Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1975-1976

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1975-1976
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text
metropolitan state college
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METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE BUILDINGS
1. Aaron Building 1447 Tremont Place
2. Cherokee Building 1090 Cherokee Street
3. Child Care Center 1038 and 1044 Cherokee
4. College Book Store 520 W. Colfax Ave.
5. College Center 1339 Elati Street
6. Court Place Building 1421 Court Place
7. Double A Building 1300 Glenarm Place
8. Elati Building 1411 Elati Street
9. Forum Building (Administration Building)
250 West Fourteenth Avenue
10. Fox Building 1435 Fox Street
11. Glenarm Building Place 1222 Glenarm Place
12. Gold Building 1440 Fox Street
13. Library
1421 Elati Street
14. Olympic Building 1330 Fox Street
15. Press Building 1340 Glenarm Place
16. Speer Building 1360 Speer
17. Student Activities Center 710 West Colfax Avenue
18. Three Thirty Three Building 333 West Colfax Avenue
19. Woodmen Building 1440 Speer
20. Zook Building
431 West Colfax Avenue
W. 9TH AVE.
GRANT


METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE
BULLETIN
250 West 14th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
Volume XI 1975-1976 Number 1
Published monthly. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Denver, Colorado.
This publication has been authorized by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. This provisions contained herein are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The information presented is based on commonly accepted practices at Colorado state colleges and plans developed to date for Metropolitan State College, but the College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the students term of attendance.
4/75-35M


1975
JANUARY
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 20 31
SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
1976
JANUARY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
FEBRUARY
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
JUNE
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MARCH
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
JULY
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
FEBRUARY
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29
JUNE
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MARCH
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
JULY
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
APRIL
5 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
AUGUST
S M T W T F S 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
APRIL
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
AUGUST
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
DECEMBER
S M T W T F S 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


COLLEGE CALENDAR
COLLEGE CALENDAR 1975 76
Summer Quarter late registration period for new, readmitted, and late
continuing students.................Tuesday-Friday........May 27-June 13
SUMMER QUARTER CLASSES BEGIN.......Monday
June 9
Last day to add classes..................
Last day to drop classes with refund
consideration .......................
Independence Day holiday.................
First five-week session ends ............
Second five-week session begins..........
Last day to submit Autumn Quarter
mail registration form ..............
Summer Quarter ends. Final examinations will be given during the last class
periods of each summer session.......
Autumn Quarter late registration period for new, readmitted, and late continuing students.....................
Friday...............................June 13
Monday ...........................June 16
Friday ............................July 4
Friday ...........................July 11
Monday...............................July 14
Friday..........................August 8
Friday.............................August 15
Monday-Friday. .August 25-September 26
AUTUMN QUARTER CLASSES BEGIN..............Monday...................September 22
Last day to add classes........................Friday .........................September 26
Last day to drop classes with refund
consideration .............................Monday .........................September 29
Mid Quarter ...................................Friday...............................October 24
Last day to submit a Winter Quarter
mail registration form ....................Friday..............................November 21
Thanksgiving vacation .........................Thursday and Friday..........November 27-28
Final examinations ..........Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. .December 1,2, 3, 4
Last day of the Autumn Quarter.................Thursday ........................December 4
Winter Quarter late registration period
for new, readmitted, and late
continuing students........................Monday-Friday ... .December 15-January 9
WINTER QUARTER CLASSES BEGIN...................Monday .........................January 5
Last day to add classes........................Friday..........................January 9
Last day to drop classes with refund
consideration .............................Monday .........................January 12
Mid Quarter ...................................Friday..........................February 6
Last day to submit Spring Quarter
mail registration form ....................Friday..........................February 13
Spring late registration period for new, readmitted and late
continuing students........................Monday-Friday............March 8-March 26
Final examinations.......Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday...........March 9,10,11,12
Last day of the Winter Quarter.................Friday .........................March 12
3


COLLEGE CALENDAR
SPRING QUARTER CLASSES BEGIN
Last day to drop classes with
Last day to submit a Summer Quarter
Summer Quarter late registration period for new, readmitted and late continuing students..........................
Commencement
SUMMER QUARTER CLASSES BEGIN
Last day to add classes.................
Last day to drop classes with
refund consideration................
First five-week session ends and
Mid Quarter for ten-week session ....
Second five-week session begins.........
Last day to submit Autumn Quarter
mail registration form .............
Summer Quarter ends. Final examinations will be given during the last class period of each summer session............
Monday March 22
Friday March 26
Monday Friday March 29 April 23
Friday May 7
Monday-Friday Thursday, Friday.... Friday Sunday June 1-June 18 .... May 25, 26, 27, 28 May 28 May 30
Monday June 14
Friday June 18
Monday
Friday Tuesday July 16 July 20
Friday August 6
Friday
4


CONTENTS
Page
College Calendar...................................................... 3
General Information on the College.................................... 7
Admission ............................................................ 8
Student Financial Aid Programs....................................... 11
Costs ............................................................... 14
Student Personnel Services........................................... 15
Center for Experimental Studies...................................... 19
Academic Information................................................. 22
Omnibus Courses ..................................................... 28
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements............................ 30
Degrees and Programs................................................. 33
School of Business................................................... 35
Center for Education................................................. 49
School of Engineering Technology .................................... 69
School of Liberal Arts .............................................. 87
School of Professional Studies...................................... 143
School of Science and Mathematics .................................. 173
Center for Urban Affairs............................................ 193
Administration ..................................................... 201
Academic Administrators ........................................ 203
Faculty............................................................. 205
Alphabetical Index.................................................. 212
Map With Building Locations...........................Inside Back Cover




GENERAL INFORMATION
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORY
Metropolitan State College was founded by an act passed by the Colorado Legislature in 1963, placing it under the control and management of the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. The first classes of the lower division academic program were held in the fall of 1965, followed by the addition of junior courses in the fall of 1967 and senior courses in the fall of 1968.
The College is authorized to offer the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Associate in Arts and Associate in Science.
ANNIVERSARY YEAR
During the 1975-76 academic year, Metropolitan State College is commemorating ten years of service to the students and residents of the metropolitan area.
Celebrations will begin in October, 1975, the 10th anniversary of the enrollment of the Colleges first class.
GOALS
The enacting legislation for Metropolitan State College sets forth in general purpose: To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the State of Colorado generally. To perform this mission, the College is directed to be a multi-purpose, urban-oriented institution with comprehensive programs in the arts and sciences, career, technical and professional fields.
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to provide equal educational and employment opportunities for all regardless of race, color, creed, age, sex or national origin. The various academic programs, services, and administrative processes of the College are committed to achieving these goals.
ACCREDITATION
Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The teacher certification program is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
STUDENT BODY
The majority of the students are residents of the five-county Denver metropolitan area.
Over 77 percent of this commuter student body work and the average age is 27 years. Student enrollment during fall quarter 1974 was slightly in excess of 10,300 ranking Metropolitan State College among the five largest state-supported institutions in Colorado.
FACILITIES
Located in the central part of the metropolitan area, the College is temporarily housed in twenty leased buildings adjacent to Denvers Civic Center. Administrative and service offices are located at 250 West 14th Avenue. Metropolitan State College takes advantage of its urban setting by drawing upon available community resources and by involving faculty and students in the social, cultural and economic affairs of the metropolis.
FACULTY
Metropolitan State Colleges faculty consists of over 260 full-time teachers. Faculty are selected on the basis of academic excellence, dedication and interest in students. They are primarily concerned with teaching and the challenge of meeting the needs of the urban student. Faculty members believe in the concept of life-long learning and community service.
NEW CAMPUS
Construction has started on a new campus for Metropolitan State College. Centrally located in downtown Denver, the 169 acre campus will be easily accessible to the five-county metropolitan area.
Metropolitan State College will be one of three institutions included in the Auraria Higher Education Center, a pioneer educational venture. The College will join the Community College of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver in shared facilities. Each institution will remain academically separate and offer distinct yet compatible programs. A broad spectrum of educational opportunities will, therefore, be available to students including vocational, undergraduate, upper division and graduate programs in this unusual effort that will unite the educational strengths of three urban schools.
It is anticipated that the College will move into its new facilities in 1976.
7


ADMISSION
ADMISSION
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to the philosophy that educational opportunities should be provided for all who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction it has to offer.
ADMISSION INSTRUCTIONS
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each quarter. Therefore, applications should be submitted at the earliest possible date after completion of the first semester of the senior year in high school. Applications for admission must be received at the College not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought for guaranteed processing. All credentials should be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records not later than four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought. All credentials which are submitted become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES
Admission of Freshmen (Applicants who have not attended college): To be eligible for admission, students must have graduated from an approved high school. Other factors considered are intelligence, personality, character and comments by secondary school officials. Persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an individual basis after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test which show they have the ability to satisfactorily pursue programs of instruction which the College offers.
Colorado high school students may apply for admission and enroll while concurrently completing high school graduation requirements through the high school. Students must have prior consent from the high school, their guardian and Metropolitan State College. Students must be awarded the high school diploma before college credits are validated.
1. Obtain the Application for Admission form from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204.
2. This form should be completed and submitted along with the application fee
directly to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, both the application and the credentials must be received at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to insure that the high school transcript is submitted to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions in time to meet processing dates.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The application fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after an evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of his admission status.
Admission Through ACT Although the ACT and SAT are not required for admission, high school students are encouraged to take the ACT and SAT to provide a basis for advising and counseling. If at the time the student takes the ACT and SAT, he or she indicates Metropolitan State College as one of his or her first three choices to receive the ACT and SAT Profile Reports, the following admission procedure shall apply:
1. A letter and card of application will be sent to the student.
2. If the student wishes to be considered for admission, he or she should sign the card, have his or her high school counselor sign it, and return it to MSC.
3. There is NO application fee.
4. The ACT and SAT Profile Reports will be used in lieu of a formal application.
5. The student need submit only one high school transcript (following graduation) with the date the diploma was awarded. It is the students responsibility to insure that the high school transcript is submitted to Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions in time to meet guaranteed processing dates.
Admission of Transfer Students (Applicants who have attended a college or university):
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited colleges or universities, an official transcript from each institution attended must be submitted. Transfer applicants are expected to present
8


ADMISSION
an overall average of C (2.00 based on a four-point system where an A grade is 4 points) on all college work previously attempted and must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college or university attended. Students who do not meet these standards are encouraged to contact the Office of Admissions for individual consideration. Failure to report correctly any previous college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
1. Request an application for admission form from Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions.
2. Complete the application for admission and return it to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, the application must be mailed so that it will reach the college at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete information about the applicants high school record.
(b) The applicant has less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours of transferable college credits.
Transfer students seeking a degree at MSC:
1. The applicant should request that one official transcript from each college or university attended be forwarded to the Office of Admissions at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicants record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
2. A student may be permitted to register for the subsequent quarter provided an official transcript from his last college or university is received. As a result of not submitting all transcripts on time, a degreeseeking student will lose his registration priority. This priority will be established once all missing transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions.
Transfer students not seeking a degree from MSC:
1. A non-degree student will be per-
mitted to register for subsequent quarters provided the official transcript from his last college or university is received by the Office of Admissions.
2. A student who does not submit this credential may not register for subsequent quarters.
Transfer credits are normally accepted if they meet the following conditions:
1. Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent. Grades of D, F and similarly graded courses will not transfer.
2. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
3. A maximum of 105 quarter hours will be accepted from a two-year institution. A maximum of 135 hours of credit will be given for work done at a four-year institution or combination of two and four-year institutions.
4. A student earning a two-year degree from an accredited institution with a G.P.A. of 2.0 or better will be guaranteed 90 hours of transfer credit if he has met the following minimums in the MSC Basic Studies
areas:
Freshman English.................................. 6 hours
Humanities .................................12 hours
Science/Mathematics ........................12 hours
Social/Behavioral Science.........................12 hours
plus 3 additional hours in any one of
these areas ............................. 3 hours
45 hours
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
(Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for one or more quarters excluding summer quarter):
1. Request an application for readmission from the Office of Admissions.
2. Complete the application for readmission and return it to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, the application should be received at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
3. No application fee is required.
4. An applicant who has attended another collegiate institution since last enrollment at MSC must request one official transcript be forwarded to the Office of Admissions so that it will be received at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which admission is sought.
(a) An applicant who was previously admitted as non-degree seeking and wishes to maintain this status but has in the interim attended another college or university is
9


ADMISSION
required to submit an official transcript from the institution. If this credential is not received by the Office of Admissions he may not be permitted to register until the credential is received.
(b) An applicant who was previously admitted as a non-degree student but now wishes to seek a degree at MSC must request one official transcript from all previously attended colleges or universities. A student will be permitted to register for subsequent quarters provided an official transcript from his last college or university is received. However, as a result of not submitting all transcripts on time, a degree seeking student will lose his registration priority. This priority will be re-established once all missing transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions.
Enrollment Without Admission
Students may enroll in college courses without having been admitted to the College. The Unlimited Education Program is designed for students who wish to enroll
for an occasional course, but who are at the time not interested in pursuing a college degree. Unlimited Education students may enroll for up to six quarter hours of credit. A record of Unlimited Education grades is maintained in the Office of Admissions and Records. These successfully completed courses are acceptable for degree credit and will be transferred to a regular college transcript upon request of the student following formal admission to the College.
ORIENTATION
New Student Orientation is a required program designed to assist all new and transfer students in becoming part of the College life. The program is planned to give each student personal attention through small group discussion which acquaints them with the College, its programs, services, activities, and facilities. Invitation to the Orientation Program will be sent prior to registration.



STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to providing equal access to higher education to all persons qualified for admission who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered. Charges to students are low because a considerable portion of the cost of operation is paid from Colorado tax revenues.
The Office of Student Financial Aid provides assistance for students who need additional finances to attend the College. This aid is available through the National Direct Student Loan Program, the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program, the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program, the Colorado State Grant Program, as well as the College Work-Study. Colorado Work-Study, Nursing Loan, Nursing Scholarship, and Law Enforcement Education Programs.
The Office of Student Financial Aid requires the American College Testing Programs Family Financial Statement (FFS) to determine the degree of need. This form is designed to identify the resources of both the student and his parents. The Family Financial Statement meets federal requirements. Use of this form means that all student needs are evaluated on the same criteria, although both the FFS and the Office of Student Financial Aid take into consideration individual circumstances.
APPLICATION PROCEDURE
The following forms are required from those requesting financial assistance:
Freshmen
These forms, which may be obtained from the Office of Student Financial Aid or local high schools, must be submitted before consideration can be given.
1. Institutional Application for Financial Aid (sent to student upon receipt of FFS).
2. The Family Financial Statement of the American College Testing Program (FFS).
Transfer Students
1. A statement of all forms of financial aid received from other institutions.
2. The Metropolitan State College Institutional Application (write to the Office of Student Financial Aid).
3. The Family Financial Statement (FFS).
Continuing Metropolitan State College Students
1. MSC Institutional Financial Aid Application.
2. The Family Financial Statement (FFS). ELIGIBILITY
All financial assistance will be based on financial need, and any student with a demonstrated need will receive consideration. The application for financial aid at Metropolitan State College includes an estimated budget for tuition, fees, and books, as well as travel, and personal needs together with an itemized statement of resources that must include parental contributions, spouses earnings, and outside income such as veterans benefits and Social Security. This information enables the Office of Student Financial Aid to analyze needs and help the student develop a financial plan for college attendance.
Participants in the federal and State aid programs must be citizens of the United States, Nationals, or be a permanent resident of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, maintain normal progress toward a degree and attend the College on a full time basis (12 hours per quarter). Aid, not to exceed tuition, fees, books, and transportation, is available to part-time students (six hours per quarter) on a need basis.
DURATION OF AWARDS
All financial aid awards are made for one academic year (or less). To continue receiving an award, a student must:
1. Be in good standing with the College.
2. Continue to demonstrate financial need.
Continuing awards are contingent upon adequate funding of the federal and State financial aid programs.
LAST GUARANTEED PROCESSING DATES
Summer Qtr. Apr. 1
Fall Qtr. Apr. 15
Winter Qtr. Oct. 24
Spring Qtr. Feb. 15
LOANS
National Direct Student Loans (NDSL) Undergraduate students may borrow up to $5,000 during their undergraduate career. Total loans for the first two years of school
11


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
may not exceed $2,500. Repayment of the NDSL begins nine months after the student ceases to be a half-time (6 hours) student. Repayment is made in monthly payments of no less than $15 per month. The period of repayment cannot exceed ten years. The NDSL has cancellation provisions. Information regarding cancellation may be obtained from the Student Financial Aid Office.
Principal and interest payments are deferrable during periods of full-time graduate study.
Federally Insured Student Loans (FISL) The College cooperates with banks in making information available to students. Undergraduates may borrow up to $2,500 in a single year, but not more than $7,500 during their undergraduate career. These loans are based on need as determined by the Financial Aid Office. Applications are initiated by the student, processed in the Office of Student Financial Aid and forwarded to the student or his bank. Applications are accepted throughout the school year. Forms and information are available at the Office of Student Financial Aid.
Nursing Loan Funds
To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Status as a part-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a part-time student (6 hours or more).
2. Enrollment in a course of study leading to a degree in nursing.
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement.
4. Good standing in the College.
Short Term Loans
Short term emergency loans are available through the Student Government Loan Fund. Their offices are located in the Student Center at 710 West Colfax. Loans up to $80 may be secured for emergency expenses. All loans are due and payable by the end of the quarter in which they were borrowed.
A loan fund has been established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl, a former student at Metropolitan State College, who was killed in military action in Vietnam. The purpose of this fund is to assist needy students through loans for short periods of time.
GRANTS
Basic Educational Opportunity Grants An entitlement program of up to $1,400
per year minus family contribution (parents plus students contribution), or Vz the cost of attending the institution, whichever is less, is available. Federal funding for the school year 1975-76 is insufficient to support the full entitlement program; therefore, average grants will be approximately $450. Freshman, sophomore and junior students who began their college work after April 1, 1973, and who attend on a full-time basis will be eligible. Applications are submitted directly to the federal government and are processed at no cost. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Amounts vary from $200 to $1,500 annually, depending upon financial need and funds allotted to the College by the federal government. Grants are renewable subject to continued financial need, a satisfactory academic record and availability of funds. These grants were established for students from low income families by the Higher Education Act of 1965.
Colorado State Grant Program Awards vary from $100 to $1,000 depending on financial need and funds allotted to the College by the State of Colorado.
State Student Incentive Grant Grants of up to $750 to Colorado residents who demonstrate substantial financial need. These grants are matched with Colorado State Grants.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Office of Student Financial Aid has a limited number of private scholarships available. Questions in this area should be directed to the Office of Student Financial Aid.
Nursing Scholarship Funds
To be eligible, an applicant must meet the
following requirements:
1. Status as a part-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a part-time student.
2. Enrollment in a course of study leading to a degree in nursing.
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement (extreme financial need must exist to receive a scholarship).
4. Good standing in the College.
12


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
Colorado Scholars Program Tuition assistance grants not to exceed the cost of resident tuition or $100 per quarter, whichever is smaller, are available through the academic departments. Recipients are chosen by the departmental scholarship committees based on departmental criteria. Students interested should contact their major departments.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Federal College Work-Study Program The student is employed by the institution to help defray the costs of attending college. Hourly rates normally vary from $2.00 to $3.50 per hour depending upon the skill and experience of the student. The student must demonstrate need.
Colorado Work-Study Program
The recipient must be a Colorado resident.
Need must be shown.
Non-Need Institutional Employment The State of Colorado and the College have limited funds available to employ students within the institution who possess the skills needed to perform jobs required by the school. Such employment is not based upon financial need.
Outside Employment Students who do not show need may also be placed in jobs outside the school on a part-time basis. Many Metropolitan State College students have received part-time jobs outside the school. Students interested should contact the Office of Job Development, 1447 Tremont St.
Criminal Justice Assistance Programs 1. Law Enforcement Education Program (LEEP)
a. LEEP grants are available to eligible
personnel employed full-time with a publicly funded, criminal justice agency. Grants pay tuition, fees, and book allowance up to $250 per quarter. Grant obligation consists of two years of service within any criminal justice system. Failure to complete this obligation requires repayment at seven percent interest of any unrepaid balance.
b. LEEP loans are available in limited numbers to qualified full-time students. Loans may be cancelled at the rate of 25 percent per year of employment in any public criminal justice system, or must be repaid at seven percent interest following graduation if the grantee does not complete the obligation OR the status of the student changes from full-time to part-time.
c. Veterans Administration education benefits may be received concurrently with LEEP grants. Colorado veterans education benefits and Colorado scholarships must be considered as duplication of benefits, and LEEP will pay only the remainder of the grantee's direct cost (tuition, fees, and book allowance).
2. Open Door Program
Ex-offenders are eligible for a package of programs, including financial assistance. The program will support a limited number of candidates and will provide those services necessary for survival in the community while the students pursue an education to prepare them for professional employment.
OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID
Scholarships and low interest loans from sources such as churches and foundations are available through the Office of Student Financial Aid. Two scholarships are provided for secretarial students and one for a student specializing in civil technology. Also, many private lending agencies have developed attractive loans for college students. High school counselors and libraries are sources of additional information.
13


COSTS
COSTS
The Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of registration for any quarter.
Tuition and College Service Fees
In-State Out-of-State
Students Taking 10 or more Quarter Hours Per Quarter:
Tuition per quarter College Service Fee per $ 94.00 $377.00
quarter. (Includes mandatory health insurance.) 26.00 26.00
Total $120.00 $403.00
Students Taking 7, but less than 10, Quarter Hours Per Quarter:
Tuition per quarter College Service Fee per $ 94.00 $377.00
quarter. (Does not include health insurance.) 18.25 18.25
Total $112.25 $395.25
Students Taking 6 or Fewer Quarter Hours Per Quarter:
Tuition per credit hour College Service Fee per $ 13.00 $ 22.00
credit hour 2.00 2.00
Total Per Credit Hour $ 15.00 $ 24.00
Standard Fees All Students
Application Fee $ 10.00
(Required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied on tuition.)
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00
Special Fees
Returned Check Penalty 5.00
Optional Health Insurance: (Must be paid within first ten days of classes)
Single coverage (cost included in College service fee for students taking ten or more quarter hours) $ 7.75 Per Quarter
Coverage for one dependent $15.00 Per Quarter
Coverage for two or more
dependents $26.00 Per Quarter
In assessing tuition and College service fees for the Summer Quarter, the total hours for which a student registers in the ten- and five-week sessions will be used to determine whether these charges are based on
the flat rate or on the quarter hour rate.
The cost of books and supplies averages about $200 per academic year with the highest cost during the first quarter of attendance. Other costs such as board and room, incidentals, transportation, clothing and other personal expenses will vary with individuals.
Tuition Adjustments
Students officially withdrawing from the College during the first ten days of classes will be credited with a 100 percent reduction in tuition and fee charges. Students officially reducing their quarter hour load during the first ten days of classes to a level requiring lower fees and tuition will be credited with a full and appropriate reduction in tuition and fee charges. No reduction in charges for withdrawal or load reduction will be made after the first ten days of classes.
Residence Qualifications A student is classified as an in-State or out-of-State registrant for tuition purposes at the time he is granted admission. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and other pertinent evidence. Once determined, the residency status is charged only on the basis of conclusive evidence submitted by written petition to the Director of Admissions and Records.
Residency classification of students under 21 years of age is determined by the residence of their parents. Students 21 years of age or over are classified by, (a) adoption of the State as a fixed and permanent home, and involves personal presence within the State at the time of such adoption, together with the intention of making Colorado the true home; and (b) living within the State for at least 12 consecutive months prior to enrollment. Any question requiring clarification of resident status should be resolved with the Office of Admissions prior to registration.
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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
The Vice President for Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as admissions, records, registration, orientation, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, placement, student health services, and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
Other student services, such as academic advising, skills reinforcement, tutorial assistance, and veterans' services, are available in the Center for Experimental Studies.
CONDUCT OF STUDENTS
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to give students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. Each student is expected to conform to high standards of conduct at the College and elsewhere. The College reserves the right to determine whether or not a particular act conforms to such standards and to exclude from the College any student whose conduct does not conform to high standards.
COUNSELING AND
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER
The Center exists for the sole purpose of providing competent, professional assistance in two broad areas to all students enrolled in the College. These areas are: 1) counseling for educational and career planning and 2) counseling for personal growth and change. These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, counseling and educational groups, as well as in the traditional one-to-one setting. Services offered by the Center are described below.
Confidential information is never given to anyone outside agencies or the college administrationwithout the written consent of the student.
Any student enrolled at the College for at least one counse is entitled to all services provided by the Center at no additional cost. Students seeking assistance should contact the Center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the other programs described below.
The Counseling and Career Development Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc.
COUNSELING FOR EDUCATIONAL AND CAREER PLANNING
Educational Counseling and Study Skills Programs
Ineffective study methods, lack of planning, poor time management, etc., often leads to failure in college. The Center provides assistance for a variety of educational problems including lack of concentration, test anxiety, goal setting, test taking, etc. The Center works closely with the Skills Center which provides tutorial assistance.
Foreign Student Coordination Admissions of foreign students is initiated in the office of the foreign student coordinator, located in this Center. Specific requirements for all foreign students must be met before admission can be granted. All foreign students applications requiring issuance of Form I-20 must be received no later than June 1 for each Fall Quarter, and at least six weeks prior to the beginning of other quarters. Tuition and fee charges are the same as for an out-of-state registrant.
Credit-By-Examination Programs The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is managed by the Counseling Center. See Academic Information section of this bulletin for details.
A Workshop for the Job Seeker Interview skills, resume writing, where and how to seek employment, setting employment goals, and the psychological aspects of job hunting are a few of the topics for discussion and skill development.
Life Planning Workshop Emphasis will be placed on learning a process for ongoing career development. Topics include: self-evaluation (skills, aptitudes, values, interests, etc.), finding accurate and unbiased career information, and relating ones career to other aspects of ones life.
Improvement of Study Skills Class A two credit hour course (Reading 190). Focus is on skill building in areas such as studying effectively, making the most of available time, taking worthwhile notes, and taking tests. Includes discussions about: establishing reasonable academic goals, feelings of uneasiness about school, anxieties about tests and speaking in class,
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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
difficulties encountered in studying and concentrating, etc.
Counseling for Personal Growth and Change
Personal, private, one-to-one help is available in each of the areas described below for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar, or group.
Groups for Personal Growth,
Personal Problems and Behavioral Change Offers participation in a low-structure group setting designed to develop skills in communicating honestly, directly and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through selfexploration in a supportive atmosphere. Deals with personal problems such as: fears, doubts, frustrations, conflicts about school, job, family, sex, loneliness, dating, etc.
The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e., relaxation and counterconditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions. Five, two-hour workshops are required to complete the program.
Marriage/Living Together Workshops For men or women married or unmarried who live together in a husband-wife relationship. The primary objective is to help these couples identify and overcome problems that interfere with harmonious living.
Divorce Counseling and Education Seminars
Designed to help people whose marriage (traditional or nontraditional) has broken up to make the transition from being married to being single again. It is an intensive, ten-week group experience and includes both educational and group counseling sessions.
Awareness Workshop
Group members involve themselves in working with their own feelings, improving their interactions with others, and increasing their awareness of themselves and their environment through experiential group activities.
Self-defeating Behavior Workshop Provides the student with an opportunity to discover and change their maladaptive ways of behaving. Emphasis is placed on
16
positive behavioral change and personal growth.
CAREER PLACEMENT OFFICE
The Career Placement Office assists students and alumni of Metropolitan State College in securing employment which will best utilize their preparation, experience, and abilities. These services involve working closely with the various departments of the College and with potential employers (school districts, businesses, industries, governmental and private agencies). A library of vocational literature is maintained and information is provided regarding supply and demand of personnel, requirements, salaries, trends and other relevant data. Graduate interview schedules are arranged for prospective employers to meet with interested candidates. Data on graduate school of fellowships, assistantships or scholarships are available in this office.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Program provides selected students with job training in their academic field. The cooperative education experience attempts to integrate career and academic pursuits through relevant internship programs. The internship involves the student in off-campus work experience during alternating quarters or on a part-time basis.
The specific purpose of the work period is to provide relevant work experience for the student while still in school. The Director of Cooperative Education will work very closely with employers, students, and faculty to place as many students as possible in this earning/learning experience.
Students applying for field positions through the Center for Cooperative Education may submit an application for Omnibus course credit following the prescribed guidelines.
HOUSING
Although the College does not operate dormitories, it assists students in finding adequate off-campus housing through the Housing Information Center Bulletin Board. Students are welcome to look through these listings to find acommodations suited to their needs.
All listings are subject to the Colorado and Denver Fair Housing Laws.
The Housing Information Center is located at the Student Activities Center, 710 West Colfax.


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
HEALTH SERVICES
Student Health Services provides professional care for any student attending the College. Registered nurses, College physicians, and a psychiatrist are available during scheduled hours. Services include treatment of minor illnesses and injuries, first aid, TB detection tests, birth control, health counseling, information on medical problems, and free health literature.
Each student must complete a preentrance health questionnaire. If he does not wish to complete the questionnaire, then a pre-entrance physical examination must be performed by a physician of his/ her choice at his/her expense. The required form may be obtained from Student Health Services. Failure to complete one of the above automatically denies the student medical services at the Student Health Center.
INSURANCE PROGRAMS
All full-time students are members of the Student Insurance Program which provides comprehensive medical insurance for accidental injury and/or hospitalization expenses. Part-time students or dependents of students may also participate in the insurance program for a nominal fee each quarter. Part-time students are not covered by the insurance program unless they pay an additional fee at the beginning of each quarter.
BOOKS
Metropolitan State College students may purchase books at the College Bookstore, located at 520 W. Colfax.
MILITARY INFORMATION
The College, through the Office of Admissions and Records, furnishes information about a students enrollment to his local board when the student supplies his Selective Service number, his local board address, and other required information at registration time.
AIR FORCE RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
Students at Metropolitan State College may register and attend Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado. Registration must be made on the Boulder campus. Courses are conducted leading to a commission in the Air Force upon earning a baccalaureate degree. Effective credit for successful completion of these courses is provided by Metropolitan State College.
(1) Four-year programs are available to students with a minimum of 12 quarters remaining at Metropolitan State College. Application for these programs should be made during fall registration at the University of Colorado (Boulder campus) after consultation with the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado.
(2) The two-year program is available to students with at least six quarters of work remaining at Metropolitan State College. Applications are accepted between November 1 and March 15.
For further information, contact:
Dean of Student Services
Metropolitan State College or Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies Air Force ROTC Detachment 105 Folsom Stadium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302 Phone 492-8351
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS
TRAINING CORPS
Students at Metropolitan State College may register and attend Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (AROTC) classes at the Uni-
17


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
versity of Colorado. Registration must be made on the Boulder Campus. Courses are conducted leading to a commission in the Army upon earning a baccalaureate degree. Effective credit for successful completion of these courses is provided by Metropolitan State College.
(1) Army ROTC offers four-year and two-year college programs. The four-year program consists of a basic course and an advanced course. The basic course, taken in the freshman and sophomore years, provides instruction in the fundamentals of leadership and management with emphasis on leadership development.
(2) The advanced course is an elective and is normally taken in the junior and senior years. Students who have demonstrated a potential for becoming officers are selected for this instruction which includes advanced leadership and management, the theory and dynamics of the military team and the development of students abilities to think creatively and to speak and write effectively.
For further information, contact:
Dean of Student Services Metropolitan State College, or Professor of Military Science Army ROTC
Folsom Stadium, Gate 5, Room 216 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302 Telephone: 492-6497
MILITARY CREDIT
Veterans with one year of continuous active military service and who are honorably discharged should request an evaluation for military credit. Form DD 214 must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records.
COLLEGE CENTER
The Metropolitan State College Center serves as a focal point for the many cultural, educational, and recreational activities of the College community available to student, faculty, administration, alumni, and guests.
As part of the educational program of the College, the Center encourages self-directed activities through its various boards, committees, and staff. Maximum opportunity is given for self-realization and growth in individual social competency and group effectiveness.
The College Center operates the Colfax Center at 520 West Colfax, the Student Activities Center at 710 West Colfax, and
the Elati Center at 1339 Elati Street. It also maintains lounges in several of the College classroom buildings.
LIBRARY
The holdings of the College Library are closely coordinated with the expanding curriculum and have a high degree of currency. The College Library has in use approximately 131,900 books and 29,772 microforms (fiche, ultrafiche, and film).
A Library Handbook, Resource Realization, and many other bibliographies and library publications are available at the Library, 1421 Elati Street.
CHILD CARE CENTER
A Child Care Center for the children of students is available at a nominal cost while the College is in session. Individualized educational programs have been set up for children in age groups 12 months to 21/2 years, 2Vz years to 4 years, and 4 years to 6 years of age. The Child Care Center is located at 1038 Cherokee Street.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
All students are members of the Associated Students of Metropolitan State College (ASMSC), the student governing body. The purpose of the student government is to promote the interest and welfare of the student body.
Numerous student clubs and organizations with special interests and objectives have been organized under the sponsorship of faculty members. The Student Activities Office coordinates and assists student organizations in program planning and development.
There is one student publication at Metropolitan State Collegea weekly newspaper.
Metropolitan State College is an active participant in intercollegiate forensics and takes part in competition throughout the western states.
A wide variety of intramural activities is offered under the direction of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. There are activities for both men and women.
Metropolitan State College is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, Rocky Mountain Collegiate Bowling Conference, the Inter-Mountain Conference for College Womens Physical Education, and the Rocky Mountain Soccer Association.
Intercollegiate competition includes soccer, basketball, swimming, baseball, track and field, tennis, bowling, and skiing.
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CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
The Center for Experimental Studies was established by Metropolitan State College to coordinate various innovative programs and approaches that cannot be accommodated through the Colleges regular curriculum. The emphasis is on innovative programs, minority groups, and those adults needing basic or transitional programs in order to either enter the mainstream of college curriculum or the job market. The general mission of the Center is to encourage students to learn at an advanced level in a concentrated manner and at their own rate.
Encouragement is given to all departments to develop and implement non-traditional, innovative, and experimental courses and methods of instruction. After experimentation, these courses and methods may become a regular part of the College curriculum.
ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER
The Academic Advising Center coordinates academic advising and related academic matters in the eight schools and centers of Metropolitan State College. It is directly responsible for advising those students who have not declared a major or are in the process of changing majors and those students admitted to MSC on a probationary status.
The Advising Center is also a central facility where all students may obtain information concerning many different areas of the College. The basic philosophy of the Academic Advising Center is to maintain a personal relationship between the College and the student and to assist students in any way possible during decision and adjustment periods.
The Advising Center is staffed by professional advisors and is open to every student enrolled at MSC as well as those who expect to be attending in the future.
CONTRACT MAJOR/MINOR PROGRAM
The Contract Major/Minor program is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with his Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific individual career objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor program. It is not designed to replace any existing catalog major or minor programs but is individual in nature and is planned to meet the specific needs of the student.
For further information contact the Academic Advising Center or the Dean of the Center for Experimental Studies.
EPIC (EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR THE INNER CITY)
An educational opportunity model offering marginal skid row men and women an opportunity to participate and interact in
an educational and social context which embodies more normative expectations than have previously been part of their life-style.
FITZSIMONS ARMY HOSPITAL AND
LOWRY AIR FORCE BASE PREP PROGRAMS
These programs are taught at Fitzsimons Army Hospital and Lowry Air Force Base for servicemen prior to discharge.
Courses may be offered in Mathematics Study Skills, Reading and Communications to enable the veteran to enroll in college for the pursuit of higher education.
OFFICE OF JOB DEVELOPMENT
The MSC Job Development Office serves the entire student body, but particularly the veteran. The primary purpose is to provide an employment development center for those seeking part-time and full-time employment. Related services, such as employment counseling, interview and resume preparation, and allied agency referrals are offered. Applicants are encouraged to apply their skills, past experiences, or special training to specific occupations. The office is staffed by job development specialists whose primary aim is to assist the students and veterans in securing employment.
OFFICE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
The Office of Veterans Affairs is a federally funded program designed to provide student veterans with all services. These services include enrollment certification, assistance with problems on VA checks, counseling assistance, remedial instruction, and tutorial services. The Office of Veterans Affairs also coordinates the activities of the Veterans Upward Bound, Vets Project, Veterans Assistance Center, Office of Job Development, Servicemens Opportunity College, and Project Ahead. (See separate descriptions of these programs.)
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CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
From time to time, the Office of Veterans Affairs will offer special courses, seminars, etc., for student veterans that may or may not be for credit. Special counseling and assistance in all areas, such as legal, personal, housing, employment, etc., are also available.
OPEN DOOR
The Open Door Program offers to the exoffender financial aid and specialized counseling and assistance in re-socialization. The program is staffed by persons having a background in the field who are familiar with the necessities of the emerging exoffender. The staff is also available for lectures on problems of the ex-offender.
PROJECT AHEAD
Project Ahead is a program designed to enable new volunteers in the U.S. Army to coordinate their academic activities while in the service. For more information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs or a U.S. Army Recruitment Office.
SERVICEMENS OPPORTUNTY COLLEGE
Metropolitan State College has received recognition as a Servicemens Opportunity College. Further information can be obtained from the Director of the Office of Veterans Affairs or the Director of Admissions.
SHORT TERM INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS
The general mission of this program is twofold: It is to enable students in selfstructuring groups under faculty direction to learn at an advanced level in a concentrated way what they want to know, when they want to know it, and at their own rate. This program is primarily interdisciplinary in nature.
In addition, new programs, courses, and methods for teaching are generated for trial within the Center. Later they may be absorbed into existing academic structures, or may become new departments or schools.
Encouragement and assistance is given departments within MSC to develop and implement Adaptive Self-Paced Learning courses.
SKILLS REINFORCEMENT CENTER
The Skills Reinforcement Center is charged with the task of providing academic supportive services for Metropolitan State College students. The Center offers individualized
learning to the students, assisted personally by instructors, tutors, or both.
The Skills Center provides for students in a variety of ways:
Tutorial Program: Either long-term or drop-in assistance is provided for students and is easily accessible in a number of classroom buildings. The tutorial service is free and the student may apply for tutorial assistance by stopping in or by telephone inquiry.
Skills Development: The Skills Center staff will administer academic diagnostic tests and prescribe a program of study for students desirous of such action. Besides identification and prescription, the Skills Center staff will assist students in implementing a prescribed course of action.
Academic Support: The efforts of the Skills Center are directed toward encouraging the individual student to begin his educational experience at his present level while providing him with enrichment materials and a chance to relearn academic basics which he may have forgotten. Enrichment materials in many disciplines are available through the Skills Center in a variety of media.
Study Skills Development: The Skills Center staff will assist students in developing study skills essential to a successful college career. Note-taking, listening skills, and writing term papers are a few of the skills that the Center assists students in acquiring.
Center for the Blind and Physically Handicapped: The Skills Center attempts to provide for students that are blind or physically handicapped in any academic area. A variety of materials as well as personal assistance is available for students requesting such assistance.
Besides the programs mentioned, the Skills Center staff is involved through many departments in providing for students. The student who is desirous of academic assistance, at any level, can find such assistance at no cost through the Skills Reinforcement Center.
UNIVERSITY YEAR FOR ACTION
A program under the auspices of ACTION where MSC students serve full-time for one year as volunteers in community agencies and at the same time receive academic credit. The focus of UYA is to combine the resources and skills of the College, the community, the student volunteer, and the federal government in an attempt to deal with the problems of poverty in the urban community.
20


CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
UPWARD BOUND
The program is aimed at recruiting students from secondary schools who, through poor academic preparation or lack of motivation, have little opportunity for a formal education. Upward Bound will make certain areas of the community aware of the accessibility of a higher education program at MSC. Upward Bound students will receive instruction in skills reinforcement, reading, writing, vocabulary, and spelling. Tutoring will also be given in the academic programs in which they are now enrolled. Students will receive career counseling in specific vocations. Tours and field trips will be used extensively for this purpose.
VETERANS ASSISTANCE CENTER
The general purpose of the VAC is to help the veteran. Specific purposes include: counseling helps (personal, social, testing, etc.); tutorial helps (Skills Reinforcement Center, G.l. Bill, tutorial assistance, and departmental assistance); remedial helps (special reading classes, orientation, seminars); and referral helps (employment, housing, financial, academic, on-the-job
training, child care, transportation, food stamps, etc.)
VETERANS EDUCATION AND TRAINING SERVICE
A program sponsored by the Office of Economic Opportunity and Denver Opportunity, Inc. The emphasis of this program is to recruit veterans, especially of the minority groups, and encourage them to use their G. I. benefits.
VETERANS UPWARD BOUND
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate Vietnam era Veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is done during a 10-week bridge quarter called Basic College. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aids advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided the participant.
21


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
The College operates on the quarter system with each quarterFall, Winter, Spring and Summerconsisting of approximately ten weeks of instruction. Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a baccalaureate or associate degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons.
ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College should review the schools admission requirements. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible to register for degree programs.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College are eligible to register each quarter. A continuing student is one who was enrolled during the quarter preceding the one for which he wishes to register. Attendance during the Summer Quarter is not required and a student enrolled during the Spring Quarter may enroll as a continuing student during the Fall Quarter.
Students who have been enrolled for at least one quarter, but not during the preceding quarter, are eligible to register providing they submit an application for readmission prior to registration. To insure processing, applications should be received four weeks prior to registration.
Registration for classes occurs during an Advance Registration Period, about the seventh week of the quarter and during regular registration, two days preceding the beginning of the quarter. Information about registration schedules and procedures will be sent to all new students. See College Calendar for registration dates during 1975-1976.
UNLIMITED EDUCATION PROGRAM
Students may enroll in college courses without having been admitted to the College. The Unlimited Education Program is designed for students who wish to enroll for an occasional course, but who are at the time not interested in pursuing a college degree. Unlimited Education students may enroll for up to six quarter hours of credit. A record of Unlimited Education
grades is maintained in the Office of Admissions and Records. These successfully completed courses are acceptable to a regular college transcript upon request of the student following formal admission to the College.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Programs are offered on both a credit and non-credit basis to those wishing to continue their educational objectives. Opportunities are provided through a variety of workshops, seminars, and institutes conducted at many locations in the Denver Metropolitan Area.
LEARNING FOR LIVING PROGRAM
Learning for Living is a learning program for adults of Metropolitan Denver and adjacent communities. Programs are designed to meet individual and group needs of adults of all ages and are conducted in many locations throughout the Denver Metropolitan Area. Courses vary in length from one-day workshops to periods of several weeks and are open to all persons regardless of previous education or experience.
QUARTER HOURS CREDIT
Course credit is based on units designated quarter hours. One quarter hour represents one class period of sixty minutes per week and normally about two hours per week of preparation outside of class by the student. Laboratory courses give one quarter hour of credit for each two or three hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week.
COURSE LOAD
The normal load per quarter is 15 or 16 quarter hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to 18 quarter hours with the approval of their faculty advisor. Total quarter hours undertaken may not exceed 18 unless approved by both the advisor and the Counseling Center. The maximum permitted with such authorization is 21 hours per quarter.
COURSE NUMBERS,
DESCRIPTIONS AND OFFERINGS
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, contents and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number desig-
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
nates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although normally a student should not take courses above the level of his class (based on quarter hours earned), he may do so at one level above if he has the specified prerequisites. In special cases a student may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for his class, if in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites he obtains the permission of his advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the quarter hours of credit. As an example, English 101-4 is a four credit course. Following the course title is a second set of numbers in parenthesis indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The first number in parenthesis indicates the number of lecture or discussion hours and the second number indicates the number of laboratory, shop or field hours. For example, in a science course followed by (3+4), the numbers indicate 3 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the material which is covered. If there is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed at the end of the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times and locations is published in the Class Schedule which is printed well in advance of the beginning of each quarter and is available to all students.
Decisions on which of the courses listed in this catalog are taught during the year will be based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
CROSS REGISTRATION WITH MSC, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER, AND/OR UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
Students enrolled for at least one course at Metropolitan State College may register for courses during the enrolled quarter at the Community College of Denver and/or the University of Colorado-Denver. Courses taken at the Community College of Denver or the University of Colorado at Denver in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College degree requirements.
Information concerning current proce-
dures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Registrars Office.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the registrar of each institution. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of the home institution.
CHANGES IN REGISTRATION
Students may adjust, schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first five days of each quarter. Students may not initiate registration after the fifth day of classes. Students may not add a class to their schedule after the fifth day of classes, unless they have permission of the dean of the school or center in which the class is being offered.
Student may drop or withdraw from a class at any time during the first two weeks of classes without grade penalty by submitting a change card to the Registrars Office. After the second week, students dropping a class must make arrangements with the instructor concerning the grade that will be submitted at the end of the quarter. See the paragraph on grades in this section.
CLASS ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If a student anticipates a prolonged absence because of illness, he should contact his instructors, if possible. If he finds that he cannot do this, he should contact the Dean of Students who will inform his instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor feels that a students absences are interfering with his academic progress, he may submit a letter to the Dean of Students informing him of the situation.
Written excuses are not issued for shortterm illnesses or other brief periods of absence from class. In such cases determination of the validity of the students absence and decisions on whether he will be allowed to make up work missed rests with his instructors.
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
ADAPTIVE SELF-PACED LEARNING
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which the student is allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to his personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a quarter, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly, extending the learning beyond the end of a quarter, of even two if necessary, without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance.
Self-paced courses are identified in the class schedule by the letters SP. Information on the method of instruction and the nature of the program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all.
Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a quarter are given the grade of SP and must re-enroll in the course in a subsequent quarter in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during that quarter when the work is completed satisfactorily.
EXAMINATIONS IN LIEU OF COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Successful completion of special examinations may be substituted for the completion of course requirements, may permit placement of students in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding of college credit. Several different types of examinations are described below. A student may not earn more than a total of 90 quarter hours of credit toward degree requirements regardless of the type of examination for which credit is or has been earned.
1. Course Examinations
A department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses in which he requests and passes special college examinations. Under this provision a maximum of 45 quarter hours of credit may be obtained. A fee of $10.00 per course will be charged for each examination.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a course offered by the College, and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided it is unduplicated in, and applicable toward, the
students curriculum. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chairperson, no later than the first week of classes in a quarter. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chairperson. Examination for credit will be taken during the first four weeks of classes in a quarter at a time specified by the department but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to 2.5 grade points or higher must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the students permanent record. Grades in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the College, or, having been in residence, is within 15 credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for college courses attended as a listener or visitor or auditor. It cannot be taken by students having received credit for more than one quarter of work in the subject in advance of the course in which the examination is to be taken. It cannot be taken to raise grades or to remove failures. It is not considered as interrupting residence, nor applicable toward residence requirements. Credits by examination will be posted on the students permanent record after completion of 12 quarter hours of classroom credit.
2. Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles the student to substitute a subject of his own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
3. College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College Entrance Examination Board has developed a series of examinations designed to evaluate nontraditional college-
24


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
level education, specifically including independent study and correspondence work, and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This series of examinations, known as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), consists of five separate examinations covering the areas of English, mathematics, humanities, natural science and social science-history. Based on results of these examinations, the College may award up to a maximum of 45 quarter hours credit, covering the freshman basic studies requirements. Thus, the successful student may test out of most of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. A subject series of examinations which apply to specific college courses is also available. Forty-five (45) quarter hours of credit may be awarded in this program, making a total of ninety (90) quarter hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Interested students should contact the Office of Counseling and Career Development for complete information about this program before registration.
4. Advanced Placement
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chairperson, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
FINAL EXAMINATIONS
It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, except in the case of seminar courses or special projects.
GRADES
Alphabetical grades and status symbols are used as follows:
A Superior 4 quality points per quarter hour attempted
B Above Average 3 quality points per quarter hour attempted
C Average 2 quality points per quarter hour attempted
D Below Average but passing1 quality point per quarter hour attempted
F Failure 0 quality points per quarter hour attempted NC No Credit
SP Self-PacedCoursework in progress
S Satisfactory
P Pass
The no credit (NC) notation may indicate withdrawal from the course, a request at registration for no credit, or may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of his out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. No Credit, due to incomplete work, must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. The notation has no effect on the grade point average.
The Self-Paced (SP) notation indicates that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the students exposure to the course in order to increase his proficiency. The student must register for the course in a subsequent quarter in order to earn credit. The notation has no effect on the grade point average. Use of SP is limited to Self-Paced courses.
A student receiving a final grade of F may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charged for each registration.
TRANSCRIPT OF RECORDS
A transcript is a certified copy of a students permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1.00 each. Transcripts will be released by the Director of Student Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name (name while attending MSC), Social Security Number, last quarter of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcript is to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropriate reasons. Copies of transcripts from other institutions on file at MSC cannot be furnished. NOTE: Students concurrently enrolled at MSC from another institution must request transcripts from the home institution for courses taken at MSC.
PASS-FAIL OPTION
The pass-fail option encourages the student to venture out of his major and minor fields and thereby broadens his educational
25


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
experience. The pass grade has no effect on the grade point average; the fail grade is equivalent to the grade of F."
Students with 45 or more MSC credits with at least a 2.00 grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses to be applied to the areas of basic studies, major, minor, and teacher certification are specifically excluded from this option. Similarly, self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is 27 credit hours, earned in no more than nine courses, limited to one course per quarter.
A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than his registration by contacting the College Registrar. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade for the course on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. If the student exercises the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the quarter that he will receive letter-grade recording in the course.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass grade is given under policies stated above. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work may wish to ascertain in advance of registering for courses under the pass-fail option whether the institution of their choice will accept credits for courses in which they receive a pass grade.
QUALITY POINTS
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points accumulated by the total number of credit hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours earned.
REQUEST FOR CHANGE IN GRADE
If a student has a reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, he must make his request for a change before the end of the third week of the quarter following the completion of the course the following fall quarter in the case of the preceding spring quarter.
Requests for reconsideration of awarded grades should be made directly to the instructor. Should no resolution be possible between the student and instructor, the matter may be appealed to the department chairperson and then to the dean. That failing, the student may appeal his case in writing to the Academic Standards Committee.
ACADEMIC SUSPENSION POLICY
In keeping with the goals and objectives of Metropolitan State College, a probation-suspension policy has been adopted which allows most students three quarters to adjust to the academic requirements of college. The policy further provides for the suspension of those students who are not prepared for successful college work.
A cumulative grade point average of C (2.00) or better indicates satisfactory progress toward a degree. A cumulative grade point average of less than C indicates unsatisfactory progress and will result in a warning, probation or suspension.
A student is expected to maintain a C average to qualify for graduation. When a student falls below a C average and becomes deficient in quality points, he will be placed on warning subject to decreasing this deficiency each quarter until satisfactory progress is indicated.
A student in a warning status will be contacted by his major department or the Academic Advising Center. It is especially important that students contact the major advisor or, if undecided, the Academic Advising Center immediately following notification of warning status.
Since Metropolitan State College recognizes each student has different strengths and weaknesses which are not totally identified by a grade point average, either of these offices may make recommendations concerning a students retention even though the grade point average may be somewhat below satisfactory. The College, therefore, strongly urges every student placed on warning status to contact either his major advisor or the Academic Advising Center.
Students failing to reduce the quality point deficiency after having been placed on warning will be subject to review by the appropriate subcommittee of the Academic Standards Committee for possible suspension due to unacceptable academic progress. If the student is re-admitted, he will be required to reduce his deficiency each quarter until satisfactory progress is achieved.
A student who has been admitted on pro-
26


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
bation will have his probationary status removed when he has attempted a minimum of 12 quarter hours and maintained at least a C average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. A student admitted on probation will be reviewed for possible suspension when his cumulative average falls below C, regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation, the student will be subject to the standard warning-suspension policy outlined above.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Academic Standards Committee. No student may re-enter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Academic Standards Committee.
STUDENT CLASSIFICATION
Students are classified according to the number of quarter hours of credit earned: freshmen fewer than 45; sophomores 45 or more but fewer than 90; juniors 90 or more but fewer than 135; seniors 135 or more.
HONORS AND AWARDS
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the college community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity.
The Presidents Award is given to one junior or senior who has excelled in both academics and service to the college.
The Deans Award is given to one Associate Degree student who has exhibited superior scholastic ability, personal integrity and campus leadership.
Outstanding Student Awards are presented to approximately fifteen students each year on the basis of scholastic ability, personal integrity and campus leadership.
Junior and senior students receiving the
above awards are among those selected for publication in Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized each spring by being named to Metropolitan State College Honor Lists.
The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who have attempted at least 45 hours and, at the time of the computation (end of Spring Quarter), have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher.
The Deans Honor List carries the names of students who have attempted at least 45 hours and, at the time of computation (end of Spring Quarter), have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.85.
Part-time students are eligible for either of the above honors. The time of computation will occur first when they have completed between 45 and 90 hours, second when they have completed between 91 and 135 hours, and finally when they have completed more than 136 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability while attending Metropolitan State College. Graduation Summa Cum Laude is awarded to students who achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.75 to 4.0. Graduation Magna Cum Laude is awarded to students who achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 to 3.74.
To be eligible for graduation honors, a student must have completed 75 quarter hours at Metropolitan State College prior to the quarter when he is due to graduate. Students who have transferred to Metropolitan State College and who have completed less than 75 quarter hours prior to graduation may petition for honors provided their total GPA for all collegiate institutions attended and their GPA at Metropolitan State College are equal to the requirements stated above.
27


OMNIBUS COURSES
OMNIBUS COURSES
The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities to meet developing needs. Experimental topics courses, seminars and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the catalog. They may be offered by all departments in the College.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and credit hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairperson of the department or discipline, and dean of
190 (Credit Variable). Topics An introductory study of selected topics especially appropriate for lower division students.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
299 (Credit Variable). Field Experience/
Internship
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the de-partment/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.
390 (Credit Variable). Advanced Topics An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
480 (Credit Variable). Workshop An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area.
Prerequisite: Approval of department.
490 (Credit Variable). Seminar Presentations, discussions, reports and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
the school or center before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 45 quarter hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
The following course numbers are the same for all disciplines and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course, and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed
5 credit hours). Independent Study Independent investigation of problems within the area of the students special interest. Restricted to students majoring in the department/discipline offering the course and must be supervised by a faculty member in that department/discipline.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chairperson.
499 (Credit Variable). Advance Field
Experience/Internship
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Guidelines on Field Experience/ Internship Courses
1. Students must make application for course credit and provide information on background, justification and aims.
2. Applications for 299 or 499 credit will be evaluated by the faculty of the department/discipline in which credit is granted or by a committee of at least two members of the department/discipline; in addition, the department chairperson will evaluate the applications. Each application must be approved by both the faculty evaluation group and the department chairperson before the student may have credit.
28


OMNIBUS COURSES
3. The locations, institutions or businesses proposed by a student, by an instructor or faculty group in an academic department/discipline, or by the department chairperson will be evaluated by the members of the department/discipline or by a committee of at least two persons from the department/discipline, and the department chairperson. After evaluation, the members of the department/discipline or the committee and the department chairperson will approve the granting of credit.
4. The approved application will be sent to the approved location, institution or business.
5. The location, institution or business approved for the field experience must agree to accept the student, provide learning opportunities, and evaluate his performance.
6. The group which approves the student application will establish the credit to be earned before the course is undertaken; the department chairperson will approve the credit. Course credit may vary from 1 to 15 hours.
7. At least one hour weekly will be spent in seminar discussion or in conferences with the field supervisor in the field experience location, or in conferences with the department or departmental committee.
8. The student will make a terminal report evaluating his course; the field supervisor must make an evaluation of the students performance during the course; and the department/discipline faculty or committee will select a member of the faculty or committee to write an evaluation of the students performance and to assign a letter grade for the course.
29


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The student is responsible for full knowledge of the information provided in this catalog concerning regulations and requirements of the College and his or her program of study.
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) earning an associate degree in applied sciences in two years; (2) following a curriculum in arts, sciences or applied sciences to meet requirements for bachelor of arts or science degree; (3) taking vocational-technical programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in fields such as business, health services, public services and technology; or (4) enrolling for selected courses to improve general education or vocational competency.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DEGREES
To earn a degree, a student must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which he is registered and must complete the minimum number of quarter hours for each degree 90 for the associate and 180 for the baccalaureate with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
A student must satisfy all of the requirements stated in a single catalog in effect during the time of his or her enrollment. The catalog used to determine compliance with graduation requirements may not be more than eight years old for a baccalaureate degree or four years old for an associate degree.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, the student is responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to his or her program, and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume approval to deviate from the stated requirement without a properly signed statement to that effect.
Transfer students should become particularly aware of the requirements of the College, the basic studies, and their major (or area of emphasis) and minor areas.
GRADUATION AGREEMENT
The graduation evaluation process is initiated when the student completes the Graduation Agreement. Once the student
has received program approval from the major (or area of emphasis) department chairperson and the minor department chairperson, the student submits his Agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. After the completion of each subsequent quarter of academic work, the student will receive a Graduation Status Report.
The deadline for submitting the Graduation Agreement is the end of the first week of the quarter in which the student is eligible to graduate. However, since the student is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of his program of study, it is advisable to begin the graduation evaluation process at least three quarters or earlier in advance of the quarter of graduation. A Graduation Agreement submitted after the deadline will be reviewed for the following graduation date.
After submitting the Graduation Agreement, a student who feels justified in deviating from college academic requirements may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee for such a change. Petition forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records. Valid reasons for the variances must accompany all petitions and must be concurred in by the appropriate dean and department chairperson. The requirements of residency and minimum quarter hours to be completed between the granting of two degrees are retroactive.
Diplomas are granted at the conclusion of each of the four quarters for those students who have met all requirements for graduation. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the Spring Quarter. Students who officially graduated during any of the previous four quarters are invited but are not required to participate in the Spring Commencement.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL ASSOCIATE DEGREES
To earn an Associate in Applied Sciences, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any other stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete 90 quarter hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
2. Complete a minimum of 30 quarter hours at Metropolitan State College with the last 15 quarter hours applicable to the Associate Degree.
3. Meet the basic studies minimum requirements listed below and earn a mini-
30


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
mum of 12 quarter hours stipulated in the area of emphasis, at least 6 of which must be earned at MSC.
BASIC STUDIES FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREES
CATEGORY
Freshman Composition................ 7-8
Humanities ........................... 3
Science and Mathematics .............. 9
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences..... 3
The specific courses meeting these requirements are listed under the program descriptions for the Schools of Business, Engineering Technology, and Professional Studies. Students planning to continue on toward a bachelors degree may want to exceed these minimums in order to prepare for bachelors degree basic studies requirements.
4. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses in the students area of emphasis.
5. Not more than six quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward an associate degree.
With the approval of the dean of the appropriate school or center, variation in associate degree course programs may be made to conform with the course requirements of a college or university to which a student plans to transfer. Such a student should be familiar with rules of the institution concerned regarding transfer of credit and courses required under the curriculum in which he intends to major and complete requirements for a baccalaureate or other degree. With regard to Colorado institutions of higher education, the office of the Dean of Students has information on recommended programs for students planning to transfer, and advisors will assist them in developing a course plan.
BASIC STUDIES FOR BACHELOR DEGREES
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the basic studies distribution requirements listed below. Each of the category requirements may be satisfied by any 100 or 200-level course of the subject matter areas. Not more than ten quarter hours taken in any one of the departments listed under Humanities, Science and Mathematics, Social/Behavioral Sciences or Career will count toward basic studies requirements. Each degree candidate must complete English 100 and/or 101 plus English 103, or demonstrate competencies equiv-
alent to the exit levels for these courses. Specific courses are listed in Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies because the programs are interdisciplinary.
Credits
Freshman Composition (ENG 100 and/or
101 and 103)............................... 8
Humanities....................................12-15
Afro-American Studies (AAS 103,104,105,
127, 150,201)
Art
Chicano Studies (CHS 104, 105,106, 202)
Chinese
English
French
German
Modern Languages
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education and Recreation
Reading
Spanish
Speech
Science and Mathematics ...................12-15
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences..........12-15
Afro-American Studies (AAS 101,102,113,
114, 123, 124, 270, 291,230, 270, 291)
Anthropology
Chicano Studies (CHS 100, 101,102,103)
Economics
History
Political Science Psychology Sociology Urban Studies Womens Studies
Credits
Career..................................... 0- 9
Accounting
Aerospace
Business Education and Communication Civil Engineering Technology Computer Management Science Education
Electronics Engineering Technology Finance
Health Administration Health Services Human Services Industrial Education Journalism Law Enforcement Management Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technology Quality Assurance Technology Social Welfare
Total Credits 53
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACHELOR DEGREES
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
31


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
1. Complete 180 quarter hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College course work.
2. Complete at least 60 quarter hours in upper division courses (300- and 400-level courses).
3. Complete all Basic Studies requirements listed for a degree.
4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 45 quarter hours and at least one subject minor consisting of at least 27 quarter hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the requirement for a minor.
Students majoring in art, music, education, or any of the programs of the School of Business or the Department of Human Services are not required to complete a minor.
5. Complete all other requirements of a department and school or center.
6. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all courses which satisfy the requirements for the minor.
7. Complete at least 12 upper division (300- and 400-level) quarter hours of the major and 7 upper division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College.
8. Complete a minimum of 45 quarter hours at Metropolitan State College, including the last 15 quarter hours applicable to the degree.
9. Credit Limitations.
a. Not more than 45 hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 6 quarter hours in
physical education activity courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring in physical education or recreation.
c. Not more than 12 quarter hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not specializing in music.
d. Not more than 45 quarter hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelors degree.
REQUIREMENTS FORA SECOND DEGREE
For an additional Bachelors Degree, the student will complete a graduation agreement that will include
1. A minimum of 12 upper division hours in the major department and at MSC.
2. The completion of a minor if required for the contemplated degree by the major department.
3. At least 3 quarters in residence.
4. A minimum of 45 credit hours at MSC in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
For an additional Associate Degree, the student will complete a graduate agreement which will include
1. A minimum of 12 additional hours at MSC and in the department of emphasis.
2. At least 2 quarters in residence.
3. A minimum of 30 credits at MSC in addition to the total number of credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
The requirements for the additional degree are determined by the major department and must be consistent with the guidelines listed above. Students planning to work for an additional degree are advised to consult with the new major department.
32


DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Metropolitan State College is organized into five schools and three centers. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. Some offer the Associate Degree in Applied Sciences. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs is described under special sections of this bulletin prepared by each school or center.
School of Business
Associate Degree Bachelors Degree Minor Major
Accounting X X
Business Education and
Communications X
Computer and Management
Science X X X
Finance X
Management X X
Manpower Management X
Marketing X X
Office Administration X X
Personnel Management X
Public Administration X
School of Engineering Technology
Associate Bachelors Degree
Degree Minor Major
Civil Engineering Technology X X X
Drafting Engineering Technology X
Electronics Engineering
Technology X X X
Industrial Marketing X
Mechanical Engineering
Technology X X X
Meteorology T echnology X X
Quality Assurance Technology X
Surveying X X
Technical Management X
School of Liberal Arts
Associate Bachelors Degree
Degree Minor Major
Anthropology X X
Applied Music X
Art X X
Behavioral Science X
Communications Writing X
Economics X X
English X X
French X
German X
History X X
Journalism X X
Modern Languages X
Music f X
Music Education X
Philosophy X X
Political Science X X
Psychology X X
Reading X
Sociology X X
Spanish X X
Speech X X
Speech Pathology X
School of Professional Studies
Associate Bachelors Degree
Degree Minor Major
Airframe and Power Plant X
Aviation Electronics X
Aviation Maintenance
Management X
Aviation Management X X
Health Administration X
Human Services X X
Industrial Education X X
Law Enforcement X X X
Mental Health Worker X X X
Nursing (Upper Division for
R.N.s) X
Professional Pilot X X X
Social Welfare X X
School of Science and Mathematics
Associate Bachelors Degree
Degree Minor Major
Biology X X
Chemistry X X
Criminalistics X
Earth Science X
Geography X
Land Use X
Mathematics X X
Physics X X
Center for Education
Associate Bachelors Degree
Degree Minor Major
Certification-Elementary
Education X
Certification-Secondary
Education
Early Childhood Education X X
Health and Safety X
Physical Education X X
Recreation X X
Reading X
Special Education X
Center for Urban Studies
Associate Bachelors Degree
Degree Minor Major
Afro-American Studies X
Chicano Studies X
Urban Studies X
Contract Major/Minor Program The Contract Major/Minor Program is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with his Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific individual career objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor programs, but is individual in nature and is planned to meet the specific needs of the student.
For further information, contact the Academic Advising Center or the Dean of the Center for Experimental Studies.
33


<* . , A
1


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The curricula of this School are designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The School offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is terminal in nature and is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment. To be awarded this degree, a student must satisfactorily complete the Colleges basic studies and other general requirements for the associate degree, the general business requirements, and the courses listed for either option shown below:
Basic Studies
All students majoring in business whose objective is an Associate in Applied Sciences degree must satisfy the following basic studies requirements:
Required Studies
BEC 200 Business Communications ............ 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics I........... 3
ENG 101 Freshman Composition................ 4
MTH 131, 132,133 Mathematics for
Management Science I, II, III.......... 10
SPE 101 Public Speaking .................... 3
"23
General Business
All students majoring in business whose objective is an Associate in Applied Sciences degree must satisfactorily complete the following general business requirements:
Required Courses ^Hours'
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I.......... 5
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing. 4
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics .... 3
MGT 221 Business Law I...................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management............ 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing............. 5
"23
Business Data Processing Option This option is designed to prepare students for entry level positions in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing.
Required Courses
Quarter
Hours
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II....... 5
CMS 110 FORTRAN .......................... 4
CMS 211 COBOL ............................ 4
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Computer
Programming ............................. 4
CMS 301 Assembler Language................ 4
CMS 305 Fundamentals of System Analysis
and Design............................... 3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL ................... 4
CMS 315 Report Program Generator (RPG).... 3
CMS316 Programming Language One (PL/1).. 3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and Software ................................. 3
Electives selected from courses offered by
the School of Business................. 7
44
Total Degree Requirement 90
Office Administration Option This associate degree provides the opportunity for individuals to attain excellence in stenographic skills and to acquire the broad knowledge necessary for upper-level positions. The student may further specialize as a medical or legal secretary, or develop proficiency in a foreign language in preparation for an executive secretarial position requiring bilingual skills.
Required Courses yHu0aur
BEC 101 Beginning Typewriting................. 3
BEC 102 Intermediate Typewriting............. 3
BEC 103 Advanced Typewriting.................. 3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines... 3
BEC 111 Beginning Gregg Shorthand............. 4
BEC 112 Intermediate Gregg Shorthand....... 4
BEC 113 Advanced Shorthand .................. 4
BEC 214 Advanced Dictation .................. 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures..... 3
BEC 323 Business Listening Skills ........... 3
BEC 354 Office Management .................... 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business.................... 3
Electives approved by the Department of Business Education and Communications.... 7
46
Total Degree Requirements 92
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The School of Business offers a major in accounting, business education and communication, computer and management science, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial or governmental accounting. The business education major prepares students to teach business subjects in public and private junior and senior high schools and junior colleges. The computer and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing and systems design, plus management science. The major in management gives the student specialization in real estate, personnel matters or production. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of retailing, advertising, sales, market research and marketing management.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the Colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Programs of Study and Degree Requirements. A summary of the course program which he must complete is as
follows: Qua rter
Hours
Basic Studies as described below................ 53
Business Core................................... 37
Major in School of Business..................... 53
Free electives ................................. 18
Electives Outside Business...................... 19
Total 180
Basic Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in accounting, business education and communication, computer and management science, management or marketing must complete the following basic studies re-
quirements:
Quarter
Hours
ENG 101-103 Freshman Composition ............... 8
Humanities
BEC 200 Business Communications ............. 3
SPE101 Public Speaking ...................... 3
Electives.................................... 9
Science and Mathematics
MTH 131,132, 133 Mathematics for
Management Science I, II, III............. 10
Laboratory Science........................... 5
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences ECO 101-103 Principles of Economics
I, II, III................................. 9
Electives (other than economics)............. 6
53
Business Core Quarter
Hours
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I .......... 5
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II.......... 5
BEC 301 Business Reporting Writing.............. 3
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing...... 4
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics .... 3
CMS 332 Decision Theory......................... 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance................... 3
MGT 221 Business Law I.......................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management ............. 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing............... 5
37
ACCOUNTING
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
ACC 220 Governmental Accounting............. 3
ACC 240 Cost Accounting...................... 3
ACC 309 Income Tax I......................... 4
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting............. 4
ACC351.352 Intermediate Accounting I, II.... 8
CMS 110 or CMS 211 FORTRAN or COBOL.... 4
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research.. 3
CMS 335 Introduction to Management Science 3
MGT321 Business Law II...................... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies................... 4
Upper division electives approved by Accounting Department* ....................... 14
53
^Students who desire to sit for the CPA examination should elect ACC 420, ACC 451, ACC 452 and MGT 322.
BUSINESS EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses Hours'
BEC 103 Advanced Typewriting............ 3
BEC 354 Office Management............... 3
BEC 360 Prin. of Bus. Educ.............. 3
BEC 361 Methods of Teaching Typewriting.... 3
12
Students must choose two of the following teaching specialties* .....................29-31
Bookkeeping and Accounting
ACC 309 Income Tax I.................... 4
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I....... 4
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II...... 4
BEC 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping... 3
Consumer Economics and Basic Business
BEC 366 Methods of Teaching Consumer
Economics ............................... 3
FIN 325 Personal Finance................... 3
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance.......... 3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate........ 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior................ 3
Data Processing
BEC 364 Methods of Teaching Data Processing 3
CMS 110 FORTRAN ......................... 4
CMS 211 COBOL ........................... 4
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design................................ 3
Secretarial
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines... 3
BEC 113 Advanced Shorthand................... 4
BEC 114 Advanced Dictation................... 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures.... 3
BEC 362 Methods of Teaching Stenography... 3
Required Education Courses* * ^Hours'
EDU 220 The Role of the Teacher in the
Secondary School............................ 3
EDU 314 Clinical Field Experiences in
Social Work and Counseling.................. 3
EDU 315 The Adolescent in the Urban Schools 3
EDU 318 The Adolescent as a Learner........ 4
EDU 321 Materials and Techniques of
Instruction for Secondary School Teachers... 4
EDU 328 Clinical Field Experiences in
Materials Construction & Tutoring........... 3
EDU 381 The Use of Media in Education...... 3
EDU 463 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary ................................. 9-18
^Students desiring to become certified for vocational office occupations programs should select the secretarial and bookkeeping teaching specialties, and complete 3 courses (9 credit hours) in Vocational Education, which are available through extension courses offered by Colorado State University or the University of Northern Colorado.
*19 hours of the required Education courses can be considered as general education courses over and above the 53 hours of Basic Studies requirement.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
COMPUTER AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
CMS 110 FORTRAN ............................. T
CMS 211 COBOL ............................... 4
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design.............................. 3
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research .... 3
CMS 335 Introduction to Management Science or
CMS 431 Management Science I................. 3
MGT 495 Business Policies ................... 4
MKT 412 Retail Management ............... 3
MKT 416 Sales Management................. 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management.. 4
Electives approved by the Department of Marketing ................................ 9
56
Minors Offered by the School of Business
(For students outside School of Business)
Because prerequisite requirements are involved in each set of courses, any student minoring in any of the areas below should contact an advisor.
Approved Electives A minimum of twenty (20) additional quarter hours from courses offered by the Computer and Management Science Department; and twelve (12) quarter hours from courses offered by the School of Business or the Mathematics Department. These additional hours must be approved by the Department of Computer and Management Science and should be directed toward one of the following areas of emphasis: Management Science, Information Systems, or Computer Data Processing........... 32
53
MANAGEMENT
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
ACC 240 Cost Accounting.................... 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design............................... 3
CMS 335 Introduction to Management Science 3
FIN 430 Managerial Finance I................ 3
MGT 321 Business Law II.................... 3
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance............ 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics............... 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management............... 3
MGT 355 Operations Management.............. 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations............... 3
MGT 451 Emerging Management Concepts.... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies ................. 4
34
Nineteen hours of electives are to be selected from management areas of emphasis which include: Administration, Manpower Management, Public Administration, Real Estate, Insurance, Production or other discipline areas as approved by the Department of Management .......................................... 16
53
MARKETING
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research.... 3
MGT 321 Business Law II...................... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies.................... 4
MKT 210 Retailing ........................... 3
MKT 211 Advertising ......................... 3
MKT 216 Salesmanship ........................ 3
MKT 301 Marketing Research................... 3
MKT 312 Promotional Strategy................. 3
MKT 321 Purchasing .......................... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior.................... 3
MKT 371 International Marketing.............. 3
MKT 454 Marketing Theory..................... 3
Accounting Minor
Required Courses
ACC 101-102 Principles of Accounting I, II.... 10
ACC 220 Governmental Accounting............ 3
ACC 240 Cost Accounting.................... 3
ACC 309 Income Tax I....................... 4
ACC 330 Accounting Systems................. 3
ACC351-352 Intermediate Accounting I, II__ 8
3?
Data Processing Minor
Required Courses ^ou
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing. 4
CMS 110 FORTRAN ........................ 4
CMS 211 COBOL .......................... 4
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Computer
Programming ............................ 4
CMS 301 Assembler Language.............. 4
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design.............................. 3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL.................. 4
Electives selected from courses offered by the Computer and Management Science Department ................................ 3
30
Finance Minor
Required Courses
ACC 101-102 Principles of Accounting 1, II
ACC 309 Income Tax I...................
FIN 350 Principles of Finance..........
FIN 360 Investments ...................
FIN 430-431 Managerial Finance I, II...
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance........
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate......
Management Minor The management minor is designed to afford non-business majors with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the business world and sufficient familiarity with business skills to work in a business environment.
Required Courses
ACC101 Principles of Accounting I............ 5
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing...... 4
CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics. 3
MGT 221 Business Law I....................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management............. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management................. 3
MGT 355 Operations Management................ 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing.............. 5
29
Quarter
Hours
10
4
3
3
6
3
_3
32
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Manpower Management Minor The manpower management minor is designed to afford students the opportunity to develop an understanding of industrial relations field and its relationship to the world of business.
Public Administration Minor
The public administration minor is designed
to afford majors in other areas with the
opportunity to develop an understanding of
business in the public and governmental
areas.
Required Courses y^ur
MGT 251 Principles of Management.............. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.................. 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations ................. 3
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision.. 3
MGT 462 Wage and Salary Administration..... 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing................ 5
MGT 391 Organizational Development......... 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior............... 3
MGT 463 Manpower Development.................. 3
29
Required Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I.......... 5
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II......... 5
ACC 220 Governmental Accounting............. 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance .............. 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management............. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management................ 3
PSC 111 American National Government 1...... 3
Electives approved by the Department of Management .................................... 6
31
Marketing Minor
Required Courses
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing............. 5
MKT 210 Retailing .......................... 3
MKT211 Advertising ........................ 3
MKT 301 Marketing Research.................. 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior................... 3
MKT 401 Marketing Management................ 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management..
Electives approved by Department of Marketing. 9
30
Office Administration Minor The office administration minor attempts to develop a moderate degree of skills while emphasizing promotional possibilities to supervisory and beginning office management positions.
Required Courses
BEC 102 Intermediate Typewriting.............. 3
BEC103 Advanced Typewriting.................. 3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines... 3
BEC 111 Beginning Gregg Shorthand............. 4
BEC 112 Intermediate Gregg Shorthand........ 4
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures..... 3
BEC 354 Office Management .................... 3
Electives (select six (6) hours from the following) 6
29
BEC 323 Business Listening Skills
BEC 301 Business Report Writing
BEC 402 Ethics in Business
MGT 353 Personnel Management
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision
Personnel Management Minor The personnel management minor is designed for students who major in non-business areas.
Required Courses Hours
ACC 101 Principles of^ccounting I.............. 5
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing........ 4v
MGT 251 Principles of Management............... 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management................... 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations .................. 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior................ 3
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision.. 3
MGT 462 Wage and Salary Administration......... 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing................ 5S
32
Real Estate and Insurance Minor
Quarter
Hours
MGT 221 Business Law......................... 3
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance............... 3
MGT 345 Life and Health Insurance............. 3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate............. 3
MGT 382 Property Insurance .................. 3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law....................... 3
MGT 386 Real Estate Investment............... 3
MGT 482 Property Management.................. 3
MGT 484 Real Estate Valuation and
Administration .............................. 3
MGT 485 Advanced Real Estate................. 3
30
Systems Management Minor
Required Courses
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing .... 4
CMS 211 COBOL .............................. 4
CMS231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics. 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design.............................. 3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software ............................... 3
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research_ 3
CMS 332 Decision Theory..................... 3
CMS 335 Introduction to Management Science 3
CMS 405 Systems Design ..................... 3
CMS 451 Data Processing Management....... 3
32
ACCOUNTING
ACC 101-5 Principles of Accounting I (5+0)
Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the double entry system: theory and practice in transactional analysis; familiarization with the accounting cycle and preparation of basic financial statements.
ACC 102-5 Principles of Accounting II (5+0)
Continuation of ACC 101, emphasizing procedures for partnerships and corporations. An introduction to cost accounting and financial statements for management analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 101.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
ACC 180-2 Personal Income Tax (2+0) Provides all students (except accounting majors) with knowledge of their rights under the current income tax laws. Enables these students to do some tax planning of their personal income, to recognize when a problem has arisen and expert help is needed, and to qualify the students to prepare their own Federal and Colorado income tax returns.
(Credit not allowed for both ACC 180 and 309).
ACC 220-3 Governmental Accounting (3+0)
Orientation in the concepts of budgetary control as a matter of law and public administration theory. Accounting principles and procedures necessary to implement budgetary controls.
Prerequisite: ACC 102, or permission of instructor.
ACC 240-3 Cost Accounting (3+0) Concepts and procedures applicable to job order and standard cost systems as well as cost, profit, volume analysis and other managerial accounting techniques.
Prerequisite: ACC 102.
ACC 250-3 Managerial Accounting (3+0)
For students who expect to use accounting data in their future occupations as well as for students intending to become professional accountants.
ACC 309-4 Income Tax I (4+0) Preparation of individual Federal and Colorado income tax returns. Credit not allowed for both ACC 180 and 309.
Prerequisite: ACC 102, or permission of instructor.
ACC 310-4 Income Tax II (4+0) Preparation of partnership, corporation, estates and trust income tax returns with research problems.
Prerequisite: ACC 309.
ACC 325-3 Analysis of Financial Statements (3+0)
A study of the techniques used to analyze and interpret financial statements of industrial and commercial enterprises. Prerequisite: ACC 102.
ACC 330-3 Introduction to Accounting Systems (3+0)
Installation and control of systems of ac-
counting in various organizations and situations. Analysis of cases and research in types of tools available for implementation of an accounting system or procedure. Prerequisites: ACC 102 and CMS 101.
ACC 341-4 Advanced Cost Accounting
(4+0)
Continuation of ACC 240. More complex problems in process and job order costing. Mathematical and statistical analyses of cost behavior for control and decision-making. Prerequisites: ACC 240 and MGT 231.
ACC 351-4 Intermediate Accounting I (4+0)
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on current assets and current liabilities.
Prerequisite: ACC 102.
ACC 352-4 Intermediate Accounting II (4+0)
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on long term assets, long term liabilities and stockholders equity. Prerequisite: ACC 351.
ACC 400-3 Quantitative Methods in Accounting (3+0)
The application of computer analysis to business decisions, planning and control. An integration of statistics and the techniques of operations research with emphasis on accounting.
Prerequisites: CMS 110 or 211 and CMS 305 or ACC 330.
ACC 410-4 Budgeting and Control (4+0)
Examines the control function, its location within the organization and service to general management. Particular attention is paid to the use of cost accounting techniques as aids to budgetary and control. Prerequisites: MGT 251 and ACC 341.
ACC 420-5 Auditing (5+0)
Auditing techniques and principles applied by certified public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and verifying underlying data.
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and 352.
ACC 440-3 Advanced Problems and Techniques (3+0)
Provides review and reinforcement of students accounting training. CPA examination problems are used.
Prerequisites: ACC 451 and 452.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
ACC 451-4 Advanced Accounting I (4+0)
includes partnerships, installments, receiverships and fiduciary accounting.
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and 352, or permission of instructor.
ACC 452-4 Advanced Accounting II (4+0)
Includes branch accounting, and a study of combinations and consolidated statements.
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and 352, or permission of instructor.
ACC 460-3 Contemporary Accounting
(3+0)
Comprehensive coverage of current literature in accounting with emphasis on recent AICPA publications.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and 24 quarter hours of courses in accounting.
BUSINESS EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
BEC 101-3 Beginning Typewriting (3+1)
Introduction to the keyboard, efficient manipulation of the typewriter, and development of minimum occupational and personal use skills. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of typewriting in high school. A minimum of one laboratory period per week is required of all students.
BEC 102-3 Intermediate Typewriting
(3+1)
Continuation of typewriting skill development. Includes occupational production, skill in business letters, tabulation, manuscripts, etc. A minimum of one laboratory period per week is required of all students.
BEC 103-3 Advanced Typewriting (3+1)
Special attention is given to a professional degree of performance in volume typing of miscellaneous business communication media. A minimum of one laboratory period per week is expected of all students.
Prerequisite: BEC 102 (Intermediate Typewriting), or two years of high school typewriting.
BEC 105-3 Operation of Calculating Machines (3+1)
Proficiency is developed in the operation of various models of electronic calculators as
applied to accounting, statistics, and general business math.
BEC 111-4 Beginning Gregg Shorthand (4+0)
A course in basic Gregg Shorthand for those who have had no previous training. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of Gregg shorthand in high school.
Prerequisite: A minimum of one course in typewriting.
BEC 112-4 Intermediate Gregg Shorthand (4+0)
A continuation of BEC 111 (Beginning Gregg Shorthand). Emphasis is upon speed dictation and transcription.
Prerequisite: BEC 102, or equivalent.
BEC 113-4 Advanced Shorthand (4+0) Continuation of BEC 112. Emphasis is on the development of dictation and transcription skills, vocabulary building, spelling improvement and other skills needed for vocational competence.
Prerequisite: BEC 112, or equivalent.
BEC 200-3 Business Communications (3+0)
Presents introduction to business listening skills, vocabulary building, and principles involved in preparing business letters and other types of communications purpose, style, structure and use of correct, forceful business English.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, completion of ENG 101, 103, and BEC 101 (Beginning Typewriting), or equivalent.
BEC 214-3 Advanced Dictation (3+0) Development of advanced miscellaneous stenographic skills combined with general office activities.
Prerequisite: BEC 112, or equivalent (80 wpm dictation rate).
BEC 222-3 Office Practices and Procedures (3+0)
Study and practice of duties commonly completed by executive assistants, secretaries and general office personnel.
Prerequisite: BEC 101 (Beginning Typewriting), or equivalent.
BEC 301-3 Business Report Writing (3+0)
Organization and preparation of reports of the types used in business including tech-
40


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
niques of collecting, interpreting and presenting information useful to management. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
BEC 323-3 Business Listening Skills (3+0)
Increases listening comprehension through analysis of listening difficulties, practice in identification of ideas, persuasive techniques and fallacies of reasoning. Emphasis is on group and business applications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
BEC 354-3 Office Management (3 + 0) Study of the principles and practices employed in the organization, operation, and control of modern business offices, including problems of layout, personnel, equipment and functions.
Prerequisite: MGT 251.
BEC 360-3 Principles of Business Education (3+0)
History of problems and trends in Business Education today. Consideration is given to American educational issues as they relate to Business Education.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.
BEC 361-3 Methods of Teaching Typewriting (3+0)
A study of the psychology, current philosophy and successful methods of instruction in typewriting for developing a desirable occupational and personal-use competence at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: BEC 103, or permission of instructor.
BEC 362-3 Methods of Teaching Stenography (3+0)
A study of the psychology, current philosophy and successful methods of instruction in stenography for developing a desirable occupational competence at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: BEC 113, or permission of instructor.
BEC 363-3 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping and Accounting (3+0)
A study of the psychology, current philosophy and successful methods of instruction in bookkeeping and accounting at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: ACC 102, or permission of instructor.
BEC 364-3 Methods of Teaching Data Processing (3+0)
A course for prospective and experienced data processing teachers emphasizing successful methods of organization, preparation, and presentation of data processing subject matter at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: CMS 110, or permission of instructor.
BEC 365-3 Methods of Teaching Distributive Education (3+0)
Current distributive education programs, methods of teaching salesmanship, advertising, and retailing. Includes selection, placements of students, and coordination of sales positions for high school distributive education programs.
Prerequisites: BEC 360 and MKT 216, or permission of instructor.
BEC 366-3 Methods of Teaching Consumer Economics and Basic Business (3+0)
Psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction for high school and junior college consumer economics and miscellaneous, basic, non-skills business courses.
Prerequisite: FIN 325, or permission of instructor.
BEC 402-3 Ethics in Business (3 + 0) Begins with a brief survey of principles of ethics followed by a strong application to specific business activities and business areas of specialization. The course makes liberal use of professional business people from the Metropolitan Denver area as resource persons and speakers in the classroom.
Prerequisite: BEC 200, or permission of instructor.
BEC 413-3 Techniques of Coordinating Vocational Programs (3+0)
Theory and practice in coordinating the business world with the educational world in giving cooperative training in office and distributive occupations. Includes identification of positions available in the community, training students for specific positions, placement, and evaluation of students while in cooperative positions.
Prerequisite: BEC 360, or permission of instructor.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
COMPUTER AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
CMS 101-4 Introduction to Data Processing (4+0)
A survey of business data processing including computer systems, computer programming, systems analysis and design, data processing management, management science, management information systems, and the computer in society.
CMS 110-4 FORTRAN (4+0)
A computer programming course in which the major elements of the FORTRAN language are taught. Problems selected from business are coded and run on a computer to familiarize students with program testing and debugging.
Prerequisite: CMS 101.
CMS 211-4 COBOL (4+0)
A computer programming course in which the major elements of the COBOL language are taught. Problems selected from business are coded and run on a computer to familiarize students with program testing and debugging.
Prerequisite: CMS 101.
CMS 214-4 Fundamentals of Computer Programming (4+0)
Introductory course in computer programming which uses the IBM 370 and its assembly language (BAL) to develop fundamental concepts. Topics include system organization and architecture; data representation; use of arithmetic, logical, and editing instructions; and program analysis and debugging techniques.
Prerequisite: CMS 110 or CMS 211.
CMS 231-3 Fundamental Business Statistics (3+0)
Organization and presentation of data, statistical description and the normal distribution.
Prerequisite: MTH 131 or 101.
CMS 300-3 Data Processing Survey (3+0)
This course will examine the social and economic impact of electronic computers in several environments government, law, health, education, the humanities, science and engineering, and business.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
CMS 301-4 Assembler Language (4+0) A computer programming course in which Basic Assembler Language (BAL) for the
IBM 370 computer is taught. Topics include a review of computer numeration systems, syntax and elements of BAL, computer program addressibility and relocatibility, and debugging techniques. Typical programming problems from business will be programmed and run on the IBM 370 computer. Prerequisite: CMS 214.
CMS 302-4 Advanced Assembler Language and Operating Systems (4+0)
A continuation of the study of the use of BAL in business applications. The emphasis is on the advanced features of BAL (Macro and Conditional Assembly) and on the Operating Systems of the IBM 370.
Prerequisite: CMS 301.
CMS 305-3 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design (3+0)
Systems analysis focuses on the study of existing information systems, problem definition, data collection, and new system requirements. System design focuses on the development of an improved information system selecting alternate solutions, determine the best solution, and documentation of that solution.
Prerequisite: CMS 101.
CMS 306-3 File Design and Data Base Management (3+0)
The course covers the current status of data base system implementation. Functional characteristics such as file design are examined in detail. Guidelines are developed which will aid in evaluation of vendor-supplied Data Base Management Systems.
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
CMS 311-4 Advanced COBOL (4+0)
A continuation of CMS 211 with emphasis on business applications involving indexed sequential and random access files. Advanced features of COBOL such as the Report Generator and Sort verb are studied. Prerequisite: CMS 211.
CMS 312-4 Advanced FORTRAN (3+0) A continuation of CMS 110 with emphasis on business applications involving subroutines, sequential and direct access files, matrices, and simulation models. Prerequisite: CMS 110.
CMS 315-3 Report Program Generator (RPG) (3+0)
A programming course in the RPG Ian-
42


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
guage. Practice problems are coded by the student after he has been taught the vocabulary, operations and elementary statements in the RPG language. The coded problems are processed on a computer to verify problem solution and familiarize students with programming, testing and debugging. Prerequisite: CMS 110, or MTH 251.
CMS 316-3 Programming Language One (PL/1) (3 + 0)
Designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the development and implementation of both scientific and/or business applications in the PL/1 language. Students will be required to analyze, flowchart, code and run on a computer several projects designed to illustrate the breadth of capability of PL/1.
Prerequisite: CMS 110 or CMS 211.
CMS 322-3 Analysis of Computer Hardware and Software (3+0)
A study of various computer systems in relation to information system requirements. Comparisons of costs, capabilities and software support will be made.
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
CMS 323-3 Data Communication Systems (3+0)
A study of data transmission; the nature of communication links and the attached hardware; the codes, modems, terminals, and methods of line organization; the need for multiplexing and the types of network structures; software; and design techniques. Prerequisite: CMS 322.
CMS 331-3 Statistics for Business Research (3+0)
Statistical inference, hypothesis testing (includes t, x2 and F distributions) correlation and regression, time series analysis and index numbers are approached from the decision-making point of view.
Prerequisites: CMS 231, MTH 132, and CMS 110.
CMS 332-3 Decision Theory (3+0) Designed to develop the students ability to make business decisions under uncertainty. Includes construction of pay-off tables and Baysian Statistics in solving realistic business problems.
Prerequisites: CMS 231, MTH 133 or equivalent.
CMS 334-3 Quantitative Methods for Management Science (3 + 0)
General introduction to fundamental principles of calculus and linear algebra with emphasis on maximization, minimization, linear programming, sets, vectors, and matrices as applied to management problems. Prerequisite: MTH 131-133 or equivalent.
CMS 335-3 Introduction to Management Science (3+0)
Terminal course for students desiring an overview of management science techniques. (Students with credit in CMS 431, 432 or MTH 323 cannot receive credit for MTH 335.)
Prerequisite: CMS 332, or permission of instructor.
CMS 401-4 Advanced Computer Programming (4+0)
Designed to provide students with an opportunity to gain practical experience in the development and implementation of programs using subroutines written and compiled in mixed languages.
Prerequisites: CMS 301 and any one of the following: CMS 311, CMS 312, or CMS 316.
CMS 405-3 Systems Design (3+0)
Final systems analysis course with emphasis on the design of an integrated computerized system. General system theory, the theory of the firm as a system, and classical and flow network organization concepts are studied.
Prerequisite: CMS 322 or CMS 305.
CMS 431-3 Management Science I (3+0)
A study of mathematical programming and its application to management.
Prerequisite: CMS 332.
CMS 432-3 Management Science II (3+0)
A study of the quantitative technique of inventory theory, queueing theory, integer programming and their application to management.
Prerequisite: CMS 332.
CMS 439-3 Case Studies in Management Science (3+0) Investigation of real management problems to develop the students ability to ascertain feasible alternative approaches and solu-
43


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
tions using available computer facilities and quantitative techniques.
Prerequisite: CMS 431 or 432.
CMS 440-4 Simulation of Management Processes (4+0)
A study of computer simulation techniques as applied to resource allocation problems in the business environment.
Prerequisite: CMS 110.
CMS 441-3 Management Information Systems (3+0)
A study of the requirements for an integrated information system in a company, the design techniques and implementation plan for such a program.
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
CMS 451-3 Data Processing Management (3+0)
A study of the problems encountered in a business data processing installation with particular emphasis on its coordination with other management functions and the integration of management systems, system design, software and hardware in the installation.
Prerequisites: MGT 251 and CMS 305.
CMS 470-3 Advancements in Data Processing (3+0)
Provides comprehensive coverage of current journals in the field of computer and management science to bring the senior student in the computer and management science major up to date regarding advances in hardware, software, management information systems, etc.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
FINANCE
FIN 325-3 Personal Finance (3+0)
A study of financial problems and institutions affecting individuals including borrowing, savings, insurance, investment and financial agencies.
Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Will not be accepted as upper division elective for Accounting majors.)
FIN 350-3 Principles of Finance (3+0) An introductory course surveying the domestic and international financial system of the U.S. as it relates to the theory and practice of business finance. The course acquaints the student with the banking, mone-
tary, and credit system, characteristics of major capital markets, and the influence of this environment on business.
Prerequisites: ACC 102 and ECO 103.
FIN 360-3 Investments (3+0)
A survey of the organization and regulation of security markets; security analysis and valuation; and principles of portfolio management from the viewpoint of the individual investor.
Prerequisites: ACC 102 and MKT 201, or junior standing.
FIN 430-3 Managerial Finance I (3+0)
A study of the dynamic environment of financial management in terms of forms of business organization, tax laws, and capital markets, and the concepts and analytical skills used in financial decision-making: financial analysis and projections, cash and capital budgeting, the use of operating and financial leverage, the cost of capital, and dividend policy.
Prerequisite: FIN 350.
FIN 431-3 Managerial Finance II (3 + 0) An integrative study of financial management focusing on major sources of capital available to business, the characteristics, costs, and instruments of each; methods of financing growth externally; financial reorganization of business firms; and a review of fundamental methods of financial analysis.
Prerequisite: FIN 430.
FIN 470-3 Securities Analysis (3 + 0) In-depth study for the student of investments, employing advanced approaches to security valuation and security markets forecasting.
Prerequisite: FIN 360.
MANAGEMENT
MGT 100-3 Introduction to Business
(3+0)
A survey of the American business system and its place in contemporary society. The relationships between economic theory and business decision-making are considered as well as types of business organizations and an introduction to marketing, production, financial, personnel and administrative management. No credit will be allowed students who have previously earned credits in accounting, management, computer and management science, or marketing.
44


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
MGT 221-3 Business Law I (3+0) Introduction to ordinary legal aspects of business transactions including such topics as contracts and agency instruments. Designed to give a general understanding of the subject and to provide information useful in deciding when a lawyer should be consulted for aid in avoiding legal mistakes. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
MGT 251-3 Principles of Management
(3+0)
Analysis of managerial functions and processes required for operating any type of business organization effectively. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
MGT 321-3 Business Law II (3+0) Continuation of MGT 221. Specific analysis of Sales and Negotiable Instruments under the Uniform Commercial Code and general property law; the Uniform Consumer Credit Code is also studied. Avoidance of pitfalls in these areas is stressed. Prerequisite: MGT 221.
MGT 322-3 Advanced Business Law (3+0)
An examination of Partnership, Corporation and Estate and Trust Law is made with emphasis on planning. Subsequently, C.P.A. practice questions are reviewed (all areas) to prepare for C.P.A. examination. Prerequisite: MGT 321.
MGT 342-3 Principles of Insurance (3+0)
Concept of risk, insurance coverages available, organizational structure of insurance companies, prevention of loss and claims settlement.
Prerequisite: MGT 221.
MGT 345-3 Life and Health Insurance (3+0)
A study of the principles and practices of life and health insurance with emphasis on types of policies and their provisions. Includes rate determination, reserves, taxation and regulation.
Prerequisite: MGT 342.
MGT 350-3 Managerial Economics (3+0)
Provides the serious student with comprehensive application of economics to managerial decision and business strategy. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
MGT 353-3 Personnel Management
(3+0)
Principles, methods and procedures related to the effective utilization of human resources in organizations. Historical development and objectives of personnel management, individual differences, labor budgeting, job analyses, recruitment, selection, placement, training, wage and salary administration, hours of work and employee health.
Prerequisite: MGT 251.
MGT 355-3 Operations Management (3+0)
Introduction to theory and practice of industrial management, problems of internal industrial organization and control, systems and procedures, materials control, production control, motion and time study, industrial statistics, industrial safety, and industrial research.
Prerequisite: MGT 251.
MGT 356-3 Small Business Management (3+0)
A survey and analysis of the managerial problems facing the small businessman including an understanding of the financial, legal and marketing principles applicable to the successful operation of a small business. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
MGT 357-3 Industrial Relations (3+0) Provides appropriate insights into the nature of union origins, developments and relation to management personnel activities. Prerequisite: MGT 251.
MGT 359-3 Black Entrepreneurship (3+0)
A seminar for exploration of the background, development and current problems of businesses owned and operated by members of the Black community.
Prerequisite: MGT 251.
MGT 380-3 Principles of Real Estate (3+0)
A study of the practices, regulations, legal aspects and professional ethics of the real estate industry.
Prerequisite: MGT 221.
MGT 382-3 Property Insurance (3 + 0)
A study of rate determination, underwriting, loss adjustment and reinsurance applicable to real property.
Prerequisites: MGT 342 and 380.
45


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
MGT 384-3 Real Estate Law (3+0) Conveyances, mortgages and leasing are covered in detail; contracts, deeds, leases and the other basic instruments are illustrated and analyzed with emphasis on advanced real estate pitfalls.
Prerequisites: MGT 221 and 380.
MGT 386-3 Real Estate Investments (3+0)
A study of yields, yield rates, management and control of income and expenses, economic feasibility of real estate trusts and commercial properties.
Prerequisites: FIN 360 and MGT 380.
MGT 391-3 Organizational Development (3+0)
A review of organizational and behavioral constructs designed to understand and react to the character and personality of the organization itself.
MGT 451-3 Emerging Management Concepts (3+0)
Provides opportunity to explore and evaluate current thought and changing patterns of management philosophy and operations. Includes behavioral, quantitative and systems approaches to management issues, current and future.
Prerequisites: MGT 251 and senior standing.
MGT 453-3 Organizational Behavior
(3+0)
Provides a balanced interpretation of modern developments in human relations and organizational behavior using an integrated social science approach.
Prerequisite: MGT 353.
MGT 461-3 Employee Training Supervision (3+0)
A study of the principles of supervision, the techniques of leadership, adjustment of grievances, policy interpretation, group attitudes and morale, training and learning processes, and counseling techniques. Prerequisite: MGT 353.
MGT 462-3 Wage and Salary Administration (3+0)
Installation and administration of a complete wage and salary program including objectives, policies, organization, control, job evaluation, wage survey and winning acceptance for an integrated program. Prerequisite: MGT 353.
MGT 463-3 Manpower Development (3+0)
Provides a comprehensive treatment of the manpower theme, explaining the problems and policies which precipitated manpower into a position of national priority. Prerequisite: MGT 353.
MGT 482-3 Property Management (3+0)
Includes analysis of rental markets, renting techniques, development of rent schedules, repairs and maintenance, accounting and tenant relations.
Prerequisite: MGT 380.
MGT 484-3 Real Estate Valuation and Administration (3+0)
Reviews methods of valuation and appraisal dealing with real estate and further develops the administrative techniques of running an appraisal office.
Prerequisite: MGT 380.
MGT 485-3 Advanced Real Estate (3+0)
Involves a sophisticated analysis of commercial and industrial transactions. Appraisal analysis, tax considerations and economic return comparisons are made. Prerequisite: MGT 380.
MGT 495-4 Business Policies (4+0)
A senior seminar in which various discip-plines are integrated and related to policy level decision-making in the business enterprise.
Prerequisite: Senior standing. MARKETING
MKT 201-5 Principles of Marketing (5+0)
Principles, methods and problems found in distribution activities in marketing products and services.
Prerequisite: ECO 101.
MKT 210-3 Retailing (3+0)
A survey of retail store operation which considers executive control, profit planning, merchandising, store location, layout, organization, policies, system and coordination of store activities.
Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 211-3 Advertising (3+0)
Theory, practices and techniques in adver-
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
tising. Layout, copy writing, selection of media, costs, research and problems are included.
Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 216-3 Salesmanship (3+0)
A study of techniques and psychological factors involved in business transactions with emphasis on personal salesmanship.
Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 301-3 Marketing Research (3+0) Collection and interpretation of marketing data with emphasis on the application of scientific techniques and its relevance of decision-making in market selection, product development and promotional efforts.
Prerequisites: MKT 201 and CMS 231.
MKT 312-3 Promotional Strategy (3+0) Survey of persuasive strategies and tactics necessary in current marketing; emphasis on behavioral aspects of promotional process and on management of programs involved.
Prerequisites: MKT 201 and MKT 211.
MKT 321-3 Purchasing (3 + 0)
A management approach to the buying function as it relates to business, institutions and governments. Selection of sources of supply, make-or-buy decisions, legal aspects, personnel considerations and evaluation of purchasing effectiveness and efficiency.
Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 331-3 Consumer Behavior (3+0)
A study of human behavior in the consumer role with emphasis on a better understanding of consumer actions leading to better management decision-making with resulting efficiencies in the marketing program and an improvement in consumer welfare.
MKT 371-3 International Marketing
(3+0)
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of the international scope and complexities of marketing. The unique marketing aspects of global enterprise opportunities as they relate to environmental differentiations among the various countries are emphasized. Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 412-3 Retail Management (3+0)
An integrated management approach to diverse retail store problems including store organization, store location, merchandise policy, buying and pricing, merchandise control, sales promotion, advertising display, department location, customer services, personnel management, accounting, credit and finance.
Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 416-3 Sales Management (3+0) Organization of the sales department, sales planning, operating procedures, and administration of the sales force including selection, training, control and compensation. Prerequisite: MKT 201.
MKT 454-3 Marketing Theory (3 + 0) Development and evaluation of modern marketing theory explaining and predicting its workings and interrelationships. Prerequisite: Senior Marketing major.
MKT 455-4 Seminar in Marketing Management (4+0)
The development and application of marketing policies and strategies to marketing problems; areas of study include the analysis of problems relating to the consumer, the business environment, and the marketing mix.
Prerequisites: Any two upper level courses in Marketing.
47




CENTER FOR EDUCATION
CENTER FOR EDUCATION
The Center is composed of three departments, the Department of Education, the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, and the Department of Reading.
The Teacher Certification Program at Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.
The Department of Education offers a major and minor in Early Childhood Education and the professional courses leading to teacher certification at both the elementary and secondary level. A minor in Special Education is offered as an additional credential.
The Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, offers a major in Physical Education with two emphasis areas and a major in Recreation with eight emphasis areas along with minors in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health and Safety.
An intramural program, administered by the PER Department, provides competitive activities, and a variety of free or reduced rate recreational opportunities.
Intercollegiate sports for both men and women are conducted through the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health. Varsity sports for men include soccer, basketball, swimming, tennis, baseball and track. Womens varsity teams include field hockey, volleyball, basketball, gymnastics, skiing, swimming, softball, track and tennis. Students interested in these intercollegiate teams should register for the specific varsity sport under the PER 100 designation.
The Department of Reading offers the only undergraduate minor in Reading in the State with numerous courses in the teaching of developmental and remedial reading. The Department also offers reading improvement courses and has a reading laboratory which is open to all students.
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS
The purpose of the program in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students under these programs must meet the basic studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this catalog. The following requirements must be met for formal admission to the education programs:
1. A minimum of 2.5 grade point average (in all work attempted) which must be maintained to continue in the program.
2. Completion of a minimum of 75 quarter hours of college work.
3. Completion of a Declaration of Intention form, to be filed in the Education Department office. Normally, students would complete this form while enrolled in their first course in education.
4. For students seeking credit for courses taken at this or at another institution that might be equivalent to the Required Courses described in this section, completion of a formal evaluation for advanced standing in consultation with their advisor, with the results of this evaluation to be filed in the Education Department office.
The following requirements must be met for admission to student teaching:
1. Completion of a minimum of 135 quarter hours of college work with a minimum grade point average of
2.5; students transferring from other institutions or those who already hold degrees must complete a minimum of 30 quarter hours before they can be admitted to student teaching and should check with their advisor concerning special grade point average requirements.
2. Completion of all professional courses required for certification.
3. Completion of all subject area courses required for certification by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
4. Completion of all items in the personal student teaching folder, to be obtained in the Department of Education.
5. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and one other person who is not a member of the student's family.
6. A physical examination report, including negative chest X-ray, on file with the Student Health Services.
7. Approval by a screening committee.
8. Completion of a formal application for student teaching, to be submitted to the Department of Education not later than the following dates:
For student teaching in the Fall Quarter,
March 30
For student teaching in the Winter Quarter, September 30
For student teaching in the Spring Quarter,
January 10
Students who have partially completed the student teaching requirement at another institution may request to take student teaching for 9 quarter hours.
49


CENTER FOR EDUCATION
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
The Department of Education offers the
following programs in Early Childhood
Education:
1. A major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
2. A certification program meeting requirements for certification to teach early childhood in the public schools of Colorado (pre-school through the primary grades).
3. A minor in Early Childhood Education.
4. All the courses necessary to meet the education requirements set by the State Department of Social Services for the licensing of day care directors.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Quarter Hours
3
3 3
3 3
3
4
4
3 3
3
\
3
4
4
_3 46
A student majoring in Early Childhood Education must complete the requirements for a minor or an approved specialty area which is the equivalent of a minor. Recommended minors include Reading, Special Education, Psychology, Sociology, Speech Pathology: other minors must be approved by the department. The specialty areas which act as equivalents of a minor are Language Arts, Science and Math, Urban Studies Education, and Music and Movement. The course requirements for each of these specialty areas are available from the department.
Requirements for Certification In addition to completing a major in Early Childhood Education, students wishing certification must satisfy the following requirements:
Required in Education HourT
EDU 316 Learning and Teaching I: Teaching
Auxiliaries .................................. 5
EDU 461 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Early Childhood (Preschool 2) ...........9 or 18
Required in Reading
RDG 304 Reading Process ......................... 3
RDG 305 Methods and Techniques of Teaching
Reading: Primary.............................. 3
In addition to the above, the student wishing certification must complete 12-15 hours in Humanities,
Required Courses
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education
(Curriculum I).............................
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood
Education..................................
HSW 202 Group Dynamics .......................
or
EDU 235 Human Relations ......................
EDU 230 Child Development I...................
EDU 231 Child Development II..................
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development_______
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Learning (Curriculum II)...................
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban
Schools Laboratory.........................
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban Schools EDU 338 History and Theory of Early
Childhood Education .......................
EDU 339 Laboratory in History and Theory of
Early Childhood Education .................
EDU 340 Facilitation of Language and
Learning (Curriculum III) .................
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on the Socialization
of Children................................
Electives in consultation with advisor........
Science and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral
Science, 0-9 hours in Career.
Quarter
Hours
Required in Humanities ........................12-15
MUS 330 Music Methods for Early Childhood.. 3
Quarter
Hours
Required in Science & Mathematics..............12-15
BIO 100 Man and the Living World .............. 4
MTH 261 Concepts of Math l..................... 3
or
MTH 234 A Survey of Mathematics................ 3
Required in Social and Behavioral Sciences .... 15
A list of courses recommended for the complement of 12-15 hours in the above area is available from the department.
Six hours of ethnic studies selected in consultation with an advisor in the early childhood program are required.
Minor
Required Courses ^Hours'
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education ............... 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood
Education..................................... 3
EDU 230 Child Development I...................... 3
EDU 231 Child Development II .................... 3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development_______ 4
HES 204 Nutrition................................ 3
HES 220 Administrative Leadership in Care
Providing Organizations ...................... 3
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on the
Socialization of Children..................... 4
Choose at least five hours of Early Childhood curriculum courses in consultation with and approved by an advisor in Early Childhood Education. 5
Choose three hours from the following list or in consultation with and approved by an advisor in Early Childhood Education: 3
SOC 315 Socialization of the Child
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development
PSY 325 Child Psychology
PSY 489 Experience with Children
SOC 341 The Family
AAS315 Education of the Black Child
CHS 315 Education of Chicano Children
37
Requirements for State Licensing of Child Care Directors The educational requirement for the State license is a minimum of 36 hours of college credit. A detailed list of the specific requirements may be obtained from the Department of Education. Majors in Early Childhood Education will fulfill these requirements by including among their electives:
Quarter
Hours
HES 204 Nutrition................................ 3
HES 220 Administrative Leadership in Care Providing Organizations.......................... 6
Minors in Early Childhood Education automatically fulfill all of these requirements.
ELEMENTARY LEVEL
Certification at the elementary level requires completion of the following profes-
50


CENTER FOR EDUCATION
sional course program and the minimum number of hours in each of the four areas of concentration stipulated below. Additional work must be taken in a discipline (English or Reading suggested) which will give the student the number of hours equivalent to the number of hours required for a minor. Substitutions for any of these requirements must be approved by the chairman of the specific department and of the Department of Education.
Special certification in Physical Education and Music are available.
Required in Education
EDU 110 The Elementary Child I................. 3
EDU210 The Elementary Child II ................ 3
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban
Schools Laboratory.......................... 3
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban Schools 3 EDU 316 Learning and Teaching I:
Teaching Auxiliaries........................ 5
EDU 462 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6).........................9 or 18
Recommended one of the following:
Quarter
Hours
PER 362 Health and Safety for the Young Child 3 PER 350 Games and Activities for the Young
Child ........................................ 3
PER 380 Rhythms for the Young Child.............. 3
Required in English and Reading (in addition to ENG
101-103 Freshman Composition):.................. 21
ENG 201 English Grammar....................... 3
or
ENG 301 Structure of the English Language. 3
RDG 304 The Reading Process................... 3
RDG 305 Methods and Techniques of
Teaching Reading: Primary .................. 3
RDG 306 Methods and Techniques of
Teaching Reading: Intermediate.............. 3
ENG 346 Childrens Literature ................ 3
Minimum of six additional quarter hours in English and Reading courses (obtain approved lists from Department of Education)
Quarter
Hours
Required in Humanities ......................... 18
ART 310 Art Instructional Methods for
Elementary School .......................... 3
MUS 306 Elementary School Music Methods. 3
SPE101 Public Speaking ....................... 3
SPE 359 Speech Problems In the Schools... 5
Minimum of four additional quarter hours in humanities courses (obtain approved list from Department of Education)
Required in Science and/or Mathematics...... 18
MTH 261 Concepts in Mathematics I
(required for K-6)........................ 3
MTH 262 Concepts in Mathematics II (required for 3-6)...................... 3
Minimum of 12 quarter hours in science courses to include one biological science, one physical science and one earth science (obtain approved
list from Department of Tducation).
Required in Social and/or Behavioral Sciences. 18 HIS 100 American Civilization .................... 3
PSC 221 American State and Local
Government ........................... 4
PSY 201 General Psychology ............. 3
Students must take six hours from Afro-American Studies, Chicano Studies, and/or Urban Studies. Minimum of three additional quarter hours in social science courses (obtain list from Department of Education).
All candidates for the certificate to teach in the elementary schools will declare their intentions at the earliest possible date and make arrangements in Education 110-3; Elementary Child I.
1. Two hundred hours of volunteer service by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church and Sunday school groups, as well as other boys and girls clubs.
2. Evidence of proficiency in handwriting and spelling.
3. Completion of a battery of elementary achievement tests.
SECONDARY LEVEL
Students may be certified at the secondary level in the following areas: Art Education, Biology, Business Education and Communication, Chemistry, English, History, Industrial Education, Mathematics, Music Education, Physical Education, Physics, Spanish, and Speech. Students should ask for advisors in the Department of Education as well as in the departments of their major and minor fields of study.
In addition to a major in the above areas, students must complete the following professional course program:
Required Courses ^urT
EDU 220 The Role of the Teacher in the
Secondary School.......................... 3
Social and Psychological Bases of Secondary Education a block of three courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban
Schools Laboratory...................... 3
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban
Schools................................. 3
EDU 318 The Adolescent as a Learner.... 4
Processes of Teaching in the Secondary Schools a block of three courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 321 Materials and Techniques of
Instruction for Secondary School Teachers. 4 EDU 328 Clinical Field Experiences in
Materials Construction and Tutoring .... 3
EDU 381 The Use of Media in Education.... 3
EDU 463 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary (7-12)......................9 or 18
Before enrolling for student teaching, students are directed to take a course in methods of teaching their major and minor field of study offered in the respective departments.
SPECIAL EDUCATION
The minor in Special Education is designed to prepare teachers to work with exceptional children found in special or regular classes. Students working toward certification in
51


CENTER FOR EDUCATION
either Early Childhood, Elementary or Secondary Education may complete the Special Education Minor and may gain endorsement for teaching the educable mentally handicapped child. The following courses are requirements for early Childhood and Elementary Education students:
Special Education Minor Early Childhood, Elementary Education
Required Courses
PSY 340 Psychology of Exceptional Children .. 3
EDU 341 Laboratory in Special Education... 3
PSY 360 Psychology of Mental Retardation.... 3
EDU 361 Remedial Techniques in Special
Education ............................. 3
PER 400 Adaptive Physical Education....... 3
EDU 347 Evaluation of Exceptional Children... 3
EDU 349 Curriculum Methods, and Materials
in Teaching the Mentally Retarded......... 3
EDU 359 Counseling the Parents of
Exceptional Children ..................... 3
EDU 464 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Special Education......................... 9
Special Education Minor Secondary Education
The same courses as above are required of Secondary Education students with the following additions:
Additional Requirements SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools.... 3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment........... 3
RDG 305 Methods and Techniques of
Teaching Reading: Primary................. 3
RDG 306 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Intermediate........... 3
EDU 100-3 Introduction to Education (3+0)
Acquaints students with the structure and function of the United States education system with emphasis on current problems. Attention to topics of interest to concerned parents and taxpayers as well as future teachers. Students completing requirements for secondary school teacher certification should enroll in EDU 220.
EDU 110-3 The Elementary Child I (3+0)
Designed to acquaint students with opportunities and responsibilities in the teaching profession. The development of behavior in the cognitive, affective, social and cultural domains from infancy through age twelve is presented to prepare the student for problems that confront him in the classroom.
EDU 111-3 Introduction to Early Childhood (3+0)
Basic course designed to acquaint the student with growth and development of the infant and child. Emphasis is placed on
emotional, social, and intellectual needs, and on individual guidance of the child. Not required for majors.
EDU 131-3 Early Childhood Education (3+0)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 132. Deals with specific teaching techniques as related to principles of child development and educational psychology. Areas covered include ways of promoting good human relationships and healthy physical, social and emotional development in the preschool child. Emphasis is on both individual and group dynamics.
EDU 132-3 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education (1+4)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 131. Observations and volunteer participation in a variety of preschool centers. Participation is coordinated with instruction in the field of early childhood education (EDU 131) with emphasis on curriculum areas and individual learning styles.
EDU 210-3 The Elementary Child II (3 + 0)
Continuation of EDU 110. Growth adjustment and capacities of the elementary school child are studied. Attention is directed to learning in terms of a process for producing a desirable behavior change in children within a school setting with the goal of maximizing the process and its product. The student has opportunities to become both a participant and an observer in group and individual demonstrations of learning phenomena.
Prerequisite: EDU 110.
EDU 220-3 The Role of the Teacher in the Secondary School (3+0)
To introduce students at the secondary level to the social, psychological and educational setting in which teachers and pupils interact in a process to promote the pupils cognitive, affective and psychomotor development. Students explore specific needs ot the adolescent, especially as related to his school setting, and will identify the roles teachers must play to meet these needs A series of evaluative experiences enabling each student to assess his potential foi assuming these roles.
EDU 230-3 Child Development I (3+0) Assigned reading, laboratory work and class discussion designed to give the student ar understanding of the patterns of develop ment of children from birth to three years
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
The student is introduced to the major developmental theories of Freud, Erikson, Piaget, and others, and to the research literature of this field.
EDU 231-3 Child Development II (3+0) A continuation of EDU 230. Consideration of the patterns of development of the child from three to eight.
Prerequisite: EDU 230.
EDU 232-4 Laboratory in Child Development (1 +6)
Students taking this course should take it concurrently with EDU 231. Development of skills of observing and recording the behavior of young children. Involves six hours a week of observation, volunteer participation in a setting with young children, and independent study.
EDU 233-4 Facilitation of Creativity and Learning (Curriculum II) (4+0) Ways of creating an atmosphere and implementing materials in early childhood education that will enhance and promote unhampered realization of a childs potential: e.g. creative expression, problem solving in subject areas, music, dramatic activities and art.
EDU 235-3 Human Relations (3+0)
This course is constructed on the assumption that a teachers knowledge of himself may well influence the way he teaches. The intent is to develop an understanding of the relationship between systematically gained self-knowledge and the teachers work. Opportunity is provided for the student to explore his own attitudes, values and behavior in a group under the leadership of a trained psychologist. The focus is on developing a positive and constructive attitude towards self-appraisal and the appraisal of others.
EDU 240-1 Handwriting for the Teacher (1 +0)
A detailed consideration of content, methods, instructional materials, and evaluation in the field of handwriting. The student demonstrates competency in manuscript and cursive handwriting.
EDU 314-3 Children and Youth in Urban Schools Laboratory (1 +4)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 315 and for students in the secondary-level program with EDU 318. Gives the student the opportunity to apply theoretical course work to field experiences involving
social workers, school psychologists, and counselors in the core city schools. A weekly seminar is held to discuss each students experiences.
EDU 315-3 Children and Youth in Urban Schools (3 + 0)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 314 (and with EDU 318 for students in the secondary-level program). Designed as an interdisciplinary course to acquaint the student with issues involved in education in a changing technological society. Demographic analysis, cultural and ethnic variations, child and youth development, human relations, and the school as a social institution are investigated. Class sessions include lectures, seminars, and audio-visual materials.
EDU 316-5 Learning and Teaching I: Teaching Auxiliaries (3+4)
A course and field experience dealing with two major aspects of elementary level teaching. The first is a study of curriculum development and the language arts, mathematics, science and social studies curricula as vehicles for learning. The second is the study and demonstration of specific teacher competencies such as: assessing childrens developmental stages; formulating behavioral objectives; demonstrating question-asking skills; sequencing instruction; recognizing and assessing creativity; and interpersonal transactions. In addition to three hours per week in the college classroom, the student spends four hours per week as an instructional aide in an elementary school setting.
Prerequisites: EDU 314 and 315.
EDU 318-4 The Adolescent as a Learner (4+0)
Applied educational psychology with special emphasis on learning-teaching processes involving adolescents. Provides the beginning teacher at the secondary level with the ability to translate theoretical constructs into useful classroom practices and to develop an approach to teaching consistent with current practices and compatible with his own personality. Direct observation of the work of school psychologists and counselors in a field-experience laboratory (EDU 314) that must be taken in conjunction with this course.
EDU 321-4 Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Secondary School Teachers (4+0)
Provides prospective teachers at the secon-
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
dary level with opportunities to convert theoretical instruction in teaching methods into practical applications in both real and simulated classroom environments. Emphasis on a systems approach to instructional program design, so that students become skilled in the planning of educational objectives and in the realistic evaluation of learning outcomes. Team teaching situations are set up in the classroom using video tape recorders for instant feedback to students developing a teaching style of their own.. Participation as tutors or teaching assistants in actual classrooms is arranged for all students in a separate laboratory course, EDU 328, which must be taken in conjunction with this course.
Prerequisites: EDU 220, 314, 315 and 318.
EDU 325-3 Social Studies in the Elementary Grades (3 + 0)
A detailed basic consideration of objectives, construction and use of units, problem solving, selection and grade placement of content, methodology including the use of concrete experiences, audio visual materials, group processes, questioning, reading and techniques of evaluation.
EDU 328-3 Clinical Field Experiences in Tutoring and Materials Construction (1+4)
Field experience in tutoring and materials construction to integrate the content, theory and conceptual aspects of academic and professional teacher education with concrete experiences in secondary schools. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 321 and EDU 381.
EDU 338-3 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education (3+0)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 339. Introduction to key theories, practices, trends and problems in the development of preschool education in the U.S. Critical consideration is given to contributions of Froebel, Montessori, Dewey, Piaget and others. Contemporary issues are examined and their historical roots identified.
EDU 339-3 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education Laboratory (1+2)
Training in observational techniques by use of filmed episodes of nursery school and kindergarten situations precedes observation of a variety of live preschool programs in Denver: the parent cooperatives, Montessori schools, Head Start programs, day care centers, private and public kindergarten
programs. Some components of current theories are considered in these observations; e.g., self selection, etc. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 338.
EDU 340-4 Facilitation of Language and Learning (Curriculum III) (3+2)
A detailed study of cognitive development from birth through early childhood with a focus on what sorts of experiences facilitate this development and what sorts of experiences impede development at each developmental level.
Prerequisite: A course in child development.
EDU 341-3 Laboratory in Special Education (1 +4)
Provides experience in public school and institutional settings so that theory will be related to the practices currently observed. Students will work in the field four hours each week and meet in the classroom for one hour to provide support for field activities. Must be taken concurrently with PSY 340.
EDU 347-3 Evaluation of Exceptional Children (3+0)
The student will be provided a working understanding and interpretation of diagnostic and descriptive materials on an individual basis and techniques for appraising and influencing the handicapped students functioning in the classroom.
Prerequisite: PSY 340.
EDU 349-3 Curriculum, Methods, and Materials in Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3+0)
This course provides an intensive study of techniques and methodology so the student may gain a background for the development of a curriculum for the mentally retarded. Readings and research will provide information about modern procedures currently in use in the public schools.
Prerequisite: PSY 340.
EDU 350-5 Education in Urban Crisis (3+4)
(Same as URS 350.) Study of the urban crisis and its effect on the student and schools. Population, urban growth, cultural diversity, technological change and social problems affecting the institutions in the city are investigated. Three quarter hours devoted to an analysis of the issues through lecture, films and speakers; two hours involve students in a practicum dealing with educational problems in urban areas.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
EDU 359-3 Counseling the Parents of Exceptional Children (3 + 0)
Students will learn methods and techniques of parent counseling and public relations. Students will explore such things as available community, state, and national resources for the rehabilitation of children. Prerequisite: PSY 340.
EDU 361-3 Remedial Techniques in Special Education (1+4)
The student will have experiences in public school and institutional settings so that students may be able to relate advanced theories to practices currently observed in a specialized situation before the final practi-cum. This course will be taken concurrently with PSY 360 or follow it.
EDU 381-3 The Use of Media in Education (3+0)
Designed to acquaint the prospective teacher with uses of educational media in the teacher-learning process. Includes operation of the most commonly used items of audio-visual equipment and construction of materials that are within the capabilities of ordinary classroom teachers and within the budget limitations of most schools. Provides an overview of the field of instructional technology, including the application of such advanced media as television, computer-assisted instruction, dial-access information retrieval systems and simulated environments, all within the framework of a systems approach to instruction.
EDU 400-3 Practicum in Tutoring (1 +4) Assigned readings, laboratory work and class discussions to give the student an understanding of and a basic competency in the art of tutoring. Enables students to use tutorial proficiency to improve academic achievement of MSC students who are experiencing difficulties.
EDU 414-4 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (4 + 0)
A presentation of the materials, methods and philosophy of science teaching with emphasis on the role of science in the school in developing the rational powers of the learner. Construction of science units and materials emphasizing the process approach to science teaching.
Prerequisite: EDU 210; 8 hours in science.
EDU 415-4 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (4+0)
A study of the materials, methods and phi-
losophy of mathematics teaching with emphasis on developing methods of teaching and grade level placement of content. Investigation of mathematics units and materials based on the learners developmental stage including the concrete and semiconcrete and means of evaluating achievement. Observation of and participation in the mathematics program in the public schools.
Prerequisite: MTH 261, junior standing.
EDU 416-4 Language Arts (4 + 0)
The objectives of the course are to develop familiarity with the concepts, methods, and materials pertinent to the teaching of language arts. The developmental process of language growth, including observing, listening, speaking, reading and writing is emphasized. (The prospective teacher needs to develop the ability to determine the language needs of each child and to formulate goals for his growth.)
Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor; ENG 201 or ENG 301.
EDU 436-4 Cultural Influence on
Socialization of Children (4+0)
Studies the socialization of children using a multi-disciplinary approach, e.g., psychology, sociology, biology, ethnology and education. From this base the student analyzes the effects that cultural and socialization patterns have on the family and the individuals development.
Prerequisites: EDU 230 and EDU 231.
EDU 461-9 or 18 Student Teaching
and Seminar: Early Childhood
(Preschool 3) (1+20 or 40)
A supervised field experience with increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of pre-primary or primary learners. The experience is designed to bring together what the student has gained from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. It includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various aspects of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers and frequent conferences with cooperating teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools. Student teaching is normally the terminal field experience in the pre-professional program leading to certification.
In conjunction with student teaching, the
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
student is required to attend a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the faculty, and other professional educators. Consideration of problems faced by the student and teachers highlight these seminars.
EDU 461 should be regarded as a full load for the quarter.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Early Childhood courses pertinent to student teaching. (List may be obtained in the Education Department.) Approval of the Dean, Center for Education, is also necessary.
EDU 462-9 or 18 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (K-6)
(1+20 or 40)
A supervised field experience with increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of elementary learners (kindergarten to sixth grade). The experience is designed to bring together what the student has gained from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. It includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various aspects of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers and frequent conferences with cooperating teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools. Student teaching is normally the terminal field experience in the pre-professional program leading to certification.
In conjunction with student teaching, the student is required to attend a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the faculty, and other professional educators. Consideration of problems faced by the student teachers highlight these seminars.
EDU 462 should be regarded as a full load for the quarter.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Elementary Teacher Education sequence, and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
EDU 463-9 or 18 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary (7-12)
(1+20 or 40)
A supervised field experience with increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of secondary learners (seventh-twelfth grades). The experience is designed to bring together what the student has gained from
his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. It includes the preparation of lesson plans and participation in various conferences with cooperating teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools. Student teaching is normally the terminal field experience in the pre-professional program leading to certification.
In conjunction with student teaching, the student is required to attend a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the faculty, and other professional educators. Consideration of problems faced by the student teachers highlight these seminars.
EDU 463 should be regarded as a full load for the quarter.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Secondary Teacher Education sequence, recommendation of major department (or department of subject(s) in which student is being certified), and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
EDU 464-9 Student Teaching and
Seminar: Special Education (EMR)
(1+20)
A supervised field experience with increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of educable mentally retarded learners (pre-primary-twelfth grade). The experience is designed to bring together what the student has gained from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. It includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various aspects of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers and frequent conferences with cooperating teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools that have EMR programs. Student teaching is normally the terminal field experience in the pre-professional program leading to certification.
In conjunction with student teaching, the student is required to attend a seminar each week with other special education student teachers, members of the faculty, and other professional educators. Consideration of problems faced by the student teachers highlight these seminars.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Special Education Minor, and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses lor All Students
(38 credit hours) jjjjjjjj'
PER 130 Introduction to Health, Physical
Education and Recreation..................... 3
PER 200 Anatomical Kinesiology.................. 3
PER 302 Applied Kinesiology..................... 3
PER 304 Physiology of Human Activity............ 3
PER 306 Prevention and Care of Sports
Injuries .................................... 2
PER 330 History and Principles of Physical
Education ................................... 3
PER 335 Curriculum in Physical Education.... 3
PER 340 Methods and Techniques of
Physical Education........................... 3
PER 350 Games and Activities for the Young
Child ....................................... 3
PER 400 Adaptive Physical Education............. 3
PER 430 Tests and Measurements in
Physical Education........................... 3
PER 435 Organization and Administration of
Physical Education........................... 3
PER 478 Outdoor Education and the School Camp Program................................. 3
A. Secondary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses Secondary Physical Education majors must present proof of proficiency in 18 different activities. A total of 12 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by: (1) receiving a passing grade in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate vertification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
Proficiency must be achieved in the following areas:
a. Basic skills all of the following:
PER 150 Swimming and Diving................ 1
PER 151 Fundamentals of Movement........ 1
PER 161 Tumbling .......................... 1
PER 184 Physical Fitness and Society.... 1
b. Team Sports 3 of the following:
PER 155 Volleyball ........................ 1
PER 168 Flag Football Flickerball..... 1
PER 169 Field Hockey....................... 1
PER 160 Soccer-Speedball (Men) ............ 1
or
PER 171 Soccer-Speedball (Women)........ 1
PER 167 Softball (Men) .................... 1
or
PER 173 Softball (Women) .................. 1
PER 156 Basketball (Men)................... 1
or
PER 170 Basketball (Women)................. 1
c. Individual Sports 5 of the following:
PER 154 Lifesaving......................... 1
PER 162 Gymnastics (Men)................... 1
PER 163 Track and Field.................... 1
PER 164 Tennis............................. 1
PER 165 Badminton ......................... 1
PER 166 Golf............................... 1
PER 172 Gymnastics (Women)................. 1
PER 180 Archery............................ 1
d. Dance and Wrestling 3 of the following:
PER 152 Square and Folk Dance.............. 1
PER 153 Social Dance....................... 1
PER 157 Wrestling ......................... 1
PER 158 Modern Dance Fundamentals .... 1
PER 159 Modern Dance Composition .......... 1
e. Elective 3 additional activities selected from the lists above.
2. Theory Courses (11 credit hours)
PER 323 Methods of Teaching Individual
Sports .................................... 2
PER 364 Secondary School Health and Safety. 3 Additional Required Courses tor Men (6 credit hours)
(Select two courses from PER 311-315)
PER 311 Analysis and Techniques of Football.. 2
PER 312 Analysis and Techniques of Basketball 2
PER 313 Analysis and Techniques of Track
and Field ................................. 2
PER 314 Analysis and Techniques of Wrestling 2
PER 315 Analysis and Techniques of Baseball. 2
PER 320 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Men)........................................ 2
Additional Required Courses for Women (6 credit hours)
PER 321 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Women) ..................................... 2
PER 322 Methods of Teaching Dance............... 2
PER 324 Coaching Techniques for Women--------- 2
or
PER 328 Officiating Techniques for Women ... 2
B. Elementary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (4 credit hours required)
PER 151 Fundamentals of Movement ............ 1
PER 161 Tumbling ............................ 1
PER 162 Gymnastics (Men)..................... 1
and
PER 172 Gymnastics (Women)................... 1
(Elect 8 hours from the following list)
PER 150 Swimming and Diving.................. 1
PER 152 Square and Folk Dance................ 1
PER 155 Volleyball .......................... 1
PER 156 Basketball (Men)..................... 1
or
PER 170 Basketball (Women)................... 1
PER 157 Wrestling ........................... 1
PER 158 Modern Dance Fundamentals............ 1
PER 160 Soccer-Speedball (Men)............... 1
or
PER 171 Soccer-Speedball (Women)............. 1
PER 163 Track and Field...................... 1
PER 168 Flag Football-Flickerball............ 1
PER 167 Softball (Men) ...................... 1
or
PER 173 Softball (Women) .................... 1
2. Theory Courses (10 credit hours) PER 345 Movement Education .................. 3
PER 362 Health and Safety for the Young Child 3
PER 380 Rhythms for the Young Child.......... 2
PER 320 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Men)...................................... 2
or
PER 321 Methods of Teaching Team Sports (Women) ....................................... 2
NOTE: Students with a physical education major who wish elementary certification may select one of the two options listed below:
1. Students may complete the courses required by the Education Department in English, Social Studies, Humanities, Science and Mathematics. Therefore, such work will be considered as equivalent to a minor for graduation.
2. Students may complete a minor in any field; then they do not need to complete the areas of emphasis required of other elementary education students.
Students who select option (1) will be certified as classroom teachers and also as physical education specialists.
Students who select option (2) will be certified as physical education specialists and are not certified for classroom teaching.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PHYSICAL EDUCATION MINOR
A. Secondary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses
PER 150-173,180,184, elect any 12 hours
2. Theory Courses (20 credit hours)
PER 130 Introduction to Health, Physical
Education, and Recreation ................
PER 306 Prevention and Care of Sports
Injuries .................................
PER 335 Curriculum in Physical Education.... PER 340 Methods and Techniques of Physical
Education.................................
PER 435 Organization and Administration of Physical Education........................
Additional Required Courses for Men (Select 6 hours from the above)
PER 311 Analysis and Techniques of Football.. PER 312 Analysis and Techniques of
Basketball................................
PER 313 Analysis and Techniques of Track
and Field ................................
PER 314 Analysis and Techniques of Wrestling PER 315 Analysis and Techniques of Baseball. PER 320 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Men).....................................
PER 323 Methods of Teaching Individual Sports
Additional Required Courses for Women (Select 6 hours from the above)
PER 321 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Women)...................................
PER 322 Methods of Teaching Dance............
PER 323 Methods of Teaching Individual Sports
PER 324 Coaching Techniques for Women--------
PER 328 Officiating Techniques for Women ...
PER 350 Games and Activities for the Young
Child ...................................... 3
PER 362 Health and Safety for the Young Child 3
PER 380 Rhythms for the Young Child............ 2
PER 478 Outdoor Education and the School
Quarter Camp Program 3
Hours
3 HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION
2 Minor
3 A. Health Education Emphasis Quarter Hours
3 PER 206 First Aid 2
PER 360 Safety Education 3
3 PER 362 Health and Safety for the Young Child 3
PER 364 Secondary School Health and Safety. 3
Quarter BIO 231 Human Anatomy 4
BIO 232 Human Physiology 4
2 HES 204 Nutrition 3
LEN 114 Narcotics and Drugs 3
2 PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment 3
PSY 325 Child Psychology 3
2 or
2 PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence 3
2 B. Driver and Traffic Safety Emphasis Quarter Hours
2 PER 206 First Aid 2
2 PER 360 Safety Education 3
PER 366 Basic Driver Education 3
Quarter Hours PER 368 Advanced Driver Education 3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology 4
LEN 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
2 System 3
2 LEN 110 Administration of Justice I 3
2 LEN 117 Traffic Control and Investigation 3
2 PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence 3
2 Approved Electives 3
B. Elementary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (4 credit hours required)
PER 151 Fundamentals of Movement.............. 1
PER 161 Tumbling ............................. 1
PER 162 Gymnastics (Men)...................... 1
and
PER 172 Gymnastics (Women).................... 1
(Elect 6 hours from the following list)
PER 150 Swimming and Diving................... 1
PER 152 Square and Folk Dance................. 1
PER 155 Volleyball ........................... 1
PER 156 Basketball (Men)...................... 1
or
PER 170 Basketball (Women).................... 1
PER 157 Wrestling ............................ 1
PER 158 Modern Dance Fundamentals............. 1
PER 160 Soccer-Speedball (Men)................ 1
or
PER 171 Soccer-Speedball (Women).............. 1
PER 163 Track and Field....................... 1
PER 168 Flag Football-Flickerball ............ 1
PER 167 Softball (Men)........................ 1
or
PER 173 Softball (Women) ..................... 1
2. Theory Courses (22 credit hours) houi
PER 130 Introduction to Health, Physical
Education and Recreation ..................... 3
PER 320 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Men)......................................... 2
or
PER 321 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Women) ...................................... 2
PER 340 Methods and Techniques of Physical
Education..................................... 3
PER 345 Movement Education...................... 3
RECREATION MAJOR
The Major in Recreation is intended to prepare students to enter recreation related jobs that are available at both local and national levels. The major consists of a common core of courses deemed essential for all recreation oriented persons and emphasizes field work with several recreation agencies.
A group of professional activity courses may be selected from twenty-four offerings, and a core of special emphasis courses is designed to provide the student with the depth needed for the selected area of interest. The areas of interest from which the student may choose are:
A. Therapeutic Recreation and Treatment
B. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities
C. Fine Arts in Recreation
D. Urban Program Specialist
E. Sports and Athletics
F. Performing and Cultural Arts Specialist
G. Recreation and Park Administration
H. Camping and Outdoor Recreation
To summarize, Recreation Majors have the following
degree requirements:
Common Core Courses..............................23 hours
Professional Activity Courses.................... 4 hours
Emphasis Area ..........................30-34 hours
57-61 hours'
Recreation Internship (Recommended for State Registration)..........................10 hours
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Recreation Major Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for AH Students A. Core Course Requirements Quarter
(23 credit hours) Hours
PER 130 Introduction to Health, Physical
Education, and Recreation ..................... 3
PER 206 First Aid............................... 2
PER 370 Social Recreation Leadership......... 3
PER 372 Community Recreation.................... 3
PER 374 Camp and Outdoor Recreation.......... 3
PER 375 Recreation for Special Groups
(Handicapped) ................................. 3
PER 470 Organization and Administration
of Recreation.................................. 3
PER 474 Recreation Program Construction.... 3
6. Professional Activity Courses (4 credit hours)
PER 150-185 series. A total of four credit hours from the 150-185 Professional Activity Courses, plus any additional course requirements in selected emphasis area, will be counted toward the major requirements. See sports and athletics emphasis area for course offerings and requirements.
C. Emphasis Areas (30-34 credit hours)
Students will be allowed to select one of eight areas of special emphasis courses designed to provide the student with a high degree of specialization in his chosen area of interest. These emphasis areas consist of 30-34 hours of course work offered by the Department of PER and other disciplines within the college.
D. Internship
PER 482-10 Internship in Recreation NOTE: Demonstrated proficiencies comparable to course content are acceptable in meeting requirements in the Recreation Major or Minor. Check with the Director of Professional Preparation in Recreation for details.
Emphasis Areas
A. Therapeutic Recreation and Treatment (30 credit hours)
PER 270 Introduction to Therapeutic
Recreation .................................... 3
URS101 Urban Institutions...................... 3
HSW 103 Mental Retardation ....................... 3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.............. 3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development .. 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology I............. 3
SOC 405 Urban Gerontology...................... 3
PER 200 Kinesiology ............................ 3
PER 304 Physiology of Human Activities....... 3
PER 400 Adaptive Physical Education........... 3
Or approved elective.
B. Aquatic and Water Front Activities
(33 credit hours) jjjjjj]
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I............... 5
MGT 251 Principles of Management ................ 3
PER 309 Analysis and Techniques of
Swimming...................................... 2
PER 310 Analysis and Techniques of Diving... 2
PER 354 Water Safety Instructor Certification.. 3
PER 373 Water Front, Marina, and Boating
Management ................................... 3
PER 377 Aquatic Facility Management........... 3
PER 471 Development and Maintenance Park
and Recreation Facilities..................... 3
PER 476 Federal Grant and Aid Programs........ 3
Approved Electives............................... 6
C. Fine Arts (32 hours)
ART 110 Basic Drawing Methods.................... 3
ART 120 Basic Design Methods..................... 3
ART 130 Methods in Crafts.................... 3
ART 211 Painting and Media Techniques........ 3
ART 241 Form and Sculpture................... 3
ART 331 Fabric Design: Hand Construction.... 3
ART 361 Ceramics I............................ 3
ART 391 Metalwork and Jewelry Making 1....... 3
IED 130 Materials Fabrication ................ 3
IED 350 Industrial Arts for the Elementary
School........................................ 3
PER 231 Recreation Arts & Crafts.............. 2
D. Urban Program Specialist (Total 33 credit hours)
AAS 330 The Black Community I............... 5
CHS 302 Analysis of the Chicano Community.. 3
PER 282 Recreation Laboratory Experience .. 2
PER 477 Recreation Programs in the
Urban Ghetto.............................. 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology I......... 3
SOC 213 Urban Sociology I ................. 3
SOC 311 Criminology I ...................... 3
SOC 405 Urban Gerontology................... 3
URS 200 Urban Studies....................... 5
Approved Elective........................... 3
E. Sports and Athletics (30 hours)
1. Professional Activity Courses (8 credit hours)
Quarter
Hours
PER 150 Swimming and Diving................... 1
PER 151 Fundamentals of Movement.............. 1
PER 152 Square and Folk Dance................. 1
PER 153 Social Dance.......................... 1
PER 154 Lifesaving............................ 1
PER 155 Volleyball ........................... 1
PER 156 Basketball (Men)...................... 1
PER 157 Wrestling ............................ 1
PER 158 Modern Dance Fundamentals............. 1
PER 159 Modern Dance Composition ............. 1
PER 160 Soccer-Speedball (Men)................ 1
PER 161 Tumbling ............................. 1
PER 162 Gymnastics (Men)...................... 1
PER 163 Track and Field....................... 1
PER 164 Tennis................................ 1
PER 165 Badminton ............................ 1
PER 166 Golf.................................. 1
PER 167 Softball (Men) ....................... 1
PER 168 Flag Football-Flickerball ............ 1
PER 169 Field Hockey.......................... 1
PER 170 Basketball (Women).................... 1
PER 171 Soccer-Speedball (Women) ............. 1
PER 172 Gymnastics (Women).................... 1
PER 173 Softball (Women) ..................... 1
PER 180 Archery............................... 1
PER 181 Fly, Bait, Spin Casting............... 1
PER 182 Ice Skating........................... 1
PER 183 Outing Activities..................... 1
PER 184 Physical Fitness and Society.......... 1
PER 185 Indoor Leisure Activities ............ 1
A total of 8 quarter hours from the above list will be counted toward the recreation major and emphasis area requirements.
2-A. Additional Required Courses for Men (8 credit hours)
PER 309 Analysis and Techniques of
Swimming................................. 2
PER 310 Analysis and Techniques of Diving.. . 2
PER 311 Analysis and Techniques of Football.. 2
PER 312 Analysis and Techniques of Basketball 2
PER 313 Analysis and Techniques of Track
and Field................................. 2
PER 314 Analysis and Techniques of Wrestling 2
PER315 Analysis and Techniques of Baseball. 2
PER316 Techniques of Officiating for Men I. . 2
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PER 317 Techniques of Officiating for Men II .. 2
PER 306 Prevention and Care of Sports
Injuries ...................................... 2
(Total of 8 quarter hours from the above list)
2-B. Additional Required Courses tor Women (8 credit hours)
PER 309 Analysis and Techniques of Swimming 2
PER 310 Analysis and Techniques of Diving... 2
PER 321 Methods of Teaching Team Sports
(Women) ..................................... 2
PER 322 Methods of Teaching Dance .............. 2
PER 323 Methods of Teaching Individual Sports 2
PER 324 Coaching Techniques for Women .... 2
PER 328 Officiating Techniques for Women.... 2
PER 306 Prevention and Care of Injuries....... 2
(Total of 8 quarter hours from the above list)
3. Required Theory Courses
PER 200 Anatomical Kinesiology.................. 3
PER 350 Games and Activities for the Young
Child ....................................... 3
PER 371 Administration of Intramural Sports
and Student Recreation ...................... 2
PER 400 Adaptive Physical Education............. 3
PER 472 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ......................................... 3
F. Performing and Cultural Arts Specialist
(34 credit hours) jjjjjj1'
MUS104 Fundamentals of Music.................. 3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theater............... 3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I................ 3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stage Crafts ......... 3
PER 281 Music and Drama in Recreation....... 2
MUS 306 Elementary School Music Methods... 3
MUS309 American Music....................... 3
PER 322 Methods of Teaching Dance............. 2
SPE 328 Stage Directing....................... 3
PER 380 Rhythms for the Young Child........... 2
SPE 427 Community Theater..................... 3
1. Professional Activity Courses Requirements
PER 152 Square and Folk Dance................. 1
PER 153 Social Dance.......................... 1
PER 158 Modern Dance Fundamentals........... 1
PER 159 Modern Dance Composition.............. 1
G. Recreation and Park Administration (34 credit hours)
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I............
ACC 220 Governmental Accounting...............
ACC 240 Cost Accounting.......................
ACC 410 Budgeting and Control.................
MGT 251 Principles of Management..............
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing..............
PER 376 Urban Park and Recreation Planning
(Seminar) .................................
PER 473 Park and Recreation Management. .. PER 471 Design and Maintenance of Recreation Facilities.........................
Quarter
Hours
5
3
3
4 3 3
5 5
3
H. Camping and Outdoor Recreation (31 credit hours)
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I......
ART 130 Methods in Crafts...............
MGT 251 Principles of Management........
PER 231 Recreation Arts and Crafts......
PER 373 Waterfront, Marina, and Boating
Management...........................
PER 471 Development and Maintenance of
Park and Recreation Facilities.......
PER 475 Camp Management.................
Quarter
Hours
5
3
3
2
3
3
3
PER 476 Federal Grant and Aid (Public and
Private) ...................................... 3
PER 478 Outdoor Education and the School
Camp Program.................................. 3
PER 481 Camp Counseling........................ 3
Recreation Minor
Recreation Minor (31 hours)
Professional Activities (PER 150-185 series)
Elect any 6 hours from the PER 150-185 series of Professional Activity Courses. Refer to sports and athletics emphasis area for complete course listings and department requirements.
Theory Courses
PER 130 Introduction to Health, Physical
Education and Recreation...........
PER 231 Recreation Arts and Crafts....
PER 281 Music and Drama in Recreation..
PER 370 Social Recreation Leadership ...
PER 372 Community Recreation..........
PER 374 Camp and Outdoor Recreation ..
PER 375 Recreation for Special Groups
(Handicapped) .....................
PER 470 Organization and Administration
for Recreation ....................
PER 474 Recreation Program Construction
PER 100-1 Physical Education Activities (1+1)
A wide variety of one credit activity classes is offered. These classes are designed for the interests of the general student body and are not specifically for physical education majors.
PER 130-3 Introduction to Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (3+0)
Designed to orient and acquaint students with the origin, development, scope and purposes of these fields.
PER 150-1 Swimming and Diving (1+1) For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice in basic swimming skills and diving techniques.
PER 151-1 Fundamentals of Movement
(1+D
For PER majors and minors. Theory and practice of fundamental movement patterns, basic motor skills and mechanics of movement. Selection, uses and purposes of motor ability, motor fitness and physical fitness tests.
PER 152-1 Square and Folk Dance
(1+D
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice in folk and square dance.
Quarter
Hours
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
Physical Education Majors will be allowed 3 hours of approved electives (See Recreation Advisor) to substitute for PER 130-3 Introduction to PER.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PER 153-1 Social Dance (1 +1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of traditional and current social dance techniques.
PER 154-1 Lifesaving (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic swimming survival and rescue skills necessary for the Senior Life Saving certification.
Prerequisite: PER 150.
PER 155-1 Volleyball (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of volleyball. Basic rules, strategies and skills necessary in power volleyball.
PER 156-1 Basketball (Men) (1 +1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic rules, strategies and skills necessary in mens basketball.
PER 157-1 Wrestling (1 + 1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic rules, strategies and skills necessary for wrestling.
PER 158-1 Modern Dance Fundamentals (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Introduction to and development of technique in modern dance.
PER 159-1 Modern Dance Composition
(1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Theory and practice of modern dance choreography. Prerequisite: PER 158.
PER 160-1 Soccer Speedball (Men)
(1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic skills, rules, and strategies necessary in the game of both soccer and speedball for men.
PER 161-1 Tumbling (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic tumbling skills.
PER 162-1 Gymnastics (Men) (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of exercises and spotting techniques on the side horse, parallel bars, trampoline, horizontal bars, and rings. Prerequisite: PER 161.
PER 163-1 Track and Field (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction is given in proper warm-up methods; tech-
niques of performing in various events; rules governing the various events; and general knowledge of the records and events in track and field.
PER 164-1 Tennis (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic rules, strategies and skills necessary in tennis.
PER 165-1 Badminton (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of the basic rules, strategies and skills necessary in badminton.
PER 166-1 Golf (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. This course is designed to develop the skills, knowledge and application of the rules and the etiquette of the game of golf.
PER 167-1 Softball (Men) (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic fundamentals, strategies, rules and skills of softball for men.
PER 168-1 Flag Football Flickerball
(1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of individual skills, rules and strategies in flag football and flickerball.
PER 169-1 Field Hockey (1+1)
For PER majors and minors. Theory and practice of skills, strategy and rules of the game of field hockey.
PER 170-1 Basketball (Women) (1+1) For PER majors and minors. Theory and practice of skills, strategy and rules of womens basketball.
PER 171-1 Soccer Speedball (Women) (1 +1)
For PER majors and minors. Theory and practice of skills, strategy and rules of soccer and speedball.
PER 172-1 Gymnastics (Women) (1+1) For PER majors and minors. Instruction and practice of basic skills and competitive routines on uneven parallel bars, balance beam, floor exercise and vaulting. Prerequisite: PER 161.
PER 173-1 Softball (Women) (1 +1)
For PER majors and minors. Theory and practice of skills, strategy and rules of womens softball.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PER 180-1 Archery (1+1)
The fundamental skills used in target shooting such as stringing the bow, selecting arrows, addressing target, pulling and anchoring the bow, releasing the arrow, and scoring. Types of competition will be covered.
PER 181-1 Fly, Bait, Spin Casting
(1 +1)
To develop exceptional skill and study in the art of fishing. Skills will be provided in bait casting, fly casting, spinning, fly tying, and the general skills.
PER 182-1 Ice Skating (1 +1)
A course to give the individual skills in skating for pleasure and also introduce him to figure skating.
PER 183-1 Outing Activities (1 +1) Designed to acquaint students with the origin of outing activities and the different areas of activity that are involved.
PER 184-1 Physical Fitness and Society (1 +1)
For professional students. Fundamental skills and knowledge of the philosophy of physical fitness in our society today. Hiking, bicycling, weight training and jogging will be covered.
PER 185-1 Indoor Leisure Activities
(1+D
For professional students. Fundamental skills in indoor activities. Bridge, pinochle, pocket billiards, table tennis, and bowling will be covered.
PER 200-3 Anatomical Kinesiology (3+0)
A study of the musculature of the human body. Analysis of joint movement and muscular involvement in various physical activities.
Prerequisite: BIO 231.
PER 206-2 First Aid (2+0)
Emergency treatment for various types of injuries. Course leads to a Red Cross certificate in the new Standard First Aid and Personal Safety.
PER 231-2 Recreation Arts and Crafts
(2+0)
Limitations and implications of art materials and programs oriented toward institutional, commercial and public recreation.
PER 270-3 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation (3+0)
Types of illnesses and disabilities, clinical or institutional settings, programming and services and role of therapeutic recreator.
PER 281-2 Music and Drama in Recreation (2+0)
Limitations and implications of music, drama and dance programs oriented toward institutional, commercial and public recreation programs.
PER 282-2 Recreation Lab Experience (0+4)
A guided experience which provides for the attainment of educational achievement within the practical environment of professional recreation agencies.
PER 302-3 Applied Kinesiology (3+0) Application of the principles of kinesiology, mechanics, and physics in the analysis of sports activities. Cinematography, electromyography and directed research in analysis of movement will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PER 200.
PER 304-3 Physiology of Human Activities (3+0)
Effect of exercise on the various systems and organs of the body.
Prerequisite: BIO 232.
PER 306-2 Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries (2 + 0)
Recognition, cause, prevention, treatment and various physical therapeutic procedures for sports injuries.
Prerequisite: PER 206, or current Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Card.
PER 309-2 Analysis and Techniques of Swimming (2+0)
Emphasis on stroke theory, long range practice scheduling, workout techniques, age and group programming, diving, timing and judging competition.
Prerequisites: PER 150, 154.
PER 310-2 Analysis and Techniques of Diving (2+0)
Diving theory, basic techniques of required and optional dives, mechanics of diving, practice and competitive meet scheduling, and competition judging.
Prerequisite: PER 150.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PER 311-2 Analysis and Techniques of Football (2+0)
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of football.
Prerequisite: PER 168.
PER 312-2 Analysis and Techniques of Basketball (2 + 0)
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of basketball.
Prerequisite: PER 156.
PER 313-2 Analysis and Techniques of Track and Field (2+0)
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of track and field. Prerequisite: PER 163.
PER 314-2 Analysis and Techniques of Wrestling (2+0)
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of wrestling.
Prerequisite: PER 157.
PER 315-2 Analysis and Techniques of Baseball (2+0)
Equipment and facilities, team organization and techniques of baseball.
Prerequisite: PER 167.
PER 316-2 Techniques of Officiating for Men (Football Baseball) (2 + 0)
The principles, philosophy, interpretation and techniques of officiating football and baseball.
Prerequisites: PER 167 and 168.
PER 317-2 Techniques of Officiating for Men (Wrestling Basketball) (2 + 0) The principles, philosophy, interpretation and techniques of officiating basketball and wrestling.
Prerequisites: PER 156 and 157.
PER 320-2 Methods of Teaching Team Sports for Men (2 + 0)
For professional students. The course includes the teaching techniques used in teaching the various team sports. It involves various organizational methods, philosophy and approaches.
Prerequisites: PER 155, 156, 160, 167 and 168. (3 out of 5 necessary.)
PER 321-2 Methods of Teaching Team Sports (Women) (2+0)
Methods of teaching team sports, skill analysis, and correction.
Prerequisites: PER 155, 169, 170, 171 and 173. (3 out of 5 necessary.)
PER 322-2 Methods of Teaching Dance
(2 + 0)
Techniques, composition, interpretation and organization of folk, square, social and modern dance.
Prerequisites: PER 152, 153, 158.
PER 323-2 Methods of Teaching Individual Sports (2+0)
Methods of teaching individual sports, skill analysis, and correction-directed teaching in individual sports.
Prerequisites: PER 150, 163, 164, 165 and 166. (3 out of 5 necessary.)
PER 324-2 Coaching Techniques for Women (2+0)
For PER majors and minors (women). Theory, practice and problems of coaching interscholastic sports for girls.
Prerequisite: PER 321, or permission of instructor.
PER 328-2 Officiating Techniques for Women (2+0)
Includes practice in theory and techniques of officiating womens basketball and volleyball. Practical experience and tests for DGWS ratings are emphasized.
Prerequisites: PER 155, 170, or permission of instructor.
PER 330-3 History and Principles (3+0)
An interpretative study and analysis of the philosophy, principles and practices of physical education through their historical development and in their present application and significance.
PER 335-3 Curriculum in Physical Education (3+0)
Factors in selecting activities, program variations, planning instructional units, program standards and evaluation. Considers both ideal and problematic situation. Prerequisite: PER 130.
PER 340-3 Methods and Techniques of Physical Education (3+0)
Instructional materials and procedures for conducting public school experience in physical education class activities. Includes lesson planning, record keeping and grading, motivation and discipline, and teaching techniques.
Prerequisites: PER 320 or 321, and junior standing.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
PER 345-3 Movement Education (3+0) Theories and methods of presenting movement education activities to young children. A survey of approaches and techniques appropriate to movement exploration.
PER 350-3 Games and Activities for the Young Child (3+0)
A course designed to familiarize students with skills, activities and games appropriate to the maturation level and motor development of the elementary school child. Methods of presentation, teaching organization and program development specific to the elementary area are covered.
PER 354-3 Water Safety Instructor Certification (3+0)
Methods of teaching water safety, skill analysis and correction. Course leads to Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Certificate.
Prerequisite: Current Red Cross Lifesaving Card.
PER 360-3 Safety Education (3+0) Provides the student with knowledge about accident prevention in many areas: home, school, physical and recreational activities, traffic and community.
PER 362-3 Health and Safety for the Young Child (3+0)
Designed to give the prospective elementary teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living and an understanding of the health services program.
PER 364-3 Secondary School Health and Safety (3 + 0)
Designed to give the prospective junior and senior high school teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living and an understanding of the health services program.
PER 366-3 Basic Driver Education (3+0)
Study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasizes methods, materials and resources for effective teaching, including discussion, demonstration and techniques basic to on-the-street instruction.
PER 368-3 Advanced Driver Education (3+0)
Advanced study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Empha-
sizes administration, instructional aids, evaluation and research.
Prerequisite: PER 366.
PER 370-3 Social Recreation Leadership (3+0)
Experience in the selection of materials, and leadership techniques in group work in social and recreational games, skits, singing, dance and craft activities for use in recreation programs.
PER 371-2 Administration of Intramural Sports and Recreation (2+0)
The field of intramural sports, recreational games, schedules, publicity, group organization, finance, eligibility, supervision and evaluation.
PER 372-3 Community Recreation
(3+0)
History and development, scope, programs and importance of community recreation. Covers the functions of various agencies with responsibilities in recreation.
PER 373-3 Water Front, Marina, and Boating Management (3+0)
Emphasis will be on development of marinas, boating and water front (outdoor) programs and facilities, nomenclature in boating, sanitation, marketing (hard and soft goods), use of federal and state inland water resources, use of existing agency programs; i.e., American Red Cross, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Power Squadron, Bureau of Reclamation, state agencies, etc.
PER 374-3 Camp and Outdoor Recreation (3+0)
History and trends, objectives, programs, and skills and techniques of activities common to camp and outdoor recreation.
PER 375-3 Recreation for Special Groups (Handicapped) (3+0)
Activities and programs adapted to the handicapped and aged.
PER 376-5 Urban Park and Recreation Planning (5+0)
(Seminar.) Recreation budgeting and finance, recreation supervisory practices, park management practices, recreation management practices and regional planning (interregional resources).
PER 377-3 Aquatic Facility Management (3+0)
Emphasis on staffing, supervision and management policies and procedures. Facility
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
scheduling including service programs to handicapped, urban care, federal assistance, school, etc.
PER 380-2 Rhythms for the Young Child (2 + 0)
Participation and instruction in the fundamental movements, forms and patterns of creative rhythms, folk dance and singing games for children.
PER 399-1 or 2 Field Experience (1+2) or (1+4)
Provides opportunities for students to gain practical experience assisting in the conduct of sports-type activities with community agencies, schools and the College. Credit is determined by the quality of the experience and hours of time required. Registration for this course requires prior approval of the instructor for the course and the cooperating agency. It cannot be repeated for credit in the same area of concentration.
PER 400-3 Adaptive Physical Education (3 + 0)
The field of adaptive and corrective physical education and its relationship to the regular curriculum. Covers suitable skills, activity, game and sports programs.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
PER 430-3 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3+0)
Use of tests and measurements in physical education. Evaluation of objectives, programs and student achievement through measurement techniques.
PER 435-3 Organization and Administration of Physical Education (3+0) Organization and administrative policies and procedures for conducting the required physical education and elective intramural and athletic programs. Includes personnel relationships, legal provisions, budgets, purchase and care of equipment, facilities, schedules and activities, public relations and related problems.
Prerequisite: PER 130.
PER 470-3 Organization and Administration of Recreation (3+0)
Problems in organizing and establishing public recreation and park services. Consideration of legislative provisions, controls, budgeting and finance, personnel, public relations, in-service training, records and reports, and administrative practices.
PER 471-3 Design and Maintenance of Recreation Facilities (3+0)
Emphasis on acquisition, development, construction and maintenance of recreational service centers, swimming pools, playfields, building design, park designs, playground and equipment, playing surfaces, turf, tree and shrub maintenance.
PER 472-3 Sociology of Athletics in American Society (3+0)
To examine and utilize basic sociological concepts and demonstrate their manifestations in areas of recreation and athletics.
PER 473-5 Park and Recreation Management (5+0)
An intensive study of the principles, practices and problems involved in managing public park systems. Includes history of parks, organization, planning, facility design, master plan, maintenance, finance, operational systems, personnel and policy procedures, legal liabilities and legislative practices.
PER 474-3 Recreation Program Construction (3+0)
Study of the procedures and planning involved in various types of recreation programs. Playgrounds, special groups, community recreation, and state and federal programs will be emphasized.
PER 475-3 Camp Management (3+0) Selected organizational and administrative aspects of organized camping, including site development, personnel, health, safety, sanitation, programs (public and private), finance and public relations. Emphasis will be placed on national and local standards.
PER 476-3 Federal Grant and Aid Programs (3+0)
Emphasis of study will be directed toward requirements for participating in Federal and State Grant-in-Aid Programs, with emphasis on recreation, education, conservation, environment, and beautification. (Health Education and Welfare, Land-Water Conservation, Housing and Urban Development, etc.)
PER 477-3 Recreation Programs in the Urban Ghetto (3 + 0)
Growth and development of recreation programs in the core areas of our urban cities. Emphasis will be directed toward facility, equipment, community resources and activities, agencies, finance, and personnel
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
practices. Class will include opportunities for students to observe existing programs in the core communities of Denver.
PER 478-3 Outdoor Education and the
School Camp Program (3 + 0) Development of outdoor education and school camping. Principles of programming, constructing and relating camp programs to other subjects.
PER 481-3 Camp Counseling (3+0) Orientation to youth work in camps; examination of the values and objectives of organized camps; understanding campers, camp programs and staff responsibilities.
PER 482-10 Internship in Recreation
(1+30)
A guided experience which provides for the maturation of educational achievement within the practical environment of professional recreation agencies.
READING
The Reading Department offers reading improvement courses for all students and a reading minor for elementary or secondary education majors.
The reading improvement courses emphasize development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills and rate. A well-equipped reading lab is available.
The Reading Laboratory is equipped with materials for use in improving comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills as well as with machines for improving reading speed. Any student may use the Laboratory. Students enrolled in the reading improvement courses work on areas identified by a diagnostic reading test administered in each class at the beginning of the quarter. Many colleges and universities have used the MSC Laboratory as a model in establishing their reading programs.
The reading minor is designed to produce well-trained classroom teachers. In the developmental sequence, students take course work in methods and techniques of teaching reading and supervise a reading group for a quarter.
In the remedial sequence, students learn to administer a complete reading diagnosis, write a comprehensive case report, develop materials for students with reading difficulties and work on a one-to-one basis with students with severe reading problems. Much of the work for both sequences is done in schools in the metropolitan area.
Reading Minor
Required Courses yHours
RDG 304 The Reading Process..................... 3
RDG 305 Methods and Techniques of
Teaching Reading: Primary.................... 3
RDG 306 Methods and Techniques of
Teaching Reading: Intermediate............... 3
RDG 308 Practicum in Reading.................... 3
RDG 403 Remedial Reading Theories ........... 3
RDG 405 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities---- 3
RDG 406 Development of Reading Materials... 3
RDG 408 Practicum in Remedial Reading........ 3
24
Electives A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in Reading.
Highly Recommended RDG 307 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Secondary (Required for Secondary Reading Minors)....... 3
RDG 100-3 Elements of Reading (3+2) This course is designed to help the student improve his basic skills by concentrating on vocabulary, spelling, comprehension, study skills, and some aspects of rate. The course combines group lessons and individualized prescription. Individual work in the Reading Laboratory is required in the course.
RDG 104-3 Improvement of Reading I
(3 + 2)
A course for the improvement of reading comprehension, speed, vocabulary and general performance in all college courses. Individual work in the Reading Laboratory is required in the course. Some sections are self-paced.
RDG 205-3 Improvement of Reading II
(3+2)
An advanced course for developing critical reading techniques, study skills in various subject areas, further vocabulary improvement, and flexible reading rates. Individual work in the Reading Laboratory is required.
Prerequisite: RDG 104, or permission of instructor.
RDG 304-3 The Reading Process (3+0)
An overview of components of the reading process, including reading acquisition theories, scope and sequence of skill development, reading materials past and present, and research and issues related to the teaching of reading at all levels.
RDG 305-3 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Primary (3 + 0) Approaches to the teaching of reading especially at the primary level (K-3), including decoding skills, the language experience
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
approach, and materials and ideas to aid beginning readers.
Prerequisite: RDG 304, or permission of instructor.
RDG 306-3 Methods and Techniques of
Teaching Reading: Intermediate (3+0) Approaches to the teaching of reading, emphasizing the intermediate grade levels (4-6), and including basal reading programs, comprehension skills, individualized reading, and use of the informal reading inventory.
Prerequisite: RDG 304, or permission of instructor.
RDG 307-3 Teaching Reading in the
Content Areas: Secondary (3+0) Approaches to the teaching of reading at the secondary (junior-senior high school) level, including developmental reading, content area reading, and remedial reading.
Special emphasis is given to preparing lessons in various subject areas to aid the poor reader at the secondary level.
RDG 308-3 Practicum in Reading (1 +4) Pre-student teaching experience in planning, preparing, and presenting lesson plans in developmental reading programs at any chosen grade level. This course is designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the practical application of theoretical concepts in the teaching of reading. Thirty clock hours of experience in the schools are required.
Prerequisite: RDG 305 and 306 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 403-3 Remedial Reading Theories
(3+0)
A study of the factors which may contribute to reading disability, the means by which these may be diagnosed or determined, the extent to which they are causally connected, and the corrective procedures to be followed in eliminating or mitigating these factors.
Prerequisite: RDG 308 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 405-3 Diagnosis of Reading
Disabilities (3+0)
Practice in administration of individual diagnostic reading inventories and in writing recommendatons for remediation of reading difficulties.
Prerequisite: RDG 403 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 406-3 Development of Reading Materials (3+0)
Analysis and development of reading materials for use in remedial and corrective reading programs.
Prerequisite: RDG 405 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 408-3 to 6 Practicum in Remedial Reading (1 +4-8)
Practice in diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties, including individual tutoring experience. A minimum of thirty clock hours of practicum in the schools are required.
Prerequisite: RDG 406, or permission of instructor.
67


l+i *


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The School of Engineering Technology provides technical education to prepare individuals for employment or to operate their own businesses in various technological fields. Emphasis is placed on giving students an understanding of the principles of mathematics and science and instruction in applying the principles as owners, supervisors, technicians, or teachers in a constantly expanding industrial economy. Courses in the humanities and social sciences are included to broaden the individuals general education.
The School offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES*
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment at the end of two years.
Technology courses carry credit and provide instruction and training of a different nature and at a considerably higher level than that attained by craftsmen, mechanics and other skilled workers. The courses are not pre-engineering curricula planned for continuation of study for a baccalaureate engineering degree, and some of them may not be accepted by a four-year engineering college or university.
Candidates for the Associate in Applied Sciences degree must meet the general requirements of the College and specified Basic Studies requirements. They must also choose one of the fields of specialization listed below.
Civil Engineering Technology Drafting Engineering Technology Electronics Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology Quality Assurance Technology
Basic Studies
All students majoring in technology, whose objective is an Associate in Applied Science degree must satisfy the following Basic Studies requirements:
Required Courses *jjl*[^r
English ............................... 7-8
ENG 101-103 Freshman Composition or
ENG 255 Introduction to Technical Writing or
BEC 200 Business Communications
Physics ........................................ 5
Mathematics..................................... 5
Humanities ..................................... 3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences ............. 3
23-24
Metropolitan State College is in the process of transferring some of these associate degree programs to the Community College of Denver. Beginning freshmen should consult with a technology advisor.
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CORE COURSES
In addition to the Basic Studies previously listed, the following core courses are required for all Associate Degree students majoring in Engineering Technology. It is recommended that all technology students see a technology advisor within his field of emphasis before registering for course work.
Ouarter
Hours
CEN 110 Introduction to Civil Technology...... 3
CEN 120 Technical Graphics ..................... 4
CEN 215 Mechanics l-Statics..................... 4
CEN 216 Mechanics II Dynamics................. 3
EET 100 Introduction to Electricity and
Electronics.................................. 3
ENT 100 The Technology Profession............... 1
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology.................................... 3
21
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Civil Engineering Technology graduates assist engineers in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroads, bridges, viaducts, dams and other structures. In the planning for a construction project, they may help in estimating costs and preparing specifications for materials, or may particioate in surveying, drafting and designing work. When the project gets under way, they may assist the contractor or superintendent in scheduling construction activities and in inspecting the work for conformance with specifications.
Required Courses Hu,r,r
CEN 111 Civil Technology I..................... 4
CEN 121 Technical Drawing I.................... 3
CEN 122 Technical Drawing II .................. 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ................. 4
CEN 210 Structural Drawing..................... 3
CEN 211 Computing and Estimating .............. 3
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing.................... 3
CEN 213 Elementary Surveying .................. 5
CEN 214 Construction Project .................. 5
CEN 220 Descriptive Graphics................... 3
CEN 310 Construction Law....................... 3
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN311 Construction Methods .................. 3
In addition, 4 quarter hours of approved electives, 21 hours of Engineering Technology core courses and 23 quarter hours of Basic Studies courses are required.
DRAFTING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Draftsmen prepare detailed drawings from sketches, notes, specifications and technical data furnished by engineers or architects. The preparation of these drawings involves mathematical computations, catalog research for suitable parts and materials, the use of engineering and technical handbooks and a broad knowledge of industrial processes and materials. The capable draftsman advances from junior draftsman to positions of intermediate draftsman, senior draftsman, design draftsman and drafting group leader. Draftsmen are employed in architectural engineering offices, manufacturing plants, research and development centers, utility companies and many other industrial complexes.
Required Courses 'Jjjjjjj1
CEN121 Technical Drawing I.................... 3
CEN 122 Technical Drawing II ................. 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ................ 4
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing................... 3
CEN 220 Descriptive Graphics.................. 3
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing.......... 3
CEN 321 Production Illustration............... 3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes I............. 3
MET 206 Basic Machine Design.................. 3
MET 240 Fundamentals of Welding .............. 3
MET 307 Mechanical Design..................... 3
In addition, a minimum of 12 quarter hours of approved electives, 21 quarter hours of Engineering Technology core courses and 23 quarter hours of Basic Studies courses are required.
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
EET102 Electrical Circuits II .................... 5
EET 103 Electrical Circuits III .................. 5
EET 221 Electronics I............................. 5
EET 222 Electronics II ........................... 5
EET 223 Electronics III .......................... 5
EET 202 Electronic Drafting ...................... 2
In addition, 14 quarter hours of approved electives, 23 quarter hours of Basic Studies, and 21 quarter hours of Engineering Technology core courses are required.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Sciences The mechanical engineering technician, as the liaison man between the engineer and the skilled worker, translates creative ideas into new machines, products, structures, or processes. As a connecting link, he must have knowledge of the world of both the engineer and the skilled worker. He must be familiar with the hand and machine tools of the skilled worker and the basic scientific principles and tools of the engineer. He may use drafting instruments, gauges, control instruments, testing equipment, measuring instruments, mathematics, and science in his work. He may be called upon to plan and organize material, analyze data, exercise good judgment, and write accurate technical reports.
Required Courses CEN 121 Technical Drawing I.................. 3
CEN 122 Technical Drawing II ................ 3
CEN 220 Descriptive Graphics.................. 3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes I........... 3
MET 102 Manufacturing Processes II ......... 3
MET 200 Industrial Hydraulics ................ 3
MET 208 Basic Tool Design ................... 4
MET 210 Principles of Numerical Control...... 4
MET 220 Principles of Metallurgy.............. 3
MET 240 Fundamentals of Welding............... 3
In addition, 14 quarter hours of approved electives, 23 quarter hours of Basic Studies and 21 quarter hours of Engineering Technology core courses are required.
Associate in Applied Science
The electronic technician acts as a liaison between the electronic engineer and the skilled worker. He possesses some of the know why of an engineer and some of the know how of the craftsman. The work consists of building and testing prototype circuits and equipment, modifying and maintaining electronic apparatus, and following schematic drawings, sketches, and verbal instructions. These functions are performed in a wide range of areas including radar, microwave, loran, sonar, missiles, satellites, space flights, computers, and communications.
Required Courses <|{l0aur£r
EET 101 Electrical Circuits I............... 5
QUALITY ASSURANCE TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Sciences The task of assuring high quality and reliability of goods and services for consumers, industry and government has reached the status of a professional discipline. Control concepts and techniques have been devised and proven effective during the past twenty years and must continue to improve. The responsibility, authority and complexity of the quality assurance staff and its work is increasing constantly and the demands upon the professional personnel have, in turn, increased. Every progressive industrial organization has a staff of quality control and reliability personnel. There are excellent opportunities for employment within
70


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
the field.
The quality assurance program is designed to provide the training required to meet industry and government needs for competent persons in this field. Individuals with an Associate Degree can find employment as quality inspectors, technicians, analysts, and engineering assistants. Further education and experience for personnel already working in quality assurance could lead to more responsible positions in management.
Required Courses
CEN 121 Technical Drawing I.................. 3
CEN 122 Technical Drawing II ................ 3
MET 210 Principles of Numerical Control... 4
MET 220 Principles of Metallurgy............. 3
QAT 100 Introduction to Quality Assurance.... 4
QAT 101 Principles of Quality Assurance..... 4
QAT 201 Theory and Application of Quality
Assurance .................................. 4
QAT 203 Advanced Quality Assurance ......... 4
QAT 205 Nondestructive Testing .............. 2
QAT 206 Metrology............................ 2
QAT 207 Electronic Quality Assurance ........ 2
QAT 208 Procurement Quality Assurance..... 3
In addition, 8 quarter hours of approved electives, 23 quarter hours of Basic Studies and 21 quarter hours of Engineering Technology core courses are required.
Studies and Electives, are designed to prepare a student for entry into industry as a technician. The second two years also contain a balance of Basic Studies and Electives, as well as specialization in depth and cross training in related technical and business programs.
In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree, the student must conform to the Colleges general specifications for the Bachelors Degree including 60 hours of upper division courses.
The first two years of the program taken at Metropolitan State College or at a com-munity/junior college should include the following:
Basic Studies
English 8, Mathematics 5, Physics 5, Humanities 3, Social or Behavioral Science 3.. 24
Required Technical Courses and Electives Courses listed under Associate in Applied Sciences degree in the appropriate engineering technology, or equivalent, must be taken............................ 67
The second two years of the program have the following course requirements:
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The engineering technologist program provides students with the opportunity to receive a Bachelor of Science degree with majors in civil, electronics, mechanical, meteorology, or surveying. In addition, the student may combine business with technology and receive a Bachelor of Science degree in technical management or industrial marketing.
These programs provide students with greater breadth and depth than is possible in the two-year Associate Degree programs. Upper division courses are available to those students who, after earning an Associate Degree desire to obtain a baccalaureate degree. The four-year trained technologist fills the gap created by increased emphasis upon the development of scientifically oriented engineers. New developments in the more efficient utilization of engineering manpower have created a large demand for the technologist. The four-year baccalaureate programs are designed to prepare students for greater technical and managerial responsibilities. Graduates become vital members on technical engineering application teams.
The following four-year Engineering Technology programs are built upon the concept of two plus two. The first two years, containing a balance of specialization, Basic
Basic Studies <{^r
Humanities approved courses .............. 12
Science and/or Mathematics the 15 quarter-hour requirement is normally completed during the first two years.
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences........... 12
Minor....................................... 27
Electives.................................... 9
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses 9,u
CEN 111 Civil Technology I................... 4
CEN 121 Technical Drawing I.................. 3
CEN 122 Technical Drawing II ................ 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ............... 4
CEN 210 Structural Drawing................... 3
CEN 211 Computing and Estimating ............ 3
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing.................. 3
CEN 213 Elementary Surveying................. 5
CEN 214 Construction Project ................ 5
CEN 217 Mechanics III ....................... 4
CEN 220 Descriptive Graphics................. 3
CEN 310 Construction Law..................... 3
CEN 311 Construction Methods................. 3
CEN 317 Mechanics IV ........................ 4
CEN 410 Timber Technology.................... 3
CEN 411 Steel Technology .................... 3
CEN 412 Concrete Technology.................. 3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics ..................... 4
ENT 410 Technology Seminar................... 2
MTH 101 College Algebra and Trigonometry I.. 4
MTH111 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I.... 5
PHY 123 College Physics III ................. 5
In addition, 16 quarter hours of approved electives, 21 quarter hours of Engineering Technology core courses, 53 quarter hours of Basic Studies and 27 quarter hours of a minor are required.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Minor
Required Courses
CEN122 Technical Drawing II .... CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ...
CEN 210 Structural Drawing.........
CEN 211 Computing and Estimating CEN 213 Elementary Surveying
CEN 215 Mechanics I................
CEN 216 Mechanics II ..............
CEN 220 Descriptive Graphics-------
CEN 310 Construction Law ..........
CEN 314 Construction Methods ...
Quarter
Hours
3
4 3
3
5
4 3 3 3 3
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
Quarter
Hours
EET 101 Electrical Circuits I..................... 5
EET 102 Electrical Circuits II .................. 5
EET 103 Electrical Circuits III................... 5
EET 120 Intro, to Elec. Ckts. and Lab. Inst.... 2
EET 221 Electronics I............................. 5
EET 222 Electronics II............................ 5
EET 223 Electronics III .......................... 5
EET 321 Advanced Electrical Circuits I...... 5
EET 322 Advanced Electrical Circuits II ........ 5
EET 410 Electrical/Electronics Technology
Seminar ....................................... 2
MTH111 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I.... 5
MTH112 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II ... 5
PHY 123 College Physics III....................... 5
In addition, a minimum of 9 quarter hours of approved upper division Electronics Engineering Technology courses are required.
Minor
Required Courses 'ttoJr'r
EET 120 Intro, to Elect. Ckts. and Lab Inst. ... 2
EET 251 Principles of Electricity and
Magnetism I..................................... 5
EET 252 Principles of Electricity and
Magnetism II ................................... 5
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and
Electronic Circuits I .......................... 5
EET 302 Principles of Electronics and
Electronic Circuits II.......................... 5
In addition, a minimum of 12 quarter hours in upper division Electronics Technology courses are required.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes I.............
MET 102 Manufacturing Processes II ...........
MET 200 Industrial Hydraulics ................
MET 208 Basic Tool Design ....................
MET 210 Principles of Numerical Control.......
MET 220 Principles of Metallurgy .............
MET 240 Fundamentals of Welding ..............
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis................
MET 304 Work Simplification and Layout........
MET 306 Fluid Power and Control Systems....
MET 307 Mechanical Design.....................
MET 400 Project Engineering...................
MET 404 Plant Layout .........................
4-
3
4 3 3 3 3 3
In addition, 14 quarter hours of approved electives, 11 quarter hours of approved related technical electives, 14 quarter hours of upper division credits in Mechanical Engineering Technology, 21 quarter hours of Engineering Technology core courses, 55 quarter hours of Basic Studies and 27 quarter hours of minor are required. Student should consult with a department advisor for an option in mechanical, power, manufacturing, or production.
Minor
Required Courses
Quarter
Hours
CEN 121 Technical Drawing I ................. 3
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ................................ 4
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes I............ 3
MET 102 Manufacturing Processes II .......... 3
MET 200 Industrial Hydraulics ............... 3
MET 210 Principles of Numerical Control.... 4
MET 240 Fundamentals of Welding ............. 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis............... 4
MET 400 Project Engineering.................. 3
QAT 100 Introduction to Quality Assurance.... 4
METEOROLOGY TECHNOLOGY
Major for Bachelor of Science
The meteorology technologist represents the liaison between meteorological information and the public. He collects, analyzes and subsequently, translates the information for public use. The public includes such varied groups as large general contractors, public and private utilities, heavy manufacturing, chemical processing plants, agriculture, transportation (including aviation services), government (such as the military and federal agencies) and research organizations.
The meteorology technologist must be familiar with fundamental meteorological theory and analysis practices as well as instrumentation, data processing and communications concepts. The program is designed to provide the student with the concepts of meteorology while emphasizing one or two chosen areas of public need.
Required Courses SjotTr*'
MTH 121 Descriptive Statistics............ 4
MTH 111 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I.... 5
MTH 112 Calculus & Analytical Geometry II ... 5
EET 100 Introduction to Electricity &
Electronics................................. 3
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing.... 4
CEN 140 Basic Meteorology................. 3
CEN 241 Meteorological Instrumentation..... 4
CEN 340 Synoptic Meteorology ................ 3
CEN 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory ... 4
CEN 343 Introduction to Theoretical
Meteorology................................. 4
CEN 344 Cloud Physics..................... 3
CEN 345 Meteorological Kinematics &
Dynamics ................................... 3
CEN 440 Applied Meteorology ................. 4
CEN 441 Meteorological Numerican Products.. 3
CEN 442 Industrial Meteorology............ 3
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Electives
A minimum of five additional hours of work from the
following selection of courses:
CEN 240 Meteorology and the Urban
Environment.................................. 3
CEN 242 The Use of Radar in Meteorology.... 3
CEN 299 Basic Field Experience ............ 4-12
CEN 443 Meteorology and Media................ 3
CEN 499 Advanced Field Experience ......... 4-12
GEG 400 Remote Sensing of the Environment.. 3
GEG410 Systematic Climatology-.............. 3
Minor
Required Courses CEN 140 Basic Meteorology ...................... 3
CEN 340 Synoptic Meteorology ................... 3
CEN 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory.... 4
CEN 343 Introduction to Theoretical
Meteorology.................................. 4
CEN 440 Applied Meteorology..................... 4
MTH111 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I.... 5
MTH 112 Calculus & Analytical Geometry II ... 5
A minimum of four additional hours of work from a choice of meteorology electives is required in Meteorology Technology.
Industrial Marketing Program
Bachelor of Science
The industrial marketing program links sales and manufacturing. Specialists are trained to become familiar with designing, manufacturing, branding, packaging, transporting, labeling, pricing, selling and servicing products. In addition, the curriculum develops an awareness of the policies and practices of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and users of technical goods. Graduates may expect to find positions in retail and wholesale industrial sales positions, in the areas of advertising and promotion, and in the field of marketing planning. Administration of the program is handled jointly through the Departments of Electronics Technology and Marketing.
Basic Studies Quarter
Hours
ECO 101 Principles of Economics I.......... 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics II ........ 3
ENG 101-103 Freshman Composition ............. 8
ENG 255 Introduction to Technical Writing.... 3
MTH 106 Applied Technical Mathematics...... 5
PSY 201 General Psychology ................... 3
PSY 345 Industrial Psychology................. 3
SPE101 Public Speaking ....................... 3
An additional 3 quarter hours in social or behavioral science, 3 quarter hours in humanities, 5 quarter hours in chemistry, 5 quarter hours in physics, and 6 quarter
hours from the following list must be taken:
ENG 256 Introduction to Communication
Theories ................................. 3
RDG104 Improvement of Reading............ 3
SPE 201 Business and Professional Speaking 3
SPE 210 Argumentation and Debate ......... 3
SPE 211 Discussion Methods................ 3
SPE 311 Conference Leadership ............ 3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication..... 3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.......... 3
53
Technology Course Studies
CEN 110 Technical Graphics ..................
CEN 215 Mechanics I..........................
ENT 218 Production Reporting.................
ENT 404 Production Control...................
EET 251 Principles of Electricity and
Magnetism I...............................
EET 252 Principles of Electricity and
Magnetism II .............................
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and
Electronics Circuits I ...................
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ...............................
MET 200 Industrial Hydraulics ...............
MET 210 Principles of Numerical Control......
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis...............
QAT 100 Introduction to Quality Assurance.. .. QAT 208 Procuremen) Quality Assurance........
Quarter
Hours
4
4
3
3
5 5 5
3
3
4 4 4
_3
"50
Business Core
Business Course Studies
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I........... 5
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II.......... 5
BEC 301 Business Report Writing ............. 3
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing.... 4
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics .... 3
CMS 332 Decision Theory...................... 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance ................ 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ...................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management ............ 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing.............. 5
MKT 216 Salesmanship ........................ 3
MKT 321 Purchasing .......................... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior.................... 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management... 4
50
An additional 27 quarter hours selected in consultation with and approved by the Schools of Business or Technology must be taken. It is the students responsibility to insure his program includes at least 60 hours of upper division credit.
Technical Management
Bachelor of Science
Technical management is an interdisciplinary program training students to become technically proficient in order to handle their own jobs effectively and to communicate with and manage technical specialists. Because of the skills, insight, knowledge and maturity of judgment demanded in the field, the program is on a high level and the 200-quarter-hour minimum requirement exceeds the traditional 180 hours that most programs demand. Graduates are needed for positions in value engineering, logistics engineering, quality control, maintenance engineering, systems analysis or management, operations research and field engineering. This program has been coordinated with several industrial management representatives and is administered jointly through the Schools of Business and Engineering Technology.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required Courses ENG 101-103 Freshman Composition ................. 8
SPE101 Public Speaking ........................... 3
ENG 255 Introduction to Technical Writing.... 3
ECO 101 Principles of Economics I............. 3
ECO 102 Principles of Economics II .......... 3
ECO 103 Principles of Economics III.......... 3
MTH111 Calculus and Analytical
Geometry I..................................... 5
MTH 112 Calculus and Analytical Geometry II ................................... 5
The following additional quarter hours rtiust be taken:
Humanities ...................................... 3
Soc/Behavioral Science .......................... 3
Physics or Chemistry............................. 5
Approved upper division electives............... 15
Free Electives ................................. 17
Six quarter hours from the following list:
RDG104 Improvement of Reading.............. 3
ENG 256 Introduction to Communication
Theories .................................. 3
SPE 201 Business and Professional Speaking.. 3
SPE210 Argumentation and Debate ............ 3
SPE 211 Discussion Methods.................. 3
SPE 311 Conference Leadership .............. 3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication ........ 3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion............ 3
Technology Course Studies
CEN 110 Introduction to Civil Technology......
CEN 120 Technical Graphics ...................
CEN 215 Mechanics I...........................
CEN 216 Mechanics II .........................
ENT 218 Production Reporting..................
ENT 400 Motion and Time Study ................
ENT 401 Advanced Engineering Technology...
ENT 404 Production Control....................
ENT 410 Technology Seminar....................
EET 120 Introduction to Electronic Circuits
and Laboratory Instruments.................
EET 251 Principles of Electricity and
Magnetism I................................
EET 252 Principles of Electricity and
Magnetism II ..............................
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and
Electronics Circuits I.....................
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ................................
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis................
MET 304 Work Simplification and Layout........
MET 400 Project Engineering...................
MET 404 Plant Layout .........................
Quarter
Hours
3
4
4
3
3
3
5 3 2
2
5
5
5
3
4
3
3
_3
63
Business Core
Business Course Studies
Quarter
Hours
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I............ 5
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II .......... 5
BEC 301 Business Report Writing ................ 3
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing......... 4
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics .... 3
CMS 332 Decision Theory......................... 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance................... 3
MGT 221 Business Law I.......................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management ............. 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing............... 5
37
An additional 18 quarter hours of Business courses must be taken including at least 9 hours from the following list:
ACC 240 Cost Accounting....................... 3
ACC 325 Analysis of Financial Statements. 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design.............................. 3
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research. 3
CMS 335 Intro, to Mgmt. Science............. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management................ 3
MGT 355 Operations Management............... 3
MGT 462 Wage and Salary Administration... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies................... 3
MKT 410 Retail Management .................. 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management .. 3
55
Surveying
The program for the Bachelor of Science degree with surveying major and mathematics minor is designed to provide the basic theoretical training with practical applications necessary for a career as a professional surveyor.
Following completion of the required professional experience the individual will be qualified to take the State Board Examination for Registered Land Surveyor. For details on surveying major or minor, contact the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology.
Drafting Engineering Technology Minor
Required Courses 9HJJJ
CEN 121 Technical Drawing I.................... 3
CEN 122 Technical Drawing II .................. 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ................. 4
CEN 220 Descriptive Graphics .................. 3
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing.......... 3
CEN 321 Production Illustration................ 3
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology..................................... 3
MET 206 Elements of Machine Design............. 3
In addition, 8 quarter hours of approved electives are required.
Quality Assurance Technology Minor
Required Courses
CEN 121 Technical Drawing I ................. 3
EET 100 Introduction to Electricity and
Electronics.................................. 3
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology .................................. 3
or
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes I........... 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis............... 4
MET 404 Plant Layout ........................ 3
QAT 100 Introduction to Quality Assurance.... 4
QAT102 Principles of Quality Assurance I------ 4
QAT 201 Theory and Application of Quality
Assurance.................................... 4
QAT 205 Nondestructive Testing .............. 2
QAT 206 Metrology............................ 2
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN 110-3 Introduction to Civil Technology (3+0)
An introduction to the profession of engineering technology with emphasis on the history, role, work and challenge to civil
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
technologists. Education, study habits, communications and problem solving are stressed.
CEN 111-4 Civil Technology I (4+0) Continuation of CET 100 with emphasis on the tools of engineering problem solving, the problem, the influencing factors, the analysis and the creative design process itself.
Prerequisite: CEN 110, or permission of instructor.
CEN 120-4 Technical Graphics (3+2) An introductory course in technical drawing. Covers the use of instruments, lettering, geometric construction, sketching and orthographies. Basic knowledge is acquired in the preparation and reading of technical drawings.
CEN 121-3 Technical Drawing I (2 + 2) Pictorial and orthographic sketching, multiview orthographic projections, sectional views, single auxiliary views and basic dimensioning.
Prerequisite: CEN 120.
CEN 122-3 Technical Drawing II (2 + 2) Continuation of DET 101 to include: advanced study in orthographic projection, dimensioning, auxiliary views, and sectioning. Prerequisite: CEN 121.
CEN 123-4 Architectural Drawing (2+4)
Introduction to architectural working drawings. Development of plans, sections, elevations and details.
Prerequisite: CEN 122, or equivalent.
CEN/AES 140-3 Basic Meteorology (3+0)
Designed to explain the basic concepts of meteorology phenomena such as high and low pressure areas, air masses, fronts and precipitation processes. Includes explanations of how to read and use the various reports and forecasts published by the National Weather Service.
CEN 210-3 Structural Drawing (2 + 2) Study and preparation of necessary drawings of structural members and connections including engineering layout and detail drawing.
Prerequisite: CEN 122.
CEN 211-3 Computing and Estimating (3+0)
Problems of approximate and exact meth-
ods of taking off quantities from plans; methods of arriving at lump sum and unit prices, and estimating total costs from quantities.
Prerequisite: CEN 210.
CEN 212-3 Topographic Drawing (1+3) A study of map symbols, types of contours, sources for map data and methods used in map plotting. Students prepare plats and topographic maps.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN 213-5 Elementary Surveying (3+6)
Instruction in use of the engineers tape, transit, and level and methods of recording field data in note form. Also included is traverse layout and computing.
Prerequisite: MTH 102, or permission of instructor.
CEN 214-5 Construction Project (variable)
A comprehensive problem in a selected field of construction is developed in consultation with instructor. Working drawings, design details, and specifications are required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN 215-4 Mechanics IStatics (4+0) Elementary principles of engineering statics. Prerequisite: MTH 102.
CEN 216-3 Mechanics IIDynamics (3+0)
Covers dynamics. Includes kinematics, force mass acceleration, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and vibrations. Prerequisites: MTH 102 and CEN 215.
CEN 217-4 Mechanics III (4+0)
Basic theory of strength of materials. Prerequisite: CEN 215.
CEN 220-3 Descriptive Graphics (2 + 2) A graphic study of the relative position of points, lines and planes in space. Prerequisite: CEN 122.
CEN 240-3 Meteorology and the Urban Environment (3+0)
Introductory course designed to examine the social, economic and ecological effects of weather upon the urban environment. Emphasis is upon air pollution problems in the Denver area. Other topics considered are heavy precipitation storms and strong winds.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN 241-4 Meteorological Instrumentation (3+2)
Designed to acquaint the student with the various types and nature of meteorological instrumentation used in both operations and research field work. Instruments are examined in class and in the field with emphasis upon calibration and maintenance. Types of instruments include barographs, thermographs and wind recorders.
Prerequisites: CEN 140 and EET 100.
CEN 242-3 The Use of Radar in Meteorology (3+0)
This course examines the uses of radar in meteorological observation, analysis and forecasting. The various types of radars and analysis techniques used with each radar is discussed in detail. Emphasis is also given to the correlation of radar information with other meteorological data.
Prerequisites: CEN 241, or permission of instructor.
CEN 310-3 Construction Law (3 + 0)
A study of contract documents, proposals, award procedures, bonding, liens, arbitration, litigation and the role of the expert witness.
Prerequisite: CEN 210.
CEN 311-3 Construction Methods (3+0)
Study of the various methods of construction of steel, timber, and concrete structures in bridges, highways, buildings, footings, retaining walls, tanks and towers. Prerequisite: CEN 210.
CEN 317-4 Mechanics IV (4+0)
Basic structural analysis.
Prerequisite: CEN 217.
CEN 320-3 Advanced Technical Drawing (2+2)
Students develop advanced skills in technical drawing within the specialization of their choice.
Prerequisite: CEN 220.
CEN 321-3 Production Illustration
(2 + 2)
Pictorial drawing with emphasis on application to industrial production work. Prerequisite: CEN 320.
CEN/AES 340-3 Synoptic Meteorology (3+0)
An advanced course in meteorological
phenomena, built on the concepts of basic meteorology such as temperature, pressure areas, moisture, stability, air masses and fronts, thunderstorms, icing and fog. Includes discussions on pollution, weather modification and satellite meteorology. The student learns to analyze and interpret National Weather Service maps and charts. Prerequisites: CEN 140 and MTH 101.
CEN 341-4 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory (2+4)
To familiarize the student with map analysis and forecasting techniques, weather charts are analyzed on a daily basis and students participate in map briefing and forecasting for selected areas.
Prerequisites: CEN 140 and permission of instructor.
CEN/AES 343-4 Introduction to Theoretical Meteorology (4+0) Designed to present the basic laws and concepts related to the behavior of the atmosphere. The relationship between meteorology and thermodynamics, radiation and hydrodynamics are examined. Atmospheric phenomena and meteorological practice will be explained in terms of the theory developed.
Prerequisites: CEN 340 and MTH 112.
CEN 344-3 Cloud Physics (3+0)
To investigate the formation and constitution of clouds and precipitation. The various physical processes concerning droplet and ice crystal growth are discussed in detail. Modification, both natural and man-made, of clouds is also examined.
Prerequisite: CEN 343.
CEN 345-3 Meteorological Kinematics and Dynamics (3+0)
This course is intended to describe and examine the energy relationships in the atmosphere. Included as topics are: radiation balance in the atmosphere, the equations of motion, divergence and vorticity, and atmospheric long waves.
Prerequisite: CEN 343.
CEN 350-2 Spherical Trigonometry (2+0)
The course includes spherical geometry, relationships between spheres and planes, and the development of formulas for the solution of spherical triangles. Includes applied astronomy for surveying.
Prerequisites: MTH 101 and 102.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN 351-4 Curves and Earthwork (4+0)
The course includes the development of the mathematical formula for circular highway curves. Earthwork volumes are computed by the use of prismoidal formulas. The reductions of cross-section data to the computation of volumes is stressed; also, the construction of mass and haul diagrams. Prequisites: MTH 101, 102, CEN 213.
CEN 352-3 Route Surveying (2+4) Theory and methods for selecting and surveying routes for highways, railways, canals, transmission lines, etc.
Prerequisite: CEN 351.
CEN 410-3 Timber Technology (3 + 0) Timber uses in modern day construction applications are studied. Physical and mechanical propertiesbeams, girders, trusses, decking. Allowable stresses and proper fastenings are examined. Prerequisite: CEN 317.
CEN 411-3 Steel Technology (3 + 0) Analysis and application of steel structures including loading stresses in members, selection and application of connectors. Emphasis on practical solutions to problems and influences on design. Field trips and problem solving.
Prerequisite: CEN 317.
CEN 412-3 Concrete Technology (3+0) Analysis and application of concrete structures including columns, beams, slabs, walls and other types.
Prerequisite: CEN 411.
CEN 413-4 Soils Mechanics (2 + 6)
Soil properties are studied and soil characteristics introduced; methods of sampling and analysis are treated. Variations in behavior under different loading conditions are analyzed.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN/AES 440-4 Applied Meteorology (4 + 0)
Designed for teaching students to apply knowledge gained in synoptic meteorology. Develops such topics as surface and upper-air analysis, adiabatic diagrams and cross-section analysis. This course will provide applications of meteorological patterns for planning. Special topics include weather and energy, industrial applications, and mountain weather.
Prerequisites: CEN 340 and 341 or permission of instructor.
CEN 441-3 Meteorological Numerical Products (2+2)
To examine the various numerical products that have been developed and are utilized on an operational basis. Included in discussions are barotropic and baroclinic models, thermodynamic models, diffusion modeling, data processing techniques and display and presentation methods. Prerequisites: CEN 345.
CEN 442-3 Industrial Meteorology
(2+2)
The purpose of this course is to examine the problems associated with the relationship between the atmosphere and various types of industry, industrial site locations, pollution sources and controls. Included are discussions of the composition and behavior of pollution sources and controls. Prerequisites: CEN 340 and CEN 344.
CEN 443-3 Meteorology and Media
(0+6)
To acquaint the student with the presentation of analysis and forecast products. Students develop presentations for daily briefings, newspaper reports, radio and television presentations. Included in discussions are the various types of public needs and problems associated with each type of media presentation.
CEN 450-5 Cadastral Surveying (3 + 8) The modern name of surveys of boundaries for lands is cadastral surveying. This course includes the history of land surveys in the United States, field investigations of land monuments, and writing a description of properties. Practice will be given in record searching and learning to interpret field notes as recorded in the public land offices. Prerequisites: CEN 213 and CEN 350.
CEN 451-5 Advanced Surveying (3 + 8) Triangulation and control surveys; electronic distance measuring techniques; field astronomy; construction surveys and instrument adjustments.
Prerequisites: CEN 213 and 350.
CEN 452-5 Introduction to Photogrametry (3 + 8)
Photo interpretation; control points and paneling; stereoplotters and areotriangula-tion.
Prerequisites: CEN 213 and 350.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN 453-3 Legal Procedures and Land Law (3+0)
Principles of jurisdiction and the exercise thereof. Courtroom trial procedures and case briefing.
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
EET 100-3 Introduction to Electricity and Electronics (3+0)
An introductory course in electricity and electronics. Topics studied include fundamentals of direct current, alternating current, and electronic circuits; principles of electrical measuring instruments; applications of electronics in the fields of communications, medicine, computers and other areas.
EET 101-5 Electrical Circuits I (4+2)
A study of the concepts of electricity and an analysis of resistive circuits including series circuits, parallel circuits and series parallel circuits.
Prerequisites: MTH 100, 101 or 106.
EET 102-5 Electrical Circuits II (4+2) Continuation of EET 101 with study of singletime constant circuits (R-L and R-C circuits). Includes study of relationships of linear circuit elements to sinusoidal voltages and currents.
Prerequisites: EET 101 and MTH 102 or 106, or permission of instructor.
EET 103-5 Electrical Circuits III (4+2) Continuation of EET 102. An advanced study of electrical network circuits, equations and theorems.
Prerequisite: EET 102.
EET 120-2 Introduction to Electronic Circuits and Laboratory Instruments (1+2)
Designed to provide familiarization with circuit components, practical electronic circuits, laboratory instruments and basic measurement techniques.
Prerequisite: EET 102-5 (may be taken concurrently).
EET 202-2 Electronic Drafting (1 +2) This course covers symbols for electrical and electronic devices, electrical schematics, circuits and wiring diagrams. Prerequisite: CEN 120.
EET 221-5 Electronics I (3+4)
Study of active electronic devices (tubes
and transistors) and their use in elementary electronic circuits. Emphasizes diode circuits, biasing circuits, basic amplifiers and equivalent circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 102, or permission of instructor.
EET 222-5 Electronics II (3+4) Continuation of EET 221 with emphasis on general electronic circuits, such as amplifiers, oscillators and multivibrators. Prerequisite: EET 221.
EET 223-5 Electronics III (3+4) Continuation of EET 222. Emphasizes more complex electronic systems and functional circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 222.
EET 250-1 to 5 Field Problems in Electrical/Electronic Technology (variable)
Supervised work in special topics in Electronics Engineering Technology. Credit to be determined by Department Chairman. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
EET 251-5 Principles of Electricity and Magnetism I (4+2)
Principles of electrical technology: basic physical and electrical energy concepts, definitions and terminology. Study of Ohms Law, Kirchhoffs Laws, and network theorems with applications to circuit problems. Introduction to magnetic and electric fields and transient behavior. Fundamentals of both DC and AC applications including complex quantities, covering resistive, inductive, capacitive and combination circuits.
Prerequisite: MTH 111 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
EET 252-5 Principles of Electricity and Magnetism II (4+2)
Continuation of EET 251.
Prerequisites: EET 251, or 102 and MTH 111 or permission of instructor.
EET 301-5 Principles of Electronics and Electronics Circuits I (3+4) Analysis of the principles, characteristics and operation of electron devices utilizing concepts of modern physics and physical laws. Study includes vacuum and gas tubes, photo-electricity, fundamentals of semiconductors and transistors. Fundamental operation of these devices is analyzed in circuit applications such as amplifiers, detectors, oscillators, modulators and control systems.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Prerequisites: EET 103 or 252, and MTH 112 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
EET 302-5 Principles of Electronics and Electronic Circuits II (3+4) Continuation of EET 301.
Prerequisites: EET 222 or 301, and MTH 112, or permission of instructor.
EET 305-4 Introduction to Electrical Measurements (3+2)
A fundamental course dealing with the determinations of various quantities using electrical measuring techniques. Special consideration is to be given to measurements of voltage, resistance, current, capacitance, inductance, frequency, etc., and techniques of converting these measurements into determinations of other physical properties, such as pressure and temperature. Includes history and development of electrical measurements and an introduction to the operation of the Bureau of Standards.
Prerequisite: EET 222 or 303, or permission of instructor.
EET/AES 307-3 Principles of Radar (3+0)
Advanced course covering the theory and operation of general radar circuitry. Emphasis is placed upon block diagram integration and specific circuits such as pulse circuits, control circuits, servo circuits, amplifiers and power supplies.
Prerequisites: EET 222 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 309-3 Introduction to Computer Electronics (2 + 2)
Deals with the fundamental concepts and circuits of electronic computers, both analog and digital. Emphasis is on the circuitry and electrical logic and not upon programming.
Prerequisite: EET 222 or 301, or permission of instructor.
EET 311-5 Minicomputer Programming and Operation (4+3)
An introductory course designed to teach students how to operate and program a minicomputer. Specifically students will learn the assembler language for the Nova 1210 Minicomputer.
Prerequisites: EET 309 or Junior standing and permission of instructor.
EET/AES 316-3 Basic Aircraft Radio and Electronic Equipment (3+0)
See course description for AES 316.
EET/AES 317-3 Advanced Aircraft Radio and Electronic Equipment (3+0)
See course description for AES 317.
EET/AES 318-3 FCC License Requirements (3+0)
A course in electronics that includes practical information required to pass examinations for Federal Communications Commission radio license. Topics include radio laws and regulations, radiotelephone operation, message priorities,, urgency and distress signals, radio fundamentals and navigation equipment.
Prerequisite: EET 222 or 302.
EET 321-5 Advanced Electrical and Electronics Circuits I (3+4)
An advanced course which requires previous knowledge of basic electrical circuits. Study also includes analysis of non-linear circuit elements within circuits.
Prerequisites: EET 223 or EET 302 and MTH 112, or permission of instructor.
EET 322-5 Advanced Electrical and Electronic Circuits II (3+4)
Continuation of EET 321.
Prerequisite: EET 321, or permission of instructor.
EET 336-3 Pulse Circuits (2 + 2)
Analysis of static and regenerative circuits including shaping circuits, multivibrators, blocking oscillators, pulse amplifiers and transmitter circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 223 or 302 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
EET 341-3 Electric Power Generation
(2+2)
Study of electric power generation systems. Primarily includes AC and DC dynamo construction and operation.
Prerequisite: EET 222 or EET 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 342-3 Electric Power Distribution
(3 + 0)
Continuation of EET 341. Study of distribution techniques and equipment employed in electric power distribution and control.
Prerequisite: EET 341, or permission of instructor.
EET 361-3 Lines, Filters and Transmission Line Theory (3+0) Fundamental concepts of transmission line
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
characteristics, matching sections and filters. Study includes radiation, wave propagation and antenna theory.
Prerequisite: EET 223 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 401-3 Circuit and Network Analysis (3+0)
Advanced theory in methods of circuit analysis and network synthesis. Study includes matrices, Laplace transform and advanced operational methods.
Prerequisite: EET 322, or permission of instructor.
EET 402-3 Digital Circuits (2 + 2)
Study of counters, shift registers, logic circuits and information storage devices used in digital electronic systems.
Prerequisite: EET 309, or permission of instructor.
EET 403-3 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits (2+2)
Theory of linear closed loop control systems. Analysis of servomechanisms containing electronic, magnetic and, mechanical devices. Study includes feedback control techniques.
Prerequisites: EET 222 or 301 or PHY 123, or permission of instructor.
EET 410-2 Electrical/Electronic Technology Seminar (2 + 0)
Discussion, study, and analysis of historical, current, and future applications of electronics. Each student prepares and presents paper on suitable subjects.
Prerequisite: Senior standing, or permission of instructor.
EET 411-5 Minicomputer Applications (3+4)
Advanced minicomputer course in which students will define interfacing projects and develop the required hardware and software.
Prerequisites: Previous minicomputer programming knowledge, or EET 311-5, or permission of instructor.
EET 430-3 Instruments and Measurements (3+0)
Advanced theory and applications of electrical and electronics instruments and instrumentation devices used in measurements of both physical and electrical quantities. Includes high frequency measurements used within microwave systems.
Prerequisite: EET 223 or 302, or permission of instructor.
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ENT 100-1 The Engineering Technology Profession (1 +0)
History and development of the fields of engineering and technology, educational requirements, employment opportunities and trends in the various fields. Required of all Engineering Technology majors.
ENT 106-5 Applied Technical Mathematics (5+0)
(Same as MTH 106.) Designed to assist the student majoring in technology by providing background and understanding in applied mathematics pertinent to any technology. The subject matter is covered from the standpoint of applicability to specific types of jobs. It incorporates drawings, specifications, and blueprints into the mathematical area and applies the mathematical functions to these areas.
Prerequisite: MTH 100, or equivalent.
ENT 218-3 Production Reporting (3+0) A study of management techniques used for production and planning, scheduling and forecasting. The student becomes acquainted with Program Evaluation Review Techniques and Line of Balance technology and prepares graphs, charts and PERT diagrams.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ENT 250-1 to 5 Field Problems in Engineering Technology (variable) Supervised advanced work for qualified students. Work is initiated by a student and may consist of a special individual project under the supervision of a faculty member, or may consist of advanced study in connection with an established program. Credit to be determined by department chairman. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ENT 299-1 to 10 Field Experience (variable)
Supervised work experience with a cooperating employer. Students are assigned according to their field of concentration. Credit and hours to be arranged with department chairman.
Prerequisite: Approval of chairman.
ENT 305-4 Computer Graphics (3+2)
A comprehensive survey of the general principles and applications of numerical control as it applies to design. Students study the basic language structure designed for effective communication between the draftsman
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
and the automated drafting machine and numerical control systems for other machines.
Prerequisites: CEN 122 and MTH 100.
ENT 400-3 Motion and Time Study (3+0)
An analysis of motion and time study as applied to manufacturing procedures, with emphasis given to work simplifications, motion economy, time standards and performance ratings.
ENT 401-5 Advanced Engineering Technology (5+0)
Advanced study of the use of technicians in industry. Emphasis is given to those areas offered at MSC.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
ENT 404-3 Production Control (3+0)
A study of the meaning and scope of production control. Students become acquainted with the function of production control as a part of the management framework and learn how decisions and actions taken by the production control departments affect the rest of a company. Typical production control activities encountered in industrial employment are discussed.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ENT 410-2 Technology Seminar (2 + 0) Study of selected topics and an analysis of the interrelationship of the engineering technology fields.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ENT 499-1 to 15 Advanced Field Experience (variable)
Supervised work experience with a cooperating employer. Credit and hours to be arranged with Chairman.
Prerequisite: Permission of Chairman.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
MET 100-3 Materials and Manufacturing Technology (3+0)
An introductory survey course in manufacturing production processes which include a study of the primary materials and manufacturing processes used in the fabrication of industrial products.
MET 101-3 Manufacturing Processes I
(2+2)
Basic fundamentals in the operation of lathes, drilling machines, metal saws and
measuring equipment. Includes tool grinding, bench work and layout.
MET 102-3 Manufacturing Processes II
(2+2)
Continuation of MET 101. Fundamentals of vertical and horizontal milling machines and surface grinders; advanced lathe and drilling operations.
Prerequisite: MET 101, or permission of instructor.
MET 200-3 Industrial Hydraulics (3+0) Provides a practical working knowledge of the components and systems involved in hydraulic and power transmission. Among the topics covered are fluidpower pumps and motors, cylinders, plumbing, pressure accumulators, flow and directional control valves, servo systems and industrial hydraulic circuits.
Prerequisite: PHY 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 205-3 Production Machine Tools (3 + 0)
Construction features and industrial applications for special purpose, manual, semiautomatic, automatic and numerical control production machine tools. Operation and tooling methods for turret lathes, multispindle lathes, automatic screw machines, drilling machines and transfer machine tools. Emphasis is on numerical control manufacturing.
Prerequisite: MET 102.
MET 206-3 Elements of Machine Design (3+0)
A survey of the more important elements used in tool and machine design and their general characteristics pertaining to application, efficiency, economy and standardization.
Prerequisite: CEN 220.
MET 208-4 Basic Tool Design (4+0) Introduction to the basic concepts of tool designing. Design projects include simple jigs, fixtures, cutting tools and inspection gauges. Students have the opportunity to study selected portions of MIL-STA-8C as related to tool and gauge design for positionally toleranced parts.
Prerequisites: MET 101 and CEN 121, or permission of instructor.
MET 210-4 Principles of Numerical Control (2+4)
Introduction to vocabulary and processes
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
involved in programming a component for numerical control manufacturing. Study of selected numerical controlled manufacturing equipment is introduced. Laboratory projects involve programming a part and preparation of numerical control tapes. Local field trips are arranged to provide students an opportunity to observe numerical controlled machine tools in operation.
Prerequisite: MET 101, or permission of instructor.
MET 220-3 Principles of Metallurgy (3+0)
An introduction to physical and process metallurgy; production processes for iron and steel, the study of pure metal and alloy characteristics, basic phase diagrams and metal structures and effects of low alloy content on the iron carbide phase diagrams.
Prerequisite: MET 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 240-3 Fundamentals of Welding
(2+2)
A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the common welding processes for metal joining. Units include fusion welding of mild steel sheet and plate with the oxy-acetylene and arc processes, brazing of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, oxy-acetylene cutting and introduction to inert-gas welding.
MET 300-4 Manufacturing Analysis (4+0)
Economics of tooling operations: the productivity of machines, tool maintenance, tool costs and job estimating. A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of process planning.
Prerequisite: MET 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 304-3 Work Simplification and Layout (3+0)
A study of management techniques with emphasis on methods of improvement, time study analysis, plant layout and material handling procedures.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 306-3 Fluid Power and Control Systems (3+0)
Studies in hydraulic, pneumatic and electronic control devices as applied to numerically controlled and other automated production equipment.
Prerequisite: MET 200, or permission of instructor.
MET 307-3 Mechanical Design (3+0) Application of stress analysis in the design of machine components. Analysis of static and dynamic forces and stresses in machine elements. The main topics are fastenings, shafting, coupling, clutches, brakes, bearings and rolling contacts and lubrication. Prerequisites: PHY 100 and CEN 121.
MET 308-3 Metallurgy (3+0)
A study of the physical properties, composition, constituents and heat treatments of metals and metal alloys. Material specifications, tests and places of applications in industry are reviewed.
Prerequisite: MET 220, or permission of instructor.
MET 310-3 Basic Thermodynamics I (3+0)
Provides a basic course in generating and controlling energy in form of heat and transferring it into other useful forms. A study of heat flow, gas properties, reversible and irreversible flow. Introduction to Carnot cycle. For power option students in the four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology program.
Prerequisite: MTH 100 or equivalent.
MET 311-13 Thermodynamics II (3+0)
A continuation of MET 310. To acquaint power option students with fundamental principles of energy conversion mechanisms. Introduction to cycles and principles related to energy conversion mechanisms. Prerequisite: MET 310.
MET 320-4 Fuels and Lubricants (4 + 0) Introduction to physical and chemical properties of fuels and lubricants with emphasis on characteristics and qualities of desirable fuels and lubricants. Required of all power option students in four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology programs.
MET 340-4 Advanced Welding (2+4) Provides a student with a technological understanding of the advanced welding techniques used in industry. Required of all four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology Power Option students.
Prerequisite: MET 240, or permission of instructor.
MET 400-3 Project Engineering (3+0) An introduction to the role of the project
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
engineer. The course reviews the various phases of a research and development program and the different disciplines in which the project engineer must be expert in order to effectively bring each phase of the program to successful completion.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 404-3 Plant Layout (3+0)
The basic principles of plant layout to meet production needs. Application of materials handling devices to the process. Selection and arrangement of production machinery, product and process layout schemes, techniques of making layouts, and balance and flexibility of operations are fully discussed.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 405-4 Production Tooling (4+0) Classroom discussion and actual drawing board work are combined to help the student gain knowledge and experience necessary to design tools commonly used in industry. Students design cutting tools, gauges, jigs, fixtures and dies, and prepare tooling layouts for production machine tools.
Prerequisite: MET 208, or permission of instructor.
MET 410-4 Numerical Control Machine
(2+4)
Theory and applications of numerical control as applied to machine tools in manufacturing operations. Principles and application techniques of various control media. Emphasis on point-to-point and dimensional and three-dimensional configurations.
Prerequisite: MET 210, or permission of instructor.
MET 420-3 Air Induction Systems and
Emission Controls (3+0)
Course presents an in-depth study of the engine air requirements and factors influencing volumetric efficiency. Super-charging and turbocharging effects on performance will be studied and related to power performance factors. Exhaust system design factors will be studied with emphasis on waste heat recovery and smog control. Required of all four-year mechanical engineering technology power option students.
MET 430-3 Transportation Problems
(3+0)
Provides insight into the economics of transportation, physical distribution, and traffic management. Provides pertinent data and
knowledge regarding all modern means of transport and impact and social implications involving transportation industry. Required of all four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology Power Option students.
MET 440-4 Power Systems Design
(3 + 2)
Study of fluid mechanics with emphasis on principles of hydraulic power systems as applied in modern automotive and industrial systems. Included will be design features applied through power brakes, power steering, automatic transmission, torque converters, and industrial power hydraulic systems. Required of all four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology Power Option students.
Prerequisite: MET 306.
MET 441-4 Automotive Design (3+2) Study of automobile safety design, synthesizing the anatomical, psychological, and engineering relationships between man and machine. Evolves around the ideal ergonomic motor car with future impressions and implications. Required of all four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology Power Option students.
Prerequisite: MET 302.
MET 450-3 Service Management (3+0) Provides basic tools of management so novice can employ them; thus, increase job satisfaction through growth of a sense of competence in ability to handle men. Required of all four-year Mechanical Engineering Technology Power Option students.
QUALITY ASSURANCE TECHNOLOGY
QAT 100-4 Introduction to Quality Assurance (4+0)
A survey course tracing the development of the concept of quality assurance. Emphasis is on process control, product acceptance, the rejection and corrective cycle and quality costs.
QAT 101-4 Principles of Quality Assurance I (4+0)
A basic course on scope and function of quality assurance, including regulations, records, vendor selection, procurement quality and inspection and measurement techniques.
Prerequisite: QAT 100, or equivalent.
QAT 102-4 Principles of Quality Assurance II (4+0)
Continuation of QAT 101, including the
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
interpretation and use of quality assurance data. Material control, rejection analysis, measuring instruments and electronic requirements are covered.
Prerequisite: QAT 101.
QAT 201-4 Theory and Application of Quality Assurance I (4+0)
Presents the latest techniques of quality assurance at the component, the assembly, and the systems level. Quality assurance is analyzed from design conception through consumer use and disposal, including sampling, testing, data analysis and interpretation.
Prerequisite: QAT 101.
QAT 202-4 Theory and Application of Quality Assurance II (4+0)
Continuation of QAT 201, with emphasis on statistical analysis, cost analysis, case problem solving applications, and configuration identification and control. Prerequisite: QAT 201.
QAT 203-4 Advanced Quality Assurance (4+0)
An analysis of the total concept of quality assurance, including special quality experiments and quality cost optimization. Sampling by attributes and variables and trouble-shooting quality problems and the application of statistical techniques to the manufacturing process are included. Prerequisite: QAT 201.
QAT 205-2 Nondestructive Testing
(1+2)
Provides a background in industrial nondestructive testing. Emphasis is given to the methods used to predict equipment performance and to the proper use of each nondestructive test. Advantages and limitations of nondestructive testing methods are reviewed.
Prerequisites: QAT 100 and PHY 100.
QAT 206-2 Metrology (1 +2)
A study of the common measuring instruments used in quality assurance. Included are electrical, pressure, vacuum, vibration, acceleration, human error and data evaluation.
QAT 207-2 Electronic Quality Assurance (2 + 0)
A study of advanced inspection methods and principles peculiar to the electronics industry.
Prerequisites: EET 100 and QAT 100.
QAT 208-3 Procurement Quality Assurance (3+0)
Procurement quality assurance techniques and policy, including regulations, records, vendor selection, and monitoring, inspection measurement instruments and test equipment and control charts applicable to receipt and shipment of goods.
Prerequisite: QAT 101.
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
The School of Liberal Arts offers flexible programs in the social sciences and humanities directed toward personal, occupational, and professional goals in a rapidly changing world.
Each Liberal Arts department (Art, Economics, English, History, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology-Anthropology, Speech) provides a comprehensive academic program with many options to fulfill the multiple needs of a diverse urban college population.
The Liberal Arts curriculum amplifies the programs of every other academic area of the College by offering the wide range of courses generally included in the total educational mission of an accredited institution.
Liberal Arts studies aim toward the development of perspective and intellectual strength for the endeavors of a lifetime. The School of Liberal Arts is fully engaged in expanding career programs that combine the preparation and broad background essential for educational sufficiency in todays urban community.
In harmony with the basic philosophy and goals of Metropolitan State College, the School of Liberal Arts assumes a major role in encouraging and preparing students to participate fully in the challenges and opportunities of modern life.
School of Liberal Arts departmental majors and minors, as shown below, lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.
ART
The Art Department offers a full range of courses in: a. the Fine Arts of Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, and Sculpture; b. the Applied Art areas of Graphic and Advertising Design, Photography, Product and Industrial Design; c. the Craft disciplines of Clay, Fiber, and Metal. Art History courses include Contemporary and Modern Art, Ancient, Medieval, Gothic, Renaissance, 18th, 19th and 20th Century Art. Art Education Methods courses may be taken in addition to the Art major program, enabling students to be certified for teaching art at the secondary school level.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses
ART 111 Image Processes and Concepts I .... 3
ART 112 Image Processes and Concepts II .... 3
ART 113 Image Processes and Concepts III ... 3
ART 121 Form Processes and Concepts I ....... 3
ART 122 Form Processes and Concepts II --- 3
ART 123 Form Processes and Concepts III .... 3
ART 201 Survey of Contemporary Art I ........ 3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art II..... 3
ART 203 Survey of Contemporary Art III ...... 3
ART 211 Painting and Media Techniques..... 3
ART 212 Lettering and Graphics........... 3
ART 213 Drawing and Transfer Images....... 3
ART 241 Form and Sculpture .................. 3
ART 242 Structure and Product ............... 3
ART 243 Craft and Object................. 3
The above listed required courses in Art comprise an art core program of 45 hours, generally to be completed prior to enrollment in upper division art courses.
Upper division requirements include study in the following sub-areas:
A. FINE ARTS Drawing Painting
Printmaking
Sculpture
B. APPLIED ARTS
Advertising Design
Graphic Communications Design
Industrial Design
Photography
Product Design
C. CRAFTS
Ceramics
Fabric Design and Weaving Metalwork and Jewelrymaking
D. ART HISTORY
African Art
Ancient and Medieval Art Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque Art 18th and 19th Century Art Contemporary Art
Eighteen quarter hours required within a
specific area, A, B, C or D................. 18
Six quarter hours elected within each of the
remaining areas, A, B, C, and D............. 18
Electives Nine additional quarter hours in art courses selected in consultation with and
approved by the Department of Art........... 9
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Minor Requirement
The degree requirement of a minor is optional for students majoringin Art.
Art Education
Students seeking secondary credentials must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of Metropolitan State College, including Art methods courses in addition to Art major requirements.
Minor in Art
Required Courses
ART 111 Image Processes and Concepts I .... 3
ART 112 Image Processes and Concepts II .... 3
ART 113 Image Processes and Concepts III ... 3
ART 121 Form Processes and Concepts I ...... 3
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
ART 122 Form Processes and Concepts II .... 3
ART 123 Form Processes and Concepts III_______ 3
ART 201 Survey of Western Art.................... 3
Electives Minimum of two Art studio courses at the 200 level (Art 211, 212, 213, 241,
242, 243)..................................... 6
Minimum of one upper division (300 level)
Art History course............................ 3
Minimum of two upper division (300 level)
Art studio courses............................ 6
36
ART 100-3 Arf Appreciation (3 + 0) Designed primarily for people who are not Art majors but who are interested in acquiring information about various aspects and types of art works as a basis for broadening their knowledge and appreciation of the subject. Study of the worlds art masterpieces and visits to art exhibits and museums in Denver are included.
ART 110-3 Basic Drawing Methods
(0+6)
A studio course in drawing which introduces basic drawing media and materials, covering various techniques for free hand drawing, including principles of perspective drawing. For non-art majors; particular orientation to PER and Education students.
ART 111-3 Image Processes and Concepts I (0+6)
Introduction and acquaintanceship with media and materials of all types as they are used in drawing and graphic control. Prerequisite: Art major declaration.
ART 112-3 Image Processes and Concepts II (0+6)
Continuation of ART 111 with emphasis on mixed media in developing visual communication of ideas.
Prerequisite: ART 111.
ART 113-3 Image Processes and Concepts III (0+6)
Adapting abilities gained in ART 111 and 112 to express ideas and concepts graphically.
Prerequisites: ART 111 and 112.
ART 120-3 Basic Design Methods (0+6)
A studio course which is oriented to examining and exploring the elements and principles of design, expressed in abstract form. Use of various media and materials: exploring both two and three dimensional form. For non-art majors; particular orientation to Education students.
ART 121-3 Form Processes and Concepts I (0 + 6)
Introduction to elements and principles of design as they apply to organizing space and surface.
Prerequisite: Art major declaration.
ART 122-3 Form Processes and Concepts II (0+6)
Continuation of ART 121 with emphasis upon concepts of color applied to processes and form.
Prerequisite: ART 121.
ART 123-3 Form Processes and Concepts III (0+6)
Application of the principles studied in ART 121 and 122, expressing ideas through theoretical sensory exploration.
Prerequisites: ART 121 and 122.
ART 130-3 Methods in Crafts (0 + 6)
An art studio course in crafts in which wood, metal, and fiber are worked directly to design and craft objects as an expression of the individual student involved. For non-art majors; particular orientation to PER and Education students.
ART 201-3 Survey of Western Art
(3+0)
A chronological study of Western Art History. Surveys Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Modern periods of art.
ART 202-3 Survey of Contemporary Art I (3+0)
A chronological survey of significant examples and trends in modern architecture, sculpture, and painting; 1870-1960. Prerequisite: ART 201.
ART 203-3 Survey of Contemporary Art II (3+0)
A continued study (1960 through present day) of major trends and works of art in architecture, sculpture, and painting. Prerequisite: ART 202.
ART 211-3 Painting and Media Techniques (0+6)
Introducing uses of pigments and paint media for abstract and pictorial expression of ideas.
Prerequisites: ART 113, 123, and 203.
ART 212-3 Lettering and Graphics
(0 + 6)
An introduction to lettering as a graphic
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form and symbol; used in conjunction with other methods of graphic communication. Prerequsites: ART 113, 123.
ART 213-3 Drawing and Transfer Images (0 + 6)
Basic media extensions through transferring of photo, drawing, and print images. Applicable to all two and three dimensional disciplines.
Prerequisites: ART 113, 123, and 203.
ART 241-3 Form and Sculpture (0+6) Introduction to three dimensional form as it is used in context of fine arts expression for sculpture. Wide variety of materials explored.
Prerequisites: ART 113, 123, and 203.
ART 242-3 Structure and Product
(0+6)
Designing and fabricating forms and units into three dimensional configurations or products.
Prerequisites: ART 113, 123.
ART 243-3 Craft and Object (0+6)
An introduction to the media of metal, fiber, and clay for handcrafting articles and objects.
Prerequisites: ART 113, 123, and 203.
ART 301-3 History of Ancient and Early Medieval Art (3+0)
A study of Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, and early Romanesque art. Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 201.
ART 302-3 History of Gothic,
Renaissance and Baroque Art (3+0)
A study of late Romanesque, Gothic, Italian and Northern Renaissance, and Baroque periods of art in Europe.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 201.
ART 303-3 History of 18th and 19th Century Art (3+0)
A study of Rococco, Neo-Classical, and the Romantic periods of painting, sculpture, and architecture.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 201.
ART 304-3 History of African and Afro-American Art (3+0)
History and identification of the tribal arts and crafts of Africa plus a study of contemporary Black artists. Particular attention is given to modern Black artists in the United States.
ART 310-3 Art Instructional Methods for Elementary Schools (2+4) Introduces the student to possibilities, limitations and implications of art materials used in the elementary school, stressing appropriate methods of teaching children at various age levels.
ART 311-3 Advanced Drawing I (0 + 6) An advanced drawing course offering the student a concentrated studio exposure to the human image.
Prerequisites: ART 203 and 213.
ART 312-3 Advanced Drawing II (0+6) An advanced drawing course extending skills, awareness and confidence with the human image.
Prerequisite: ART 311.
ART 313-3 Advanced Drawing III (0+6) An advanced drawing course pursuing the human image as a contemporary idiom. Prerequisite: ART 312.
ART 320-3 Art Instructional Methods for Secondary Schools (3+0)
A thorough study of adolescent development in the visual arts; evaluation of methods and processes to motivate and stimulate art capabilities of junior and senior high school students.
Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division art courses.
ART 321-3 Graphic Communications Design I (0+6)
Acquaints the art student with lettering, typography and advertising layout. The student applies design and illustration to the solution of specific visual communication problems.
Prerequisites: ART 203 and 212.
ART 322-3 Graphic Communications Design II (0+6)
Continuation of ART 321.
Prerequisite: ART 321.
ART 323-3 Graphic Communications Design III (0+6)
Continuation of ART 322.
Prerequisite: ART 322.
ART 324-3 Photography I (0+6) Photography is treated as an art form and a discipline of significance to every art major. The first quarter deals with the history
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
of photography and familiarizes the student with basic darkroom procedures. Prerequisites: ART 123 and 203.
ART 325-3 Photography II (0+6) Continuation and implementation of basic skills learned in Photography I through assignments in traditional subject matter and concepts of picturing.
Prerequisite: ART 324.
ART 326-3 Photography III (0+6) Concepts of media extensions and nonsilver printing.
Prerequisite: ART 325.
ART 331-3 Fabric Design: Hand Construction (0+6)
Introduction of many handcraft techniques of fiber and fabric construction, including macrame. Hand stitchery for wall hangings as well as basic looming methods for fiber constructions.
Prerequisite: ART 243.
ART 332-3 Fabric Design: Dyeing and Printing (0+6)
Designing and decorating of textiles by means of tie-dye, batik, block printing, silk screen, and hand-painting techniques on fabrics.
Prerequisite: ART 243.
ART 333-3 Fabric Design: Weaving
(0+6)
The art of weaving is taught as a craft for purposes of originating decorative and utilitarian fabrics and textile designs. Instruction with simple primitive-type looms is included. Prerequisites: ART 243 and 331.
ART 341-3 Sculpture I (0+6)
Creative approach to the problems of three dimensional design in sculpture; modeling, molding, working in cold casting materials. Construction in wood, plastics and metals. Prerequisites: ART 203 and 241.
ART 342-3 Sculpture II (0+6) Continuation of ART 341.
Prerequisite: ART 341.
ART 343-3 Sculpture III (0+6) Continuation of ART 342.
Prerequisite: ART 342.
ART 351-3 Painting I (0+6)
A study of materials and techniques used in painting. Control of form and space is approached through the use of color, and de-
sign structure is applied to the problem of creating visual expressions.
Prerequisites: ART 203 and 211.
ART 352-3 Painting II (0+6)
Continuation of ART 351.
Prerequisite: ART 351.
ART 353-3 Painting III (0+6)
Continuation of ART 352.
Prerequisite: ART 352.
ART 361-3 Ceramics I (0 + 6)
Introducing clay as an art and craft medium, the instruction concentrates on the large variety of hand forming methods available for building pottery and sculptural forms. Also involves preparing pottery for glazing and firing.
Prerequisite: ART 243.
ART 362-3 Ceramics II (0+6) Continuation of ART 361 with added emphasis upon competent use of the potters wheel and additional study of glaze formulas. Prerequisite: ART 361.
ART 363-3 Ceramics III (0 + 6) Continuation of ART 362; further development in the craft technique and form expression of ceramic art. Development of low and high firing methods plus emphasis on glaze decorating.
Prerequisite: ART 362.
ART 371-3 Printmaking I; Silk Screen
(0+6)
The unique characteristics of Relief Printmaking as a fine art medium are examined. Students are introduced to a wide variety of Relief Printing techniques and media. Prerequisites: ART 203 and 213.
ART 372-3 Printmaking II; Lithography
(0+6)
The fundamentals of Lithography are used as a point of departure for students to evolve a personal approach to the fine art of printmaking.
Prerequisites: ART 203 and 213.
ART 373-3 Printmaking III; Intaglio
(0+6)
Limitations and possibilities of Intaglio, including etching, engraving, dry point, and aqua-tint are explored. Students are encouraged to evolve personal approaches to Intaglio as a fine art expression. Prerequisites: ART 203 and 213.
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
ART 374-3 Printmaking IV; Photo Techniques (0+6)
An in-depth investigation of Photo Printmaking possibilities in developing an aesthetic imagery.
Prerequisites: ART 324, 371, 372, and 373.
ART 381-3 Product Design I (0+6)
A course designed to explore the art and aesthetic potential inherent in the utilitarian product. Emphasis will be placed on studio projects which will enable the student to develop as an artist, designer, and craftsman. Wood and other organic materials will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: ART 203 and 242.
ART 382-3 Product Design II (0+6)
A continuation of ART 381 with emphasis placed on updated technical processes available to the artist and designer-craftsman.
Prerequisite: ART 381.
ART 383-3 Product Design III (0+6)
A continuation of ART 382 with emphasis placed on development and maintenance of the small shop or artist-studio necessary to the self sustaining designer-craftsman. Prerequisite: ART 382.
ART 391-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking I (0+6)
Design quality as a fundamental part of good craftsmanship is emphasized through the basic techniques involved in working nonferrous and precious metals, plus utilizing rare woods, fibers, and plastics. Prerequisite: ART 243.
ART 392-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking II (0+6)
Continuation of ART 391.
Prerequisite: ART 391.
ART 393-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking III (0+6)
Continuation of ART 392.
Prerequisite: ART 392.
ART 411-3 Advanced Drawing and Illustration I (0+6)
Advanced studio drawing oriented to interpreting subject matter for purpose of illustration, whether for fine arts expression or for commercial application.
Prerequisite: ART 313.
ART 412-3 Advanced Drawing and Illustration II (0+6)
Continuation of ART 411.
Prerequisite: ART 411.
ART 413-3 Advanced Drawing and Illustration III (0+6)
Continuation of ART 412.
Prerequisite: ART 412.
ART 421-3 Advertising Design I (0+6) Continuation of ART 323 with emphasis on production techniques in advertising design. Field trips to printing establishments in the area are conducted to acquaint students with reproduction methods used in advertising. The student is encouraged to build a portfolio of finished work prepared for various methods of reproduction. Prerequisite: ART 323.
ART 422-3 Advertising Design II (0 + 6) Continuation of ART 421.
Prerequisite: ART 421.
ART 423-3 Advertising Design III (0+6) Continuation of ART 422.
Prerequisite: ART 422.
ART 441-3 Advanced Sculpture I (0 + 6) Students are to explore the problems of sculpture with emphasis on development of techniques and personal expression in self chosen media for sculpture.
Prerequisite: ART 343.
ART 442-3 Advanced Sculpture II
(0+6)
Continuation of ART 441.
Prerequisite: ART 441.
ART 443-3 Advanced Sculpture III
(0+6)
Continuation of ART 442.
Prerequisite: ART 442.
ART 451-3 Advanced Painting I (0+6) Intended to develop the possibilities of personal expression inherent in the painting medium.
Prerequisites: ART 351, and permission of the instructor.
ART 452-3 Advanced Painting II (0 + 6) Continuation of ART 451.
Prerequisite: ART 451.
ART 453-3 Advanced Painting III (0 + 6) Continuation of ART 452.
Prerequisite: ART 452.
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ART 461-3 Advanced Ceramics I (0+6) Advanced instruction on the potters wheel in order to extend experience of throwing forms of clay on the wheel. Wheel-thrown techniques are combined with hand-building techniques of clay for pottery.
Prerequisite: ART 363.
ART 462-3 Advanced Ceramics II
(0+6)
Emphasis on combining technical skills of wheel-throwing, glazing ware, and ceramicmaking with the art and aesthetic potential inherent in the ceramics processes. Prerequisite: ART 461.
ART 463-3 Advanced Ceramics III
(0+6)
Problem assignments in the ceramics studio are formulated by individual students in consultation with the instructor. Stressed is student awareness to his individual responsibility to the clay medium and ceramic process as both an art and a craft.
Prerequisite: ART 462.
ART 471-3 Advanced Printmaking I
(0 + 6)
Advanced work in Silk Screen, Lithography, Intaglio and/or Photo Printmaking in which students are directed toward individual expression of the media.
Prerequisites: ART 371, 372, 373, and 374.
ART 472-3 Advanced Printmaking II
(0+6)
Continued advanced work in Silk Screen, Lithography, Intaglio, and/or Photo Printmaking in which the students are given opportunity to develop professionally in a chosen area.
Prerequisite: ART 471.
ART 473-3 Advanced Printmaking III
(0+6)
A continuation of ART 472 in which the student is provided opportunity to mature as a printmaker-artist.
Prerequisite: ART 472.
ART 481-3 Industrial Design I (0+6) Continuation of ART 383 applying art and design concepts and solutions to manufacturers products and to improvement of company and corporate image through all phases of design aesthetics and function. Both two- and three-dimensional projects included.
Prerequisite: ART 383.
ART 482-3 Industrial Design II (0+6) Continuation of ART 481 with emphasis on techniques of preparing and presenting visual models and mock-ups of designs. Prerequisite: ART 481.
ART 483-3 Industrial Design III (0+6) Continuation of ART 482 with emphasis on illustration techniques of design solutions, working drawings and specifications, and methods appropriate to presenting art design concepts and solutions to clients. Prerequisite: ART 482.
ART 491-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking IV (0+6)
Advanced craft work in Metal Raising and forming. Jewelrymaking is included. Students required to develop a philosophy on style and methods developed for individuality of artistic expression.
Prerequisite: ART 393.
ART 492-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking V (0+6)
Continuation of ART 491.
Prerequisite: ART 491.
ART 493-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking VI (0+6)
Continuation of ART 492.
Prerequisite: ART 492.
ECONOMICS
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses 9j,ar?!r
ECO 101-103 Principles of Economics
I, II, III...................................... 9
ECO 301-303 Intermediate Economic Theory I, II, III.......................................... 9
Electives A minimum of 27 additional quarter hours selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
Students majoring in economics must have a minimum of 45 quarter hours in economics, of which 36 should be in upper division courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding the requirement of a minor field; however, it is normally expected that at least 9 quarter hours of political science and 5 quarter hours of statistics will be completed regardless of the minor field chosen.
Minor
Required Courses 9jlr)?r
ECO 101-103 Principles of Economics
I, II, III....................................... 9
ECO 301-303 Intermediate Economic Theory I, II, III.......................................... 9
Electives A minimum of 9 additional quarter hours in economics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
ECO 101-3 Principles of Economics I (3+0)
Introduction to the fundamental principles of economics to open the way to further study and to give those not intending to specialize in the subject an outline of the field.
ECO 102-3 Principles of Economics II (3+0)
Continuation of ECO 101.
Prerequisite: ECO 101.
ECO 103-3 Principles of Economics III (3+0)
Continuation of ECO 102.
Prerequisite: ECO 102.
ECO 204-3 Contemporary Economic Problems (3+0)
Introduction to some of the complex economic problems which face this country and the world. Topics include unemployment, inflation, poverty, pollution, the right-to-work, the farm problem and the population explosion. Emphasis on attempting to develop innovative solutions to complex problems. For majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 301-3 Intermediate Economic Theory I (3+0)
Production, price, and distribution theory. Value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market structures with special reference to the contributions of modern economic theorists. National income and employment theory; primary emphasis placed upon national income analysis and contemporary theories of consumption, investment and employment.
Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 302-3 Intermediate Economic Theory II (3+0)
Continuation of ECO 301.
Prerequisite: ECO 301.
ECO 303-3 Intermediate Economic Theory III (3+0)
Continuation of ECO 302.
Prerequisite: ECO 302.
ECO 305-3 Econometrics (3+0) Application of mathematical and statistical techniques to problems of economic theory. Emphasis is on principles rather than computational methods of mathematical rigor.
Prerequisites: ECO 103, MTH 101, or consent of instructor.
ECO 310-3 Money and Banking (3+0) The study of money in theory and analysis as a policy variable affecting economic activity. Monetary theory is emphasized, where money is examined both in its role in facilitating exchange and as an instrument of economic policy. Money supply, money demand and their respective effects on macro-economic models is stressed.
Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 320-4 Public Finance I (4+0) Taxation, public expenditures, debts and fiscal policy. Role of public finance in times of peace and war. National, state and local taxation.
Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 330-4 Economic History of Europe (4+0)
Evolution of industrial society, with emphasis upon the growth and development of English industry and commerce. Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 332-4 Economic History of the United States (4+0)
American economic organization and institutions and their development from colonial times to the present.
Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 350-3 Comparative Economic Systems (3+0)
practice. Critical study of socialism, capitalism, communism and other proposed economic systems.
Economic organization of national societies, as visualized in theory and as realized in
ECO 360-4 History of Economic Thought (4+0)
Survey of the development of economic thought from ancient to modern times. Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 370-3 Labor Economics (3+0)
The study of the topics related to the supply of labor, the allocation of labor among uses, the extent and incidence of unemployment, and the determination of wages. Concentration is on the application of economic theory as a useful tool in understanding the behavior of labor and problems of labor markets.
Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 373-3 Social and Economic Security (3+0)
Study of the development of social insur-
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ance in the United States. Consideration of the development of programs for security in old age, unemployment, accident, sickness and other income loss situations. Critical examination of recent and proposed American social security legislation.
ECO 375-3 Economics of Poverty (3+0)
An investigation into the causes and cures of poverty in the United States. Emphasis on the definition and measurement of poverty, its changing incidence among different groups over time, and its relationship to possible causal factors. Analyzes present programs and current proposals to alleviate poverty.
ECO 376-3 Urban Economic Problems (3+0)
Study of selected problems, current policies and possible alternatives from the urban scene. Particular emphasis on such topics as urban poverty, housing, employment, transportation and environment.
ECO 380-4 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (4-j- 0)
Structure and performance of important American industries as measured against the yardstick of the public interest. Alternative methods of serving the public interest. Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 421-4 Public Finance II (4-fO) Continuation of ECO 320.
Prerequisite: ECO 320.
ECO 440-3 International Trade I
(3+0)
Theories of interregional and international trade, private and public trade, world population and resources, tariffs and commercial policy, and international economic organization.
Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 450-3 Economic Development I (3+0)
Theoretical and empirical analysis of problems of economic development in both underdeveloped and advanced countries. Prerequisite: ECO 103.
ECO 451-3 Economic Development II (3+0)
Current problems of economic development, with emphasis on accelerating and maintaining growth.
Prerequisite: ECO 450.
ECO 461-3 American Contributions to Economic Thought (3+0)
Critical analysis of the unique contributions of American economists to the corpus of economic thought. The theories of American economists from the Institutionalist School to the present time are examined through readings from some of their original texts and secondary sources.
Prerequisite: ECO 360, or permission of instructor.
ECO 463-4 History of Socialist and Marxist Economics (4-fO)
Survey of the basic tenets of Marxist economics together with its predecessors and successors.
Prerequisite: ECO 103, or permission of instructor.
ECO 472-3 Economics of Collective Bargaining (3+0)
Scientific analysis of processes by which labor and management reach agreements; how differences between labor and management are settled by means of grievance procedures and arbitration; overall economic effect of collective bargaining.
ENGLISH
The Department of English offers comprehensive and varied programs in literature, language, and writing. A number of the courses in these programs are intended to appeal to students in every school of the College who wish to read and understand the major works of literature, to acquire the ability to express themselves accurately, lucidly, and forcefully, and to develop their intellectual and imaginative powers. More advanced courses are designed for students who are especially interested in one or more of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Among these are courses in journalism and communications. These courses provide students with the opportunity to study and to practice using the modes of expression, verbal and nonverbal, employed by newspapers, television and radio, commercial and industrial firms, and governmental agencies.
General English Major for Bachelor of Arts
Grouped Requirements
I. Seven of the following courses (at least two from each group): Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 211 -212-213 World Literature ENG 221-222-223 American Literature ENG 231-232-233 British Literature
Quarter Hours Required 21
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II. Two of the following courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 201 English Grammar ENG 251 Advanced Composition ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 255 Introduction to Technical Writing
ENG 256 Introduction to Communication Theories
Quarter Hours Required 6
III. Five of the following courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 323, 324, 325, 326, 329, 361 American Literature: Main Periods and Themes
ENG 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336 British Literature: Main Periods ENG 341,342, 343, 344, 345, 346 World Literature: Poetry and Prose ENG 423, 427, 428, 429 American Literature: Genres and Major Authors
ENG 431,432, 433, 434, 439 British Literature: Major Authors ENG 437, 438, 442 British Literature:
Novel, Epic, and Romance ENG 449 World Literature: Major Authors
ENG 327, 328, 363 American Drama ENG 337, 432, 433, 434, 435 British Drama
ENG 441 Modern Drama (British,
American, Continental)
ENG 461,462 Literary Criticism
Quarter Hours Required 15
IV. Two of the following courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 301 Structure of English Language
ENG 302 History of English Language ENG 303 Semantics ENG 351 Modern Rhetoric in Writing ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing
ENG 391 Techniques and Practice of English Research
ENG 392 Communications Materials and Resources
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing I ENG 453 Advanced Creative Writing II
Quarter Hours Required 6
Electives A minimum of 6 additional quarter hours in upper division English, Journalism, or Communication courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English, is required.
Quarter Hours Required _6 Total Quarter Hours Required 54
English Major for Bachelor of Arts: Secondary School Teaching Emphasis
Required Courses for Certification
I.
Same as for General English Major for Bachelor of Arts
Quarter Hours Required 21
Each Course 3 Quarter Hours
II. ENG 201 English Grammar ENG 251 Advanced Composition (Recommend to follow in sequence:
Eng 351, Modern Rhetoric in Writing and Eng 303, Semantics. Recommended in addition: Rdg 205,
Reading Improvement II and/or Eng 252, Introduction to Creative Writing)
Quarter Hours Required 6
III. Same as for General English Major for Bachelor of Arts
IV. Three Of the following four courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 301 Structure of the English Language
ENG 303 Semantics RDG 307 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading: Secondary ENG 351 Modern Rhetoric in Writing
Quarter Hours Required 9 Electives A minimum of 3 additional quarter hours in upper division English, Communication, or Journalism courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English. Recommended: Eng 302, History of the English Language and/or Eng 352, Creative Writing Workshop.
Quarter Hours Required _3 Total Quarter Hours Required 54
English Major for Bachelor of Arts: Writing Emphasis
Required Courses
I. Same as for General English Major for Bachelor of Arts
Quarter Hours Required 21
II. One of the following courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 251 Advanced Composition ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 255 Introduction to Technical Writing
Quarter Hours Required 6
III. Same as for General English Major for Bachelor of Arts
Quarter Hours Required 15
IV. Any four of the following courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 351 Modern Rhetoric in Writing ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing
ENG 354 Radio-Television Script Writing
ENG 355 Advanced Technical Writing ENG 359 Writing for Films JRN 381 Feature Article Writing JRN 382 Public Relations Writing ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing I
ENG 453 Advanced Creative Writing II
ENG 455 Projects in Technical Writing
Quarter Hours Required 12 Electives A minimum of 3 additional quarter hours of upper division English, Communication, or Journalism selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Quarter Hours Required _3 Total Quarter Hours Required 54
English Minor
Required Courses
I. Two of the following courses:
ENG 211-212-213 World Literature
Each Course 3 Quarter Hours
Quarter Hours Required 6
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
II. Three of the following courses (at least one from
6ach 9rouP): Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 221-222-223 American Literature ENG 231-232-233 British Literature
Quarter Hours Required 9
III. One of the following courses: Each Course
3 Quarter Hours
ENG 201 English Grammar ENG 251 Advanced Composition
Quarter Hours Required 3 Electives A minimum of 9 additional quarter hours in upper division English courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Quarter Hours Required _9 Total Quarter Hours Required 27
Communications Minor
Required Courses
ENG 256 Introduction to Communication Theories
ENG 303 Semantics ENG 392 Communications Materials and Resources
Each Course 3 Quarter Hours
Five of the folowing courses:
Each Course 3 Quarter Hours
ENG 251 Advanced Composition ENG 255 Introduction to Technical Writing ENG 257 Communications in Arts and Industry
ENG 309 Modern Linguistic Studies in Writing
ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ENG 354 Radio-Television Script Writing ENG 355 Advanced Technical Writing ENG 356 Projects in Communication Theories
ENG 357 Technical Editing and Production ENG 358 Technical Communications ENG 359 Writing for Films JRN 382 Public Relations Writing ENG 388 Copyright, Libel and Slander ENG 393 Communication in Education ENG 455 Projects in Technical Writing JRN 483 News Media in an Urban Society RDG 205 Improvement of Reading II SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing SPE 374 Psychology of Communication SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life SOC 387 Mass Communication and Public Opinion I
SOC 388 Mass Communication and Public Opinion II
Quarter Hours Required
15
Electives A minimum of 12 additional quarter hours in upper division Communications, English, Journalism or cognate area courses in consultation with and approved by the Department of English.
Quarter Hours Required 12 Total Quarter Hours Required 36
Journalism Major
The Journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media including the press, broadcasting, public relations, and advertising.
Required Courses
Each Course 3 Quarter Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism
JRN 182 News Reporting
JRN 281 News Reporting Projects
JRN 282 News Editing and Copyreading
JRN 285 Press Photography
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues
JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing
JRN 482 Producing the Company Publication
JRN 483 News Media in an Urban Society
JRN 484 Propaganda and Public Opinion
Quarter Hours Required 36
Electives At least 9 additional quarter hours in upper division Journalism, English, Communications, or other cognate areas selected in consultation with and approved by the Journalism faculty are required. Students planning careers in Education should include JRN 385, Supervising of School Publications.
Quarter Hours Required _9 Total Quarter Hours Required 45
Journalism Minor
Required Courses
Each Course 3 Quarter Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism JRN 182 News Reporting JRN 281 News Reporting Projects JRN 282 News Editing and Copyreading JRN 381 Feature Article Writing JRN 382 Public Relations Writing JRN 383 Contemporary Issues JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing JRN 483 News Media in an Urban Society
Quarter Hours Required 27
Electives A minimum of 9 additional quarter hours of upper division courses in Journalism, English, Communications, or other cognate areas selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in Journalism.
Quarter Hours Required _9 Total Quarter Hours Required 36
ENG 100-4 Elements of Composition
(4+0)
A course in the fundamentals of sentence structure, diction, punctuation, spelling, and organization. Required of students whose facility in English is below the norm for first-year college students, as determined by tests and a writing sample. Students who complete the course with a grade of A may substitute it for English 101 and proceed to English 103. Students making B or C must take English 101.
ENG 101-4 Freshman Composition:
The Essay (4+0)
A course in writing exposition and argumentation. Instruction is given in standard English usage and effective methods of expression. Students practice writing by composing a number of short essays which the instructor corrects and evaluates.
Prerequisite: Admission to the College without deficiency or probationary status. Students admitted on probation or with de-
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SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
ficiencies may be required to take English 100. Regularly admitted students with identifiable weaknesses may be required to take ENG 100.
ENG 103-4 Freshman Composition: Research and Documentation (4+0)
A course in writing the research paper and documenting it properly. One or more extended papers are required.
Prerequisite: ENG 101, or grade of A in ENG 100.
ENG 106-3 English for Speakers of Other Languages (3+0)
Development of the basic skills of reading, writing, and speaking English for native and foreign speakers of other languages. Instruction in the fundamentals of English usage.
ENG 111-3 Introduction to Literature: Fiction (3+0)
A critical introduction to selected short stories and short novels, with emphasis on twentieth century British and American writings.
Recommended for the humanities Basic Studies requirement.
ENG 112-3 introduction to Literature: Drama (3+0)
A critical introduction to drama: study of a number of plays, mostly British and American.
Recommended for the humanities Basic Studies requirement.
ENG 113-3 Introduction to Literature: Poetry (3+0)
An introduction to modern American and British poetry through study of prosody, including methods of determining the voice of the poet, meaning and form in the poem, and simple explication approaches.
Recommended for the humanities Basic Studies requirement.
ENG 201-3 English Grammar (3+0) Study of the elements of modern English grammar.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ENG 211-3 World Literature I (3+0) Literature of the Ancient East, Greece, Rome, and Europe.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 212-3 World Literature II (3+0) Literature from the early Renaissance through the late Romantic Period.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 213-3 World Literature III (3+0) Continental literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 221-3 American Literature I (3+0) American literature from the Colonial Period through Emerson and Thoreau.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 222-3 American Literature II
(3+0)
American literature from Hawthorne through Henry James.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 223-3 American Literature III: Modern Era (3+0)
American literature from Stephen Crane through writers of the mid-twentieth century.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 231-3 British Literature I (3+0) British literature from the Old English period to the Restoration (1660).
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 232-3 British Literature II (3+0) British literature from the Restoration through the Romantic Period (1832).
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 233-3 British Literature III:
Modern Era (3+0)
British literature from the Victorian Period to the present.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 251-3 Advanced Composition (3+0)
Writing and critical study of expository prose, with emphasis on essays and documented papers.
Prerequisite: ENG 103, or permission of instructor.
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