from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204.
2. This form should be completed and submitted along with the application fee directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. Applications for admission must be received at the college not later than six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought, or four weeks prior to the beginning of a summer session. All credentials must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter or session for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to insure that the high school transcript and test scores are submitted to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records in time to meet processing deadlines.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply on tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The application fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. It is recommended that all entering freshmen take the American College Test (ACT) prior to registration and have the scores forwarded to the college. Admissions decisions are not influenced by ACT scores, but test results are used as a basis for assignment to classes and for counseling. Contact the Counseling and Testing Center for test dates.
5. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after an evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of his admission status.
Admission of Transfer Students (Applicants who have attended a college or university):
1. Request an application for admission form from Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records.


ADMISSION 5
2. Complete the application for admission and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, the application must be mailed so that it will reach the college at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply on tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. Request that one official transcript from each college or university attended be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicants record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
Transfer credits are normally accepted if they meet the following conditions:
(a) Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent. Grades of D, F and similarly graded courses will not transfer.
(b) Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
(c) Not more than 90 quarter hours plus 3 quarter hours of physical education will be accepted in transfer from a two-year college. In the event the student has attended a four-year institution prior to attending the two-year college, the credits from the four-year institution will be separately considered for transfer. Credit hours taken at a four-year institution after the two-year college will also be considered for transfer.
5. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete information about the applicants high school record.
(b) The applicant has less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours in college.
6. It is recommended that all transfer students take the American College Test (ACT) prior to registration and have the scores forwarded to the college if they have not satisfactorily completed freshman English with a grade of C or better, and/or one year of college. Admissions decisions are not influenced by ACT scores, but test results are used as a basis for assignment to


6 ADMISSION
classes and for counseling. Therefore, transfer students who do not meet the above requirement and for whom test scores have not been received must take the ACT at Metropolitan State College before they will be permitted to register for classes. Contact the Counseling and Testing Center for test dates.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students (Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for one or more quarters):
1. Request an application for readmission from the Office of Admissions and Records.
2. Complete the application for readmission and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, the application must be received at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
3. No application fee is required.
4. An applicant who has attended another collegiate institution since last enrollment at MSC must request that one official transcript be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records so that it will be received at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought. This is the only situation in which a transcript is necessary for the admission of previously enrolled students.
New Student New Student Orientation is a required program designed to
Orientation assist all new and transfer students in becoming part of the college life. The program is planned to give each student personal attention through small group discussions which acquaint them with the college, its programs, activities and facilities. During this time, students have the opportunity to meet members of the college administration, faculty and student association. Invitation to the orientation program will be sent prior to registration.
Financial Aid Eligibility for the National Defense Student Loan, College
Work Study Program, Educational Opportunity Grant and the Nursing Loan and Scholarship Programs is based on need as determined by the Family Financial Statement.
The Law Enforcement Education Program is not based on need up to direct educational costs (i.e., tuition, fees and books). Any consideration above direct educational cost is based on need.
Participants in the Federal and State Aids Programs must be citizens of the United States, or nationals, maintain normal progress


ADMISSION 7
toward a degree, and attend the college on a full-time basis (12 hours per quarter).
Evaluation of need is based on income and assets of both the parents and the student and on outside resources such as veterans benefits, Social Security and welfare.
Duration of Awards
All financial aid awards are made for one academic year or less. To continue receiving an award, a student must meet the following requirements:
1. Be in good standing with the college.
2. Submit annually the Family Financial Statement (FFS) and an institutional application demonstrating need.
3. The nature of continuing awards depends on federal and state funding patterns and the current financial situations of parents/students.
Application Procedures
Individuals requesting financial assistance must submit the forms listed below. Incorrect information will cancel any award the student receives. All forms and substantiating documents submitted for financial aid consideration become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student.
Freshmen
Required forms, which may be obtained from either the Office of Student Financial Aid or local high schools, are:
1. The Family Financial Statement Worksheet or the Family Financial Statement supplemental sheet as well as Report from ACT.
2. Metropolitan State College Application for Financial Assistance.
Transfer Students.
1. A statement of all forms of financial aid received from other institutions.
2. The Family Financial Statement Worksheet or the Family Financial Statement supplemental sheet as well as Report from ACT.
3. Metropolitan State College Application for Financial Assistance.


8 ADMISSION
Continuing Metropolitan State College Students.
1. The Family Financial Statement Worksheet as well as Report from ACT.
2. Metropolitan State College Application for Financial Assistance.
Financial Aid Application Dates for the 1972-73 Academic-Year. Fall Quarter high school graduates or equivalent, March 1; continuing and transfer students, April 15. Summer Quarter all applicants, April 1. Winter Quarter all applicants, October 24. Spring Quarter all applicants, February 15.
Loans
Loans are justified when financial aid from parents plus the students earnings will not cover the cost of his education. To qualify, a student must show financial need and be in good standing.
National Defense Student Loans (NDSL). Undergraduate students may borrow up to $1,000 in an academic year, but not more than $5,000 during their undergraduate career. Repayment of the NDSL begins nine months after the student ceases to be a half-time (8 hours) student. Repayment is made in monthly payments of not less than $15.00 per month. The period of repayment cannot exceed ten years. The NDSL has cancellation provisions. Information regarding cancellation may be obtained from the Student Financial Aid Office.
Principal and interest payments are deferrable during periods of full-time graduate study.
Federally Insured Loans. The college cooperates with banks in making information available to students. Undergraduates may borrow up to $1,500 in a single year, but not more than $7,500 during their undergraduate career. These loans are made at the option of the lender and the bank determines the amount. Applications are initiated by the student, processed in the Office of Financial Aid and forwarded to the student or his bank. Applications are accepted throughout the school year. Forms and information are available at the Office of Financial Aid.
Nursing Loan Funds. To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Status as a full-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a full-time student.
2. Enrollment in a course of study leading to an associate degree in nursing.


ADMISSION 9
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement.
4. Good standing in the college. Preference will be given to applicants who enter the nursing program as first-year students; however, second-year students will also be considered.
Law Enforcement Program Loans. Loans up to $1,800 per academic year are available to full-time students enrolled in study programs related to law enforcement. Special consideration is given to police and personnel employed by correctional institutions who take leaves of absence to study for degrees. Repayment is cancelled at the rate of 25 percent for each year spent in full-time law enforcement work.
Short Term Loans. Full-time students in good standing may, in an emergency, apply for a short-term loan up to $50. This loan must be repaid in full by the end of the quarter in which it is made or the borrower will not be permitted to register for the following quarter. The loan is not to be used to pay tuition and fees or as a regular method of financing college attendance.
A loan fund has been established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl, a former student at Metropolitan State College, who was killed in military action in Vietnam. The purpose of this fund is to assist needy students through loans for short periods of time in pursuing their education.
Grants
Educational Opportunity Grants. Amounts vary from $200 to $1,000 annually, depending on financial need and funds allotted to the college by the federal government. Grants are renewable subject to continued financial need, a satisfactory academic record and availability of funds. These grants were established for students from low income families by the Higher Education Act of 1965.
Colorado State Grant Program. Awards vary from $100 to $1,000 depending on financial need and funds allotted to the college by the State.
Ethnic Minority Teacher Grants. This program encourages members of ethnic minorities to enter the teaching profession. For additional information, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid.
Law Enforcement Program Grants. Personnel working fulltime in law enforcement are eligible for grants up to $200 per academic quarter while studying part-time for degrees. Repayment is not required if individuals remain with their present employer for two years after completing the courses.


10 ADMISSION
If loan or grant requirements are not fulfilled, the balance must be repaid with interest at the rate of seven percent per year.
Approved study programs include those offering degrees or certificates in law enforcement, police administration, corrections, criminology or public safety administration.
Part-Time Student Employment
Federal College Work-Study Program. The. student may work no more than 15 hours per week. Hourly rates normally vary from $1.60 to $2.50 per hour depending on the skill and experience of the student. Need must be shown.
Colorado Work-Study Program. The recipient must be a Colorado resident and is limited to 15 hours of work per week. Need must be shown.
Non-Need Institutional Employment. The State and the College have limited funds available to employ students within the institution who possess the skills needed to perform essential work.
Outside Employment. Students who do not show need may be placed in jobs outside the school on a part-time basis.
Other Sources of Financial Aid
Scholarships and low interest loans from sources such as churches and foundations are available through the Office of Financial Aid. Two scholarships are provided for secretarial students and one for a student specializing in civil technology. The Sidney Keller Fund and the Metropolitan State College Faculty Memorial Student Loan Fund are sources of short-term emergency loans. Also, many private lending agencies have developed attractive loans for college students. High school counselors and libraries are sources of additional information.
Scholarships
The Office of Student Financial Aid has available a limited number of private scholarships. Questions in this area should be directed to the Office of Student Financial Aid.
Nursing Scholarship Funds. To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Status as a full-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a full-time student.
2. Enrollment in a course of study leading to an associate degree in nursing.


ADMISSSION 11
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement. In order to receive a scholarship, the applicant must show extreme financial need.
4. Good standing in the college. Preference will be given to applicants who enter the nursing program as first-year students; however, second-year students will also be considered.


COSTS
All tuition and fees for each quarter (there are four quarters in a year, each consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction) normally are payable at the time of registration, and a student will not be admitted to classes until full payment has been made. The Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the college, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of registration for any quarter.
Tuition and College Students Taking 7 or More Quarter
Service Fees Hours Per Quarter In-State Out-of-State
Tuition per quarter $ 81.00 $324.00
College Service Fee per quarter 30.00 30.00
(Includes mandatory health insurance)
Total $121.00 $354.00
Students Taking 6 or Fewer Quarter Hours Per Quarter*
Tuition per quarter hour $ 12.00
College Service Fee per quarter hour 2.50
Total $ 14.50
Standard Fees All Students
Application Fee $10.00
(Required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied on tuition.)
Placement Test Fee 10.00
(Charged only when the student has not taken the ACT prior to enrollment at Metropolitan State College.)
Late Registration 5.00
Change of Schedule Fee, per transaction 2.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00
Special Fees
Art Supply Fee 5.00
(For each Art class designated for special fee)
Bad Check Penalty 5.00
Bowling Classes 20.00
Horsemanship Classes 30.00
Skiing Classes 36.00
(Does not include transportation)
All students taking 6 or fewer quarter hours per quarter are considered as having resident or in-state status for tuition and fee purposes.
12


COSTS 13
In assessing tuition and college service fees for the Summer Quarter, the total hours for which a student registers in the ten- and five-week sessions will be used to determine whether these charges are based on the flat rate or on the quarter hour rate.
The cost of books and supplies averages about $150 per academic year with the highest cost during the first quarter of attendance. Other costs such as board and room, incidentals, transportation, clothing and other personal expenses will vary with individuals.
Students officially withdrawing from the college, or reducing the quarter hour load to a lower tuition and college service fee, will receive a refund as shown below:
Percent Refunded
Upon withdrawal through 10th day of eiasses 75%
Upon quarter hour reduction through
10th day of classes 50%
No refund will be made after the first 10 days of classes. Refunds will be mailed to students approximately 4 weeks after the time of withdrawal or load reduction. All refunds are less any indebtedness to the college.
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for tuition purposes at the time he is granted admission. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and other pertinent evidence. Once determined, the residency status is changed only on the basis of conclusive evidence submitted by written petition to the Director of Admissions and Records.
Residency classification of students under 21 years of age is determined by the residence of their parents. Students 21 years of age or over are classified by the following general residency criteria:
1. Qualification for in-state tuition status requires, (a) adoption of the State as a fixed and permanent home, and involves personal presence within the State at the time of such adoption, together with the intention of making Colorado the true home; and (b) living within the State while not enrolled for more than 8 hours per term at any Colorado institution of higher learning for at least 12 consecutive months prior to enrollment. Any question requiring clarification of resident status should be resolved with the Office of Admissions prior to registration.
Refunds
Residence
Qualifications


14 COSTS
2. A student from another state or country who comes to Colorado and enrolls for more than 8 hours per term prior to completing 12 consecutive months of residency in the State is presumed to be in Colorado primarily for educational purposes and will be classified as a non-resident.
Colorado Law permits a student to enroll for, and. carry, a maximum of 8 hours per term while establishing resident status. Residence in the State while an active member of the armed forces does not necessarily qualify a student for resident tuition status. Any question requiring clarification of resident status should be reviewed with the Office of Admissions prior to registration.


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
The constant goal of the college is to provide educational opportunities adapted to the interests, needs and abilities of the individual student. To this end, each student is assigned a faculty advisor who becomes conversant with his background, aptitudes and educational objectives, and who takes a personal interest in his education and welfare. Generally this advisor is associated with the students major field of study.
The Dean of Students coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as admissions, records, registration, orientation, faculty advising, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, placement, veterans affairs, student health services and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to give students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. Each student is expected to conform to high standards of conduct at the college and elsewhere. The college reserves the right to determine whether or not a particular act conforms to such standards and to exclude from the college any student whose conduct does not conform to high standards.
The Counseling and Testing Center is committed to helping students make personal-social adjustments. A highly qualified professional staff is available for exploration of a wide variety of concerns such as personal problems, vocational choices, academic weaknesses, marriage counseling, vocational, personality and psychological testing, growth and encounter groups, and psychotherapy. When deemed necessary, students are referred out to additional mental health facilities available in the community.
The Counseling Center is an entirely confidential service and operates under ethical codes established by the American Psychological Association and the American Personnel and Guidance Association. Confidential information is never given to anyone outside agencies or the college administration without consent from the student involved.
Any student enrolled at Metropolitan State College for at least one course may avail himself of these services. Emphasis is placed on helping all students with any problems that interfere with
Conduct of Students
Counseling
Center
15


16 STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
Foreign
Students
Placement
Housing
Health
Services
achieving success at the college. Since the service is entirely voluntary, the student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff, in order to receive assistance. Students seeking assistance may contact the Counseling and Testing Center.
Admission of foreign students is initiated in the office of the Foreign Student Coordinator, located in the Counseling and Testing Center. Specific requirements for all foreign students must be met before admission can be granted. Complete information is available from the Foreign Student Coordinator. Tuition and fee charges are the same as for an out-of-state registrant.
The Placement Office assists students and alumni of Metropolitan State College in securing employment which will best utilize their preparation, experience and abilities. Placement personnel also help graduates further their progress toward positions of responsibility and personal satisfaction. These services involve working closely with the various departments of the college and with potential employers (school districts, businesses, industries, governmental and private agencies). A library of vocational literature is maintained and information is provided regarding supply and demand of personnel, requirements, salaries, trends and other relevant data. Graduate interview schedules are arranged for prospective employers to meet with interested candidates.
Part-time placement for students is coordinated by the Office of Financial Aid. Information on part-time job openings with local firms and agencies is continually updated to provide students with the greatest opportunity to work.
Although the college does not operate dormitories, it assists students in finding adequate off-campus housing. Upon request, students are provided lists of apartments, rooms, houses for rent or sale, and boarding accommodations. All listings are subject to the Colorado and Denver Fair Housing Laws. Students seeking housing assistance should contact the Housing Information Center.
Student Health Services provides professional care for any student attending the college. Registered nurses, college physicians and a psychiatrist are available during scheduled hours. Services include treatment of minor illness and injuries, first aid, TB detection tests, birth control, health counseling, information on medical problems and free health literature.


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 17
Each student, regardless of the number of quarter hours being taken, must complete a pre-entrance health questionnaire. If he does not wish to complete the questionnaire, then a pre-entrance physical examination must be performed by a physician of his/her choice at his/her expense. The required form may be obtained from the Student Health Service. Failure to complete one of the above automatically denies the student medical services at the Student Health Center.
All full-time students are members of the student insurance program which provides comprehensive medical insurance for accidental injury and/or hospitalization expenses. Part-time students or dependents of students may also participate in the insurance program for a nominal fee each quarter. Part-time students are not covered by the insurance program unless they pay an additional fee at the beginning of each quarter.
Metropolitan State College students may purchase books at the College Center and Bookstore at 520 West Colfax Avenue.
The college, through the Office of Admissions and Records, furnishes information about a students enrollment to his local board when the student supplies his Selective Service number, his local board address, and other required information at registration time. A student must receive passing grades in 45 quarter hours during a calendar year and be accepted by the college to continue attendance.
Students who want information on the draft lottery should obtain this from their local board.
The Office of Admissions and Records assists students who are eligible to receive federal educational benefits under the War Orphans Act, provision for disabled veterans or the Cold War G.I. Bill. Students entering under the various categories of the veterans education and training program must present a certificate of eligibility for use at Metropolitan State College at the time of registration.
Veterans with one year of continuous active military service and who are honorably discharged should request an evaluation for military credit. Form DD 214 must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Insurance
Programs
Books
Military
Information
Veterans
Services
Military
Credit


18 STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
College
Center
Child Care Center
Student
Activities
The Metropolitan State College Center serves as a focal point for the many cultural, educational and recreational activities of the college community available to students, faculty, administration, alumni and guests.
As a part of the educational program of the college, the Center encourages self-directed activity through its various boards, committees and staff. Maximum opportunity is given for self-realization and growth in individual social competency and group effectiveness.
The College Center operates four major facilities: the Bannock Center at 1345 Bannock, the Colfax Center at 510 W. Colfax, the Student Activities Center at 710 W. Colfax and the Child Care Center at 1038 Cherokee. The College Center also maintains lounges in several of the college classroom buildings.
A Child Care Center for the children of students is available at a nominal cost while the college is in session. Separate programs have been set up for those 10 months to 2Vi years of age and from 2 Vi years to 5 years of age.
All students are members of the Associated Students of Metropolitan State College (ASMSC), the student governing body. The purpose of the student government is to promote the interest and welfare of the student body.
Numerous student clubs and organizations with special interests and objectives have been organized under the sponsorship of faculty members. Honorary, religious, fraternal, academic, recreational, service and social groups are included. The Student Activities Office coordinates and assists student organizations in program planning and development.
There are two student publications at Metropolitan State College a weekly newspaper and a magazine.
Metropolitan State College is an active participant in intercollegiate forensics and takes part in competition throughout the western states.
A wide variety of intramural activities is offered under the direction of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. There are activities for both men and women.
The metropolitan area offers a wealth of opportunities to enrich classroom learning experiences. Students are encouraged to take advantage of theatrical and musical performances, public


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 19
lectures, museum displays, art exhibits, recreational activities and other cultural and educational endeavors offered by the college and the community.
Metropolitan State College is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, Rocky Mountain Collegiate Bowling Conference, the Inter-Mountain Conference for College Womens Physical Education and the Central Intercollegiate Alpine League. Intercollegiate competition for men and women is offered in many sports including soccer, basketball, swimming, wrestling, baseball, track and field, golf, tennis, bowling and skiing.
The Student Information Center is a central facility where all students may obtain information concerning many different areas of the college. The basic philosophy of the Information Center is to maintain a personal relationship between the college and the student and to assist students in any way possible during decision and adjustment periods.
Students who need assistance in the areas of advising, counseling, curriculum planning and graduation requirements are encouraged to contact the Student Information Center. Other areas of information offered by the Center include data on various graduate schools, changes in advisors and/or majors, help during the registration process, and a wide range of other informational services designed to make the academic life at Metropolitan State College a more meaningful experience.
Student Information Center


20 STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
The college operates on the quarter system with each quarter Fall, Winter and Spring consisting of approximately eleven weeks of instruction. The Summer quarter is integrated with the three quarters of the usual academic year so that it is possible for a student to carry on almost continuous study.
In order to serve people who are employed, evening as well as day classes are scheduled, and enrollment can be on either a full or part-time basis.
All continuing students at Metropolitan State College in good standing are eligible to register each quarter. The colleges definition of a continuing student is one who was enrolled during the preceding quarter. The exception is the student who did not register for the Summer Quarter but was enrolled during the Spring Quarter and plans to continue in the Fall. This student would be classified as a continuing student.
Students who have been enrolled for at least one quarter, but not during the preceding quarter are eligible to register providing they submit an application for readmission six weeks prior to registration. The exception is the student who did not register for the Summer Quarter but was enrolled during the Spring Quarter and plans to continue in the Fall. This student would be classified as a continuing student.
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College are expected to submit an application for admission and ALL credentials so that they reach the college at least six weeks before registration. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible to register.
Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the registrar of each institution.
Course credit is based on units designated quarter hours. One quarter hour represents one class period of fifty to sixty minutes per week which normally also requires two hours of outside preparation on the part of the student. Laboratory courses give one quarter hour of credit for each two or three hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week.
Registration
Concurrent
Enrollment
Quarter Hour
21


22 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Course Load
Inter-
Institutional
Offerings
Late Registration, Change of Registration or Complete Withdrawal
Class A ttendance
The normal load per quarter is 15 to 16 quarter hours. Registration for additional quarter hours depends on the ability of the student. Taking up to a total of 18 hours requires the approval of the students faculty advisor. Total quarter hours undertaken may not exceed 18 unless approved by both the advisor and the office of the Dean of Students. The maximum permitted with such authorization is 21 quarter hours per quarter.
Students from participating Colorado institutions of higher education are eligible to register for any courses offered on an inter-institutional basis. Each quarter these courses are listed in the class schedule under the heading of Cooperative Inter-Institutional Offerings. The registration is handled at the home institution of the student. The proper registration form for the courses is available at the Registrars office or during registration.
Students may not initiate registration after the third day of classes. During the third day of each quarter, students may adjust their class schedules by making appropriate additions or deletions. Students may add a course after the third day of classes provided the add is processed prior to the first scheduled class meeting. Students wishing to add a class after the dates specified above must have permission from the professor and the section dean. Students may drop or withdraw from a class at any time during the first three weeks without grade penalty by submitting a change card to the Business Office. After the third week, students must make arrangements with the instructor concerning the grade that will be submitted at the end of the quarter.
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If a student anticipates a prolonged absence because of illness, he should contact his instructors, if possible. If he finds that he cannot do this, he should contact the Dean of Students who will inform his instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor feels that a students absences are interfering with his academic progress, he may request a letter from the Dean of Students informing him of the situation.
Written excuses are not issued for short-term illnesses or other brief periods of absence from class. In such cases determination of the validity of the students absence and decisions on whether he will be allowed to make up work missed rests with his instructors.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 23
In special cases, a department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses in which he requests and passes special college examinations. Under this provision a maximum of 45 quarter hours of credit may be obtained. A fee of $10.00 per course will be charged for each examination.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a course offered by the college, and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided it is unduplicated in, and applicable toward, the students curriculum. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chairman, no later than the first week of classes in a quarter. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department and division chairman. Examination for crpdit will be taken during the first four weeks of classes in a quarter at a time specified by the department but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to 2.5 grade points or higher must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the students permanent record. Grades in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degreeseeking curriculum in the college, or, having been in residence, is within 15 credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for college courses attended as a listener or visitor or auditor. It cannot be taken by students having received credit for more than one quarter of work in the subject in advance of the course in which the examination is to be taken. It cannot be taken to raise grades or to remove failures. It is not considered as interrupting residence, nor applicable toward residence requirements. Credits by examination will be posted on the students permanent record after completion of 12 quarter hours of classroom credit.
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles the student to
Examination for Credit
Attainment
Examination


24 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Advanced
Placement
CLEP
Final
Examinations
Grades
substitute a subject of his own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the corresponding freshman course.
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate division or department chairman, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
The College Entrance Examination Board has developed a series of examinations designed to evaluate nontraditional college-level education, specifically including independent study and correspondence work, and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This series of examinations, known as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), consists of five separate examinations covering the areas of English, mathematics, humanities, natural science and social science-history. Based on results of these examinations, the college may award up to a maximum of 45 quarter hours credit, covering the freshman basic studies requirements. Thus, the successful student may test out of most of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. Interested students should contact the Office of Counseling and Testing for complete information about this program before registration.
It is the general policy of the college to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, except in the case of seminar courses or special projects. A student receiving a final grade of F may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charged for each registration.
Alphabetical grades and status symbols are used as follows: A Superior 4 quality points per quarter hour attempted B Above Average
3 quality points per quarter hour attempted C Average 2 quality points per quarter hour attempted


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 25
D Below Average
but passing 1 quality point per quarter hour attempted F Failure 0 quality points per quarter hour attempted NC No Credit IP In Progress P Pass
The no credit (NC) notation may indicate withdrawal from the course, a request at registration for no credit, or may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of his out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. The notation has no effect on the grade point average.
The in progress (IP) notation indicates that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the students exposure to the course in order to increase his proficiency. The student must register for the course in a subsequent quarter in order to earn credit. The notation has no effect on the grade point average. Use of IP is limited to skill or foundation-type courses.
The pass-fail option encourages the student to venture out of his major and minor fields and thereby broadens his educational experience. The pass grade has no effect on the grade point average; the fail grade is equivalent to the grade of F.
Students with 45 quarter hours of transcript credit, or more, and with at least a 2.00 grade point average, may enroll for pass or fail rather than letter-grade credit recording. Courses in the students major and minor fields, teacher education courses required for certification and required basic studies courses are specifically excluded from this option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 27 credit hours, earned in no more than nine courses, limited to one course per quarter.
A student must declare for the pass-fail option no later than his registration and must so indicate on his official registration card. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade for the course on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. If the student exercises the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the quarter that he will receive letter-grade recording in the course.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass grade is given under policies stated above. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work may wish to
Pass-Fail
Option


26 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Quality
Points
Request for Change in Grade
Honors and Awards
ascertain in advance of registering for courses under the pass-fail option whether the institution of their choice will accept credits for courses in which they receive a pass grade.
To be eligible for a degree a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours earned. Grades earned in remedial courses are not considered in computing grade point averages.
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points accumulated by the total number of credit hours attempted.
If a student has a reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, he must make his request for a change before the end of the third week of the quarter following the completion of the course the following fall quarter in the case of the preceding spring quarter.
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity.
The Presidents Award is given to one junior or senior who has excelled in both academics and service to the college.
The Deans Award is given to one Associate Degree student who has exhibited superior scholastic ability, personal integrity and campus leadership.
Outstanding Student Awards are presented to approximately fifteen students each year on the basis of scholastic ability, personal integrity and campus leadership.
Junior and senior students receiving the above awards are among those selected for publication in Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.
In addition to annual awards, students with, outstanding academic achievements are recognized each quarter by being named to Metropolitan State College Honor Lists.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION 27
The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who attempted 12 or more quarter hours of course work and achieved a perfect average of 4.0.
The Deans Honor List carries the names of students who attempted 12 or more quarter hours of course work and achieved an average of 3.5 or higher.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability while attending Metropolitan State College.
Graduation Magna Cum Laude is awarded to students who have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.75 to 4.0.
Graduation Cum Laude is awarded to students who have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 to 3.74.
In keeping with the goals and objectives of Metropolitan State College, a probation-suspension policy has been adopted which allows most students three quarters to adjust to the academic requirements of college. The policy is further formulated to suspend those students who are not prepared for successful college work.
A cumulative grade point average of C (2.00) or better indicates satisfactory progress toward a degree. A cumulative grade point average of less than C indicates unsatisfactory progress and will result in a warning, probation or suspension.
A student is expected to maintain a C average to qualify for graduation. When a student falls below a C average and becomes deficient in quality points, he will be placed on warning providing his deficiency does not exceed 10 quality points. Students whose grade point deficiency exceeds 10 quality points below C average (2.00) will be placed on academic probation subject to decreasing this deficiency each quarter until satisfactory progress is indicated. Students failing to reduce the quality point deficiency after having been placed on probation will be subject to review by the appropriate subcommittee of the Academic Standards Committee for possible suspension due to unacceptable academic progress. If the student is re-admitted, he will be required to reduce his deficiency each quarter until satisfactory progress is achieved.
A student who has been admitted on probation will have this probationary status removed when he has attempted a minimum of 12 quarter hours and maintained at least a C average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. Until the student has been removed from probation, he will be suspended when his cumulative
Probation-
Suspension
Policy


28 ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Student Classification
average falls below C, regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation, the student will be subject to the standard probation-suspension policy outlined above.
Deficiency reports will be made available to students earning less than C grades at the mid-point of each quarter. This warning should help the student to recognize and identify the source of his academic difficulty and, through counseling with faculty and administrative personnel, bring his work to a passing level by the end of the quarter.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Academic Standards Committee. No student may re-enter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Academic Standards Committee.
Students are classified according to the number of quarter hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 45; sophomores 45 or more but fewer than 90; juniors 90 or more but fewer than 135; seniors 135 or more.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) earning an associate degree in applied sciences in two years; (2) following a curriculum in arts, sciences or applied sciences to meet requirements for bachelor of arts or science degree; (3) taking vocational-technical programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in fields such as business, health services, public services and technology; or (4) enrolling for selected courses to improve their general education or vocational competency.
Since offering a well-rounded education is one of the objectives of the college, each curriculum specifies certain minimums in basic studies. Students with an ACT test score of 85 percentile, or above, using college-bound percentile norms, or equivalency in any category, may, on the approval of the department concerned, fulfill the basic studies requirements through the substitution of equivalent credit hours of study in approved advanced courses in the same category. Stipulated requirements for areas of emphasis, majors, minors and options recognize the significance of opportunities for specialization.
To earn a degree, a student must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which he is registered and must complete the minimum number of quarter hours for each degree 93 for the associate and 183 for the baccalaureate with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
No more than 45 quarter hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
Three quarter hours of credit in physical education activities courses are required for all degrees, unless the student is over 25 years of age when he matriculates or is a veteran with at least one year of active military service and obtains authorization for waiver of the physical education requirement from the Dean of Students. Any student with a physical condition which would restrict his participation in the regular program is requested to secure a medical evaluation form from the college Student Health Services and have this filled out by a physician of his choice. Students with a physical limitation should enroll in the physical education activities adapted class in which activities are modified according to a students particular physical limitation. Exemptions
Requirements for All Degrees
29


30 PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Requirements for All Associate Degrees
for health reasons will be granted only upon recommendation of the college Student Health Services.
A student who obtains a waiver for the physical education requirement must substitute three hours of other course work.
A student must satisfy all of the requirements stated in a single catalog in effect during the time of his enrollment. The catalog used to determine compliance with graduation requirements may not be more than eight years old for a baccalaureate degree or four years old for an associate degree.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, he is responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to his program, and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume that he has approval to deviate from the stated requirements unless he possesses a properly signed statement to that effect. In any case, he should check with his dean or divisional office when he has reached 135 quarter hours to make certain that his program plans are complete.
A student should make application for graduation when within three quarters of actually completing degree requirements. The Graduation Request Card may be obtained in the Office of Admissions and Records.
After a student receives his graduation evaluation and feels justified in deviating from the colleges requirements for his degree, he may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee for such a change provided his petition cannot be handled by an appropriate department and/or division chairman. Petition forms may be obtained in the Registrars office.
Participation in graduation exercises is the final requirement for all degrees. It is compulsory for all graduating students to participate in these exercises unless formally excused. Graduating students may obtain forms in the Office of Admissions and Records for requesting an excuse from graduation exercises.
To earn an Associate in Applied Sciences, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any other stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 93 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
2. Complete a minimum of 30 quarter hours, excluding physi-


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 31
cal education activities courses, at Metropolitan State College with the last 15 quarter hours completed in residence.
3. Meet the basic studies requirements stipulated for a degree and earn a minimum of 12 quarter hours in the area of emphasis.
4. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses in the students field or area of interest.
5. Not more-than six quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward an associate degree for students who are not specializing in music.
With the approval of the administration, variation in associate degree course programs may be made to conform with the course requirements of a college or university to which a student plans to transfer. Such a student should be familiar with rules of the institution concerned regarding transfer of credit and courses required under the curriculum in which he intends to major and complete requirements for a baccalaureate or other degree. With regard to Colorado institutions of higher education, the office of the Dean of Students has information on recommended programs for students planning to transfer, and advisors will assist them in developing a course plan.
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 183 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
2. Complete a minimum of 45 quarter hours at Metropolitan State College, including the last 15 quarter hours applicable to the degree.
3. Students majoring in areas other than Physical Education may elect to enroll in PE 100 beyond the required 3 quarters, but no more than 6 credits in such courses can be applied as electives toward the minimum 183 hours required for baccalaureate degrees.
4. Not more than 12 quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not specializing in music.
5. At least 60 quarter hours in upper division courses; i.e., junior and senior level, must be included in the 183 required for graduation.
6. All students must have one major subject consisting of not less than 45 nor generally not more than 60 quarter hours and at
Requirements for All Bachelors Degrees


32 PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Requirements for a Second Degree
Course Numbers, Descriptions and Offerings
least one minor consisting of at least 27 quarter hours. In the event of a double major, the second major satisfies the requirement for a minor.
7. Achieve a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher in all courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and also for the minor.
8. At least 12 upper division quarter hours of the major and 6 upper division quarter hours of the minor must be taken at Metropolitan State College.
9. Course requirements for state certification of elementary school teachers in Colorado will satisfy the major/minor requirements for a degree.
10. All basic studies requirements listed for a degree must be completed.
11. All other course requirements of a section, division or department must be satisfied.
For an extra Associate Degree the student must complete a minimum of 30 quarter hours between the awarding of the two degrees, and he must spend at least two quarters in residence. These 30 credits must be in addition to the total number of credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
A student must spend at least three quarters in residence and complete a minimum of 45 quarter hour credits between the awarding of any two undergraduate Bachelors Degrees. These 45 credits must be in addition to the total number of credits completed by the student for the first degree.
In addition to the above residence requirements, a student shall have completed all of the regular curriculum and scholastic requirements for the second degree. The satisfaction of requirements for the second degree shall be subject to departmental approval.
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, contents and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although normally a student


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 33
should not take courses above the level of his class (based on quarter hours earned), he may do so at one level above if he has the specified prerequisites and his advisors approval as shown by signature on the students registration form. In special cases a student may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for his class, if in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites and advisors approval, written permission of the faculty member teaching the course is obtained.
After each course number is a figure specifying the quarter hours of credit. As an example, English 101-4 is a four credit course.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the material which is covered. If there is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed at the end of the course description.
Decisions on which of the courses listed in this catalog are taught during the year will be based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
The instructional program is organized under two sections Arts and Sciehces, and Applied Sciences with several divisions in each section. Any additional degree requirements, information on programs of study and course offerings are listed under the sections.


34 PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


SCHOOL AND CENTER ORGANIZATION
Metropolitan State College is made up of five schools and three centers. These are listed below with majors and minors offered by each. Many offer the Associate Degree.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Accounting Business Management Business Systems Business Teacher Education* Finance**
Manpower Management* Marketing
Personnel Management**
Public Administration**
Systems Management**
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Civil Technologist**
Drafting Technologist** Electronics Technologist Industrial Marketing*
Mechanical Technologist Technical Management*
Quality Assurance Technologist** Surveying Technologist**
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Anthropology**
Applied Music*
Art
Behavioral Science*
Communications: Writing
Economics
English
French**
German**
History
Modern Languages*
Music**
Music Education*
Philosophy Political Science Psychology
Public Communications: Journalism**
Reading**
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Speech Pathology**
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic**
Air Traffic Controller*
Aviation Electronics**
Aviation Maintenance Management* Aviation Management Helping Services***
Industrial Education Law Enforcement*
Professional Pilot Registered Nurse***
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
Biology Chemistry Earth Science Geography**
Mathematics
Physics
CENTER FOR EDUCATION
Early Childhood Education*
Health and Safety**
Physical Education Recreation
CENTER FOR URBAN STUDIES
Afro-American Studies**
Chicano Studies**
Urban Studies**
CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
Major only Minor only Associate Degree only
35


36 SCHOOL AND CENTER ORGANIZATION
Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the basic studies minimums listed below in addition to satisfying all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. Since the purpose of the basic studies program is to help students develop understanding and an appreciation of broad fields of basic knowledge, a degree candidate must complete the two-quarter sequence in basic communication and 15 quarter hours of courses in each of the groupings listed below. Not more than 10 quarter hours taken in any one of the departments listed under Humanities, Science and Mathematics, or Social Sciences and/or Behavioral Sciences, will count toward basic studies requirements.
Quarter Hours
English 101-102. Basic Communication I, II 8
Humanities 15
Art
English
Modem Languages Music Philosophy Speech
Science and Mathematics 15
Biology Chemistry Earth Science*
Mathematics
Physics
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences 15
Economics History
Political Science Psychology
Anthropology and Sociology
See departmental listings for recommended courses.


OMNIBUS COURSES
Purposes of the omnibus courses listed below are to provide opportunities for meeting developing needs by offering courses on an experimental basis which deal with selected topics, seminars and workshops on various subjects and problems, independent study so that students may investigate problems of special interest, and supervised field or internship experiences conducted cooperatively with a business, industry, governmental agency or other organization. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the catalog. They may be offered by all departments in the College.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and credit hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairman or coordinator of the department or discipline, and chairman of the division before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 45 quarter hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
The following course numbers are the same for all disciplines and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course, and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
Guidelines on Field Experience/Intemship courses follow:
1. Students must make application for course credit and provide information on background, justification and aims.
2. Applications for 299 or 499 credit will be evaluated by the faculty of the depart-ment/discipline in which credit is granted or by a committee of at least two members of the department/discipline; in addition, the department or division chairman (or discipline coordinator) as appropriate will evaluate the applications. Each application must be approved by both the faculty evaluation group and the department or division chairman (discipline coordinator) before the student may have credit.
3. The locations, institutions or businesses proposed by a student, by an instructor or faculty group in an academic department/discipline, or by the department chairman (or discipline coordinator) will be evaluated by the members of the department/discipline or by a committee of at least two persons from the department/discipline, and the department chairman (or discipline coordinator). After evaluation, the members of the department/discipline or the committee and the department chairman (or discipline coordinator) or division chairman as appropriate will approve the granting of credit.
4. The approved application will be sent to the approved location, institution or business.
5. The location, institution or business approved for the field experience must agree to accept the student and evaluate his performance.
6. The group which approves the student application will establish the credit to be earned before the course is undertaken; the department chairman (or discipline coordinator) or division chairman will approve the credit. Course credit may vary from 1 to 15 hours.
7. At least one hour weekly will be spent in seminar discussion of Field Experience/ Internship experiences and their pertinence, or conferences with the field supervisor in the field experience location, or conferences with the department or departmental committee.
37


38 OMNIBUS COURSES
8. The student will make a terminal report evaluating his course; the Field Supervisor must make an evaluation of the students performance during the course; and the depart-ment/discipline faculty or committee will select a member of the faculty or committee to write an evaluation of the students performance and to assign a letter grade for the course.
190 (Credit Variable). Topics.
An introductory study of selected topics especially appropriate for lower division students.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 299-1 to 15. Field Experience/Intern-
SHIP.
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the depart-ment/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.
390 (Credit Variable). Advanced Topics.
An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
480 (Credit Variable). Workshop.
An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area.
Prerequisite: Approval of department.
490 (Credit Variable). Seminar.
Presentations, discussions, reports and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
498 (Credit Variable). Independent Study.
Independent investigation of proolems within the area of the students special interest. Restricted to students majoring in the department/discipline offering the course and must be supervised by a faculty member in that department/discipline.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chairman.
499-1 to 15. Advanced Field Experi-ence/Internship .
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The curricula of this division are designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The School offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
Associate in Applied Sciences
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is terminal in nature and is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment. To be awarded this degree, a student must satisfactorily complete the colleges basic studies and other general requirements for the associate degree, the general business requirements, and the courses listed for either option shown below:
Basic Studies
All students majoring in business whose objective is an Associate in Applied Sciences degree must satisfy the following basic studies requirements:
Quarter Hours
4
3
5
4 3 3
22
HPER 100. Physical Education Activities 3
25
General Business
Required Courses
English 101. Basic Communication I
English 254 (Business Communications 200). Business Communications Laboratory Science
Mathematics 231. Mathematics for Management Science I
Speech 101. Public Speaking
Economics 101. Principles of Economics I
All students majoring in business must satisfactorily complete the following general
business requirements:
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Marketing 201. Principles of Marketing 3
Business 221. Business Law I 3
Management Science 231. Business Statistics I 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Accounting 101. Principles of Accounting I 5
Business Systems 101. Introduction to Business Systems 3
20
Accounting Option
This option is designed to equip the student to maintain the financial records of a small enterprise or to perform various accounting functions within a larger organization.
39


40 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Required Courses
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II Accounting 351-352. Intermediate Accounting I, Accounting 309. Income Tax I
or
Accounting 220. Accounting 330. Accounting 240. Business Systems 106. Business Systems 110.
Governmental Accounting Introduction to Accounting Systems Cost Accounting BASIC FORTRAN Business Systems 305. Systems and Procedures Business Systems 310. COBOL I Approved electives
Quarter Hours 5 8 3-4
3
3
1
3
3
4
14-15
48
Grand Total 93
Business Systems Option
This option is designed to prepare students for initial employment as technicians in the
rapidly expanding field of business data processing.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Business Systems 106. BASIC 1
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN 3
Business Systems 310. COBOL I 4
Business Systems 305. Systems and Procedures 3
Business Systems 311. Advanced COBOL 4
Mathematics 232. Mathematics for Management Science II 3
Mathematics 233. Mathematics for Management Science III 3
Electives selected from any of the following areas:
business systems, accounting, management marketing, or mathematics 19
48
Grand Total 93
Management Option
This option is designed to prepare students for careers in general management of
modern business and public enterprises.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Marketing 352. Marketing Management 3
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 330. Introduction to Accounting Systems or
Business Systems 305. Systems and Procedures 3
Business Systems 106. BASIC 1


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 41
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN 3
Economics 102-103. Principles of Economics II, III 6
Electives selected from departments of accounting,
business management, business systems, or marketing 18
48
Grand Total 93
Marketing Option
This option is designed to prepare a student for employment in retailing, advertising, personal selling, industrial selling, and sales management.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Marketing 216. Salesmanship 3
Marketing 210. Retailing 3
Marketing 211. Advertising 3
Marketing 212. Industrial Sales 3
Marketing 352. Marketing Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Economics 102-103. Principles of Economics II, III 6
Psychology 200. Personality and Adjustment 3
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Approved electives 18
48
Grand Total 93
Office Management Option
This option is designed to prepare students for positions such as executive assistants, office managers, and office systems analysts.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business Communications 354. Office Management 3
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 309. Income Tax I 4
Accounting 330. Introduction to Accounting Systems 3
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Business Systems 106. BASIC 1
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN 3
Business Systems 310. COBOL I 4
Business Systems 311. Advanced COBOL 4
Business Communications 105. Operation of Office Machines 3
Approved electives 12
48
Grand Total 93
Secretarial Option
This option provides the opportunity for individuals to attain excellence in stenographic skills and to acquire the broad knowledge necessary for upper-level positions. The student may further specialize as a medical or legal secretary, or develop proficiency in a foreign language in preparation for an executive secretarial position requiring bilingual skills.


42 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Business Communications 101. Beginning Typewriting 3
Business Communications 102. Intermediate Typewriting 3
Business Communications 103. Advanced Typewriting 3
Business Communications 105. Operation of Office Machines 3
Business Communications 111. Beginning Gregg Shorthand 4
Business Communications 112. Intermediate Gregg Shorthand 4
Business Communications 113. Advanced Shorthand 4
Business Communications 214. Advanced Dictation 3
Business Communications 222. Office Practices and Procedures 3
Accounting 309. Income Tax I 4
Business Communications 354. Office Management 3
Approved electives 11
48
Grand Total 93
Bachelor of Science
The School of Business offers a major in business management, business systems, accounting, business teacher education, and marketing. The major in business management is general in nature and provides a foundation upon which further education may be added, such as specialization in a particular area of business, either on the undergraduate or the graduate level. The business systems major develops a high degree of occupational competency in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing and systems design and, along with the business management minor, prepares the graduate for advancement in the business community. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial or governmental accounting. The business teacher education major prepares students to teach business subjects in public and private junior and senior high schools and junior colleges. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of retailing, advertising, sales, market research and marketing management.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Programs of Study and Degree Requirements. A summary of the course program which he must complete is as follows:
Quarter Hours
Basic studies as described below 56
A Business Division major* 46-60
A minor* 27-30
Free electives (18 hours must be upper division) 36-51
Total 183
To provide undergraduate specialization in business, a student may minor in accounting, business systems, business management, finance, marketing, public administration, manpower management, personnel management, or systems management and thereby achieve a high level of occupational competency, or he may choose a minor which the college offers in any other subject matter area. Students electing a minor in business areas will be expected to devote at least 15 hours of free elective credits to courses offered by schools other than business.
Courses applied to satisfy the requirements of the major may not be used to satisfy minor requirements or vice versa.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 43
Basic Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in business management, business systems, accounting, business teacher education, or marketing must complete the following basic studies requirements:
Quarter Hours
English 101-102. Basic Communications I, II 8
Humanities
Speech 101, Public Speaking 3
English 254. (Business Communications 200). Business Communications 3
Electives 9
Science and Mathematics
Mathematics 231-233. Mathematics for Management Science I, II, III 10
Laboratory Science 5
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences
Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics I, II, III 9
Electives (other than economics) 6
53
HPER 100. Physical Education Activities 3
56
Accounting
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 351, 352. Intermediate Accounting I, II 8
Accounting 309. Income Tax I 4
Accounting 220. Governmental Accounting 3
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Accounting 341. Advanced Cost Accounting 4
Business 321. Business Law II 3
Management Science 331-332. Business Statistics II, III 6
Business 495. Business Policies 4
Business Systems 106. BASIC 1
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN 3
Approved upper division electives in accounting or supporting courses* 16
60
Students majoring in accounting must elect the business management minor.
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Accounting 351-352. Intermediate Accounting I, II 8
Accounting 309. Income Tax I 4
Accounting 220. Governmental Accounting 3
Accounting 341. Advanced Cost Accounting 4
Approved upper division electives 11
30
Students who desire to be eligible to sit for the C.P.A. examination must elect Accounting 451, Accounting 452, Accounting 420 and Business 322.


44 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Business Management
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
Accounting 101-102. Principles of Accounting I, II
Marketing 201. Principles of Marketing
Business Systems 101. Introduction to Business Systems
Business Systems 106. BASIC
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting
Business 221, 321. Business Law I, II
Management Science 231, 331, 332. Business Statistics I, II, III
Business 251. Principles of Management
Finance 350. Financial Institutions
Marketing 352. Marketing Management
Business 353. Personnel Management
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management
Management Science 335. Introduction to Management Science
Business 495. Business Policies
Minor
Quarter Hours 10 3 3 1
3
3
6
9
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
60
The business management minor is designed to afford majors in other areas with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the business world and sufficient familiarity with business skills to work in a business environment. Business management majors may not elect this minor.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Marketing 201. Principles of Marketing 3
Business 221. Business Law I 3
Management Science 231. Business Statistics I 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Accounting 101. Principles of Accounting I 5
Business Systems 101. Introduction to Business Systems 3
Approved upper division electives 9
29
Business Systems
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Management Science 331-332. Business Statistics II, III 6
Management Science 335. Introduction to Management Science 3
Business 495. Business Policies 4
Business Systems 106. BASIC 1
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN 3
Business Systems 301. Assembler Language 4
Business Systems 302. Advanced Assembler Language and Operating Systems 4
Business Systems 305. Systems and Procedures 3


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 45
Business Systems 310. COBOL I 4
Business Systems 311. Advanced COBOL 4
Business Systems 322. Techniques of Systems Analysis 3
Business Systems 405. Systems Design 3
Business Systems 451. Data Processing Management 3
Electives selected from any of the following areas:
business systems, accounting, management, marketing, or mathematics
60
Students majoring in business systems must elect the Business Management minor.
Minor
Required Courses
BASIC Quarter Hours 1
FORTRAN 3
Assembler Language 4
Systems and Procedures 3
COBOL I 4
Advanced COBOL 4
i any of the following areas: accounting, management, marketing, or mathematics 11
30
Business Teacher Education
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses* Quarter Hours
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Business Communications 103. Advanced Typewriting 3
Business Communications 354. Office Management 3
Business 495. Business Policies 4
Business Teacher Education 360. Principles of Business Education 3
Business Teacher Education 361. Methods of Teaching Typewriting 2
Students must choose four hours from the following: 4
Business Teacher Education 362-2. Business Teacher Education 363-2.
Bookkeeping and Accounting Business Teacher Education 364-2. Business Teacher Education 366-2.
Methods of Teaching Stenography Methods of Teaching
Methods of Teaching Data Processing Methods of Teaching
Consumer Economics and Basic Business
24
Students must choose two of the following teaching specialties* 22-25
Secretarial
Business Communications 105. Operation of Office Machines 3
Business Communications 113. Advanced Shorthand 4
Business Communications 214. Advanced Dictation 3
Business Communications 222. Office Practices and Procedures 3
13


46 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
4 4 4
12
3 3 3 3
12
3 3 3 3
12
Systems and Procedures 3
BASIC 1
FORTRAN 3
COBOL I 4
11
TOTAL 46-49
Students majoring in Business Teacher Education must elect the business management minor.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
The approved upper division electives in this minor shall consist
of 3 courses from the following group: 9
Business 321-3. Business Law II Management Science 331-3. Business Statistics II Finance 350. Financial Institutions Business 353-3. Personnel Management
The following courses are required for Colorado Teacher Certification:*
Education 220. The Role of the Teacher in the Secondary School 3
Education 314. Clinical Field Experiences in Social Work and Counseling 3
Education 315. The Adolescent in the Urban Schools 3
Education 321. Methods and Techniques for Secondary Teachers 4
Education 325. The Adolescent as a Learner 4
Education 326. Clinical Field Experiences in Tutoring and
Materials Construction 3
Education 381. The Use of Media in Education 3
Education 420. Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 9-15
Education 490. Seminar on Student Teaching 1
------------ 33-39
*Students desiring to become certified for vocational office occupations programs should select the secretarial and bookkeeping teaching specialties, and complete 3 courses (9 credit hours) in Vocational Education, which are available through extension courses offered by Colorado State University or the University of Northern Colorado.
Business Systems Business Systems 305. Business Systems 106. Business Systems 110. Business Systems 310.
Bookkeeping and Accounting Accounting 351. Intermediate Accounting I Accounting 352. Intermediate Accounting II Accounting 309. Income Tax I
Consumer Economics and Basic Business Management Sciences 101. Mathematics of Finance Finance 325. Personal Finance Business 342. Principles of Insurance Business 380. Principles of Real Estate
Distributive Education Marketing 216. Salesmanship Marketing 210. Retailing Marketing 211. Advertising Marketing 352. Marketing Management


Marketing
Major for Bachelor of Science
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 47
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Accounting 102. Principles of Accounting II 5
Business 321. Business Law II 3
Management Science 331. Business Statistics II 3
Finance 350. Financial Institutions 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Business 495. Business Policies 4
Marketing 216. Salesmanship 3
Marketing 210. Retailing 3
Marketing 211. Advertising 3
Marketing 352. Marketing Management 3
Marketing 411. Marketing Research 3
Marketing 453. Marketing Problems 3
Marketing 454. Marketing Theory 3
Choose nine hours from the following: 9
Business 342-3. Principles of Insurance Finance 360-3. Investments Marketing 410-3. Industrial Marketing Marketing 412-3. Retail Management Marketing 416-3. Sales Management
Approved electives 9
60
Students majoring in marketing must elect the business management minor.
Minor
Required Courses
Marketing 216. Salesmanship Marketing 210. Retailing Marketing 211. Advertising Marketing 411. Marketing Research Choose nine hours from the following:
Business 342-3. Principles of Insurance Finance 360-3. Investments Marketing 410-3. Industrial Marketing Marketing 412-3. Retail Management Marketing 416-3. Sales Management Approved electives
Quarter Hours 3 3 3 3 9
9
30
Additional Minors Offered by the School of Business
Finance Minor
Required Courses
Accounting 309, 310. Income Tax I, II Business 342. Principles of Insurance Finance 360. Investments
Quarter Hours 8 3 3


48 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Business 380. Principles of Real Estate 3
Finance 430-431. CorporateFinanceI.il 6
Economics 310. Money and Banking 3
Choose one course from the following: 3
Business 345-3. Life and Health Insurance Business 382-3. Property Insurance Business 386-3. Real Estate Investments Accounting 351-352-8. Intermediate Accounting I, II Economics 320-4. Public Finance
29
Manpower Management Minor
The Manpower Management minor is intended for students majoring in Business Management. Behavioral Science majors may not elect this minor.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Psychology 201. General Psychology I 3
Psychology 202. General Psychology II 3
Sociology 101. Introduction to Sociology 3
Sociology 102. Introduction to Sociology 3
Sociology 210. Urban Sociology 3
Psychology 341. Psychology and Management 3
Business 357. Industrial Relations 3
Business 453. Advanced Personnel Management 3
Business 461. Employee Training and Supervision 3
Business 462. Wage and Salary Administration 3
30
Personnel Management Minor
This minor is designed for students who major in behavioral science areas, particularly Psychology. Business Management majors may not elect this minor.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Accounting 101. Principles of Accounting 5
Marketing 201. Principles of Marketing 3
Business Systems 101. Introduction to Business Systems 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business 357. Industrial Relations 3
Business 453. Advanced Personnel Management 3
Business 461. Employee Training and Supervision 3
Business 462. Wage and Salary Administration 3
29
Public Administration Minor
Required Courses
Accounting 220. Governmental Accounting Business 251. Principles of Management Business 353. Personnel Management
Quarter Hours 3 3 3


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 49
Political Science 111-112. American National Government I, II 6
Economics 320. Public Finance 4
Choose eleven hours from the following: 11
Accounting 341-4. Advanced Cost Accounting Accounting 410-4. Budgeting and Control Business Communications 301-3. Business Report Writing Business 461-3. Employee Training and Supervision Economics 380-4. Industrial Organization and Public Policy Political Science 121-4. State and Local Government Political Science 331-4. American Political Parties Political Science 361-4. Political Theory
30
Systems Management Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Management Science 332. Business Statistics III 3
Management Science 335. Introduction to Management Science 3
Business Systems 106. BASIC 1
Business Systems 110. FORTRAN 3
Business Systems 305. Systems and Procedures 3
Business Systems 310. COBOL I 4
Business Systems 322. Techniques of Systems Analysis 3
Business Systems 405. Systems Design 3
Business Systems 451. Data Processing Management 3
Electives selected from any of the following areas:
business systems, accounting, management, marketing, or mathematics 3-4
Accounting
Acct. 101-5. Principles of Accounting I.
Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the double entry system: theory and practice in transaction analysis; familiarization with the accounting cvcle and preparation of basic financial statements.
Acct. 102-5. Principles of Accounting II.
Continuation of Accounting 101, emphasizing procedures for partnerships and corporations. An introduction to cost accounting and financial statements for management analysis.
Prerequisite: Accounting 101.
Acct. 180-2. Personal Income Tax.
Provides all students (except accounting majors) with knowledge of their rights under the current income tax laws. Enables these students to do some tax planning of their
29-30
personal income, to recognize when a problem has arisen and expert help is needed, and to qualify the students to prepare their own Federal and Colorado income tax returns.
(Credit not allowed for both Accounting 180 and 309.)
Acct. 220-3. Governmental Accounting.
Orientation in the concepts of budgetary control as a matter of law and public administration theory. Accounting principles and procedures necessary to implement budgetary controls.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102, or permission of instructor.
Acct. 240-3. Cost Accounting.
Concepts and procedures applicable to job order and process cost accounting. Emphasis is placed on the use and interpretation of cost data for managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: Accounting 102.


50 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Acer. 250-3. Managerial Accounting.
For students who expect to use accounting data in their future occupations as well as for students intending to become professional accountants.
Acer. 300-3. Accounting Survey and Analysis.
Basic accounting concepts and procedures are studied as well as the determination of periodic income, preparation and interpretation of financial statements and cost accounting. Open only to students without previous credit in accounting.
Acer. 309-4. Income Tax I.
Preparation of individual Federal and Colorado income tax returns. Credit not allowed for both Accounting 180 and 309.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102, or permission of instructor.
Acer. 310-4. Income Tax II.
Preparation of partnership, corporation, estates and trust income tax returns with research problems.
Prerequisite: Accounting 309.
Acer. 320-3. Advanced Governmental Accounting.
Continuation of Accounting 220 with greater emphasis on problem solving in state and municipal government.
Prerequisite: Accounting 220.
Acer. 330-3. Introduction to
Accounting Systems. Installation and control of systems of accounting in various organizations and situations. Analysis of cases and research in types of tools available for implementation of an accounting system or procedure.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Business Systems 101.
Acct. 341-4. Advanced Cost Accounting.
Continuation of Accounting 240. More complex problems in process and job order costing. Mathematical and statistical analyses of cost behavior for control and decisionmaking.
Prerequisites: Accounting 240 and Business 231.
Acct. 351-4. Intermediate Accounting I.
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on current assets and current liabilities.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102.
Acct. 352-4. Intermediate Accounting II.
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on long term assets, long term liabilities and stockholders equity. Prerequisite: Accounting 351.
Acct. 400-3. Quantitative Methods in Accounting.
The application of computer analysis to business decisions, planning and control. An integration of statistics and the techniques of operations research with emphasis on accounting.
Prerequisites: Business Systems 210 or 311 and Business Systems 305 or Accounting 330.
Acct. 410-4. Budgeting and Control.
Examines the control function, its location within the organization and service to general management. Particular attention is paid to the use of cost accounting techniques as aids to budgeting and control.
Prerequisites: Accounting 240 and Business 251.
Acct. 420-3. Auditing.
Auditing techniques and principles applied by certified public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and verifying underlying data. Prerequisites: Accounting 351 and 352.
Acct. 440-3. Advanced Problems and Techniques.
Provides review and reinforcement of (students accounting training. CPA examination problems are used.
Prerequisites: Accounting 451 and 452.
Acct. 451-3. Advanced Accounting I.
Includes partnerships, installments, receiverships and fiduciary accounting.
Prerequisites: Accounting 351 and 352, or permission of instructor.
Acct. 452-3. Advanced Accounting II.
Includes branch accounting, and a study of combinations and consolidated statements.
Prerequisites: Accounting 351 and 352. or permission of instructor.
Acct. 460-3. Contemporary Accounting.
Comprehensive coverage of'current literature in accounting with emphasis on recent AICPA publications.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and 24 quarter hours of courses in accounting.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 51
Business Communications
B.C. 101-3. Beginning Typewriting.
Introduction to the keyboard, efficient manipulation of the typewriter, and development of minimum occupational and personal use skills. Designed for those who have had no high school training in typewriting. No credit wilt be allowed students who have received credit for one year of typewriting in high school. One laboratory period per week is required of all students.
B.C. 102-3. Intermediate Typewriting.
Continuation of typewriting skill development. Includes occupational production, skill in business letters, tabulation, manuscripts, etc. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for two years of typewriting in high school. Laboratory practice is expected of all students.
B.C. 103-3. Advanced Typewriting.
Special attention is given to a professional degree of performance in volume typing of miscellaneous business communication media. Laboratory practice is expected of all students.
Prerequisite: Business Communications 102, or two years of high school typewriting.
B.C. 105-3. Operation of Office Machines.
Proficiency is developed in the use of various machines commonly found in offices, such as duplicating, dictating, adding, calculating.
B.C. 111-4. Beginning Gregg Shorthand.
A course in basic Gregg shorthand for those who have had no previous training. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of Gregg shorthand in high school.
Prerequisites: English 101 (may be taken concurrently), and at least one course in typewriting.
B.C. 112-4. Intermediate Gregg Shorthand.
Continuation of Business Communications 111. Emphasis is upon speed dictation and transcription. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for two years of shorthand in high school.
Prerequisite: Business Communications 102, or equivalent.
B.C. 113-4. Advanced Shorthand.
Continuation of Business Communications 112. Emphasis is on the development of dictation and transcription skills, vocabulary building, spelling improvement and others skills needed for vocational competence.
Prerequisite: Business Communications 112, or equivalent.
B.C. 200-3. Business Communications.
(Same as English 254.) Presents essential principles involved in preparing business letters and other types of communications purpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful English.
Prerequisites: English 102 or equivalent, and ability to type.
B.C. 214-3. Advanced Dictation.
The development of special skills needed by medical, legal and technical secretaries.
Prerequisite: Business Communications 112, or equivalent (80 wpm dictation rate).
B.C. 222-3. Office Practices and Procedures.
Study and practice of duties commonly carried out by secretaries, such as general office management and routine filing, human relations in business, handling mail, telegraph and telephone communications.
B.C. 223-3. Business Listening Skills.
Increases listening comprehension through analysis of listening difficulties and practice in identifying of facts, ideas, persuasive techniques and fallacies of reasoning. Emphasis will be on group and business applications.
B.C. 301-3. Business Report Writing.
Organization and preparation of reports of the types used in business including techniques of collecting, interpreting and presenting information useful to management.
Prerequisite: English 102.
B.C. 354-3. Office Management.
Study of the principles and practices employed in the organization, operation, and control of modern business offices, including problems of layout, equipment and functions.
Prerequisite: Business 251.


52 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Business Management
Bus. 100-3. Introduction to Business.
A survey of the American business system and its place in contemporary society. The relationships between economic theory and business decision-making are considered as well as types of business organizations and an introduction to marketing, production, financial, personnel and administrative management. No credit will be allowed students who have previously earned credits in accounting, business management, business systems or marketing.
Bus. 221-3. Business Law I.
Introduction to ordinary legal aspects of business transactions including such topics as contracts, agency instruments. Designed to give a general understanding of the subject and to provide information useful in deciding when a lawyer should be consulted for aid in avoiding legal mistakes.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Bus. 251-3. Principles of Management.
Analysis of managerial functions and processes required for operating any type of business organization effectively.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Bus. 321-3. Business Law II.
Continuation of Business 221. Specific analysis of Sales and Negotiable Instruments under the Uniform Commercial Code and general property law; the Uniform Consumer Credit Code is also studied. Avoidance of Ditfalls in these areas is stressed.
Prerequisite: Business 221.
Bus. 322-3. Advanced Business Law.
An examination of Partnership, Corporation and Estate and Trust Law is made with emphasis on planning. Subsequently C.P.A. practice questions are reviewed (all areas) to prepare for C.P.A. examination. Prerequisite: Business 321.
Bus. 342-3. Principles of Insurance.
Concept of risk, insurance coverages available, organizational structure of insurance companies, prevention of loss and claims settlement.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Marketing 201, or junior standing.
Bus. 345-3. Life and Health Insurance.
A study of the principles and practices of life and health insurance with emphasis on types of policies and their provisions.
Includes rate determination, reserves, taxation and regulation.
Prerequisite: Business 342.
Bus. 350-3. Managerial Economics.
Provides the serious student with comprehensive application of economics to managerial decision and business strategy.
Prerequisites: Business 251 and Management Science 331.
Bus. 353-3. Personnel Management.
Principles, methods and procedures related to the effective utilization of human resources in organizations. Historical development and objectives of personnel management, individual differences, labor budgeting, job analyses, recruitment, selection, placement, training, wage and salary administration, hours of work and employee health. Prerequisite: Business 251.
Bus. 355-3. Industrial Organization and Management.
Organization and operation of the industrial enterprise, including techniques underlying modern management methods. Prerequisite: Business 251.
Bus. 356-3. Small Business Management.
A survey and analysis of the managerial problems facing the small businessman including an understanding of the financial, legal and marketing principles applicable to the successful operation of a small business. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
Bus. 357-3. Industrial Relations.
Provides appropriate insights into the nature of union origins, developments and relation to management personnel activities. Prerequisite: Business 251.
Bus. 359-3. Black Entrepreneurship.
A seminar for exploration of the background, development and current problems of businesses owned and operated by members of the black community.
Prerequisites: Business 251 and Marketing 352.
Bus. 380-3. Principles of Real Estate.
A study of the practices, regulations, legal aspects and professional ethics of the real estate industry.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Marketing 201, or junior standing.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 53
Bus. 382-3. Property Insurance.
A study of rate determination, underwriting, loss adjustment and reinsurance applicable to real property.
Prerequisites: Business 342 and 380.
Bus. 384-3. Real Estate Law.
Conveyances, mortgages and leasing are covered in detail; contracts, deeds, leases and the other basic instruments are illustrated and analyzed with emphasis on advanced real estate pitfalls.
Prerequisites: Business 221 and 380.
Bus. 386-3. Real Estate Investments.
A study of yields, yield rates, management and control of income and expenses, economic feasibility of real estate trusts and commercial properties.
Prerequisites: Finance 360 and Business
380.
Bus. 451-3. Emerging Management Concepts.
Provides opportunity to explore and evaluate current thought and changing patterns of management philosophy and operations. Includes behavioral, quantitative and systems approaches to management issues, current and future.
Prerequisites: Business 251 and senior standing.
Bus. 453-3. Advanced Personnel Management.
Provides a balanced interpretation of modern developments in human relations and organizational behavior using an integrated social science approach.
Prerequisite: Business 353.
Bus. 461-3. Employee Training Supervision.
A study of the principles of supervision, the techniques of leadership, adjustment of grievances, policy interpretation, group attitudes and morale, training and learning processes, and counseling techniques.
Prerequisites: Business 353, and senior standing.
Bus. 462-3. Wage and Salary Administration.
Installation and administration of a complete wage and salary program including objectives, policies, organization, control, job evaluation, wage survey and winning acceptance for an integrated program. Prerequisite: Business 353.
Bus. 463-3. Manpower Development.
Provides a comprehensive treatment of the manpower theme, explaining the problems and policies which precipitated manpower into a position of national priority. Prerequisite: Business 353.
Bus. 482-3. Property Management.
Includes analysis of rental markets, renting techniques, development of rent schedules, repairs and maintenance, accounting and tenant relations.
Prerequisite: Business 380.
Bus. 495-4. Business Policies.
A senior seminar for business majors in which the various areas previously studied are integrated and related to policy level decision-making in the business enterprise.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Division of Business.
Business Systems
Bus. Sys. 101-3. Introduction to Business Systems.
General introduction to the subject of business data processing so that its elements can be understood in their simplest form. The course includes the study of manual, mechanical, punched card and electronic computer methods, techniques and systems of processing data.
Bus. Sys. 104-3. Principles of Computing.
Introductory course which considers computing a discipline in itself and a tool for other disciplines. Topics include computer arithmetic and data representation, the internal operation of a computer, storage and retrieval of information in a computer, instructing a computer, preparing the computer program, and tools for analyzing and planning computer programs.
Prerequisites: Business Systems 101 or data processing experience, and one year of high school algebra or Mathematics 100.
Bus. Sys. 105-1. Computer Programming Techniques.
Simulated machine language, simulated assembler language, and program flowchart techniques will be studied.
Bus. Sys. 106-1. BASIC.
Introductory programming course designed to teach students how to use the BASIC time-sharing language. Includes getting started in BASIC, conditional transfers.


54 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
reading and printing in BASIC, and looping techniques. Problems will be run on a computer.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 101.
Bus. Sys. 110-3. FORTRAN.
An introductory programming course utilizing the FORTRAN language. Students learn the vocabulary, operations and elementary statements used in the FORTRAN IV language. Then, they are taught program logic and flowcharting. Problems drawn from the areas of management, accounting, marketing, statistics and mathematics are run on a computer to familiarize students with program test and debug techniques. Prerequisite: Business Systems 101.
Bus. Sys. 210-4. Advanced FORTRAN.
Continuation of Business Systems 110 with emphasis on the parts of the FORTRAN language not covered in the beginning course.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 110, or Mathematics 251.
Bus. Sys. 300-3. Data Processing Survey and Analysis.
A study of the basic data processing concepts and procedures including management information systems, the hardware, software, and personnel necessary for system implementation and intra-firm coordination. Open only to students without previous credit in business systems.
Bus. Sys. 301-4. Assembler Language.
Programming course utilizing a symbolic language. Topics studied include a review of computer numbering systems, symbolic language elements, symbolic language syntax, symbolic addressing, writing programs in symbolic language, and debugging techniques. Problems will be run on a computer system.
Prerequisites: Business Systems 104 and
110.
Bus. Sys. 302-4. Advanced Assembler
Language and Operating Systems.
Continuation of Business Systems 301 and, in addition, a study of operating systems.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 301.
Bus. Sys. 305-3. Systems and Procedures.
An introductory course involving fundamental system analysis techniques which includes: problem definition, systems study
and systems design. Systems design includes system flowcharting fundamentals, design of problem logic and record design.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 110.
Bus. Sys. 310-4. COBOL.
An introductory programming course utilizing the COBOL language. Practice problems are coded by the student after he has been taught the vocabulary, operations and elementary statements in the COBOL language. The coded problems are processed on a computer to familiarize students with program test and debug techniques.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 110,
Bus. Sys. 311-4. Advanced COBOL.
Continuation of Business Systems 310 with emphasis on the parts of the COBOL language not covered in the introductory course. There is more emphasis on problem definition and program design.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 310.
Bus. Sys. 322-3. Techniques of Systems Analysis.
Continuation of Business Systems 305. Emphasis to be on documentation techniques used during systems study and design phases. The case study method is used.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 305.
Bus. Sys. 401-4. Advanced Computer Programming.
Designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the development and implementation of scientific and/or business data processing problems. Each student completes several projects in which he applies the principles and techniques learned from previous business, mathematics, science and business systems courses.
Prerequisite: Business System 210 or
311.
Bus. Sys. 405-3. Systems Design.
Final systems analysis course with emphasis on the design of an integrated computerized system. General system theory, the theory of the firm as a system, and classical and flow network organization concepts are studied. The case method will be used. Prerequisite: Business Systems 322.
Bus. Sys. 406-3. Design of Real-Time Computer Systems. Teaches students the fundamentals involved in the design of real-time computer systems.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 405.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 55
Bus. Sys. 451-3. Data Processing Management.
A study of the problems encountered in a business data processing installation with particular emphasis on its coordination with other management functions and the integration of management systems, system design, software and hardware in the installation.
Prerequisites: Business 251 and Business Systems 305.
Bus. Sys. 452-3. Computer System Selection.
Methods management has available to aid in the selection of computing systems.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 451, or experience in data processing systems or management.
Bus. Sys. 460-3. C.D.P. Review.
Provides Business Systems majors and personnel in the field of data processing a review of the knowledge required to pass the annual C.D.P. examination sponsored by the Data Processing Management Association.
Prerequisites: Business System major courses, or data processing experience.
Bus. Sys. 470-3. Advancements in Business Systems.
Provides comprehensive coverage of current journals in the field of business systems; to bring the senior student in the business systems major up-to-date regarding advances in hardware, software, management information systems, etc.
Prerequisite: Senior standing with a major in Business Systems.
Business Teacher Education
B.T.E. 360-3. Principles of Business Education.
History of, problems and trends in Business Education today. Consideration is given to American educational issues as they relate to Business Education.
Prerequisite: Education 321.
B.T.E. 361-2. Methods of Teaching Typewriting.
A study of the psychology, current philosophy and successful methods of instruction in typewriting for developing a desirable occupational and personal-use competence.
Prerequisite: Business Communications 103, or permission of instructor.
B.T.E. 362-2. Methods of Teaching Stenography.
A study of the psychology, current philosophy and successful methods of instruction in stenography for developing a desirable occupational competence.
Prerequisite: Business Communications 113, or permission of instructor.
B.T.E. 363-2. Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping and Accounting.
A study of the psychology, current philosophy and successful methods of instruction in bookkeeping and accounting at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: Accounting 102, 240 or 351, or permission of instructor.
B.T.E. 364-2. Methods of Teaching Data Processing.
A course for prospective and experienced data processing teachers emphasizing successful methods of organization, preparation, and presentation of data processing subject matter at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: Business Systems 310, or permission of instructor.
B.T.E. 365-2. Methods of Teaching
Distributive Education.
Current distributive education programs, methods of teaching salesmanship, advertising, and retailing. Includes selection, placement of students, and coordination of sales positions for high school distributive education programs.
Prerequisites: Business Teacher Education 360 and Marketing 352.
B.T.E. 366-2. Methods of Teaching
Consumer Economics and Basic Business.
Psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction for high school and junior college consumer economics and miscellaneous, basic, non-skills business courses.
Prerequisites: Finance 325, or permission of instructor.
B.T.E. 412-3. Job Analysis.
Various current employment positions in the office and distributive occupations to provide practice in determining particular responsibilities, qualifications desired, and placement procedures for specific types of positions.
Prerequisite: Business Teacher Education 360, or permission of instructor.


56 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
B.T.E. 413-3. Techniques of
Coordinating Vocational Programs.
Theory and practice in coordinating the business world with the educational world in giving cooperative training in office and distributive occupations. Includes identification of positions available in the community, training students for specific positions, placement, and evaluation of students while in cooperative positions.
Prerequisite: Business Teacher Education 360, or permission of instructor.
Finance
Fin. 325-3. Personal Finance.
A study of financial problems and institutions affecting individuals including borrowing, savings, insurance, investment and financial agencies.
Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Will not be accepted as upper division elective for Accounting and Finance majors and minors.)
Fin. 350-3. Financial Institutions.
General principles of financial management in business enterprises with some reference to financial institutions. Major emphasis is on making decisions pertaining to capital structure, fixed assets, working capital and other areas of financial decision-making.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Economics 103.
Fin. 360-3. Investments.
Analysis and evaluation of various types of securities from the viewpoint of the individual investor. Principles of sound investment policies will be discussed.
Prerequisites: Accounting 102 and Marketing 201, or junior standing.
Fin. 430-3. Corporate Finance 1.
Theory and practice in the financial management of business enterprise. Cash and capital budgeting, operating and dividend policies, problems of valuation and capitalization.
Prerequisite: Finance 350.
Fin. 431-3. Corporate Finance II.
Continuation of Finance 430.
Prerequisite: Finance 430.
Fin. 470-3. Securities Analysis.
For the more advanced student who seeks in-depth experience in study of investment theory and analytical techniques regarding securities evaluation.
Prerequisite: Finance 360.
Management Science
M.S. 101-3. Mathematics of Finance.
Includes fundamental operations of arithmetic and algebra, ratios, interests and discounts, data processing mathematics, charts and graphs. Course will be adapted to needs of current students. This course is restricted to freshmen or sophomores.
M.S. 231-3. Business Statistics I.
Organization and presentation of data, statistical description and the normal distribution.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 231 or 101.
M.S. 331-3. Business Statistics II.
Continuation of Management Science 231. Includes t, x5 and F distributions. Quality control, correlation and regression, time series analysis and index numbers are approached from the decision-making point of view.
Prerequisites: Management Science 231, Mathematics 232, and Business Systems 110.
M.S. 332-3. Business Statistics III.
Continuation of Management Science 331. Designed to develop the students ability to make business decisions under uncertainty. Includes construction of pay-off tables and extensive use of computer in solving realistic business problems.
Prerequisites: Management Science 331, Mathematics 233 or equivalent.
M.S. 335-3. Introduction to
Management Science. Terminal course for students desiring an overview of management science techniques. (Students with credit in Management Science 431, 432 or Mathematics 323 cannot receive credit for Mathematics 335.)
Prerequisite: Management Science 332.
M.S. 431-3. Management Science I.
A study of mathematical programming and its application to management.
Prerequisite: Management Science 332.
M.S. 432-3. Management Science II.
A study of the quantitative technique of inventory theory, queueing theory, integer programming and their application to management.
Prerequisite: Management Science 332.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 57
M.S. 439-4. Case Studies in
Management Science.
Investigation of real management problems to develop the students ability to ascertain feasible alternative approaches and solutions using available computer facilities and quantitative techniques.
Prerequisite: Management Science 431 or 432.
Marketing
Mkt. 201-3. Principles of Marketing.
Principles, methods and problems found in distribution activities in marketing products and services.
Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102, 103.
Mkt. 210-3. Retailing.
A survey of retail store operation which considers executive control, profit planning, merchandising, store location, layout, organization, policies, system and coordination of store activities.
Prerequisite: Marketing 201.
Mkt. 211-3. Advertising.
Theory, practices and techniques in advertising. Layout, copy writing, selection of media, costs, research and problems are included.
Prerequisite: Marketing 201.
Mkt. 212-3. Industrial Sales.
A study of the major activities involved in the sale of products to private industry and government agencies through the development and demonstration of effective sales techniques.
Prerequisite: Marketing 216.
Mkt. 216-3. Salesmanship.
A study of techniques and psychological factors involved in business transactions with emphasis on personal salesmanship. Prerequisite: Marketing 201.
Mkt. 300-3. Marketing Survey and Analysis.
A study of basic marketing concepts and procedures including sales, sales promotion, product planning and pricing, customer characteristics and service, and the impact of the marketing function on the natural economy. Open only to students without previous credit in marketing.
Mkt. 321-3. Purchasing.
A management approach to the buying function as it relates to business, institutions and governments. Selection of sources of supply, make-or-buy decisions, legal aspects, personnel considerations and evaluation of purchasing effectiveness and efficiency.
Prerequisite: Business 251.
Mkt. 352-3. Marketing Management.
Analysis of the management of the marketing function with emphasis on the adjustment of marketing policy to changes in the economic and social environment.
Prerequisite: Business 251, or permission of instructor.
Mkt. 371-3. International Marketing.
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of the international scope and complexities of marketing. The unique marketing aspects of global enterprise opportunities as they relate to environmental differentiations among the various countries are emphasized.
Prerequisites: Marketing 201 and Economics 103.
Mkt. 410-3. Industrial Marketing.
A study of industrial market structures. Includes motivations and characteristics unique to the market as related to products, pricing problems of the downtown business district, customer services, personnel, discount operations and catalog outlets.
Prerequisite: Marketing 216.
Mkt. 411-3. Marketing Research.
Collection and interpretation of marketing data with emphasis on the application of scientific techniques and its relevance of decision-making in market selection, product development and promotional efforts.
Prerequisite: Business 231.
Mkt. 412-3. Retail Management.
An integrated management approach to diverse retail store problems including store organization, store location, merchandise policy, buying and pricing, merchandise control, sales promotion, advertising, display, department location, customer services, personnel management, accounting, credit and finance.
Prerequisite: Marketing 210 or 352.
Mkt. 416-3. Sales Management.
Organization of the sales department, sales planning, operating procedures, and administration of the sales force including selection, training, control and compensation.
Prerequisites: Marketing 216 and 352.


58 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Mkt. 453-3. Marketing Problems.
A case study approach to integrative problem-solving with the marketing concept as the focal point. Areas of study include problems dealing with the consumer, channels of distribution, price policies and promotion.
Prerequisites: Marketing 411 and senior standing.
Mkt. 454-3. Marketing Theory.
Development and evaluation of modern marketing theory explaining and predicting its workings and interrelationships.
Prerequisites: Marketing 352 and 411.


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The School of Engineering Technology provides technical education to prepare individuals for employment or to operate their own businesses in various technological fields. Emphasis is placed on giving students an understanding of the principles of mathematics and science, and instruction in applying the principles as owners, supervisors, technicians, or teachers in a constantly expanding industrial economy. Courses in the humanities and social sciences are included to broaden the individuals general education.
The School offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
Associate in Applied Sciences
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment at the end of two years.
Technology courses carry credit and provide instruction and training of a different nature and at a considerably higher level than that attained by craftsmen, mechanics and other skilled workers. The courses are not pre-engineering curricula planned for continuation of study for a baccalaureate engineering degree, and some of them may not be accepted by a four-year engineering college or university.
Candidates for the Associate in Applied Sciences degree must meet the general requirements of the college and specified basic studies requirements. They must also choose one of the fields of specialization listed below and/or complete a program of studies developed with the assistance of a faculty member in the School of Engineering Technology.
Civil Engineering Technology Drafting Engineering Technology Electronics Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology Quality Assurance Technology*
Basic Studies
All students majoring in technology, whose objective is an Associate in Applied Science degree must satisfy the following basic studies requirements:
Required Courses English
English 101 and 102. Basic Communication I and
English 102. Basic Communication II or
English 255. Introduction to Technical Writing or
Business Communications 200 (English 254).
Business Communications
Quarter Hours 7-8 4
4
3
3
Metropolitan State College is in the process of transferring this program to the Denver Community College. Beginning freshmen should not enroll in this two-year associate degree program.
59


60 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Physics
Mathematics
Humanities
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences
HPER 100. Physical Education Activities
5
5
3
3
23-24
3
26-27
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
In addition to the basic studies previously listed, the following core courses are required for all Associate degree students majoring in Engineering Technology. It is recommended that all Technology students see a Technology advisor within his field of emphasis before registering for course work.
Required Technology Core Courses Quarter Hours
Drafting Engineering Technology 100. Technical Graphics 4
Engineering Technology 100. The Technology Profession 1
Engineering Technology 205. Strength of Materials 3
Engineering Technology 251. Mechanics I 4
Electronics Engineering Technology 100. Introduction to Electricity
and Electronics 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 100. Materials and
Manufacturing Technology 3
Civil Engineering Technology 100. Introduction to Civil Technology 3
21
Civil Engineering Technology
Technicians trained in civil technology assist engineers in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroads, bridges, viaducts, dams and other structures. In the planning for a construction project, technicians may help in estimating costs and preparing specifications for materials, or may participate in surveying, drafting and designing work. When the project gets under way, technicians may assist the contractor or superintendent in scheduling construction activities and in inspecting the work
for conformance with specifications.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Civil Engineering Technology 221. Elementary Surveying 5
Civil Engineering Technology 201. Structural Drawing 3
Civil Engineering Technology 205. Computing and Estimating 3
Civil Engineering Technology 207. Topographic Drafting 3
Civil Engineering Technology 250. Construction Project 5
Civil Engineering Technology 314. Construction Law 3
Civil Engineering Technology 331. Construction Methods 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 101-102. Technical Drawing I, II 6
Drafting Engineering Technology 109. Architectural Drawing 4
Drafting Engineering Technology 210. Descriptive Graphics 3
Approved electives 8


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 61
Drafting Engineering Technology
Draftsmen prepare detailed drawings from sketches, notes, specifications and technical data furnished by engineers or architects. The preparation of these drawings involves mathematical computations, catalog research for suitable parts and materials, the use of engineering and technical handbooks and a broad knowledge of industrial processes and materials. The capable draftsman advances from junior draftsman to positions of intermediate draftsman, senior draftsman, design draftsman and drafting group leader. Draftsmen are employed at architectural and electronic firms, aircraft plants, city and county engineering offices, manufacturing plants, research and development centers, utility companies and many other industrial
complexes.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Drafting Engineering Technology 101-102. Technical Drawing 1, II 6
Drafting Engineering Technology 109. Architectural Drawing 4
Drafting Engineering Technology 210. Descriptive Graphics 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 301. Advanced Technical Drawing 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 307. Production Illustration 3
Civil Engineering Technology 207. Topographic Drafting 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 101. Manufacturing Processes 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 208. Basic Tool Design. 4
Mechanical Engineering Technology 240. Fundamentals of Welding 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 307. Mechanical Design 3
Approved electives 11
46
Electronics Engineering Technology
The electronic technician acts as a liaison between the electronic engineer and the skilled worker. He possesses some of the know why of an engineer and some of the know how of the craftsman. The work consists of building and testing prototype circuits and equipment, modifying and maintaining electronic apparatus, and following schematic drawings, sketches and verbal instructions. These functions are performed in a wide range of areas including radar, microwave, loran, sonar, missiles, satellites, space flight, computers and communications.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Electronics Engineering Technology 101-103. Electrical Circuits I, II, III 15
Electronics Engineering Technology 221-223. Electronics I, II, III 15
Drafting Engineering Technology 202. Electronic Drafting 2
Approved electives 14
46
Mechanical Engineering Technology
The mechanical engineering technician, as the liaison man between the engineer and the skilled worker, translates creative ideas into new machines, products, structures or processes. As a connecting link, he must have knowledge of the world of both the engineer and the skilled worker be familiar with the hand and machine tools of the latter and the basic scientific principles which are the engineers tools. He may use drafting instruments, gauges, control instruments, testing machines, measuring instruments, mathematics and science in his work. He may be called upon to plan and organize material, analyze data, exercise good judgment and write accurate technical reports.


62 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Quarter Hours 6
3
4 4 3 3 6 3
14 46
Quality Assurance Technology*
The task of assuring high quality and reliability of goods and services for consumers, industry and government has reached the status of a professional discipline. Control concepts and techniques which have been devised and proven effective during the past twenty years must continue to be improved. The responsibilities, authority and complexity of the quality assurance staff and its work is increasing constantly and the demands upon the professional personnel have, in turn, increased. Every progressive industrial organization has a staff of quality control and reliability personnel. There are excellent opportunities for employment within the field.
The quality assurance program is designed to provide the training required to meet industry and government needs for competent persons in this field. Individuals with an associate degree can find employment as quality inspectors, technicians, analysts and engineering assistants. Further education and experience for personnel already working in quality assurance could lead to more responsible positions in management and quality assurance.
Required Courses
Quality Assurance 101. Principles of Quality Assurance Quality Assurance 201. Theory and Application of Quality Assurance Quality Assurance 203. Advanced Quality Assurance Quality Assurance 205. Nondestructive Testing Quality Assurance 206. Metrology Quality Assurance 207. Electronic Quality Assurance Quality Assurance 208. Procurement Quality Assurance Drafting Engineering Technology 101-102. Technical Drawing I, II Mechanical Engineering Technology 210. Principles of Numerical Control Mechanical Engineering Technology 220. Principles of Metallurgy Approved electives
Quarter Hours 4 4 4 2 2 2
3 6
4 3
12
46
Required Courses
Mechanical Engineering Technology 101-102. Manufacturing Processes I, II Mechanical Engineering Technology 200. Industrial Hydraulics Mechanical Engineering Technology 208. Basic Tool Design.
Mechanical Engineering Technology 210. Principles of Numerical Control Mechanical Engineering Technology 220. Principles of Metallurgy Mechanical Engineering Technology 240. Fundamentals of Welding Drafting Engineering Technology 101-102. Technical Drawing I, II Drafting Engineering Technology 210. Descriptive Graphics Approved electives
Bachelor of Science
The Division of Technology offers baccalaureate degree programs with majors and minors in the following areas:
Mechanical Technologist Electronics Technologist Industrial Marketing (major only)
Technical Management (major only)
In addition, minors are also available in:
Civil Technologist Drafting Technology Surveying Technology Quality Assurance Technology*
Metropolitan State College is in the process of transferring the Quality Assurance program to the Denver Community College. Beginning freshmen should not enroll in this two-year associate degree program.


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 63
Engineering Technologist
Bachelor of Science
The Engineering Technologist program provides students with the opportunity to receive a Bachelor of Science degree in technology with majors in Civil, Electronics or Mechanical. In addition, the student may combine Business with Technology and receive a B.S. degree in Technical Management or Industrial Marketing.
These programs provide students with greater breadth and depth than is possible in the two-year Associate degree programs. Upper division courses are available to those students who, after earning an Associate degree and after being employed as a technician, desire to obtain a Baccalaureate degree. The four-year trained technologist fills the gap created by increased emphasis upon the development of scientifically oriented engineers. New developments in the more efficient utilization of engineering manpower have created a large demand for the technologist. The four-year baccalaureate programs are designed to prepare students for greater technical and managerial responsibilities. Graduates become vital members on technical engineering application teams.
The following four-year technologist programs are built upon the concept of two plus two. The first two years, containing a balance of specialization, basic studies and electives, are designed to prepare a student for entry into industry as a technician. The second two years also contain a balance of basic studies and electives, as well as specialization in depth and cross training in related technical and business programs.
In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree, the student must conform to the colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Programs of Study and Degree Requirements. Required courses for the technologists programs are listed below.
The first two years of the program generally taken at Metropolitan State College or at a community/junior college should include the following:
Basic Studies
Quarter Hours
English 8. mathematics 5, physics 5, humanities 3, social or
behavioral sciences 3 and physical education activities 3 27
Required Technical Courses and Electives
Courses listed under Associate in Applied Sciences degree in the appropriate
engineering technology, or equivalent, must be taken 66
93


64 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The second two years of the program have the following course requirements:
Basic Studies
Humanities approved courses 12
Science and/or mathematics the 15 quarter-hour requirement is normally completed during the first two years.
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences 12
Minor 27
Electives 9
60
Electronics Engineering Technologist Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Electronics Engineering Technology 321-322. Advanced Electrical Circuits I, II 10 Electronics Engineering Technology 410. Electrical/Electronics
Technology Seminar 2
Approved upper division Electronics Engineering Technology courses 9
Mathematics 111-112. Calculus and Analytical Geometry I. II 10
Physics 123. College Physics III 5
Approved industrial related courses selected from mathematics, science,
business or technology 8
197
Electronics Engineering Technologist Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Electronics Engineering Technology 251-252. Principles of Electricity
and Magnetism I, II 10
Electronics Engineering Technology 301-302. Principles of Electronics
and Electronics Circuits I, II 10
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in electronics technology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Chairman,
Department of Electronics Technology 12
32
Mechanical Engineering Technologist Major
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Mechanical Engineering Technology 300. Manufacturing Analysis 4
Mechanical Engineering Technology 304. Work Simplification and Layout 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 306. Fluid Power and Control Systems 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 307. Mechanical Design 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 400. Project Engineering 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 404. Plant Layout 3
Total of 14 quarter hours selected from the following: 14
Mechanical Engineering Technology 308. Metallurgy 3


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 65
4 4 4 4
3 3 2
1-10
11
197
Mechanical Engineering Technologist Minor
Required Courses
Mechanical Engineering Technology 100. Materials and Manufacturing Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology 101-102. Manufacturing Processes I, II Mechanical Engineering Technology 200. Industrial Hydraulics Mechanical Engineering Technology 210. Principles of Numerical Control Mechanical Engineering Technology 240. Fundamentals of Welding Mechanical Engineering Technology 300. Manufacturing Analysis Mechanical Engineering Technology 400. Project Engineering Drafting Engineering Technology 102. Technical Drawing Quality Assurance Technology 100. Introduction to Quality Assurance
33
Quarter Hours
3
6
3
4
3
4 3
3
4
Mechanical Engineering Technology 340. Advanced Welding Mechanical Engineering Technology 405. Production Tooling Mechanical Engineering Technology 410. Numerical Control Machining Engineering Technology 305. Computer Graphics Engineering Technology 400. Motion and Time Study Engineering Technology 404. Production Control Engineering Technology 410. Mechanical Technology Seminar Engineering Technology 499. Advanced Field Experience Approved related technical electives
Industrial Marketing Major
Bachelor of Science
The Industrial Marketing program links sales and manufacturing. Specialists are trained to become familiar with designing, manufacturing, branding, packaging, transporting, labeling, pricing, selling and servicing products. In addition, the curriculum develops an awareness of the policies and practices of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and users of technical goods. Graduates may expect to find positions in retail and wholesale industrial sales positions, in the areas of advertising and promotion, and in the field of marketing planning. Administration of the program is handled jointly through the Departments of Electronics Technology and Marketing.
Basic Studies
All students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Industrial Marketing must complete the following basic studies requirements:
Quarter Hours
English 101-102. Basic Communications I, II 8
Speech 101. Public Speaking 3
English 254. Business Communications or
English 255. Introduction to Technical Writing 3
Approved electives from the following: 6
English 104. Improvement of Reading 3
English 256. Introduction to Communication Theories 3
Speech 201. Business and Professional Speaking 3


66 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate 3
Speech 211. Discussion Methods 3
Speech 311. Conference Leadership 3
Speech 374. Psychology of Communication 3
Speech 410. Techniques of Persuasion 3
Economics 101-102. Principles of Economics I, II 6
Psychology 201. General Psychology 3
Psychology 345. Industrial Psychology 3
Social or Behavioral Sciences elective 3
Mathematics 106. Applied Technical Mathematics 5
Chemistry elective 5
Physics elective 5
Humanities elective 3
53
HPER 100. Physical Education Activities 3
56
Technology Course Studies
Quarter Hours
Drafting Engineering Technology 100. Technical Graphics 4
Engineering Technology 205. Strength of Materials 3
Engineering Technology 218. Production Reporting 3
Engineering Technology 404. Production Control 3
Electronics Engineering Technology 251-252. Principles of Electricity
andMagnetismI.il 10
Electronics Engineering Technology 301. Principles of Electronics Circuits 5
Mechanical Engineering Technology 100. Materials and
Manufacturing Technology 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 200. Industrial Hydraulics 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 210. Principles of Numerical Control 4
Mechanical Engineering Technology 300. Manufacturing Analysis 4
Quality Assurance Technology 100. Introduction to Quality Assurance 4
Quality Assurance Technology 208. Procurement Quality Assurance 3
49
Business Course Studies
Quarter Hours
Business 221. Business Law I 3
Management Science 231. Business Statistics I 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Business Communications 301. Business Report Writing 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Business 495. Business Policies 4
Accounting 300. Accounting Survey and Analysis 3
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Business Systems 110. Computer Programming I 3
Business Systems 300. Data Processing and Analysis 3
Marketing 216. Salesmanship 3


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Marketing 300. Marketing Survey and Analysis 3
Marketing 352. Marketing Management 3
Marketing 410. Industrial Marketing 3
Marketing 411. Marketing Research 3
Marketing 416. Sales Management 3
49
Approved electives 29
Selected in consultation with and approved by the Divisions of Business and/or Technology. A minimum of 8 hours must be upper division.
Total 183
Technical Management Major
Bachelor of Science
Technical Management is an interdisciplinary program training students to become technically proficient in order to handle their own jobs effectively and to communicate with and manage technical specialists. Because of the skills, insight, knowledge and maturity of judgment demanded in the field, the program is on a high level and the 200-quarter-hour minimum requirement exceeds the traditional 180 hours that most programs demand. Graduates are needed for positions in value engineering, logistics engineering, quality control, maintenance engineering, systems analysis or management, operations research, field engineering. This program has been coordinated with several industrial management representatives and is administered jointly through the Divisions of Business and Technology.
Basic Studies
Required Courses
English 101-102. Basic Communications I, II Speech 101. Public Speaking English 254. Business Communications or
English 255. Introduction to Technical Writing Economics 101-103. Principles of Economics I, II, III Mathematics 111-112. Calculus and Analytical Geometry I, II Approved electives selected from the following:
English 104. Improvement of Reading English 256. Introduction to Communication Theories Speech 201. Business and Professional Speaking Speech 210. Argumentation and Debate Speech 211. Discussion Methods Speech 311. Conference Leadership Speech 374. Psychology of Communication Speech 410. Techniques of Persuasion Humanities electives
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences electives Physics or Chemistry elective Electives approved by the Department Chairman Free electives
HPER 100. Physical Education Activities
Quarter Hours 8
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
9
10
6
3
6
5
12
17
82
3
85


68 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Technology Course Studies
Quarter Hours
Civil Engineering Technology 100. Introduction to Civil Technology 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 100. Technical Graphics 4
Engineering Technology 205. Strength of Materials 3
Engineering Technology 218. Production Reporting 3
Engineering Technology 251. Mechanics I 4
Engineering Technology 400. Motion and Time Study 3
Engineering Technology 401. Advanced Engineering Technology 5
Engineering Technology 404. Production Control 3
Engineering Technology 410. Technology Seminar 2
Electronics Engineering Technology 120. Introduction to Electronic Circuits
and Laboratory Instruments 2
Electronics Engineering Technology 251-252. Principles of Electricity
and Magnetism I, II 10
Electronics Engineering Technology 301. Principles of Electronics Circuits I 5
Mechanical Engineering Technology 100. Materials and
Manufacturing Technology 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 300. Manufacturing Analysis 4
Mechanical Engineering Technology 304. Work Simplification and Layout 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 400. Project Engineering 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 404. Plant Layout 3
63
Business Course Studies
Quarter Hours
Business 221. Business Law I 3
Management Science 231. Business Statistics I 3
Business 251. Principles of Management 3
Management Science 331. Business Statistics II 3
Business 353. Personnel Management 3
Business 355. Industrial Organization and Management 3
Business 335. Operations Research 3
Business 495. Business Policies 4
Accounting 300. Accounting Survey and Analysis 3
Accounting 240. Cost Accounting 3
Business Systems 110. Computer Programming I 3
Business Systems 300. Data Processing Survey and Analysis 3
Business Systems 305. Data Processing Systems 3
Marketing 300. Marketing Survey and Analysis 3
12 hours of electives selected from the following: 12
Management Science 332. Business Statistics III 2
Finance 350. Financial Institutions 3
Business 462. Wage and Salary Administration 3
Marketing 352. Marketing Management 3
Marketing 410. Industrial Marketing 3
55
Total 203


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Additional Engineering Technologist Minors
Civil Engineering Technologist Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Drafting Engineering Technology 102. Technical Drawing II 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 109. Architectural Drawing 4
Drafting Engineering Technology 210. Descriptive Graphics 3
Civil Engineering Technology 221. Elementary Surveying 5
Civil Engineering Technology 201. Structural Drawing 3
Civil Engineering Technology 205. Computing and Estimating 3
Civil Engineering Technology 314. Construction Law 3
Civil Engineering Technology 331. Construction Methods 3
Engineering Technology 205. Strength of Materials 3
Engineering Technology 251. Mechanics I 3
33
Drafting Engineering Technologist Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Drafting Engineering Technology 101. Technical Drawing I 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 102. Technical Drawing II 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 109. Architectural Drawing 4
Drafting Engineering Technology 206. Elements of Machine Design 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 210. Descriptive Graphics 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 301. Advanced Technical Drawing 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 307. Production Illustration 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 100. Materials and
Manufacturing Technology 3
Electives
A minimum of eight additional quarter hours in related technology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department Chairman 8
33
Quality Assurance Technologist Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Quality Assurance Technology 100. Introduction to Quality Assurance 4
Quality Assurance Technology 101. Principles of Quality Assurance I 4
Quality Assurance Technology 201. Theory and Application of
Quality Assurance I 4
Quality Assurance Technology 205. Non-Destructive Testing 2
Quality Assurance Technology 206. Metrology 2
Drafting Engineering Technology 102. Technical Drawing 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 100 or 101. Manufacturing Processes I or
Materials and Manufacturing Technology 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 300. Manufacturing Analysis 4
Electronics Engineering Technology 100. Introduction to Electricity
and Electronics 3
Mechanical Engineering Technology 404. Plant Layout 3


70 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Surveying Technologist Minor
Quarter Hours
Drafting Engineering Technology 101. Technical Drawing I 3
Drafting Engineering Technology 102. Technical Drawing II 3
Civil Engineering Technology 221. Elementary Surveying 5
Civil Engineering Technology 207. Topographic Drawing 3
Civil Engineering Technology 306. Spherical Trigonometry 2
Civil Engineering Technology 322. Curves and Earthworks 4
Civil Engineering Technology 422. Cadastral Surveying 5
Engineering Technology 499. Surveying Field Experience 5
Health Physical Education and Recreation 206. First Aid 2
32
Civil Engineering Technology
CET 100-3. Introduction to Civil Technology.
An introduction to the profession of engineering technology with emphasis on the history, role, work and challenge to civil technologists. Education, study habits, communications and problem solving are stressed. Behavior of structures under various types of loads is introduced to stimulate student interest in his field.
CET 101-4. Civil Technology I.
Continuation of CET 100 with emphasis on the tools of engineering problem solving, the problem, the influencing factors, the analysis and the creative design process itself.
Prerequisite: CET 100, or permission of instructor.
CET 201-3. Structural Drawing.
Study and preparation of necessary drawings of structural members and connections including engineering layout and detail drawing with emphasis on the preparation of plans from design calculations.
Prerequisite: DET 102, or equivalent.
CET 205-3. Computing and Estimating.
Problems of approximate and exact methods of taking off quantities from plans; methods of arriving at lump sum and unit prices, and estimating total costs from quantities; accepted methods of itemizing preliminary and final estimates.
Prerequisite: DET 109.
CET 207-3. Topographic Drawing.
A study of map symbols, types of contours, sources for map data and methods
used in map plotting. Students prepare plats and topographic maps.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CET 221-5. Elementary Surveying.
Instruction in use of the engineers tape, transit, and level and methods of recording field data in note form. Field problems associated with the theory cover horizontal and vertical measurements, differential, profile and other leveling operations, and angular and bearing measurements with the transit. Also included is traverse layout and computing.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 102, or permission of instructor.
CET 250-5. Construction Project.
A comprehensive problem in a selected field of construction is developed in consultation with instructor. A complete set of working drawings, design details and presentation are required consistent with methods of approach, research and presentation as evidenced in standard engineering and architectural offices.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CET 306-2. Spherical Trigonometry.
The course includes spherical geometry, relationships between spheres and planes, and the development of formulas for the solution of spherical triangles, both right and obtuse together with the application of their solution to the celestial sphere and the terrestial sphere. Solutions computed by both logarithmic and machine methods.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and 102.
CET 314-3. Construction Law.
Legal aspects of contracts and contracting including a study of contract documents, proposals, award procedures, bonding, liens,


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 71
arbitration, litigation and the role of the expert witness.
Prerequisite: CET 201 (may be taken concurrently).
CET 322-4. Curves and Earthwork.
The course includes the development of the mathematical formula for circular highway curves and circular highway curves with spiral transitions including superelevations. The procedures for staking those curves in the field is included. Vertical curves or parabolic curves are developed from fundamental considerations of the parabola which involves the knowledge of the calculus. Minimum site distances, point of crest and low-point determination are computed. Also, the parabolic curve with unequal tangents is discussed. Earthwork volumes are computed by the use of prismoidal formulas. The reductions of cross-section data to the computation of volumes is stressed; also, the construction of mass and haul diagrams. The technique of placing slope stakes for highway construction will be covered.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 101, 102. CET 221 and 306.
CET 331-3. Construction Methods.
Study of the various methods of construction of steel, timber, and concrete structures in bridges, highways, buildings, footings, retaining walls, tanks and towers. Forming and finishing of concrete, masonry work, paints and wood finishes. Quantity take-off for estimating purposes.
Prerequisite: CET 201 (may be taken concurrently).
CET 401-3. Concrete Technology.
Analysis and application of concrete structures including columns, beams, slabs, walls and other types. Problem sessions and field trips.
Prerequisites: ET 205, 251, and CET
201.
CET 411-3. Steel Technology.
Analysis and application of steel structures including loading stresses in members, selection and application of connectors, bolts, rivets and welds. Emphasis on practical solutions to problems and influences on design. Field trips and problem solving.
Prerequisite: ET 205, 251, and CET
201.
CET 421-3. Timber Technology.
Timber uses in modern day construction applications are studied. Physical and mechanical properties beams, girders, trusses,
decking. Allowable stresses and proper fastenings are examined.
Prerequisites: ET 205, 251, and CET
201.
CET 422-5. Cadastral Surveying.
The modern name of surveys of boundaries for lands is cadastral surveying. This course includes the history of land surveys in the United States and the legal problems connected therewith. The textbook for the course is the manual of instructions for United States land surveys which is the official document controlling the surveys or resurveys of public lands in the United States. The course will include field investigations of land monuments and writing a description of properties. Practice will be given in record searching and learning to interpret field notes as recorded in the public land offices.
Prerequisites: CET 221 and ET 306.
CET 431-4. Soil Mechanics.
Soil properties are studied and soil characteristics introduced; methods of sampling and analysis are treated. Variations in behavior under different loading conditions are analyzed.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Drafting Engineering Technology
DET 100-4. Technical Graphics.
An introductory course in technical graphics; contents of the course are the use of instruments, lettering, geometric construction, sketching orthographies, sections, auxiliary, rotations, dimensioning machine drawing, pictorial drawing and architectural drawing. The course will give the individual a basic knowledge in the preparation and reading of a set of technical drawings.
DET 101-3. Technical Drawing I.
Use of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric constructions, pictorial and orthographic sketching, multiview orthographic projection, sectional views, single auxiliary views and basic dimensioning. Problems designed to require practical reasoning and develop good techniques. Films are included to assist student in formation of basic drafting concepts.
DET 102-3. Technical Drawing II.
Continuation of DET 101 which includes review in basic drafting procedures, and advanced study in orthographic projection. dimensioning, auxiliary views, section-


72 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ing and development. Methods and techniques of pictorial drafting, such as isometric, oblique, and perspective representation are also presented. Emphasis is placed on typical industrial drafting department procedures and job responsibilities for a draftsman in industry.
Prerequisite: DET 101.
DET 109-4. Architectural Drawing.
Introduction to architectural working drawings. Development of plans, sections, elevations and details in the preparation of a set of working drawings. Consideration is given to mechanical inclusions in structures.
Prerequisite: DET 102, or equivalent.
DET 202-2. Electronic Drafting.
Designed to give thorough knowledge of symbols for electrical and electronic devices and of accepted techniques for drawing electrical schematics, circuits and wiring diagrams.
Prerequisite: DET 100.
DET 206-3. Elements of Machine Design.
A survey of the more important elements used in tool and machine design and their general characteristics pertaining to application, efficiency, economy and standardization.
Prerequisite: DET 210.
DET 210-3. Descriptive Graphics.
A basic course designed to develop logical reasoning and the power of visualization in solving drafting problems that deal with single or intersecting surfaces which are not necessarily placed in the principal planes of projection. A graphic study is made of the relative position of points, lines and planes in space.
Prerequisite: DET 102.
DET 301-3. Advanced Technical Drawing.
Students develop advanced skills in technical drawing within the specialization of their choice. Considerable independent study is expected.
Prerequisite: DET 206.
DET 307-3. Production Illustration.
Pictorial drawing with emphasis on application to industrial production work.
Prerequisite: DET 102.
Electronics Engineering Technology
EET 100-3. Introduction to Electricity and Electronics.
An introductory survey course in electricity and electronics. Topics studied include fundamentals of direct-current, alternating current, and electronic circuits; principles of electrical measuring instruments and their application; magnetic circuits; and elementary circuitry for control and switching.
EET 101-5. Electrical Circuits I.
A study of the concepts of electricity and an analysis of resistive circuits including series circuits, parallel circuits and series parallel circuits.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 100, 101 or
106.
EET 102-5. Electrical Circuits II.
Continuation of EET 101 with study of single-time constant circuits (R-L and R-C circuits). Includes standard switching circuitry and linear circuits with sinusoidal source voltages.
Prerequisites: EET 101 and Mathematics 102 or 106, or permission of instructor.
EET 103-5. Electrical Circuits III.
Continuation of EET 102. An advanced study of electrical network circuits, equations and theorems.
Prerequisite: EET 102.
EET 120-2. Introduction to Electronic Circuits and Laboratory Instruments.
Designed to provide familiarization with circuit components, practical electronic circuits, laboratory instruments and basic measurement techniques.
EET 221-5. Electronics I.
Study of active electronic devices (tubes and transistors) and their use in elementary electronic circuits. Emphasizes biasing circuits, basic amplifiers and equivalent circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 102. or permsson of instructor.
EET 222-5. Electronics II.
Continuation of EET 221 with emphasis on general electronic circuits, such as amplifiers, rectifiers, oscillators and multivibrators. Prerequisite: EET 221.


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 73
EET 223-5. Electronics III.
Continuation of EET 222. Emphasizes more complex electronic systems and functional circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 222.
EET 245-3. FCC License Requirements.
(Same as Aerospace Technology 245.) A course in electronics that includes practical information required to pass examinations for Federal Communications Commission radio license. Topics include radio laws and regulations, radiotelephone operation, message priorities, urgency and distress signals, radio fundamentals and navigation equipment.
Prerequisite: EET 222.
EET 246-3. Basic Aircraft Radio and Electronic Equipment.
See course description for Aerospace Technology 246.
EET 250-1 to 5. Field Problems in Electrical/Electronic Technology.
Supervised work in special topics in Electronics Engineering Technology. Credit to be determined by Chairman of Division of Technology.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
EET 251-5. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism I.
Principles of electrical technology: basic physical and electrical energy concepts, definitions and terminology. Study of Ohms Law, Kirchoffs Law and network theorems with applications to circuit problems. Introduction to magnetic and electric fields and transient behavior. Fundamentals of both DC and AC applications including complex quantities, covering resistive, inductive, capacitive and combination circuits.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
EET 252-5. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism II. Continuation of EET 251.
Prerequisite: EET 251, or 102 and Mathematics 111 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
EET 301-5. Principles of Electronics and Electronics Circuits I. Analysis of the principles, characteristics and operation of electron devices utilizing concepts of modern physics and physical laws. Study includes vacuum and gas tubes.
photo-electricity, fundamentals of semiconductors and transistors. Fundamental operation of these devices is analyzed in circuit applications such as amplifiers, detectors,
oscillators, modulators and control systems.
Prerequisites: EET 103 or 252, and
Mathematics 112 (may be taken concur-
rently), or permission of instructor.
EET 302-5. Principles of Electronics and Electronic Circuits II.
Continuation of EET 301.
Prerequisites: EET 222 or 301. and
Mathematics 112, or permission of instructor.
EET 305-4. Introduction to Electrical Measurements.
A fundamental course dealing with the determinations of various quantities using electrical measuring techniques. Special consideration is to be given to measurements of voltage, resistance, current, capacitance, inductance, frequency, etc., and techniques of converting these measurements into determinations of other physical properties, such as pressure and temperature. Includes history and development of electrical measurements and an introduction to the operation of the Bureau of Standards.
Prerequisite: EET 221 or 301, or permission of instructor.
EET 307-3. Principles of Radar.
Advanced course covering the theory and operation of general radar circuitry. Emphasis is placed upon block diagram integration and specific circuits such as pulse circuits, control circuits, servo circuits, amplifiers, power supplies.
Prerequisite: EET 221 or 301. or permission of instructor.
EET 309-3. Introduction to Computer Electronics.
Deals with the fundamental concepts and circuits of electronic computers, both analog and digital. Emphasis is on the circuitry and electrical logic and not upon programming.
Prerequisite: EET 222 or 301, or permission of instructor.
EET 321-5. Advanced Electrical and Electronics Circuits I.
An advanced course which requires previous knowledge of basic electrical circuits. Study also includes analysis of non-linear circuit elements within circuits.
Prerequisites: EET 223 and Mathematics 112, or EET 302. or permission of instructor.


74 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
EET 322-5. Advanced Electrical and Electronic Circuits II. Continuation of EET 321.
Prerequisite: EET 321, or permission of instructor.
EET 336-3. Pulse Circuits.
Analysis of static and regenerative circuits including shaping circuits, multi-vibrators, blocking oscillators, pulse amplifiers and transmitter circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 223 or 302 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
EET 347-3. Advanced Aircraft Radio
and Electronic Equipment. See course description for Aerospace Technology 347.
EET 361-3. Lines, Filters and Transmission Line Theory. Fundamental concepts of transmission line characteristics, matching sections and filters. Study includes radiation, wave propagation and antenna theory.
Prerequisite: EET 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 401-3. Circuit and Network Analysis.
Advanced theory in methods of circuit analysis and network synthesis. Study includes matrices, laplace transform and advanced operational methods.
Prerequisite: EET 322, or permission of instructor.
EET 402-3. Digital Circuits.
Study of counters, shift registers, logic circuits and information storage devices used in digital type electronic systems.
Prerequisite: EET 336. or permission of instructor.
EET 403-3. Servomechanisms and Control Circuits.
Theory of linear closed loop control systems. Analysis of servomechanisms containing electronic, magnetic and mechanical devices. Study includes feedback control techniques.
Prerequisite: EET 222 or 301 or Physics 123, or permission of instructor.
EET 410-2. Electrical/Electronic Technology Seminar. Discussion, study and analysis of historical, current and future applications of electronics. Each student prepares and presents papers on suitable subjects.
Prerequisite: Senior standing, or permission of instructor.
EET 430-3. Instruments and Measurements.
Advanced theory and applications of electrical and electronics instruments and instrumentation devices used in measurements of both physical and electrical quantities. Includes high frequency measurements used within microwave systems.
Prerequisite: EET 302, or permission of instructor.
Engineering Technology
ET 100-1, The Engineering Technology Profession.
History and development of the fields of engineering and technology; educational requirements, employment opportunities and trends in the various fields. Required of all Engineering Technology majors.
ET 106-5. Applied Technical Mathematics.
(Same as Mathematics 106.) Designed to assist the student majoring in technology by providing background and understanding in applied mathematics pertinent to any technology. The subject matter is covered from the standpoint of applicability to specific types of jobs. It incorporates drawings, specifications, and blueprints into the mathematical area and applies the mathematical functions to these areas.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 100, or equivalent.
ET 205-3. Strength of Materials.
Elementary principles of engineering statics and strength of materials. A thorough analysis of the fundamental concepts of mechanics as applied to structures, beams, columns and machine parts.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 or 106, or permission of instructor.
ET 218-3. Production Reporting.
A study of management techniques used for production and planning, scheduling and forecasting. The student becomes acquainted with Program Evaluation Review Techniques and Line of Balance technology and prepares graphs, charts and PERT diagrams.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ET 250-1 to 5. Field Problems in Engineering Technology.
Supervised advanced work for qualified students. Work is initiated by a student and


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 75
may consist of a special individual project under the supervision of a faculty member, or may consist of advanced study in connection with an established program. Credit to be determined by Chairman of Division of Technology.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ET 251-4. Mechanics I.
Covers statics and dynamics. Includes resultants and equilibrium of force systems, friction, center of gravity, moments of inertia, methods of work, kinematics, force mass acceleration, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and vibrations.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 102 and ET 205, or permission of instructor.
ET 252-4. Mechanics II.
Continuation of ET 251.
Prerequisite: ET 251.
ET 299-1 to 10. Field Experience.
Supervised work experience with a cooperating employer. Students are assigned according to their field of concentration. Credit and hours to be arranged with Chairman of the Division of Technology.
Prerequisite: Approval of Chairman of the Division of Technology.
ET 305-4. Computer Graphics.
A comprehensive survey of the general principles and applications of numerical control as it applies to design. Students study the basic language structure designed for effective communication between the draftsman and the automated drafting machine and numerical control systems for other machines.
Prerequisites: DET 102 and Mathematics 100.
ET 351-4. Mechanics III.
Continuation of ET 252 with emphasis on stress and strain, torsional and flexural loading deflections, combined loading, columns, repeated and dynamic loading, and connections.
Prerequisite: ET 252.
ET 400-3. Motion and Time Study.
An analysis of motion and time study as applied to manufacturing procedures, with emphasis given to work simplifications, motion economy, time standards and performance ratings.
ET 401-5. Advanced Engineering Technology.
Advanced study of the use of techni-
cians in industry. Emphasis is given to those areas offered at Metropolitan State College. Prerequisite: Senior standing.
ET 404-3. Production Control.
A study of the meaning and scope of production control. Students become acquainted with the function of production control as a part of the management framework and learn how decisions and actions taken by the production control departments affect the rest of a company. Typical production control activities encountered in industrial employment are discussed.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ET 410-2. Technology Seminar.
Study of selected topics and an analysis of the interrelationship of the engineering technology fields.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ET 499-1 to 15. Advanced Field Experience.
Supervised work experience with a cooperating employer. Credit and hours to be arranged with Chairman of Division of Technology.
Prerequisite: Permission of Chairman, Division of Technology.
Mechanical Engineering Technology
MET 100-3. Materials and Manufacturing Technology.
An introductory survey course in manufacturing production processes which include a study of the primary materials and manufacturing processes used in the fabrication of industrial products.
MET 101-3. Manufacturing Processes I.
Basic fundamentals in the operation of lathes, drilling machines, metal saws and measuring equipment. Includes tool grinding, bench work and layout.
MET 102-3. Manufacturing Processes II.
Continuation of MET 101. Fundamentals of vertical and horizontal milling machines and surface grinders; advanced lathe and drilling operations.
Prerequisite: MET 101, or permission of instructor.
MET 200-3. Industrial Hydraulics.
Provides a practical working knowledge of the components and systems involved in hydraulic and power transmission. Among the topics covered are fluidpower pumps and motors, cylinders, plumbing, pressure accu-


76 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
mulators, flow and directional control valves, servo systems and industrial hydraulic circuits.
Prerequisite: Physics 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 205-3. Production Machine Tools.
Construction features and industrial applications for special purpose, manual, semiautomatic, automatic and numerical control production machine tools. Operation and tooling methods for turret lathes, multispindle lathes, automatic screw machines, drilling machines and transfer machine tools. Emphasis is on numerical control manufacturing.
Prerequisite: MET 102.
MET 208-4. Basic Tool Design.
Introduction to the basic concepts of tool designing. Design projects include simple jigs, fixtures, cutting tools and inspection gauges. Students have the opportunity to study selected portions of MIL-STA-8C as related to tool and gauge design for positionally toleranced parts.
Prerequisites: MET 101 and DET 102, or permission of instructor.
MET 210-4. Principles of Numerical Control.
Introduction to vocabulary and processes involved in programming a component for numerical control manufacturing. Study of selected numerical controlled manufacturing equipment is introduced. Laboratory projects involve programming a part and preparation of numerical control tapes. Local field trips are arranged to provide students an opportunity to observe numerical controlled machine tools in operation.
Prerequisite: MET 101, or permission of instructor.
MET 220-3. Principles of Metallurgy.
An introduction to physical and process metallurgy; production processes for iron and steel, the study of pure metal and alloy characteristics, basic phase diagrams and metal structures and effects of low alloy content on the iron carbide phase diagrams.
Prerequisite: MET 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 240-3. Fundamentals of Welding.
A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the common welding processes for metal joining. Units include fusion welding of mild steel sheet and plate with the oxy-acetylene and arc processes, brazing of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, oxy-acetylene cutting and introduction to inert-gas welding.
MET 300-4. Manufacturing Analysis.
Economics of tooling operations: the productivity of machines, tool maintenance, tool costs and job estimating. A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of process planning.
Prerequisite: MET 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 304-3. Work Simplification and Layout.
A study of management techniques with emphasis on methods of improvement, time study analysis, plant layout and material handling procedures.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 306-3. Fluid Power and Control Systems.
Studies in hydraulic, pneumatic and electronic control devices as applied to numerically controlled and other automated production equipment.
Prerequisite: MET 200, or permission of instructor.
MET 307-3. Mechanical Design.
Application of the method of stress analysis of the design of machine components. Analysis of static and dynamic forces and stresses in machine elements. The main topics are fastenings, shafting, coupling, clutches and brakes, bearings and rolling contacts, lubrication.
Prerequisites: Physics 100 and DET
102.
MET 308-3. Metallurgy.
A study of the physical properties, composition, constituents and heat treatments of metals and metal alloys. Material specifications, tests and places of applications in industry are reviewed.
Prerequisite: MET 220, or permission of instructor.
MET 340-4. Advanced Welding.
Provides a student with a technological understanding of the advanced welding techniques used in industry.
Prerequisite: MET 240, or permission of instructor.
MET 400-3. Project Engineering.
An introduction to the role of the project engineer. The course reviews the various phases of a research and development program, and the different disciplines in which the project engineer must be expert in order to effectively bring each phase of the program to successful completion.


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Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 404-3. Plant Layout.
The basic principles of plant layout to meet production needs. Application of materials handling devices to the process. Selection and arrangement of production machinery, product and process layout schemes, techniques of making layouts, and balance and flexibility of operations are fully discussed.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 405-4. Production Tooling.
Classroom discussion and actual drawing board work are combined to help the student gain knowledge and experience necessary to design tools commonly used in industry. Students design cutting tools, gauges, jigs, fixtures and dies, and prepare tooling layouts for production machine tools.
Prerequisite: MET 208, or permission of instructor.
MET 410-4. Numerical Control Machining.
Theory and applications of numerical control as applied to machine tools in manufacturing operations. Principles and application techniques of various control media. Emphasis on point-to-point and dimensional and three-dimensional configurations.
Prerequisite: MET 210, or permission of instructor.
Quality Assurance Technology
QA 100-4. Introduction to Quality Assurance.
A survey course tracing the development of the concept of quality assurance. Emphasis is on process control, product acceptance, the rejection and corrective cycle and quality costs.
QA 101-4. Principles of Quality Assurance I.
A basic course on scope and function of quality assurance, including regulations, records, vendor selection, procurement quality and inspection and measurement techniques. Prerequisite: QA 100, or equivalent.
QA 102-4. Principles of Quality Assurance II.
Continuation of QA 101, including the interpretation and use of quality assurance data. Material control, rejection analysis, measuring instruments and electronic requirements are covered.
Prerequisite: QA 101.
QA 201-4. Theory and Application of Quality Assurance I.
Presents the latest techniques of quality assurance at the component, the assembly, and the systems level. Quality assurance is analyzed from design conception through consumer use and disposal, including sampling, testing, data analysis and interpretation.
Prerequisite: QA 101.
QA 202-4. Theory and Application of Quality Assurance II.
Continuation of QA 201, with emphasis on statistical analysis, cost analysis, case problem solving applications, and configuration identification and control.
Prerequisite: QA 201.
QA 203-4. Advanced Quality Assurance.
An analysis of the total concept of quality assurance, including special quality experiments and quality cost optimization. Sampling by attributes and variables and trouble-shooting quality problems and the application of statistical techniques to the manufacturing process are included.
Prerequisite: QA 201.
QA 205-2. Nondestructive Testing.
Provides a background in industrial nondestructive testing. Emphasis is given to the methods used to predict equipment performance and to the proper use of each nondestructive test. Advantages and limitations of nondestructive testing methods are reviewed.
Prerequisites: QA 100 and Physics 100. QA 206-2. Metrology.
A study of the common measuring instruments used in quality assurance. Included are electrical, pressure, vacuum, vibration, acceleration, human error and data evaluation.
QA 207-2. Electronic Quality Assurance.
A study of advanced inspection methods and principles peculiar to the electronics industry.
Prerequisites: EET 100 and QA 100.
QA 208-3. Procurement Quality Assurance.
Procurement quality assurance techniques and policy, including regulations, records, vendor selection, and monitoring, inspection measurement instruments and test equipment and control charts applicable to receipt and shipment of goods.
Prerequisite: QA 101.




SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
The School of Liberal Arts includes the departments of Anthropology, Art, Behavioral Science, English, Economics, History, Language, Music, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology.
Anthropology
Minor
Required Courses
Quarter Hours
Anthropology 101. Anthropology 102. Anthropology 310.
Introduction to Physical Anthropology Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Archeology of North America
3
3
3
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional quarter hours in anthropology, of which at least three quarter hours must be at the 400 level, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology.
Anthro. 101-3. Introduction to Physical Anthropology.
An introduction to the science of anthropology. The goals and methods of physical anthropology are stressed. Mans position in nature, survey of fossil records and human evolution.
Anthro. 102-3. Introduction to
Cultural Anthropology. The goals and methods of cultural anthropology are stressed. The concept of culture and its importance for man. Culture development and major cultural components, such as subsistence, technology and language.
Anthro. 201-3. Man and Evolution.
Guided review of genetics directed to human populations and the forces of evolution as applied to man. These areas will be used to introduce at the general level the phenomenon of human heterography. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101.
Anthro. 202-3. Man and Culture.
Selected areas of cultural anthropology, such as primitive socio-political structures, education, art and a survey of major culture areas. Application to field studies. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102.
Anthro. 210-3. Introduction to Archeology.
Introductory course on the goals, methods, and techniques of modern archeology.
Dating techniques and chronological frameworks.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102.
Anthro. 211-3. Prehistory of Europe.
Survey of main European prehistoric culture from the earliest cultural evidence to the Mesolithic. Stone age technology of main prehistoric cultures and periods.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 220-3. Ethnography of the Old World.
Survey of the major culture areas of the Old World, their cultures and achievements, including environmental relationships. Both present and past cultures.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102.
Anthro. 221-3. Ethnography of the
North American Indian. Survey of the major Indian cultures of North America. Environmental and historical relationships are part of the course.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 and
202.
Anthro. 222-3. Indian Cultures of Meso and South America. Ethnographic survey of the major Indian cultures of Meso and South America, including environmental and historical relationship.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 and
202.
79


80 SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Anthro. 301-3. Prehistory of Africa.
Prehistory of Africa from the first archeological evidence to historic times. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 302-3. Archeology of Asia.
Prehistoric cultures of Asia from the earliest archeological evidence to the emergence of civilizations. Emphasis on cultural growth and regional relationship.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 310-3. Archeology of North America.
Prehistory of North America, emphasizing the peopling of the New World, earliest Indian cultures and later regional developments.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 311-3. Archeology of Meso America.
Survey of archeology of Meso America from earliest culture existence up to 16th century. Emphasis on culture growth, relationship with adjacent areas, and influence on development of cultures in southwestern and eastern United States.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 312-3. Archeology of South America.
Survey of the cultural development of South America from the earliest archeological evidences up to the collapse of the Inca civilization.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 320-3. Primitive Religion.
Survey of religious beliefs and practices of nonliterate peoples.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 202.
Anthro. 380-3. Archeology of the
Rocky Mountain Region. Culture development of the Rocky Mountain Region. Emphasis on culture origins, growth, relationship and ecology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 385-3. Archeology of the Middle East.
Survey of cultural development from the earliest archeological evidence up to the development of civilizations. Emphasis on the investigation of domestication and its consequences for culture development. Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.
Anthro. 401-3. History of
Anthropology.
History of the growth of anthropology from the earliest times, various schools of thought, outstanding contributors and their works, to the mid-20th century.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Anthro. 410-3. Recent Trends in Anthropology.
Major trends in contemporary anthropology since the mid-20th century. Materials from current publications will be examined. Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Anthro. 470-2-4. Archeological Field Research.
Field work consists of excavation of archeological sites. Offered summer quarter only. Two credit hours for first five-week session, and four quarter hours for ten-week session.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 210.


Art
Major for Bachelor of Arts
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 81
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art II1-113. Drawing I, II, III 9
Art 121-123. Basic Design I, II, III 9
Art 201-203. ArtSurveyI.il, III 9
Art 211-213. Drawing and Painting I, 11. Ill 9
Art 241-243. Three Dimensional Design I, II. Ill 9
45
Upper division requirements include study in the following sub-areas:
A. FINE ARTS
Drawing
Painting
Printmaking
Sculpture
B. APPLIED ARTS
Advertising Design
Graphic Communications Design
Industrial Design
Photography
Product Design
C. CRAFTS
Ceramics
Fabric Design and Weaving Metalwork and Jewelrymaking
D. ART HISTORY
African Art Primitive Art Modern Art
19th and 20th Century Architecture
Eighteen quarter hours required within a specific area, A, B, C, or D. 18
Six quarter hours elected within each of the remaining areas A. B, C, or D. 18
Electives
Nine additional quarter hours in art courses selected in consultation with
and approved by the Department of Art. 9
45
Art Education
Students seeking elementary or secondary credentials must in addition satisfy the teacher education program of Metropolitan State College, including art methods courses.
Minor
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Art 111-113. Drawing I, II, III 9
Art 121-123. Basic Design I, II, HI 9
Art 201-203. Art Survey I, II, III 9
Art 211-213. Drawing and Painting I, II. Ill 9
Art 241-243. Three Dimensional Design I, II. Ill 9
45
Transfer students must present a portfolio of their art work to the Department of Art prior to registering in art courses at the 200, 300 or 400 level.
Art 100-3. Art Appreciation.
Designed primarily for people who are not art majors but who are interested in acquiring information about various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening their knowledge and appreciation of the subject. Study of the worlds art masterpieces and visits to art exhibits and museums in Denver are included.
Art 110-3. Basic Drawing Methods.
A studio course in drawing which introduces basic drawing media and materials, covering varied techniques for free hand drawing, including principles of perspective drawing. For non-art majors, particular orientation to education students.


82 SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Art 111-3. Drawing 1.
A basic drawing course intended to develop graphic skills and familiarity with traditional drawing media; still life and perspective are used as points of departure.
Art 112-3. Drawing II.
Continuation of Art 111, stressing the human figure.
Prerequisite: Art 111, or permission of instructor.
Art 113-3. Drawing 111.
Continuation of Art 112, stressing subjective approach to drawing.
Prerequisite: Art 112, or permission of instructor.
Art 120-3. Basic Design Methods.
A studio course which is oriented to examining and exploring the elements and principles of design, expressed in abstract form. There is emphasis on use of various media and materials as well as on exploring both two and three dimensional form. For non-art majors, particular orientation to education students.
Art 121-3. Basic Design I.
An introduction to the fundamental principles of design and organization of design elements as a basis for all creative work in the visual arts.
Art 122-3. Basic Design II.
Continuation of Art 121, with emphasis on color.
Prerequisite: Art 121, or permission of instructor.
Art 123-3. Basic Design III.
Continuation of Art 122, with emphasis on form.
Prerequisite: Art 122, or permission of instructor.
Art 130-3. Methods in Crafts.
A shop oriented course in crafts in which wood, metal, fiber and plastics are worked directly to design and craft objects as an expression of the individual student involved. For non-art majors, particular orientation to HPER and education students.
Art 201-3. Art Survey I.
Major historical trends in the development of Western art including prehistoric art, with emphasis on Egyptian, Greek and Roman Classical art periods.
Art 202-3. Art Survey II.
Continuation of Art 201, with emphasis on medieval, renaissance and 18th century periods in art.
Prerequisite: Art 201.
Art 203-3. Art Survey III.
Continuation of Art 202, with emphasis on 19th and 20th century art.
Prerequisite: Art 202.
Art 211-3. Drawing and Painting I.
The student is taught to relate design and drawing as a basis for painting stressing use of various media.
Prerequisite: Art 113.
Art 212-3. Drawing and Painting II.
Continuation of Art 211, stressing color in drawing.
Prerequisite: Art 211.
Art 213-3. Drawing and Painting III.
Continuation of Art 212, stressing painting technique and paint media.
Prerequisite: Art 212.
Art 241-3. Three Dimensional Design I.
Development of basic knowledge and techniques needed for the solution of three dimensional design problems. Processes involved in the understanding and solution of problems of space, form, light and motion. Prerequisite: Art 123.
Art 242-3. Three Dimensional Design II. Continuation of Art 241.
Prerequisite: Art 241.
Art 243-3. Three Dimensional Design III.
Continuation of Art 242.
Prerequisite: Art 242.
Art 301-3. History of Primitive and Ethnic Art.
A historical and contemporary look at significant contributions in primitive painting, sculpture, crafts and adornment by cults, tribes, sects and individuals throughout the world, during both ancient and modern times.
Prerequisite: Art 203.
Art 302-3. History of Modern Art.
An analysis and study of trends and styles of 20th century art, including both painting and sculpture. Emphasis is upon the movements in art since World War II. Prerequisite: Art 203.


SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 83
Art 303-3. History of 19th and 20th Century Architecture and Furnishings.
Significant buildings and their decor throughout Europe and America are studied in relationship to the culture of their time. Included are famous modern architects and significant buildings.
Prerequisite: Art 203.
Art 304-3. History of African and Afro-American Art.
History and identification of the tribal arts and crafts of Africa and a study of contemporary Black artists. Particular attention is given to modern Black artists in the United States.
Art 310-3. Art Instructional Methods for Elementary Schools. Introduces the student to possibilities, limitations and implications of art materials used in the elementary school, stressing appropriate methods of teaching children at various age levels.
Art 311-3. Drawing IV.
An advanced drawing course intended to develop graphic skills to a higher level, while focusing attention upon the aesthetic nature of drawing.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 312-3. Drawing V.
Continuation of Art 311.
Prerequisite: Art 311.
Art 313-3. Drawing VI.
Continuation of Art 312.
Prerequisite: Art 312.
Art 320-3. Art Instructional Methods for Secondary Schools.
A thorough study of adolescent development in the visual arts; evaluation of methods and processes to motivate and stimulate art capabilities of junior and senior high school students.
Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division art courses.
Art 321-3. Graphic Communications Design I.
Acquaints the art student with lettering, typography and advertising layout. The student applies design and illustration to the solution of specific visual communication problems.
Prerequisites: Art 203, 213 and 243.
Art 322-3. Graphic Communications Design II.
Continuation of Art 321.
Prerequisite: Art 321.
Art 323-3. Graphic Communications Design III.
Continuation of Art 322.
Prerequisite: Art 322.
Art 324-3. Photography I.
Photography is treated as an art form and a discipline of significance to every art major. The first quarter deals with the history of photography and familiarizes the student with basic darkroom procedures.
Prerequisites: Art 123, 203 and 213.
Art 325-3. Photography II.
Continuation of Art 324.
Prerequisite: Art 234.
Art 326-3. Photography 111.
Continuation of Art 325.
Prerequisite: Art 325.
Art 331-3. Fabric Design: Hand Construction.
Introduction of many handcraft techniques of fiber and fabric construction, including macrame. Hand stitchery for wall hangings as well as basic looming methods for fiber constructions.
Prerequisite: Art 243.
Art 332-3. Fabric Design: Dyeing and Printing.
Designing and decorating of textiles by means of tie-dye, batik, block printing, silk screen, and hand-painting techniques on fabrics.
Prerequisite: Art 243.
Art 333-3. Fabric Design: Weaving.
The art of weaving is taught as a craft for purposes of originating decorative and utilitarian fabrics and textile designs. Instruction is given on floor looms as well as simple primitive-type looms.
Prerequisites: Art 243 and 331.
Art 341-3. Sculpture I.
Creative approach to the problems of three dimensional design in sculpture; modeling, molding, working in cold casting materials. Construction in wood, plastics and metals.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 243.


84 SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Art 342-3. Sculpture II.
Continuation of Art 341.
Prerequisite: Art 341.
Art 343-3. Sculpture III.
Continuation of Art 342.
Prerequisite: Art 342.
Art 351-3. Painting I.
A study of materials and techniques used in painting. Control of form and space is approached through the use of color, and design structure is applied to the problem of creating visual expressions.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 352-3. Painting II.
Continuation of Art 351.
Prerequisite: Art 351.
Art 353-3. Painting III.
Continuation of Art 352.
Prerequisite: Art 352.
Art 361-3. Ceramics I.
Introducing clay as an art and craft media, the instruction includes use of the potters wheel as well as hand methods for building pottery and sculpture forms. Also involves preparing pottery for glazing and firing.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 243.
Art 362-3. Ceramics II.
Continuation of Art 361 with added emphasis upon competent use of the potters wheels and additional study of glaze formulas.
Prerequisite: Art 361.
Art 363-3. Ceramics III.
Continuation of Art 362; further development in the craft technique and form expression of ceramic art. Development of low and high firing methods plus emphasis on glaze decorating.
Prerequisite: Art 362.
Art 371-3. Printmaking I.
Introduces the student to the possibilities and limitations of silk screen as a fine and applied art.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 372-3. Printmaking II.
Covers the fundamentals of lithography as a fine art; includes colored work on stones.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 373-3. Printmaking III.
Covers the fundamentals of intaglio, including etching, engraving, dry point and aquatint.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 374-3. Printmaking IV.
Built upon the fundamentals and unique characteristics of relief printmaking as a fine art medium. Students are introduced to printing from linoleum, plank-grain wood, end-grain wood, and from exploratory materials. Prerequisites: Art 203 and 213.
Art 381-3. Product Design I.
Students investigate the various areas of utilitarian design. Analytical and unbiased examination of the need, function and resultant visual expression is applied with the greatest directness possible.
Prerequisite: Art 203 and 243.
Art 382-3. Product Design II. Continuation of Art 381.
Prerequisite: Art 381.
Art 383-3. Product Design III. Continuation of Art 382.
Prerequisite: Art 382.
Art 391-3. Metalwork and Jewelrymaking I.
Design quality as a fundamental part of good craftsmanship is emphasized through the basic techniques involved in working nonferrous and precious metals, plus utilizing rare woods, fibers and plastics.
Prerequisites: Art 203 and Art 243.
Art 392-3. Metalwork and Jewelrymaking II. Continuation of Art 391.
Prerequisite: Art 391.
Art 393-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking III. Continuation of Art 392.
Prerequisite: Art 392.
Art 411-3. Advanced Drawing and Illustration I.
Advanced studio drawing oriented to interpreting subject matter for purpose of illustration, whether for fine arts expression or for commercial application.
Prerequisite: Art 313.
Art 412-3. Advanced Drawing and Illustration II.
Continuation of Art 411.
Prerequisite: Art 411.


SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 85
Art 413-3. Advanced Drawing and Illustration III.
Continuation of Art 412.
Prerequisite: Art 412.
Art 421-3. Advertising Design I.
Continuation of Art 323 with emphasis on production techniques in advertising design. Field trips to printing establishments in the area are conducted to acquaint students with reproduction methods used in advertising. The student is encouraged to build a portfolio of finished work prepared for various methods of reproduction.
Prerequisite: Art 323.
Art 422-3. Advertising Design II. Continuation of Art 421.
Prerequisite: Art 421.
Art 423-3. Advertising Design III. Continuation of Art 422.
Prerequisite: Art 422.
Art 441-3. Advanced Sculpture I.
Permits students to explore the problems of sculpture with emphasis on development of techniques and personal expression in self chosen media for sculpture.
Prerequisite: Art 343.
Art 442-3. Advanced Sculpture II. Continuation of Art 441.
Prerequisite: Art 441.
Art 443-3. Advanced Sculpture III. Continuation of Art 442.
Prerequisite: Art 442.
Art 451-3. Advanced Painting I.
Intended to develop the possibilities of personal expression inherent in the painting media and in drawing and design controls.
Prerequisite: Art 351, and permission of the instructor.
Art 452-3. Advanced Painting II. Continuation of Art 451.
Prerequisite: Art 451.
Art 453-3. Advanced Painting III. Continuation of Art 452.
Prerequisite: Art 452.
Art 461-3. Advanced Ceramics I.
Advanced instruction on the potters wheel in order to extend experience of throwing forms of clay on the wheel. Wheel-thrown techniques are combined with handbuilding techniques of clay for pottery. Prerequisite: Art 363.
Art 462-3. Advanced Ceramics II.
Emphasis on combining technical skills of wheel-throwing, glazing ware, and ceramicmaking with the art and aesthetic potential inherent in the ceramic processes. Prerequisite: Art 461.
Art 463-3. Advanced Ceramics III.
Problem assignments in the ceramics studio are formulated by individual students in consultation with the instructor. Stressed is student awareness to his individual responsibility to the clay media and ceramic process as both an art and a craft.
Prerequisite: Art 462.


86 SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Art 471-3. Advanced Printmaking 1.
Advanced work in relief printing with wood and linoleum block in which students are directed toward individual expression in the media used.
Prerequisite: Art 374.
Art 472-3. Advanced Printmaking II.
Advanced work in lithography as a fine art in which students are allowed to develop individuality in this media of printmaking.
Prerequisite: Art 372.
Art 473-3. Advanced Printmaking 111.
Advanced work in the art of intaglio, whereby students are allowed to concentrate in a specialized area such as etching, engraving, dry point or aquatint for individualized art expression.
Prerequisite: Art 373.
Art 481-3. Industrial Design I.
Continuation of product design, applying design concepts and solutions not only to manufacturers products but to improvement of company and corporate image through all phases of design aesthetics and function. Both two- and three-dimensional projects included.
Prerequisite: Art 383.
Art 482-3. Industrial Design II.
Continuation of Art 481 with emphasis on techniques of preparing and presenting visual models and mock-ups of designs. Prerequisite: Art 481.
Art 483-3. Industrial Design III.
Continuation of Art 482 with emphasis on illustration techniques of design solutions, on working drawings and specifications, and on methods appropriate to presenting various design concepts and solutions to clients. Prerequisite: Art 482.
Art 491-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking IV.
Advanced craft work in metal raising and forming; jewelrymaking is included. Students required to develop a philosophy on style and methods developed for individuality of artistic expression.
Prerequisite: Art 393.
Art 492-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking V. Continuation of Art 491.
Prerequisite: Art 491.
Art 493-3. Metalwork and
Jewelrymaking VI. Continuation of Art 492.
Prerequisite: Art 492.
Behavioral Science
Major for Bachelor of Arts
The behavioral science major groups courses from several disciplines in a related and organized manner with the objective of preparing students for positions in this field at public and private institutions, and also for the purpose of preparing students for graduate work in interdisciplinary programs.
Required Courses Quarter Hours
Anthropology 102. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
Psychology 201-202. GeneralPsychologyI.il 6
Sociology 101-102. IntroductiontoSociologyI.il 6
Sociology 201-202. Social Problems I, II 6
Behavioral Science 290. Behavioral Science Seminar 3
Behavioral Science 499. Advanced Internship (See Omnibus Courses) 3
Electives
A minimum of 28 additional hours in the Division, but not more than 12 hours in any one discipline nor less than 3, selected in consultation with and approved by the Division of Behavioral Sciences. Not less than 20 of these units must be for upper division courses.
BH 290-3. Behavioral Science Seminar.
Experiential study and involvement, including agency visits and field assignment, with agencies and institutions staffs, clients, critics operating in broad area of social welfare and the urban crisis.
BH 362-3. Interviewing Techniques.
Introduction to a wide variety of interviewing techniques. Opportunity both to observe and practice various types of interviewing.


English
Major for Bachelor of Arts
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 87
Grouped Requirements
English 211-213. World Literature \ At least two
English 221-223. American Literature > courses in each
English 231-233. British Literature ^ sequence.
English 201, 251-252, 255-256. English Grammar, Advanced Composition, Introduction to Creative Writing, Introduction to Technical Writing, Introduction to Communication Theories English 323-327. American Literature English 331-337. British Literature English 341-343, 345, 449. World Literature.
English 361-363. Afro-American Literature, Modern Black Poetry, Contemporary Black Drama English 423, 427, 429. American Literature English 431-435, 437, 439. British Literature English 441-442. Modern Drama, Medieval Epic and Romance English 461, 462. Literary Criticism, Modern Literary Criticism English 301-303, 351-353, 452-453. Structure of English Language,
History of English Language, Semantics, Modern Rhetoric in Writing. Creative Writing Workshop, Techniques of Critical Writing,
Advanced Creative Writing I, II English 391-392. Techniques and practice of English Research, Communications Materials and Resources
Quarter Hours
21
6
)
15
V
6
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Minor
Required Courses
English 211-213. World Literature
English 221-223. American Literature (At least 3 quarter hours) English 231-233. British Literature (At least 3 quarter hours) English 201, 251. English Grammar, Advanced Composition
Quarter Hours 6
! 9 3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Communications Minor: Writing
Required Courses
English 256. Introduction to Communication Theories (Printed Media) English 303. Semantics
English 392. Communications Materials and Resources
Quarter Hours 3 3 3


88 SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Electives chosen from the following courses: 15
English 183. Issues of the Day English 205. Improvement of Reading II English 251. Advanced Composition English 255. Introduction to Technical Writing English 257. Communications in Arts and Industry (Printed Media)
English 309. Modern Linguistic Studies in Writing English 345. Literature from Writings in the Sciences English 353. Techniques of Critical Writing English 354. Radio-Television Script Writing English 355. Advanced Technical Writing
English 356. Projects in Communication Theories (Printed Media)
English 357. Technical Editing and Production
English 358. Technical Communications
English 359. Writing for Films
English 382. Public Relations Writing
English 388. Copyright, Libel and Slander (Printed Media)
English 393. Communication in Education (Printed Media)
English 455. Projects in Technical Writing English 483. News Media in an Urban Society Speech 343. Radio-Television Announcing Speech 374. Psychology of Communication Speech 410. Techniques of Persuasion
Speech 449. Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life Sociology 387. Mass Communication and Public Opinion I Sociology 388. Mass Communication and Public Opinion II
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper-division Communications, English, Journalism or cognate area courses in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Public Communications Minor in Journalism
Required Courses
English 181. Introduction to Journalism English 182. News Reporting
English 201, 251, 255, 256. English Grammar, Advanced Composition, Introduction to Technical Writing, Introduction to Communication Theories
English 281. English 282. English 381. English 382. English 383. English 392. English 483.
News Reporting Projects News Editing and Copyreading Feature Article Writing Public Relations Writing Contemporary Issues Communications Materials and Resources News Media in an Urban Society
Quarter Hours 3 3
3
3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Electives
A minimum of 6 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in journalism.
To begin the journalism minor, students must qualify for English 101, Basic Communication I.


SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 89
Reading Minor
Required Courses
Quarter Hours
English 304. The Reading Process
English 305. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: English 306. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: English 307. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: English 308. Practicum in Reading English 403. Remedial Reading Theories English 405. Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities English 406. Development of Reading Materials English 408. Practicum in Remedial Reading
3
Primary Intermediate } 6
Secondary 3
3
3
3
3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper division courses selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in reading. Appropriate courses from other departments may be considered for this purpose.
Reading Programs
Eng. 104-3. Improvement of Reading I.
A course for the improvement of reading comprehension, reading speed, vocabulary and general performance in all college courses. Individual work in the reading laboratory is required in the course.
Eng. 205-3. Improvement of Reading II.
Study of techniques of critical reading and development of flexible reading rates.
Prerequisite: English 104, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 304-3. The Reading Process.
An analytical treatment of the reading process, including theories, research and issues related to all stages of reading. The course emphasizes scope and sequence of skill development.
Eng. 305-3. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Primary.
Approaches to the teaching of reading in the primary (Kindergarten-3) grade levels.
Prerequisite: English 304, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 306-3. Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Intermediate.
Approaches to the teaching of reading at the intermediate (4-6) grade levels.
Prerequisite: English 304, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 307-3. Methods and Techniques of Reading: Secondary. Approaches to the teaching of developmental reading at the secondary (Junior-Senior High School) level and to the teaching of reading skills in the content areas.
Prerequisite: English 304, or Secondary Education major.
Eng. 308-3. Practicum in Reading.
Classroom observation and application of reading techniques on the primary, intermediate, or secondary grade levels. Thirty clock hours of practicum in the schools are required.
Prerequisite: English 305, 306, or 307, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 403-3. Remedial Reading Theories.
A study of the causes of remedial reading difficulties together with the materials and techniques of remediation.
Prerequisite: English 308 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
Eng. 405-3. Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities.
Practice in administration of individual reading inventories and in writing recommendations for remediation of reading difficulties.
Prerequisite: English 403, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 406-3. Development of Reading Materials.
Organization and development of reading materials for use in remedial and corrective reading programs.


90 SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Prerequisite: English 405 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
Eng. 408-3. Practjcum in Remedial Reading.
Practice in diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties, including individual or small group tutoring experiences. Thirty clock hours of practicum in the schools are required.
Prerequisite: English 406. or permission of instructor.
Journalism Program
Eng. 181-3. Introduction to Journalism.
A course to acquaint students with information media and to provide practice in writing news and feature material.
Eng. 182-3. News Reporting.
Practice for proficiency in collecting and writing the news.
Prerequisite: English 181, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 281-3. News Reporting Projects.
News gathering and writing techniques in specific fields, including political, judicial, civic and sports.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 282-3. News Editing and Copyreading.
Experience in copyreading the news, writing headlines, proofreading and layout.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 381-3. Feature Article Writing.
Study of feature writing styles of newspapers and magazines, with practice in writing communications features intended for media publication.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 382-3. Public Relations Writing.
Practice in writing institutional news, features and editorials for public information productions, relating news and feature writing to institutional publications.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of journalism or English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 383-3. Contemporary Issues.
Investigation into current controversial topics in the community; requires extensive interviewing and writing.
Eng. 384-3. Broadcast News Writing.
Practice in writing of typical radio and television news, feature, and editorials, with copyreading and editing of such radio-TV writing.
Prerequisite: English 182, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 483-3. News Media in an Urban Society.
Examination of role, nature and function of mass media in an urban society, using community sources and the community itself as a workshop. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of Journalism or English above 103, or permission of instructor.
Communications Program
Eng. 255-3. Introduction to Technical Writing.
Practice in a variety of basic techniques used in the presentation of technical and scientific information.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of Basic Communication, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 256-3. Introduction to Communication Theories.
Elements of communication theories, as applied in communication analysis, technical and scientific writing, and writing for the mass media.
Eng. 257-3. Communications in Arts and Industry (Printed Media). Analysis and evaluation of communication processes of dynamics, and of problems in fine arts, cinematic arts, advertising, management and industry.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of Basic Communication, or permission of instructor.
Eng. 309-3. Modern Linguistic Studies in Writing.
General study of the present state and trends of language science and its relation to contemporary communication and culture. Analysis and exploration of content, uses and techniques of modern linguistics.
Prerequisite: Six quarter hours of English above 103, or permission of instructor.