Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1976-1977

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1976-1977
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text
Metropolitan State College
Bulletin 76-77 #1


AURARIA LIBRARY
Ulfl7Dl TflDDLS3
Volume XII Number 1
Published monthly. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Denver, Colorado.
This publication has been authorized by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. The provisions contained herein are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The information presented is based on commonly accepted practices at Colorado state colleges and plans developed to date for Metropolitan State College, but the College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the students term of attendance.
5/76-30M




METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE BUILDINGS
1. Aaron Building 1447 Tremont Place
2. Cherokee Building 1090 Cherokee Street
3. Child Care Center
1038 and 1044 Cherokee
4. College Bookstore
520 West Colfax Avenue
5. College Center 1339 Elati Street
6. Court Place Building 1421 Court Place
7. Double A Building 1300 Glenarm Place
8. Elati Building 1411 Elati Street
9. Forum Building (Administration Building) 250 West Fourteenth Avenue
10. Fox Building 1435 Fox Street
11. Glenarm Building 1222 Glenarm Place
12. Gold Building 1440 Fox Street
13. Library
1421 Elati Street
14. Olympic Building 1330 Fox Street
15. Press Building 1340 Glenarm Place
16. Speer Building 1360 Speer Blvd.
17. Student Activities Center 710 West Colfax Avenue
18. Three Thirty Three Building 333 West Colfax Avenue
19. United Way Building 1375 Delaware
20. Woodmen Building 1440 Speer Blvd.
21. Zook Building
431 West Colfax Avenue


Metropolitan State College
Bulletin
76-77
250 W. 14th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204


COLLEGE CALENDAR
COLLEGE CALENDAR 1976
SPRING TERM CLASSES BEGIN .............March 22
Last day to add classes ................March 26
Last day to apply for Spring Term graduation .............................March 26
Last day to drop classes with refund consideration ..........................March 29
Last day to submit a Summer Term mail registration form .................April 23
Guaranteed processing deadline for
Summer Term applications.................May 10
Summer Term walk-in registration period for new, readmitted and
late continuing students.....May 24-June 11
Spring Term final examinations.. .May 25-May 28
Last day of Spring Term..................May 28
Commencement ............................May 30
Memorial Day ............................May 31
SEMESTER CALENDAR BEGINS
SUMMER TERM CLASSES BEGIN ..............June 7
Last day to add classes................June 11
Last day to apply for Summer Term
graduation ...........................June 11
Last day to drop classes with refund
consideration ........................June 14
Last day to submit an Autumn Term
mail registration form ................July 2
Independence Day holiday
no classes..............................July 5
First five-week module ends................July 12
Second five-week module begins.............July 13
Guaranteed processing deadline for
Autumn Term applications .............July 26
Autumn Term walk-in registration period for new, readmitted and
late continuing students ........August 2-27
Summer Term ends. Final examinations will be given during the last class period of each class....................August 16
AUTUMN TERM CLASSES BEGIN .. August 23 Last day to add classes..................August 27
Last day to apply for Autumn Term
graduation .........................August 27
Last day to drop classes with refund
consideration ......................August 30
Labor Day no classes.............September 6
First five-week module ends........September 27
Second five-week module begins .September 28
Second five-week module ends.......November 1
Third five-week module begins......November 2
Last day to submit a Spring Term
mail registration form..............November 19
Thanksgiving vacation
no. classes ...............November 25 & 26
Autumn Term ends. Final examinations will be given during the last class
period of each class.............December 8
Guaranteed processing deadline for
Spring Term applications...........January 3
Spring Term walk-in registration period for new, readmitted and late continuing
students ..............January 17-February 4
SPRING TERM CLASSES BEGIN... .January 31
Last day to add classes ..............February 4
Last day to apply for Spring Term
graduation ........................February 4
Last day to drop classes with refund
consideration .....................February 7
First five-week module ends...............March 4
Second five-week module begins............March 7
Spring break no classes .........March 19-27
Second five-week module ends ..........April 15
Third five-week module begins.............April 18
Last day to submit a Summer Term
mail registration form ..............April 22
Guaranteed processing deadline for
Summer Term applications..................May 9
Spring Term ends. Final examinations will be given during the last class
period of each class ..................May 20
Commencement .............................May 22
Summer Term walk-in registration period for new, readmitted and late continuing students........May 23-June 10
1977
SUMMER TERM CLASSES BEGIN ............June 6
Last day to add classes................June 10
Last day to apply for Summer Term graduation ..........................June 10
Last day to drop classes with refund consideration .......................June 13
Independence Day no classes.............July 4
First five-week module ends..............July 11
Second five-week module begins.........July 12
Last day to submit an Autumn Term
mail registration form................July 15
Guaranteed processing deadline for
Autumn Term applications.............August 9
Autumn Term walk-in registration period for new, readmitted and late continuing
students .............August 15-September 12
Summer Term ends. Final examinations will be given during the last class period of each class..................August 15
2


CONTENTS
Page
College Calendar .................................................... 2
General Information on the College................................... 5
Auraria Higher Education Center Map.................................. 6
Auraria Higher Education Center...................................... 7
Admission ........................................................... 8
Student Financial Aid Programs ..................................... 13
Costs .............................................................. 16
Student Personnel Services.......................................... 17
Community Services ................................................. 21
Center for Experimental Studies..................................... 22
Academic Information................................................ 25
Omnibus Courses..................................................... 33
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements........................... 35
Degrees and Programs................................................ 39
School of Business.................................................. 41
Center for Education................................................ 55
School of Engineering Technology................................... 79
School of Liberal Arts.............................................. 99
School of Professional Studies......................................153
School of Science and Mathematics..................................181
Center for Urban Affairs............................................203
Administration .....................................................211
Academic Administrators.............................................213
Faculty.............................................................215
Alphabetical Index..................................................223
Metropolitan State College Map ......................Inside Back Cover
3


V 4


GENERAL INFORMATION
GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORY
Metropolitan State College was founded by an act passed by the Colorado Legislature in 1963, placing it under the control and management of the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. In the Fall of 1965, the College opened its doors to 1,189 students and offered the first classes of the lower division academic program.
In 1967, the Colorado General Assembly authorized an upper division program. Junior level courses were added that Fall and senior level courses in 1968. A decade later, in the Fall of 1975, Metropolitan State had enrolled over 12,000 students and had grown to become the largest college in the Denver area and one of the four largest institutions of higher learning in Colorado.
During 1975-76 Metropolitan State College commemorated its first ten years of service as a state institution and was designated a national bicentennial college campus.
GOALS
Metropolitan State Colleges first ten years were marked by dramatic enrollment growth and implementation of new educational approaches that reflect the realities of our times.
The enacting legislation for Metropolitan State College sets forth in general purpose: To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the State of Colorado generally. To perform this mission, the College is directed to be a multi-purpose, urban-oriented institution with comprehensive programs in the arts and sciences, career, technical and professional fields.
The College is authorized to offer the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Associate in Arts and Associate in Science.
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to provide equal educational and employment opportunities for all regardless of race, color, creed, age, sex, or national origin. The various academic programs, services, and administrative processes of the College are committed to achieving these goals.
ACCREDITATION
Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The teacher certification program is accredited by the National Council for the Accredita-
tion of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
STUDENT BODY
Metropolitan State Colleges diverse, commuter student body ranges in age from 18 to 80 and comes from different backgrounds and walks of life. The average age of the Colleges student body is 27 years, and the majority, are self-supporting, with almost 50 percent of the students attending part-time. Women account for about 40 percent of the total student population. Most of the Colleges students are residents of the five-county Denver metropolitan area.
FACILITIES
Metropolitan State College is presently located in the central part of the Denver metropolitan area in twenty leased buildings adjacent to Denvers Civic Center. The College will move to the new Auraria site during December, 1976. Classes will continue to be held in the present buildings through the Autumn Semester and then meet on the new campus for the Spring Semester.
FACULTY
Metropolitan State Colleges full-time faculty numbers over 250. The faculty are selected on the basis of teaching effectiveness and educational preparation. Highly qualified, they are dedicated to instructional excellence and innovative teaching ideas. Many of them have backgrounds that include business and professional work outside the realm of institutional learning. They are attracted to Metropolitan State College because of the challenge of an urban institution.
COMMUNITY SERVICES
As an urban college, Metropolitan State participates in the surrounding community.
All schools and centers at the College incorporate programs through which students work with community businesses and agencies in areas of the students' interests and expertise. These programs include internships, independent study placements, cooperative education, and student volunteer programs. Students are active in over 150 community organizations, governmental agencies, and local businesses each year.
All academic courses are open to area residents, and many are offered off-campus through various community service programs. The Colleges Community Services Office coordinates all community efforts and finds new approaches for continued community involvement.
5


Metropolitan State Colleges new campus site on the Auraria Higher Education Center
Auraria
Sher ication Center
HI Buildings Public Parks Parking
Public Transit Access N4~l Plazas
1 Warehouse
2 Public Safety
3 Physical Plant
4 Tivoli Brewery
5 Student Center
6 Physical Education
7 Emmanuel Information
Center
8 St. Cajetans
9 Education
10 Learning Resources
Center (30)
11 Science (11)
12 Arts (41)
13 Central Classrooms (42)
14 MSC Administration (29)
15 St. Elizabeths Church
16 Ecumenical Center
17 Ninth Street Park
18 Child Development Center
19 Child Care Center
20 Technology (43)
21 CCD Administration (28)
22 UCD Administration East Classrooms Bromley


AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
MOVE TO SITE
In its second decade of educational growth, Metropolitan State College will share in a new educational facility, the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC). The College moves to the Auraria site during December, 1976.
The Auraria concept is based on facility sharing and cooperation among three institutions Metropolitan State College, the Community College of Denver-Auraria campus, and the University of Colorado at Denver.
AHEC is located on a 169-acre historic site in downtown Denver bounded by Sixth Street, Wazee Street, Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard. The new facility will include classrooms, offices, laboratories, and shops; a health/physical education/recre-ation building; a science building; a services building; a day care center; a student services facility; and a library all to be shared by the three institutions.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The three institutions will continue to be governed by their separate boards and will maintain their distinctive roles and missions. Metropolitan State College will continue to offer a diversity of four-year degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences and to emphasize career preparation. The College is dedicated to the development of educational opportunities to meet the needs of the urban student. The Colleges curriculum also will be appropriately linked to the lower division programs at CCD and to the graduate programs at UCD.
AURARIA CONCEPT
Having the three institutions housed together in the Auraria Higher Education Center will allow students greater flexibility in their academic choices. A student may obtain an associate degree from CCD, a baccalaureate degree from MSC, and a graduate degree from UCD all at one location. Interinstitutional registration is encouraged and can be accomplished simply. The proximity of the Center to downtown Denver will enable students to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, political, cultural, and economic fabric of the inner-city.
ORIGIN OF PLAN
The Auraria Higher Education Center was born out of a provident educational endeavor to provide permanent quarters for three rapidly growing urban institutions. In 1967, the Auraria site was selected by the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado as the future home for Metropolitan State College, which had been operating for two years in scattered buildings in downtown Denver. Efforts began early in 1968 to find a location for the Community College of Denver, which had doubled in size, and for the University of Colorado at Denver, which was expanding its graduate programs. Out of this need to provide space for three institutions arose the concept for the Auraria Higher Education Center.
In 1971, Governor John Love created the Auraria Board of Directors to plan the campus, construct the buildings, and maintain the facilities. In 1972, the Colorado Legislature appropriated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus. Additional funds were contributed by the City of Denver, the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the State of Colorado. This makes the Center a creative example of cooperation by government at all levels.
HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE
A little more than a hundred years ago Auraria was a tiny community of determined pioneers looking for gold. Located at the mouth of the Cherry Creek, Auraria was one of several original town organizations which had sprung into existence during the late 1850s, including Denver, Highland, and St. Charles. One of the founding fathers of Auraria, Levi J. Russell, named the site after his hometown in Lumpkin County, Georgia.
When the settlement of Auraria became a part of Denver City in 1860, it had already established the first school, the first newspaper, and the first library.
Because of Aurarias historic significance in Denvers early beginnings, it is appropriate that the campus will be completed during Colorados centennial year.
Auraria today is a blending of the old and new modern, brick buildings; 19th century restored Victorian homes; Tivoli Brewery; St. Elizabeths Catholic Church; and St. Cajetan's Catholic Church. The site is a reminder of the past and an educational promise for the future.
7


ADMISSION
ADMISSION
ADMISSION INSTRUCTIONS
Applications for admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. Applications for admission must be received at the College not later than four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought for guaranteed processing. All credentials should be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records not later than four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. All credentials which are submitted become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student.
An official transcript must carry the seal of the sending institution, signed by the registering authority, and be issued by the sending institution within the last calendar year. Date of graduation and/or degree received must also appear on the transcript.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES
Admission of Freshmen (Applicants who have not attended college): To be eligible for admission, students must have graduated from an approved high school. Other factors considered are intelligence, personality, character, and comments by secondary school officials. Persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an individual basis after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test which show they have the ability to satisfactorily pursue programs of instruction which the College offers.
Colorado high school students may apply for admission and enroll while concurrently completing high school graduation requirements through the high school. Students must have prior consent from the high school, their guardian and Metropolitan State College. Students must be awarded the high school diploma before college credits are validated.
1. Obtain the Application for Admission form from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204.
2. This form should be completed and submitted along with the application fee directly to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, both the application and
the credentials must be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to insure that an official high school transcript is submitted to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions in time to meet processing dates.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The application fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after a preliminary evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of his admission status.
Admission Through ACT Although the ACT and SAT are not required for admission, high school students are encouraged to take the ACT or SAT to provide a basis for advising and counseling. If at the time the student takes the ACT or SAT, he indicates Metropolitan State College as one of his first three choices to receive the ACT or SAT Profile Reports, the following admission procedure shall apply:
1. A letter and card of application will be sent to the student.
2. If the student wishes to be considered for admission, he should sign the card, have his high school counselor sign it, and return it to MSC.
3. There is NO application fee.
4. The ACT and SAT Profile Reports and the application card will be used in lieu of a formal application.
5. The student need submit only one official high school transcript (following graduation) with the date the diploma was awarded. It is the students responsibility to insure that the official high school transcript is submitted to Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions in time to meet guaranteed processing dates.
Admission of Transfer Students (Applicants who have attended a college or university):
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited colleges or universities, an official transcript from each institution attended must be submitted. Transfer applicants are expected to present an overall average of C (2.00 based on a
8


ADMISSION
four-point system where an A grade is 4 points) on all college work previously attempted and must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college or university attended. Students who do not meet these standards should contact the Office of Admissions for individual consideration. Failure to report correctly any previous college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
1. Request an application for admission form from Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions.
2. Complete the application for admission and return it to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, the application must be mailed so that it will reach the college at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. A $10.00 application fee, which is non-refundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete information about the applicants high school record.
(b) The applicant has less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours of transferable college credits.
5. The applicant should request that one official transcript from each college or university attended be forwarded to the Office of Admissions at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicants record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
Transfer credits are normally accepted if they meet the following conditions:
1. Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent. Grades of D, F, and similarly graded courses will not transfer.
2. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
3. A maximum of 70 semester hours will be accepted from a two-year institution. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for work done at a four-year
institution or combination of two and four-year institutions.
4. A student earning a two-year degree from an accredited institution with a G.P.A. of 2.0 or better will be guaranteed 60 semester hours of transfer credit if he has met the following minimums in the MSC
basic studies areas:
Freshman English .......................... 4 hours
Humanities ................................ 8 hours
Science/Mathematics ....................... 8 hours
Social/Behavioral Science.................. 8 hours
plus Z additional hours in any one of
these areas.............................. 2 hours
30 hours
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
(Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for two or more semesters.)
1. Request an application for readmission from the Office of Admissions.
2. Complete the application for readmission and return it to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, the application should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. No application fee is required.
4. An applicant who has attended another collegiate institution since last enrollment at MSC must request one official transcript be forwarded to the Office of Admissions so that it will be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
(a) An applicant who was previously admitted as non-degree seeking and wishes to maintain this status but has in the interim attended another college or universtiy is required to submit an official transcript from that institution. If this credential is not received by the Office of Admissions, he may not be permitted to register until the credential is received.
(b) An applicant who was previously admitted as a non-degree student but now wishes to seek a degree at MSC must request one official transcript from all previously attended colleges or universities. A student will be permitted to register for subsequent semesters provided an official transcript from his last college or university is received. However, as a result of not submitting all transcripts on time, a degree seeking student will lose his registration priority. This priority will be re-established once all missing transcripts are received by the Office of Admissions.
9


ADMISSION
ADMISSION OF FOREIGN STUDENTS
Any student who indicates on his application for admission that his country of citizenship is a country other than the United States must contact the Director of Admissions.
1) Admission of permanent immigrants:
a) Those individuals holding a permanent immigrant visa must present the visa to the Director of Admissions prior to being accepted to the institution.
b) Official transcripts must be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
c) Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
d) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
2) Admission of students from abroad:
a) Applications for admission must be received prior to the following dates:
Summer Semester
1976 Mar. 15,1976
Autumn Semester
1976 May 31,1976 Spring Semester
1977 Nov. 7,1976
b) Credentials of previous academic work must be received four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
c) Applicants are required to submit English proficiency results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or English Language Services Test (ELS).
d) Students from abroad must pay their tuition and fees on the day they register. Failure to comply will result in withdrawal of their U. S. Immigration Form 20 (I-20).
e) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
If the student is academically admissible and has met the minimum requirements on the English proficiency examination, he will be issued the U. S. Immigration Form 20 (I-20). Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent immi-
grants should be forwarded to the Director of Admissions.
ORIENTATION
New Student Orientation is a program designed to assist all new and transfer students in becoming part of the College life. The program is planned to give each student personal attention through small group discussion which acquaints them with the College, its programs, services, activities, and facilities. Invitation to the Orientation Program will be sent prior to registration.
RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time he is granted admission. The classification is based upon information supplied by the student on his application for admission and in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Statute. Once determined, the residency status remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary. Written evidence in the form of a Petition for Change of Resident Status, along with documented evidence to support the students claim for residency, shall be submitted to the Director of Admissions.
The tuition classification statute requires that certain criteria be met:
1) The parents of an unemancipated minor must have been domiciled in the State for at least twelve consecutive months.
2) The emancipated minor must have been domiciled for at least twelve consecutive months after being emancipated.
3) All students must have been domiciled in the State for a minimum of twelve consecutive months after attaining the age of 21.
4) The registration of intent to make Colorado a permanent home. Intent to establish Colorado as ones permanent home must be established one year prior to being granted residency status. The following may be considered, as evidence of intent: a) fulltime employment in Colorado; b) ownership of residential real property in Colorado; c) filing of a Colorado
10


ADMISSION
State Income Tax return; d) obtaining a valid Colorado motor vehicle operators license; e) registration of vehicle in Colorado; f) and the compliance with any law imposing a man-
datory duty upon a domiciliary of the State.
Any questions regarding classification of resident status should be resolved with the Office of Admissions prior to registration.
11


ij
J' 1


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to providing equal access to higher education to all persons qualified for admission who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered. Charges to students are low because a considerable portion of the cost of operation is paid from Colorado tax revenues.
The Office of Student Financial Aid provides assistance for students who need additional finances to attend the College. This aid is available through the National Direct Student Loan Program, the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program, the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program, the Colorado State Grant Program, as well as the College Work-Study, Colorado Work-Study, Nursing Loan, Nursing Scholarship, and Law Enforcement Education Programs.
The Office of Student Financial Aid requires the American College Testing Programs Family Financial Statement (FFS) to determine the degree of need. This form is designed to identify the resources of both the student and his parents. The Family Financial Statement meets federal requirements. Use of this form means that all student needs are evaluated on the same criteria, although both the FFS and the Office of Student Financial Aid take into consideration individual circumstances.
APPLICATION PROCEDURE
The following forms are required from those requesting financial assistance:
Freshmen
These forms, which may be obtained from the Office of Student Financial Aid or local high schools, must be submitted before consideration can be given.
1. Institutional Data Sheet (IDS).
2. The Family Financial Statement of the American College Testing Program (FFS).
Transfer Students
1. A statement of all forms of financial aid received from other institutions.
2. Institutional Data Sheet (IDS).
3. The Family Financial Statement (FFS).
Continuing Metropolitan State College Students
1. Institutional Data Sheet (IDS).
2. The Family Financial Statement (FFS).
ELIGIBILITY
All financial assistance will be based on financial need, and any student with a demonstrated need will receive consideration. The application for financial aid at Metropolitan State College includes an estimated budget for tuition, fees, and books, as well as travel and personal needs, together with an itemized statement of resources that must include parental contributions, spouses earnings, and outside income such as veterans benefits and Social Security. This information enables the Office of Student Financial Aid to analyze needs and help the student develop a financial plan for college attendance.
Participants in the federal and State aid programs must be citizens of the United States, Nationals, or be a permanent resident of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, maintain normal progress toward a degree and attend the College on a full time basis (12 hours per semester). Aid, not to exceed tuition, fees, books, and transportation, is available to part-time students (six hours per semester) on a need basis.
DURATION OF AWARDS
All financial aid awards are made for one academic year (or less). To continue receiving an award, a student must:
1. Be in good standing with the College.
2. Continue to demonstrate financial need.
Continuing awards are contingent upon adequate funding of the federal and State financial aid programs.
NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The awarding of financial aid is a contractual agreement between the student and Metropolitan State College. The continuation of financial aid is based upon the student making normal academic progress. Normal academic progress is defined as registering for and completing 12 hours per semester (in some cases a student may register for less with prior approval from the Financial Aid Office). Students failing to complete 12 hours per semester for two consecutive semesters will have their financial aid reviewed and reduced to direct education costs (providing at least 6 hours were completed each semester). Students failing to complete six (6) hours during any given semester will have their financial aid
13


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
package canceled. Reinstatement of the aid will be based upon individual circumstances and available monies. A no-credit (N/C) or F grade is not considered a completed course for financial aid purposes.
It cannot be emphasized too much that the receipt of aid carries with it a concurrent responsibility to complete those hours for which the student has registered.
LAST GUARANTEED PROCESSING DATES
Summer Semester Apr. 1
Fall Semester Apr. 15
Spring Semester Oct. 24
LOANS
National Direct Student Loans (NDSL) Undergraduate students may borrow up to $5,000 during their undergraduate career. Total loans for the first two years of school may not exceed $2,500. Repayment of the NDSL begins nine months after the student ceases to be a half-time (6 hours) student. Repayment on loans made prior to September 1975, is made in monthly payments of no less than $15 per month. First time recipients as of September, 1975 repay NDSL funds at a minimum of $30 per month. The period of repayment cannot exceed ten years. The NDSL has cancellation provisions. Information regarding cancellation may be obtained from the Student Financial Aid Office.
Principal and interest payments are deferrable during periods of at least part-time study.
Federally Insured Student Loans (FISL) The College cooperates with banks in making information available to students. Undergraduates may borrow up to $2,500 in a single year, but not more than $7,500 during their undergraduate career. A student not already on full financial aid may apply through his own or local banks. Applications are accepted throughout the school year. Forms and information are available at the Office of Financial Aid.
Nursing Loan Funds
To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Status as a part-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a part-time student (6 hours or more).
2. Acceptance in the Nursing Degree program at the College.
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement.
4. Good standing in the College.
Short Term Loans
Short term emergency loans are availabU through the Student Government Loar Fund. Their offices are located in the Stu dent Center at 710 W. Colfax. Loans up t< $80 may be secured for emergency ex penses. All loans are due and payable b} the end of the semester in which they were borrowed.
A loan fund has been established ir memory of Raymond R. Uhl, a former stu dent at Metropolitan State College, whc was killed in military action in Vietnam The purpose of this fund is to assist need} students through loans for short periods o time.
GRANTS
Basic Educational Opportunity Grants An entitlement program providing up tc $1,400 per year depending upon an analy sis of family income and the colleges edu cational costs. Effective July 1, 1976 al students are eligible to apply, regardless of when they first attended a post-secondary institution. Grants average approximately $750 per year.
Applications are available in the Financia Aid Office and are processed directly by the federal government. There is no cos to apply.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Amounts vary from $200 to $1,500 annually depending upon financial need and funds allotted to the College by the federal government. Grants are renewable subject tc continued financial need, a satisfactory academic record and availability of funds These grants were established for students for low income families by the Higher Education Act of 1965.
Colorado State Grant Program Awards vary from $100 to $1,000 depending on financial need and funds allotted to the College by the State of Colorado.
State Student Incentive Grant Grants of up to $750 to Colorado residents who demonstrate substantial financial need. These grants are matched with Colorado State Grants.
Criminal Justice Assistance Programs
1. Law Enforcement Education Program (LEEP).
14


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
a. LEEP grants are available to eligible personnel employed full-time with a publicly funded, criminal justice agency. Grants pay tuition, fees, and book allowance up to $250 per quarter ($400 per semester). Grant obligation consists of two years of service within any criminal justice system. Failure to complete this obligation requires repayment at seven percent interest of any unrepaid balance.
b. Full-time students who qualify for a LEEP grant may elect to receive a LEEP loan instead. In certain circumstances, the loan may supplement the grant. Loans may be cancelled at the rate of 25 percent per year of employment in any public criminal justice system, or must be repaid at seven percent interest following graduation if the grantee does not complete the obligation, OR the status of the student changes from full-time to part-time.
c. Veterans Administration education benefits may be received concurrently with LEEP grants. Colorado veterans education benefits and Colorado scholarships must be considered as duplication of benefits, and LEEP will pay only the remainder of the grantees direct cost (tuition, fees and book allowance).
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Office of Student Financial Aid has a limited number of private scholarships available. Questions in this area should be directed to the Office of Student Financial Aid.
Nursing Grant Funds
To be eligible, an applicant must meet the
following requirements:
1. Status as a part-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a part-time student.
2. Acceptance in the nursing degree program at the College.
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement (extreme financial need must exist to receive a scholarship).
4. Good standing in the College.
Colorado Scholars Program Tuition assistance grants not to exceed the cost of resident tuition or $100 per semester, whichever is smaller, are available through the academic departments. Recipients are chosen by departmental scholarship committees based on departmental criteria.
Students interested should contact their major departments.
Athletic Scholarships Metropolitan State College has a limited number of Athletic Scholarships available. These scholarship awards vary from one-half to full in-state tuition. Metropolitan State College athletics include soccer, basketball, swimming, track and field, tennis, and baseball for men; and for women the sports include field hockey, volleyball, skiing, basketball, softball, and tennis.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Federal College Work-Study Program The student is employed by the institution to help defray the costs of attending college. Hourly rates normally vary from $2.20 to $3.50 per hour depending upon the skill and experience of the student. The student must demonstrate need.
Off-Campus Work-Study Program To a limited extent, jobs for needy students are available with off-campus, non-profit, public interest agencies, Federal agencies, State agencies and City agencies.
Colorado Work-Study Program
The recipient must be a Colorado resident.
Need must be shown.
No-Need Institutional Employment The State of Colorado and the College have limited funds available to employ students within the institution who possess the skills needed to perform jobs required by the school. Such employment is not based upon financial need.
Outside Employment Students who do not show need may also be placed in jobs outside the school on a part-time basis. Many Metropolitan State College students have received part-time jobs outside the school. Students interested should contact the Office of Job Development, 1447 Tremont Street.
OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID
Scholarships and low interest loans from sources such as churches and foundations are available through the Office of Student Financial Aid. Many private lending agencies have developed attractive loans for college students. High school counselors and libraries are sources of additional information.
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COSTS
COSTS
The Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of registration for any semester.
TUITION AND COLLEGE SERVICE FEES
Students taking 10 or more hours per. semester: In State Out-of-State
Tuition per semester College Service Fee per semester (includes $132.00 $525.00
health insurance) 36.00 36.00
College Center Bond Fee 6.00* 6.00*
TOTAL $174.00 $567.00
Students taking 9 or fewer hours per semester: 1st credit hour:*
Tuition per credit hour College Service Fee per credit hour (does not $ 13.00 $ 35.00
include health insurance) 3.00 3.00
College Center Bond Fee 6.00* 6.00*
TOTAL for 1st Credit Hour $ 22.00 $ 44.00
2 thru 9 credit hours: *
Tuition per credit hour College Service Fee per credit hour (does not $ 13.00 $ 35.00
include health insurance) 3.00 3.00
TOTAL per, Credit Hour for
2 thru 9 Credit Hours $ 16.00 $ 38.00
* All regularly enrolled students are required to pay
a $6 fee for the Aurar.ia College Center Bond issue
regardless of the number of hours being Charge per credit hour in taken.
excess of 18 (see page 26). Credit by Examination or Credit for Life Experience per semester $ 9.00 $ 35.00
hour. $ 6.50 $ 17.50
STANDARD FEES
Application Fee (required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is non-refundable and will not be applied on tuition.) $ 10.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00
SPECIAL FEES
Class Drop Fee (for each class dropped during first six days of classes) $ 5.00
Late Payment Fee 10.00
Returned Check Penalty 5.00
Health Insurance (Single coverage included in College Service Fee for students taking ten or more semester hours. These students may apply for a waiver if they have other coverage.)
Health Insurance Rates:
Single Coverage $12 per semester
Coverage for one dependent $31 per semester
Coverage for two or more
dependents $54 per semester
Above premiums must be paid within first ten days of classes.
OTHER COST INFORMATION
In assessing tuition and College Service fees for the Summer Semester, the total hours for which a student registers in fifteen-week, ten-week, or five-week sessions will be used to determine whether these charges are based on the flat rate or on the semester-hour rate.
The cost of books and supplies averages about $300 per academic year with the highest cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other personal expenses will vary with individuals.
TUITION ADJUSTMENTS
Students officially withdrawing from the College during the first six days of classes will be credited with a 100 percent reduction in tuition and fee charges. Students officially reducing their semester-hour load during the first six days of classes to a level requiring lower tuition and fees will be credited with a full and appropriate reduction in tuition and fee charges. No reduction in charges for withdrawal or load reduction will be made after the first six days of classes.
The Business Office of MSC has a Review Committee to evaluate disputed tuition and fee charges.
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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
The Vice President for Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as admissions, records, registration, orientation, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, placement, student health services, and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
Other student services, such as academic advising, skills reinforcement, tutorial assistance, and veterans services, are available in the Center for Experimental Studies.
CONDUCT OF STUDENTS
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to give students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. Each student is expected to conform to high standards of conduct at the College and elsewhere. The College reserves the right to determine whether or not a particular act conforms to such standards and to exclude from the College any student whose conduct does not conform to high standards.
COUNSELING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER
The Center exists for the sole purpose of providing competent, professional assistance in two broad areas to all students enrolled in the College. These areas are:
1) Counseling for Educational and Career Planning and 2) Counseling for Personal Growth and Change. These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, counseling and educational groups, as well as in the traditional one-to-one setting.
Confidential information is never given to anyone outside agencies or the College administration without the written consent of the student.
Any student enrolled at Metropolitan State College for at least one course is entitled to all services provided by the Center at no additional cost. Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problem that interferes with achieving success at the College. The student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the College, in order to receive assistance.
Most group programs begin at the start of each semester. Please register prior to
or during the first week of classes. Students seeking assistance should contact the Center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs described below.
The Counseling and Career Development Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc.
COUNSELING FOR EDUCATIONAL AND CAREER PLANNING
Educational Counseling and Study Skills Programs
Ineffective study methods, lack of planning, poor time management, etc., often lead to failure in college. The Center provides assistance for a variety of educational problems including lack of concentration, motivation, test anxiety, goal setting, test taking, etc.
Seminar for Returning Students Designed to ease the readjustment to an academic situation for students who have interrupted their education. The Counseling Center works closely with the Skills Center which provides tutorial assistance.
Credit-by-Examination Programs The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is managed by the Counseling Center. See Academic Information section of this Bulletin for details about CLEP and other credit-by-examination programs.
Improvement of Study Skills Class A two-credit hour course (Reading 102). Focus is on skill building in areas such as studying effectively, making the most of available time, taking worthwhile notes, improving concentration, and taking tests. Includes discussions about goal setting, anxieties about tests and speaking in class, organization, and motivation, etc.
Career Information Library Contains information on employment projections, salary surveys, training, and educational programs. Books, pamphlets, college bulletins, etc., are available on career planning and job finding.
Career Planning Workshop Designed to assist students in focusing on a career that is most relevant to their interests and abilities. Through lectures and discussions, participants will learn practical
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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
methods of choosing a career and setting life/or work goals.
Workshop On Alternative Careers Aims primarily at techniques for self-evaluation. Will consider questions such as: Who am I (needs, values, personality traits, life style, etc.)? What needs to be done in the world? How may I set about doing it (e.g. selling my ideas to an employer, obtaining a grant, designing my own business or service)?
Career Development Seminar A two-credit hour course (Psychology 390). Objectives: 1) to educate students, in-depth, for an ongoing, life-long process of career development and 2) to equip students to assist others with career planning. Experiential learning and field projects will be part of the seminar.
COUNSELING FOR PERSONAL GROWTH AND CHANGE Personal, private, one-to-one help is available in each of the areas described below for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar, or group.
Personal Growth and Development Group I
Offers participation in a low-structure group setting designed to develop skills in communicating honestly, directly, and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through self exploration in a supportive atmosphere. Deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts, frustrations, conflicts about school, job, family, sex, loneliness, dating, etc.
Personal Growth and Development Group II
Designed for students who have participated in a Counseling Center personal development type group who wish to have additional structured group experience in human interaction and growth.
Anxiety Reduction Workshops Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning. The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e., relaxation and counterconditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions. Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program.
Marriage/Living Together Workshops For men and women married or unmar-
ried who live together in a husband-wife relationship. The primary objectives are to help couples identify and overcome problems, to increase understanding and acceptance of self and others, and to promote a sense of harmony and well-being in the relationship.
Separation and Divorce Counseling Group
Designed to help people whose marriage (traditional or nontraditional) has broken up to make the transition from being married to being single again. An intensive group experience that includes both didactic (i.e., educational) and group counseling sessions.
Awareness Workshop Group members will involve themselves in working with their own feelings, improving their interactions with others, and increasing their awareness of themselves and their environment through experiential group activities.
Explorations in Intimacy A workshop designed for couples who are planning marriage (traditional or nontraditional) in the near future. Involves educational and group activities. Areas of focus include communication skills, the role of each partner, expectations versus reality, effective fighting, and honest expression of feelings.
CAREER PLACEMENT OFFICE
The Career Placement Office assists students and alumni of Metropolitan State College in securing employment which will best utilize their preparation, experience, and abilities. These services involve working closely with the various academic departments, school districts, businesses, industries, and governmental and private agencies. A library of vocational literature is maintained and information is provided regarding supply and demand of personnel, requirements, salaries, trends, and other relevant data. Interview schedules are arranged for prospective employers to meet with interested candidates, and individual notices of job vacancies are mailed to job candidates. Data on graduate school fellowships, assistantships, scholarships, and catalogs, are also available in this office. The Career Placement Office also conducts Professional Job-Hunting Techniques Seminars periodically throughout each semester. The Seminar is open to any individual who is seeking to learn or upgrade his/her skills in finding a career level job.
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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
HOUSING
Although the College does not operate dormitories, it assists students in finding adequate housing in the Denver area through the Housing Information Center located in the Student Activities Center. Students are invited to look through these listings to find accommodations suited to their needs. The Housing Center will be located in the Auraria Student Center upon its opening.
HEALTH SERVICES
Student Health Services provides professional care for any MSC student. Registered nurses, College physicians, and a psychiatrist are available during scheduled hours. Services include treatment of minor illnesses and injuries, first aid, TB detection tests, birth control, health counseling, information on medical problems, and free health literature.
Each student must complete a preentrance health questionnaire. If he does not wish to complete the questionnaire, then a pre-entrance physical examination must be performed by a physician of his choice at his expense. The required form may be obtained from Student Health Services. Failure to complete one of the above automatically denies the student medical services at the Student Health Center.
INSURANCE PROGRAMS
There is a mandatory-with-waiver medical insurance policy which provides insurance for accidental injury and/or hospitalization expenses. Full-time MSC students are automatically covered. Part-time MSC students or dependents of students may also participate in the insurance program for a nominal fee each quarter. Part-time students are not covered by the insurance program unless they pay an additional fee at the beginning of each semester.
BOOKSTORE
The College provides the required materials and texts needed by the students of Metropolitan State College at the College Bookstore, 520 W. Colfax Ave. After moving to the Auraria Higher Education Center, the Bookstore will be located on the garden level of the Auraria Student Center.
MILITARY INFORMATION
The College, through the Office of Admissions and Records, furnishes information about a students enrollment to his local board when the student supplies his Selec-
tive Service number, his local board address, and other required information at registration time.
AIR FORCE RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
Students at Metropolitan State College may register and attend Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado. Registration must be made on the Boulder campus. Courses are conducted leading to a commission in the Air Force upon earning a baccalaureate degree. Effective credit for successful completion of these courses is provided by Metropolitan State College.
(1) Four-year programs are available to students with a minimum of 8 semesters remaining at Metropolitan State College. Application for these programs should be made during fall registration at the University of Colorado (Boulder campus) after consultation with the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado.
(2) The two-year program is available to students with at least 4 semesters of work remaining at Metropolitan State College. Applications are accepted between November 1 and March 15.
For further information, contact:
Dean of Student Services
Metropolitan State College or Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies Air Force ROTC Detachment 105 Folsom Stadium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302 Phone 492-8351
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS
TRAINING CORPS
Students at Metropolitan State College may register and attend Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (AROTC) classes at the University of Colorado. Registration must be made on the Boulder Campus. Courses are conducted leading to a commission in the Army upon earning a baccalaureate degree. Effective credit for successful completion of these courses is provided by Metropolitan State College.
(1) Army ROTC offers four-year and two-year college programs. The four-year program consists of a basic course and an advanced course. The basic course, taken in the freshman and sophomore years, provides instruction in the fundamentals of leadership and management with emphasis on leadership development.
(2) The advanced course is an elective and is normally taken in the junior and
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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES
senior years. Students who have demonstrated a potential for becoming officers are selected for this instruction, which includes advanced leadership and management, the theory and dynamics of the military team, and the development of students abilities to think creatively and to speak and write effectively.
For further information, contact:
Dean of Student Services Metropolitan State College, or Professor of Military Science Army ROTC
Folsom Stadium, Gate 5, Room 216 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302 Telephone: 492-6497
MILITARY CREDIT
Veterans with one year of continuous active military service who have been honorably discharged should request an evaluation for military credit. Form DD 214 must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records.
COLLEGE CENTER
The Metropolitan State College Center serves as the focal point for the many cultural, educational, and recreational activities of the College community available to students, faculty, administration, alumni, and guests.
As part of the educational program of the College, the Center encourages self-directed activities through its various boards, committees, and staff. Maximum opportunity is given for self-realization and growth in individual social competency and group effectiveness.
Currently, the College Center operates the Colfax Center at 520 W. Colfax, the Student Activities Center at 710 W. Colfax, the Elati Center at 1339 Elati Street, and lounges dispersed in several of the academic buildings. During the 1976-77 academic year, the College Center will move to its new facility on the Auraria Higher Education Center. Housed in the new Auraria Student Center will be the College Bookstore, student activities, cafeteria, rathskellar, MSC administrative offices, T. V. and music listening lounges, commuter center, recreation center, and a variety of quiet lounges for relaxation and study. These facilities will be used by students of the three institutions on Auraria.
LIBRARY
The holdings of the College Library are closely coordinated with the expanding curriculum and have a high degree of currency. The College Library has in use approximately 138,400 books and 40,000 microforms (fiche, ultrafiche, and film).
A Library Handbook, Resource Realization, and many other bibliographies and library publications are available at the Library, 1421 Elati Street.
CHILD CARE CENTER
Metropolitan State College will be participating in the newly developed Auraria Child Care Center. This unique ten classroom facility, to be shared with the University of Colorado-Denver Center and the Community College of Denver, will be licensed for 145 children per hour. Since student parents will use the Center on a part-time basis while they are attending classes or studying, children from as many as 400 families could be served.
The Program will be a child-centered one, providing for individual ages, needs, and interests through a comprehensive range of activities. A primary objective of the Center will be to develop competent and creative young children who are continually learning to cope effectively with themselves, peers and adults, and the environment. The staff foresees its function as stimulating, encouraging, and helping the child integrate what he learns. While the curriculum will be geared for children between the ages of one to six years, provisions can and will be made for children up to twelve years of age.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
The Student Activities Center is presently located at 710 W. Colfax. It houses the Associated Students of Metropolitan State College (ASMSC), 13 of the 33 clubs and organizations, the student newspaper, and the College Center and student activities administrative staffs.
The new facility scheduled for opening during the academic year will house the clubs and organizations of the three institutions, the student governments of the three schools, the student activities administrative staffs and those services designed to assist and enhance the growth and development of the clubs and organizations.
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COMMUNITY SERVICES
COMMUNITY SERVICES
The Office of Community Services coordinates and develops a variety of community-oriented programs not assigned to specific schools or centers. The programs administered by the Office of Community Services provide educational and assistance services in the metropolitan area; coordinate extended campus offerings, both credit and non-credit; and furnish an experimental dimension to academic programs. Community service activities, which respond wherever possible to documented community needs, demonstrate the Colleges commitment to its role and mission as a comprehensive, urban-oriented institution.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Extended-campus credit course offerings are provided for interested students on location in Denver, Adams, Arapahoe, and Jefferson Counties. Courses usually correspond to or parallel Bulletin listings and are authorized through the appropriate College departments. Standard tuition charges apply within the four-county urban campus.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Program provides participating students with on-the-job experience and training related directly to their chosen academic field. The Cooperative Education experience integrates career and academic pursuits through relevant off-campus internship placements on an alternating semester or part-time basis. The Cooperative Education staff works closely with students, employers, and faculty members in order to place as many interested students as possible in this earning while learning program. Students applying for field internships through the Center for Cooperative Education may submit an application for omnibus course credit following prescribed guidelines.
LEARNING FOR LIVING
Learning for Living is a non-credit life enrichment program for adults in Denver and surrounding communities. LFL offerings concentrate on personal growth and topics of individual or group interest and encourage the open exchange of ideas. Convenient locations, qualified faculty, and a variety of programs, formats, and time schedules have contributed to the programs popularity throughout the metropolitan Denver area. Courses vary in length from one-day workshops to periods of several weeks and are open to all persons regardless of previous education or experience.
TITLE I PROGRAM (Higher Education Act of 1965)
Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965 provides funds for institutions of higher
education to pursue projects in the area of community service and continuing education. The projects undertaken relate to meeting identified community needs and assisting in the solution of community problems. Projects developed and supported at the College include the Center for Human Effectiveness; the Metro College for Living, a program for developmentally disabled adults; the Musicgenerians; and the Center for Political Awareness and Understanding. Funds are available on a limited basis for students and faculty to implement community service programs consistent with the approved Title I State Plan.
SPEAKERS RESOURCE CENTER
The Speakers Resource Center provides speakers upon request to clubs, organizations, schools, and citizens groups in the metropolitan area. The faculty and staff members who offer their services without charge through the Center are knowledgeable and experienced in their individual fields. They can provide informative and entertaining insights into a broad array of topics in response to community requests. A brochure listing subject areas, topics, and speakers is available.
COMMUNITY ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Metropolitan State College Community Advisory Council includes thirty-two members, reflecting a variety of backgrounds and points of view. The membership includes business leaders, legislators, homemakers, students, and alumni. The Council meets quarterly to offer opinions, expertise, and observations to the College from various sectors of the community. Proceedings are published and distributed to Council members, community leaders, and the Colleges schools and centers. The Councils observations assist the College in responding creatively to changing educational needs.
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CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
The Center for Experimental Studies was established by Metropolitan State College to coordinate various innovative programs and approaches that cannot be accommodated through the Colleges regular curriculum. The emphasis is on innovative programs, minority groups, and those adults needing basic or transitional programs in order to either enter the mainstream of college curriculum or the job market. The general mission of the Center is to encourage students to learn at an advanced level in a concentrated manner and at their own rate.
Encouragement is given to all departments to develop and implement non-traditional, innovative, and experimental courses and methods of instruction. After experimentation, these courses and methods may become a regular part of the College curriculum.
ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER
The Academic Advising Center coordinates academic advising and related academic matters in the eight schools and centers of Metropolitan State College. It is directly responsible for advising those students who have not declared a major or are in the process of changing majors and those students admitted to MSC on a probationary status.
The Advising Center is also a central facility where all students may obtain information concerning many different areas of the College. The basic philosophy of the Academic Advising Center is to maintain a personal relationship between the College and the student and to assist students in any way possible during decision and adjustment periods.
The Advising Center is staffed by professional advisors and is open to every student enrolled at MSC as well as those who expect to be attending in the future.
CONTRACT MAJOR/MINOR PROGRAM
The Conrtact Major/Minor Program is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with his Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific individual career objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing major and/or minor program. It is not designed to replace any existing major or minor programs but is individual in nature and is planned to meet the specific needs of the student.
For further information contact the Academic Advising Center or the Dean of the Center for Experimental Studies.
EPIC (EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR THE INNER CITY)
An educational opportunity model offering marginal skid row men and women an
opportunity to participate and interact in an educational and social context which embodies more normative expectations than have previously been part of their life-style.
FITZSIMONS ARMY HOSPITAL AND
LOWRY AIR FORCE BASE PREP PROGRAMS
These programs are taught at Fitzsimons Army Hospital and Lowry Air Force Base for servicemen prior to discharge.
Courses may be offered in Mathematics Study Skills, Reading, and Communications to enable the veteran to enroll in college for the pursuit of higher education.
OFFICE OF JOB DEVELOPMENT
The MSC Job Development Office serves the entire student body, but particularly the veteran. The primary purpose is to provide an employment development center for those seeking part-time and full-time employment. Related services, such as employment counseling, interview and resume preparation, and allied agency referrals are offered. Applicants are encouraged to apply their skills, past experiences, or special training to specific occupations. The office is staffed by job development specialists whose primary aim is to assist the students and veterans in securing employment.
OFFICE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
The Office of Veterans Affairs is a federally funded program designed to provide student veterans with all services. These services include enrollment certification, assistance with problems on VA checks, counseling assistance, remedial instruction, and tutorial services. The Office of Veterans Affairs also coordinates the activities of the Vets Project, Veterans Assistance Center, Office of Job Development, Servicemens Opportunity
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CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
College, and Project Ahead. (See separate descriptions of these programs.)
From time to time, the Office of Veterans Affairs will offer special courses, seminars, etc., for student veterans that may or may not be for credit. Special counseling and assistance in all areas, such as legal, personal, housing, employment, etc., are also available.
OPEN DOOR
The Open Door Program offers to the exoffender financial aid and specialized counseling and assistance in re-socialization. The program is staffed by persons having a background in the field who are familiar with the necessities of the emerging exoffender. The staff is also available for lectures on problems of the ex-offender.
PROJECT AHEAD
Project Ahead is a program designed to enable new volunteers in the U.S. Army to coordinate their academic activities while in the service. For more information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs or a U.S. Army Recruitment Office.
SERVICEMENS OPPORTUNTY COLLEGE
Metropolitan State College has received recognition as a Servicemens Opportunity College. Further information can be obtained from the Director of the Office of Veterans Affairs or the Director of Admissions.
SHORT TERM INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS
The general mission of this program is twofold: It is to enable students in selfstructuring groups under faculty direction to learn at an advanced level in a concentrated way what they want to know, when they want to know it, and at their own rate. This program is primarily interdisciplinary in nature.
In addition, new programs, courses, and methods for teaching are generated for trial within the Center. Later they may be absorbed into existing academic structures, or may become new departments or schools.
Encouragement and assistance is given departments within MSC to develop and implement Adaptive Self-Paced Learning courses.
SKILLS REINFORCEMENT CENTER
The Skills Reinforcement Center is charged with the task of providing academic supportive services for Metropolitan State College students. The Center offers individualized learning to the students, assisted personally by instructors, tutors, or both.
The Skills Center provides for students in a variety of ways:
Tutorial Program: Either long-term or drop-in assistance is provided for students and is easily accessible in a number of classroom buildings. The tutorial service is free and the student may apply for tutorial assistance by stopping in or by telephone inquiry.
Skills Development: The Skills Center staff will administer academic diagnostic tests and prescribe a program of study for students desirous of such action. Besides identification and prescription, the Skills Center staff will assist students in implementing a prescribed course of action.
Academic Support: The efforts of the Skills Center are directed toward encouraging the individual student to begin his educational experience at his present level while providing him with enrichment materials and a chance to relearn academic basics which he may have forgotten. Enrichment materials in many disciplines are available through the Skills Center in a variety of media.
Study Skills Development: The Skills Center staff will assist students in developing study skills essential to a successful college career. Note-taking, listening skills, and writing term papers are a few of the skills that the Center assists students in acquiring.
Center for the Blind and Physically Handicapped: The Skills Center attempts to provide for students, in any academic area, who are blind or physically handicapped. A variety of materials as well as personal assistance is available for students requesting such assistance.
Besides the programs mentioned, the Skills Center staff is involved through many departments in providing for students. The student who is desirous of academic assistance, at any level, can find such assistance at no cost through the Skills Reinforcement Center.
UNIVERSITY YEAR FOR ACTION
A program under the auspices of ACTION where MSC students serve full-time for one year as volunteers in community agencies and at the same time receive academic credit. The focus of UYA is to combine the
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CENTER FOR EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
resources and skills of the College, the community, the student volunteer, and the federal government in an attempt to deal with the problems of poverty in the urban community.
UPWARD BOUND
The program is aimed at recruiting students from secondary schools who, through poor academic preparation or lack of motivation, have little opportunity for a formal education. Upward Bound will make certain areas of the community aware of the accessibility of a higher education program at MSC. Upward Bound students receive instruction in skills reinforcement, reading, writing, vocabulary, and spelling. Tutoring is also given in the academic programs in which they are now enrolled. Students receive career counseling in specific vocations. Tours and field trips are used extensively for this purpose.
VETERANS ASSISTANCE CENTER
The general purpose of the VAC is to help the veteran. Specific purposes include: counseling (personal, social, testing, etc.); tutorial help (Skills Reinforcement Center, G.l. Bill, tutorial assistance, and departmental assistance); remedial assistance
(special reading classes, orientation, seminars); and referral (employment, housing, financial, academic, on-the-job training, child care, transportation, food stamps, etc.)
VETERANS EDUCATION AND TRAINING SERVICE
A program sponsored by the Office of Economic Opportunity and Denver Opportunity, Inc. The emphasis of this program is to recruit veterans, especially of the minority groups, and encourage them to use their G. I. benefits.
VETERANS UPWARD BOUND
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate Vietnam era Veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is done during a 10-week bridge quarter called Basic College. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aids advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided the participant.
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Effective June, 1976, the College converts from the quarter to the semester system with each semester, Autumn, Spring, and Summer, consisting of fifteen weeks of instruction. Running concurrently with the fifteen-week courses will be five-week courses, or modules, scheduled to begin on the first week, the sixth week, and the eleventh week of the fifteen-week semester. The calendar system has been called the flexible five-week fifteen-week calendar. During any fifteen-week semester, students may enroll in fifteen-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under Course Load are not exceeded.
Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Enrollment can be on a full-time or parNtime basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a baccalaureate or associate degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons.
The schedule to be followed during the 1976-1977 academic year has been strongly influenced by the construction schedule of the Auraria Higher Education Center. All MSC buildings should be ready for occupancy on December 1, 1976. In order to schedule a mid-winter move, the College has planned a ten-week Summer Session for the period June 7 through August 16, 1976, and a fifteen-week Autumn Semester for the period August 23 through December 8, 1976. The fifteen-week Spring Semester will not begin until January 31, 1977, and will conclude on May 20, 1977. The seven-week period from December 8 to January 31 will be used to move the College to the Auraria location.
ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College should review the Colleges admission requirements. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible for degree programs.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College are eligible to register each semester.
A student may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the College; however, following two full semesters of absence, the student should review his status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated
application for readmission will be required.
A student may register for classes in one of two ways; (1) By mail approximately eight to ten weeks prior to the beginning of the semester; or (2) by direct computer registration during the three weeks just prior to the beginning of classes. Information on the registration procedure is published in the Class Schedule which is sent to all new and continuing students. See the College Calendar in this Bulletin for registration periods during the 1976-1977 academic year.
UNLIMITED EDUCATION PROGRAM
Students may enroll in College courses without having been admitted to the College. The Unlimited Education Program is designed for students who wish to enroll for an occasional course, but who are not interested at the time in pursuing a college degree. Unlimited Education students may enroll for up to six semester hours of credit. A record of Unlimited Education grades is maintained by the Office of Student Records. A limit of 30 semester hours of successfully completed course work may be applied toward regular degree requirements following formal admission to the College.
COMMUNITY OUTREACH PROGRAMS
For information on Cooperative Education, Continuing Education, and Learning for Living Programs, see the Community Services Section of this Bulletin.
CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE
The Credit for Life Experience Program is a mechanism for evaluation and awarding college credit for experiential learning not sponsored by the College. For example, the College may award credit for skills developed during full-time employment. Students, in consultation with sponsoring advisors, submit applications to appropriate departments. Credits are awarded on the basis of careful evaluation of student portfolios prepared to document the content, quality, and quantity of the learning experiences.
Students participating in this program are subject to all degree requirements such as basic studies, resident hours, etc., as outlined in this Section. Life Experience credits are not applicable toward residence requirements. Credits approved by departments must bear some reasonable relationship to the academic course offerings within
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
the department, and duplicate credit will not be awarded. The number of credits will be recommended by the departments and must receive final approval by the Life Experience Committee. In all cases, however, the student must complete 30 semester hours in residence, of which at least eight semester hours must be Upper Division courses for the major and four semester hours of Upper Division courses for the minor.
Life Experience credits are viewed as examination types of credits, and a student may earn up to a total of 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements through any combination of Life Experience credits; College Level Examination Program (CLEP), subject matter and general; Advanced Placement; and Institutional Credit by Examination. Credit awarded through CLEP may not be duplicated by Life Experience credits. Credits are recorded on the transcript by department and course number; however, no letter grades are given for Life Experience credits, and students are advised when applying for credit that some institutions do not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades.
The College will assess a fee of $10.00 per course equivalent for Credit for Life Experience.
SEMESTER HOURS CREDIT
Course credit is based upon units designated as semester hours. One semester hour represents one class period of fifty-five minutes per week for fifteen weeks and normally about two hours per week of preparation by the student outside of class. Laboratory courses give one semester hour of credit for each two or three hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week.
COURSE LOAD
The normal course load per fifteen-week semester is fifteen or sixteen semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to eighteen semester hours during any semester. Students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take nineteen or twenty semester hours, and those with grade point averages of 3.50 or higher may take twenty-one semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average mini-mums or for more than twenty-one semester hours of course work is only given by the Academic Standards Committee following a successful formal appeal prior to the
commencement of the semester.*
Students may enroll for combinations of fifteen-week and five-week courses as long as the credit load does not at any time exceed 1.2 credits per week.
COURSE NUMBERS, DESCRIPTIONS, AND OFFERINGS
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although normally a student should not take courses above the level of his class (based upon semester hours earned), he may do so at one level above if he has the specified prerequisites. In special cases, a student may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for his class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites, he obtains the permisson of his advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example, English 101-3 is a three-credit course. Following the course title is a second set of numbers in parenthesis indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The first number in parenthesis indicates the number of lecture or discussion hours and the second number indicates the number of laboratory, shop, or field hours. For example, in a science course followed by (3+4), the numbers indicate three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If there is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed at the end of the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule which is printed well in advance of the beginning of each semester and is available to all students.
Decisions on which of the courses listed in this Bulletin are taught during the year will be based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
*For information on the charge per credit hour in excess of 18 refer to page 16.
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
CONVERSION FROM QUARTER CREDITS TO SEMESTER CREDITS
A quarter credit is equivalent to two-thirds of a semester credit. Multiply quarter credits .by two-thirds to convert them to semester credits. Fractional credits will not be counted except in meeting basic studies requirements.
Examples:
A. 17 quarter credits x 2/3 = 34/3 =
11 1/3 or 11 semester credits
B. 19 quarter credits x 2/3 = 38/3 =
12 2/3 or 12 semester credits
C. 180 quarter credits x 2/3 = 360/3 = 120 semester credits
The permanent record card will have only the cumulative total quarter hours converted to semester hours; e.g., 129 quarter credits x 2/3 = 258/3 = 86 semester credits.
DEGREE CHECK SHEETS FOR DEPARTMENTAL MAJORS
All departments have been asked to prepare degree check sheets listing both quarter and semster course requirements for each of their majors. Students should meet with their departmental advisors to plan for conversion to the semester system using the departmental check sheets to determine which requirements have already been completed and which courses are needed to fulfill remaining degree requirements. If proposed departmental requirements resulting from the conversion make it impossible for students to fulfill degree requirements in the normal period of time and problems cannot be resolved at the departmental level, students may ask the Joint Committee on Academic Standards to review their degree plans. Students may also seek help from the Academic Advising Center.
CROSS REGISTRATION WITH MSC, COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF DENVER, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER, AND/OR ARAPAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College may register for courses during the enrolled semester at the Community College of Denver, the University of Colorado-Denver, and/or Arapahoe Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements at MSC subject to approval by MSC.
Information concerning current proce-
dures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Registrars Office.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Concurrent enrollment differs from inter-institutional enrollment in that the student is currently matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the Registrar of each institution. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of the home institution.
CHANGES IN REGISTRATION
Subject to a $5.00 fee for each class dropped, students enrolled in fifteen-week courses may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first six days of each semester (not including weekends). There will be no charge for classes added to a schedule, and the fee will not be charged for cancelled classes, total withdrawal from the College, or dropping from a waiting list. No other exceptions will be made.
Students may not initiate registration in fifteen-week classes after the fifth day of classes. Students not dropping a course before the end of the sixth day, who for some reason are unable to complete the course, must make arrangements with the instructor concerning the notation or grade that will be submitted at the end of the semester. See the paragraphs on Grades, Course Load, and Class Attendance in this Section.
Students enrolled in five-week courses may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding courses during the first two days of class. Students may not enroll in five-week courses after the second day of classes. Students not dropping a five-week class before the end of the second day of classes, who for some reason are unable to complete the course, must make arrangements with the instructor concerning the notation or grade that will be submitted at the end of the semester. See paragraphs on Grades, Course Load, and Class Attendance in this Section.
CLASS ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If a student anticipates a prolonged absence because of illness, he should contact his instructors, if possible. If he finds that he cannot do this, he should contact the Dean of Students, who will inform his instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor feels that a students absences are interfering with his academic progress, he may submit a letter to the Dean of Students informing him of the situation.
ADAPTIVE SELF-PACED LEARNING
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which the student is allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to his personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly, extending the learning beyond the end of a semester or module, or even two if necessary, without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance.
Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced. Information on the method of instruction and the nature of the program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all.
Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester or module are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in the course ih a subsequent semester or module in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during that semester when the work is completed satisfactorily.
EXAMINATIONS IN LIEU OF COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Successful completion of special examinations may be substituted for the completion of course requirements, may permit placement of students in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding college credit. Several different types of
examinations are described below. A student may not earn more than a total of 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements regardless of the type of examination for which credit is or has been earned.
Departmental Course Examinations
A department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses for which he requests and passes special College examinations. Under this provision, a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be obtained. A fee of $10.00 per course will be charged for each examination.
Examinations for credit must be based upon work equivalent to a course offered by the College, and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided it is unduplicated in and applicable to the students curriculum. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chairman no later than the third week of classes in a term. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon the recommendation of the department chairman. Examination for credit will be taken during the first seven weeks of classes in a semester at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to 2.5 grade points or higher must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the students permanent record. Grades in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the College, or, having been in residence, is within twelve credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, auditor, or as a regular student. These examinations cannot be taken by students who have received credit for more than one semester of work in the subject in advance of the course for which the examination is to be taken. These examinations cannot be taken to raise grades or to remove failures. They are not considered as interrupting residence nor applicable
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
toward residence requirements. Credits by examination will be posted on the students permanent record after completion of eight semester hours of classroom credit.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles the student to substitute a subject of his own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College Entrance Examination Board has developed a series of examinations designed to evaluate nontraditional college-level education, specifically including independent study and correspondence work, and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This series of examinations, known as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), consists of five separate examinations covering the areas of English, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Science, and Social Science-History. Based upon results of these examinations, the College may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman basic studies requirements areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of most of the traditional courses required during the freshman year.
A subject series of examinations which apply to specific College courses is also available. Thirty semester hours of credit may be awarded in this program, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Interested students should contact the Office of Counseling and Career Development for complete information about this program before registration.
Advanced Placement
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chairman, determines the amount and
nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
FINAL EXAMINATIONS
It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
GRADES
Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College are as follows:
A Superior.......4 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
B Above Average... .3 quality points per semester hour attempted.
C Average........2 quality points per
semester hour attempted
D Below Average
but Passing... .1 quality point per semester hour attempted
F Failure........0 qualify points per
semester hour attempted
NC No Credit
S Satisfactory (Limited to Student Teaching)
P Pass
The no credit" (NC) notation may indicate withdrawal from the course, a request at registration for no credit, that the student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of his out-ofclass assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. The notation has no effect on the grade point average. The NC notation, when used to indicate incomplete work, may be replaced by a letter grade if the work is completed by a time set at the discretion of the faculty member. In no case may this privilege extend beyond one calendar year following the end of the module or semester in which the course is taught.
The NC notation for a self-paced course indicates that the student or the faculty member have decided to extend the students exposure to the course in order to increase his proficiency. The student must register for the course in a subsequent semester or module in order to earn credit. The notation has no effect on the grade point average.
A student receiving a final grade of F
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charged for each registration. Students must notify the Office of the Registrar that the class has been repeated with a passing grade in order that the students record may be adjusted. The F grade is changed to an NC when the repeated course carries the same title, course number, and credit hours.
TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS
A transcript is a certified copy of a students permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1.00 each. Transcripts will be released by the Office of Student Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if writteVi authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name as recorded while attending MSC, Social Security Number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropriate reasons. Certified true copies of transcripts from other institutions which are on file in the Office of Student Records will be issued upon signed, notarized request by the student. A charge of $1.00 per copy page is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions who concurrently enroll at MSC must request transcripts from the home institution for courses taken at MSC.
PASS-FAIL OPTION
The pass-fail option encourages the student to venture out of his major and minor fields and thereby broadens his educational experience. The Pass grade has no effect on the grade point average; the Fail grade is equivalent to the grade of F.
Students with 30 or more MSC credits with at least a 2.00 grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses to be applied to the areas of basic studies, major, minor, and teacher certification are excluded from this option. Similarly, self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is eighteen credit hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
A student must declare interest in the
pass-fail option no later than the first class day of the semester or module by contacting the Office of the Registrar. The instructor will assign and record the pass or fail grade for the course on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. If the student exercises the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the semester that he will receive letter-grade recording in the course.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a Pass grade is given under policies stated above. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work may wish to ascertain in advance of registering for courses under the pass-fail option whether the institution of their choice will accept credits for courses in which they receive a Pass grade.
QUALITY POINTS
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of credit hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours earned.
REQUEST FOR CHANGE IN GRADE
If a student has reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, he must make his request for a change before the end of the third week of the semester following the completion of the course the following Autumn Semester in the case of the preceding Spring Semester.
Requests for reconsideration of awarded grades should be made directly to the instructor. Should no resolution be possible between the student and the instructor, the matter may be appealed to the department chairman and then to the dean.
ACADEMIC SUSPENSION POLICY
In keeping with the goals and objectives of Metropolitan State College, a probation-suspension policy has been adopted which allows most students three semesters to adjust to the academic requirements of college. The policy further provides for the
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
suspension of those students who are not prepared for successful college work.
A cumulative grade point average of "C (2.00) or better indicates satisfactory progress toward a degree. A cumulative grade point average of less than C indicates unsatisfactory progress and will result in a warning, probation, or suspension.
A student is expected to maintain a C average to qualify for graduation. When a student falls below a C average and becomes deficient in quality points, he will be placed on warning subject to decreasing this deficiency each semester until satisfactory progress is indicated.
A student in a warning status will be contacted by the Academic Advising Center It is especially important that students contact the major advisor or, if undecided as to major, the Academic Advising Center immediately following notification of warning status.
Since Metropolitan State College recognizes each student has different strengths and weaknesses which are not totally identified by a grade point average, either of these offices may make recommendations concerning a students retention even though the grade point average may be somewhat below satisfactory. The College, therefore, strongly urges every student placed on warning status to contact either his major advisor or the Academic Advising Center.
Students failing to reduce the quality point deficiency after having been placed on warning status will be subject to review by the appropriate subcommittee of the Academic Standards Committee for possible suspension due to unacceptable academic progress. If the student is readmitted, he will be required to reduce his deficiency each semester until satisfactory progress is achieved.
A student who has been admitted on probation or warning will have his status changed when he has attempted a minimum of twelve semester hours and maintained at least a C average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. A student admitted on probation or warning will be reviewed for possible suspension when his cumulative average falls below C regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation or warning, the student will be subject to the standard warning-suspension policy outlined above.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Academic Stan-
dards Committee. No student may reenter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Academic Standards Committee.
STUDENT CLASSIFICATION
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
HONORS AND AWARDS
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the College community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity.
The Presidents Award is given to one junior or senior who has excelled in both academics and service to the College.
The Deans Award is given to one Associate Degree student who has exhibited superior scholastic ability, personal integrity, and campus leadership.
Outstanding Student Awards are presented to approximately fifteen students each year on the basis of scholastic ability, personal integrity, and campus leadership.
Junior and senior students receiving the above awards are among those selected for publication in Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized each spring by being named on Metropolitan State College Honor Lists. The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who have attempted at least 30 hours and, at the time of the computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher. The Deans Honor List carries the names of students who have attempted at least 30 hours and, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.85.
Part-time students are eligible for either of the above honors. The time of computation will occur first when they have completed between 30 and 60 hours, second when they have completed between 60 and 90 hours, and finally when they have completed more than 90 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability while attending Metropolitan State College. Graduation Summa Cum Laude is awarded to students who achieve
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
a cumulative grade point average of 3.75 to 4.0. Graduation Magna Cum Laude is awarded to students who achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 to 3.74.
To be eligible for graduation honors, a student must have completed 50 semester hours at Metropolitan State College prior to the semester when he is due to graduate.
Students who have transferred to MSC and who have completed less than 50 semester hours prior to graduation may petition for honors provided their total grade point average for all collegiate institutions attended and their grade point average at MSC are equal to the requirements stated above.
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OMNIBUS COURSES
OMNIBUS COURSES
The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities to meet developing needs. Experimental topics courses, seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the Bulletin. They may be offered by all departments in the College.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and credit hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairman of the department or discipline, and dean of the school or center before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements.
The following course numbers are the same for all disciplines and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course, and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
190 (Credit Variable). Topics An introductory study of selected topics especially appropriate for lower division students.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
299 (Credit Variable). Field Experience/
Internship
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the de-partment/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.
390 (Credit Variable). Advanced Topics An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
480 (Credit Variable). Workshop An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area.
Prerequisite: Approval of department.
490 (Credit Variable). Seminar Presentations, discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed
5 credit hours). Independent Study Independent investigation of problems within the area of the students special interest. Restricted to students majoring in the department/discipline offering the course and must be supervised by a faculty member in that department/discipline.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chairman.
499 (Credit Variable). Advance Field
Experience/Internship
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Guidelines on Field Experience/ Internship Courses
1. Students must make application for course credit and provide information on background, justification and aims.
2. Applications for 299 or 499 credit will be evaluated by the faculty of the department/discipline in which credit is granted or by a committee of at least two members of the department/discipline; in addition, the department chairman will evaluate the applications. Each application must be approved by both the faculty evaluation group and the department chairman before the student may have credit.
3. The locations, institutions, or businesses proposed by a student, by an in-
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OMNIBUS COURSES
structor or faculty group in an academic department/discipline, or by the department chairman will be evaluated by the members of the department/discipline or by a committee of at least two persons from the department/discipline and the department chairman. After evaluation, the members of the department/discipline or the committee and the department chairman will approve the granting of credit.
4. The approved application will be sent to the approved location, institution, or business.
5. The location, institution, or business approved for the field experience must agree to accept the student, provide learning opportunities, and evaluate his performance.
6. The group which approves the stu-
dent application will establish the credit to be earned before the course is undertaken; the department chairman will approve the credit. Course credit may vary from one to fifteen hours.
7. At least one hour weekly will be spent in seminar discussion, or in conferences with the field supervisor in the field experience location, or in conferences with the department or departmental committee.
8. The student will make a terminal report evaluating his course; the field supervisor must make an evaluation of the students performance during the course; and the department/discipline faculty or committee will select a member of the faculty or committee to write an evaluation of the students performance and to assign a letter grade for the course.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The student is responsible for full knowledge of the information provided in this Bulletin concerning regulations and requirements of the College and his program of study.
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) earning an Associate Degree in Applied Sciences in two years; (2) following a curriculum in arts, sciences, or applied sciences to meet requirements for Bachelor of Arts or Science Degree; (3) taking vocational-technical programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in fields such as business, health services, public services, and technology; or (4) enrolling for selected courses to improve general education or vocational competency.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DEGREES
To earn a degree, a student must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which he is registered and must complete the minimum number of semester hours for each degree (60 for the associate and 120 for the baccalaureate) with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
For degree requirement evaluation purposes, a student may select any Bulletin in effect while the student is continuously enrolled at MSC. A student who interrupts his enrollment for one calendar year or more at any time may select only those Bulletins in effect after his return to the institution. The student must complete the basic studies, major, minor, and all other degree requirements as outlined in the Bulletin under which he plans to graduate.
After the Summer Semester, 1978, Upper Division (300-499) courses may not be used to satisfy basic studies requirements regardless of the Bulletin by which the student has chosen to be evaluated.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, the student is responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to his program and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume approval to deviate from the stated requirements without a properly signed statement to that effect.
Transfer students should become particularly aware of the requirements of the College, the basic studies, and their major (or area of emphasis) and minor areas.
GRADUATION AGREEMENT
The graduation evaluation process is initiated when the student completes the Graduation Agreement. Once the student has received program approval from the major (or area of emphasis) department chairman and the minor department chairman, the student submits his Agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. After the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive a Graduation Status Report.
The deadline for submitting the Graduation Agreement is the end of the first week of the semester in which the student is eligible to graduate. However, since the student is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of his program of study, it is advisable to begin the graduation evaluation process at least two semesters in advance of the semester of graduation. A Graduation Agreement submitted after the deadline will be reviewed for the following graduation date.
After submitting the Graduation Agreement, a student who feels justified in deviating from College academic requirements may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee for such a change. Petition forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records. Valid reasons for the variances must accompany all petitions and must be concurred in by the appropriate dean and department chairman.
Diplomas are granted at the conclusion of each of the three semesters for those students who have met all requirements for graduation. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the Spring Semester. Students who officially graduated during any of the previous three semesters are invited but are not required to participate in the Spring Commencement.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL ASSOCIATE DEGREES
To earn an Associate in Applied Sciences, a student must satisfy the following requirements, plus any other stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
35


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
1. Complete 60 semester hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
2. Complete a minimum of 18 semester hours at Metropolitan State College with the last 9 semester hours applicable to the Associate Degree.
3. Meet the basic studies minimum requirements listed below.
4. Earn 15 semester hours stipulated in the field of specialization, at least 9 of which must be earned at MSC.
BASIC STUDIES FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREES
CATEGORY S?I!Ie?!er
Freshman Composition .......................... 6
Humanities .................................... 3
Science and Mathematics........................ 3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences.............. 3
The specific courses meeting these requirements are listed under the program descriptions for the Schools of Business, Engineering Technology, and Professional Studies. Students planning to continue on toward a Bachelors Degree may want to exceed these minimums in order to prepare for Bachelors Degree basic studies requirements.
4. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses in the students area of emphasis.
5. Not more than four semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward an Associate Degree.
With the approval of the dean of the appropriate school or center, variation in Associate Degree course programs may be made to conform with the course requirements of a college or university to which a student plans to transfer. Such a student should be familiar with rules of the institution concerned regarding transfer of credit and courses required under the curriculum in which he intends to major and complete requirements for a baccalaureate or other degree. With regard to Colorado institutions of higher education, the office of the Dean of Students has information on recommended programs for students planning to transfer, and advisors will assist them in developing a course plan.
BASIC STUDIES FOR BACHELOR DEGREES
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the basic studies distribution requirements listed below. Each of the category requirements may be satisfied by any 100 or 200-level course of the subject mat-
ter areas. Not more than six semester hours taken in any one of the departments listed under Humanities, Science and Mathematics, Social/Behavioral Sciences, or Career will count toward basic studies requirements. Each degree candidate must complete English 100 and/or 101 plus English 102, or demonstrate competencies equivalent to the exit levels for these courses. Specific courses are listed in Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies because the programs are interdisciplinary.
Credits
Freshman Composition (ENG 100 and/or
101 and 102) .............................. 6
Humanities.................................... 8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 103,104)
Art
Chicano Studies (CHS 200, 201)
Chinese
English
French
German
Modern Languages
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education and Recreation
Reading
Spanish
Speech
Science and Mathematics..................... 8-10
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences........... 8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 101,102,113,
220, 230, 270)
Anthropology
Chicano Studies (CHS 100,101,102)
Economics
History
Political Science Psychology Sociology Urban Studies Womens Studies
Credits
Career ..................................... 0- 6
Accounting
Aerospace
Business Education and Communication Civil Engineering Technology Computer Management Science Education
Electronics Engineering Technology Finance
Health Care Administration
Health Services
Human Services
Industrial Education
Journalism
Law Enforcement
Management
Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technology Quality Assurance Technology Social Welfare
Total Credits 36
36


ERRATA
p-36, 38
The policy regarding students meeting degree requirements under the 1976-77 catalog has been amended as follows:
1. BASIC STUDIES will henceforth be referred to as GENERAL STUDIES.
2. Upper-division (300 and A00 level) coursework, as well as lower-
division coursework, will be allowed in the general studies.
3- Physical education courses will not be allowed in the human i t ies category of the general studies, but instead will apply to the career category option.
4. Only four (A) semester hours of physical education activity courses may be counted toward a bachelor's degree, and only three (3) of these may be applied to the career category. 5
5- Only seven (7) semester hours of music ensemble coursework may be counted toward a bachelor's degree, and only three (3) of these may be applied to the humanities category.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACHELOR DEGREES
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements
1. Complete 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College course work.
2. Complete at least 40 semester hours in Upper Division courses (300 and 400 level courses).
3. Complete all basic studies requirements listed for a degree and major.
4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours and at least one subject minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the requirements for a minor.
Students majoring in art, applied music, music education, or any of the programs of the School of Business or the Department of Human Services are not required to complete a minor.
5. Compete all special requirements of a department and school or center.
6. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all courses which satisfy the requirements for the minor.
7. Complete at least 8 Upper Division (300 and 400 level) semester hours of the major and 4 Upper Division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College.
8. Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours at Metropolitan State College, including the last 10 semester hours applicable to the degree.
9. Credit Limitations:
a. Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 4 semester hours in physical education activity courses will be counted toward a Bachelors Degree for students who are not majoring in Physical Education or Recreation.
c. Not more than 8 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a Bachelors Degree for students who are not specializing in Music.
d. Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a Bachelors Degree.
REQUIREMENTS FORA SECOND DEGREE
For an additional Bachelors Degree, the student will complete a graduation agreement that will include:
1. A minimum of 8 semester Upper Division hours in the major department and at MSC.
2. The completion of a minor if required for the contemplated degree by the major deoartment.
3. At least two semesters in residence.
4. A minimum of 30 semester hours at MSC in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
For an additional Associate Degree, the student will complete a graduate agreement which will include
1. A minimum of 8 additional semester hours at MSC and in the department of emphasis.
2. At least two semesters in residence.
3. A minimum of 20 semester hours at MSC in addition to the total number of credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
The requirements for the additional degree are determined by the major department and must be consistent with the guidelines listed above. Students planning to work for an additional degree are advised to consult with the new major department.
38


PROGRAMS OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Metropolitan State College is organized into five schools and three centers. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. Some offer the Associate Degree in Applied Sciences. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs is described under special sections of this Bulletin prepared by each school or center.
School of Business
Associate Bachelors Degree Degree Minor Major
Accounting X X
Business Education and
Communications X
Computer and Management
Science
Data Processing X X
Finance X
Management X X
Manpower Management X
Marketing X X
Office Administration X
Production Management X
Public Administration X
Real Estate X
Systems Management X
School of Engineering Technology
Civil Engineering Technology X X X
Drafting Engineering Technology X
Electronics Engineering
Technology X X X
Industrial Marketing X
Mechanical Engineering
Technology X X X
Meteorology Technology X X
Quality Assurance Technology X
Surveying X X
Technical Management X
School of Liberal Arts
Anthropology X X
Applied Music X
Art X X
Behavioral Science X
Communications X
Economics X X
English X X
French X
German X
History X X
Journalism X X
Modern Languages X
Music X
Music Education X
Philosophy X X
Political Science X X
Psychology X X
Reading X
Sociology X X
Spanish X X
Speech Communications X X
Speech Pathology-Audiology X
School of Professional Studies
Associate Degree Bachelors Degree Minor Major
Airframe and Power Plant X
Aviation Electronics X
Aviation Maintenance
Management X
Aviation Management X X
Health Care Administration X
Human Services X X
Industrial Education X X
Law Enforcement X X X
Mental Health Worker X X X
Nursing (Upper Division for
R.N.'s) X
Professional Pilot X X X
Social Welfare X X
School of Science and Mathematics
Biology X X
Chemistry X X
Criminalistics X
Earth Science X
Geography X
Land Use X
Mathematics X X
Physics X X
Center for Education
Bilingual-Bicultural Education X
Certification-Elementary
Education X
Certification-Secondary
Education
Early Childhood Education X X
Health and Safety X
Physical Education X X
Recreation X X
Reading X
Special Education X
Center for Urban Studies
Afro-American Studies X
Chicano Studies X
Urban Studies X
Womens Studies X
Contract Major/Minor Program The Contract Major/Minor Program is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with his Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific individual career objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing Bulletin major and/or minor programs, but is individual in nature and is planned to meet the specific needs of the student.
For further information, contact the Academic Advising Center or the Dean of the Center for Experimental Studies.
39




SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The curricula of this School are designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The School offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
A Three-Year Degree in Business is being planned for implementation in the near future. The Three-Year Degree in Business will offer options in Executive Secretary, Office Management, and Paralegal. Students interested in this program should check with the School of Business concerning the status of the program.
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is terminal in nature and is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment. To be awarded this degree, a student must satisfactorily complete the Colleges basic studies and other general requirements for the associate degree, the general business requirements, and the courses listed for the Business Data Processing option shown below:
Basic Studies
All students majoring in business whose objective is an Associate in Applied Sciences degree must satisfy the following basic studies requirements:
Required Courses
BEC 200 Business Communications............. 3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics I........... 3
ENG 101 Freshman Composition ............... 3
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the
Management and Social Sciences........... 4
SPE101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ............................ 3
Total 16
General Business
All students majoring in business whose objective is an Associate in Applied Sciences degree must satisfactorily complete the following general business requirements:
Required Courses SHou^er
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I......... 3
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing .... 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ... 3
MGT300 Principles of Management........... 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ............... 3
Total 15
Business Data Processing Option This option is designed to prepare students for entry level positions in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing.
Required Courses s?["*!*er
CMS 110 FORTRAN ........................ 3
CMS 211 COBOL .......................... 3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Computer
Programming .......................... 3
CMS 301 Assembler Language ............. 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ........................... 3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL.................... 3
CMS 315 Programming Small Business
Computers ............................. 3
CMS316 Programming Language One (PL/1). 3
Electives selected from courses offered by Computer and Management Science Department ............................ 6
Total 30
Total Degree Requirement 60
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The School of Business offers majors in accounting, business education and communication, computer and management science, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, or governmental accounting. The business education major prepares students to teach business subjects in public and private junior and senior high schools and junior colleges. The computer and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing and systems design, plus management science. The major in management gives the student specialization in real estate, personnel matters or production. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of retailing, advertising, sales, market research, and marketing management.
A major in finance is being planned for implementation in the near future. The major is designed to prepare students for positions in investments, commercial banking, or corporate planning. Students interested in this program should check with the School of Business concerning the status of the program.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the Colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Programs of Study and Degree Requirements. A summary of the course program which he must complete within the School of Business is as follows:
41


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Semester
Hours
Basic Studies ................................... 36
Business Core ................................... 30
Major in School of Business ..................... 30
Electives Within the School of Business........ 12
Electives Outside School of Business............ 12
Total 120
Basic Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in accounting, business education and communications, computer and management science, finance, management or marketing must complete the following basic studies requirements:
Semester
Hours
ENG 100-102 Freshman Composition ............. 6
Humanities
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication ........................... 3
Electives ................................. 5
Science and Mathematics
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the
Management and Social Sciences........... 4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management
and Social Sciences ..................... 3
Laboratory Science ........................ 3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences ECO 201-202 Principles of Economics
I and II................................. 6
Electives ................................. 3
Career
BEC 200 Business Communications......... 3
Total 36
ACC 420 Auditing ..................... 3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ........ 3
ACC 452 Advanced Accounting II........ 3 9
Choose nine additional hours from above, or:
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting
Systems .............................. 3
ACC 460 Contemporary Accounting.......3
ACC 470 Advanced Problems and
Techniques ........................... 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business.............3
FIN 430 Managerial Finance I ......... 3
FIN 431 Managerial Finance II ........ 3
MGT 321 Business Law II............... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies ............ 3 9
Total 30
BUSINESS EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses SHourer
BEC 102 Advanced Typewriting.............. 3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis_ 4
BEC 360 Principles of Business Education ... 2
BEC 361 Methods of Teaching Typewriting ... 2
TT
Students must choose two of the following
teaching specialties** ................16-17
Bookkeeping and Accounting
ACC 309 Income Tax I ..................... 3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I ........ 3
BEC 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping and Accounting ......................... 2
Business Core
In addition to the basic studies requirement, students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses:
Semester
Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ............ 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II............ 3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report
Writing ...................................... 3
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing .... 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ... 3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making............ 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance................... 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ......................... 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management............... 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ............... 3
Total 30
ACCOUNTING
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
ACC 309 Income Tax I ....................... 3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting .................... 3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I .......... 3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II.......... 3
Choose nine hours from:
ACC 310 Income Tax II.................. 3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting ....... 3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting .... 3 ACC 409 Tax Procedure and Research ... 3
Students who plan to sit for the CPA examination should elect ACC 320, ACC 341, ACC 420, ACC 451, ACC 452, and MGT 321.
Consumer Economics and Basic Business
BEC 366 Methods of Teaching Consumer
Economics and Basic Business........... 2
FIN 225 Personal Money Management..... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior................ 3
Data Processing
BEC 498 Independent Study Teaching
Data Processing ....................... 2
CMS 211 COBOL ........................... 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design ............................ 3
Secretarial
BEC 113 Advanced Gregg Shorthand III.. 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Word Processing 4 BEC 362 Methods of Teaching Stenography .. 2
Required Education Courses'**
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban
Secondary Schools ........................ 3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban
Secondary Schools .......................... 2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner......... 3
EDU 321 Materials and Techniques of
Instruction for Secondary School Teachers .. 3
EDU 322 Field Experiences in Tutoring and Materials Construction...................... 2
Students desiring to become certified for vocational office occupations programs should select the secretarial as one teaching specialty, and complete three courses in Vocational Education, which are available through extension courses offered by Colorado State University or the University of Northern Colorado.
Thirteen hours of the required education courses can be considered as general education courses over and above the 36 hours of basic studies requirement.
42


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
EDU 346 Identification and Diagnosis of Young
Exceptional Children ..................... 3
EDU 361 The Use of Media In Education........ 2
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar......... 12
COMPUTER AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses SHours
CMS 110 FORTRAN ......................... 3
CMS 211 COBOL ............................ 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design .............................. 3
MGT 495 Business Policies ................ 3
Approved Electives A minimum of eighteen
(18) additional semester hours from courses offered by the Computer and Management Science Department. These additional hours must be approved by the Department of Computer and Management Science and should be directed toward one of the following areas of emphasis: Management Science, Information Systems, or Computer
Data Processing............................ 18
Total 30
MANAGEMENT
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
MGT 321 Business Law II...................... 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics................. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management................. 3
MGT 355 Production and Operations
Management ............................... 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations ................ 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ............. 3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management......... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies .................. 3
24
Approved Electives Six (6) hours of upper division electives are to be selected from Department of Management courses, except paralegal courses (MGT 324, MGT 325 and
MGT 326)................................... _6
Total 30
MARKETING
Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
MKT 301 Marketing Research ................. 3
MKT 310 Retailing .......................... 3
MKT 311 Advertising ........................ 3
MKT 316 Sales Management ................... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior................... 3
MKT 454 Marketing Theory ................... 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management .. 3
Plus nine (9) hours of Marketing electives. 9
Total 30
Minors Offered by the School of Business
(for students outside School of Business)
Because prerequisite requirements are involved in each set of courses, any student minoring in any of the areas below should contact an advisor.
Accounting Minor
The Accounting minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of accounting.
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ........... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II........... 3
ACC 309 Income Tax I ........................... 3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting ........................ 3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I ........... 3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II........... 3
Accounting Electives............................ 3
Total 21
Data Processing Minor The Data Processing minor is designed to give non-business students a career skill in computer programming for business.
Required Courses SHoure'r
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing--- 3
CMS 110 FORTRAN ........................ 3
CMS 211 COBOL .......................... 3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Computer
Programming ........................... 3
CMS 301 Assembler Language .............. 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ............................ 3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL................... 3
Total 21
Finance Minor
The Finance minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some
knowledge of finance.
Required Courses SHour!
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I .......... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.......... 3
ACC 309 Income Tax I ........................ 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance ............... 3
FIN 360 Investments ......................... 3
FIN 430 Managerial Finance I ................ 3
FIN 431 Managerial Finance II................ 3
Total 21
Management Minor
The Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with business skills to work in a business
environment.
Required Courses SHour<
MGT 221 Business Law I ..................... 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management............ 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management................ 3
MGT 355 Production and Operations
Management .............................. 3
MGT 356 Small Business Management .......... 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior............. 3
Total 18
43


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Manpower Management Minor The Manpower Management minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of industrial relations in business and government.
Required Courses SeH^
MGT 300 Principles of Management............. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management ................ 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations ................ 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ............. 3
MGT 461 Advanced Personnel Management .. 3
MGT 463 Manpower Development................. 3
Total 18
Marketing Minor
The Marketing minor offers the non-business major an overview and understanding of the functional business area of marketing. Required Courses SeHs'er
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing............. 3
MKT 301 Marketing Research ................. 3
MKT 311 Advertising ........................ 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior .................. 3
MKT455 Seminar in Marketing Management.. 3 Plus three (3) hours of Marketing electives. 3
Total 18
Office Administration Minor The Office Administration minor attempts to develop a moderate degree of skills while emphasizing promotional possibilities to supervisory and beginning office management positions.
Required Courses S
BEC 102 Advanced Typewriting ................. 3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines.. 3
BEC 111 Beginning Gregg Shorthand............. 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Word Processing 4 BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis .... 4
Elective (Select one of the following courses).. 3
BEC 112-3 Intermediate Gregg Shorthand BEC 323-3 Business Listening Skills BEC 402-3 Ethics in Business
Total 20
Production Management Minor The Production Management minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the production process and managerial functions as they relate to production.
Required Courses S Hu?'
MGT 300 Principles of Management............. 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics................. 3
MGT 355 Production and Operations
Management .................................. 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations ................ 3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management........ 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis .............. 3
Total 18
Public Administration Minor The Public Administration minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of managerial functions as they relate to management of government organizations at the local, state, and federal level.
Required Courses SeHs'er
MGT 300 Principles of Management............. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management ................ 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations................. 3
MGT 358 Public Administration................ 3
MGT 461 Advanced Personnel Management .. 3
PSC 221 American State and Local Government.................................. 4
Total 19
Real Estate Minor
The Real Estate minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with basic course requirements for GRI, prelicensing preparation, and required education hours for re-certification.
Required Courses S HoSrs"
MGT 221 Business Law I ...................... 3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate............ 3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance ................. 3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law ..................... 3
MGT 484 Real Estate Appraisal ............... 3
MGT 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate ...................................... 3
Total 18
Systems Management Minor The Systems Management minor is designed to give non-business students a basic understanding of business data processing with particular emphasis on systems analysis and design.
Required Courses SHourser
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing----- 3
CMS 211 COBOL ................................. 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ... 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ................................. 3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software.................................... 3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems .. 3
CMS 451 Data Processing Management.......... 3
Total 21
ACCOUNTING
ACC 201-3 Principles of Accounting I
(3 + 0)
Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the double entry system; theory and practice in transaction analysis; familiarization with the accounting cycle and preparation of basic financial statements.
44


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
ACC 202-3 Principles of Accounting II (3 + 0)
Continuation of ACC 201 emphasizing partnerships and corporations. An introduction to branch accounting, cost accounting, and financial statements for management analysis.
Prerequisite: ACC 201.
ACC 309-3 Income Tax I (3 + 0)
A study of federal income tax laws with an emphasis on personal income taxation, including such topics as gross income, gains and losses, and deductions. Credit not allowed for both FIN 225 and ACC 309.
Prerequisite: ACC 202, or permission of instructor.
ACC 310-3 I ncome Tax 11 (3 + 0) Continuation of ACC 309 with an emphasis on the taxation of organizational tax entities, including parnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts.
Prerequisite: ACC 309.
ACC 320-3 Governmental Accounting
(3 + 0)
A detailed study of the eight funds and two groups used in the accounting of a municipality with reference to state and federal governments. Review of municipalities budgets and municipalities annual reports. Orientation in the concepts of budgetary control as a matter of law and public administration theory.
Prerequisite: ACC 202, or permission of instructor.
ACC 330-3 Introduction to Accounting Systems (3 + 0)
Analysis of principles and types of tools available for design and implementation of an accounting system or procedure. Case studies are used to illustrate both manual and machine accounting system problems arising in various organizations and situations.
Prerequisites: ACC 202 and CMS 101, or permission of instructor.
ACC 340-3 Cost Accounting (3 + 0) Concepts and procedures applicable to job order and standard cost systems as well as budgeting, direct costing, cost-profit-volume analysis, relevant costing, inventory planning, and joint and by-product.
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
ACC 341-3 Advanced Cost Accounting (3 + 0)
Continuation of ACC 340. Concepts and
procedures applicable to process cost and capital budgeting. Includes performance measurement, transfer pricing, and mathematical and statistical analysis of cost behavior for control and decision-making.
Prerequisites: ACC 340, ACC 351, and CMS 231.
ACC 351-3 Intermediate Accounting I (3 + 0)
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on current assets and current liabilities.
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
ACC 352-3 Intermediate Accounting II (3 + 0)
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on long-term assets, long-term liabilities, stockholders equity, and special problems.
Prerequisite: ACC 351.
ACC 409-3 Tax Procedure and Research (3 + 0)
An in-depth study of tax procedure from preparation of the various returns to audit by the IRS. Also, the tools used in tax research are explained and illustrated. A research paper dealing with a major tax problem is required of each student.
Prerequisite: ACC 310, or permission of instructor.
ACC 420-3 Auditing (3 + 0)
Auditing techniques and principles applied by certified public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and verifying underlying data.
Prerequisite: ACC 352.
ACC 451-3 Advanced Accounting I (3 + 0)
An in-depth study of accounting for partnerships, consignment sales, installment sales, fiduciary transactions, branches, and foreign currency.
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and ACC 352, or permission of instructor.
ACC 452-3 Advanced Accounting II (3 + 0)
A comprehensive study of business combinations and consolidated financial statements.
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and ACC 352, or permission of instructor.
ACC 460-3 Contemporary Accounting (3 + 0)
Comprehensive coverage of current litera-
45


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
ture in accounting with emphasis on recent AICPA and FASB publications.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and eighteen (18) semester hours of courses in accounting.
ACC 470-3 Advanced Problems and Techniques (3 + 0)
Provides review and reinforcement of students accounting training. CPA examination problems are used.
Prerequisites: ACC 451 and ACC 452.
BUSINESS EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
BEC 101-3 Beginning Typewriting (3 + 1)
Introduction to the keyboard, efficient manipulation of the typewriter, and development of minimum occupational and personal use skills, as well as simple centering, short letters, and manuscripts. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of typewriting in high school. A minimum of one laboratory period per week is required of all students.
BEC 102-3 Advanced Typewriting (3 + 1)
A self-paced instructional program designed to increase production skills, with business letters, tabulation, manuscripts, numerical proficiency, and legal documents. Students needs are assessed periodically with emphasis on those topics relevant to a chosen discipline or occupation. A minimum of one laboratory hour per week is required of all students.
Prerequisites: BEC 101, or equivalent.
BEC 105-3 Operation of Calculating Machines (3 + 1)
Proficiency is developed in the operation of various models of electronic calculators with emphasis on applications for business, statistics, and metrication.
BEC 111-3 Beginning Gregg Shorthand I (3 + 0)
Gregg shorthand theory and basic skill building in principles of dictation and transcription. No credit will be allowed students who have received credit for one year of Gregg shorthand in high school.
Prerequisite: A minimum of one course in typewriting.
BEC 112-3 Intermediate Gregg Shorthand II (3 + 0)
Continuation of Gregg shorthand theory
with emphasis on speed dictation and transcription.
Prerequisites: BEC 102 and BEC 111, or equivalent.
BEC 113-3 Advanced Gregg Shorthand III (3 + 0)
Continuation of BEC 112 with emphasis on speed dictation and transcription development for various business and legal documents.
Prerequisite: BEC 112, or equivalent.
BEC 200-3 Business Communications
(3 + 0)
Emphasis is placed on the preparation of business letters and other related types of business correspondence. A business level of vocabulary and communication skills are stressed. In addition, business listening skills, dictation, and interviewing techniques are introduced. Students are given the opportunity to utilize skills developed in simulated activities.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, completion of ENG 100, 102, and BEC 101, or equivalent.
BEC 222-4 Office Practices and Word Processing (4 + 0)
Study and practice of duties commonly completed by executive assistants, secretaries, and general office personnel. A major emphasis on the concept of word processing with some orientation to mechanical media in that area.
Prerequisite: BEC 101, or equivalent.
BEC 224-3 Legal Office Procedures (3 + 0)
Course emphasis is on the knowledge and responsibilities required of a person in the paralegal profession. Special consideration is given to the court system, legal documents, legal terminology, laws pertaining to legal assistants and the necessary skills involved in interviewing, investigation and research.
Prerequisites: BEC 222 and MGT 221.
BEC 301-3 Business Research and Report Writing (3 + 0)
Proper techniques of conducting primary and secondary research investigations. Organization, preparation, and interpretation of data from both descriptive and experimental research designs for informational, examinational, and analytical reports used in contemporary business.
Prerequisite: BEC 200, or permission of instructor.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
BEC 323-3 Business Listening Skills (3 + 0)
Increases comprehension and retention through analysis of listening difficulties, idea identification, persuasive techniques, fallacies of reasoning, non-verbal communication, and transactional analysis. Major emphasis is on testing individual growth and on business situations.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
BEC 354-4 Office Management and Analysis (4 + 0)
Analytical study of the administrative approach to information processing which includes creating, processing, retaining, and distributing information. Conceptualization of what office work is to be done, how it will be accomplished, who will do it and under what environment, and the supervision of those who do the work is stressed. Prerequisite: MGT 300.
BEC 360-2 Principles of Business Education (2 + 0)
History of growth, trends, and issues in Business Education today. Consideration is given to research and the individual business teachers role in the current American educational environment.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor.
BEC 361-2 Methods of Teaching Typewriting (2 + 0)
A study of the psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction in typewriting for developing a desirable occupational and personal-use competence at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: BEC 102, or permission of instructor.
BEC 362-2 Methods of Teaching Stenography (2 + 0)
A study of the psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction in stenography for developing a desirable occupational competence at the high school and junior college levels.
Prerequisite: BEC 113, or permission of instructor.
BEC 363-2 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping and Accounting (2 + 0)
A study of the psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction in bookkeeping and accounting at the high school and community college levels.
Prerequisite: ACC 202, or permission of instructor.
BEC 366-2 Methods of Teaching Consumer Economics and Basic Business (2 + 0)
Designed to teach prospective high school and community college business teachers the subject matter content and proper instructional techniques to be used in consumer economics and miscellaneous basic non-skills business courses.
Prerequisite: FIN 225, or permission of instructor.
BEC 402-3 Ethics in Business (3 + 0) Begins with a survey of the principles of ethics followed by a strong application of personal and business ethics to current business situations. A major emphasis is given to the accounting, consumerism, management, and marketing areas. The course makes liberal use of business executives, company representatives, attorneys, and Denver institutional personnel as in-class resource speakers.
Prerequisite: MGT 300, or permission of instructor.
COMPUTER AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
CMS 101-3 Introduction to Data Processing (3 + 0)
An introduction to business data processing including computer hardware, computer programming, systems analysis and design, data processing management, management science, management information systems, and the computer in society.
CMS 110-3 FORTRAN (3 + 0)
A computer programming course in which the major elements of the FORTRAN language are taught. Problems selected from business are coded and run on a computer to familiarize students with program testing and debugging.
Prerequisite: CMS 101.
CMS 211-3 COBOL (3 + 0)
A computer programming course in which the major elements of the COBOL language are taught. Problems selected from business are coded and run on a computer to familiarize students with program testing and debugging.
Prerequisite: CMS 101.
CMS 214-3 Fundamentals of Computer Programming (3 + 0)
Introductory course in computer programming which uses the IBM 370 and its as-
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
sembly language (BAL) to develop fundamental concepts. Topics include system organization and architecture; data representation; use of arithmetic, logical, and editing instructions; and program analysis and debugging techniques.
Prerequisite: CMS 110 or CMS 211.
CMS 215-3 Job Control Language and Operating Systems (3 + 0)
A continuation of the study of the use of BAL as used in implementation of assemblers, macros, loaders, compilers, and operating systems for the IBM 360/370. Prerequisite: CMS 214.
CMS 231-3 Fundamental Business Statistics (3 + 0)
Organization and presentation of data, basic probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing (includes t, x2, and F distributions), correlation, and regression.
Prerequisite: MTH 132.
CMS 300-3 Data Processing Survey (3 + 0)
This course will examine the social and economic impact of electronic computers in several environments including government, law, health education, the humanities, science and engineering, and business. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
CMS 301-3 Assembler Language (3 + 0)
A computer programming course in which Basic Assembler Language (BAL) for the IBM 370 computer is taught. Topics include a review of computer numeration systems, syntax and elements of BAL, computer program addressability and repeatability, and debugging techniques. Typical programming problems from business will be programmed and run on the IBM 370 computer. Prerequisite: CMS 214.
CMS 305-3 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design (3 + 0)
Systems analysis focuses on the study of existing information systems, problem definition, data collection, and new system requirements. System design focuses on the development of an improved information system selecting alternate solutions, determining the best soltuion, and documenting that solution.
Prerequisite: CMS 101.
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CMS 306-3 File Design and Data Base Management (3 + 0)
The course covers the current status of data base system implementation in the United States. Functional characteristics, such as file design, are examined in detail. Guidelines are developed which will aid in evaluation of vendor-supplied data base management systems or specification of an in-house system.
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
CMS 311-3 Advanced COBOL (3 + 0)
A continuation of CMS 211 with emphasis on business applications involving indexed sequential and random access files. Advanced features of COBOL such as the Report Generator and Sort Verb are studied. Prerequisite: CMS 211.
CMS 315-3 Programming Small Business Computers (3 + 0)
A computer programming course in which the Report Program Generator (RPG) language is presented. An assembler programming language used by one of the major mini-computers will also be included. Prerequisite: CMS 110 or CMS 211.
CMS 316-3 Programming Language One (PL/1) (3 + 0)
Designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the development and implementation of both scientific and/or business applications in the PL/1 language. Students will be required to analyze, flowchart, code, and run on a computer several projects designed to illustrate the breadth of capability of PL/1. Prerequisite: CMS 110 or CMS 211.
CMS 322-3 Analysis of Computer Hardware and Software (3 + 0)
A study of various computer systems (both hardware and software) in relation to information system requirements. Comparisons of costs, capabilities, and software support will be made.
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
CMS 323-3 Data Communication Systems (3 + 0)
A study of data transmission; the nature of communication links and the attached hardware; the codes, modems, terminals, and methods of line organization; the need for multiplexing and the types of network structures; software; and design techniques. Prerequisite: CMS 322.
CMS 331-3 Statistics for Business Research (3 + 0)
A study of linear and multiple regression, time series forecasting, index number calculation, and analysis.
Prerequisite: CMS 231.
CMS 332-3 Quantitive Decision Making (3 + 0)
Designed to develop the students ability to use basic theory and management science techniques. Includes construction of payoff tables, Baysian Statistics, inventory and production control, and linear programming methods.
Prerequisite: CMS 231.
CMS 431-3 Management Science Techniques (3 + 0)
A study of currently used management science techniques including mathematical programming, inventory theory, queueing theory, and production scheduling. Prerequisite: CMS 332.
CMS 439-3 Case Studies in Management Science (3 + 0)
A study of realistic cases in which alternative management science techniques could be applied. (This course will include use of available computer software for these techniques.)
Prerequisite: CMS 431.
CMS 440-3 Simulation of Management Processes (3 + 0)
A study of computer simulation techniques as applied to resource allocation problems in the business environment.
Prerequisite: CMS 110.
CMS 441-3 Management Information Systems (3 + 0)
A final systems analysis course with emphasis on design of an integrated management information system in a company. Classical and flow network organization concepts are studied in relation to design techniques and implementation plan for an MIS.
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
CMS 451-3 Data Processing Management (3 + 0)
A study of the problems encountered in a business data processing installation with particular emphasis on its coordination with other management functions and the integration of management systems, systems
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
design, software, and hardware in the installations.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
FINANCE
FIN 225-3 Personal Money Management (3 + 0)
A study of financial problems and institutions affecting individuals including taxes, borrowing, savings, insurance, investment, and financial agencies.
FIN 350-3 Principles of Finance (3 + 0) An introductory course surveying the historical, institutional, legal, and theoretical materials dealing with the United States financial system and the relationships with the international financial system. The course acquaints the student with the monetary, banking, and credit system, the characteristics of major financial markets, and the influence of this environment on business. Prerequisites: ACC 202 and ECO 202.
FIN 360-3 Investments (3 + 0)
A survey of the organization and regulation of security markets: security analysis and valuation: and principles of portfolio management from the viewpoint of the individual investor.
Prerequisites: ACC 202 and Junior standing.
FIN 430-3 Managerial Finance I (3 + 0) A study of the dynamic environment of financial management in terms of forms of business organization, tax laws, and capital markets, and the concepts and analytical skills used in financial decision-making: Financial analysis and projections, cash and capital budgeting, the use of operating and financial leverage, the cost of capital, and dividend policy.
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
FIN 431-3 Managerial Finance II (3 + 0)
An integrative study of financial management focusing on major sources of capital available to business, the characteristics, costs, and instruments of each; methods of financing growth externally: financial reorganization of business firms; and a review of fundamental methods of financial analysis. Prerequisite: FIN 430.
FIN 470-3 Securities Analysis (3 + 0) In-depth study for the student of investments, employing advanced approaches to
security valuation and security markets forecasting.
Prerequisite: FIN 360.
MANAGEMENT
MGT 100-3 Introduction to Business (3 + 0)
This is a survey course for non-business students of the American business system and its place in contemporary society. The relationships between economic theory and business decision-making are examined. Types of business organizations as well as an introduction to marketing, production, financial, personnel, and administrative management are covered.
MGT 221-3 Business Law I (3 + 0)
This course is an introduction to origins and developments of law. The major emphasis of the course focuses on the fundamentals of the law pertaining to contracts, agency, sales, commercial paper, and the application of the Uniform Commercial Code to these areas.
MGT 300-3 Principles of Management
(3 + 0)
This course analyzes managerial functions and processes required for effective management of business or governmental organizations. Included is the study of analytical methods, systems design, operation and control of production systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
MGT 321-3 Business Law II (3 + 0)
This course includes an examination of business organizations with major emphasis on partnerships and corporations. It also includes a study of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to secured transactions and a study of the fundamental legal concepts of property, bankruptcy and estates.
Prerequisite: MGT 221, or permission of instructor.
MGT 324-3 Litigation (3 + 0)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the legal process. It deals with the sources of law, the methods of enforcement, and the various courts and administrative agencies involved in the administration of justice.
MGT 325-3 Family Law (3 + 0)
Family Law is a course designed to introduce the student to the law governing the marriage relationship, the dissolution of
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
marriage, and adoption. It also includes an examination of the juvenile law. The course will acquaint the student with the function and procedure of the courts in the resolution of the problems which arise in those areas.
Prerequisite: MGT 221 or MGT 324.
MGT 326-3 Probate Decedents Estates Wills Trusts (3 + 0)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the law governing the administration and distribution of decedents estates and some of the instruments used in estate planning, including wills and trusts. Reference will be made to the Uniform Probate Code and other statutes as well as applicable cases.
Prerequisite: MGT 221 or MGT 324.
MGT 342-3 Principles of Insurance (3 + 0)
This course is a study of the principles of life and health insurance with emphasis on types of policies and their provisions. The concept of risk, insurance coverages available, organizational structure of insurance companies, prevention of loss, and claims settlement are also covered.
MGT 350-3 Managerial Economics (3 + 0)
This course provides the student with an understanding of the use of economic principles and analyses of problems in business. An exposition of the fundamental, theoretical, and analytical tools of economics useful in managerial decision-making are included.
Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202.
MGT 353-3 Personnel Management (3 + 0)
This course encompasses the principles used to effectively utilize human resources in organizations. The historical, psychological, and social development of personnel management practices are studied. Topics such as job analysis, recruitment, selection, placement, and compensation are analyzed.
MGT 355-3 Production and Operations Management (3 + 0)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of production management. Topics such as plant location, layout and procedures, materials control, and production control are covered.
Prerequisite: MGT 300.
MGT 356-3 Small Business Management (3 + 0)
This is a survey course providing analysis of the managerial problems facing the small businessman. Topics include an understanding of the financial, legal, and marketing principles which are applicable to the successful operation of small business.
MGT 357-3 Industrial Relations (3 + 0) This course provides an understanding of the development and current posture of the law as it relates to labor-management relations. The course is concerned with the legal framework in which the collective bargaining process operates. Cases and illustrations are used to demonstrate the bargaining and the methods for securing industrial peace.
MGT 358-3 Public Administration (3 + 0).
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to public administration that combines both theory and practice in the administrative conduct of public affairs at local, state, and federal levels.
Prerequisite: MGT 300.
MGT 380-3 Principles of Real Estate
(3 + 0)
This is an overview course which surveys the principles and practices of the real estate field. Subject areas treated include real property ownership, finance, contract and agency law, appraisal, and real estate as an investment.
MGT 382-3 Real Estate Finance (3 + 0) This course treats, in greater depth, the financial factors affecting real estate. Topics include techniques of financing, money market sources and cost factors, and the effects of financial leverage.
Prerequisite: MGT 380.
MGT 384-3 Real Estate Law (3 + 0)
This is a study of the legal aspects of most real estate transactions with special emphasis on the law of contracts and agency. Also treated are license law, land title and interest, deeds, liens, and closing statements.
MGT 453-3 Organizational Behavior This course applies behavioral science research and theory to industry in order to learn how the needs of the employee might be more effectively integrated with the requirements of the organization.
Prerequisite: MGT 300.
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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
MGT 455-3 Systems-Project Management (3 + 0)
This course investigates the concepts and applicability of systems and project management. The unique nature of the project management structure, including its emphasis on integrative decision making throughout a products life cycle, is also examined and compared with more traditional forms of organization and managerial practices. Prerequisites: MGT 300 and MGT 355.
MGT 461-3 Advanced Personnel Management (3 + 0)
This course uses a seminar approach in investigating various training and learning processes with particular concern for development of supervisors and executives. It incorporates newer approaches to executive development, including executive compensation.
Prerequisite: MGT 353.
MGT 463-3 Manpower Development (3 + 0)
This course provides a comprehensive treatment of the manpower theme, explaining the problems and policies which precipitated manpower into a position of national priority.
Prerequisite: MGT 353.
MGT 484-3 Real Estate Appraisal
(3 + 0)
This is a basic study of the principles and techniques used in the valuation of real property. Both land and improved property are covered. Greater emphasis is placed upon residential property, plus an introduction to commercial appraisal.
Prerequisite: MGT 380.
MGT 485-3 Commercial and
Investment Real Estate (3 + 0)
This course studies real estate as an investment medium, the techniques used in evaluating and comparing the investment quality of property, the pros and cons of exchanging, and certain of the tax factors relevant to real estate investment.
Prerequisite: MGT 484.
MGT 495-3 Business Policies (3 + 0) This is a senior seminar in which all the business disciplines are integrated and related to policy level decision-making. Included is the study of business and its environment, with emphasis on social, political, economic, and legal influences as they relate to organization goals. Actual problem situations are examined through cases, simulation, and experiential learning.
Prerequisite: Final semester prior to graduation.
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MARKETING
MKT 300-3 Principles of Marketing (3 + 0)
Principles, methods, and problems found in distribution activities in marketing products and services.
Prerequisite: ECO 201.
MKT 301-3 Marketing Research (3 + 0) Provides the marketing student with a systematic and objective approach to the search for and analysis of information relevant to the identification and solution of marketing problems. Special emphasis is given to the use of scientific method in decision-making.
Prerequisites: MKT 300 and CMS 231.
MKT 310-0 Retailing (3 + 0)
This course provides a comprehensive survey of the merchandising operations of modern day retailers and the environment in which they operate. The course includes an integrated management approach to diverse retail store problems.
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
MKT 311-3 Advertising (3 + 0) Principles, strategies, and tactics of advertising copy and layout, media selection, consumer and advertising research, budgets and problems are covered. Prerequisite: MKT 300.
MKT 312-3 Promotional Strategy (3 + 0)
Survey of persuasive strategies and tactics necessary in current marketing; emphasis on behavioral aspects of promotional process and on management of programs involved.
Prerequisites: MKT 300 and MKT 311.
MKT 316-3 Sales Management (3 + 0) Course consists of a brief course in salesmanship followed by an analysis of the problems involved in supervising sales personnel. Problems are studied and alternative solutions are considered for recruiting, selecting, training, promoting, evaluating, and motivating or leading sales personnel. Specific attention is given to personnel matters such as compensation, testing, and personnel development. Organizational and operating matters such as system analysis,
routing, and resource utilization are included.
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
MKT 331-3 Consumer Behavior (3 + 0) A study of human behavior in the consumer role with emphasis on a better understanding of consumer actions leading to better management decision-making with resulting efficiencies in the marketing program and an improvement in consumer welfare. Prerequisite: MKT 300.
MKT 341-3 Channel Structure and Strategy (3 + 0)
Provides the marketing student with a survey of channel structure and strategy; areas of study include the evolution of and theoretical explanations for channel structure, the nature and type of channel decisions to be made, and the development of effective strategy for the solution of contemporary channel problems.
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
MKT 371-3 International Marketing (3 + 0)
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of the international scope and complexities of marketing. The unique marketing aspects of global enterprise opportunities as they relate to environmental differentiations among the various countries are emphasized.
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
MKT 454-3 Marketing Theory (3 + 0) Provides the advanced marketing student with an in-depth survey of the theoretical development of channel structure and design and the conceptual relations between micro-units within the channel. Emphasis is given to channel relationships and models for determination of structure and effectiveness.
Prerequisite. Senior Marketing Major.
MKT 455-3 Seminar in Marketing Management (3 + 0)
The development and application of marketing policies and strategies to marketing problems; areas of study include the analysis of problems relating to the consumer, the business environment, and the marketing mix.
Prerequisite: Any two upper level courses in Marketing.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
CENTER FOR EDUCATION
The Center is composed of three departments, the Department of Education, the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, and the Department of Reading.
The Teacher Certification Program at Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
The Department of Education offers a major in Early Childhood and minors in Early Childhood and Special Education. Professional courses leading to certification in the areas of Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Secondary Education, and Special Education are also offered.
The Center for Education, with the cooperation of the Modern Languages Department and the Chicano Studies Department, offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education.
The Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health offers a major in Physical Education with two emphasis areas and a major in Recreation with nine emphasis areas along with minors in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health and Safety.
An intramural program, administered by the PER Department, provides competitive activities and a variety of free or reduced rate recreational opportunities.
Intercollegiate sports for both men and women are conducted through the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health. Varsity sports for men include soccer, basketball, swimming, tennis, baseball, and track. Womens varsity teams include field hockey, volleyball, basketball, skiing, softball, and tennis. Students interested in these intercollegiate teams should register for the specific varsity sport under the PER 100 designation.
The Department of Reading offers the only undergraduate minor in Reading in the State with numerous courses in the teaching of developmental and remedial reading. The Department also offers reading improvement courses. The well-equipped Reading Laboratory offers an opportunity for individualized work in a variety of materials which include development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. It is open to all students whether or not they are enrolled in a reading course.
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS
The purpose of the programs in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students under these programs must meet the basic studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a Bachelors Degree stipulated earlier in this Bulletin. The following requirements must be met for formal admission to the education programs:
1. Before being admitted to any 300-level course in education, certification students must present evidence that they
a. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all college work attempted,
b. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in all education courses attempted to date (which may only be one introductory course).
Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition
to and action by the respective area committees.
2. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours of college work.
3. Completion of a Declaration of Intention form, to be filed in the Education Department office. Normally, students would complete this form while enrolled in their first course in education.
4. For students seeking credit for courses taken at this or at another institution that might be equivalent to the required courses described in this section, completion of a formal evaluation for advanced standing in consultation with their advisor, with the results of this evaluation to be filed in the Education Department office.
5. Completion of 200 clock hours of volunteer service by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth groups, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church groups, as well as other boys and girls clubs, camps, recreational programs, etc.
The following requirements must be met for admission to Student Teaching:
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
1. Completion of a minimum of 90 semester hours of college work; students transferring from other institutions, where more than 70 semester hours are being transferred into Metropolitan State College, or those who already hold degrees must complete a minimum of 20 semester hours before they can be admitted to student teaching.
2. Students must present evidence that they
a. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all college work attempted,
b. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in all education courses attempted to date.
(Individual exceptions to the above requirement may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees. Under-graduate and postgraduate transfer students should check with their Education Department advisor concerning special GPA requirements.)
3. Completion of all professional courses required for certification.
4. Completion of all subject area courses in the students teaching area(s) required by North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
5. Completion of all items in the personal student teaching folder, to be obtained in the Department of Education.
6. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and/or evaluations from prestudent teaching field experiences.
7. A physical examination report including negative chest X-ray, on file with the Student Health Services.
8. Approval by the appropriate screening committee when applicable.
9. Completion of formal application for student teaching, to be submitted to the Department of Education not later than the following dates:
For Fall Semester
student teaching.........January 10
For Spring Semester
student teaching......September 10
Students who have completed student teaching requirements at another institution may request to take student teaching for six semester hours.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
The Department of Education offers the following programs in Early Childhood Education:
1. A major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
2. A certification program meeting requirements for certification to teach early childhood in the public schools of Colorado (preschool through the primary grades).
3. A minor in Early Childhood Education.
4. Ail the courses necessary to meet the education requirements set by the State Department of Social Services for the licensing of day care directors.
Major for Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education
Required Courses S Hours^
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education .......... 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood
Education .................................... 2
EDU 231 Child Development ....................... 3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development ... 3
EDU 265 Human Relations ......................... 3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive
Development .................................. 4
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the
Educational Process .......................... 3
EDU 432 Working with Parents .................... 2
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on the
Socialization of Children..................... 4
EDU 437 History and Theory Seminar in
Early Childhood Education..................... 2
One course in special education selected in consultation with the Early Childhood
Education faculty ............................ 3
Choose two courses from the following:
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity............... 2
PER 258 Movement Education....................... 3
MUS432 Music Methods for Early Childhood.. 2
ART 310 Art Instructional Methods for
Elementary Schools............................ 3
EDU 434 Mathematics and Science in the Early Childhood Curriculum ................... 2
36
A student majoring in Early Childhood Education must complete the requirements for a minor or an approved specialty area which is the equivalent of a minor. Recommended minors include Reading, Bilin-gual-Bicultural, Speech Pathology, Special Education, Psychology, and Sociology; other minors must be approved by the Department. The specialty areas which are as equivalents of a minor are Language Arts, Science and Math, Urban Studies Education, and Music and Movement.
Requirements for Public School Teacher Certification In addition to completing a major in Early Childhood Education, students wishing certification must satisfy the following require-
ments:
Required in Education SHoun
EDU 260 Handwriting for the Teacher ........... 1
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban Schools 3
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban Schools
Laboratory ................................. 2
EDU 316 Learning and Teaching............... 2
EDU 435 Advanced Curriculum Design and
Implementation ............................. 4
EDU 439 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Early Childhood ........................... 12
Required in Reading
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary .................................... 3
A list of courses recommended for the completion of basic studies requirements is available from the Department.
Requirements lor State Licensing ot Child Care Directors
The education requirement for the State license is a minimum of 24 hours of college credit. A detailed list of the specific requirements may be obtained from the Department of Education. Majors in Early Childhood Education will fulfill these requirements by including
among their electives:
HES 204 Nutrition ................................ 3
HES 220 Administration in Care Providing Organizations ................................... 4
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
Minor in Early Childhood Education (Also fulfills requirements for State licensing of child care directors.)
Required Courses
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education............. 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood
Education ................................. 2
EDU 231 Child Development .................... 3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development ... 3
Choose two additional hours in Early Childhood curriculum courses in consultation with and approved by an advisor in Early Childhood Education
HES 204 Nutrition ............................... 3
HES 220 Administration in Care Providing Organizations ...................................... 4
Choose three or four hours from each of the following groups of courses (A & B) for a minimum of six
hours:
A. Psychological Foundations
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development.. 3
PSY 325 Child Psychology......................... 3
B. Sociological Foundations
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on the
Socialization of Children..................... 4
SOC315 Socialization of the Child................ 3
26
SPECIALTY AREAS EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Language Arts Specialty
Semester
Hours
RDG312 Teaching Elementary Reading:
Primary ..................................... 3
RDG313 Teaching Elementary Reading:
Intermediate ................................ 3
ENG 346 Childrens Literature................. 3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools .... 3
Electives ...................................... 6
18
Electives Six hours to be selected from the follow-
ing list or in consultation with faculty in ECE.
EDU 410 Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School. 2 EDU 411 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the
Elementary School ........................ 2
RDG 360 Practicum in Reading................. 3
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials .. 2
ENG 202 English Grammar...................... 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication ............................ 3
PER 219 Music, Drama and Dance in Recreation .................................. 2
Science and Mathematics Specialty
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics................ 4
MTH 261 Concepts in Mathematics.............. 4
EDU 434 Mathematics and Science in the Early
Childhood Curriculum ..................... 2
BIO 100 Man and the Living World............. 3
Electives ................................... 5
18
Electives Five hours (with at least one course in physical science) from the following list or in consulta-
tion with the faculty in ECE.
GEL 101 General Geology ..................... 4
GEG 123 Weather and Climate.................. 3
GEG 124 Land Forms .......................... 3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy............ 3
BIO 107 Relevant Topics in Biology........... 1
EDU 412 Methods of Teaching Mathematics
and Science in the Elementary School...... 2
EDU 413 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math and Science in the Elementary School.. 2
Urban Studies Specialty
AAS101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies 3
AAS315 Education of the Black Child.......... 3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the
Southwest: Mexican and U. S. Periods...... 3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children........ 2
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education ................................... 4
Electives ...................................... 3
T8
Electives Three hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with Early Childhood faculty.
AAS 330 The Black Community..................... 3
CHS 200 Living Cultures and Linguistics of the
Chicano ..................................... 2
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature......... 3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials for the Bilingual-Bicultural
Classroom ................................... 4
PER 465 Recreation Programs and
Management Problems in Urban Ghetto....... 4
SOC 201 Social Problems......................... 3
Music and Movement Education Specialty
MUS101 Fundamentals of Music Theory.......... 3
MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood.. 2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation .. 2
PER 258 Movement Education...................... 3
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning............... 3
Electives ...................................... 4
17
Electives Four hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with Early Childhood faculty.
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity.............. 2
MUS 161 Folk Guitar I........................... 1
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement................ 1
PER 150 Modern Dance I ......................... 1
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child....... 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child.......... 2
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical
Education for Children....................... 3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education ............ 3
ELEMENTARY LEVEL
Certification at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program. Additional work must be taken in a discipline (Reading suggested) which will give the student the number of hours equivalent to those required for a minor. Substitutions for any of these requirements must be approved by the chairman of the Department of Education.
Special certification in Music and Physical Education is available.
All candidates for the certificate to teach in the elementary schools will declare their intentions at the earliest possible date.
They will make arrangements in EDU 110,
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
Elementary Child I, to satisfy the following requirements:
1. Two hundred clock hours of volunteer service by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church group, etc.
2. Evidence of proficiency in handwriting, spelling, and new math concepts.
3. Completion of a battery of elementary achievement tests.
Required Courses (in recommended sequence) SeHr^er
EDU 110 The Elementary Child I .............. 3
EDU 231 Child Development ................... 3
EDU 210 The Elementary Child II.............. 1
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary Child II ... 2
EDU 260 Handwriting for the Teacher.......... 1
EDU 265 Human Relations ..................... 3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education........ 2
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban Schools 3 EDU 315 Laboratory in Children and Youth in
Urban Schools ............................... 2
EDU 316 Learning and Teaching................... 2
EDU 317 Laboratory in Learning and Teaching 2 EDU 345 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning
Disabilities in the Regular Classroom..... 3
ART 310 Art Instructional Methods for
Elementary Schools........................... 3
MUS 431 Music Methods for Elementary
School Classroom Teachers.................... 2
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical
Education to the Young Child................. 3
RDG312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary ..................................... 3
RDG313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate ................................ 3
EDU 410 Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School. 2 EDU 411 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the
Elementary School ........................... 2
EDU 412 Methods of Teaching Math and
Science in the Elementary School............. 2
EDU 413 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math and Science in the Elementary School.. 2
EDU 419 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6)..........................6 or 12
EDU 469 Post Student Teaching .................. 6
61 or 67
(Students lacking proficiency in any area may be required to take additional course work to remedy the lack of proficiency.)
When planning to teach in grades K-3, the following courses are strongly recommended:
Semester
Hours
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education............. 2
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood
Education ................................. 2
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development ... 3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development 4
EDU 435 Advanced Curriculum Design............ 4
Courses Strongly Recommended in the Academic
Areas":
Humanities:
SPE101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication .............................. 3
ENG 346 Children's Literature.................. 3
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts.......... 2
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child......... 2
PER 254 Games for Children .................... 2
PER 258 Movement Education.................... 3
PER 441 Environmental Education .............. 2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning............. 3
Social Science/Behavioral Science
HIS 100 American Civilization ................ 3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology............... 3
Mathematics/Science
MTH 261 Concepts in Mathematics I* ** ........ 4
A minimum of one course from each of the following sciences is highly recommended:
Biological Science
BIO 100 Man and the Living World.............. 3
Earth Science
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy ............ 3
GEG 100 World Regional Geography............. 5
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography .. 3
GEL 101 General Geology ...................... 4
Physical Science
PHY 108 Physical Science for Teachers...... 3
*100 and 200 level courses may count toward basic studies, but not more than six semester hours in any one department will qualify to meet those requirements.
This course may be required when math proficiency test indicates a deficiency in this area.
SECONDARY LEVEL
Students may be certified at the secondary level in the following areas: Art Education, Biology, Business Education and Communication, Chemistry, English, History, Industrial Education, Mathematics, Music Education, Physical Education, Physics, Spanish, and Speech. Students should ask for advisors in the Department of Education as well as in the departments of their major and minor fields of study.
In addition to a major in the above areas, students must complete the following professional course program:
Required Courses S HoSre6'
Social and Cultural Bases ot Secondary Schools a
block of two courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban
Secondary Schools ..................... 3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban
Secondary Schools ..................... 2
Psychological and Physiological Bases ot Secondary Education a block of two courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...... 3
EDU 345 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disorders in the Regular
Classroom .............................. 3
(In lieu of EDU 345, Physical Education Majors take
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education....... 3)
Processes ot Teaching in the Secondary Schools a block of three courses to be taken concurrently and not earlier than two semesters before student teaching. EDU 321 Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Secondary School Teachers 3 EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and
Materials Construction ................. 2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education ... 2
Teaching Practice
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar;
Secondary ..............................6 or 12
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
In addition to the field experiences included in the required courses, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of volunteer work with adolescents in the age bracket they intend to teach. This may be accomplished through work with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church groups, volunteer tutor programs, or similar activities.
Before enrolling for student teaching, students are directed to take a course in methods of teaching their major and minor field of study offered in the respective departments.
Student teaching normally is for twelve semester hours and involves ten weeks of full-time work. The remaining five-week block is planned individually for each student through consultation with his advisor and may include an additional six semester-hour block of student teaching in a different school setting, or for additional certification purposes.
Special Education Minor The minor in Special Education is designed to prepare teachers, physical educators, recreation therapists, counselors, and professionals in human services to work effectively with exceptional children in any setting. The courses listed below provide classes totaling nineteen (19) semester hours for completion of the minor.
Students who wish to gain endorsement for teaching the educable mentally handicapped (EMH) child must complete the minor and student teaching. The courses listed below are requirements for certification for students in the areas of Early Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Education:
Recommended Sequence ot Courses Required for Minor
EDU 340 Education of the Exceptional Child.. 4 EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of
Exceptional Children ........................ 3
EDU 342 Curriculum, Methods and Materials
for Teaching the Mentally Retarded........... 3
EDU 343 Field Testing Remedial Techniques
in Special Education ........................ 3
EDU 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional
Children .................................... 3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education.......... 3
19
(Recreation Therapy majors should select another course with the approval of the Special Education advisor.)
Required for Certification Educable Mentally Handicapped (EMH)
EDU 464 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Special Education ............................. 6
Required for Elementary and Secondary Education Majors
EDU 345 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning
Disorders in the Regular Classroom............. 3
Required for Early Childhood Education Majors EDU 346 Identification and Diagnosis of
Young Exceptional Children..................... 3
Additional Requirements for Secondary Education Certification
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary ....................................... 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate ................................. 3
Highly Recommended:
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools .... 3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas Secondary ....................... 3
Bilingual-Bicultural Education Minor The Center for Education offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education. The minor is an interdisciplinary program sponsored by the Chicano Studies Department, the Education Department, the Department of Modern Languages, and the Reading Department. The principal objective of the Bilingual-Bicultural minor is to prepare future teachers who will be able to conduct all phases of classroom instruction in a bilingual and bicultural setting. In the developmental sequence, the minor will provide the potential teacher with a background of the Mexican heritage and with an understanding of present day Hispano/Chicano culture. Proficiency in the Spanish language is required of all students before they complete the minor. This proficiency will prepare the teacher to understand and further develop the native tongue of bilingual-bicuitural children, while offering a second language to many other children. In addition, the minor will provide the teacher with sufficient field and academic experiences and resources in order to develop, implement, and evaluate curricular methods, techniques, and materials in the bilingual-bicuitural classroom. For students who do not student teach in a bilingual-bicuitural program, the Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education will be required.
Bilingual-Bicultural Education Minor
Reouired Courses and Recommended Sequence:
Semester
Hours
CHS 101 History of Meso-America:
Pre-Colombian and Colonial Periods ............ 3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the American Southwest: Mexican and U. S.
Periods ....................................... 3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education ..................................... 4
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English
Speakers ...................................... 2
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the
Bilingual Classroom............................ 2
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and
Civilization .................................. 3
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural
Classroom ..................................... 3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom ..................................... 4
Total 24
Required when student teaching in a bilingual-bicul-tural program is not completed:
EDU 452 Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education ..................................... 3
Preparation Requirements:
Language Proficiency: Proficiency in oral and written
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
Spanish will be determined by a committee composed of Spanish-speaking members of the Modern Language Department, Chicano Studies Department, and the Center for Education. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory score on the proficiency examination will be required to take sufficient Spanish classes to enable them to pass the proficiency examination. The following courses are designed to help students meet the proficiency requirements before the completion of the Bilingual-Bicultural minor:
Semester
Hours
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I ............... 4
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II .............. 4
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and
Conversation I ............................. 3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ............................. 3
EDU 110-3 The Elementary Child I (3 + 0)
An introductory course in early childhood and elementary education, designed to acquaint future teachers, parents, and community members with the cognitive, affective, social, and cultural development of the child from infancy through age twelve. The understanding, knowledge, and responsibility of child rearing and its implications to the educational field will be presented.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 131-3 Early Childhood Education (3 + 0)
The introductory course in early childhood education. In the first five weeks students learn about the various types of early childhood settings, the social context of modern early childhood education, and professional and occupational opportunities. The last ten weeks will concentrate on developing the beginning skills, understanding, and competencies necessary for students to observe and participate in field experience as informed learners guiding and interacting with children, planning and teaching in early childhood programs.
EDU 132-2 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education (1 + 4)
Guided observation and participation in a variety of early childhood settings such as public school, nursery school, Head Start, and day care. Course emphasizes relationships of theory to practice in beginning development of teacher competency. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 131.
EDU 210-1 The Elementary Child II (1+0)
Designed to introduce the student to the organizational structure of an elementary school. All classes will be held at the school where the student will be exposed to the
classroom environment. Curriculum and instructional patterns, individual learning styles, and practical application of learning theories will be covered.
Prerequisite: EDU 110; corequisite: EDU
211.
EDU 211-2 Laboratory in Elementary
Child II (0 + 4)
Guided observation and participation in a pre-selected elementary school setting. Designed to provide students with experiences in organizational structure; curriculum and instructional patterns; individual learning styles; and practical applications of learning theories.
Prerequisite: EDU 110; corequisite: EDU 210.
EDU 221-3 Processes of Education in
Urban Secondary Schools (3 + 0)
This course is designed to introduce students who aspire to enter the teaching profession at the secondary level to the urban social, psychological, and educational setting in which teachers and pupils interact in a process designed to promote the pupils cognitive, affective, and psychomotor development. To this end, students in this course will explore the specific needs of adolescents from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds and will identify the roles teachers must play in order to meet these needs. A series of evaluative experiences allows students to assess their own potential for assuming these roles.
Prerequisite: Students are required to enroll in EDU 222 concurrently.
EDU 222-2 Field Experiences in Urban
Secondary Schools (1 + 4)
Gives the prospective teacher an opportunity to translate theoretical information from course work to practical settings in urban secondary schools. Students work with counselors, social workers, school psychologists, and other school personnel in order to gain better understanding of the social and cultural issues in secondary schools.
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with EDU 221.
EDU 231-3 Child Development (3 + 0) Assigned readings and class discussion designed to give the student an understanding of the patterns of development of children from birth to eight years. The student is introduced to the major developmental theories of Piaget, Erikson, Sears and
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
others, and to the research literature in this field.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 232-3 Laboratory in Child Development (1 + 5)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 231. Techniques of child study are reviewed and applied to real life settings. Observation and recordings of normal and abnormal childrens behavior in a variety of settings. Individual child study includes consideration of parent-child, child-child, and child-group interactions.
EDU 233-2 Facilitation of Creativity
(1+2)
Ways of creating an atmosphere and implementing materials in early childhood education that will enhance and promote unhampered realization of a childs potential; i.e., creative expression and problem solving in subject areas, music, art, and dramatic activities.
EDU 260-1 Handwriting for the Teacher
(1+0)
A detailed consideration of content, methods, instructional materials, and evaluation in the area of handwriting. The student demonstrates competency in manuscript and cursive handwriting.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 265-3 Human Relations (3 4- 0)
The purpose of this course is to help future teachers gain a systematic understanding of him or herself as a person. Group Dynamics will be stressed as we realize the need for teachers to be able to work in groups. Opportunity is provided for the student to explore his own attitudes, values, and behavior in a group setting. Prerequisite: None.
EDU 314-3 Children and Youth in Urban Schools (3 4- 0)
Designed as an interdisciplinary course to acquaint the student with issues involved in education in a changing technological society. Demographic analysis, cultural and ethnic variations, human relations, and the school as a social institution are investigated. Class sessions include lectures, audio-visual material, and seminars. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 315.
EDU 315-2 Children and Youth in Urban Schools Laboratory (0 + 4)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 314. Gives the prospective teacher the oppor-
tunity to apply theoretical course work to field experience involving social workers, school psychologists, counselors, or teachers in core city schools.
EDU 316-2 Learning and Teaching
(2 + 0)
A curriculum course dealing with major aspects of early childhood and elementary level teaching. The first is the study of curriculum development through implementation of the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. The second is the study and demonstration of specific teacher competencies, such as lesson and unity preparation, writing behavioral objectives, individualization, inquiry, and evaluation.
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; corequisite: EDU 317.
EDU 317-2 Laboratory in Learning
and Teaching (0 + 4)
Guided observation and participation in an elementary school setting. The student will be assigned as an instructional aide for from four to six clock hours per week. The aide work should provide increasing levels of responsibility for the student starting from a one-to-one relationship with pupils increasing to small and large group involvement under close supervision of the teacher.
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; corequisite: EDU 316.
EDU 320-3 The Adolescent as a
Learner (3 + 0)
This is a course in applied educational psychology with special emphasis on learningteaching processes involving adolescents. It is designed to provide the beginning teacher at the secondary level with the ability to translate theoretical constructs into useful classroom practices and to develop an approach to teaching that is consistent with current secondary school practices and compatible with his own personality.
Prerequisite: EDU 221, or permission of instructor. To be taken concurrently with EDU 345, (or, for Physical Education majors, PER 462).
EDU 321-3 Materials and Techniques
of Instruction for Secondary School
Teachers (3 + 0)
Provides opportunity for prospective teachers at secondary level to convert theoretical instruction in teaching methods into practical applications in both real and simulated classroom environments. Serves as a capstone to the secondary education program, requiring the integration of skills
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
and theories learned in prerequisite courses. Emphasis on a systems approach to instructional program design so that students become skilled in the planning of educational objectives and in the realistic evaluation of learning outcomes. Team teaching situations are set up in the classroom using videotape recorders for feedback to students developing a teaching style of their own. Participation as tutors or teaching assistants in actual classrooms is arranged for students in a separate laboratory course, EDU 322, which must be taken in conjunction with this course.
Prerequisites: EDU 221; EDU 222; EDU 320; EDU 345 (or PER 462); concurrent enrollment in EDU 322 and EDU 361.
EDU 322-2 Field Experiences in
Tutoring and Materials Construction (1+4)
Field experiences in tutoring and materials construction to integrate the content, theory, and conceptual aspects of academic and professional teacher education with concrete experiences in secondary schools. A weekly seminar is held to discuss each students experiences.
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with EDU 321 and EDU 361.
EDU 337-4 Language and Cognitive
Development (4 + 0)
The cause of normal language and cognitive development in young children, including environmental influences, is considered. Special emphasis is given to methods and materials for facilitating that development in home and school.
Prerequisites: EDU 131 and EDU 231.
EDU 340-4 Education of the
Exceptional Child (3 + 4)
An introduction and survey of all of the areas of exceptionality. Explores the history, etiology, prevalence, characteristics, behaviors, medical aspects, intellectual development, and educational programs for mental retardation. Among the topics covered are learning disabilities, gifted, educable mentally retarded, deaf and hard-of-hearing, blind and visually impaired, neurological and health impairments, and emotionally disturbed. Field trips will explore local facilities where clients and programs can be observed. Students will work in an institutional or school setting for four hours per week and will meet in the college classroom for three hours per week to provide support for their field activites.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 341-3 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional Children (3 + 0) Selection, use, and interpretation of formal and informal instruments for assessment of student behavior. Interpretation and use of the results of assessment information for diagnostic teaching and educational prescription for learning disorders. Use of assessment information for the development of instructional or performance objectives.
Prerequisites: EDU 340, or permission of instructor.
EDU 342-3 Curriculum Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3 + 0)
An intensive study of the curriculum sequence and content for the mentally retarded based on instructional or performance objectives. Methodology for teacher presentations for both teacher-designed and commercially produced materials will be studied. A clinical approach to teaching will be used to develop learning activities for remediation of specifically diagnosed disorders. Precision-charting and behavior reinforcement schedules will be studied.
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341, or permission of the instructor.
EDU 343-3 Field Testing Remedial Techniques in Special Education (2 + 4)
Provides a four-hour-per-week field experience in public or private schools and/or institutional settings. Students meet for two hours per week at the college to explore theories and principles of learning, career education, and vocational orientation as they are related to the development of remedial techniques. Materials for specific remediation for clients will be developed and analyzed for field testing in the school setting where the student works. A written evaluation of this experience will be prepared by the supervisor in the school or institution.
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341, EDU 342, or permission of the instructor.
EDU 344-3 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children (3 + 0)
A study of counseling techniques for, and stress experienced by, parents of exceptional children. Techniques in counseling, group therapy, and transactional analysis will be taught as methods for promoting adjustment within the family structure. Students will explore the resources available in local state, and national agencies for family services.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341, EDU 342, EDU 343, or permission of the instructor.
EDU 345-3 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disorders in the Regular Classroom (3 + 0)
Emphasis in the course will be the development of educational strategies for the child based on interpretation of data from diagnostic instruments. Characteristics of children in the regular classroom who have one or more specific learning disorder will be explored. The student will learn to use and interpret diagnostic instruments in order to detect specific learning disorders. Interpretation of the data will be used to develop prescriptive programs of remediation based on several educational strategies. Prerequisite: None.
EDU 346-3 Identification and Diagnosis of Young Exceptional Children (3 + 0) The nature and extent of differences and discrepancies in intellectual functioning of the young child. Special emphasis on formal and informal assessment leading to specific education prescriptive programs for children during their early childhood years.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 347-3 Methods and Materials for Teaching the Trainable Mentally Retarded Child (3 + 0)
A study of characteristics, classification, and development of the trainable mentally retarded child. Curriculum, methods, and materials appropriate for teaching the train-able retardate. A survey of teacher-made and commercial devices for classroom use with special emphasis on language development and self-help skills.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 351-4 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural Education (4 + 0)
An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with local, state, and national bilingual-bicultural education programs. Emphasis will be placed on goals, objectives, and outcomes of these education programs in terms of their implications on the learners self-concept. Time will be spent in structured observation and interaction in a bilingual classroom.
EDU 361-2 The Use of Media in Education (2 + 0)
This course is designed to acquaint pro-tive teachers and other interested persons
with the role of audiovisual media in education. Emphasis throughout the course is placed on practical work, so that students may become proficient in the selection and use of media, including the construction of inexpensive materials and the operation of audiovisual equipment as commonly found in the public schools and similar educational institutions.
Prerequisite: None.
EDU 410-2 Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School (2 + 0)
Emphasis on current and experimental programs in the elementary school in Language Arts and Social Studies, K-6. The objectives of the course are to develop the concepts, methods, techniques, and materials pertinent to the teaching of language arts and social studies. The relationship and integration of language arts and social studies into total school curriculum will be developed with concurrent enrollment in EDU 412, Methods of Teaching Math and Science in the Elementary School; EDU 413, Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math and Science in the Elementary School; RDG 313, Teaching of Reading: Intermediate; and RDG 312, Teaching of Elementary Reading Primary.
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; corequisite: EDU 411.
EDU 411-2 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School (0 + 4)
Guided observation and participation in the elementary schools in the subjects of social studies and language arts. It is designed to provide students with the opportunity to convert the methods and techniques discussed in EDU 410 into practical application in the actual classroom environment.
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; corequisite: EDU 410.
EDU 412-2 Methods of Teaching Math and Science in the Elementary School (2 + 0)
Emphasis on current and experimental programs in the Elementary School in Mathematics and Science, K-6. The objectives of the course are to develop the concepts, methods, techniques, and materials pertinent to the teaching of mathematics and science. The relationship and integration of mathematics and science into the total school curriculum will be developed with
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
concurrent enrollment in EDU 410, 411, and RDG 313.
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; corequisite: EDU 413.
EDU 413-2 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math and Science in Elementary School (0 + 4)
Guided observation and participation in the elementary schools in the subjects of mathematics and science. The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to convert methods and techniques discussed in EDU 412 into practical application in the actual classroom environment.
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; corequisite: EDU 412.
EDU 419-6 or 12 Student Teaching and Seminar:.Elementary (K-6)
(1 +20 or 40)
A supervised ten-week field experience with increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of elementary learners (kindergarten to sixth grade). The experience is designed to bring together what the student has gained from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. It includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various aspects of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers, and frequent conferences with cooperating teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools. Student teaching is normally the terminal field experience in the pre-professional program leading to certification.
In conjunction with student teaching, the student is required to attend a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the faculty, and other teachers and professional educators. Consideration of problems faced by the student teachers highlight these seminars.
EDU 419 should be regarded as a full load for the quarter.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Elementary Teacher Education sequence, and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
EDU 429-6 or 12 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary (1 + 20 or 40) Directed observation and guided classroom teaching in the appropriate subjects from grade 7 through 12, designed to bring together what the student has gained in background from his college courses to help
him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate methods of teaching. Includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various phases of the regular out-ofclass activities of teachers, and frequent conferences with critic teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools with certified teachers. Student teaching is a ten-week full time assignment. The remaining five-week block will be planned individually for each student through consultation with his advisor.
In conjunction with student teaching, the student attends a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the education faculty, and other professional educators. Considerations of problems faced by the student teachers highlight these seminars.
Prerequisites: Completion of professional education courses, recommendation of major department, and approval of Dean, Center of Education. Completion of all courses in the Secondary Education sequence.
EDU 431-3 Parents As Partners in the Educational Process (3 + 0)
This course, designed for teachers and parents, demonstrates the importance of parents in relation to the education of their children. It emphasizes current concepts of parent education and the criteria for successful interaction of parents and teachers as facilitators of children.
Prerequisite: A child development course.
EDU 432-2 Working with Parents (0 + 4)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 431. This course applies the theories learned in EDU 431 to practical experience. Students work in a variety of settings, infancy through primary grades, where they are able to encourage parent effectiveness.
EDU 434-2 Mathematics and Science in the Early Childhood Curriculum
(2 + 0)
This course provides the future teacher of the young child with background and materials to design educational settings and experiences which facilitate the development of concepts of quantity, space, the natural world, and the heuristics of thinking. Prerequisite: EDU 231.
EDU 435-4 Advanced Curriculum Design and Implementation (4 + 0)
An advanced course geared to the student
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preparing to take full responsibility for a group of children. Three content areas, i.e., planning, classroom organization and management, and setting goals, will be utilized to help students learn how to organize, schedule, sequence, and integrate resources in the implementation of an early childhood program responsive to childrens needs. Prerequisites: EDU 337 and EDU 316.
EDU 436-4 Cultural Influence on the Socialization of Children (4 + 0) Studies the socialization of children using a multi-disciplinary approach; e.g., psychology, sociology, biology, ethnology, and education. From this base the student analyzes the effects that cultural and socialization patterns have on the family and the individuals development.
Prerequisite: EDU 231, or permission of instructor.
EDU 437-2 History and Theory Seminar in Early Childhood Education (2 + 0)
Analysis of key theories, practices, trends, and problems in the development of preschool education in the United States. Critical consideration is given to contributions of Froebel, Montessori, Dewey, Piaget, and others. Contemporary issues are examined and their historical roots identified. Prerequisites: EDU 131 and EDU 231.
EDU 438-2 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education Field Experience (0 + 4)
Filmed episodes of nursery school and kindergarten situations precedes observation of a variety of live preschool programs in Denver; the parent cooperatives. Montessori schools, Head Start programs, day care centers, private and public kindergarten programs. Some components of current theories are considered in these observations; e.g., self-selection etc. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 437.
EDU 439-6 or 12 Student Teaching and Seminar: Early Childhood (Preschool-3) (1 + 20 or 40)
A supervised ten-week field experience with increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of pre-primary or primary learners. The experience is designed to bring together what the student has gained from his college courses to help him understand the psychology and sociology of learning as a basis for developing appropriate meth-
ods of teaching. It includes the preparation of lesson plans, participation in various aspects of the regular out-of-class activities of teachers, and frequent conferences with cooperating teachers and college supervisors. Students are placed in accredited public and private schools. Student teaching is normally the terminal field experience in the pre-professional program leading to certification.
In conjunction with student teaching, the student is required to attend a seminar each week with other student teachers, members of the faculty, and other professional educators. Consideration of the problems faced by the student and teachers highlight these seminars.
EDU 439 should be regarded as a full load for ten weeks. The student will need to consult with his advisor regarding appropriate or required course work for the remaining five weeks of the student teaching semester.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Early Childhood course pertinent to student teaching. (List may be obtained in the Education Department.) Approval of Dean, Center for Education is also necessary.
EDU 451-4 Development of Methods
and Materials for the Bilingual-
Bicultural Classroom (4 + 0)
A practical course designed to help student in identifying appropriate instructional materials in the areas of Language Arts, Math and Science, Social Studies, and the Fine Arts. Special emphasis in planning curriculum for the linguistically and culturally diverse student with emphasis on alternatives in approach and methodology. Time will be spent in structured observation and interaction in a bilingual classroom.
Prerequisites: EDU 351 and proficiency in Spanish.
EDU 452-3 Practicum in Bilingual-
Bicultural Education (1 + 6)
A focus on the practical application of the learned theories, models, and materials in a classroom. The course will consider bilingual-bicultural techniques and developing and implementing them in a bilingual-bicultural classroom. Community resources will be identified and utilized. Six hours per week in a bilingual school or community setting is required.
Prerequisites: EDU 451 and proficiency in Spanish.
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
EDU 464-6 Student Teaching and
Seminar: Special Education (0 + 20) This practicum is the culminating activity in the Special Education minor for students working toward certification to teach the educable mentally handicapped. The student will complete a minimum of two hundred clock hours of teaching in a school setting with exceptional children. This experience must be supervised by a person certified to teach the educable mentally handicapped child. All other course work in the minor must be completed before student teaching.
EDU 465-3 Current Issues in
Education: Variable Topics (3 + 0) In-depth examination of selected current topics and issues in education. Topics will vary, but all will be of current importance, requiring study of recent writings, research, legislation, etc. Issues considered may include career education, infant development, continuing education, etc. May be repeated for credit under a different topic.
Prerequisite: Advanced students in Education.
EDU 469-6 Post Student Teaching
(1 + 40)
A five-week, post-student teaching field experience required in the Elementary Education Program and optional in the Early Childhood and Secondary Education Programs. The five-week program will be cooperatively designed by the student, College advisor, and other appropriate individuals. The following alternatives are possible examples of programs: 1) Extended student teaching when needed in the same assignment as the original student teaching: 2) additional student teaching at a different level or subject area, such as in the Music K-12 program; 3) Senior Assistants Program assisting faculty in Lower Division courses and field experiences; 4) field experiences in related areas in the community or college such as assistants to principals, community program directors, etc.; 5) remedial work in areas of deficiency such as communication skills, content areas, or methodology.
Prerequisites: Permission of major advisor and completion of student teaching.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The major in Physical Education is designed to provide specialization in either the secondary or elementary level. For the student who does not seek teacher certification or
who wishes to complete a major or minor in a more specialized area, a contract major or minor is suggested. Details concerning contract programs may be obtained from the Center for Experimental Studies.
Possible areas in which a contract major or minor might be developed could include the following: Athletic training, coaching, dance, sports specialization, adaptive physical education, athletic administration, research in exercise and movement, sports journalism, sports facility and equipment maintenance, media and public relations in sports, or any other related and approved areas. Majors in Physical Education may utilize the option of completing a minor in a contract area of specialization or selecting a minor from another disciplines.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
A. Secondary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
Secondary Physical Education majors must present proof of proficiency in fifteen different activities. A total of 23 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by (1) receiving a passing grade in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
a. Basic Skills (All of the following) fours'"
Swimming ............................. 1
Fundamentals of Movement ............. 1
Physical Fitness .................. 2
Tumbling ............................. 1
b. Team Sports (3 of the following)
Volleyball .......................... 2
Flag Football......................... 2
Field Hockey.......................... 2
Soccer ............................... 2
Softball ............................. 2
Basketball ........................... 2
c. Individual Sports (5 of the following)
Lifesaving ........................... 1
Gymnastics ........................... 2
Track and Field....................... 2
Tennis .............................. 2
Badminton ............................ 2
Golf.................................. 2
Archery, Racketball, Handball ........ 2
Personal Defense ..................... 2
d. Miscellaneous (3 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance............... 2
Ballroom Dance .................. 2
Wrestling ............................ 2
Modern Dance.......................... 2
Weight Training....................... 2
Total Credits 23
2. Theory Courses (must take all of the toll owing):
Semester
Hours
PER 160 Introduction to Physical
Education ............................ 1
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology...... 2
PER 332 Biomechanics .......... 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise...... 3
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PER 340 Methods of Teaching
Secondary Physical Education....... 3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement
in Physical Education................. 2
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in
Physical Education.................... 3
Approved electives...................... 3
Total Credits 20
Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Certificate is required. Student may take PER 206 or obtain valid card from the American Red Cross.
To obtain a certificate from the State of Colorado, all Secondary Physical Education Majors must also complete the courses required by the Department of Education for secondary level certification as listed under "Secondary Level in the Education section of the catalog. The only exception to that listing is that Secondary Physical Education Majors must substitute PER 462, Adaptive Physical Education, for EDU 345.
B. Elementary Emphasis (PER 150)
1. Professional Activity Courses
a. Basic Skills (All of the following)
Fundamentals of Movement .............. 1
Physical Fitness ...................... 2
Tumbling .............................. 1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following)
Volleyball ............................ 2
Basketball ............................ 2
Soccer ................................ 2
Football .............................. 2
Softball .............................. 2
Field Hockey....................... 2
c. Miscellaneous (2 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance.............. 2
Track and Field.................... 2
Wrestling ............................. 2
Lifesaving ............................ 1
Archery, Racketball and Handball ... 2
Total Credits 15
2. Additional Elementary Activity Courses
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child. 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child.. 2
PER 258 Movement Education............ 3
Total Credits 8 3. Theory Classes SHour
PER 160 Introduction to Physical
Education.............................. 1
PER 33Q Anatomical Kinesiology .......... 2
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise........ 3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical
Education for Children................. 3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement
in Physical Education.................. 2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning ... 3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in
Physical Education..................... 3
Approved electives....................... 3
Total Credits 20
Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Certificate is required. Student may take PER 206 or obtain valid card from the American Red Cross.
Total minimum hours for major 43 To obtain certification by the State of Colorado, all Elementary Physical Education teachers must also
complete the following courses:
EDU 110 Elementary Child I ............... 3
EDU 210 Elementary Child II............... 1
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary Child II. 2
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban
Schools ............................... 3
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban
Schools Laboratory .................... 2
EDU 361 Use of Media in Education....... 2
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education .... 3
Total Credits 16
Highly recommended, but not required:
EDU 231 Child Development ................ 3
EDU 265 Human Relations................ 3
C. Non-Teaching Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities
(Select any 12) ......................... 12
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education 1
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (or valid
American Red Cross Card).................. 2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology......... 2
PER 332 Biomechanics ..................... 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise......... 3
PER 362 History of Physical Education .... 2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in
American Society.......................... 2
Approved electives: Selected in accordance with student's intended career objectives.
Must be pre-planned with an advisor in
PER Department........................... 13
Total Credits 40
Physical Education Minor
A. Secondary Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities ............. 9
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (or valid
American Red Cross Card)................... 2
PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education......................... 3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in Physical
Education ................................. 3
Approved electives........................... 3
Total Credits 20
B. Elementary Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities............ 4
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (or valid
American Red Cross Card)................... 2
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child .... 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .... 2
PER 258 Movement Education................. 3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical
Education for Children..................... 3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in Physical
Education ................................. 3
Total Credits 20
C. Non-Teaching Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities............ 6
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education 1
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (or valid
American Red Cross Card)................... 2
PER 362 History of Physical Education ... 2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in
American Society........................... 2
Approved electives: Selected in accordance with students intended career objectives.
Must be pre-planned with an advisor in
PER Department............................. 7
Total Credits 20
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
RECREATION
The major in Recreation is intended to prepare students to enter recreation-related jobs that are available at both local and national levels. The major consists of a common core of courses deemed essential for all recreation personnel and emphasizes field work with various types of recreation, parks, conservation, and other social service agencies.
In conjunction with the core course selections, the student will select one or more areas of emphases. The areas of emphasis provide the student with specialized knowledge and skills related to particular job functions provided by the various recreation related service agencies. The areas of emphases from which the student may select one or more are:
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services
B. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities
C. Arts and Crafts
D. Inner-City Program Specialist
E. Sports and Athletics
F. Performing and Cultural Arts Specialist
(Music Drama Dance)
G. Recreation and Park Administration
H. Camping
I. Outdoor Recreation
To summarize, Recreation majors have the following
degree requirements or options:
Core Courses..............................13 hours
Emphasis Area.............................27 hours
40 hours
Recreation Internship (Recommended for State Registration) ......................10 hours
Each Recreation major will have the option to complete an existing catalog minor or to select a second area of emphasis from the list above for equivalent minor (22 hours minimum).
The selection of course work will be approved by the Chairman of the Department or his designee(s).
NOTE: Demonstrated proficiencies or credit by exam for course content are acceptable in meeting requirements in the Recreation major or minor. Contact the Director of Professional Preparation in Recreation for details.
For students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Recreation, the following courses are highly recommended for basic studies:
Semester
Hours
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics................. 4
SOC101 Introduction to Sociology................ 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology............ 3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ............. 3
SPE101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ................................ 3
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for All Students
A. Core Courses (13 hours)
PER 211 Recreation Leadership and Leisure
Service Systems ....................... 4
PER 215 Recreation Facility and Equipment Maintenance ............................. 2
PER 335 Recreation for Special
Populations .............................. 2
PER 411 Recreation Program Construction
and Control Processes...................... 3
PER 413 Administration and Organization
of Recreation ............................. 2
Total Credits 13
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Certificate is required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid card from the American Red Cross.
B. Emphasis Area (27 hours)
Students will be required to select one of nine areas of special emphasis courses designed to provide the student with high degree of specialization in a chosen area of interest. These emphasis areas consist of 27 hours of course work offered by the PER Department and other desciplines within the College.
C. Internship
PER 489 Recreation Internship.................10 hours
This practical learning experience is designed primarily to help students make the transition from the classroom to the practical situation. Opportunity is provided for students to assume normal responsibilities involved in the delivery of services commensurate with their degree emphasis(es). This experience is also recommended for State registration.
Emphasis Areas Se(fj'er
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses .... 6
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment........ 3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human
Development ............................... 3
PER 231 Introduction to Therapeutic
Recreation Services........................ 2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology .............. 2
PER 331 Activity Analysis Remotivation
and Socialization Techniques .............. 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise............... 3
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning......... 3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education .... 3
NOTE: Areas of study recommended for equivalency of minor for therapeutic emphasis are identified below: Minimum of 22 hours.
Mental Retardation
HSW104 Behavior Modification ............. 4
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community .... 4
HSW 311 Human Services for Handicapped
Persons ................................... 4
PSY 340 Psychology of Exceptional
Children .................................. 3
EDU 340 Education of the Exceptional
Child ..................................... 3
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of
Exceptional Children ...................... 3
Approved electives...................... 2-5
Youth Corrections
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and
Treatment ................................. 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community .... 4
LEN 320 Criminal Justice Organization
and Administration..................... 3
PSY 325 Child Psychology................. 3
PSY 326 The Psychology of Adolescense.. 3
LEN 331 Classification and Treatment of
the Offender .............................. 3
LEN 332 Corrections in the Community ... 3
HSW 345 Crisis Intervention and Legal
Issues .................................... 4
SOC351 Juvenile Delinquency ................. 3
LEN 441 Contemporary Problems in Criminal Justice ...................... 3
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Psychiatric Services
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory
and Experience............................. 4
HSW 204 Family Functioning:
Dysfunctioning and Therapy................. 4
PSY 241 Social Psychology ................... 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community .... 4
PSY 321 Abnormal Psychology I................ 3
PSY 342 Issues in Community-Social
Psychology ................................ 3
PSY 400 Theories of Personality.............. 3
HSW 432 Psychopathology and Mental
Health Clinician .......................... 4
PSY 469 Survey of Psychotherapies......... 3
Drug and Alcohol
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and
Treatment ................................. 3
SOC 201 Social Problems...................... 3
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory
and Experience............................. 4
HSW 203 Introduction to Theory and Techniques in Interviewing and
Psychotherapy ............................. 4
HSW 204 Family Functioning:
Dysfunctioning and Therapy............ 4
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community .... 4
HSW 347 Counseling the Substance Abuser 4
SOC 467 Contemporary Sociological Trends (Interviewing Techniques)......... 3
Special Education
EDU 110 The Elementary Child I .............. 3
EDU 210 The Elementary Child II.............. 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community .... 4
HSW 311 Human Services for Handicapped
Persons ................................... 4
EDU 340 Education of the Exceptional
Child ..................................... 3
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of
Exceptional Children ...................... 3
EDU 342 Curriculum Methods and Materials
in Teaching Mentally Retarded.............. 3
EDU 344 Counseling the Parents of
Exceptional Children ...................... 3
EDU 346 Identification and Diagnosis of
Young Exceptional Children............ 3
EDU 347 Methods and Materials for Teaching the Trainable Mentally Retarded Child ................................. 3
Early Childhood Education
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education......... 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood
Education ................................. 2
EDU 231 Child Development ................... 3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development. 3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity........... 2
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child .... 3
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues: (Child
Rearing) .................................. 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community .... 4
EDU 346 Identification and Diagnosis of
Young Exceptional Children................. 3
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on Socialization of Children.................... 4
B. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses (11 hours)
Gymnastics ................................ 2
Swimming .................................. 1
Diving .................................... 1
Advanced Lifesaving ....................... 1
Canoeing ................) Select
Sailing .................> 2 out ......... 2
Power Boating ...........) of 3
Water Polo ..
Synchronized Swimming Competitive Swimming Scuba Diving PER 210 Techniques of Officiating Aquatic
Activities ................................. 2
PER 316 Water Safety Instructor
Certification .............................. 3
PER 330 Anatomical .
Kinesiology .. i Select
PER 332 Biomechanics .. > 2 out....... 5-6
PER 334 Physiology of | of 3
Exercise........'
Semester
Hours
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating
Operations ................................ 2
PER 359 Teaching the Handicapped to
Swim ...................................... 2
PER 455 Swimming Pool Operation and Management ............................ 4
C. Arts and Crafts (select 27 hours)
IED101 Introduction to Wood.................. 3
ART 110 Basic Drawing Methods................ 3
IED111 Introduction to Plastics.............. 3
ART 120 Basic Design and Crafts Methods. 3 IED 131 Introduction to Craft Materials
and Processes ............................. 2
IED 141 Introduction to Graphic Arts .... 3
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts........ 2
IED 231 Art Metal, Silversmith, Lapidary .. 3
IED 241 Introduction to Photography....... 3
IED 381 Industrial Arts for Elementary School ................................ 2
D. Inner City Program Specialist (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activities ........... 4
SOC 213 Urban Sociology .................. 3
PSC 221 American State and Local
Government ................................ 4
GEG 261 Urban Geography ..................... 3
HSW 345 Crisis Intervention and Legal
Issues .................................... 4
SOC 415 Sociology of Urban Poor .......... 3
PER 463 Recreation Program for Aged .... 2
PER 465 Recreation Programs and Management Problems in Urban Ghetto .. 4
SOC 467 Contemporary Sociological Trends ...................................... 3
E. Sports and Athletics (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses (Required)
Fundamentals of Movement (Required) ... 1
Physical Fitness (Required) ............... 2
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses .... 16
Student to select any sixteen (16) hours:
PER 210 Officiating ....................... 2
PER 250 Activities for Young Child...... 3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology............. 2
PER 332 Biomechanics ...................... 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise............. 3
PER 371 Administration of Intramural
Sports and Student Recreation......... 2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society....................... 2
F. Performing and Cultural Arts (select 27 hours)
Students are to select one of the following areas: (1) Music, (2) Drama, or (3) Dance for their major emphasis area. It is also recommended that a second area be taken to represent the equivalency of a minor,
(minimum of 22 hours).
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Music (select 27 hours)
Semester
Hours
MUS 100 MUS 101 MUS 161 MUS 162 MUS 161 MUS 162 MUS 161 MUS 162 MUS 161 MUS 162 PER 219 MUS 281
MUS 282
MUS 331 Methods
Introduction to Music.......... 3
Fundamentals of Music Theory .. 3
Class Piano I ................... 1
Class Piano II................... 1
Folk Guitar I ................... 1
Folk Guitar II .................. 1
Class Voice I ................... 1
Class Voice II................... 1
Reed Instrument I ............... 1
Reed Instrument II............... 1
Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation 2 Music Ensembles (Large) I .
Music Ensembles (Large) II ..
Elementary School Music
Select 1
MUS 381 MUS 382 MUS 421
Music Ensembles (Small) I .... Music Ensembles
(Small) II....
Choral Literature
Select 1 ____
1
2
Drama (select 27 hours)
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation 2
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre........ 3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I............... 3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stage Craft........ 3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity..... 2
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage............... 2
SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design and
Theatre Lighting ......................... 3
SPE 328 Stage Directing................ 3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I ................ 1
SPE 427 Theatre: Practicum II................ 3
SPE 328 Stage Directing................... 2
Dance (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Series
Square and Folk Dance..................... 2
Ballroom Dance ........................... 2
Modern Dance.............................. 2
Tap Dance ................................ 1
Ballet ................................... 1
Ethnic Dance I ........................... 1
Ethnic Dance II........................... 1
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation 2 PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .... 2
Approved electives (see Coordinator of Recreation Education) ... 12
G. Recreation and Park Administration
(select 27 hours) S*HTr!
GEG 261 Urban Geography ................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management......... 3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing........... 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management .............. 3
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating
Operations............................... 2
PER 383 Urban Park and Recreation
Planning ................................ 3
PER 455 Swimming Pool Operation and
Management .............................. 4
MGT 461 Advanced Personnel Management 3
PER 481 Federal Grant and Aid Programs. 2
PER 483 Park and Recreation Management 3
H. Camping (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses .... 12
Swimming ..............................
Advanced Lifesaving ...................
Canoeing ........"1
Sailing ......... V Select 2out of 3 ...
Power Boating .. J
Camp Craft Skills........................
Wilderness Travel........................
Western Horsemanship I...................
Mountaineering I ........................
Mountaineering II........................
Travel Activities .......................
Game and Fish Activities.................
White Water Boating .....................
IED 131 Introduction to Craft Materials and
Processes ............................... 2
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts...... 2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation 2
PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation 2
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating
Operations .............................. 2
PER 441 Environmental Education ........... 2
PER 445 Camp Management and Counseling .............................. 4
I.
Outdoor Recreation (select 27 hours)
GEG 123 Weather and Climate..........
GEG 124 Landforms ...................
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses
Group I
Swimming ................
Wilderness Travel.....
Mountaineering I .....
Game and Fish
Activities ..........
Western Horsemanship I ................
White Water Boating ... Fly, Bait, Spin Casting ..
Canoeing .............
Sailing ..............
Power Boating ..........
_ Select 8 hours

3
3
11
Semester
Hours
Group II '
Mountaineering II .....
Mountaineerinn III ....
White Water Boating II .. ^Select Western Horseman- f 3 hours
ship II..............
Game and Fish
Activities II .......
B\0 205 Natural Resources and
Conservation ............................. 3
PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation 2
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating
Operations ............................... 2
PER 441 Environmental Education ........... 2
PER 445 Camp Management and Counseling ........................... 4
Recreation Major
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses .... 5
Elect any five (5) hours from the PER 150 listings of Professional Activity Courses. Contact PER Department for complete listing of course seletctions available.
PER 211 Recreation Leadership and
Leisure Service Systems...............
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts.......
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation PER 335 Recreation for Special Populations PER 341 Camp and Outdoor Recreation ..
PER 411 Recreation Program Construction
and Control Processes.................... 3
PER 413 Administration and Organization of Recreation ............................. 2
Total Credits 22
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HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION
Minor
The minor in Health Education is intended to prepare students to teach Health Education at either the secondary or elementary level or both levels. This is an excellent area of specialization for the student who is obtaining a teaching major in another area or for those nurses who are interested in the area of School Health Nurse.
Students who select the minor in Drivers Education and Safety may be certified at the secondary level in Drivers Education and Motorcycle Education.
A. Health Education Minor or Emphasis Semester
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and
Treatment ............................... 3
PER 202 Community Health .................. 3
HES 204 Nutrition ......................... 3
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ............. 2
PER 300 School Health Programs............. 3
PER 391 Safety Education .................. 3
PSV 325 Child Psychology or
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence....... 3
Total Credits 20
B. Driver and Traffic Safety Education Minor or Emphasis
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and
Treatment ................................ 3
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation............... 2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education .. 2
PER 391 Safety Education ................... 3
PER 392 Driver Education (Basic and
Advanced) ................................ 4
PER 394 Simulators, Ranges and Behind-
the-Wheel Techniques.................. 3
PER 396 Motorcycle Safety Education .... 2
Total Credits 19
PER 100-1 Physical Education Activities (1+1)
A wide variety of one credit activity classes designed for the interests of the general student body. These classes do not serve the needs of physical education/recreation majors. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
PER 150-1-2 Professional Activity Courses (1 + 1) or (2 + 2)
Courses which physical education and recreation majors and minors must take to meet departmental skills requirements in various physical activities. These courses will also cover methods of teaching and field experience assignments. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
PER 160-1 Introduction to Physical Education (1+1)
For physical education majors. A survey
course designed to orient prospective teachers to the field of physical education. Lecture, discussion and field experience.
PER 202-3 Community Health (3 + 0) Designed to provide an in-depth study into health matters involving virtually all citizens for teachers of Health Education. It attempts to focus attention in health problems amenable to community action and the benefits of which are channeled to individual citizens. Emphasis is in promoting community health, preventing disorders and disabilities, environmental health and health services.
PER 206-2 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation
(2 + 0)
Designed for use by the general public to prepare people, through providing them with knowledge and skill, to meet the needs of most situations when emergency first aid care is needed. Cardio-pulmonary respiration is covered. The Red Cross Standard First Aid and Personal Safety card will be given on adequate completion course.
PER 210-1-2 Officiating (1 + 1) or
(1+2)
Courses designed for students who wish to acquire or perfect officiating skills. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the classes. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
Prerequisite: PER 150 in appropriate sport.
PER 211-4 Recreation Leadership and Leisure Service Systems (4 + 1)
Study of the development and scope of leisure service systems and principles and practices in recreation leadership services.
PER 215-2 Recreation Facility and Equipment Maintenance (2 + 0)
To give the student an understanding of the design and maintenance problems identified in use of recreation and park facilities and equipment. Emphasis will be directed toward community centers, swimming pools, playfields, building and park designs, playground equipment, playing surfaces, and turf maintenance.
Prerequisite: PER 211.
PER 217-2 Recreation Arts and Crafts
(2 + 0)
Course relates to myriad forms of recreational art and craft programs conducted in schools, youth-serving agencies, camps, public and private recreation agencies. Em-
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
phasis will be directed toward nature and meaning of crafts, graphic and manipulative arts and instruction methods, conventional and non-conventional crafts, sources of supplies.
PER 219-2 Music Drama Dance in Recreation (2 + 1)
Exploration of the skills and techniques of performing arts programs in areas of music, drama, and dance in recreation services.
Prerequisite: MUS 101, or permission of instructor.
PER 231-2 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services (2 + 1)
Study of the therapeutic recreation services provided for special populations administered by Federal, state, and local health care and treatment facilities. Particular emphasis will be directed toward agency organization, administration, therapeutic leadership functions, and services. Course will include opportunity for observation and outside involvement with various health care facilities in the Denver area. Prerequisites: PER 211.
PER 250-3 Activities for the Young Child (2 + 3)
Course is designed to acquaint the student with appropriate sports, games, gymnastics, and tumbling skills for the young child. Teaching progressions, safety factors, items of equipment spotting techniques, and leadership experiences are included.
PER 252-2 Rhythms for the Young Child (2 + 2)
Participation and instruction in the fundamental movements, forms and patterns of creative dance, rhythms, and singing games for children.
PER 258-3 Movement Education (3 + 1)
Participation and instruction in the problemsolving method of teaching movement exploration. Designed for teachers of preschool and elementary children. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the class.
PER 300-3 School Health Programs (3 + 0)
A course designed to give the prospective and early childhood, elementary, and secondary teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, the promotion of healthful living, and an understanding of the health services program.
PER 306-2 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (2 + 0)
Recognition, cause, prevention, treatment, and various physical therapeutic procedures for sports injuries.
Prerequisites: PER 206 or current Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Card.
PER 316-3 Water Safety Instructor Certification (3 + 1)
Methods of teaching water safety, skill analysis, and correction. Course leads to Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Certification. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the class.
Prerequisite: Advanced Lifesaving Certificate.
PER 330-2 Anatomical Kinesiology
(2 + 0)
A study of the musculature of the human body. Analysis of joint movement and muscular involvement in various physical activities.
Prerequisite: BIO 231, or acceptable human anatomy course.
PER 331-3-1 Activity Analysis, Remotivation, and Socialization Techniques (3 + 1)
A study of procedures and techniques used in activity assessment and remotivation of atypical individuals in therapeutic recreation rehabilitative settings. Emphasis will be directed toward sociological, psychological, and physiological elements that affect activity participation.
Prerequisites: SOC 101, PSY 101, BIO 232.
PER 332-3 Biomechanics (2 + 2) Application of the principles of mechanics, physics, and mathematics to the analysis of sport activities. Cinematography, motion analysis, and prediction of performance will be essential aspects of this class.
Prerequisite: PER 330, or permission of instructor.
PER 334-3 Physiology of Exercise (2 + 2)
Effect of exercise on the various systems and organs of the body.
Prerequisite: BIO 232, or acceptable human physiology course.
PER 335-2 Recreation for Special Populations (2 + 0)
Study related to providing recreation services and activities to those persons who
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
are restricted because of mental, physical, social, cultural, or economic conditions. Prerequisite: PER 211.
PER 340-3 Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education (3 + 0) Course is designed to present alternative instructional strategies on a practical application level to potential teachers of physical education at the secondary level. A cumulative strategies course established to reach those who shortly will go into their student teaching learning experience. Field experience assignments will be a required part of this class.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
PER 341-2 Camping and Outdoor Recreation (2 + 1)
History, trends, objectives, programs, skills, and techniques common to camp and outdoor recreation programs.
Prerequisites: PER 150 (Wilderness Travel; Mountaineering I); and PER 211.
PER 350-3 Methods of Teaching Physical Education for Children
(3 + 0)
Methods of teaching (traditional, exploratory, combined), techniques of class control and management, program planning, and organization will be covered in this course. Also included will be teacher responsibilities in the total elementary school program. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the class.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
PER 353-2 Waterfront, Marina, and Boating Operations (2 + 0)
Emphasis will be on development of marinas, boating and waterfront (outdoor) programs and facilities, nomenclature in boating, sanitation, marketing (hard and soft goods), use of Federal and state inland water resources, use of existing agency programs; i.e., American Red Cross, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Power Squadron, Bureau of Reclamation, state agencies, etc.
Prerequisites: Canoeing (PER 150), Sailing (PER 150), Powerboating (PER 150): Two of three.
PER 359-2 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim (2 + 1)
Methods of teaching swimming to students with disabilities including: Orthopedic, learning disabilities, mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, sight and hearing difficulties, etc. Course leads to Red Cross
Instructor of Handicapped Swimming Certificate.
Prerequisite: PER 316.
PER 362-2 History of Physical Education (1850 to present) (2 + 0)
A study and analysis of the history of physical education from the mid-1800s to the present.
PER 317-2 Administration of Intramural Sports and Student Recreation (2 + 0) Study of problems and techniques of organization and administration for intramural and recreation programs in schools and colleges.
PER 383-3 Urban Park and Recreation Planning (3 + 0)
Course of study directed toward the administrative planning and directing the developmental aspects of an urban park and recreation agency. Particular attention will be directed toward development of agency objectives, development of standards, capital improvement programs, systems service analysis, short and long range service programs, and regional planning and interregional resource agencies.
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 215, or permission of instructor.
PER 391-3 Safety Education (3 + 0) Provides the student with knowledge about accident prevention in many areas: home, school, physical and recreational activities, traffic and community.
PER 392-4 Driver Education (Basic and Advanced) (4 + 0)
A study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasis on methods, materials, and resources for effective teaching, including discussion, demonstrations and techniques basic to classroom, on-the-street instruction, instructional aid, evaluation and research.
PER 394-3 Simulators, Ranges, and Behind-the-Wheel Techniques Designed to give the prospective teacher a foundation in the use of multiple car driving ranges, behind-the-wheel techniques, and electro-mechanical devices. Emphasizes the use of electro-mechanical devices, films, lesson plans, and the use of these materials in curriculum planning and teaching procedures.
Prerequisite: PER 392.
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PER 396-2 Motorcycle Safety Education (2 + 0)
Designed to give the prospective teacher a foundation and skills in the organization and conduct of an educationally sound program for novice motorcycle riders in secondary schools and at the community level. Emphasizes organization, course content, lessons, and development of skill in motorcycle riding.
Prerequisite: PER 392.
PER 399-1-2 Field Experience (1 +2) or (1 + 4)
Provides opportunities for students to gain practical experience assisting in the conduct of sports-type and recreation activities with community agencies, schools, and the College. Credit is determined by the quality of the experience and hours of time required. Registration for this course requires prior approval of the instructor for the course and the cooperating agency. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
PER 411-3 Recreation Program Construction and Control Processes (3 + 0)
Designed to prepare students for effective
program development and budget control processes in various types of leisure service programs. Special attention will be given to programs for public playgrounds, community centers, and regional facilities. Prerequisite: PER 335.
PER 413-2 Administration and Organization of Recreation (2 + 0) Problems in organizing and establishing public recreation and park services. Consideration of legislation, budgeting, staffing, and control processes in providing leisure and park services.
Prerequisites: PER 211, PER 215, PER 335.
PER 440-2 Evaluation and
Measurement in Physical Education
(2 + 0)
A practical approach to measurement and evaluation in physical education for the potential physical education student. Students will have the opportunity to apply measurement and evaluation in practical situations including administration of fitness tests and interpretation of results. Field experience assignments will be required.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
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PER 441-2 Environmental Education (2 + 1)
A study of the development of outdoor education and school camping. Principles of programming, administration, and organization of outdoor education programs will be stressed.
PER 445-4 Camp Management and Counseling (4 + 1)
Study of recent trends and philosophies in camp management and counseling related to resident and day-camping programs. Particular attention will be directed to management, leadership, and counseling functions of personnel in the camp environment. Prerequisite: PER 341.
PER 450-3 Perceptual Motor Learning (3 + 0)
Survey of perceptual motor theories including historical background, researchers and their work, and assessment techniques.
PER 455-4 Swimming Pool Operation and Management (4 + 0)
Study of the types of swimming facilities; how they are operated and maintained to provide optimum public use. Emphasis on staffing, supervision, program development, maintenance, and management policies. Prerequisite: PER 316.
PER 460-3 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in Physical Education (3 + 0)
The organizational and administrative policies and procedures for curriculum development and conducting physical education programs. Emphasis will be directed toward program development, personnel relationships, legal provisions, budgets, purchasing and care of equipment, facilities, schedules and activities, public relations, philosophy and administrative practices, supervision, in-service training, records, reports, and other related problems.
Prerequisites: Junior standing, PER 160.
PER 462-3 Adaptive Physical Education (3 + 0)
Physical education as adapted to the physically and mentally inconvenienced in public schools for recreation/physical education majors/minors, special education, and early childhood students. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the class.
PER 463-2 Recreation Programs for Aged (2 + 1)
The role of recreation service as it relates
to understanding the needs and providing programs of services to the elderly. Emphasis will be on program planning for the older (retired) adult through community recreation programs, senior centers and health care facilities.
Prerequisites: PER 211, PER 335, or permission of instructor.
PER 465-4 Recreation Programs and Management Problems in Urban Ghetto (4 + 1)
An intensive study of the growth and development of recreation programs along with the diverse problems related to inner-city neighborhoods. Emphasis will be directed to urban program planning, advocacy involvement, political influences, and management procedures. Class will include opportunities for community involvement. Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 335.
PER 473-2 Sociology of Athletics in American Society (2 + 0)
To examine and utilize basic sociological concepts and demonstrate their manifestations in areas of recreation and athletics.
PER 481-2 Federal Grant and Aid Programs (2 + 0)
The purpose of this course will be to acquaint the student with the categorical Federal grants-in-aid programs and their impact on state and local governments. Also, alternative grants-in-aid programs will be discussed including private foundation and education grants. Emphasis will be placed on resource agencies in recreation, education, conservation, environment, and beautification.
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 215.
PER 483-3 Park and Recreation Management (3 + 0)
An intensive study of the principles, practices, and programs involved in managing municipal park and recreation systems. Emphasis will be placed at the chief administrator and department head functioning level, with emphasis on departmental finance, planning, systems, personnel practices, policy development and implementation, legal liabilities, and legislative practices.
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 215.
PER 489-10 Recreation Internship (0 + 20)
A guided experience which provides for the maturation of educational achievement within the practical environment of a leisure
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
service agency. Supervision is provided by both the instructional staff of college and cooperating agencies.
Prerequisites: Recreation major, Senior status, G.P.A. 2.5, completion of three-fourths of major-minor program.
READING
The Reading Department offers reading improvement courses for all students and a reading minor for elementary or secondary education majors.
The reading improvement courses emphasize development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. A well-equipped Reading' Laboratory is used to reinforce classroom instruction. The Reading Laboratory contains materials for use in improving comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills as well as machines for improving reading speed. Any student may use the Laboratory. Students enrolled in the reading improvement courses work on areas identified by a diagnostic reading test administered in each class at the beginning of the semester. Many colleges and universities have used the MSC Laboratory as a model in establishing their reading programs.
The reading minor is designed to produce well-trained classroom teachers. In the developmental sequence, students take course work in methods and techniques of teaching reading and supervise a reading group for a semester in a school classroom setting.
In the remedial sequence, students learn to administer a complete reading diagnosis, write a comprehensive case report based on the study of current remedial theory, develop materials for students with reading difficulties, and work on a one-to-one basis with students with severe reading problems. Much of the work for both sequences is done in schools in the metropolitan area.
Reading Minor
Required Courses sfjJ^
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary .................................. 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate ............................. 3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content
Areas: Secondary....................... 2
RDG 360 Practicum in Teaching Reading.......... 3
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials .. 2
RDG 435 Remedial Reading Theories and
Diagnosis.............................. 4
RDG 460 Practicum in Teaching Remedial Reading ................................. 3-5
20-22
Electives Additional semester hours selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in Reading.
Total 24
Highly Recommended
RDG 339 Reading Laboratory Experience .... 2
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English
Speakers ...........:...................... 2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom (competency in Spanish required). 3
RDG 100-1 Elements of Reading (1+0)
Offered under a variety of topics. Each module covers a basic skill or competency which will help the college student. These include reading, comprehension, memory and test-taking, pronunciation of words, rate of reading, spelling, and vocabulary. This course may be repeated for credit whenever it is taken under a different title.
RDG 102-2 Study Techniques (2 + 0)
A course to provide instruction and practice in study skills including note-taking and studying for examinations. The class will include lectures, discussions, individualized instruction, and practice sessions. Students will be encouraged to work individually on specific study problems.
RDG 103-3 Communication Skills (3 + 0)
This course is designed to help students improve their communication skills by providing them with information and practice in study skills, reading comprehension and rate, writing mechanics, organization and style, and speaking.
RDG 104-3 Improvement of Reading I
(2 + 2)
A course for the improvement of reading comprehension, speed, vocabulary, and general performance in all college courses. Individual work in the reading laboratory is required in the course. Some sections are self-paced.
RDG 105-2 Improvement of Reading II (1+2)
An advanced course for developing critical reading techniques, study skills in various subject areas, further vocabulary improvement, and flexible reading rates. Individual work in the Reading Laboratory is required.
Prerequisite: RDG 104, or permission of instructor.
RDG 312-3 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Primary (3 + 0)
An overview of components of the reading process including reading acquisition the-
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CENTER FOR EDUCATION
ories, scope and sequence of skill development, reading materials past and present, terminology, basal reading programs, research and issues related to teaching of reading with emphasis on teaching reading at the primary level (K-3), and techniques of teaching beginning reading.
RDG 313-3 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate (3 + 0) Approaches to the teaching of reading with emphasis on teaching reading at the intermediate level (4-6) and including skill area techniques, content area reading, individualized reading, planning reading lessons and units, and use of the informal reading inventory.
Prerequisite: RDG 312 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 328-2 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas: Secondary (2 + 0) Approaches to the teaching of developmental reading at the secondary (Junior-Senior High School) level and to the teaching of reading skills in the content areas. Special attention will be given to preparing lessons plans in various subject matter areas which simultaneously teach reading skills.
Prerequisite: RDG 312 (may be taken concurrently), or Secondary Education Major.
RDG 339-2 Reading Laboratory Experience (0 + 4)
This course is designed to provide reading minors with experience in supervising the Reading Laboratory and the curriculum center, acting as teaching assistants in lower division reading courses, and developing materials for reading courses.
Prerequisite: Six (6) hours of 300 level reading courses.
RDG 353-2 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers (1 + 2) Theories, methods, and techniques for teaching language and reading to the non-English speaker. Tutoring with a non-English speaker is required for a minimum of 25 hours during the semester.
Prerequisite: RDG 312.
RDG 358-3 Reading in the Bilingual Bicultural Classroom (3 + 0)
Emphasis on the teaching of Spanish reading skills in the bilingual-bicultural classroom, pre-school through third grade. A study of methods and techniques for systematically teaching the primary child to
speak and to read the Spanish language.
Prerequisites: RDG 312, and proficiency in Spanish.
RDG 360-3 Practicum in Reading (1+4)
Pre-student teaching experience in planning, preparing, and presenting lesson plans for a group of students in developmental reading programs at any chosen grade level. This course is designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the practical application of theoretical concepts in the teaching of reading. Forty-four clock hours of experience in the school are required.
Prerequisite: RDG 313, or permission of instructor.
RDG 434-2 Development of Reading Materials (2 + 0)
Analysis and construction of reading games and materials for use in developmental, remedial, and corrective reading programs.
Prerequisite: RDG 360 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 435-4 Remedial Reading Theories and Diagnosis (4 + 0)
A study of the factors which may contribute to reading disability, the means by which these may be diagnosed or determined, the extent to which they are causally connected, and the corrective procedures to be followed in eliminating or mitigating these factors.
Prerequisite: RDG 360 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
RDG 449-2 Current Reading Issues: Variable Topics (2 + 0)
This course offers students an opportunity to examine, in depth, topics of current interest in reading. This course may be repeated for credit if different topics are covered.
Prerequisite: Six (6) hours of 300 level reading courses, or permission of instructor.
RDG 460-3-5 Practicum in Remedial Reading (1 + 4-8)
Administration of diagnostic reading tests to students with severe reading disabilities and planning and carrying out of remediation procedures based on the diagnosis. Forty-four clock hours of practicum in the school are required.
Prerequisite: RDG 435, or permission of instructor.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The School of Engineering Technology provides technical education to prepare individuals for employment or to operate their own businesses in various technological fields. Emphasis is placed on giving students an understanding of the principles of mathematics, science, and instruction in applying the principles as owners, supervisors, technicians, or teachers in a constantly expanding industrial economy. Courses in the humanities and social sciences are included to broaden the individuals general education.
The School offers two degrees the Associate in Applied Sciences and the Bachelor of Science.
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES*
The Associate in Applied Sciences degree is designed to provide students with intensive preparation for employment at the end of two years.
Technology courses carry credit and provide instruction and training of a different nature and at a considerably higher level than that attained by craftsmen, mechanics, and other skilled workers. The courses are not pre-engineering curricula planned for continuation of study for a baccalaureate engineering degree, and some of them may not be accepted by a four-year engineering college or university.
Candidates for the Associate in Applied Sciences degree must meet the general requirements of the College and specified basic studies requirements. They must also choose one of the fields of specialization listed under the department headings.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The Engineering Technologist Program provides students with the opportunity to receive a Bachelor of Science degree with majors in civil, electronics, mechanical, meteorology, or surveying. In addition, the student may combine business with technology and receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Technical Management or Industrial Marketing.
These programs provide students with greater breadth and depth than is possible in the two-year Associate Degree programs. Upper Division courses are available to those students who, after earning an Associate Degree desire to obtain a baccalaureate degree. The four-year trained technologist fills the gap created by increased emphasis upon the development of scientifically oriented engineers. New developments in the more efficient utilization of
Metropolitan State College is in the process of transferring some of these associate degree programs to the Community College of Denver. Beginning freshmen should consult with a technology advisor.
engineering manpower have created a large demand for the technologist. The four-year baccalaureate programs are designed to prepare students for greater technical and managerial responsibilities. Graduates become vital members on technical engineering application teams.
The following four-year engineering technology programs are built upon the concept of two plus two. The first two years, containing a balance of specialization, basic studies and electives, are designed to prepare a student for entry into industry as a technician. The second two years also contain a balance of basic studies and electives, as well as specialization in depth and cross training in related technical and business programs.
In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree, the student must conform to the Colleges general specifications for the Bachelors Degree including 60 hours of Upper Division courses.
The first two years of the program taken at Metropolitan State College or at a com-munity/junior college should include the requirements as listed in -the following program descriptions.
Industrial Marketing
Bachelor of Science
The Industrial Marketing Program links sales and manufacturing. Specialists are trained to become familiar with designing, manufacturing, branding, packaging, transporting, labeling, pricing, selling, and servicing products. In addition, the curriculum develops an awareness of the policies and practices of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and users of technical goods. Graduates may expect to find positions in retail and wholesale industrial sales positions, in the areas of advertising and promotion, and in the field of marketing planning. Administration of the program is handled jointly through the Departments of Electronics Technology and Marketing.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
INDUSTRIAL MARKETING
Basic Studies
ENG 101 Freshman Composition: The Essay 3 ENG 102 Freshman Composition: Analysis,
Research, and Documentation ................ 3
Humanities
SPE 101 Fund, of Speech Communications .. 3
ENG 271 Intro to Technical Writing ............ 3
Elective ...................................... 3
Science and Mathematics
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the
Management and Social Sciences ............. 3
PHY 125 Physics of Technology I ............ 5
Social and/or Behavioral Science
ECO 201 Prin. of Economics I .................. 3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology.............. 3
Elective ...................................... 3
Career
BEC 200 Business Communications ............... 3
Subtotal 35
Technology Course Studies
CEN 100 The Technology Profession ........ 1
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ................................. 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ................. 3
CEN 110 Civil Technology .................... 3
MET 130 Quality Assurance Technology...... 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis .............. 3
MET 405 Production Control .................. 3
MET 430 Transportation Problems ............. 3
EET 111 D.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ................................ 6
EET 112 A.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ................................ 6
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and
Electronics Circuits........................ 4
Electives ..................................... 8
Subtotal 46
Business Course Studies
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ......... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ......... 3
BEC 301 Business Report Writing ............. 3
CMS 101 Intro to Data Processing ............ 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ... 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance................ 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ...................... 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management ......... 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ............. 3
MKT 301 Marketing Research .................. 3
MKT 311 Advertising ......................... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ................... 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management.. 3
Subtotal 39
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The specialized fields within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology include programs in Civil Engineering Technology, Drafting, Meteorology, and Surveying, with a wide variety of program options available. The Meteorology Technology program and the Survey program are separate, specialized tour-year programs. Their individual curriculum requirements are listed separately.
Civil Engineering Technology graduates apply engineering principles in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, build-
ings, railroads, bridges reservoirs, dams, irrigation works, water systems, airports, and other structures. In planning for a construction project, they may participate in estimating costs, preparing specifications for materials, and participate in surveying, drafting, and design work. During the construction phase, the engineering technologist works closely with the contractor and the superintendent in scheduling construction activities and the inspection of the work for conformity to specifications. In recent years, a major work area for Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology relates to environmental considerations with particular emphasis on the preparation of environmental impact studies.
Following are the curriculum requirements for the various degrees, minors, and areas of increased emphasis offered.
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science
Required Technical Studies SHoSrs6r
CEN 100 The Engineering Technology
Profession .................................. 1
CEN 110 Civil Technology I...................... 3
CEN 111 Civil Technology II .................... 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I..................... 3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ................... 3
CEN 210 Structural Drawing ..................... 3
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing..................... 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics .................. 3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry.................... 2
CEN 251 Surveying I ............................ 3
CEN 310 Contracts and Specifications......... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines....... 3
MET 101 Materials Fabrication .................. 3
Approved Technical Elective .................... 3
Subtotal 39
Required General Studies SHour
English Composition ............................ 6
Humanities ..................................... 3
MTH 111 ........................................ 3
MTH 112......................................... 3
PHY 121 ........................................ 5
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences .............. 3
Subtotal 23 Total 62
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Bachelor of Science The four year baccalaureate program is built on the two-plus-two concept. That is, it is presumed that a Bachelor of Science candidate usually will have completed a two-year associate degree program or equivalent at Metropolitan State College or another institution. Therefore, only additional requirements for the upper two years are listed here.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required Technical Studies Semester Hours
CEN 216 Mechanics II 3
CEN 252 Surveying II 3
CEN 316 Mechanics III Dynamics 3
CEN 318 Fluid Mechanics 3
CEN 319 Hydrology 3
CEN 400 Senior Seminar 3
Subtotal 18
Technical Electives: Must include a Technology area of specialization or a College minor of not less than eighteen (18) semester hours, as approved by the Department (See various
areas following.) Required General Studies 18 Subtotal 36 Semester Hours 5
Social and Behavioral Science 5
MTH 141 4
MTH 241 4
PHY 122 5
Chemistry CONSTRUCTION: AREA OF Subtotal Total 5 28 64
SPECIALIZATION
Required Technical Studies
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing................ 3
CEN211 Computing and Estimating .............. 3
CEN 312 Engineering Economy ................. 3
CEN 313 Materials Engineering................ 3
CEN 351 Curves and Earthwork ................. 3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics ..................... 4
CEN 498 Independent Study.................. 1-5
Total 20-24
ENVIRONMENTAL: AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Technical Studies
CEN 240 Meteorology and the Urban
Environment .............................. 3
CEN 330 Sanitation and Sewerage.............. 3
CEN 331 Fundamentals of Sanitation ........ 3
CEN 430 Environmental Technology............ 3
CEN 490 Environmental Impact Statements
Background Part I ...................... 3
CEN 499 Environmental Impact Statements
Part II ................................ 3
CEN 499 Environmental Impact Statements
Part III .............................. _3
Total 21
STRUCTURES: AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Technical Studies
CEN 317 Mechanics IV....................... 3
CEN 410 Timber Technology ................. 3
CEN 411 Steel Technology .................. 3
CEN 412 Concrete Technology ............... 3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics ................... 3
Approved Technical Electives .............. 6
Total 2?
SURVEYING AND MAPPING: AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Technical Studies
CEN 350 Applied Astronomy for Surveyors ... 2
CEN 351 Curves and Earthwork .............. 3
CEN 352 Route Surveying ................... 3
CEN 450 Cadastral Surveying ................ 3
CEN 451 Advanced Surveying ............... 3
CEN 452 Introduction to Photogrammetry .... 3
Approved Technical Electives ................ 3
Total 20
MINOR: CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required Technical Studies
CEN 110 Civil Technology I................... 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ................. 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ................ 3
CEN 251 Surveying I .......................... 3
CEN 310 Contracts and Specifications ........ 3
Approved Upper Division Technical Elective .. 3
Approved Lower Division Technical Elective .. 3
Total 2?
DRAFTING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Sciences
Required Technical Studies
CEN 100 The Engineering Technology
Profession ................................... 1
CEN 110 Civil Technology I.................... 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ................. 3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing il ................ 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ................ 3
CEN 210 Structural Drawing ................... 3
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing .................. 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ................ 3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry .................... 2
CEN 310 Contracts and Specifications ........ 3
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing ......... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines........ 3
MET 101 Materials Fabrication ............... 3
MET 206 Elements of Machine Design ......... 3
Approved Technical Elective................... 3
Subtotal 42
Required Technical Studies
English Composition .......................... 6
Humanities.................................... 3
MTH 111 ...................................... 3
MTH 112 ...................................... 3
PHY 121 ...................................... 5
Social and/or Behavorial Sciences ............ 3
Subtotal 23
Total 65
MINOR: DRAFTING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required Technical Studies Hour-
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ................ 3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ......... 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing ................ 3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry.................. 2
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing ......... 3
MET 206 Elements of Machine Design ......... 3
Approved Upper Division Elective.............. 3
Total 20
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Electronics Engineering Technology graduates act as a liaison between the electronic engineer and the skilled worker. They possess some of the know-why of the engi-
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
neer and some of the know-how of the craftsman.
Graduates are employed in a variety of positions as engineering technicians or technologists working with engineers and scientists in some of the following functional areas:
Research and Development
Technical activities in research and development are primarily directed towards obtaining new information and new knowledge of the field. The engineering technologist is a member of the research team, along with scientists and engineers. This specific work may involve the development and manufacture of prototypes, test and evaluation of equipment, or other activities necessary to render technical support to a research project.
Electronic Manufacturing
A graduate employed in a manufacturing facility might be involved in actual manufacturing, fabrication, test, prototype development, calibration, quality control, maintenance, or field service. He may also in some cases become heavily involved in sales engineering.
Manufacturing Plants
In all other areas of industry, the rapid advancement of sophisticated electronic instrumentation is opening vast fields for the engineering technology graduates. Practically all on line control processes are electronically directed. In this area, maintenance, calibration, installation, as well as personnel supervisory positions are available to the engineering technologist.
Services
Service engineering has become a field of its own. This involves extensive activities in the fields of computers, communications, instrumentation, new product development, and numerous other activities involving electrical and electronic systems.
The EET curriculum provides a strong foundation in mathematics and science as well as a thorough treatment of the characteristics of electric circuits and electronic devices. In the four-year program, specialization may be achieved by selection of individual programs or areas of emphasis included within the scope of the department offerings.
Following are the specific technical courses required for both the Associate of Applied Science Degree as well as the Bachelor of Science Degree in Electronics Engineering Technology:
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE: ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required EET Courses Houre
EET 111 D.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ................................. 6
EET 112 A.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ................................. 6
EET 202 Electronic Drafting .................... 2
EET 211 Electronics I .......................... 6
EET 212 Electronics II ........................ _6
26
The following related technical courses are required:
CEN 100 The Technology Profession .............. 1
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ................................. _3
4
Additional course requirements:
English .......................................... 6
Humanities ....................................... 3
Social/Behavioral Science......................... 3
Math (111, 112) .................................. 6
Physics (121, or 125) ............................ 5
Technical Elective ............................... 4
Free Elective ................................... _3
30
T otal 60
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The Bachelor of Science program is based on the two-plus-two concept. In addition to the program listed under the Associate of Applied Science above, the following courses are required: (Note: EET 202-2 listed under the AAS requirements is not a requirement for the BS program if one chooses to go directly to the BS without
the AAS degree.)
Required Courses SHo*r!
EET 311 Advanced Electrical and
Electronic Circuits I ........................ 4
EET 312 Advanced Electrical and
Electronic Circuits II ...................... 4
EET 332 Digital Circuits I....................... 3
EET 366 Electrical Measurements ................. 2
EET 410 Electrical/Electronic
Technology Seminar ........................... 2
Upper Division EET Electives .................... 6
21
Additional course requirements:
Humanities....................................... 5
Social/Behavioral Science........................ 5
Math (141, 241) ................................. 8
Physics (122, or 126) ........................... 5
Chemistry ....................................... 3
26
Minor or EET Specialization .................... 18
Electives (Preferably in Math,
Science, Technology, or Business.............. 2
20
Total 125
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Communications
Required EET Courses SHoun
EET 331 Pulse Circuits .................. 2
EET 362 Communication I .................... 3
EET 363 Communication II ................... 3
EET 365 Avionics II ........................ 3
EET 367 Instruments and Measurements..... 3
EET 368 Principles of Radar ................ 2
EET 446 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits ................................... 4
20
Avionics
Required Courses SHour'
EET 331 Pulse Circuits ...................... 2
EET 364 Avionics I .......................... 3
EET 365 Avionics II ......................... 3
EET 368 Principles of Radar.................. 2
EET 446 Servomechanisms and Control
Circuits ................................. 4
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion .... 3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulation .................................... 3
20
Control Systems
Required EET Courses SHoun
EET 333 Digital Circuits II .................. 3
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and
Operation.................................. 4
EET 367 Instruments and Measurements........ 3
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications............. 3
EET 446 Servomechanisms and Control
Circuits .................................. 4
EET 451 Circuit Analysis with
Operational Math .......................... 3
EET 453 Applications of Operational Amplifiers .........................\......... 3
23
Computer Technology
Required Courses SHour'
EET 331 Pulse Circuits .................... 2
EET 333 Digital Circuits II .................. 3
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and
Operations ................................ 4
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications ............ 3
EET 453 Applications of Operational
Amplifiers ................................ 3
MTH151 Computing I ........................... 3
18
MINOR: ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGY
Required EET Courses SHour!
EET 111 D.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ............................... 6
EET 112 A.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ............................... 6
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and
Electronics Circuits I .................... 4
EET 302 Principles of Electronics and
Electronics Circuits II ................... 4
Upper Division EET Electives ................. 4
24
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The Mechanical Engineering Technologist, as a specialist in applied engineering, translates creative ideas and concepts into practical applications in new machines, products, structures, or processes. As a connecting link, he must have knowledge of the disciplines of both the engineering scientist and the skilled worker. He must be familiar with the hand and machine tools of the skilled worker and the scientific principles and skills of the engineer.
The technologists mathematical, scientific, and technological knowledge must be matched with solid experience and ability in the application of this knowledge to practical field problems.
Programs leading to both the AAS degree and the BS degree are offered in Mechanical Engineering Technology.
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required MET Courses S?w
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ............................... 3
MET 101 Materials Fabrication ............... 3
MET 200 Industrial Hydraulics and
Control Systems ............................ 4
MET 206 Elements of Machine Design .......... 3
MET 210 Numerical Control Machining ......... 3
MET 220 Principles of Metallurgy ............ 3
MET 240 Fundamentals of Welding ............. 3
22
In addition, the following related technical courses will be required:
CEN110 Civil Technology .................... 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I.................. 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ............... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.... 3
12
Candidates for the Associate degree are required to meet these basic studies re-
quirements:
English .................................... 6
Humanities ................................... 3
Social/Behavioral Science .................... 3
Physics ...................................... 5
Math 111, 112, 141 .......................... 10
27
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The four-year program is built on the two-plus-two concept. The Bachelor of Science candidate will have completed a two-year Associate Degree plus these additional requirements:
83


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Required MET Courses
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis MET 304 Work Simplification and
Methods Design ................
MET 307 Mechanical Design ........
MET 311 Basic Thermodynamics MET 400 Project Engineering ....
MET 404 Plant Layout .............
MET 450 Engineering Management
The following related technical courses
must be taken:
CEN316 Mechanics IIIDynamics ............ 3
PSY 345 Industrial Psychology ............ 3
~6
Additional hours of basic studies and minor or area of specialization requirements are:
Humanities ...................................... 5
Mathematics ..................................... 5
Physics.......................................... 5
Social/Behavioral Science........................ 5
Upper Division Elective ......................... 6
Minor or Area of Specialization ................ 18
44
The Colleges general specifications for the Bachelors Degree includes 40 hours of Upper Division courses.
A student interested in specializing in manufacturing, power, or production should consult with the department chairman for program study requirements.
MINOR: MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Semester
Hours
3
4
3
3
3
3
. _3
22
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY: AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Courses
MET 130 Quality Assurance Technology MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance MET 208 Production Machine Tools,
Jigs and Fixtures..................
MET 304 Work Simplification and
Methods Design .......................
MET 330 Advance Quality Assurance ... MET 404 Plant Layout .................
METALLURGY: MINOR OR AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Courses
MET 236 Nondestructive Testing .........
MET 308 Advance Physical Metallurgy MET 321 Metallurgical Materials and
Processes .........................
MET 421 Metallurgical Materials and
Processes .........................
MET 422 Experimental Methods and
Analysis ..........................
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry .
Semester
Hours
3
3
4
3
3
. _3
19
Semester
Hours
3
3
4
4
3
. _5 22
POWER: MINOR OR AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Courses H^ur
MET 320 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants .... 3
MET 331 Thermodynamics II Heat Power .. 3
MET 420 Air Induction Systems and
Emission Controls .......................... 3
MET 430 Transportation Problems ............... 3
MET 440 Power Systems Design ............... 3
MET 441 Automotive Design ..................... 3
18
Required Courses
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ................................ 3
MET 101 Materials Fabrication .................. 3
MET 206 Elements of Machine Design .......... 3
MET 208 Production Machine Tools,
Jigs and Fixtures ........................... 3
MET 210 Numerical Control Machining ......... 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis ................. 3
MET 400 Project Engineering .................... 3
21
The Mechanical Engineering Technology student, or other students, may minor in, or specialize in, one of the following areas of specialization:
HEAT (THERMAL)
AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Courses
MET 301 Basic Fluid Flow .................... 3
MET 312 Survey of Basic Heat Transfer.... 3
MET 320 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants .... 3
MET 331 Thermodynamics II Heat Power .. 3
MET 420 Air Induction Systems and
Emission Controls ........................... 3
MET 421 Metallurgical Materials and Processes ...................................... 4
19
PRODUCTION: MINOR OR AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Courses
MET 130 Quality Assurance Technology......... 3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance .... 3
MET 208 Production Machine Tools,
Jigs and Fixtures ........................ 4
MET 330 Advance Quality Assurance ........... 3
MET 400 Project Engineering ................. 3
MET 405 Production Control .................. 3
19
QUALITY ASSURANCE: MINOR OR AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Required Courses Hour
MET 130 Quality Assurance Technology......... 3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance .... 3
MET 132 Quality Assurance Management .... 3
MET 231 Quality Control Engineering-
Theory and Application ...................... 3
MET 232 Reliability Concepts ................... 3
MET 236 Non-Destructive Testihg ................ 3
MET 405 Production Control ..................... 3
21
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCES: QUALITY ASSURANCE TECHNOLOGY
The task of assuring high quality and reli-
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ability of products and services for industry, government, and consumers has reached the status of a professional discipline. The responsibility, authority, and complexity of the quality assurance staff is increasing constantly. Every progressive industrial organization has a staff of quality control and reliability personnel. There are excellent exployment opportunities in quality assurance. Women find this a very convenient and short road to management positions.
Quality Assurance Technologists may find employment as quality inspectors, technicians, analysts, and engineering assistants. Further education and experience in quality assurance can lead to a more responsible position in management.
To receive an Associate Degree in quality assurance, a student must complete the following requirements:
Required Quality Courses SHours*f
MET 130 Quality Assurance Technology...... 3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance .... 3
MET 132 Quality Assurance Management .... 3
MET 231 Quality Control Engineering-
Theory and Application ................... 3
MET 232 Reliability Concepts ................ 3
MET 236 Nondestructive Testing............... 3
MET 330 Advance Quality Assurance ........ 3
2?
Required MET Courses SHoursr
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology ............................... 3
MET 101 Materials Fabrication ............... 3
MET 208 Production Machine Tools,
Jigs and Fixtures ........................ 4
MET 210 Numerical Control Machining ...... 3
MET 220 Principles of Metallurgy ......... 3
76
Required Related Technical Courses S Hours'"
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .............. 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.... 3
~6
METEOROLOGY TECHNOLOGY
The Meteorology Technologist represents the liaison between meteorological information and the public. He collects, analyzes and, subsequently, translates the information for public use. The public includes such varied groups as large general contractors, public and private utilities, heavy manufacturing, chemical processing plants, agriculture, transportation (including aviation services), government (such as the military and federal agencies), and research organizations.
The Meteorology Technologist must be familiar with fundamental meteorological theory and analysis practices as well as instrumentation, data processing, and com-
munications concepts. The program is designed to provide the student with the concepts of meteorology while emphasizing one or two chosen areas of public need.
METEOROLOGY TECHNOLOGY
Bachelor of Science
Required Technical Studies fours'"
CEN 140 Basic Meteorology ................. 3
CEN 240 Meteorology and the Urban
Environment .............................. 3
CEN 241 Meteorological Instrumentation .... 3
CEN 340 Synoptic Meteorology............... 3
CEN 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory .. 4
CEN 343 Introduction to Dynamic
Meteorology .............................. 3
CEN 344 Dynamic Meteorology:
Atmospheric Processes .................... 3
CEN 345 Dynamic Meteorology:
Kinematics and Dynamics .................. 3
CEN 440 Applied Meteorology.................. 3
CEN 441 Meteorological Numerical Products . 2
CEN 442 Industrial Meteorology .............. 2
CMS 101 Introduction to Data Processing ... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines... 3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics .......... 3
Subtotal 41
Technical Electives: Must include a Technology area of concentration or College Minor of not less than eighteen (18) semester hours, as approved by the department............ 36
Subtotal 77
Required General Studies
English Composition ......................... 6
Humanities .................................. 8
Social and Behavioral Science ............... 8
MTH 111 and 112 ............................. 6
MTH 141 and 241 ............................. 8
PHY 121 and 122 ......................... ^10
Subtotal 46
Total 123
MINOR: METEOROLOGY TECHNOLOGY
Required Technical Studies SHoure*r
CEN 140 Basic Meteorology ................. 3
CEN 340 Synoptic Meteorology.......... 3
CEN 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory .. 4
CEN 343 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology 3
CEN 440 Applied Meteorology........... 3
Approved Technical Electives ............... 4
Total 20
SURVEYING
Surveying involves the measurement of distances, directions, and/or differences in elevation between two or more points and the related research, procedures, calculations, and records related thereto. Survey measurements are made for construction and engineering work, property or boundary location, topographic and photogrammetic mapping, geodetic control, and many other uses, all of which require careful field and
85


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
computational procedures. The Bachelor of Science in Surveying major is designed to provide basic theoretical training with practical applications for a career as a surveying professional. The intent of this curriculum is to familiarize the student with modern field and computational procedures used in routine and specialized surveying services. The program is flexible, allowing a course of study that fulfills the objectives of the student, while insuring a sound surveying education. Following completion of the required professional experience, the individual will be qualified to take the State Board Examination for Registered Land Surveyors.
SURVEYING
Bachelor of Science
Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ................. 3
CEN 251 Surveying I ......................... 3
CEN 252 Surveying II ........................ 3
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing ................. 3
CEN 350 Applied Astronomy for Surveying ... 2
CEN 351 Curves and Earthwork ................ 3
CEN 352 Route Surveying ..................... 3
CEN 450 Cadastral Surveying ................. 3
CEN 451 Advanced Surveying .................. 3
CEN 452 Intro to Photogrammetry............. 3
CEN 453 Legal Procedures and Land Law ... 3
CEN 299 and/or 499 Surveying Internship ... 3-10
MTH 151 Computing ........................... 4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics .......... 3
Subtotal 42-49
Technical Electives: Must include a Technology area of concentration or College Minor of not less than eighteen (18) semester hours, as approved by the department....................... 36
Subtotal 78-85
Required General Studies
English Composition ........................ 6
Humanities ................................. 8
Social and Behavioral Science .............. 8
MTH 111 and 112 ............................ 6
MTH 141 and 241 8
PHY 121 and 122 ........................... 10
Subtotal 46 Total 124-131
MINOR: SURVEYING
Required Technical Studies SHmir
CEN 212 Topographic Drawing .............. 3
CEN 251 Surveying I ...................... 3
CEN 252 Surveying II ..................... 3
CEN 351 Curves and Earthwork .............. 3
CEN 450 Cadastral Surveying ............... 3
CEN 299 or CEN 499 Survey Internship ..... 3-6
Approved Technical Elective ............... 3
Total 21-24
TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Technical Management is an interdisciplinary program training students to become
technically proficient in order to handle their own jobs effectively and to communicate with and manage technical specialists. Because of the skills, insight, knowledge, and maturity of judgment demanded in the field, the program is on a high level and the 135 semester hour minimum requirement exceeds the traditional 120 hours that most programs demand. Graduates are needed for positions in value engineering, logistics engineering, quality control, maintenance engineering, systems analysis or management, operations research, and field engineering. This program has been coordinated with several industrial management representatives and is administered jointly through the Schools of Business and Engineering Technology.
Students completing the Industrial Marketing Program requirements are not required to complete a separate minor.
TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT
Basic Studies
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition ............... 6
Humanities
SPE101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication ............................... 3
ENG 271 Introduction to Technical Writing ... 3
Elective ....................................... 3
Social and/or Behavioral Science
ECO 201 Principles of Economics I ............ 3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics II............ 3
Elective ....................................... 3
Science and Mathematics
MTH 141 Essentials of Calculus ............... 4
MTH 241 Calculus ............................. 4
Career
BEC 200 Business Communications .............. 3
Subtotal 35
Technology Course Studies
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology .................................. 3
CEN 110 Intro, to Civil Technology............ 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .................... 3
CEN 211 Computing and Estimating ............... 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ................... 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis ................. 3
MET 304 Work Simplification and
Methods Design .............................. 3
MET 400 Project Engineering .................... 3
MET 404 Plant Layout............................ 3
MET 405 Production Control ..................... 3
MET 430 Transportation Problems ................ 3
MET 450 Engineering Management ................. 3
EET111 D.C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ................................. 6
EET 112 A C. Circuits and Laboratory
Instruments ................................. 6
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and
Electronics Circuits ........................ 4
Subtotal 52
Business Course Studies SHour*
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ............. 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ............ 3
BEC 301 Business Report Writing ................ 3
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CMS 101 Intro, to Data Processing ............. 3
CMS 231 Fund, of Business Statistics .......... 3
CMS 332 Decision Theory (Quantitative
Decision Making) .............................. 3
FIN 350 Principles of Finance.................. 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ........................ 3
MGT 251 Principles of Management .............. 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ............... 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics .................. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management .................. 3
MGT 355 Prod, and Operations Management . 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations .................. 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ............... 3
MGT 455 Systems-Product Management ............ 3
Subtotal 48
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN 100-1 The Engineering Technology Profession (1 + 0)
History and development of the fields of science, engineering, and technology; educational requirements, employment opportunities, and trends in the various fields. Required of all Civil Engineering Technology majors.
CEN 110-3 Civil Technology I (3 + 0)
An introduction to the profession of engineering technology with emphasis on the history, role, work, and challenge to civil engineering technologists. Education, study habits, communications, and problem solving are stressed.
CEN 111-3 Civil Technology II (3 + 0) Continuation of CEN 100 with emphasis on the tools of engineering problem solving, the problem, the influencing factors, the analysis, and the creative design process itself.
Prerequisite: CEN 110, or permission of instructor.
CEN 120-3 Technical Drawing I (2 + 4) An introductory course in technical drawing. Covers the use of instruments, lettering, geometric construction, sketching, and orthographies.
CEN 121-3 Technical Drawing II (2 + 4) Continuation of CEN 120 to include advanced study in orthographic projection, dimensioning, auxiliary views, and sectioning. Prerequisite: CEN 120.
CEN 123-3 Architectural Drawing (2 + 4)
Introduction to architectural working drawings. Development of plans, sections, elevations, and details.
Prerequisite: CEN 121.
CEN 140-3 Basic Meteorology (3 + 0) Explains basic concepts of meteorology
phenomena: high and low pressure areas, air masses, fronts, and precipitation processes. Includes explanations of how to read and use the various reports and forecasts published by the National Weather Service.
CEN 141-2 Basic Meteorology for Aerospace Students (2 + 0)
Explains basic concepts of meteorology phenomena: high and low pressure areas, air masses, fronts, and precipitation processes. Includes reading and use of reports and forecasts published by the National Weather Service. Will prepare students for FAA Private Pilots examination.
CEN 210-3 Structural Drawing (2 + 4) Study and preparation of necessary drawings of structural members and connections including engineering layout and detail drawing.
Prereguisite: CEN 121.
CEN 211-3 Computing and Estimating (2 + 4)
Methods of taking off quantities from plans; methods of arriving at lump sum and unit prices, and estimating total costs from quantities.
Prerequisite: CEN 210.
CEN 212-3 Topographic Drawing (2 + 4)
A study of map symbols, types of contours, sources for map data, and methods used in map plotting. Students prepare plats and topographic maps.
Prerequisites: CEN 121,251, or permission of instructor.
CEN 215-3 Mechanics I Statics (3 + 0)
Elementary principles of engineering statics. Prerequisite: MTH 112.
CEN 216-3 Mechanics II (2 + 3)
Basic theory of strength of materials. Prerequisites: CEN 215 and MTH 112.
CEN 220-2 Descriptive Geometry (1+3)
A graphic study of the relative position of points, lines, and planes in space. Prerequisite: CEN 121.
CEN 240-2 Meteorology and the Urban Environment (2 + 0)
Examines the social, economic, and ecological effects of weather on the urban environment. Emphasis is on air pollution problems
87


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
in the Denver area. Topics considered are heavy precipitation storms and strong winds.
CEN 241-3 Meteorological Instrumentation (2 + 2)
Acquaints the student with the various types and nature of meteorological instrumentation in operations and research field work. Instruments are examined in class and in the field with emphasis upon calibration and maintenance.
Prerequisites: CEN 140 and EET 200.
CEN 242-3 The Use of Radar in Meteorology (2 + 2)
Examines the uses of radar in meteorological observation, analysis, and forecasting. Various types of radars and analysis techniques used with each radar are discussed.
Prerequisite: CEN 241, or permission of instructor.
CEN 251-3 Surveying I (2 + 3)
Instruction in use of the engineers tape, transit, and level, and methods of recording field data in note form. Also included is traverse layout and computing.
Prerequisite: MTH 112, or permission of instructor.
CEN 252-3 Surveying II (2 + 3) Continuation of CEN 251. Covers instruments, theories, and procedures more advanced than those in CEN 251 including analysis, automatic levels, theodolites, EDM, field astronomy, coordinates, and photo-grammetry.
Prerequisites: CEN 251 and MTH 112, or permission of instructor.
CEN 310-3 Contracts and Specifications (3 + 0)
A study of contract documents, proposals, award procedures, bonding, liens, arbitration, litigation, and the role of the expert witness.
Prerequisite: CEN 211.
CEN 312-3 Engineering Economy (3 + 0)
To use the Time Value of Money as a basis for evaluating alternatives in engineering decision-making.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
CEN 313-3 Materials Engineering (3 + 0)
Covers materials used in industry, their properties and how they are measured, characterization of materials, and process-
ing of materials. Includes metals, plastics, and ceramics.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
CEN 316-3 Mechanics Ill-Dynamics
(3 + 0)
Covers dynamics. Includes kinematics, force mass acceleration, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and vibrations. Prerequisites: CEN 215 and MTH 141.
CEN 317-3 Mechanics IV (3 + 0)
Basic structural analysis.
Prerequisite: CEN 316.
CEN 318-3 Fluid Mechanics (3 + 0) Covers physical properties of fluids, hydrostatics, kinematics and dynamics of fluid flow, flow measurements, flow in pipes and open channels, dynamic force and momentum.
Prerequisite: CEN 316.
CEN 319-3 Hydrology (3 + 0)
Includes the study of the hydrologic cycle, rainfall and runoff, water losses, snowmelt, ground water, unit hydrograph, floods and flood routing, streamflow records, frequency and duration, and water resources planning. Prerequisite: CEN 318.
CEN 320-3 Advanced Technical Drawing (2 + 4)
Students develop advanced skills in technical drawing.
Prerequisite: CEN 220.
CEN 330-3 Sanitation and Sewerage (2 + 3)
A study of water and sewerage to include water supply, sources, potability, quantity estimates, distribution, treatment, and usage. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN 331-3 Fundamentals of Sanitation (Waste Disposal) (2 + 3)
A continuation of studies in sanitation with emphasis on liquid and solid waste disposal. Fundamentals of treatment, plant design, and plant operation.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN 340-3 Synoptic Meteorology (3 + 0)
An advanced course in meteorological phenomena, built on the co-ncepts of basic meteorology such as temperature, pressure areas, and moisture. An emphasis is placed upon the understanding of stability in the atmosphere and the interpretation of upper air patterns. Includes discussions on pollu-
88


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
tion, weather modification, and satellite meteorology. The student learns to analyze and interpret National Weather Service maps and charts.
Prerequisite: CEN 140.
CEN 341-3 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory (2 + 4)
This course is designed to familiarize the student with map analysis and forecasting techniques. Various methods will be examined by application. Operational techniques will be simulated within the laboratory. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN 343-3 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology (3 + 0)
This course is designed to present the basic laws and concepts related to the behavior of the atmosphere. The relationship between meteorology and thermodynamics, radiation and hydrodynamics are examined. Atmospheric phenomena and meteorological practice explained in terms of theory developed.
Prerequisites: CEN 340 and MTH 241.
CEN 344-3 Dynamic Meteorology: Atmospheric Process (3 + 0)
To investigate the formation and constitution of clouds and precipitation. The various physical processes concerning droplet and ice crystal growth are discussed in detail. Modification, both natural and man-made, of clouds is also examined.
Prerequisite: CEN 343.
CEN 345-3 Dynamic Meteorology: Kinematics and Dynamics (3 + 0)
This course is intended to describe and examine the energy relationships in the atmosphere. Included as topics are: radiation, the equations of motion, divergence and vorticity, and atmospheric long waves. Prerequisite: CEN 343.
CEN 346-3 Meteorology and Flight Operations (3 + 0)
This course is designed to provide the application of meteorological principles to aviation operations. The course concentrates upon stability and turbulence, clear-air turbulence, aircraft icing problems, and jet-stream weather.
Prerequisite: CEN 140 or CEN 141.
CEN 350-2 Applied Astronomy for Surveying (2 + 0)
Includes spherical geometry, spherical trigonometry, and study of the celestial sphere
with solutions involving direction, time, latitude, and longitude.
Prerequisites: CEN 252 and MTH 112.
CEN 351-3 Curves and Earthwork (3 + 0)
A first course in Route Surveying. The course emphasizes development and computations for circular, parabolic, and spiral highway curves. Cross sections and earthwork are covered.
Prerequisite: CEN 252.
CEN 352-3 Route Surveying (3 + 0)
A second course in Route Surveying. Design criteria related to route surveying is covered, including superelevation, sight distance, interchanges, mass diagram, EDM and computer applications, and construction surveying.
Prerequisite: CEN 351.
CEN 400-3 Senior Seminar (3 + 0)
Study of selected technological topics and analysis of the interrelationship of engineering technology fields. Each student prepares and presents papers and or projects on suitable subjects on an individual or team basis.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
CEN 410-3 Timber Technology (3 + 0) Timber uses in modern day construction applications are studied. Physical and mechanical properties beams, girders, trusses, decking. Allowable stresses and proper fastenings are examined. Prerequisite: CEN 317.
CEN 411-3 Steel Technology (3 + 0) Analysis and application of steel structures including loading stresses in members, selection and application of connectors. Emphasis on practical solutions to problems and influences on design.
Prerequisites: CEN 317 and MTH 241.
CEN 412-3 Concrete Technology (3 + 0)
Analysis and application of concrete structures including columns, beams, slabs, walls and other types.
Prerequisite: CEN 411.
CEN 413-3 Soils Mechanics (2 + 4)
Soil properties are studied and soil characteristics introduced; methods of sampling and analysis are treated. Variations in behavior under different loading conditions are analyzed.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
CEN 430-3 Environmental Technology (3 + 2)
Covers the fundamentals of environmental sanitation, to include an overview of disease transmission and control; hygienic disposal of wastes; air, ground, and water pollution abatement and control. Field trips to control facilities and agencies.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
CEN 431-3 Environmental Technology Practices (3 + 0)
Continuing studies in sanitation technology covering regulatory and control measures. Planning, public relations, and other aspects. Regulatory statutes, bodies, regulations, reports, and possible new control arrangements are reviewed and discussed. Prerequisite: CEN 430.
CEN 440-3 Applied Meteorology (3 + 0)
Designed for teaching students to apply knowledge gained in synoptic meteorology. Develops such topics as surface and upper-air analysis, adiabatic diagrams and cross-section analysis. This course will provide applications of meteorological patterns for planning. Special topics include weather and energy, industrial applications, and mountain weather.
Prerequisite: CEN 340.
CEN 441-2 Meteorological Numerical Products (2 + 1)
To examine the various numerical products that have been developed and are utilized on an operational basis. Included in discussions are barotropic and baroclinic models, thermodynamic models, diffusion modeling, data processing techniques, and display and presentation methods.
Prerequisite: CEN 345.
CEN 442-2 Industrial Meteorology (2 + 1)
The purpose of this course is to examine the problems associated with the relationship between the atmosphere and various types of industry, industrial site locations, pollution sources and controls. Included are discussions of the composition and behavior of pollution sources and controls. Prerequisites: CEN 340 and CEN 344.
CEN 443-2 Meteorology and Media (0 + 4)
To acquaint the student with the presentation of analysis and forecast products. Students develop presentations for daily briefings, newspaper reports, radio and
television presentations. Included in discussions are the various types of public needs and problems associated with each type of media presentation.
Prerequisite: CEN 341.
CEN 450-3 Cadastral Surveying (3 + 0) A first course in land surveying. Includes the history of land surveys in the U. S., land descriptions, conveyances, and monumen-tation.
Prerequisite: CEN 252.
CEN 451-3 Advanced Surveying
(2 + 3)
An advanced course in surveying measurement and theory. Coverage includes control traverses and triangulation, EDM, State Plane Coordinates, and adjustment computations.
Prerequisites: CEN 252, CEN 350, and MTH 141.
CEN 452-3 Introduction to Photogrammetry (2 + 3)
Photo interpretation, control points and paneling, stereo plotters and aerotriangu-lation.
Prerequisite: CEN 252.
CEN 453-3 Legal Procedures and Land Law (3 + 0)
The second course in land surveying. Includes conveyances, the importance of evidence, unwritten rights, surveying laws, and trial procedures.
Prerequisite: CEN 450.
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
EET 100-2 Survey of Electricity and Electronics for Non-Technology Majors (2 + 0)
This course emphasizes the aspects and applications of electronics that are useful to persons who are not technically oriented. Topics included are household power and appliances, communication and entertainment electronics, computers and calculators, and various other applications, such as medical electronics.
EET 106-3 Applied Technical Mathematics (3 + 0)
Designed to assist the student majoring in technology by providing background and understanding in applied mathematics.
Prerequisite: MTH 100, or permission of instructor.
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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
EET 111-6 D.C. Circuits and Laboratory Instruments (5 4- 2)
A study of the concepts of electricity and analysis of resistive circuits, single time constant circuits, magnetic circuits, and introduction to laboratory equipment. Corequisite: MTH 111.
EET 112-6 A.C. Circuits and Laboratory Instruments (4 + 4)
This course is a continuation of EET 111 with studies of A.C. circuits, impedance concepts, network theorems, electrical measurements, and transformers.
Prerequisite: EET 111.
Corequisite: MTH 112.
EET 200-3 Electric Circuits and Machines (3 + 0)
An introductory course in electric circuits for Mechanical and Civil Engineering Technology majors. Covers D.C. and A.C. circuits, generators, motors (single and multiphase), transformers, and instruments and measurement. Introduces elementary electronic devices and circuits.
Corequisite: MTH 112.
EET 202-2 Electronic Drafting (1 4- 2)
A drafting course that treats the main areas of electronics including automation, microelectronics, electric power, and integrated circuits. A large portion of the course includes learning the use of diagrammatic standardized symbols and assembling them into circuit diagrams.
EET 211-6 Electronics I (5 4-2)
Study of active electronic devices with emphasis on transistors. This study includes device construction, biasing, equivalent circuits, and their use in elementary amplifiers (single device).
Prerequisite: EET 112.
EET 212-6 Electronics II (4 + 4) Continuation of EET 211 with emphasis on various circuits including amplifiers (small signal and large signal), difference amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, mixers, and voltage regulation. Concepts of feedback, frequency, and distortion are also covered. Prerequisite: EET 211.
EET 230-5 Introduction to Logic and Computer Operations (4 4- 2)
Course for non-EET majors including the computer structure, number systems, combinatorial logic and flip-flop utilization, arithmetic and logical processes, programming techniques, BASIC programming, and
the use and operation of the NOVA 1210 Minicomputer with the BASIC language. A laboratory will include experiments with electronic logic blocks and the use and operation of the NOVA 1210 for the solution of student problems.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
EET 301-4 Principles of Electronics and Electronics Circuits I (3 + 2) Analysis of the principles, characteristics, and operation of electron devices utilizing concepts of modern physics and physical laws. Study includes vacuum and gas tubes, photo-electricity, fundamentals of semiconductors and transistors, and their application in elementary circuits.
Prerequisites: EET 112 and MTH 141.
EET 302-4 Principles of Electronics and Electronic Circuits II (3 + 2) Continuation of EET 301 with emphasis on circuit applications such as amplifiers, detectors, oscillators, modulators, and control systems.
Prerequisites: MTH 141 and EET 211 or EET 301, or permission of instructor.
EET 311-4 Advanced Electrical and Electronic Circuits (3 4- 2)
An advanced course which requires previous knowledge of basic electrical circuits. Study also includes analysis of non-linear circuit elements within circuits.
Prerequisites: MTH 241 and EET 212 or EET 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 312-4 Advanced Electrical and Electronic Circuits II (3 + 2) Continuation of EET 311.
Prerequisite: EET 311, or permission of instructor.
EET 331-2 Pulse Circuits (2 4- 0) Analysis of static and regenerative circuits including shaping circuits, multivibrators, blocking oscillators, pulse amplifiers, and transmitter circuits.
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 332-3 Digital Circuits I (2 4- 2) Fundamental concepts of computer number systems, Boolean logic, and logic gate circuits. Emphasis is on circuitry and logic and not upon programming.
Prerequisite: EET 211 or 301, or permission of instructor.
EET 333-3 Digital Circuits II (2 4-2) Study of counters, shift registers, logic cir-
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cuits, and information storage devices used in digital electronic systems.
Prerequisite: EET 332, or permission of instructor.
EET 334-4 Minicomputer Programming and Operation (3 + 2)
An introductory course designed to teach students how to operate and program a minicomputer. Specifically students will learn the assembler language for the NOVA 1210 Minicomputer.
Prerequisites: EET 332, or Junior standing and permission of instructor.
EET 341-3 Electric Power Generation
(2 + 2)
Study of electric power generation systems. Primarily includes A.C. and D.C. dynamo construction and operation.
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 342-3 Electric Power Distribution (3 + 0)
Continuation of EET 341. Study of distribution techniques and equipment employed in electric power distribution and control.
Prerequisite: EET 341, or permission of instructor.
EET 362-3 Communication I (3 + 0)
A study of communications systems, including such topics as Modulation, Noise, Receivers, Pulse Systems, Wave Propagation, and Information Theory. Also covers transmission line characteristics, matching sections, and filters.
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 363-3 Communication II (3 + 0) Continuation of Communication I. Covers additional subjects of antennas, VLF propagation, wave-guides, microwave measurements, and filters.
Prerequisite: EET 362.
EET 364-3 Avionics I (3 + 0)
Designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the operation and principles of basic radio and electronics equipment used in todays aircraft. The relationships between the airborne and ground equipment systems are studied. Covers theory of operation and block diagrams of entire systems. Inspection and checkout practice is covered in laboratory exercises. Airborne radio and electronic equipment is covered.
Prerequisite: EET 212, or the equivalent.
EET 365-3 Avionics II (3 + 0)
A course in electronics that includes practical information required to pass examinations for Federal Communications Commission Second Class RADIO TELEPHONE OPERATORS LICENSE. Topics include radio laws and regulations, radio telephone operation, message priorities, urgency and distress signals, radio fundamentals, and navigation equipment.
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302.
EET 366-2 Electrical Measurements
(1+2)
A fundamental course dealing with the determinations of various quantities using electrical measuring techniques. Special consideration is to be given to measurements of voltage, resistance, current, capacitance, inductance, frequency, etc., and techniques of converting these measurements into determinations of other physical properties, such as pressure and temperature. Includes history and development of electrical measurements.
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 367-3 Instruments and Measurements (2 + 2)
Advanced theory and applications of electrical and electronics instruments and instrumentation devices used in measurements of both physical and electrical quantities. Includes high frequency measurements used within microwave systems.
Prerequisite: EET 366, or permission of instructor.
EET 368-2 Principles of Radar (2 + 0)
A course that presents the mathematical explanation of what radar is and how it works. A unified approach to the systems aspects of various types of radars is given in terms of complete block diagrams. Types studied include monostatic and bistatic pulse radar, CW, Doppler, FM-CW Doppler, Pulsed-Doppler, and MTI.
Prerequisite: 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
EET 410-2 Electrical/Electronic Technology Seminar (2 + 0)
Discussion, study, and analysis of historical, current, and future applications of electronics. Each student prepares and presents paper on suitable subjects.
Prerequisite: Senior standing, or permission of instructor.
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EET 435-3 Minicomputer Applications
(2 + 2)
Advanced minicomputer course in which students will define interfacing projects and develop the required hardware and software.
Prerequisites: Previous minicomputer programming knowledge, or EET 333 and EET 334, or permission of instructor.
EET 446-4 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits (3 + 2)
Theory of linear closed loop control systems. Analysis of servomechanisms containing electronic, magnetic, and mechanical devices. Study includes feedback control techniques.
Prerequisite: EET 451, or permission of instructor.
EET 451-3 Circuit Analysis with Operational Math (3 + 0)
Advanced theory in methods of circuit analysis and network synthesis. Study includes matrices, Laplace transform, and advanced operational methods.
Prerequisite: EET 311, or permission of instructor.
EET 453-3 Applications of Operational Amplifiers (2 + 2)
Introduction to Applications of Integrated Circuit Op-Amps. Applications to include inverters, summers, integratros, differentiators, oscillators, active filters, comparators, and multi-vibrators. Special projects selected from audio, automotive, medical, and industrial applications.
Prerequisite: EET 212, or 302, or permission of instructor.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
MET 100-3 Materials and Manufacturing Technology (3 + 0)
An introductory survey course in manufacturing production processes which include a study of the primary materials and manufacturing processes used in the fabrication of industrial products and relates these to current national, social, industrial, and international issues and problems.
MET 101-3 Materials Fabrication (2 + 2)
Basic fundamentals in the operation of production equipment. Includes measuring tools, bench work and layout, and tool grinding. Operational skill development includes lathes, vertical and horizontal mill-
ing machines, surface grinders, drilling machines, and other cutting and forming equipment.
MET 130-3 Quality Assurance Technology (3 + 0)
An introduction to the role of the concept of quality assurance. Emphasis is on the jobs of quality control, organization for quality, quality costs, quality systems, incoming material control, process control, product control, and corrective action cycle.
MET 131-3 Principles of Quality Assurance (3 + 0)
A basic course on scope and function of quality assurance, including basic definitions, quality policy and objectives, quality manuals and procedures, concept of variation, inspection techniques, metrology, acceptance sampling, process control, customer relations, and product audit. Prerequisite: MET 130.
MET 132-3 Quality Assurance Management (3 + 0)
In-depth course of the latest techniques of quality assurance at the component, the assembly, and the systems level. Quality assurance is analyzed from design conception through consumer use and disposal, including planning for product effectiveness, engineering a quality product, configuration management, industrial inspection, and control charting theory.
Prerequisite: MET 131, or instructors approval.
MET 200-4 Industrial Hydraulics and Control Systems (4 + 0)
Provides a practical working knowledge of the components and systems involved in hydraulic and power transmission. Among the topics covered are fluid power pumps and motors, cylinders, plumbing, pressure accumulators, flow and directional control valves, servo systems and industrial hydraulic circuits. Studies of hydraulic, pneumatic, and electronic control devices will be studied as related to industrial application and production equipment.
Prerequisite: PHY 190, or permission of instructor.
MET 206-3 Elements of Machine Design (2 + 2)
A survey of the more important elements used in tool and machine design and their general characteristics pertaining to application, efficiency, economy, and standardization.
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Prerequisite: CEN 120, or permission of instructor.
MET 208-4 Production Machine Tools, Jigs, and Fixtures (3 + 2)
In-depth study of the construction features, industrial application, and design concepts of production tools, jigs, and fixtures. Students design cutting tools, gauges, jigs, fixtures and dies, and prepare tooling layouts for production machine tools. Selected portions of MIL-STA-8C as related to tool and gauge design for positionally toleranced parts will be studied.
Prerequisites: MET 101 and CEN 120.
MET 210-3 Numerical Control Machining (2 + 2)
Introduction to vocabulary and processes involved in programming a component for numerical control manufacturing. Study of selected numerically controlled manufacturing equipment is introduced. Emphasis on point-to-point and dimensional and three-dimensional configuration. Laboratory projects involve programming a part and preparation of numerical control tapes. Local field trips are arranged to provide students an opportunity to observe numerical controlled machine tools in operation.
Prerequisite: MET 101, or permission of instructor.
MET 220-3 Principles of Metallurgy (3 + 0)
An introduction to physical and process metallurgy; production processes for iron and steel, the study of pure metal and alloy characteristics, basic phase diagrams and metal structures, and effects of low alloy content on the iron carbide phase diagrams. Prerequisite: MET 100.
MET 231-3 Quality Control Engineering-Theory and Application (3 + 0)
An emphasis on statistical analysis using fundamental statistical concepts, the use of the theory of probability, the aspects of specifications and tolerances, the concepts of sampling, aspects of life testing, and some cost aspects of quality decisions.
MET 232-3 Reliability Concepts (3 + 0) A basic course encompassing the entire field of reliability engineering. Emphasis is on the concept and definition of reliability, useful life and wearout of product, effect of chance and wearout failures, series and parallel systems, confidence limits, and
reliability testing. Consumerism and liability are covered.
Prerequisite: MET 131.
MET 236-3 Nondestructive Testing (2 + 2)
A study of the test methods used when destructive techniques are not feasible. Nondestructive testing areas of ultrasonic test, radiography, fluoroscopy, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are included.
MET 240-3 Fundamentals of Welding (2 + 2)
A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the common welding processes for metal joining. Units include fusion welding of mild steel sheet and plate with the oxyacetylene and arc processes, brazing of ferrous and non-ferrous metals oxyacetylene cutting and introduction to inert-gas welding. Provides a student with a technological understanding of advanced welding techniques used in industry.
MET 300L3 Manufacturing Analysis (3 + 0)
Economics of tooling operations: the productivity of machines, tool maintenance, tool costs and job estimating. A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of process planning.
Prerequisite: MET 100, or permission of instructor.
MET 301-3 Basic Fluid Flow (3 + 0) Review gas and liquid flow in pipe. Steady-state flow conditions will be identified for compressible and incompressible fluids. Reynolds number and flow regimes identified. Volumetric flowrate, velocity, and flow loss (pressure drop) equations will be reviewed. Industrial applications are identified.
Prerequisites: MTH 111 and MET 200.
MET 304-3 Work Simplification and Methods Design (3 + 0)
A study of management techniques witf emphasis on methods of improvement, time study analysis, plant layout, and materia handling procedures. An analysis of motior and time study as applied to manufacturing procedures with emphasis given to wori simplifications, motion economy, time stan dards, and performance ratings.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission o instructor.
MET 307-3 Mechanical Design (3 + 0) Application of stress analysis in the desigi
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of machine components. Analysis of static and dynamic forces and stresses in machine elements. The main topics are fastenings, shafting, coupling, clutches, brakes, bearings, and rolling contacts and lubrication.
Prerequisites: MET 206, MET 220, and CEN 316.
MET 308-3 Advanced Physical Metallurgy (3 + 0)
A study of the physical properties, composition, constituents, and heat treatments of metals and metal alloys. Material specifications, tests, and places of applications in industry are reviewed. Provides a background in industrial non-destructive testing. Prerequisite: MET 220.
MET 311-3 Basic Thermodynamics (3 + 0)
Provides a basic study of the laws of thermodynamics, the perfect gas laws, gas properties, enthalpy-entropy, heat energy, and heat transfer. State properties are identified, making use of the Mollier Diagram. Reversible and irreversible flow processes are analyzed.
Prerequisites: MTH 141, or equivalent.
MET 312-3 Survey of Basic Heat Transfer (3 + 0)
The objective is to survey the three basic mechanisms of heat transmission; conduction, convection, and radiation. Fundamental laws will be reviewed, equations identified, and industrial applications summarized. A field trip to Martin Marietta will be included to tour the multi-million dollar Thermal Vacuum Chamber.
Prerequisites: MET 311, MTH 111, and Physics.
MET 320-3 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants (3 + 0)
Introduction to physical and chemical properties of fuels and lubricants with emphasis on characteristics and qualities of desirable fuels and lubricants. The industrial application of lubricants and coolants will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: Chemistry.
MET 321-4 Mechanical Metallurgy (3 + 2)
An in-depth study of the mechanical and physical behavioral properties of metals and the various testing methods used to determine these characteristics. Elastic and plas-tio behavior of metals are analyzed.
Prerequisites: MET 220, MET 308, and MTH 141.
MET 330-3 Advanced Quality Assurance (3 + 0)
An analysis of the total concept of quality assurance, including special quality experiments, cost optimization, troubleshooting quality problems, and application of statistical techniques to the manufacturing process. Included is the study of the normal curve, inferences about variances, analysis of variance, regression analysis, and planning experiments for statistical analysis. Prerequisite: MET 131.
MET331-3 Thermodynamics II
Heat Power (3 + 0)
Introduction to energy-work relationships through fundamental principles of energy conversion cycles and mechanisms. Temperature-entropy relationships are used to discuss various engine cycles: Carnot,
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Brayton, Rankin, Auto, Diesel, and others. The steam engine and turbine is developed and steam tables used.
Prerequisite: MET 311.
MET 400-3 Project Engineering (3 + 0) An introduction to the role of the project engineer. The course reviews the various phases of a research and development program and the different disciplines in which the project engineer must be expert in order to effectively bring each phase of the program to successful completion.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 404-3 Plant Layout (3 + 0)
The basic principles of plant layout to meet production needs. Application of materials handling devices to the process. Selection and arrangement of production machinery, product and process layout schemes, techniques of making layouts, and balance and flexibility of operations are fully discussed. Managements role is discussed in the section: Managing and Training for Plant Layout.
Prerequisite: MET 300, or permission of instructor.
MET 405-3 Production Control (3 + 0) A study of the meaning and scope of production control. Students become acquainted with the function of production control as a part of the management framework and learn how decisions and actions taken by the production control departments affect the rest of a company. Typical production control activities encountered in industrial employment are discussed. Emphasis is on the statistical approach to process and production control, product acceptance, the rejection and corrective cycle, and quality costs.
MET 420-3 Air Induction Systems and
Emission Controls (3 + 0)
Course presents an in-depth study of the engine air requirements and factors influencing volumetric efficiency. Supercharging and turbocharging effects on performance will be studied and related to power performance factors. Exhaust system design factors will be studied with emphasis on waste heat recovery and smog control.
MET 421-4 Metallurgical Materials
and Processes (3 + 2)
An in-depth extension of MET 100, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, based on
the relation of structure to the particular type of processes used.
Prerequisites: MET 100 and MET 321.
MET 422-3 Experimental Methods and Analysis (2 + 2)
Course includes three very valuable tools for metallurgical analysis of materials: metallography, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Metallography deals with the examination of a metal structure under an optical microscope. Sample preparation and picture taking is presented. Highly magnified and detailed structure is revealed with the electron microscope. X-ray diffraction measures such characteristics as interatomic spacing, types of crystal structure, and residual stresses. Course also touches on special types of thermometers such as the optical pyrometer and the thermocouple.
MET 430-3 Transportation Problems (3 + 0)
Provides insight into the economics of transportation, physical distribution, and traffic management. Provides pertinent data and knowledge regarding all modern means of transport and impact and social implications involving transportation industry.
MET 440-3 Power Systems Design
(2 + 2)
Study of fluid mechanics with emphasis on principles of hydraulic power systems as applied in modern automotive and industrial systems. Included will be design features applied through power brakes, power steering, automatic transmission, torque converters, and industrial power hydraulic systems.
Prerequisites: MET 200 and MET 307, or permission of instructor.
MET 441-3 Automotive Design (2 + 2) Study of automobile safety design, synthesizing the anatomical, psychological, and engineering relationships between man and machine. Evolves around the ideal ergonomic motor car with future impressions and implications.
Prerequisite: MET 307.
MET 450-3 Engineering Management (3 + 0)
Provides basic tools of management so novice can employ them; thus, increase job satisfaction through growth of a sense of competence in ability to handle men. Various interface requirements will be identified for successful operations and communications between engineers, technicians, and management. Case studies will be used for discussion and problem solving.
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