Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1979-1981

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1979-1981
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text
Metropolitan State College #
Bulletin
1979-81


AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A7D1 TflDDL?^
An application for admission to Metropolitan State College is included in this Bulletin for your convenience.
This Bulletin is published for the information of Metropolitan State College students only. The material published herein is based upon the best information available at the time of printing and should be verified for currency and accuracy with the appropriate College office. This Bulletin is not intended as a contract between the student and the College, nor as an irrevocable statement of policies, procedures, or other data, since these matters are subject to change.


Parking
Metropolitan State College Denver, Colorado
Campus
Building Code
Arts AR
* Bromley BR
* CCD Administration CA
Child Care Center CC
Child Development Center CD
East Classroom EC
Education (UCD) ED
Emmanuel Gallery EG
Learning Resource Center LR
* MSC Administration MA
Ninth Street Park NP
* Physical Education PE
* Science SC
St Cajetans SA
Student Center ST
* Technology TE
* UCD Administration UA
* West Classroom WC
MSC Classes Held in (*) Buildings


ivietropoii St G0e
1006 11th Street Denver, Colorodo 80204
Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage
PAID
Permit 973 Denver, Colorado
MR. CHARLES E ALLBEE ENGLISH
32
V


Metropolitan State College Bulletin
79-81
1006 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204


College Calendar 1979-1981
1979-1980
Summer Semester 1979
Classes begin..................................June 11
Independence Day*no classes...................July 4
Summer Term ends................................August 20
Autumn Semester 1979
Classes begin.............................September 4
Thanksgiving Holiday*no classes .....November 22-23
Autumn Term ends.......................... December 19
Winterim 1980
Classes begin...............................January 2
Winter Term ends ...........................January 29
Spring Semester 1980
Classes begin..................................January 31
Spring Breakno classes...................March 24-28
Spring Term ends ...............................May 21
Commencement.......................................May 25
1980-1981
Summer Semester 1980
Classes begin.....................................June 9
Independence Day*no classes......................July 4
Summer Term ends................................August 18
Autumn Semester 1980
Classes begin.............................September 2
Thanksgiving Holiday*no classes ......November 27-28
Autumn Term ends.......................... December 17
Winterim 1981
Classes begin..................................January 5
Winter Term ends ...........................January 29
Spring Semester 1981
Classes begin..................................January 30
Spring Breakno classes...................March 23-27
Spring Term ends ...............................May 21
Commencement.......................................May 24
'College Offices also closed during this holiday.
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE HOLIDAY CALENDAR
1979 1980 All College Offices Will Be Closed 1980 1981
July 4 January 1 September 1 January 1, 2
September 3 May 26 November 27, 28 May 25
November 22, 23 December 24, 25, 26, 31 July 4 December 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31
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Contents
College Calendar............................
General Information.........................
.Campus ....................................
Admissions..................................
Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado____
Student Financial Aid Programs..............
Costs.......................................
Student Personnel Services..................
Center for Community Services...............
Center for Experimental Studies ............
Academic Information........................
Omnibus Courses.............................
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements.
Degrees and Programs Available..............
School of Business..........................
Center for Community Services (Academic) ..
Center for Education........................
School of Engineering Technology............
School of Liberal Arts......................
Center for Interdisciplinary and Urban Studies
School of Professional Studies..............
School of Science and Mathematics...........
Trustees ...................................
Administration..............................
Academic Administrators.....................
Faculty.....................................
Alphabetical Index .........................
Admission Application.......................
Auraria Higher Education Center Map.........


-* n
General Information
Historical Background Campus
Admission Information
Kenneth C. Curtis, Dean of Admissions and Records
Consortium of State Colleges Student Financial Aid Programs Costs
Student Personnel Services
Edward L. Schenck, Dean of Student Services
Center for Community Services
Alan M. Dahms, Dean
Center for Experimental Studies
Academic information Omnibus Courses
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements Degrees and Programs Available


General Information
General Information
History
Metropolitan State College was founded by an act passed by the Colorado Legislature in 1963, placing it under the control and management of the Trustees of the State Colleges in Colorado. In the Fall of 1965, the College opened its doors to 1,189 students and offered the first classes of the lower division academic program.
In 1967, the Colorado General Assembly authorized an upper division program. Junior level courses were added that Fall and senior level courses in 1968. A decade later, in the Fall of 1978, Metropolitan State College had enrolled more than 13,600 students and had grown to become the largest college in the Denver area and one of the three largest institutions of higher learning in Colorado.
Goals
The enacting legislation for Metropolitan State College sets forth its general purpose: To serve the needs for higher education in the Denver metropolitan area, as well as to serve the needs for higher education in the State of Colorado generally. To perform this mission, the College is directed to be a multi-purpose, urban-oriented institution with comprehensive programs in the arts and sciences, career, technical and professional fields.
The College is authorized to grant the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to provide equal educational and employment opportunities for all regardless of race, color, creed, age, sex, or national origin. The various academic programs, services, and administrative processes of the College are committed to achieving these goals.
Accreditation
Metropolitan State College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, the National League for Nursing, the National Association of Schools of
Music and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.
Student Body
Metropolitan State Colleges diverse, commuter student body ranges in age from 17 to 73 and comes from broadly different backgrounds. The average age of the College's student body is 28.1 years, and the majority are self-supporting, with almost 56 percent of the students attending part-time. Women account for about 49 percent of the total student population. Most of the Colleges students are residents of the five-county Denver metropolitan area.
Faculty
Metropolitan State College's full-time faculty numbers 300. The faculty are selected on the basis of teaching effectiveness and educational preparation. Highly qualified, they are dedicated to instructional excellence and innovative teaching ideas. Many of them have backgrounds that include business and professional work outside the realm of institutional learning. They are attracted to Metropolitan State College because of the challenge of an urban institution.
Community Learning Opportunities
As an urban college, Metropolitan State participates in the surrounding community.
All Schools and Centers at the College incorporate programs through which students work with community businesses and agencies in areas of the students' interests and expertise. These programs include internships, independent study placements, cooperative education, and student volunteer programs. Students are active in over 200 community organizations, governmental agencies, and local businesses each year.
All academic courses are open to area residents, and many are offered at community locations through the Extended Campus Credit Program.
Campus
Auraria Campus
Metropolitan State College moved to new facilities on the Auraria Higher Education Center during the 1976-77 academic year. The 169-acre campus is located in downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver-Auraria Campus (CCD-A) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with MSC.
Nearly one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian homes in Denvers historic Ninth Street Park located within the Auraria site. The campus also features a day care center; a block-long gymnasium with a swimming pool; areas for handball, soccer, baseball and track; a student center and a library housing 455,000 volumes.
The Auraria Concept
The Auraria Higher Education Center is planned to provide a variety of educational opportunities that meet the needs of the urban student. The three Auraria institutions continue to be governed by separate boards and to maintain their distinctive roles and missions. However, the concept of facility sharing affords the MSC student the flexibility of
taking lower division courses at the community college and graduate or specialized professional courses at the university. Metropolitan State College's four-year degree programs are coordinated with those of the other two institutions, and cross-registration is encouraged and can be accomplished easily.
The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, political, cultural and economic fabric of the city.
Origin of Plan
The Auraria Higher Education Center originated with the need to provide permanent facilities for three rapidly growing urban institutions. In 1971, the Auraria Board of directors was created by the Governor to plan the campus, construct the buildings, and maintain the facilities. In 1972, the Colorado Legislature appropriated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus. Additional funds were contributed by the City of Denver, the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the State of Colorado. This makes the Center a creative example of cooperation by government at all levels.
5


Admission
Admissions
Admission Instructions
Applications for Admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. To insure guaranteed processing, Applications for Admission must be, and credentials should be, received at the College not later than four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. All credentials which are submitted become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student.
An official transcript must carry the seal of the sending institution, signed by the registering authority, and be issued by the sending institution within the last calendar year. Date of graduation and/or degree received must also appear on the transcript.
Admission Requirements and Procedures
Admission of Freshmen
(Applicants who have not attended college):
Applicants who rank in the upper two-thirds of their high school graduating class, regardless of their year of graduation, are qualified for admission.
Applicants who rank in the lower third and have graduated within the past year are encouraged to make an appointment with an Admissions Officer at the earliest possible time. These applicants will be counseled on the basis of supplementary information such as recommendations, ACT or SAT examination profiles, experience and maturity. When admitted, students will be assigned special academic advisors to insure maximum potential for academic success. Applicants who rank in the lower third and have been away from the academic setting for more than one year are encouraged to meet with an Admissions Officer since maturity and experience have been found to be strong, positive factors in successful academic performance.
Persons who are not high school graduates will be considered on an individual basis after submitting certified scores on the standard General Education Development test, which show they have the ability to satisfactorily pursue programs of instruction which the College offers.
Colorado high school seniors may apply for admission and enroll while concurrently completing high school graduation requirements through the high school. Students must have prior consent from the high school, their guardian and Metropolitan State College. Students must be awarded the high school diploma before college credits are validated.
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the Application for Admission which can be found in the back of this bulletin. Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, MSC Administration Building, 1006 11th Street, Denver, Colorado, 80204 (629-2953).
2. The completed form must be submitted along with the application fee directly to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, both the application and official transcript must be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to insure that an official high school transcript is submitted to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions in time to meet processing dates.
3. A $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The application fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after a
preliminary evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of his/her admission status.
Admission Through ACT
Although the ACT and SAT are not required for admission, high school students are encouraged to take the ACT or SAT to provide a basis for advising and counseling. If, in the senior year when the student takes the ACT or SAT, he/she indicates Metropolitan State College as one of his/her first three choices to receive the ACT or SAT Profile Reports, the following admission procedure shall apply:
1. A letter of explanation and application form will be sent to the student.
2. If the student wishes to be considered for admission, he/she should complete the form, have his/her high school counselor sign it, and return it to MSC.
3. There is NO application fee.
4. The ACT and SAT Profile Reports and the application form will be used in lieu of a formal application.
5. The student need submit only one official high school transcript (following graduation) with the date the diploma was awarded. It is the students responsibility to insure that the official high school transcript is submitted to Metropolitan State Colleges Office of Admissions in time to meet guaranteed processing dates.
6. Supplemental scores are not included in this procedure.
Admission of Transfer Students.
(Students who have attended a college or a university):
To be eligible for admission as a transfer student from other accredited colleges or universities, an official transcript from each institution attended must be submitted. Transfer applicants are expected to present an average of C (2.00 based on a four-point system where an A grade is 4 points) from each college or university previously attended and must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college or university attended. Students who do not meet these standards should contact the Office of Admissions for individual consideration. Failure to report correctly any former or current college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
1. Complete the Application for Admission which can be found in the back of this Bulletin. Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records, MSC Administration Building, 1006 11th Street, Denver, Colorado, 80204 (629-2953).
2. Complete the application for admission and return it to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, the application must be received by the College at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. A $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and will not apply toward tuition, must accompany the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. A high school transcript is requested when:
(a) The college transcripts do not give complete informa-mation about the applicants high school record.
(b) The applicant has less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours of transferable college credits.
5. The applicant should request that one official transcript from each college or university be forwarded to the Office of Admissions at Metropolitan State College. Although an applicant's record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, an application will not be considered until official transcripts from each college attended are received. These are required even though no
6


Admission
credit may have been earned at an institution.
Transfer Credit Evaluation
Once final official transcripts for degree seeking students are received by the Office of Admissions, the evaluation process begins. Within three to five weeks the student receives two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
1. Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent; however, only the credits will be shown on the academic record at MSC. Transfer grades will not affect the MSC grade point average. Courses with grades of D, F or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer.
2. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
3. A maximum of 70 semester hours will be accepted from a two-year institution. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for work done at a four-year institution or combination of two and four-year institutions.
4. A student earning a two-year degree from an accredited institution with a G.P.A. of 2.0 or better will be guaranteed 60 semester hours of transfer credit, if he/she has met the following minimums in the MSC general studies areas as part of the two year degree:
Freshman English .........................4 semester hours
Humanities................................8 semester hours
Science/Mathematics.......................8 semester hours
Social/Behavioral Science.................8 semester hours
plus 2 additional hours in any one of these areas or
in the career area.....................2 semester hours
30 semester hours
These 60 semester hours of transfer credit may not necessarily fulfill all lower-division course requirements for a particular degree program. Students should consult with an advisor in their major department to determine whether additional lower division courses will be required.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
(Former students who have not been in attendance at at Metropolitan State College for one or more years.)
1. Obtain the Application for Readmission from the Office of Admissions and Records, MSC Administration Building, 1006 11th St., Denver, Colorado 80204 (629-2953).
2. Complete the Application for Readmission and return it to the Office of Admissions. To insure processing, the application should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. No application fee is required.
4. An applicant who has attended other collegiate institutions since last enrollment at MSC must request that one official transcript from each institution be forwarded to the Office of Admissions so that it will be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
(a) An applicant who was previously admitted as nondegree seeking and wishes to maintain this status, but in the interim has attended other colleges or universities, is required to submit an official transcript from those institutions.
(b) An applicant who was previously admitted as a nondegree student but now wishes to seek a degree at MSC must request one official transcript from all previously attended colleges or universities.
Admission of International Students
Any student who indicates on his/her application for admission that his/her country of citizenship is a country other than the United States must contact the Director of Admissions.
1. Admission of permanent immigrants:
(a) Those individuals holding a permanent immigrant visa must present their alien registration card to the Director of Admissions prior to being accepted to the institution.
(b) Official transcripts must be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
(c) Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
(d) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
2. Admission of students from abroad:
(a) Applications for admission must be received prior to the following dates:
Autumn Semester 1980 Autumn Semester 1981 Spring Semester 1980 Spring Semester 1981 Summer Semester 1980 Summer Semester 1981
June 6, 1979 June 8, 1980 November 8, 1979 November 6, 1980 March 14, 1980 March 13, 1981
(b) Credentials of previous academic work must be received four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
(c) Applicants are required to submit English proficiency results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or English Language Services (ELS).
(d) Submission of an affidavit of financial support (Immigration Form 134).
(e) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
If the student is academically admissible and has met the minimum requirements on the English proficiency examination he/she will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form 20 (I-20). Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent immigrants should be forwarded to the Director of Admissions.
Orientation
New Student Orientation is a program designed to assist all new and transfer students in becoming part of the College life. The program is planned to give each student personal attention through discussion which acquaints them with the college, its programs, services, activities, and facilities. Invitation to the Orientation Program will be sent prior to registration.
Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a student's tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A "Petition for In-State Tuition Classification, and the evidence requested in it should be submitted to the Office of Admissions, if a student believes he/she is entitled to in-state status.
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Admission
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-state status a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the last day to add classes for the semester for which such classification is sought.
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some examples of connections with the state which provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law, and (5) registering to vote. Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent.
Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the College. In order to qualify for in-state status a student must prove his or her domicile began not later than one year prior to the last day to add classes for the semester for which he/she believes he/she qualifies.
Petitions and all supporting documentation must be submitted by the last day to add a class for the semester
subsequent to that for which the change in classification is sought. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the class schedule each semester.
Education Policy For Persons Over 62
Older area citizens are encouraged to participate in Metropolitan State College's programs and activities.
A. Persons 62 years or older, wishing to enroll lor credit, should submit required admissions and registration materials to the Office of Admissions and Records, MSC Administration Building, Room 103, 1006 11th Street. Every attempt will be made to make financial assistance available. A college record of participation will be maintained.
B. Persons 62 years or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend class on a space-available basis, in classes of their choice, at either Metropolitan State College or at Extended Campus locations. There is no cost for these classes. These persons may attend classes beginning the sixth day of each semester. Interested older persons should obtain prior verbal approval from the class instructor.
Participation in the no-cost, no-credit basis should not contribute to an increased faculty workload and will not involve required homework or examinations. No college records of participation will be maintained.
Consortium of State Colleges
Purpose:
The institutions governed by the Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado (Adams State College, Mesa College, Metropolitan State College, and Western State College) are joined in a consortium. The purpose of the consortium is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions. It is expected that such efforts will lead to broader educational opportunities for students than can be offered by any one of the institutions.
Enrollment Procedure:
The registering authority of each Consortium member institution can provide any regularly enrolled student in good standing the materials with which the student can enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring
additional matriculation costs. The student is subject only to regular tuition and fees assessed by the host institution for the particular schedule of courses, as determined by the students residency status at the home institution.
The enrollment status of the student at the host institution will be determined by his/her status at the home institution. Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at a consortium institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution. The process of enrolling as a consortium student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution.
Members of the consortium are Adams State College, Mesa College, Metropolitan State College, and Western State College.
Student Financial Aid Programs
Metropolitan State College is dedicated to providing equal access to higher education to all persons qualified for admission who have the will and ability to benefit from the instruction offered. Charges to students are low because a considerable portion of the cost of operation is paid from Colorado tax revenues.
The Office of Student Financial Aid provides assistance for students who need additional finances to attend the College. This aid is available through the National Direct Student Loan Program, the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program, the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program, the Colorado State Grant Program, as well as the College Work-Study, Colorado Work-Study, Nursing Loan, Nursing Scholarship, and Law Enforcement Education Programs.
The Office of Student Financial Aid requires the American College Testing Programs Family Financial Statement (FFS) to determine the degree of need. This form is designed to
identify the resources of both the student and his/her parents. The family Financial Statement meets federal requirements. Use of this form means that all student needs are evaluated on the same criteria, although both the FFS and the Office of Student Financial Aid take into consideration individual circumstances.
Application Procedure
The following forms are required from those requesting financial assistance:
Freshmen
These forms may be obtained from the Office of Student Financial Aid or local high schools.
1. MSC Internal Application for Financial Aid
2. The Family Financial Statement of the American College Testing Program (FFS)
3. Basic Education Opportunity Grant Form (BEOG)
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Student Financial Aid Programs
Transfer Students
1. A statement of all forms of financial aid received from other institutions
2. MSC Internal Application for Financial Aid
3. The Family Financial Statement
4. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Form
Continuing Metropolitan State College Students
1. MSC Internal Application For Financial Aid
2. The Family Financial Statement
3. BEOG Form
Eligibility
Most financial assistance will be based on financial need, and any student with a demonstrated need will receive consideration. Financial need equals the estimated cost of attendance minus the resources available to the student. Resources must include parental contributions, spouse's earnings, and outside income such as veterans benefits and social security.
Participants in the federal and state aid programs must be citizens of the United States, Nationals, or be a permanent resident of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, maintain normal progress toward a degree and attend the College on a full-time basis (12 hours per semester).
Duration of Awards
All financial aid awards are made for one academic year (or less). To continue receiving an award, a student must:
1. Be in good standing with the College.
2. Continue to demonstrate financial need.
Continuing awards are contingent upon adequate funding of the federal and State financial aid programs.
Normal Academic Progress
The awarding of financial aid is a contractual agreement between the student and Metropolitan State College. The continuation of financial aid is based upon the student making normal academic progress. Normal academic progress is defined as registering for and completing 12 hours per semester (in some cases a student may register for less with prior approval from the Financial Aid Office). Students failing to complete 12 hours per semester for two consecutive semesters will have their financial aid reviewed and reduced to direct education costs (providing at least 6 hours were completed each semester). Direct educational costs will not be given for more than two semesters.
Students failing to complete 6 hours during any given semester will have their financial aid package canceled. Reinstatement of the aid will be based upon individual circumstances and available monies. A No-credit (NC) notation or F grade is not considered a completed course for financial aid purposes.
It cannot be emphasized too much that the receipt of aid carries with it a concurrent responsibility to complete those hours for which the student has registered. The Minimum Grade Point Average Requirement for MSC students on financial aid is 2.00.
Last Guaranteed Processing Dates
Summer Semester March 1 Fall Semester March 15 Spring Semester October 25
Loans
National Direct Student Loans (NDSL)
Undergraduate students may borrow up to $5,000 during their undergraduate career. Total loans for the first two years of school may not exceed $2,500. Repayment of the NDSL begins nine months after the student ceases to be a half-time (6 hours) student. NDSL funds are to be repaid at a minimum of $30 per month. The period of repayment cannot exceed ten years. The NDSL has cancellation provisions. Information regarding cancellation may be obtained from the Student Financial Aid Office.
Principal and interest payments are deferrable during periods of at least part-time study.
Federally Insured Student Loans (FISL)
The College cooperates with banks in making information available to students. Undergraduates may borrow up to $2,500 in a single year, but not more than $7,500 during their undergraduate career. A student not already on full financial aid may apply through his/her own or local banks. Applications are accepted throughout the school year. Forms and information are available at the Office of Financial Aid.
Nursing Loan Funds
To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Status as a part-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a part-time student (6 hours or more).
2. Acceptance in the Nursing Degree program at the College.
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement.
4. Good standing in the College.
Short Term Loans
Short term emergency loans are available through the Student Government Loan Fund. Their offices are located in the Student Center. Loans may be secured for emergency expenses. All loans are due and payable by the end of the semester in which they were borrowed.
A loan fund has been established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl, a former student at Metropolitan State College, who was killed in military action in Vietnam. The purpose of this fund is to assist needy students through loans for short periods of time.
Grants
Basic Education Opportunity Grants
The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program is a Federal aid program designed to provide financial assistance to those who need it to attend post-high school educational institutions. Basic Grants are intended to be the "floor of a financial aid package and may be combined with other forms of aid in order to meet the full costs of education. The amount of your Basic Grant is determined on the basis of your own and your familys financial resources. All students are eligible to apply except those who have received a bachelors degree. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office and are processed directly by the federal government. There is no cost to apply.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Amounts vary from $200 to $1,500 annually, depending upon financial need and funds allotted to the College by the federal government. Grants are renewable subject to continued financial need, a satisfactory academic record and availability of funds.
9


Student Financial Aid Programs
Colorado State Grant Program
Awards vary from $100 to $1,000 depending on financial need and funds allotted to the College by the State of Colorado.
State Student Incentive Grant
Grants of up to $750 are available to Colorado residents who demonstrate substantial financial need. These grants are matched with Colorado State Grants.
Criminal Justice Assistance Programs
1. Law Enforcement Education Program (LEEP).
a. LEEP grants are available to eligible personnel employed full-time with a publicly funded, criminal justice agency. Grants pay tuition and fees up to $400 per semester. After funds have been advanced, grant recipients are obligated to complete two years of service within a publicly funded criminal justice agency. Failure to complete this obligation requires repayment at seven percent interest per annum of any outstanding balance.
b. Full-time students who qualify for a LEEP grant may elect to receive a LEEP loan instead. In certain circumstances, the loan may supplement the grant. Also subject to funding, LEEP loans may be available to full-time students who are not currently employed in the criminal justice system. Loans may be cancelled at the rate of 25 percent per year of employment in any public criminal justice system, or must be repaid at seven percent interest per annum following graduation if the grantee does not complete the obligation, OR the status of the student changes from full-time to part-time.
c. Veterans Administration education benefits may be received concurrently with LEEP grants. Colorado veterans education benefits and Colorado scholarships must be considered as duplication of benefits, and LEEP will pay only the remainder of the grantees direct cost (tuition and fees).
Scholarships
The office of Student Financial aid has a limited number of private scholarships available. Ouestions in this area should be directed to the Office of Student Financial Aid.
Nursing Grant Funds
To be eligible, an applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Status as a part-time student or acceptance for enrollment as a part-time student.
2. Acceptance in the nursing degree program at the College.
3. Demonstration of need as shown by the Family Financial Statement (extreme financial need must exist to receive a scholarship).
4. Good standing in the College.
Colorado Scholars Program
Tuition assistance grants not to exceed the cost of resident tuition or $400 per Academic Year, whichever is smaller, are available through the academic departments. Recipients are chosen by departmental scholarship committees based on departmental criteria. Students interested should contact their major departments.
Athletic Scholarships
Metropolitan State college has a limited number of Athletic Scholarships available. These scholarship awards vary from one-half to full in-state tuition. Metropolitan State College athletics include soccer, swimming, track and field, tennis and baseball for men; and volleyball, basketball, softball, swimming, and tennis for women.
Student Employment
Federal College Work-Study Program
The student is employed by the institution to help defray the costs of attending college. Hourly rates normally vary from $2.90 to $4.33 per hour depending upon the skill and experience of the student. The student must demonstrate need.
Off-Campus Work-Study Program
To a limited extent, jobs for needy students are available with off-campus, non-profit, public interest agencies, Federal agencies, State agencies and City agencies.
Colorado Work-Study Program
The recipient must be a Colorado resident. Need must be shown.
No-Need Institutional Employment
The State of Colorado and the College have limited funds available to employ students within the institution who possess the skills needed to perform jobs required by the school. Such employment is not based upon financial need.
Outside Employment
Students who do not show need may also be placed in jobs outside the school on a part-time basis. Many Metropolitan State College students have received part-time jobs outside the school. Students interested should contact the Office of Job Development.
Other Sources of Financial Aid
Scholarships and low interest loans from sources such as churches and foundations are available through the Office of Student Financial Aid. Many private lending agencies have developed attractive loans for college students. High school counselors and libraries are sources of additional information.
Costs
The Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees prior to the first day of classes for any semester.
Tuition and College Service Fees
Tuition and College Service fees are determined by the Legislature and Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year, and therefore, are not available for inclusion in this Bulletin. These costs may be found either in
an addendum to this Bulletin or in the current semesters Class Schedule. However, the cost of tuition and fees for students taking 10 or more hours per semester is projected to be approximately $275 per semester for in-state students and $1,000 for out-of-state students. The cost of students taking 9 or fewer hours will be approximately $27 per semester hour for in-state students and $70 per semester hour for out-of-state students. There is also an additional tuition charge for hours taken in excess of 18 credits per semester. For in-state students this charge will be approximately $15 per credit hour and $65 per credit hour for out-of-state students.
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Student Financial Aid Programs
Standard Fees
Application Fee (required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is non-refundable and will not be
applied on tuition). $10.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript 1.00
Special Fees
Class Drop Fee (see current class schedule).
Late Payment Fee 10.00
Returned Check Penalty 5.00
Health Insurance: Single coverage is included in the College Service Fee for students taking ten or more semester hours. These students may apply for a waiver if they have other coverage. Optional coverage is available for dependents and
part-time students who are enrolled for six or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first four weeks of each semester.
Other Cost Information
The cost of books and supplies averages about $230 per academic year with the highest cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other personal expenses will vary with individuals.
Tuition Adjustments
Please see the insertion to this Bulletin or the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Personnel Services
The Vice President for Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as admissions, records, registration, orientation, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, placement, student health services, and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
Other services, such as academic advising, skills reinforcement, tutorial assistance, and veterans services, are available in the Center for Experimental Studies.
Academic Standards
The Joint Board on Academic Standards is coordinated through the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Composed of faculty senators and student government appointees, the group is chaired by the Vice President of Student Affairs. The Board is responsible for reviewing academic policies and is the final appeal route for questions and possible exceptions regarding academic policies. More detailed information may be obtained in the handbook, or is available in MA 316.
Conduct of Students
It is the policy of Metropolitan State College to give students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. However, the College does publish standards of conduct to which students are expected to adhere. The Student Due Process Procedure, which contains the procedural rights provided to students at MSC before disciplinary action is imposed, is available through the office of the Dean of Student Services.
Center for Counseling and Career Services
The Center exists for the purpose of providing competent, professional assistance in three related areas to all students presently enrolled at MSC or MSC alumni. These areas are: 1.) Educational and Career Planning, 2.) Job Information and Placement and 3.) Counseling for Personal Growth and Change. These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, employer interviews, counseling and educational groups as well as the traditional one-to-one setting.
Most group programs begin at the start of each semester and interested students should register prior to or during the first week of classes. Students desiring assistance are encouraged to contact the Center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs listed below.
The Center for Counseling and Career Services is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc.
Educational and Career Planning
Educational Counseling and Study Skills Programs
Ineffective study methods, lack of planning, poor time management, etc., often lead to failure in college. The Center provides assistance for a variety of educational problems including lack of concentration, motivation, test anxiety, goal setting, test taking, etc.
Seminar for Returning Students
Designed to ease the readjustment to an academic situation for students who have interrupted their education. The Counseling Center works closely with the Skills Center which provides tutorial assistance.
Credit-by-Examination Programs
The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is managed by the Counseling Center. See Academic Information section of this Bulletin for details about CLEP and other credit-byexamination programs.
Improvement of Study Skills Class
A two-credit hour course (Reading 102). Focus is on skill building in areas such as studying effectively, making the most of available time, taking worthwhile notes, improving concentration, and taking tests. Includes discussions about goal setting, anxieties about tests and speaking in class, organization, and motivation, etc.
Career Planning Workshop
Designed to assist students in focusing on a career that is most relevant to their interests and abilities. Through lectures and discussions, participants will learn practical methods of choosing a career and, setting life/or work goals.
Workshop on Alternative Careers
Aims primarily at techniques for self-evaluation. Will consider questions such as: Who am I (needs, values, personalty traits, life style, etc.)? What needs to be done in the world? How may I set about doing it (e.g. selling my ideas to an employer, obtaining a grant, designing my own business or service)?
Job Information and Placement
Permanent Employment Credentials
A permanent placement file is maintained for mailing to employers when such service is requested. Files include personal data, job history, education and references.
Campus Employment Interviews
Employers from government, schools and private industry are scheduled for applicant interviews on the MSC campus. Interview dates are publicized and appointments made for interested students.
Employment Vacancy Newsletter
Lists of position vacancies are published periodically and mailed to students who register for the informational mailings. Newsletters are provided listing teacher vacancies and for other non-teaching positions.
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Student Personnel Services
Placement Workshops
Workshops to provide job-acquisition skills are provided periodically for students. These workshops focus on primary techniques aimed at: job information, resume writing, application completion and interviewing skills.
Part-Time Job Service
Listings of part-time jobs are solicited from employers and maintained for student assignment. Assignment of students to part-time positions within the institution on the Federal College Work-Study Program is also provided.
Career Library
A library of vocational literature is maintained and information is provided regarding supply and demand of personnel requirements, salaries, trends and other relevant data. Data on graduate school fellowships, assistantships, scholarships and catalogs are also available.
Personal Growth and Change
Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problem that interferes with achieving success at the College. The student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the College, in order to receive assistance. Information disclosed in counseling is held in strictest confidence and is never released without the written consent of the student. Private one-to-one assistance in each of the areas described below is available for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar or group.
Personal Growth and Development Group
Offers participation in a low-structure group setting designed to develop skills in communicating honestly, directly, and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through self exploration in a supportive atmosphere. Deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts, frustrations, conflicts about school, job, family, sex, loneliness, dating, etc.
Rational Living Workshop
Provides an opportunity to become acquainted with the fundamentals of Rational Emotive Training and to apply these principles to problem areas specific to each individual's life. The process involves developing an awareness of self and of the emotional self-defeating thought patterns that have been learned. This opportunity to learn effective emotional management and positive behavior skills is provided through discussion, lecture, role playing and group interaction.
Anxiety Reduction Workshops
Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning. The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e., relaxation and counterconditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions. Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program.
Womens Group
For the woman who is seeking to learn more about herself and wants to identify and accept her own positive qualities. The group will develop an environment which is supportive of focusing on attitudes and feelings as well as encouraging new modes of behavior.
Marriage Enrichment Group
The primary objectives are to help couples identify and overcome problems, to increase understanding, and to promote a sense of harmony and well-being in the relationship. The participants will include those living together in a husband-wife relationship.
Separation and Divorce Counseling Group
Designed to help people whose marriage has not endured to make the transition from being married to being single again. An intensive group experience that includes both didactic (i.e., educational) and group counseling sessions.
Group Psychotherapy
Designed to assist in resolving personal or interpersonal problems through on-going exploration in a long term group.
An evaluation interview prior to entering the group is necessary.
Housing
Although the college does not operate dormitories, assistance in finding adequate housing in the Denver area can be obtained through listings in the Auraria Student Center at the MSC Activities Office.
Student Health Service
The Student Health Service is a student fee supported clinic located in the Auraria Student Center, Room 140. Services are provided to MSC students on weekdays and some evenings, during each academic semester. Reduced services are provided during academic breaks.
Care for general health problems, psychiatric assessment and short term treatment, and health counseling and education are provided, primarily on an appointment basis. Appointments may be made on the phone or in person. Students appearing in person at the Student Health Service should allow 20 minutes waiting time in order to speak with a nurse regarding an appointment.
Registered Nurses and Adult Nurse Practitioners provide most of the primary health care. Physicians are available during some hours each week to see the more complex problems. A consulting psychiatrist is also available.
If the Student Health Service is unable to provide the health care that is needed, referrals are arranged to community resources. The student is responsible for any community bills that are incurred.
Students wishing to use the Student Health Service must provide proof of current MSC registration and complete a health questionnaire, which is available at the Health Service. Students who do not comply with these two requirements will be denied service.
Student Health Insurance
The Student Health Insurance is a group mandatory with waiver" policy which is automatic for all full-time MSC students. The insurance premium for full-time students is included in the student fee assessment each semester. The premiums are paid to an insurance company. The Student Health Service coordinates all insurance claims and forwards them to the insurance company for payment of benefits. Optional coverage is available for dependents and part-time students who are enrolled for six or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first four weeks of each semester.
The policy is in effect 24 hours a day in the United States and Canada and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of classes of the following semester. The policy provides coverage for hospitalization or accidents. Free insurance brochures listing other benefits, as well as insurance claim forms and information, are available at the Student Health Service. The group policy number is G 3392.
Services for Disabled Students
MSC has a program to assist physically disabled students. Our goal is to provide supportive services to permit students with physical disabilities to be able to participate fully in the academic, culture, and social activities at the College. This is accomplished by providing individualized services in the areas of admissions, registration, parking, tutoring, career counseling and personal counseling, etc.
Additional services and accommodations will be available as funding for the program improves.
Metropolitan State College does not discriminate on the basis of handicap in admission or access to its programs.
For additional information call or come to either the Skills Reinforcement Center (MA 209) or the Counseling and Career Development Center (MA 104).
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Student Personnel Services
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps
Students at Metropolitan State College may register and attend Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (AROTC) classes at the University of Colorado. Registration must be made on the Boulder campus. Courses are conducted leading to a commission in the Army upon earning a baccalaureate degree. Credit will be awarded by MSC for successful completion of these courses.
1. Army ROTC offers four-year and two-year college programs. The four-year program consists of a basic course and an advanced course. The basic course, taken in the freshman and sophomore years,
provides instruction in the fundamentals of leadership and management with emphasis on leadership development.
2. The advanced course is an elective and is normally taken in the junior and senior years. Students who have demon-stated a potential for becoming officers are selected for this instruction, which includes advanced leadership and management, the theory and dynamics of the military team, and the development of students abilities to think creatively and to speak and write effectively.
For further information, contact:
Dean of Student Services Metropolitan State College Telephone: 629-3077, or Professor of Military Science Army ROTC
Folsom Stadium, Gate 5, Room 216 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302 Telephone: 492-6497
Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps
Students at Metropolitan State College may register and attend Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado. Registration must be made on the Boulder campus. Courses are conducted leading to a commission in the Air Force upon earning a baccalaureate degree. Effective credit for successful completion of these courses is provided by Metropolitan State College.
1. Four-year programs are available to students with a minimum of 8 semesters remaining at Metropolitan State College. Application for these programs should be made during Fall registration at the University of Colorado (Boulder campus) after consultation with the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado.
2. The two-year program is available to students with at least 4 semesters of work remaining at Metropolitan State College. Applications are accepted between November 1 and March 15.
For further information, contact:
Dean of Student Services
Metropolitan State College Telephone: 629-3077, or Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies Air Force ROTC Detachment 105 Folsom Stadium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302 Telephone: 492-8351
Credit for Military Service Schools
Veterans with one year of continuous active military service who have been honorably discharged should request an evaluation for credit from military service schools. Military service schools are evaluated according to American Council on Education recommendations for credit comparable to MSC coursework. Service schools should be clearly documented on the Form DD214, which is to be presented to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Student Center
The Auraria Student Center, serves as the location for out-of-class activities and services for Metropolitan State College students. The Center, shared by the students of the three institutions on Auraria, contains a bookstore, student activities offices, cafeteria, rathskellar, game room, meeting and conference rooms, MSC Health Center and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Center also contains the Commuter Center, which lists available housing and public transportation information. The Student Center is the focal point for many cultural, social, and recreational activities of the college community. The Student Center is located at 10th Street and Lawrence Street.
Child Care Center
Metropolitan State College is participating in the newly developed Auraria Child Care Center. This facility is shared with the University of Colorado at Denver and the Community College of DenverAuraria campus and is licensed for 150 children per hour. Since student parents use the Center on a part-time basis while they are attending classes or studying, children from as many as 400 families can be served.
The Program is child-centered, providing for individual ages, needs, and interests through a comprehensive range of activities. An important objective of the Center is to develop competent and creative young children who are continually learning to cope effectively with themselves, peers and adults, and the environment. While the curriculum is to be geared for children between the ages of one to six years, provisions can and are made for children up to twelve years of age.
Student Activities
Metropolitan State Colleges Office of Student Activities offers movies, dances, leadership development programs, lectures series, art shows and a miriad of other co-curricular activities for the students of Metropolitan State College.
In addition to providing social, cultural and recreational activities, the Office of Student Activities encourages and supports the development of a wide range of professional, social, academic honorary, and special interest student organizations.
The Office of Student Activities is on the first floor of the three-story Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student Center. The Activities wing houses the clubs and organizations of the three Auraria institutions, the student newspapers and the administrative offices of the Student Activities staffs of the three Auraria institutions.
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Center for Community Services
Center for Community Services
The Center for Community Services sponsors a variety of community oriented and community based programs providing educational and assistance services in the metropolitan area. These include the coordination of extended campus offerings, both credit and non-credit; the administration of Community Services Development classes, the academic component of the University Year for ACTION program; the furnishing of experimental opportunities related to academic programs; and the provision of educationally related services in assisting in the search for solutions to community problems. Center activities respond whenever possible to documented community needs and demonstrate the Colleges commitment to fulfilling its role and mission as a comprehensive, urban-oriented institution.
Extended Campus Credit Program
The ECCP coordinates class offerings throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Courses usually correspond to or parallel Bulletin listings and are authorized through and taught by the appropriate College departments.
Classes carry full credit and are identical in their standards to those held on campus. Standard tuition charges apply. Classes are open to regular MSC students as well as interested community members.
Community Learning Centers
Community Learning Centers have been established in strategic community settings in order to better meet educational needs in the College's four-county service area. A variety of credit, non-credit, special programs, and support services are available at locations convenient to residents of the southeast, southwest, and northwest metropolitan area.
Cooperative Education/Metro Volunteers
The Cooperative Education Program offers students paid internships related to their academic major. All Cooperative Education students receive on-the-job training and experience in their field, and many also earn academic credits toward their degree. Co-op placements are available throughout the academic year with private industry and public agencies in the metropolitan and regional area. In addition to placing students in study-related jobs, the Cooperative Education program invites employers on campus for counseling and employment seminars to assist students in making career decisions.
Metro Volunteers refers students for volunteer field experiences with over 50 community service agencies in the Denver area. The program is designed to help students explore a variety of human service careers, satisfy departmental and class requirements for field experience, and develop the skills and self-confidence to complement classroom learning.
Learning for Living
Learning for Living is a year-round program of non-credit classes and workshops for adults who wish to continue to learn for professional or personal growth. There are no grades, tests, or prerequisites.
Convenient locations, qualified faculty, and a variety of programs, formats, and time schedules have contributed to the programs popularity. Special programs include Lunch and Learning" and Freedom After Fifty.
Offerings are open to all persons regardless of previous education or experience. Certificates of Completion or Continuing Education Units (CEUs) may be granted upon student request at the completion of non-credit learning experiences.
Workshops, Institutes and Conferences
Through Learning for Living's Workshops, Institutes and Conferences component, programs are designed with businesses, organizations, and agencies for executive and
staff development. Programs addressing topics of general professional interest and development are designed by LFL/WIC staff, often in cooperation with College departments.
University Year for Action
The University Year for Action program is multi-disciplinary and is designed to provide undergraduate professional education for men and women who wish to prepare themselves for leadership and administrative positions in community-based, small, non-profit service agencies and organizations. A certificate of attendance is available to individuals already in leadership and administrative positions in community service agencies.
The Community Services Development curriculum is the UYA academic base (see p. 39 for academic course listing). Selected CSD classes constitute an area of emphasis within the Urban Studies major. (See Urban Studies, p. 118)
Title I Program
(Higher Education Act of 1965)
Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965 sponsors projects in the area of community service and continuing education that are consistent with the approved Title I State Plan. Projects relate to meeting identified community needs and assisting in the solution of community problems. Activities developed and supported at the College have included the following projects:
Metro Volunteers:
A clearinghouse service supplying approximately 50 human service agencies with from 150 to 200 student volunteers from a variety of departments each year. Metro Volunteers is currently a component of the Cooperative Education Program.
Metro Senior Generation:
a. SCRIBES: A literary and information magazine written by and for older persons in cooperation with the Department of English, several seniors centers and numerous nursing homes.
b. Seniors Services Directories: A guide to services available for Denvers time honored generation in southwest and northeast Denver.
c. Barnum Community Development: A project involving older persons and active seniors groups in an effort to better meet the needs of neighborhood residents.
Five Points Community Center:
Assistance in organizing community information, problem solving, and development of intern programs to assist the Centers programs.
National Chicano Health Organization MSC Chapter, Preventive Health Care Educational Project:
Pulmonary and blood pressure screenings with referral if necessary. Services delivered by trained students in Chicano neighborhoods.
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Center for Community Services
Community Education Project:
Workshops, seminars, short courses, and one-to-one technical assistance in response to the expressed needs and interests of community-based agencies and organizations.
Metro College for Living
College for Living is a survival and living skills program for developmentally disabled adults. MCL has grown from sixteen students and five volunteer teachers in 1974 to 200 students and 35 MSC student teachers each semester. The program has been supported by HEW funds through the
Office of Education. The MCL model has been duplicated in 30 similar programs in Colorado and across the country. Certificates of Completion or Continuing Education Units, (CEU's) are provided upon the request of students at the completion of each non-credit learning experience.
Speakers Resource Center
The Speakers Resource Center, a cooperative program with the Department of Psychology, provides speakers upon request to clubs, organizations, schools, and citizens' groups in the metropolitan area. The faculty and staff members offer their services without charge.
Center for Experimental Studies
The Center for Experimental Studies was established to stimulate and coordinate various innovative programs and approaches to undergraduate education that cannot be accommodated through the Colleges regular curriculum. The emphasis is on innovative programs, particularly those that are designed to serve the unique needs of urban students, and on careful evaluation of all experimental efforts. Encouragement is given to all departments of the College to develop and implement non-traditional, innovative, and experimental courses and methods of instruction. After experimentation, these courses and methods may become a regular part of the College curriculum or of the academic support systems available to all MSC students.
Academic Advising Center
The Academic Advising Center coordinates academic advising and related academic matters in the nine Schools and Centers of Metropolitan State College. The Center is directly responsible for providing advising services, such as recommending course selections and providing basic information on all the majors and minors offered at MSC to those students who have not yet decided on a field of study. The Center assists those students who enter the College on academic probation and those whose cumulative grade point average falls to less than a "C.
The Advising Center also serves as a central referral facility where any student or prospective student may obtain information on many of the services and programs available at MSC. It is staffed by professional academic advisers and operates year round.
Contract Major/Minor Program
Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College the need arises occasionally for a major that will not fit the existing catalog major or minor and which is individual in nature and meets the specific needs of the students. The Contract Major/Minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific individual career objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor programs.
For further information contact the office of the Dean of the Center for Experimental Studies.
High School Upward Bound
The program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary to succeed in education beyond high school for youth from low-income families who have academic potential but who have inadequate secondary school preparation. The program provides intensive instruction in basic academic skills such as reading, writing, and mathematics. A comprehensive counseling and enrichment program, for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression, and positive attitudes toward learning, is also part of the support program. The students are recruited at the beginning of their junior year in high school from four target area high schools located in Denver County.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is a federally funded program designed to provide veterans with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving VA checks, tutorial and counseling assistance, assistance in filling out admission and financial aid applications, and many referral services such as for employment and emergency housing. The specific VA-related function of certifying student veterans enrollment with the VA is also provided.
The OVA coordinates the Colorado Veterans Tuition Assistance program which is a State benefit offering tuition credit for many student veterans. Individuals should contact the OVA for eligibility and application information.
Metropolitan State College has received recognition as a Servicemen's Opportunity College and also participates in Project Ahead. Project Ahead is a program designed to enable new volunteers in the U. S. Army to coordinate their academic activities while in the service. For more information contact the OVA or a U. S. Army recruitment office. Additional information about the Servicemens Opportunity College can be obtained from the OVA or the Director of MSC Admissions.
Short Term Innovative Programs
The general mission of this program is twofold: to provide faculty the opportunity to experiment with new instructional techniques and to give the College a setting in which to develop and model new experimental programs. Some experiments that have been developed under STIP auspices in the last three years have been: University Year For Action, Urban Interface (a "street course), PSI courses (based on the Keller Plan), other forms of Adaptive Self-Paced Learning, the College for Living, computer-assisted instruction, services to the handicapped, Special Services for the Disadvantaged, and courses based on Piagetian principles of learning.
Once these experiments have demonstrated their effectiveness they are moved to other Schools or Centers of the College on a permanent basis. The ultimate purpose of STIP is to provide better educational experiences for the diverse students who are attracted to Metropolitan State College.
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Center for Community Services
Skills Reinforcement Center
The Skills Reinforcement Center provides academic support services to MSC students at all levels, from basic skills development to upper division courses. The Center is dedicated to gathering knowledge about adult learning techniques and helping adults enhance their academic success strategies.
Tutorial Program: Either long-term or drop-in tutoring is available to students in most subjects. Skills Center tutors are recommended by professors as capable students in their major field of study and are then trained and supervised by the Center. This tutorial assistance is free to MSC students.
Placement Testing and Individualized Programs: For some students, formal or informal diagnosis of academic strengths and weaknesses can be the first step in selecting regular academic courses in which they will encounter success experiences. The Skills Center can determine an individual's academic strengths and weaknesses and help map out an individual self-help program based on the students own learning pace.
Study Skills Development: The Skills Center staff will assist students in developing study skills essential to a successful college career. Study skills courses include phonics (word attack) for college students, spelling improvement, memory and test taking, communication skills, and listening and notetaking.
Learning Disabilities Program: Learning disabled students who can possess a superior intelligence level but underachieve because of a specific learning difficulty.The Learning Disabilities Program provides both diagnosis to identify learning disabled learners and program involvement to help MSC students develop learning strategies to overcome their learning problems. Intensive individualized assistance is available in the areas of reading, written expression, spelling, language usage, and math, for which class credit can now be obtained, the Learning Disabilities Program also coordinates student involvement in different agencies to better meet individual and personal needs.
Exceptional Student Center: The Exceptional Student Resource Center provides a meeting and study room for all exceptional students. It also houses the Braille dictionaries and equipment.
Special Services Program
The purpose of Special Services at Metropolitan State College is to provide educational assistance for selected students who, because of financial and/or other circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs. Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Communications skills courses for college credit, coupled with tutorial assistance, will provide the Special Services student with the tools to participate in higher education. Other supportive services include counseling, testing, assistance with financial aid forms, transportation, and, when possible, social and cultural events to make the student feel a part of Metropolitan State College.
STAR Steps to Abstract Reasoning
STAR is an interdisciplinary program designed to enhance the critical thinking and abstract reasoning abilities of students. Introductory level courses in math, science, social studies, and the humanities are included in the program; thus students acquire credits to the General Studies requirement for graduation from MSC. The courses in STAR present a new approach to college teaching based on directed exploration of ideas and self-discovery.
It is recommended that students desiring to er^ich their reasoning skills register for four or five STAR courses concurrently. However, if this is not possible, gains in critical thinking and reasoning skills can be realized through participating in only one or two STAR courses.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate Vietnam era Veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is done during a 10-week bridge term called Basic College." Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aids advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided the participant.
Academic Information
The College operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of fifteen weeks of instruction. Running concurrently with the fifteen-week courses, are modules, scheduled to begin on the first, sixth and eleventh week of the fifteen-week semester. During any fifteen-week semester, students may enroll in fifteen-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under "Course Load are not exceeded.
The College also offers a ten-week summer term during which students may enroll for either ten-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both. The course load restrictions are the same as during the regular academic year.
Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Students who are planning to take the majority of their classes in the evenings should check with appropriate department chairpersons about the availability of courses in their major during evening hours. Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a baccalaureate or associate degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons.
Admission and Registration
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College should review the Colleges admission requirements. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible for degree programs.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College are eligible to register each semester.
A student may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the College; however, following two full semesters of absence, the student should review his status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated application for readmission will be required.
A Student may register for classes in one of two ways: (1) By mail approximately eight to ten weeks prior to the beginning of the semester; or (2) by direct computer registration just prior to the beginning of classes. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is sent to all continuing students.
Registration procedures and dates for five-week modules are described in the Class Schedule.
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Academic Information
Community Outreach Programs
For information on Cooperative Education, Extended Campus Credit Program, and Learning for Living Programs, see the Community Services Section of this Bulletin.
Credit for Life Experience
The Credit for Life Experience Program is a mechanism for evaluation and awarding college credit for experiential learning not sponsored by the College. For example, the College may award credit for skills developed during fulltime employment. Students, in consultation with sponsoring advisors, submit applications to appropriate departments. Credits are awarded on the basis of careful evaluation of student portfolios prepared to document the learning as well as the content, quality, and quantity of the learning experiences.
Students participating in this program are subject to all degree requirements such as general studies, resident hours, etc., as outlined in this Section. Life Experience credits are not applicable toward academic residence requirements. Credits approved by departments must bear some reasonable relationship to the academic course offerings within the departmet, and duplicate credit will not be awarded. The number of credits will be recommended by the departments and must receive final approval by the Life Experience Committee. In all cases, however, the student must complete 30 semester hours in residence (classroom credit), of which at least eight semester hours must be upper division courses for the major and four semester hours of upper division courses for the minor.
Life Experience credits are viewed as examination types of credits, and a student may earn up to a total of 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements through any combination of Life Experience credits; College Level examination Program (CLEP), subject and general;
Advanced Placement; and Institutional Credit by Examination. Credit awarded through CLEP may not be duplicated by Life Experience credits. Credits are recorded on the transcript by department and course number; however, no letter grades are given for Life Experience credits. Students are advised when applying for credit that some institutions do not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades. Credit will be posted for regular, degree-seeking students who have completed eight semester hours of credit at MSC.
The College will assess a fee of one-half the part-time student tuition rate per semester-hour equivalent for Credit for Life Experience. For more information contact the Office of Academic Affairs.
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours. One semester hour represents one class period of fifty-five minutes per week for fifteen weeks and normally about two hours per week of preparation by the student outside of class. Laboratory courses give one semester hour of credit for each two or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week.
Course Load
The normal course load per fifteen-week semester is fifteen or sixteen semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to eighteen semester hours during Fall and Spring Semesters. Students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take ninetten or twenty semester hours, and those with grade point averages of 3.50 or higher may take twenty-one semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums or for more than twenty-one semester hours of course work is only given by the Academic Standards Committee following a successful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester.*
Students may enroll for combinations of fifteen-week, ten-week (summer only), and five-week courses as long as the credit load does not at any time exceed 1.2 credits per week.
For information on the charge per credit hour in excess of 18 refer to page 10.
Course Numbers, Descriptions, and Offerings
Before starting registration, students should study the list of courses for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although normally a student should not take courses above the level of his class (based upon semester hours earned), he may do so at one level above if he has the specified prerequisites. In special cases, a student may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for his class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites, he/she obtains the permission of his/her advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example, English 101-3 is a three-credit course. Following the course title is a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The first number in parentheses indicates the number of lecture or discussion hours and the second number indicates the number of laboratory, shop, or field hours. For example, in a science course followed by (3+4), the numbers indicate three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If there is a prerequisite which must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed above the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule which is printed well in advance of the beginning of each semester and is available to all students.
Decisions on which of the courses listed in this Bulletin are taught during the year will be based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
Interinstitutional Registration
Denver Area Colleges
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College may register for courses during the enrolled semester at the Community College of Denver, the University of Colorado-Denver, Arapahoe Community College, Regis College or Colorado Women's College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements at MSC subject to specific approval by MSC.
Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Concurrent Enrollment
Concurrent enrollment differs from interinstitutional enrollment in that the student is currently matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the Director of Student Registration of each
17


Academic Information
institution. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both institutions.
Changes in Registration
Students enrolled in fifteen-week or ten-week courses may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first fifteen percent of each semester (not including weekends). See the current Semester Class Schedule for complete information on the drop fee policy. The drop fee is assessed in addition to the tuition owed the college. There is no drop fee charged for dropping from a waiting list or dropping/adding the same call number, the same day, the same number of times. Total withdrawals are not exempt from the drop fee assessment.
Students not dropping a course before the end of the fifteen percent cutoff time, who for some reason are unable to complete the course, must make arrangements with the instructor concerning the "notation or grade that will be submitted at the end of the semester. See the paragraphs on Grades, Course Load, and Class Attendance in this Section.
Procedures for adding or dropping a five-week course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If a student anticipates a prolonged absence because of illness he/she should contact his/her instructors if possible. If they find that they cannot do this, they should contact the Dean of Student Services who will inform his/her instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor feels that a student's absences are interfering with his academic progress, he/she may submit a letter to the Dean of Student Services informing him/her of the situation.
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which the student is allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to his/her personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly, extending the learning beyond the end of a semester or module, or even two if necessary, without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalize.d system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance.
Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by "SP or self-paced." Information on the method of instruction and the nature of program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all.
Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during that semester when the work is completed satisfactorily.
Examinations in Lieu of Course Requirements
Successful completion of special examinations may be substituted for the completion of course requirements, may permit placement of students in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding college credit. Several different types of examinations are described below. A student may not earn more than a total of 60 semester hours of credit toward degree requirements regardless of the type of examination for which credit is or has been earned.
Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases a department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses in which he/she requests and passes special college examinations. Under this provision a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the College. A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition rate will be charged per semester hour credit.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded), and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the student's graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chairperson no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chairperson.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the College. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, or auditor. In a given discipline no credit by examination can be obtained for a course lower in number than the highest course already completed by that student. If a student is registered for but has not completed a higher-numbered course in the discipline, the examination for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Academic Standards Committee following endorsement of the department chairperson or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove "NC" or SP notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to "A" or "B" must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the students permanent record. No record of failures on such examinations will be entered on the students permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
No credit by examination will be posted until a student has completed 8 semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College.
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Academic Information
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation entitles the student to substitute a subject of his/her own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College Entrance Examination Board has developed a series of examinations designed to evaluate nontraditional college-level education, specifically including independent study and correspondence work, and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This series of examinations, known as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), consists of five separate examinations covering the areas of English, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Science, and Social Science-History. Based upon results of these examinations, the College may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman general studies requirements areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of most of the traditional courses required during the freshman year.
A subject series of examinations which apply to specific College courses is also available. Thirty semester hours of credit may be awarded in this program, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
CLEP scores transferred from another institution will be reevaluated according to MSC CLEP standards.
Interested students should contact the Office of Counseling and Career Development for complete information about this program before registration.
Advanced Placement
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chairperson, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Grades/Notations
Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College are as follows:
ASuperior...................4 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
BAbove Average .............3 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
CAverage....................2 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
DBelow Average but Passing .1 quality point per semester
hour attempted.
FFailure ...................0 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
NCNo Credit
SSatisfactory (Limited to Student Teaching)
PPass
XGrade assignment pending. Student must see Faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade.
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course, a request at registration for no credit, or may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of his/her out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. Incomplete work denoted by NC, must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member.
The notation has no effect on the grade point average.
The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the student's exposure to the course in order to increase the students proficiency. In order to earn credit, the student must reregister for the course in a subsequent term.
The following minimal requirements shall be required throughout the College and shall be a part of all school/center, departmental, or individual policies:
1. The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the third week of classes of each term.
2. During the last week of a term, requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted.
The NC (incomplete) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply.
3. A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which he/she enrolls.
4. Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize his/her success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Additional requirements for an NC notation may be set by each school/center, department, and/or faculty member. School/center policies shall supersede departmental policies; either school/center policies or departmental policies shall supersede individual policies.
A student receiving a final grade of F may secure credit for the course by repeating it with a passing grade. Full tuition and fees will be charged for each registration. Students must notify the Office of Admissions and Records that the class has been repeated with a passing grade in order that the students record may be adjusted. The F grade is changed to an NC" when the repeated course carries the same title, course number, and credit hours.
Transcripts of Records
A transcript is a certified copy of a students permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1 each. Transcripts will be released by the Office of Admissions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name as recorded while attending MSC,
Student Identification Number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropriate reasons. Certified true copies of transcripts from other institutions which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records will be issued upon signed, notarized request by the student. A charge of $1 per copy page is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions who concurrently enroll at MSC must request transcripts from the home institution for courses taken at MSC.
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Academic Information
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages the student to venture out of his/her major and minor fields and thereby broaden his education experience. The "Pass" grade has no effect on the grade point average; the Fail' grade is equivalent to the grade of F. A no credit (NC) notation may not be recorded for a pass-fail course.
Students who have taken at least one course at MSC and have at least a 2.00 grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Pass-fail courses may apply to the general studies, major, minor, and teacher certification requirements; however, academic departments may exercise discretion as to the application of pass-fail credits toward major, minor, and certification requirements. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is eighteen semester hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester.
A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes for a particular semester or module by completing the appropriate form available in the Office of Admissions and Records. If the student exercises the option and later is declared ineligible he/she receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the semester that he/she will receive letter-grade recording in the course.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a Pass grade is given under policies stated above. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work may wish to ascertain in advance of registering for courses under the pass-fail option whether the institution of their choice will accept credits for courses in which they receive a Pass grade.
Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of credit hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours attempted. The notations NC, S, and P have no effect on the grade point average.
Request for Change in Grade
If a student has reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, he/she must make their request for a change before the end of the third week of the semester following the completion of the coursethe following Autumn Semester in the case of the preceding Spring Semester.
Requests for reconsideration of awarded grades should be made directly to the instructor. Should no resolution be possible between the student and the instructor, the matter may be appealed to the department chairperson and then to the dean. Grades that are lowered must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson, Dean, and Vice President of Academic Affairs.
Academic Suspension Policy
In keeping with the goals and objectives of Metropolitan State College, a probation-suspension policy has been adopted which allows most students two semesters to adjust to the academic requirements of college. The policy further provides for the suspension of those students who are not prepared for successful college work.
Students are required to maintain a grade point average of 2.00 (C) in order to qualify for graduation. When a students
cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0, the student will be placed on warning subject to decreasing this deficiency each semester until a grade point average of 2.0 is achieved.
The College, therefore, requires every student placed on warning status to meet with the Probation Review Committee and the student's major advisor. In all cases, a Mid-term Progress Report is required before a student on warning status is allowed to register for the following semester.
If at the end of the warning semester, a student has failed to show satisfactory progress, the student will be reviewed by the Probation Review Committee for suspension. In certain cases, a student may be granted an additional semester if the student agrees to fulfill specific contractual obligations as determined by the Committee. For example, a student may be required to repeat courses, enroll in specific courses, or limit the number of hours attempted during this probationary semester. Failure to fulfill all terms of the contract may result in the students disenrollment from M.S.C. without any adjustment in tuition or fees. A student who is dismissed may petition for readmission after one year.
A student who has been readmitted on probation or warning will have his/her status changed when he/she has attempted a minimum of twelve semester hours and maintained at least a C" average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. A student readmitted on probation or warning will be reviewed for possible suspension when they fail to show satisfactory progress regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation or warning, the student will be subject to the standard policy outlined above.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Academic Standards Committee. No student may reenter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Academic Standards Committee.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned; Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more; but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Honors and Awards
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the College community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity.
The Presidents Award is given to one junior or senior who has excelled in both academics and service to the College. The Vice Presidents Award is given to one Associate Degree student who has exhibited superior scholastic ability, personal integrity, and campus leadership.
Outstanding Student Awards are presented to approximately fifteen students each year on the basis of scholarship ability, personal integrity, and campus leadership.
Junior and senior students receiving the above awards are among those selected for publication in Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on Metropolitan State College Honor Lists. The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher. The Vice Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusive.
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Academic Information
Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSC, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
1) Summa Cum LaudeTop 5% of graduates within each school/center with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than
3.65.
Magna Cum Laude Next 10% of graduates within each school/center with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than
3.65.
2) To determine each honors category grade point averages for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer, autumn and spring graduates.
3) To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC prior to the term of graduation.
4) Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
5) This policy for determining graduation honors applies to all students graduating after Spring Semester, 1979.
Omnibus Courses
The omnibus" courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities. Experimental topics courses, seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the Bulletin. They may be offered by all departments in the College.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and credit hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairperson of the department or discipline, and dean of the school or center before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the onmibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements. Omnibus courses do not count toward the General Studies Requirements.
The following course numbers are the same for all disciplines and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course, and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
190 (Credit Variable). Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An introductory study of selected topics especially appropriate for lower division students.
299 (Credit Variable). Field Experience/lnternship
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
390 (Credit Variable). Advanced Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
480 (Credit Variable). Workshop
Prerequisite: Approval of department.
An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group
appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area.
490 (Credit Variable). Seminar.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Presentations, discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed 5 credit hours). Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chairperson.
Independent investigation of problems within the area of the students majoring in the department/discipline offering the course and must be supervised by a faculty member in that department/discipline.
499 (Credit Variable). Advance Field Experience/
Internship
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Guidelines on Field Experience/lnternship Courses
1. Students must make application for course credit and provide information on background, justification and aims.
2. Applications for 299 or 499 credits will be evaluated by the faculty of the department/discipline in which credit is granted or by a committee of at least two members of the department/discipline; in addition, the department chairperson will evaluate the applications. Each application must be approved by both the faculty evaluation group and the department chairperson before the student may have credit.
3. The locations, institutions, or businesses proposed by a student, by an instructor or faculty group in an academic department/discipline, or by the department chairperson will be evaluated by the members of the department/discipline or by a committee of at least two persons from the department/discipline and the department chairperson. After evaluation, the members of the department/discipline or the committee and the department chairperson will approve the granting of credit.
4. The approved application will be sent to the approved location, institution, or business.
5. The location, institution, or business approved for the field experience must agree to accept the student, provide learning opportunities, and evaluate his/her performance.
6. The group which approves the student application will establish the credit to be earned before the course is
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Omnibus Courses
undertaken; the department chairperson will approve the credit. Course credit may vary from one to fifteen hours.
7. At least one hour weekly will be spent in seminar
discussion, or in conferences with the field supervisor in the field experience location, or in conferences with the department or departmental committee.
8. The student will make a terminal report evaluating his course; the field supervisor must make an evaluation of the students performance during the course; and the department/discipline faculty or committee will select a member of the faculty or committee to write an evaluation of the students performance and to assign a letter grade for the course.
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the Information provided In this Bulletin concerning regulations and requirements of the College and their program of study.
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) following a curriculum in arts, sciences, or applied sciences to meet requirements for Bachelor of Arts or Science Degree; (2) taking vocational-technical programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in fields such as business, health services, public services, and technology; or (3) enrolling for selected courses to improve general education or vocational competency.
Requirements for All Degrees
To earn a degree, a student must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which he/she is registered and must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
For degree requirement evaluation purposes, a student may select any Bulletin in effect while he/she is enrolled at Metropolitan State College providing that the Bulletin contains his/her complete program of study. A student interrupting continuous enrollment for one calendar year or more may select only those Bulletins in effect after his/her return to the institution. The student must complete the general studies, major, minor, and all other degree requirements as outlined in the Bulletin under which he/she plans to graduate.
Effective with this Bulletin, Metropolitan State College will phase out all Associate Degree programs and after May 30, 1979 will not admit new students to those programs.
Students presently enrolled In an Associate Degree program should contact their department for information concerning completion of the degree requirements.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, the student is responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to his/her program and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume approval to deviate from the stated requirements without a properly signed statement to that effect.
Transfer students should become familiar with the requirements of the College, the general studies, and their major (or area of emphasis) and minor areas.
Graduation Agreement
The official academic evaluation process is initiated when the student completes the Graduation Agreement. Once the student has received program approval from the major (or area of emphasis) department chairperson and the minor department chairperson, the student submits his Agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. After the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive an updated Graduation Status Report.
The deadline for submitting the Graduation Agreement coincides with the deadline for submitting early (mail)
registration for the semester the student plans to graduate. However, since the student is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of his program of study, it is advisable to begin the graduation evaluation process at least one year and preferably two years prior to the semester of graduation. A Graduation Agreement submitted after the deadline will be reviewed for the following graduation date.
After submitting the Graduation Agreement, a student who feels justified in deviating from College academic requirements may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee to request a variance. Petition forms may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Valid reasons for the variances must accompany all petitions and must be signed by the appropriate dean and department chairperson.
Diplomas are granted after conclusion of each of the three semesters for those students who have met all requirements for graduation. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the Spring Semester. Students who officially graduated during any of the previous three semesters are invited but are not required to participate in the Spring Commencement.
General Studies for Bachelor Degrees
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the general studies distribution requirements listed below. Each of the category requirements may be satisfied by any course of the subject matter areas except courses numbered 190, 299, 390, 480, 490, 498, and 499. Not more than six semester hours taken in any one department (as indicated by the three-letter course prefix) will apply toward general studies requirements. Each degree candidate must complete English 101 and English 102. The same course may be used toward meeting requirements in the general studies and the major or minor with the approval of the major or minor department chairperson. The credit-value of the course may be considered only once, however, in the upper-division and cumulative credit totals. The Career category is an option within the General Studies. A maximum of 6 semester hours of applicable course work may be applied to the Career category to compensate for less than 10 (but at least 8) semester hours in each of the Humanities, Science and Mathematics and Social/Behavioral Science categories. Students should check for specific general studies requirements stipulated by their major. Specific courses are listed in Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies because the programs are interdisciplinary.
Credits
Freshman Composition (ENG 101 and 102)......... 6
Humanities....................................... 8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 103, 104, 108, 450)
Art
Chicano Studies (CHS 200, 201, 202, 340, 341, 351, 352, 420)
English
French
German
Modern Languages Music
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Programs of Study and Degree Requirements
Philosophy
Reading
Spanish
Speech
Science and Mathematics.......................... 8-10
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences................ 8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 101, 102, 113, 213,
220, 230, 270, 315, 330, 340, 355, 370, 375, 391,
440, 460, 470, 485)
Anthropology
Chicano Studies (CHS 100, 101, 102, 211, 221, 231,
301, 310, 311, 312, 314, 320, 330)
Economics
History
Political Science Psychology Sociology Urban Studies Womens Studies
Career........................................... 0- 6
Accounting
Aerospace
Business Education and Communication
Civil Engineering Technology
Communications
Community Service Development
Computer Management Science
Education
Electronics Engineering Technology Finance
Health Care Management Health Services Human Services Industrial Education Journalism Law Enforcement Management Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technology Physical Education and Recreation Quality Assurance Technology Social Welfare
Total Credits.................................... 36
Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student
must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any
others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a
candidate.
Programs of Study and Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College course work.
2. Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper division courses (300 and 400 level courses).
3. Complete all general studies requirements listed for a degree and major.
4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see major department), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies any minor requirement. Course-work used toward meeting requirements for one major or minor may not be used toward meeting requirements for another major or minor.
5. Complete all special requirements of a department and school or center.
6. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all MSC courses which satisy the requirements for the major and for all courses which satisfy requirements for a minor.
7. Academic Residency (classroom credit)
a. Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College, including the last 10 semester hours applicable to the degree.
b. Complete at least 8 upper division (300 and 400 level) semester hours of the major and 4 upper division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College (classroom credit).
c. Students should check with the Office of Admissions and Records before attempting to apply interinstitutional credit to academic residence requirements.
8. Credit Limitations:
a. Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 4 semester hours in physical education activity courses will be counted toward a Bachelors Degree for students who are not majoring in Physical Education or Recreation and only 3 of these may be applied to the career category of general studies.
c. Not more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a Bachelors Degree for students who are not majoring in Music and only 3 of these may be applied to the humanities category of general studies.
d. Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a Bachelors Degree.
Requirements for a Second Degree
For an additional Bachelors Degree, the student will comply
with the following:
1. The first Bachelors Degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College.
2. A minimum of 8 MSC classroom upper division semester hours in the major department of the second degree.
3. The completion of a minor, if required by the major department, for the contemplated degree.
4. At least two additional semesters in residence.
5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC, in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
6. General studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.
7. Credit limitations for a Bachelor's degree will continue to exist for the second degree.
23


Degrees and Programs available at Metropolitan State College
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Metropolitan State College is organized into five schools and four centers. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described under special sections of this Bulletin prepared by each school or center.
Bachelors Degree Minor Major
School of Business Accounting X X
Business Education and Communications X*
Computer and Management Science X
Data Processing X
Finance X X
Management X X
Manpower Management X
Marketing X X
Office Administration X
Production Management X
Real Estate X
Systems Management X
In addition to the BS degree major a 3-year specialist degree is offered with options in Administrative Assistant, Administrative Office Management, and Legal Assistant (paralegal).__________________________
School of Engineering Technology
Civil Engineering Technology Drafting Engineering Technology Electronics Engineering Technology Industrial Marketing Mechanical Engineering Technology Meteorology Quality Assurance Technology Surveying Technical Management X X X X X X X X X X X X X
School of Libral Arts Anthropology X X
Art X X
Behavioral Science X
Economics X X
English X X
French X
German X
History X X
Journalism X X
Modern Languages X
Music X
Music Education X
Music Performance X
Philosophy X X
Political Science X X
Psychology X X
Public Administration X
Sociology X X
Spanish X X
Speech Communications X X
Speech Pathology-Audiology X
Center for Interdisciplinary and Urban Studies
Afro-American Studies X X
Bilingual Chicano Studies X X
Communications X
Communications Multi-Major X
Hospitality, Meeting, and Travel
Administration Urban Studies Womens Studies X X X X
Bachelors Degree
Minor Major
School of Professional Studies
Airframe and Power Plant
Mechanics X
Aviation Electronics X
Aviation Maintenance Management X
Aviation Management X X
Health Care Management (Upper Division) X X
Human Services X X
Industrial Education X X
Law Enforcement X X
Nursing (Upper Division for R.N.s) X
Professional Pilot X X
Social Welfare X
School of Science and Mathematics
Biology X X
Chemistry X X
Criminalistics X
Earth Science X
Geography X
Land Use X
Mathematics X X
Physics X X
Center for Education
Bilingual-Bicultural Education X
Early Childhood Education X X
Elementary Education X
Health and Safety X
Physical Education X X
Reading X
Recreation X X
Special Education X
Teacher Certification: Early Childhood, Elementary, Thirteen Secondary Fields, and Special Education
Contract Major/Minor Program
The Contract Major/Minor Program is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with his/her Contact Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific individual career objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing Bulletin major and/or minor programs. It is individualized and planned to meet the specific needs of the student.
For further information, contact the Academic Advising Center or the Dean of the Center for Experimental Studies.
24


School of Business
Richard E. Pasternak, Dean
Academic Departments:
Accounting and Financial Administration Business Education and Communications Computer and Management Science Management Marketing


School of Business
School of Business
The curricula of this School are designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The School offers two degreesthe Three-Year Specialist Degree, and the Bachelor of Science.
Effective with this Bulletin Metropolitan State College will phase out all Associate Degree programs and after May 30, 1979 will not admit new students to those programs. Students presently enrolled in an Associate Degree program should contact their department for information concerning completion of the degree requirements.
Three-Year Specialist Degree
The School of Business also offers a three-year degree with a choice from three options emphasizing specialized areas currently in strong demand. The options take into consideration work experience credit, permit additional specialization and include a field experience requirement for a partial on-the-job training. The student has the opportunity later to obtain a bachelors degree by completing limited additional requirements for a contract major.
Students seeking a three-year degree in business for any of the options given below must complete the following general studies requirements:
Required Courses Houra
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition ......... 6
Humanities:
SPE 101 Fundamental of Speech Communication...... 3
Elective .................................. 3
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences ....................... 4
Laboratory Science......................... 3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of EconomicsMacro............... 3
Elective .................................. 3
Career:
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications . _3
Total................................................ 28
In addition, all three-year degree students must complete the following abbreviated business core:
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..................... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.................... 3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing........... 3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems.............. 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics.............. 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ................................ 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management...................... _3
Total.................................................... 21
Three-year degree students should choose one of the following options as their major area of interest:
Options
Administrative Assistant
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BEC 102 Advanced Typewriting ........................ 3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines............ 3
BEC 112 Intermediate Shorthand....................... 3
BEC 113 Advanced Shorthand........................... 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Word Processing ........ 3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic.......................... 3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis............... 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business........................... 3
BEC 499 Field Experience............................. 5
MGT 321 Business Law II.............................. 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics......................... 3
Upper-Division Business Electives........... _6
Total.................................................. 41
'Life Experience credit hours for the successful completion of the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination may be applied to the completion of this option.
Administrative OUlce Management
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I................................ 3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines............ 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Word Processing ........ 3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic.......................... 3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis............... 3
BEC 355 Records Management........................... 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business........................... 3
BEC 499 Field Experience............................. 5
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design or
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research............. 3
MGT 321 Business Law II............................. 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management or
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior........................ 3
Electives ................................. _6
Total................................................. 41
Paralegal
Required Courses ^Ttmlrs
ACC 309 Income Tax I................................ 3
BEC 302 Legal Research and Procedures................ 3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic.......................... 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business........................... 3
BEC 499 Field Experience............................. 5
MGT 321 Business Law II............................. 3
BEC 324 Litigation................................... 3
BEC 325 Family Law................................... 3
BEC 326 ProbateDecedentsEstatesWillsTrusts ... 3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate................... 3
Electives
(Choose a minimum of 9 credits from the
following courses):.................................... 9
LEN 110 History and Administration of Justice....3
LEN 210 Criminal Law and Procedures.............. 5
LEN 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures ....... 3
PSC 200 American State and Local Government...... 4
MGT 384 Real Estate Law............................ 3 _
Total ................................................ 41
Bachelor of Science
The School of Business offers majors in accounting, business education and communications, computer and management science, finance, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, or governmental accounting. The business education major prepares students to teach business subjects in public and private junior and senior high schools and junior colleges. The computer and
27


School of Business
management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding field of business data processing and systems design, plus management science. The finance major is designed to prepare students for careers in corporate financial analysis, banking, and the financial health care field. The major in management gives the student specialization in real estate, personnel matters or production. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of retailing, advertising, sales, market research, and marketing management.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the College's general specifications for the bachelor's degree listed under Programs of Study and Degree Requirements. A summary of the course program which he must complete within the School of Business is as follows:
General Studies.......................................... 36
Business Core............................................ 33
Major in School of Business ............................. 27
Electives Within the School of Business .................. 9
Electives Outside the School of Business............... _15.
Total.................................................. 120
General Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in accounting, business education and communications, computer and management science, finance, management or marketing must complete the following general studies requirements:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition...................... 6
Humanities:
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication 3
Electives ................................. 5
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences ........................ 4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences............................. 3
Physical or Biological Science.............. 3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of EconomicsMacro............... 3
ECO 202 Principles of EconomicsMicro............... 3
Electives .................................. 3
Career:
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications . _3
Total ............................................... 36
Business Core
In addition to the general studies requirement, students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..................... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.................... 3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing.......... 3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ............. 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics.............. 3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making................... 3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance 1........................... 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ................................ 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management....................... 3
MGT 495 Business Policies.............................. 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing....................... _3
Total.................................................... 33
Accounting
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I.............................. 3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting............................. 3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I................... 3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II................. _3
Total ................................................ 12
Students must select 15 hours of Accounting electives or one of the following areas of emphasis:
Financial Emphasis
ACC 310 Income Tax II........................... 3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting................. 3
ACC 420 Auditing................................ 3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I.................... 3
ACC 452 Advanced Accounting II................. _3
Total ............................................ 15
Those planning to sit for the CPA examination should elect MGT 321.
Managerial Emphasis (CMA)
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems... 3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting................. 3
ACC 420 Auditing................................ 3
FIN 300 The American Financial System............ 3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II ................... 3
Total ........................................... 15
Those planning to sit for the CMA examination should elect MGT 357 and MGT 453, and MGT 350.
Tax Emphasis
ACC 310 Income Tax II........................... 3
ACC 409 Tax Procedure and Research ............. 3
ACC 410 Tax Planning............................ 3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I.................... 3
ACC 420 Auditing............................... _3
Total ............................................ 15
Systems Emphasis
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems... 3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting................. 3
ACC 420 Auditing................................ 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design .............................. 3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL.......................... _3
Total ............................................ 15
Governmental Emphasis
ACC 310 Income Tax II........................... 3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting................. 3
ACC 420 Auditing................................ 3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I.................... 3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .................. _3
Total ............................................ 15
Health Care Emphasis
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting................. 3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting................. 3
ACC 420 Auditing................................ 3
ACC 440 Accounting for Health Care Organizations
........................................ 3
FIN 450 Financial Administration of Health Care
Organizations............................ 3
Total .......................................... 15 _____
Total Accounting Major ............................. 27
28


School of Business
Business Education and Communications
Major (or Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BEC 102 Advanced Typewriting ......................... 3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis.............. 3
BEC 360 Principles of Business Education............ 2
BEC 361 Methods of Teaching Typewriting ............. _3
Total ............................................... 11
Students must choose two of the following
teaching specialties**............................... 16
Bookkeeping and Accounting
ACC 209 Personal Income Taxes ........................ 2
ACC 309 Income Tax I.................................. 3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting............................... 3
or
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I.................. 3
BEC 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping,
Accounting, and Basic Business Subjects__ 3
Consumer Economics and Basic Business
BEC 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping,
Accounting, and Basic Business Subjects__ 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business.......................... 3
FIN 225 Personal Money Management .................. 3
Data Processing
BEC 498 Independent StudyTeaching Data
Processing.................................. 2
CMS 211 COBOL....................................... 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design.................................. 3
Students desiring to become certified for vocational office occupations programs should select the secretarial as one teaching specialty, and complete three courses in Vocational Education, which are available through extension courses offered by Colorado State University or the University of Northern Colorado.
Secretarial
BEC 113 Advanced Shorthand........................... 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Word Processing ....... 3
BEC 362 Methods of Teaching Stenography.............. 2
Required Education Courses**
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban
Secondary Schools............................ 3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary
Schools...................................... 2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner.................. 3
EDU 321 Materials and Techniques of Instruction
for Secondary School Teachers ............... 3
EDU 322 Field Experiences in Tutoring and Materials
Construction ................................ 2
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in Content Areas:
Secondary.................................... 3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ...... 2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education............... 2
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar................ 12
Total ................................................ 32
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Business Communications Concentration
See Communications Multi-Major, p. 111, for requirements of this Interdisciplinary umbrella" program sponsored by the Department of Business Education and Communications.
Computer and Management Science Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 210 FORTRAN............................... 3
CMS 211 COBOL................................. 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design............................ 3
One of the following areas of emphasis must be chosen for an additional eighteen (18) hours:
Information System Emphasis
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management. 3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software................................ 3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ........... 3
Approved CMS Electives................. _6
18
Management Science Emphasis
CMS 331 Statistics for Business Research ......... 3
CMS 431 Management Science Techniques........... 3
CMS 439 Case Studies in Management Science ... 3
CMS 440 Simulation of Management Processes ... 3
Approved CMS Electives................. _6
18
Computer Systems Emphasis
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming-
Assembler ............................ 3
CMS 309 Job Control Language and Operating
Systems............................... 3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software.............................. 3
Approved CMS Electives................ _9_
18
Semester Hours for area of emphasis chosen.......... 18
Total Hours for Major............................... 27
Finance
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I................................ 3
ECO 430 Public Finance............................... 3
FIN 300 The American Financial System .............. 3
FIN 360 Investments................................... 3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II........................ 3
FIN 435 Financial Problems and Policy................ _3
18
Choose nine (9) additional hours from the following to supplement an area of emphasis:
Insurance
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance....................... 3
MGT 345 Social Insurance.............................. 3
MGT 343 Property and Liability Insurance.............. 3
Real Estate
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate..................... 3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance........................... 3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law .............................. 3
29


School of Business
Financial Management
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I............... 3
MGT 321 Business Law II........................ 3
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance................ 3
Health Care Administration
ACC 440 Accounting for Health Care ................. 3
FIN 450 Financial Administration of Health
Care Organizations...................... 3
FIN 451 Seminar in Financial Topics for Health
Care Administration..................... 3
Investments
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I............... 3
FIN 460 Securities Analysis..................... 3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate.............. 3
Extractive Industries
FIN 320 Financial Management in the Extraactive Industries.................................. 3
ACC 405 Taxation of Natural Resources.......... 3
ACC 445 Oil and Gas Accounting................. 3
(must elect Geology to fulfill Science requirement)
Commercial Banking
ECO 465 Advanced Monetary Theory............... 3
FIN 370 The Management of Commercial
Banks....................................3
FIN 470 Special Topics in Bank Management.........3 _9
Total Hours for Major............................... 27
Management
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hour>
MGT 321 Business Law II................................ 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics.......................... _3
6
Students Select One of the Following Areas of Emphasis:
Insurance
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance.................... 3
MGT 343 Property and Liability Insurance........... 3
MGT 344 Life and Health Insurance.................. 3
MGT 345 Social Insurance........................... 3
MGT 346 Risk Management............................ 3
Approved Management Electives ........... _6
21
Management
MGT 353 Personnel Management....................... 3
MGT 356 Small Business Management.................. 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations....................... 3
MGT 375 Performance Appraisal...................... 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior.................... 3
Approved Management Electives ........... _6
21
Personnel and Manpower Management
MGT 353 Personnel Management....................... 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations ...................... 3
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision........... 3
MGT 462 Compensation Administration................ 3
MGT 463 Manpower Development....................... 3
Approved Management Electives ............. J5
21
Production Management
ACC 340 Cost Accounting............................. 3
MGT 355 Production and Operations Management.... 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations....................... 3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management................. 3
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision.......... 3
Approved Management Electives ............ _6
21
Real Estate
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate.................. 3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance...................... 3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law ........................... 3
MGT 484 Real Estate Appraisal ................... 3
MGT 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate ..... 3
Approved Management Electives ............ _6
21
Small Business Management
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation................... 3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business........................ 3
MGT 356 Small Business Management................. 3
MGT 457 Selected Topics in Small Business
Management ................................ 3
MGT 458 Advanced Problems in Small Business..... 3
Approved Management Electives ............ _6
21
Total Hours for Major............................... 27
Marketing
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MKT 301 Marketing Research........................... 3
MKT 310 Retailing ................................... 3
MKT 311 Advertising.................................. 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior............................ 3
MKT 454 Marketing Theory............................. 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management.............. 3
MKT 456 Advanced Marketing Problems ................. 3
Plus six (6) hours of Marketing electives. _6
Total Hours for Major............................... 27
Minors Offered by the School of Business
The minors offered by the School of Business are specifically created for non-business majors. Because prerequisite requirements are involved in each set of courses, any student minoring in any of the areas below should contact an advisor.
Accounting Minor
The Accounting minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of accounting.
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting l.................... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II................... 3
ACC 309 Income Tax I.................................. 3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting............................... 3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I..................... 3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II................... 3
Accounting Electives......................... _3
Total................................................... 21
Data Processing Minor
The Data Processing minor is designed to give nonbusiness students a career skill in computer programming for business.
Required Courses
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ........ 3
CMS 210 FORTRAN................................... 3
CMS 211 COBOL..................................... 3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming-
Assembler ............................... 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design............................... 3
30


School of Business
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL........................... 3
CMS 314 Advanced Assembler Language............. _3
Total.............................................. 21
Finance Minor
The Finance minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of finance.
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.................... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II................... 3
ACC 309 Income Tax I................................. 3
FIN 300 The American Financial System ................ 3
FIN 360 Investments .................................. 3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I.......................... 3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II........................ _3
Total.................................................. 21
Management Minor
The Management minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with business skills to work in a business environment.
Required Courses
MGT 221 Business Law I ............................. 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management...................... 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.......................... 3
MGT 355 Production and Operations..................... 3
MGT 356 Small Business Management..................... 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior...................... _3
Total................................................ 18
Manpower Management Minor
The Manpower Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of industrial relations in business and government.
Required Courses
MGT 300 Principles of Management..................... 3
MGT 353 Personnel Management......................... 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations......................... 3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior...................... 3
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision............ 3
MGT 463 Manpower Development......................... 3
Total.................................................. 18
Marketing Minor
The Marketing minor offers the non-business major an overview and understanding of the functional business
area of marketing.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing...................... 3
MKT 301 Marketing Research............................ 3
MKT 311 Advertising................................... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior............................. 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management.............. 3
Plus three (3) hours of Marketing electives ... _3
Total................................................ 18
Office Administration Minor
The Office Administration minor attempts to develop a moderate degree of skills while emphasizing promotional possibilities to supervisory and beginning office management positions.
Semester
Required Courses Hou
BEC 102 Advanced Typewriting ............................ 3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines.............. 3
BEC 111 Beginning Shorthand ........................ 3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Word Processing ....... 3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis............ 3
Elective (Select one of the following courses) 3 BEC 112-3 Intermediate Shorthand BEC 323-3 Listening and Logic BEC 402-3 Ethics in Business
Total................................................ 18
Production Management Minor
The Production Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the production process and managerial functions as they relate to production.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................... 3
MGT 350 Managerial Economics............................. 3
MGT 355 Production and Operations Management.......... 3
MGT 357 Industrial Relations ............................ 3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management....................... 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis .<....................... _4
Total................................................... 19
Real Estate Minor
The Real Estate minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with basic course requirements for GRI, pre-licensing preparation, and required education hours for re-certification.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 221 Business Law I .............................. 3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate.................... 3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance.......................... 3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law ............................. 3
MGT 484 Real Estate Appraisal ....................... 3
MGT 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate ....... _3
Total.................................................. 18
Systems Management Minor
The Systems Management minor is designed to give non-business students a basic understanding of business data processing with particular emphasis on systems analysis and design.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .......... 3
CMS 211 COBOL....................................... 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics............ 3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design.................................. 3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software ................................... 3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems........... 3
CMS 451 Data Processing Management................. _3
Total................................................ 21
Accounting
ACC 201-3 Principles of Accounting I (3 + 0)
Fundamental principles of Accounting with emphasis on the double entry system; theory and practice in transaction analysis; familiarization with the basic financial statements.
ACC 202-3 Principles of Accounting II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 201.
Continuation of ACC 201 emphasizing partnerships and corporations. An introduction to branch accounting, cost accounting, and financial statements for management analysis.
ACC 209-2 Personal Income Taxes (2 + 0)
For non-accounting majors. Enables students to prepare personal federal and Colorado tax reports. Examines the tax implications of different forms of organizations for small businesses. Credit not allowed for both ACC 209 and 309.
31


School of Business
ACC 302-3 Managerial Accounting (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 201 and 202.
For non-accounting majors. Covers cost behavior and control, budgeting, standard costs, analysis of variances. Credit not allowed for both ACC 302 and ACC 340.
ACC 308-3 Small Business Taxation (3 + 0)
A study of state and federal income taxes as they apply to small business. Also includes property, social security, sales, and unemployment taxes. Examines the tax implications of electing different forms of organization (sole proprietorship, corporation, or partnership) for small businesses. Credit not allowed for both ACC 308 and ACC 309.
ACC 309-3 Income Tax I (3+0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202, or permission of instructor.
A study of federal income tax laws with an emphasis on personal income taxation, including such topics as gross income, gains and losses, and deductions. Credit not allowed for both ACC 209 and ACC 309.
ACC 310-3 Income Tax II (3+0)
Prerequisite: ACC 309 or permission of instructor. Continuation of ACC 309 with an emphasis on the taxation of organizational tax entities, including partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts.
ACC 320-3 Governmental Accounting (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202, or permission of instructor.
Study of.the accounting used in a municipality with reference to state and federal governments. Review of municipalities' budgets and municipalities annual reports. Orientation in the concepts of budgetary control as a matter of law and public administration theory.
ACC 330-3 Introduction to Accounting Systems (3+ 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 202 and CMS 201, or permission of instructor.
Analysis of principles and types of tools available for design and implementation of an accounting system or procedure. Case studies are used to illustrate both manual and machine accounting system problems arising in various organizations and situations.
ACC 340-3 Cost Accounting (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
Fundamentals of cost behavior and analysis, analysis of variances for materials, labor, and overhead. Includes budgeting, absorption and direct costing, job order and process cost systems. Credit not allowed for both ACC 302 and ACC 340.
ACC 341-3 Advanced Cost Accounting (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 340, ACC 351, CMS 201, and CMS 332. Continuation of ACC 340. Concepts and procedures applicable to cost allocation, capital budgeting, joint costing, and inventory management. Includes process costing, breakeven analysis, performance measurement, transfer pricing, and mathematical and statistical analysis of cost behavior for control and decision-making.
ACC 351-3 Intermediate Accounting I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on current and long-term assets and current liabilities.
ACC 352-3 Intermediate Accounting II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 351.
Continuation of ACC 351. In-depth study of basic accounting principles with emphasis on long-term liabilities, stockholders equity, and special problems.
ACC 405-3 Taxation of Natural Resources (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 202 and ACC 309.
The treatment of special tax problems encountered in the leasing, acquisition, depletion, pre-production costs, and operations of natural resource properties.
ACC 409-3 Tax Procedure and Research (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 310, or permission of instructor.
An in-depth study of tax procedure from preparation of the various returns to audit by the IRS. Also, the tools used in
tax research are explained and illustrated. A research paper dealing with a major tax problem is required of each student.
ACC 410-3 Tax Planning (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 310, or permission of instructor.
A portion of this course is devoted to the Federal estate and gift tax laws with emphasis placed upon the accountants role in estate planning. The remainder is devoted to the various planning techniques which can often be utilized to reduce an individuals personal income taxes.
ACC 420-3 Auditing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 352.
Auditing techniques and principles applied by certified public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and verifying underlying data.
ACC 440-3 Accounting for Health Care Organizations (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
A survey of fund accounting concepts and procedures for health care organizations, budgeting revenues and expenses, and the use of accounting information for hospital management.
ACC 445-3 Oil and Gas Accounting (3+0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
A survey of the accounting practices relating to pre-drilling exploration, development, production, and refining in the petroleum industry.
ACC 451-3 Advanced Accounting I (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and ACC 352, or permission of instructor.
An in-depth study of accounting for price-level adjusted financial statements, accounting theory, real estate, interim reporting, segmental data, partnership and fiduciary transactions.
ACC 452-3 Advanced Accounting II (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 351 and ACC 352, or permission of instructor.
A comprehensive study of business combinations and consolidated financial statements, including branches and foreign operations.
ACC 460-3 Contemporary Accounting (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: Senior standing and eighteen (18) semester hours of courses in accounting.
Comprehensive coverage of current literature in accounting with emphasis on recent AICPA and FASB publications.
ACC 470-3 Advanced Problems and Techniques (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 451 and ACC 452.
Provides review and reinforcement of students accounting training. CPA examination problems are used.
Finance
FIN 225-3 Personal Money Management (3 + 0)
A study of financial problems and institutions affecting individuals including taxes, borrowing, savings, insurance, investment, and financial agencies.
FIN 300-3 The American Financial System (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 202 and ECO 202.
An introductory course surveying the historical, institutional, legal, and theoretical materials dealing with the U.S. financial system. The course acquaints the student with the monetary, banking, and credit system, and the influence of this environment on business.
FIN 320-3 Financial Management In the Extractive Industries
(3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
An introduction to financial analysis for special industries plus a survey of the sources and uses of funds including: production payment financing, project financing, and longterm financing.
FIN 330-3 Managerial Finance (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 202.
A study of the dynamic environment of financial
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School of Business
management using the following analytical skills: financial analysis, forecasts, cash and capital budgeting, operating and financial leverage, the cost of capital, and dividend policy.
FIN 331-3 Managerial Finance II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: FIN 330.
An integrated approach to financial management using case problems to focus on sources of capital; methods of financing growth externally; financial reorganization; and a review of fundamental methods of financial analysis.
FIN 360-3 Investments (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 202 and Junior standing.
A survey of the organization and regulation of security markets; security analysis and valuation; and principles of portfolio management from the viewpoint of the individual investor.
FIN 370-3 The Management of Commercial Banks (3+0)
Prerequisite: FIN 300.
An inquiry into the management aspects of commercial banking. This is a comprehensive" study of the various functions, activities, and operations of commercial banks.
The major topics covered are: banking structure, organization and management, lending, investing, trust services, international banking, capital structure, and profitability.
FIN 435-3 Financial Problems and Policy (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: FIN 330 and FIN 331.
A case study approach to financial decision making. This capstone course deals with financial problems from the real world and trains students to discover problem areas and offer solutions to the cases.
FIN 450-3 Financial Administration of Health Care Organizations (3+0)
Prerequisite: FIN 330.
Concepts and methods for planning and control of health care organizations, including workload forecasting, operations budgeting, and management control systems, capital budgeting and capital financing.
FIN 451-3 Seminar in Financial Topics for Health Care Administration (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ACC 440, FIN 450, and CMS 332.
Advanced study of health care financial management topics and strategies relating to rate setting, reimbursement systems, management of capital projects, shared service systems, insurance for health institutions, governmental regulations and current legislation affecting the health delivery system.
FIN 460-3 Securities Analysis (3+0)
Prerequisite: FIN 360.
In-depth study for the student of investments, employing advanced approaches to security valuation and security markets forecasting.
FIN 470-3 Special Topics in Bank Management (3+0)
Prerequisites: FIN 330 and FIN 370.
An in-depth analysis of significant topics in bank management. This course utilizes analytical tools and decision-oriented materials in examining topics such as bank organization and strategy, financial analysis of banks, liquidity management, loan policy, investment policy, adequacy of capital, etc.
Business Education and Communications
BEC 101-3 Beginning Typewriting (3 + 1)
An introduction to keyboard skill development through manipulation, and technique application designed to develop minimum occupational/personal-use skills. No credit allowed for one year of high school typewriting. A minimum of one laboratory period per week is required.
BEC 102-3 Advanced Typewriting (3 + 1)
Prerequisite: BEC 101, or equivalent.
An instructional program designed to increase production skills, with business letters, tabulation, manuscripts, numerical proficiency, and legal documents. Selected units
are identified self-paced. A minimum of one laboratory hour per week is required of all students.
BEC 105-3 Operation of Calculating Machines (3+0)
Proficiency is developed in the operation of various models of electronic calculators with emphasis on applications for business, statistics, and metrication. Day classes utilize Self-Paced Learning method.
BEC 111-3 Beginning Shorthand (3+0)
Prerequisite: A minimum ol one course in typewriting. Shorthand theory and basic skill building in principles dictation and transcription in either Gregg or Landmark systems. No credit permitted students who have completed one year of Gregg shorthand. Gregg classes offered day timeLandmark during evenings.
BEC 112-3 intermediate Shorthand (3+0)
Prerequisite: BEC 111, or equivalent.
Continuation of either Gregg or Landmark shorthand theory with emphasis on speed dictation and transcription.
BEC 113-3 Advanced Shorthand (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 112, or equivalent.
Continuation of BEC 112, with emphasis on speed dictation and timed transcription of various business and legal communications.
BEC 200-3 Business and Interpersonal Communications (3+0)
Prerequisites: ENG 102 and BEC 101, or high school equivalent.
Emphasis on the preparation of business letters and related business correspondence. A business level of vocabulary and communications skills is stressed. In addition, business listening skills, dictation, interpersonal communications and interviewing techniques are emphasized.
BEC 222-3 Office Practices and Word Processing (3+0)
Prerequisite: BEC 101 or equivalent.
Practice of office duties and human relations commonly practiced by executive assistants and secretaries. A major emphasis on the word processing concepts is also given. Knowledge of what is available in the field with some individual experience on different equipment in the area.
BEC 301-3 Business Research and Report Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 200, or permission of instructor.
Proper techniques of conducting primary and secondary research. Organization, preparation, and interpretation of data from both descriptive and experimental research designs for informational, examinational, and analytical reports used in business.
BEC 302-3 Legal Research and Procedures (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: Ability to type and permission of instructor. Designed to make paralegals and others reasonably adept at recognizing, finding, and using the most appropriate legal sources. Special emphasis on the court system, legal documents, legal terminology, and skills involved in interviewing. Ability to type desirable.
BEC 323-3 Listening and Logic (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Increases comprehension and retention through analysis of listening difficulties, idea identification, emotions, fallacies of reasoning, non-verbal communication, and transactional analysis in business situations. Primary emphasis is on individual growth.
BEC 324-3 Litigation (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 302.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the legal process. It deals with the sources of law, the methods of enforcement, and the various courts and administrative agencies involved in the administration of justice.
BEC 325-3 Family Law (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 302.
Family law introduces students to laws governing the marriage relationship, the dissolution of marriage, and adoption. It includes an examination of the juvenile law. The course acquaints the student with the function and
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School of Business
procedure of courts in resolving problems which arise in those areas.
BEC 326-3 ProbateDecedents Estates WillsTrusts (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 302.
This course acquaints students with the law governing administration and distribution of decedents estates and some of the instruments used in estate planning, including wills and trusts. Reference will be made to the Uniform Probate Code and other statutes as well as applicable cases.
BEC 354-3 Office Management and Analysis (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MG T 300.
Analytical study of the administration of information processing which includes creating, processing, retaining, and distributing information. Conceptualization of what office work is to be done, how it will be accomplished, who will do it, and under what environment, is stressed.
BEC 355-3 Records Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 354, or permission of instructor.
Study of institutional and legal requirements for accumulating and maintaining business and personnel information. Emphasizes computerized and noncomputerized systems and efficient management of them. Field studies are a part of the course.
BEC 360-2 Principles of Business Education (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor. History of growth, trends, and issues in Business Education today. Consideration is given to research and the individual business teachers role in the current American educational environment.
BEC 361-3 Methods of Teaching Typewriting (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of the psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction in typewriting for developing a desirable occupational and personal-use competence at the high school and junior college levels.
BEC 362-2 Methods of Teaching Stenography (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: BEC 113, or permission of instructor.
A study of psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction in stenography for developing a desirable occupational competence at the high school and junior college levels.
BEC 363-3 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Basic Business Subjects (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ACC 102 and FIN 225, or permission of instructor.
A study of the psychology, current philosophy, and successful methods of instruction in bookkeeping, accounting, and miscellaneous basic business courses at the high school and community college levels.
BEC 402-3 Ethics in Business (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MG T 300, or permission of instructor.
A survey of the principles of ethics followed by an application to current business situations and fields, i.e., accounting, management, marketing and consumerism. Representatives from the business world are utilized as resource speakers.
Computer and Management Science
CMS 201-3 Principles of Information Systems (3 + 0)
An introduction to business data processing including computer hardware, computer programming, systems analysis and design, data processing management, management science, management information systems, and the computer in society.
CMS 210-3 FORTRAN (3+0)
Prerequisite: CMS 201.
A computer programming course in which the major elements of the FORTRAN language are taught. Problems selected from business are coded and run on a computer to familiarize students with program testing and debugging.
CMS 211-3 COBOL (3+0)
Prerequisite: CMS 201.
A computer programming course in which the major elements of the COBOL language are taught. Problems selected from business are coded and run on a computer to familiarize students with program testing and debugging.
CMS 214-3 Fundamentals of Programming Assembler (3+0)
Prerequisite: CMS 211.
Introductory course in computer programming which uses the IBM 370 and its assembly language (BAL) to develop fundamental concepts. Topics include system organization; data representation; use of arithmetic, logical, and editing instructions; and program analysis and debugging techniques.
CMS 231-3 Fundamental Business Statistics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MTH 132.
Organization and presentation of data, basic probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing (including t, x2, and F distributions), correlation, and regression.
CMS 300-3 Computers and Society (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
This course will examine the social and economic impact of electronic computers in several environments including government, law, health education, the humanities, science and engineering, and business.
CMS 305-3 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design
(3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 201.
Systems analysis focuses on the study of existing information systems, problem definition, data collection, and new system requirements. System design focuses on improving the information system selecting alternate solutions, determining the best solution, and documenting that solution.
CMS 306-3 File Design and Data Base Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
The course covers the current status of data base system implementation. Functional characteristics, such as file design, are examined in detail. Guidelines are developed which will aid in evaluation of vendor-supplied data base management systems or specification of an in-house system.
CMS 309-3 Job Control Language and Operating Systems (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 214, or permission of instructor.
A continuation of the study of the use of BAL as used in implementation of assemblers, macros, loaders, compilers, and operating systems for the IBM 360/370.
CMS 311-3 Advanced COBOL (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 211.
A continuation of CMS 211 with emphasis on business applications involving indexed sequential and random access files. Advanced features of COBOL such as the Report Generator and Sort Verb are studied.
CMS 314-3 Advanced Assembler Language (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 214.
A computer programming course in which Basic Assembler Language (BAL) for the IBM 370 computer is taught. Topics include a review of computer numeration systems, syntax and elements of BAL, computer program addressability and relocatability, and debugging techniques.
CMS 315-3 Programming Small Business Computers (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 210 or CMS 211.
A computer programming course in which the Report Program Generator (RPG) language is presented. An assembler programming language used by one of the major mini-computers will also be included.
CMS 316-3 Programming Language One (PL/1) (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 210 or CMS 211.
The study of the programming language PL/1 with direct programming experiences.
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School of Business
CMS 322-3 Analysis of Computer Hardware and Software
(3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
A study of various computer systems (both hardware and software) in relation to information system requirements. Comparisons of costs, capabilities, and software support will be made.
CMS 323-3 Data Communication Systems (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 322.
A study of data transmission; the nature of communication links and the attached hardware; the codes, modems, terminals, and methods of line organization; the need for multiplexing and the types of network structures; software; design techniques.
CMS 331-3 Statistics for Business Research (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 231.
A study of linear and multiple regression, time series forecasting, index number calculation, and analysis.
CMS 332-3 Quantitative Decision Making (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 231.
Designed to develop the students ability to use basic theory and managment science techniques. Includes construction of payoff tables, Baysian Statistics, inventory and production control, and linear programming methods.
CMS 405-3 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design Seminar (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CMS 306 and CMS 322.
Information systems problems will be analyzed; new systems will be designed; actual business problems will be used.
CMS 410-3 Applications of Data Base Management (3+0)
Prerequisites: CMS 306 and permission of instructor.
A systems analysis/design seminar emphasizing the design of practical subsystems for the Metropolitan State College Management Information System.
CMS 411-3 Implementation of Information Systems (3+0)
Prerequisites: CMS 311 and permission of instructor.
An advanced programming seminar featuring the development of programs to be used in the Metropolitan State College Management Information System. Emphasis will be on writing programs in COBOL to use the Data Base Management System.
CMS 416-3 Advanced Programming Seminar (3+0)
Prerequisite: CMS 311, or CMS 314, or CMS 316.
Major business-related projects will be analyzed, coded and tested.
CMS 431-3 Management Science Techniques (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 332.
A study of currently used management science techniques including mathematical programming, inventory theory, queueing theory, and production scheduling.
CMS 439-3 Case Studies in Management Science (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 431.
A study of realistic cases in which alternative management science techniques could be applied. (This course will include use of available computer software for these techniques.)
CMS 440-3 Simulation of Management Processes (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 210.
A study of computer simulation techniques as applied to resource allocation problems in the business environment.
CMS 441-3 Management Information Systems (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CMS 305.
A final systems analysis course with emphasis on design of an integrated management information system in a company Classical and flow network organization concepts are studied in relation to design technique and implementation plan for an MIS.
CMS 451-3 Data Processing Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
A study of the problems encountered in a business data processing installation with particular emphasis on its
coordination with other management systems, systems design, software, and hardware in the installations.
Management
MGT 100-3 Introduction to Business (3 + 0)
This is a survey course of American business. The relationships between economic theory and business decision making are examined. Types of business organizations as well as an introduction to marketing, production, financial, personnel, and administrative management are covered.
MGT 221-3 Business Law I (3 + 0)
This course is an introduction to origins and developments of law. The major emphasis of the course focuses on the fundamentals of the law pertaining contracts, agency, sales, and the application of the Uniform Commercial Code to these areas.
MGT 300-3 Principles of Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
This course examines applications of managerial functions and processes as applied to business and other organizations. Human behavior is discussed within the organizational environment. Production techniques and systems as applied to a variety of business organizations is the third area of study.
MGT 321-3 Business Law II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 221, or permission of instructor.
This course examines business organizations with major emphasis on partnerships and corporations. It includes a study of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to secured transactions, commercial paper, and a study of the fundamental legal concepts of property, bankruptcy, and estates.
MGT 342-3 Principles of Insurance (3 + 0)
A study of the underlying principles of insurance, the need for insurance in a progressive, dynamic society. Includes an introductory examination of insurable risks, uses of insurance as well as a study of the important coverages that are currently available.
MGT 343-3 Property and Liability Insurance (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 342.
An examination and analysis of the theory of risk, risk as associated with property and liability, and the economic functions of liability and property insurance.
MGT 344-3 Life and Health Insurance (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 342.
An examination and study of the principles and practices of life and health insurance with particular emphasis on the human life value concept. Includes the basic forms of life and health insurance.
MGT 345-3 Social Insurance (3+0)
Prerequisite: MGT 342.
An examination and analysis of social insurance. Ecompasses public and private approaches to problems of retirement, employment, private firms, medical care, disability, and employment. Also includes the regulation of insurance by legislation and regulated insurance forms.
MGT 346-3 Risk Management (3+ 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 342.
An analysis of risk identification and evaluation, measurement of protection, and methods of handling risk. Also, includes insurance buying and loss financing.
MGT 350-3 Managerial Economics (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202.
This course provides the student with an understanding of the use of economic principles and analyses of problems in business. An exposition of the fundamental, theoretical, and analytical tools of economics useful in managerial decision making are included.
MGT 353-3 Personnel Management (3+0)
This course encompasses the principles used to effectively utilize human resources in organizations. The historical, psychological, and social development of personnel
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School of Business
management practices are studied. Topics such as recruitment, selection, and placement are analyzed.
MGT 355-3 Production and Operations Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MG T 300.
This course is an introduction to the activities required to produce a product or service. Topics include product design, plant location, layout and procedures, materials control, and quality control, are covered.
MGT 356-3 Small Business Management (3 + 0)
Prereqeuisite: MG T 300.
This course is oriented around a five-year feasibility study of a small business of the students choice. Upon completion of the study, each student will have a thorough understanding of what it would take to start and operate his chosen business.
MGT 357-3 Industrial Relations (3 + 0)
Course provides an understanding of the development and current posture of law as it relates to labor-management relations. It is concerned with legal framework of collective bargaining. Cases and illustrations are used to demonstrate bargaining and methods for securing industrial peace.
MGT 375-3 Performance Appraisal (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MG T 353.
This course provides the student with the opportunity to study and practice methods of (1) evaluating and (2) counseling employees. Rating and ranking systems, MBO, Human Resource Accounting, Career Planning, and Non-Directive Interviewing will be included.
MGT 380-3 Principles of Real Estate (3 + 0)
This is an overview course which surveys the principles and practices of the real estate field. Subject areas treated include real property ownership, finance, contract and agency law, appraisal, real estate investment, and real estate as a career.
MGT 382-3 Real Estate Finance (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 380.
This course treats, in greater depth, the financial factors affecting real estate. Topics include techniques of financing, money market sources and cost factors, and the effects of financial leverage.
MGT 384-3 Real Estate Law (3+ 0)
This is a study of the legal aspects of most real estate transactions with special emphasis on the law of contracts and agency. Also treated are license law, land title and interest, deeds, liens, and closing statements.
MGT 453-3 Organizational Behavior (3+0)
Prerequisite: MGT 300.
This course applies behavioral science research and theory to industry in order to learn how the needs of the employee might be more effectively integrated with the requirements of the organization.
MGT 455-3 Systems-Project Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MGT 300 and MGT 355.
This course investigates the concepts and applicability of systems and project management. The unique nature of the project management structure, including its emphasis on integrative decision making throughout a product's life cycle, is also examined.
MGT 457-3 Selected Topics In Small Business Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MGT 356 and ACC 308.
An intensified and rigorous examination of the various facets of the small business operation, including marketing, production, accounting, law, finance, and human resources management. Designed for the student selecting Small Business Management as an area of emphasis.
MGT 458-3 Advanced Problems in Small Business Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MGT 356 and MGT 457.
This is a course designed to give the student practical exposure to the problems of small business. Each student will work with a local small business on a specific project
under the supervision of the instructor (and the Small Business Administration).
MGT 461-3 Employee Training and Supervision (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MG T 353.
This course uses a seminar approach in investigating various training and learning processes with particular concern for development of supervisors and executives. It incorporates newer approaches to executive development.
MGT 462-3 Compensation Administration (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 353.
Installation and administration of complete wage and salary programs, including objectives, policy, organization, control, analyses, job descriptions, job evaluation, job pricing, employee evaluation, and job standards.
MGT 463-3 Manpower Development (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 353.
This course provides a comprehensive treatment of the manpower theme, explaining the problems and policies which precipitated manpower into a position of national priority.
MGT 484-3 Real Estate Appraisal (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 380.
This is a basic study of the principles and techniques used in the valuation of real property. Both land and improved property are covered. Greater emphasis is placed upon residential property, plus an introduction to the appraisal of income property.
MGT 485-3 Commercial and Investment Real Estate (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MGT 484.
This course studies real estate as an investment medium, the techniques used in evaluating and comparing the investment quality of property, the pros and cons of exchanging, and certain of the tax factors relevant to real estate investment.
MGT 495-3 Business Policies (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Final Semester preceding graduation.
This is a senior seminar designed to give the student an opportunity to apply acquired business skills to analyzing and solving multi-faceted business problems. Special emphasis is given to policy formulation and strategic planning for both profit and non-profit organizations.
Marketing
MKT 300-3 Principles of Marketing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ECO 201, or permission of instructor.
Principles, methods, and problems found in distribution activities in marketing products and services.
MKT 301-3 Marketing Research (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MKT 300 and CMS 231.
Provides the marketing student with a systematic and objective approach, to the search for and analysis of information relevant to the identification and solution of marketing problems.
MKT 310-3 Retailing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
This course provides a comprehensive survey of the merchandising operations of modern day retailers and the environment in which they operate.
MKT 311-3 Advertising (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
Principles, strategies, and tactics of advertising copy and layout, media selection, consumer and advertising research, budgets and problems are covered.
MKT 312-3 Promotional Strategy (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MKT 300 and MKT 311.
Survey of persuasive strategies and tactics necessary in current marketing; emphasis on behavioral aspects of promotional process and on management of programs involved.
MKT 316-3 Sales Management (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
Course consists of a brief course in salesmanship followed by an analysis of the problems involved in supervising sales
36


personnel. Specific attention is given to personnel matters such as compensation, testing, and personnel development.
MKT 330-3 Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300, or permission ot instructor.
This is a course designed to give the student exposure to the conceptual system of marketing and how this system can be applied to the marketing problems of non-profit organizations. Specific marketing concepts will be examined so as to transpose the conceptual system from the profit sector to the non-profit sector.
MKT 331-3 Consumer Behavior (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
A study of human behavior in the consumer role with emphasis on a better understanding of consumer actions leading to better management decision-making in the marketing program.
MKT 341-3 Channel Structure and Strategy (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
Provides the marketing student with a survey of channel structure and strategy; areas of study include evolution of and theoretical explanations for channel structure and types of channel decisions to be made.
MKT 371-3 International Marketing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MKT 300.
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of international scope and complexities of marketing; unique marketing aspects of global enterprise opportunities.
MKT 454-3 Marketing Theory (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Senior Marketing Major.
Provides the advanced marketing student with an indepth survey of the theoretical development of channel structure and design and the conceptual relations between micro-units within the channel.
MKT 455-3 Seminar in Marketing Management (3+0)
Prerequisites: MKT 300 plus two additional upper division marketing courses.
The development and application of marketing policies and strategies to marketing problems; areas of study include the analysis of problems relating to the consumer and the business environment.
MKT 456-3 Advanced Marketing Problems (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MKT 300, MKT 301, MKT 310, MKT 311.
An integrative case study approach to the study of marketing problems. Problem areas to be studied include marketing planning, strategy, organization and control.


Center for Community Services
Alan M. Dahms, Dean
Academic Programs:
Community Services Development


Center tor Community Services
Center for Community Services
The Center for Community Services offers a course of study in Community Services Development, the academic component of the University Year for ACTION Program. Selected CSD classes may also be used as electives within major areas of study or may be incorporated into contract major agreements.
Community Services Development
General Program Description
The Community Services Development curriculum, the academic component of the University Year for ACTION, is designed to provide professional education and experience for men and women who wish to prepare themselves for leadership and administrative positions with community service agencies.
The program integrates classroom theory and principles of community service administration with applied experience gained in on-the-job situations. Students enrolled full-time (12 to 16 semester hours) in CSD classes spend four to six hours each week in the classroom and a minimum of twenty hours each week in an administrative, agency-based position. Either a paid administrative staff position or an internship secured through the University Year for ACTION office may be used to satisfy the experiential requirement of the academic component.
The total CSD curriculum is structured to involve students academically and experientially over two consecutive semesters for a total of 30 semester hours credit and a corresponding minimum commitment of 600 agency work hours. Students and agency supervisors develop specific job responsibilities, goals, and objectives at the beginning of each semester. Job and academic requirements are structured to complement each other as closely as possible.
Baccalaureate Program
Community Services Development classes may be incorporated into a four-year baccalaureate program in three ways.
Selected CSD classes constitute an area of emphasis within the Urban Studies major and may be applied to completion of major requirements in accord with department policies. (See Urban Studies, p. 120)
CSD classes may be applied as electives for other MSC majors, and,
CSD classes may be incorporated in a Contract Major program.
Requirements
Prior to acceptance into the University Year for ACTION Program or into Community Services Development classes, applicants must have been formally accepted to the College; hold a staff position or be willing to secure an internship with a community service agency that allows the theories and principles developed in classes to be applied in work situations; and attend a special orientation session. (Places, dates, and times of sessions are available through the UYA Office.)
Certificate of Completion
A CSD Certificate of Completion is available for persons who are presently directors or administrators of community service agencies and who are not interested in pursuing an undergraduate degree. A minimum of twenty academic hours of Community Services Development classes must be taken in order to satisfy requirements for the CSD Certificate of Completion; the Certificate of Completion will be awarded to students by the University Year for ACTION program at the end of their program of study. The requirements for pursuing the Certificate of Completion are the same as those listed under the Baccalaureate Program.
CSD 200-1 Introduction to Community Services Development (1 +0)
Explains the basic concepts of Community Services Development and serves to acquaint the student with the philosophy of CSD courses and programs.
CSD 201-4 Principles of Community Services Development (2+8)
Provides the student with a general awareness of the principles, philosophies and problems associated with the development and maintenance of small, community-based, non-profit, service agencies.
CSD 300-4 Applied Development and Seminar (2+8)
Weekly sessions assist students in integrateing theory gained in the classroom with the experiential learning in the field. The sessions stress leadership competencies and self-evaluation skills along with the building of a peer learning and support system.
CSD 321-2 Conflict Resolution and Decision Making (1+4)
Focuses on the various stages involved in resolving problems from the conflict identification to the implementation of a solution. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of a systematic model for conflict resolution.
CSD 331-2 Development of Volunteer Programs (1 +4)
Analyzes approaches, problems and benefits of effective use of volunteers in community service programs and projects. Topics covered: Interviewing, recuitment, designing of volunteer jobs, motivation, program planning, evaluation methods, and communications.
CSD 341-2 Development and Use of Inexpensive Media (1 +4)
Examines the development and use of inexpensive media including brochures, posters, slide shows, handouts, news releases, and public service announcements.
CSD 351-2 Politics of Agency Survival (1 +4)
Examines the problems of community service programs in a political context. The political factors will be studied which affect the decision making process, the existence, and the operation of community service agencies.
CSD 401-4 Assessment and Evaluation of Community Service (2+8)
Students are required to develop an assessment or evaluation plan for a program, problem, or project in community service agency. The course is designed to help determine what is needed, how it is to be collected, and how to evaluate the findings.
CSD 402-4 Proposal Writing and Communication Skills for Community Services (2+8)
Examines the format, philosophy, and funding resources necessary for successful community service proposal writing including budgets and budget narratives.
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Center for Education
Charles V. Branch, Dean
Academic Departments:
Teacher Education
Physical Education, Recreation and Health Reading


Center for Education
Center for Education
The Center is composed of the Department of Teacher Education, the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, the Department of Reading, and a Child Development Center.
The Teacher Certification Program at Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
The Department of Teacher Education offers majors in Early Childhood and Elementary Education, as well as minors in Early Childhood and Special Education. Professional courses leading to certification in the areas of Early Childhood Education, Secondary Education, and Special Education are also offered. The major in Elementary Education includes the courses needed for certification.
The Center for Education, with the cooperation of the Modern Languages Department and the Chicano Studies Department, offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education.
The Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health offers a major in Physical Education with two emphasis areas and a major in Recreation with ten emphasis areas along with minors in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health and Safety.
An intramural program, administered by the PER Department, provides competitive and noncompetitive activities and a variety of free or reduced rate recreational opportunities.
Intercollegiate sports for both men and/or women are conducted through the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health. Varsity sports for men include soccer, swimming, tennis, baseball, and track. Womens varsity teams include field hockey, volleyball, basketball, skiing, softball, and tennis. Students interested in these intercollegiate teams should register for the specific varsity sport under the PER 100 designation.
The Department of Reading offers one of the few undergraduate Reading minors in the area with numerous courses in the teaching of developmental and remedial reading. The Department also offers reading improvement courses. The well-equipped Reading Laboratory offers an opportunity for individualized work in a variety of materials which include development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. It is open to all students whether or not they are enrolled in a reading course.
The Child Development Center is a preschool laboratory which serves as a training facility for students enrolled in early childhood and other educational programs. The Center provides a setting for college students to observe, and participate, in an on-going educational program for young children.
Teacher Education Programs
The purpose of the programs in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students under these programs must meet the general studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a Bachelor's Degree stipulated earlier in this Bulletin.
Colorado law affecting teacher certification may be changed in the period during which this bulletin is in effect. Students should contact the Teacher Education Department for modifications.
The Department of Teacher Education accepts no course work older than 7 years as substitutes for required courses in the certification sequence and in certain instances may not accept more recent coursework if there have been significant changes in content in more recent years.
The following requirements must be met for formal admission to the teacher education programs:
1. Before being admitted to any 300-level course in education, certification students must present evidence that they
a. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all college work attempted,
b. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all in education courses attempted to date (which may only be one introductory course).
Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees.
2. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours of college work.
3. Completion of a Declaration of Intention form, to be filed
in the Teacher Education Department office. Normally, students would complete this form while enrolled in their first course in education.
4. For students seeking credit for courses taken at this or at another institution that might be equivalent to the required courses described in this section, completion of a formal evaluation for advanced standing in consultation with their advisor, with the results of this evaluation to be filed in the Teacher Education Department office.
5. Completion of 200 clock hours of volunteer service by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth groups, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts,
Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church groups, as well as other boys' and girls clubs, camps, recreational programs, etc.
The following requirements must be met for admission to
Student Teaching:
1. Completion of a minimum of 90 semester hours of college work; students transferring from other institutions, where more than 70 semester hours are being transferred into Metropolitan State College, or those who already hold degrees must complete a minimum of 20 semester hours and two semesters before they can be admitted to student teaching.
2. Students must present evidence that they
a. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all college work attempted,
b. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in all education courses attempted to date.
(Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees. Under-graduate and post-graduate transfer
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Center for Education
students should check with their Teacher Education Department advisor concerning special GPA requirements.)
3. Completion of all professional courses required for certification.
4. Completion of all subject area courses in the student's teaching area(s) required by North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
5. Completion of all items in the personal student teaching folder, to be obtained in the Department of Teacher Education.
6. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and/or evaluations from pre-student teaching field experiences.
7. A physical examination report including negative chest X-ray, on file with the Student Health Services.
8. Approval by the appropriate screening committee when applicable.
9. Completion of formal application for student teaching, to be submitted to the Department of Teacher Education not later than the following dates:
For Fall Semester
student teaching .............February 28
For Spring Semester
student teaching .............September 30
Students who have completed student teaching requirements at another institution may request to take student teaching for six semester hours.
Early Childhood Education
The Department of Teacher Education offers the following programs in Early Childhood Education:
1. A major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
2. A certification program meeting requirements for certification to teach early childhood in the public schools of Colorado (preschool through the primary grades).
3. A minor in Early Childhood Education.
4. All the courses necessary to meet the education requirements set by the State Department of Social Services for the licensing of day care directors.
Early Childhood Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement...... 1
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education.................... 3
EDU 132 Lab in Early Childhood Education............. 2
EDU 231 Child Development ........................... 3
EDU 232 Lab in Child Development..................... 3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity................... 3
EDU 265 Human Relations ............................. 3
EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in the
Early Childhood Classroom ................... 4
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development........ 4
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational
Process ..................................... 4
EDU 436 Cultural Influences on the Socialization
of Children.................................. 4
EDU 437 History and Theory Seminar in Early
Childhood Education ......................... 2
Choose one from the following:
PER 258 Movement Education........................... 3
ART 310 Art Instructional Methods for Elementary
School....................................... 3
MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood............ 2
EDU 434 Math & Science in the Early
Childhood Curriculum ....................... _2
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A student majoring in Early Childhood Education must complete the requirements for a minor or an approved specialty area which is the equivalent of a minor. Recommended minors include Reading, Billingual-Bicultural, Speech Pathology, Special Education, Psychology, and Sociology; other minors must be approved by the Department. The specialty areas which are as equivalents of a minor are Language Arts, Science and Math, Urban Studies Education, and Music and Movement.
Requirements for Public School Teacher Certification
In addition to completing a major in Early Childhood Education, students wishing certification must satisfy the following requirements:
Semester
Required in Education Hours
EDU 260 Handwriting for the Teacher.................. 1
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban Schools.......... 3
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban Schools
Laboratory................................... 2
EDU 316 Learning and Teaching........................ 2
EDU 317 Laboratory in Learning and Teaching.......... 2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Regular
Classroom.................................... 3
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood
Classroom.................................... 4
EDU 439 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Early Childhood ............................ 12
Required in Reading
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary ..................................... 3
A list of courses recommended for the completion of basic studies requirements is available from the Department.
Requirements for State Licensing of Child Care Directors
The education requirement for the State license is a minimum of 24 hours of college credit. A detailed list of the specific requirements may be obtained from the Department of Teacher Education. Majors in Early Childhood Education will fulfill these requirements by
including among their electives:
HES 204 Nutrition ....................................... 3
HES 220 Administration in Care Providing
Organizations ................................ 4
Minor in Early Childhood Education (Also fulfills requirements for State licensing of child care directors)
Required Courses
EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement....... 1
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education..................... 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education ______ 2
EDU 231 Child Development ............................ 3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development............... 3
Choose two additional hours in Early Childhood
curriculum courses in consultation with and
approved by an advisor in Early Childhood Education .. 2
HES 204 Nutrition .................................... 3
HES 220 Administration in Care Providing
Organizations ............................... 4
Choose three or four hours from each of the following groups of courses (A & B) for a minimum of six hours:
A. Psychological Foundations:
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development............... 3
PSY211 Educational Psychology........................ 3
PSY 325 Child Psychology.............................. 3
B. Sociological Foundations
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Center for Education
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on the Socialization
of Children................................... 4
SOC 315 Socialization of the Child....................... 3
26
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials
for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom...... 4
PER 465 Recreation Programs and Management
Problems in Urban Ghetto.................... 4
SOC 201 Social Problems ............................... 3
Speciality Areas Early Childhood Education
Language Arts Speciality
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary ...................................... 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate.................................. 3
ENG 346 Childrens Literature......................... 3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools............... 3
Electives .................................... 6
18
Electives
Six hours to be selected from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE.
EDU 410 Methods of Teaching Language Arts and
Social Studies in the Elementary School 2
EDU 411 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the
Elementary School........................... 2
RDG 360 Practicum in Reading....................... 3
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials........... 2
ENG 202 English Grammar............................ 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication_____ 3
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation............. 2
Science and Mathematics Specialty
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics...................... 3
MTH 261 Mathematics for the Elementary School
Teacher................................... 4
EDU 434 Mathematics and Science in the Early
Childhood Curriculum ....................... 2
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non Majors................ 3
Electives .................................. 6
18
Electives
Six hours (with at least one course in physical science) from the following list or in consultation with the faculty
in ECE.
GEL 101 General Geology............................. 4
GEG 123 Weather and Climate........................ 3
GEG 124 Landforms.................................. 3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy................... 3
EDU 412 Methods of Teaching Mathematics and
Science in the Elementary School ......... 2
EDU 413 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math
and Science in the Elementary School...... 2
Urban Studies Specialty
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies....... 3
AAS 315 Education of the Black Child................... 3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexico and U.S. Periods..................... 3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children.................. 3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education...................................... 4
Electives ..................................... 3
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Electives
Three hours chosen from the following list or in
consultation with Early Childhood faculty.
AAS 330 The Black Community........................ 3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the
Mexican and Chicano...................... 2
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature............... 3
Music and Movement Education Specialty
MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music Theory................ 3
MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood........... 2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation............. 2
PER 258 Movement Education.......................... 3
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning................... 3
Electives .................................. 5
18
Electives
Five hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with Early Childhood faculty.
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity.................... 3
MUS 161 Folk Guitar I................................. 1
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement...................... 1
PER 150 Modern Dance I ............................... 1
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child ............... 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child................... 2
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children ................................. 3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education .................. 3
Elementary Level
Certification and/or a Bachelor of Arts Degree at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program. Additional work must be taken in a discipline (Reading suggested) which will give the student the number of hours equivalent to those required for a minor. Substitutions for any of these requirements must be approved by the chairman of the Department of Teacher Education.
Special certification in Music and Physical Education is available.
All candidates for the certificate to teach in the elementary schools will declare their intentions at the earliest possible date.
They will make arrangements in EDU 110, Elementary Child I, to satisfy the following requirements:
1. Two hundred clock hours of volunteer service by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church group, etc.
2. Evidence of proficiency in reading, handwriting, spelling, and new math concepts.
Elementary Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses (in recommended sequence)
EDU 110 The Elementary Child 1...................... 3
EDU 231 Child Development .......................... 3
EDU 210 The Elementary Child II..................... 1
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary Child II........... 2
EDU 260 Handwriting for the Teacher................. 1
EDU 265 Human Relations ............................ 3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education............... 2
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban Schools......... 3
EDU 315 Laboratory in Children and Youth in
Urban Schools............................... 2
EDU 316 Learning and Teaching....................... 2
EDU 317 Laboratory in Learning and Teaching......... 2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ..... 3
ART 310 Art Instructional Methods for Elementary
Schools................................... 3
MUS 431 Music Methods for Elementary ...............
School Classroom Teachers................. 2
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Center for Education
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child .............. 3
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary ..................................... 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate................................. 3
EDU 410 Methods of Teaching Language Arts and
Social Studies in the Elementary School... 2
EDU 411 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary
School....................................... 2
EDU 412 Methods of Teaching Math and Science
in the Elementary School..................... 2
EDU 413 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math
and Science in the Elementary School...... 2
EDU 419 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6)..........................6 or
12
EDU 469 Post Student Teaching........................ 6
61 or 67
(Students lacking proficiency in any area may be required to take additional course work to remedy the lack of proficiency.)
When planning to teach in grades K-3, the following courses are strongly recommended:
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education................... 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education ____ 2
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development 3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development....... 4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom......................... 4
Courses Strongly Recommended in the Academic Areas':
Humanities
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .. 3
ENG 346 Childrens Literature....................... 3
Career
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts.................. 2
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child................. 2
PER 258 Movement Education.......................... 3
PER 441 Environmental Education..................... 2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning................... 3
Social Science/Behavioral Science
HIS 100 American Civilization I..................... 3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology..................... 3
PSY211 Educational Psychology...................... 3
Mathematics/Science
MTH 261 Mathematics for the Elementary School
Teacher** ................................. 4
A minimum of one course from each of the following sciences is highly recommended:
Biological Science
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non Majors.................. 3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy .................... 3
GEG 100 World Regional Geography...................... 5
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography............... 3
GEL 101 General Geology................................ 4
Physical Science
PHY 108 Physical Science for Teachers.................. 3
Courses may count toward basic studies, but not more than six semester hours in any one department will qualify to meet those requirements.
"This course required.
Secondary Level
Students may be certified at the secondary level, being endorsed to teach in the following areas: Art, Business
Education and Communication, English, Industrial Education, Mathematics, Modern Languages, Music, Physical Education, Science*, Social Studies**, Spanish and Speech. Students should ask for advisors in the Department of Teacher Education as well as in the departments of their major and minor fields of study.
The student is cautioned to check with his advisor for changes mandated by new Colorado Law.
In addition to a major in the above areas, students must complete the following professional course program:
Semester
Required Courses Hour*
Social and Cultural Bases of Secondary Schools
A block of two courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools.................................... 3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary
Schools ......................................2
Psychological and Physiological Bases of Secondary Education
A block of three courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner.................. 3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas:
Secondary.................................... 2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ...... 3
In lieu of EDU 360, Physical Education Majors take
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education ................. 3
Processes of Teaching in the Secondary Schools
A block of three courses to be taken concurrently and not
earlier than two semesters before student teaching.
EDU 321 Materials and Techniques of Instruction
for Secondary School Teachers ............ 3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials
Construction ............................. 2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education............... 2
Teaching Practice
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary.................................6 or
12
In addition to the field experiences included in the required courses, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of volunteer work with adolescents in the age bracket they intend to teach. This may be accomplished through work with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church groups, volunteer tutor programs, or similar activities.
Students should plan their volunteer work in consultation with their advisor, who will need to sign a form indicating his/her approval.
Students who seek Secondary Certification must pass a Public Speaking course with a grade of C" or better, or obtain a waiver. Students must also achieve a satisfactory score on an evaluation of written communication or attain a grade of "C or better in ENG 251, COM 271, or BEC 200, or obtain a waiver.
Before enrolling for student teaching, students are directed to take a course in methods of teaching their major and minor field of study offered in the respective departments. Student teaching normally is for twelve semester hours and involves ten weeks or full-time work. The remaining five-week block is planned individually for each student through consultation with his advisor and may include an additional six semester-hour block of student teaching in a different school setting, or for additional certification purposes.
"See Science Certification Program requirements listed on the next page.
*See Social Studies Certification Program requirements listed on the next page.
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Center for Education
Science Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of science, a concentration in a second area, and a sampling from additional areas of science and mathematics. The program satisfies both major and minor requirements, so no further minor is required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College in one of the following areas:
Biology
Chemistry
Earth-Space Science Physics
Please consult with the department involved or with the Teacher Education Department for a list of approved and/or required courses.
Science Support Area
Students must complete one of the following teaching support areas in an area other than that of the major.
Biology
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.............. 4
BIO 210 General Botany............................... 5
BIO 220 General Zoology.............................. 5
BIO 355 Urban Ecology ............................... 4
or
BIO 364 General Genetics............................. 3
Chemistry
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ........................ 5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II......................... 3
CHE 125 General Chemistry Lab........................ 2
CHE 220 Quantitative Analysis....................... 3
CHE 221 Quantitative Analysis Lab.................... 2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ........................ 4
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab ....................... 2
Earth Science
GEL 101 General Geology.............................. 4
GEL 103 Historical Geology........................... 4
GEG 100 World Regional Geography.................... 5
GEG 123 Weather and Climate......................... 3
GEG 124 Landforms................................... 3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy.................... 3
Physics
PHY 131 General Physics I.......................... 4
PHY 132 General Physics II ........................ 4
PHY 171 General Physics Lab I........................ 1
PHY 172 General Physics Lab II....................... 1
Plus 8 additional hours in Physics General Requirements
These may be fulfilled in the academic major or teaching support area.
Choose at least one course from each of the following areas:
Biology
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology.............. 4
Chemistry
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry.................... 5
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ......................... 5
Earth Science
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy.................... 3
or
GEG 100 World Regional Geography..................... 5
or
GEL 101 General Geology.............................. 4
Physics
PHY 121 College Physics ................................ 5
or
PHY 131 General Physics I............................... 4
Mathematics
MTH 111 College Algebra ................................ 4
or
MTH 112 College Trigonometry............................ 3
or
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics...................... 4
or
MTH 140 Pre-calculus Mathematics........................ 4
or
MTH 141 Calculus ....................................... 4
or
MTH 151 Computing I..................................... 4
or
MTH 320 Biostatistics................................... 3
or
MTH 360 History of Mathematics....................... 3
Science
(This course is required)
SCI 395 Methods of Teaching Science.................. 3
Notes
Physics majors should choose AST 104 and MTH 151 so as to meet certification requirements.
Students who elect the Earth Science or Physics teaching support areas must choose at least one upper division course in addition to SCI 395.
Permission is being sought for mathematics to be included as a support area. Check with the Teacher Education Department.
Social Studies Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of Social Science, a concentration in a second area, and a sampling from every social/behavioral science.
The program meets both major and minor requirements, so an additional minor is not required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College in one of the following areas:
Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Behavioral Science
Bilingual Chicano Studies
Economics
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Please consult with the department involved or with the Teacher Education Department for list of approved and/or required courses.
Social Studies Support Area
Students must complete one of the following teaching support areas. History must be selected unless the academic major is History.
History (18 semester hours)
HIS 101 Western Civilization I .......................
HIS 102 Western Civilization II.......................
HIS 121 American History I............................
HIS 122 American History II...........................
Six (6) additional upper division History hours selected in consultation with the department. HIS 400-1 Research Techniques must be taken. Reading courses will not apply.
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Afro-American Studies (12 semester hours)
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studios....... 3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle................ 3
Six (6) additional hours in Afro-American Studies; three (3) must be upper division. Afro-American History suggested. Students are reminded to take Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies courses as listed under general requirements.
Anthropology (12 semester hours)
ANT 101 Introduction to Physical Anthropology..... 3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..... 3
ANT 161 Introduction to Archeology.................. 3
Three (3) additional upper division hours in Anthropology.
Chicano Studies (12 semester hours)
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies............. 3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America..................... 3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest... 3
Three (3) additional upper division hours in Chicano Studies.
Economics (18 semester hours)
ECO 201 Principles of EconomicsMacro............... 3
ECO 202 Principles of EconomicsMicro............... 3
Twelve (12) additional upper division hours in Economics.
Geography (12 semester hours)
GEG 123 Weather and Climate.......................... 3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography.............. 3
GEG 140 World Resources ............................. 3
GEG 422 Climate and Land Use ........................ 3
Political Science (12 semester hours)
PSC 111 American National Government................ 4
PSC 201 Survey of Political Science................. 4
PSC 221 American State and Local Government....... 4
PSC 361 Political Theory............................ 3
Psychology (12 semester hours)
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology..................... 3
PSY 320 Educational Psychology...................... 3
Six (6) additional hours of electives. Suggested:
PSY 216, 221, 241, 295.
Sociology (12 semester hours)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology................... 3
SOC 307 Sociological Research Methods............... 3
Six (6) additional hours of electives, three (3) of which must be upper division.
General Requirements.
(Some may be satisfied in academic major or support area.)
EDU 421 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Interdisciplinary Social Studies HIS 401 Methods of Teaching History
Select one course from each of the following areas:
*Afro-American Studies Anthropology Chicano Studies Economics Geography Political Science Psychology Sociology
Afro-American History or other course dealing with Afro-American experience in the United States.
*GEG 100-5 World Regional or GEG 140-3 World Resources suggested. To be taken as part of General Studies.
Special Education Minor
The minor in Special Education is designed to prepare teachers, physical educators, recreation therapists, counselors, and professionals in human services to work effectively with exceptional children in any educational setting. The courses listed below provide classes totaling nineteen (19) semester hours for completion of the minor. Students who wish to gain endorsement for teaching the educable mentally handicapped (EMH) child must complete the minor and student teaching. The courses listed below are requirements for certification for students in the areas of Early Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Education:
Recommended Sequence of Courses
Semester
Required for MinorCore Courses Hours
EDU 340 Education & Training of the Mentally
Retarded Child ............................. 4
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of
Exceptional Children........................ 3
*EDU 342 Curriculum Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded at the
Early Childhood and Elementary Level...... 3
or
*EDU 348 Curriculum Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded
Adolescent and Adult............
EDU 343 Field Testing Remedial Techniques
EDU 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children.. PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education ..................
19
(Recreation Therapy majors should select another course with the approval of the Special Education advisor.)
Required for Certification Educable Mentally Handicapped (EMH)
EDU 449 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Special Education .......................... 6
Additional Requirements for Secondary Majors:
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary ................................... 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate............................... 3
Highly Recommended for all Special Education Minors:
EDU 347 Methods of Materials for Teaching the
Trainable Mentally Retarded Child.......... 3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the School................ 3
EDU 342 to be taken by Early Childhood and Elementary Majors, and EDU 348 to be taken by Secondary Education Majors.
Bilingual-Bicultural Education Minor
The Center for Education offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education. The minor is an interdisciplinary program sponsored by the Chicano Studies Department, the Education Department, the Department of Modern Languages, and the Reading Department. The principal objective of the Bilingual-Bicultural minor is to prepare future teachers who will be able to conduct all phases of classroom instruction in a bilingual and bicultural setting. In the developmental sequence, the minor will provide the potential teacher with a background of the Mexican heritage and with an understanding of present day Hispano/Chicano culture. Proficiency in the Spanish language is required of all students before they complete the minor. This proficiency
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will prepare the teacher to understand and further develop the native tongue of bilingual-bicultural children, while offering a second language to many other children. In addition, the minor will provide the teacher with sufficient field and academic experiences and resources in order to develop, implement, and evaluate curricular methods, techniques, and materials in the bilingual-bicultural classroom. For students who do not student teach in a bilingual-bicultural program, the Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education will be required.
Bilingual-Bicultural Education Minor-
Required Courses and Recommended Sequence:
Semester
Hours
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the American
Southwest: Mexican and U.S. Periods............ 3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education...................................... 4
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers.. 2
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual
Classroom...................................... 2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom 3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials
for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom......... 4
"CHS Electives .................................. 3
*SPA Electives .................................. 3
Total.................................................... 24
Must be advanced courses and taken with the approval of the bilingual advisor.
Courses Strongly Recommended in Chicano Studies and Spanish
CHS 310 Chicano Community Organization................. 2
CHS 330 Education of the Chicano Child ................ 3
CHS 410 Seminar: Mexican and Chicano Art............... 3
SPA 322 Culture and Folklore of the Mexican
Southwest..................................... 3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation.......................... 3
SPA 312 Spanish Phonetics and Diction ................. 3
Required when student teaching in a bilingual-bicultural program is not completed:
EDU 452 Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education .. 3
Preparation Requirements:
Language Proficiency: Proficiency in oral and written Spanish will be determined by a committee composed of Spanish-speaking members of the Modern Language Department, Chicano Studies Department, and the Center for Education. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory score on the proficiency examination will be required to take sufficient Spanish classes to enable them to pass the proficiency examination. The following courses are designed to help students meet the proficiency requirements before the completion of the Bilingual-Bicultural minor:
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I ........................ 5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II........................ 5
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I.......... 3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II......... 3
EDU 100-1 Entry Level Assessment and Placement (1 +0)
Purpose of this course is to assess and advise students according to their prior learning and needs. Content includes assessment of basic skills, cognitive level functioning, interests, prior learning and present competence in relation to MSCs expectations; individual and group advisement. Required entry level course for students seeking early childhood certification, major, or minor.
EDU 110-3 The Elementary Child I (3 + 0)
An introductory course in early childhood and elementary education, designed to acquaint future teachers, parents, and community members with the cognitive, affective, social, and cultural development of the child.
EDU 131-3 Early Childhood Education (3+0)
An introduction to the social context of early childhood education, types of early childhood settings, and professional opportunities. Emphasis is on the understandings and competencies essential as a basis for future academic work and field experience.
EDU 132-2 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education (1 +4)
Guided observation and participation in a variety of early childhood settings: public school, Head Start, and day care. Emphasizes relationship of theory to practice in beginning development of teacher competency. Take concurrently with EDU 131.
EDU 133-2 CDA Competency A: Safe, Healthy Learning Environment (2 +0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
Course is designed to provide learner with knowledge, skills and field support to enable him to demonstrate competency in setting up and maintaining a safe, healthy learning environment for young children. Major portion of learners time will be spent in early childhood classroom.
EDU 134-4 CDA Competency B: Advancement of Physical and Intellectual Abilities (4+0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
Course is designed to provide learner with knowledge, skills and field support to enable him to demonstrate competency in advancing the physical and intellectual abilities of young children. Major portion of learners time will be spent in an early childhood classroom.
EDU 135-3 CDA Competency C: Positive Sell Concept and Individual Strength (4+0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
Course is designed to provide the learner with knowledge, skills and field support to enable him to demonstrate competency in building positive self concepts and individual strength in young children. Major portion of learners time will be spent in an early childhood classroom.
EDU 136-3 CDA Competency D: Positive Functioning of Children and Adults in a Group Environment (4+0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
Course provides learner with knowledge, skills and field support to enable him to demonstrate competency in maintaining the positive functioning of children and adults in a group environment. Major portion of learners time will be spent in an early childhood classroom.
EDU 137-3 CDA Competency E: Coordination of Home and Center Child-Rearing Practices and Expectations (0 + 6)
Prerequiste: Must have permission of instructor.
This course is designed to provide learner with the knowledge, skiils, and field support to enable him to demonstrate competency in coordinating Home and Center Child-rearing practices and expectations. Major portion of learners time will be spent in an early childhood classroom.
EDU 138-3 CDA Competency F: Supplementary
Responsibilities Related to Childrens Program (3+0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
This course is designed to provide knowledge, skills and field support to enable learners to demonstrate competency in the supplementary responsibilities related to childrens programs. Major portion of learners time will be spent in an early childhood classroom.
EDU 139-3 Bilingual Bicultural CDA: Variable Topics (3+0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
Overview of specific issues and topics related to the early childhood educators work with young children and their families in a bilingual community. Course content will vary and the course may be repeated for credit for different topics.
EDU 210-1 The Elementary Child II (1 +0)
Prerequisite: EDU JTO; Corequisile: EDU 211.
All classes will be held at public school where the student will be exposd to the classroom environment. Curriculum
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and instructional patterns, individual learning styles, and practical application of learning theories will be covered.
EDU 211-2 Laboratory in Elementary Child il (0+4)
Prerequisite: EDU 110; Corequisite: EDU 210.
Guided observation and participation in a preselected elementary school setting. Designed to provide students with experiences relating to theories presented in EDU 210.
EDU 221-3 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary Schools (3+0)
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDU 222.
An analytical assessment of teaching-learning processes with special emphasis on urban secondary schools and on the roles teachers must play in such schools to meet the needs of adolescents from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Includes a series of self-evaluative experiences.
EDU 222-2 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools (1 +4)
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDU 221.
Gives the prospective teacher an opportunity to translate theoretical information from course work to practical settings in urban secondary schools and to gain better understanding of the social and cultural issues in such schools. A weekly seminar promotes discussion of experiences.
EDU 231-3 Child Development (3+0)
Designed to give students an understanding of the patterns of development of normal children. Students will study current research and developmental theories as they apply to educating young children.
EDU 232-3 Laboratory in Child Development (1 +5)
Students apply techniques of child study to a variety of real life settings, integrating theoretical constructs with practical considerations. Parent-child, child-child, child-group, and child-material interactions are studied. Take concurrently with EDU 231.
EDU 233-3 Facilitation of Creativity (3+0)
Facilitating children's creative expression and problem solving in music, art, drama, literature, and other forms are considered. Emphasis is on ways to create and maintain a classroom atmosphere and environment that allows creative expression.
EDU 239-2 CDA Assessment (2 +0)
Prerequisite: Must have permission of instructor.
Final course in CDA sequence. Preparation for assessment in all 8 competency areas. Learner will complete a portfolio documenting his competence in all CDA competency areas. Major portion of the learners time will be spent in an early childhood classroom.
EDU 260-1 Handwriting for the Teacher (1 +0)
Prerequisite: None.
A detailed consideration of content, methods, instructional materials, and evaluation in the area of handwriting. The student demonstrates competency in manuscript and cursive handwriting.
EDU 265-3 Human Relations (3+0)
The purpose of this course is to help future teachers gain a systematic understanding of him or herself as a person. Group dynamics will be stressed as we realize the need for teachers to be able to work in groups.
EDU 314-3 Children and Youth in Urban Schools (3 + 0)
Designed as an interdisciplinary course to acquaint the student with issues involved in education in a changing technological society. Class sessions include lectures, audiovisual material, and seminars. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 315.
EDU 315-2 Children and Youth in Urban Schools Labratory (0+4)
Must be taken concurrently with EDU 314. Gives the prospective teacher the opportunity to apply theoretical work to field experience involving social workers, school psychologists, counselors, or teachers in core city schools.
EDU 316-2 Learning and Teaching (2 +0)
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; Corequisite;
EDU 317.
A curriculum course dealing with major aspects of early childhood and elementary level teaching. The study of curriculum development through implementation of the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains is stressed.
EDU 317-2 Laboratory in Learning and Teaching (0+4)
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; Corequisite:
EDU 316.
Participation in an elementary school setting. The student will be assigned as an instructional aide for from four to six clock hours a week.
EDU 320-3 The Adolescent as a Learner (3 +0)
Prerequisites: EDU 221 or permission of the instructor; to be taken concurrently with EDU 360 or an equivalent course approved to satisfy the special education requirement.
A course in applied educational psychology with special emphasis on adolescents. Allows the beginning teacher at the secondary level to formulate a set of useful classroom practices based on sound psychological principles and consistent with current secondary school practices.
EDU 321-3 Materials and Techniques of Instruction for Secondary School Teachers (3+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 221; EDU 222; EDU 320; EDU 360
(or PER 462); concurrent enrollment in EDU 322 and EDU 361.
Provides opportunity for prospective teachers to convert theoretical instruction in teaching methods into practical applications in both real and simulated classroom environments. Requires the integration of skills and theories learned in prerequsite courses.
EDU 322-2 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials Construction (1 +4)
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with EDU 321 and EDU 361.
Field experiences in tutoring and materials construction to integrate the content, theory, and conceptual aspects of academic and professional teacher education with concrete experiences in secondary schools. A weekly seminar is held to discuss each students experiences.
EDU 335-4 Assessment and Measurement of Children in the Early Childhood Classroom (4+0)
Prerequisite: EDU 131, EDU 132, EDU 231 and EDU 232. Basic foundations for assessing and measuring student growth and learning in the early childhood classroom, with emphasis on techniques and procedures appropriate for use with pre-reading children. Informal and observational methods of assessment will be stressed, along with more traditional teacher-made and standardized tests. Offered Fall semester.
EDU 337-4 Language and Cognitive Development (4+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 131 and EDU 231.
Understanding of language, normal language and cognitive development in young children, and environmental influences, is considered. Special emphasis is given to methods and materials for facilitating that development in home and school. Offered Fall semester.
EDU 340-4 Education and Training of the Mentally Retarded Child (3+4)
Prerequisite: EDU 360.
To acquaint the student with the history, philosophy, care and education of the mentally retarded child.
EDU 341-3 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional Children (3+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 340, or permission of instructor.
Selection, use, and interpretation of formal and informal instruments for assessment of student abilities.
EDU 342-3 Curriculum Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341, or permission of the instructor.
An intensive study of the curriculum sequence and content
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for exceptional children based on instructional or performance objectives.
EDU 343-3 Field Testing Remedial Techniques in Special Education (2 +4)
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341, EDU 342, or permission of the instructor.
Provides a four-hour-per-week field experience in public or private schools and/or institutional settings. Students also meet for two hours per week at the college.
EDU 344-3 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children (3+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341, EDU 342, EDU 343, or permission of the instructor.
Techniques in counseling, group therapy, and transactional analysis will be taught as methods for promoting adjustment within the structure of the family with an exceptional child.
EDU 347-3 Methods and Materials for Teaching the Trainable Mentally Retarded Child (3+0)
A study of characteristics, classification, and development of the trainable mentally retarded child.
EDU 348-3 Curriculum Methods and Materials for Teaching the Mentally Retarded Adolescent and Adult (3+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 340, EDU 341 and EDU 343.
An intensive study of curriculum methods, materials and delivery systems on the pre-vocational and vocational level in special education.
EDU 351-4 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural Education (4+0)
An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with local, state, and national bilingual-bicultural education programs. Time will be spent in structured observation and interaction in a bilingual classroom.
EDU 360-3 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom (3+0)
Emphasis in the course will be the development of educational strategies for the child in the regular classroom based on interpretation of data from diagnostic instruments.
EDU 361-2 The Use of Media in Education (2+0)
A course designed to acquaint prospective teachers and other interested persons with the role of audiovisual media in education. Students become proficient in the operation of audiovisual equipment and in creating effective materials for classroom use. Secondary students should take this course concurrently with EDU 321 and EDU 322.
EDU 410-2 Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School (2+0)
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; Corequisite:
EDU 411.
Emphasis on current and experimental programs in the elementary school in Language Arts and Social Studies, K-6. The objectives of the course are to develop the concepts, methods, techniques, and materials pertinent to the teaching of language arts and social studies.
EDU 411-2 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School (0+4)
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; Corequisite:
EDU 410.
Eight hours of guided observation and participation in the elementary schools in the subjects of social studies and language arts is required.
EDU 412-2 Methods of Teaching Math and Science in the Elementary School (2+0)
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; Corequisite:
EDU 413.
Emphasis on current and experimental programs in the Elementary School in Mathematics and Science, K-6. The objectives of the course are to develop the concepts, methods, techniques, and materials pertinent to the teaching of mathematics and science.
EDU 413-2 Laboratory in Methods of Teaching Math and Science in Elementary School (0+4)
Prerequisite: Permission of major advisor; Corequisite:
EDU 412.
Guided observation and participation in the elementary schools in the subjects of mathematics and science. The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to convert methods and techniques discussed in EDU 412 into practical application in the actual classroom environment.
EDU 419-6 or 12 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (K-6) (1 +20 or 40)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Elementary
Teacher Education major and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
A supervised 10-week field experience in accredited public or private elementary schools providing increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of learners (Kgn to 6th Grade). A weekly seminar is a part of the field experience requirement.
EDU 421-3 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Interdisciplinary Social Studies (3+0)
Prerequisite: Completion of the Social Studies Certification Program.
This is a course designed to acquaint prospective teachers in social science at the secondary level with current philosophies, techniques, and materials for teaching social science with emphasis on an interdisciplinary frame of reference.
EDU 429-6 or 12 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary (6-12) (1 +20 or 40)
Prequisites: Successful completion of the Secondary
education requirements, teaching major, and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
A supervised 10-week field experience in accredited public or private secondary schools providing increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of learners (7th to 12th Grade). A weekly seminar is a part of the field experience requirement.
EDU 431-4 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process (4 +0)
Prerequisite: EDU 231.
Demonstrates the importance of parents in relation to the education of their children. The students study current issues and programs related to parent involvement.
Emphasis is placed on working with parents in schools, homes, day care centers and community agencies. The students have the opportunity to apply theory to practice by attending parent meetings and organizing workshops for parents.
EDU 434-2 Mathematics and Science in the Early Childhood Curriculum (2+0)
Prerequisite: EDU 231.
This course provides the future teacher of the young child with background and materials to design educational settings and experiences which facilitate the development of concepts of quality, space, the natural world, and the heuristics of thinking.
EDU 435-4 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood Classroom (4+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 337 and EDU 316.
Students learn how to organize, schedule, sequence, and integrate available resources to plan and implement an early childhood program responsive to childrens needs. Content areas include planning, classroom organization and management, and securing and implementing resources to achieve child and program outcomes. Offered Spring Semester.
EDU 436-4 Cultural Influence on the Socialization of Children (4+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 231 or permission of instructor.
Studies the socialization of children using a multidisciplinary approach; anthropology, psychology, sociology, biology and education. Emphasis is on the study of human
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attachment, modeling and social learning theory. From this base the student analyzes the effects that cultural and socialization patterns have on the family and individuals development.
EDU 437-2 History and Theory Seminar in Early Childhood Education (2 +0)
Prerequisites: EDU 131 and EDU 231.
Analysis of key theories, practices, trends and problems in the development of early education. Critical consideration is given to the contributions of Montessori, Dewey, Piaget and others. Current research and programs are examined and their historical roots identified. Students are encouraged to clarify their own philosophy of education.
EDU 438-2 History and Theory of Early Childhood Education Field Experience (0+4)
Topics and issues of current importance and controversy in education will be examined through observation of selected early childhood programs and structured analyses regarding these observations. May be taken concurrently with EDU 437.
EDU 439-6 or 12 Student Teaching and Seminar: Early Childhood (Preschool-2) (1 +20 or 40)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Early Childhood Education major and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
A supervised 10-week field experience in accredited public or private schools (preschool to 2nd Grade) providing increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of learners. A weekly seminar is part of the field experience requirement.
EDU 449-6 Student Teaching and Seminar: Special Education (EMH) (1 +40)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Special
Education minor, the certification program for regular classroom and approval of the Dean, Center for Education.
A supervised 5-week field experience in accredited public or private schools (EMH program) providing increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and direction of an identified group of learners. A weekly seminar is part of the field experience requirement.
EDU 451-4 Development of Methods and Materials for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom (4+0)
Prerequisites: EDU 351 and proficiency in Spanish.
Emphasis in planning curriculum for the linguistically and culturally diverse student with emphasis on alternatives in approach and methodology. Time will be spent in structured observation and interaction in a bilingual classroom.
EDU 452-3 Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education (1+6)
Prerequisites: EDU 451 and proficiency in Spanish.
The course will consider bilingual-bicultural techniques and developing and implementing them in a bilingual-bicultural classroom. Six hours per week in a bilingual school or community setting is required.
EDU 465-3 Current Issues in Education: Variable Topics (3+0)
Prerequisite: Advanced students in Education.
In-depth examination of selected current topics and issues in education. Topics will vary, but all will be of current importance, requiring study of recent writings, research, legislation, etc. May be repeated for credit under a different topic.
EDU 469-6 Post Student Teaching (1 +40)
Prerequisites: Completion of student teaching and
permission of college supervisor of student teaching.
A 5-week field experience designed cooperatively by the student and his college supervisor of student teaching. Required for Elementary majors and optional for other certification programs. Experiences may range from remedial work to internships in education related organizations.
Physical Education
The major in Physical Education is designed to provide certification, in either secondary, elementary or K-12 levels. For the student who does not seek teacher certification or who wishes to complete a major or minor in a more specialized area, a non-teaching major or minor in Physical Education or a contract major or minor is suggested. Details concerning contract programs may be obtained from the Center for Experimental Studies.
Possible areas in which a contract major or minor might be developed could include the following: Athletic training, sports specialization, adaptive physical education, athletic administration, research in exercise and movement, sports journalism, sports facility and equipment maintenance, media and public relations in sports, or any other related and approved areas. Majors in Physical Education may utilize the option of completing a minor in a contract area of specialization or selecting a minor from another discipline.
Students seeking teaching credentials in physical education must satisfy the Teacher Education Program at MSC in addition to all of the requirements of the Department of Physical Education. Requirements for formal admission to the education programs as listed on page 41 of this Bulletin must also be met. Colorado law affecting teacher certification may be changed in the period during which this Bulletin is in effect. Students should contact the Teacher Education Department for modifications.
Physical Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
A. Secondary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Secondary Physical Education majors must present proof of proficiency in fifteen different activities. A total of 23 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by (1) receiving a passing grade in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office. semester
Hour*
a. Basic Skills (All of the following)
Swimming.................................... 1
Fundamentals of Movement.................... 1
Physical Fitness............................ 2
Tumbling.................................... 1
b. Team Sports (3 of the following)
Volleyball.................................. 2
Flag Football............................... 2
Field Hockey................................ 2
Soccer...................................... 2
Softball.................................... 2
Basketball ................................. 2
c. Individual Sports (5 of the following)
Lifesaving ................................. 1
Gymnastics.................................. 2
Track and Field............................. 2
Tennis...................................... 2
Badminton and Archery....................... 2
Golf........................................ 2
Racketball, Handball ....................... 1
Personal Defense ........................... 2
d. Miscellaneous (3 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance....................... 2
Ballroom Dance.............................. 2
Wrestling................................... 2
Modern Dance (creative movement)......... 2
Weight Training............................. 2
Total Credits .......................................... 23
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2. Theory Courses (must take all of the following):
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education .......... 1
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology....................... 2
PER 332 Biomechanics ................................ 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise....................... 3
PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education .......................... 3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education.................................... 2
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education............ 3
Approved electives........................... 3
Total Credits ...................................... 20
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross.
Total Minimum Hours for Major.......................... 43
To obtain a certificate from the State of Colorado, all Secondary Physical Education Majors must also complete the courses required by the Department of Teacher Education for Secondary level certification as listed under Secondary Level" in the Education section of the catalog. The only exception to that listing is that Secondary Physical Education Majors must substitute PER 462, Adaptive Physical Education, for EDU 345.
B. Elementary Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
a. Basic Skills (All of the following)
Fundamentals of Movement.................... 1
Physical Fitness............................ 2
Tumbling................................... 1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following)
Volleyball.................................. 2
Basketball.................................. 2
Soccer...................................... 2
Football ................................... 2
Softball.................................... 2
Field Hockey................................ 2
c. Miscellaneous (2 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance..................... 2
Track and Field............................. 2
Wrestling................................... 2
Livesaving.................................. 1
Racketball, Handball ....................... 1
Total Credits .......................................... 15
2. Additional Elementary Activity Courses
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child ................ 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child.................... 2
PER 258 Movement Education............................. 3
Total Credits ........................................... 8
3. Theory Classes (must take all of the following)
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education ............ 1
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology......................... 2
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise......................... 3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children ................................. 3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education..................................... 2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning...................... 3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education............. 3
Approved electives........................... _3
Total Credits .......................................... 20
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206
or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resusci-
tation Cards from the American Red Cross.
Total minimum hours for major....................... 43
To obtain certification by the State of Colorado, all Elementary Physical Education teachers must also complete the following courses:
EDU 110 Elementary Child I........................... 3
EDU 210 Elementary Child II ......................... 1
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary Child II............ 2
EDU 314 Children and Youth in Urban Schools.......... 3
EDU 315 Children and Youth in Urban Schools
Laboratory................................... 2
EDU 361 Use of Media in Education ................... 2
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education ................. 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading
Intermediate................................ _3
Total Credits ........................................ 19
Highly recommended, but not required:
EDU 231 Child Development ........................... 3
EDU 265 Human Relations ............................. 3
C. K-12 Emphasis in Physical Education Major
1. Professional Activities (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Students desiring K-12 Certification must be proficient in 16 different activities, selected from the categories below. A maximum of 25 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by (1) receiving a passing grade in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
a. Basic Skills (must take all of the following)
Swimming.................................. 1
Fundamentals of Movement.................... 1
Physical Fitness............................ 2
Tumbling.................................... 1
b. Team Sports (must take 4 of the following)
Volleyball.................................. 2
Flag Football............................... 2
Field Hockey................................ 2
Soccer...................................... 2
Softball.................................... 2
Basketball ................................. 2
c. Individual Sports (must take 5 of the following)
Lifesaving ................................. 1
Gymnastics.................................. 2
Track and Field............................. 2
Tennis...................................... 2
Badminton and Archery....................... 2
Golf........................................ 2
Racketball, Handball ....................... 1
Personal Defense ........................... 2
d. Miscellaneous (must take 3 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance....................... 2
Ballroom Dance.............................. 2
Wrestling................................... 2
Modern Dance (creative movement)......... 2
Modern Dance (improvisation, technique,
composition)................................ 2
Weight Training............................. 2
2. Theory Classes
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education ........... 1
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child ............... 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child................... 2
PER 258 Movement Education............................ 3
PER 306 Care and Prevention of Sports Injuries..... 2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology........................ 2
PER 332 Biomechanics ................................. 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise........................ 3
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PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education ......................... 3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children .............................. 3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education................................... 2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning................... 3
PER 460 Organization and Curriculum Development in
Physical Education ......................... 3
PER 399 Field Experience............................ 2
35
Total Required for K-12.............................. 60
Field Experience (399) must be taken during senior year, in a secondary school at the level in which the student does not do student teaching.
Student teaching must be taken for 18 credits in a combination of elementary and secondary. In that this program enables a person to gain certification to teach physical education in both Secondary and Elementary School Programs, the minor requirements are considered fulfilled.
3. The following Teacher Education Classes are required for K-12 Certification
EDU 110 Elementary Child I............................
EDU 210 Elementary Child II ..........................
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary Child................
EDU 231 Child Development ............................
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools....................................
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary Schools
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...................
PER 462 Adaptive P.E. (In lieu of EDU 345) ...........
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading
Intermediate...............................
or
3
1
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading Content Areas:
Secondary............................... 2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication____ _3
25-26
D. Non-Teaching Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or Methods
of Teaching) (Select any 12)................ 12
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education .......... 1
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card).................................. 2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.......................... 2
PER 332 Biomechanics ................................... 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise.......................... 3
PER 362 History of Physical Education .................. 2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society... 2
Approved electives:
Selected in accordance with student's intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an advisor in PER
Department............................................. 13
Total Minimum Hours for Major.......................... 40
Communications Multi Major lor Bachelor of Arts Sports Communications Concentration
See Communications Multi-Major, page 111 for requirements of this Interdisciplinary "umbrella program sponsored by the Department of Physical Education and Recreation.
A. Secondary Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.................. 1
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or Methods
for Teaching)........................... 8
PER 206 First Aid and C.P.R. (or valid American Red
Cross cards or card).......................... 2
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise........................ 3
PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary P.E............. 3
Approved electives (150 or above)............ _3
Total Credits .......................................... 20
B. Elementary Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities....................... 4
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)................................... 2
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child ............... 3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child................... 2
PER 258 Movement Education............................ 3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children ................................. 3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education............ _3
Total Credits .......................................... 20
C. Non-Teaching Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities....................... 6
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education ........... 1
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)................................... 2
PER 362 History of Physical Education ................ 2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society... 2
Approved electives: Selected in accordance with students intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an
advisor in PER Department............................... _7
Total Credits .......................................... 20
Coaching Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement...................... 1
PER 150 Weight Training .............................. 2
PER 150 Physical Fitness ............................. 2
PER 150 Select from: Volleyball, Soccer, Basketball,
Softball ..................................... 2
PER 150 Select from: Gymnastics, Track & Field, Tennis,
Golf, and Aquatics............................ 2
PER 306 Care and Prevention of Sports Injuries
(Prerequisite PER 206-2) ................... 2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology
(Prerequisite BIO 231)...................... 2
PER 334 Physiology Kinesiology
(Prerequisite BIO 232)..................... 3
*PER 370 Psychology of Coaching ....................... 2
*PER 372 Science and Art of Coaching and Athletic
Administration................................ 2
*PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society... _2
Total Credits .......................................... 20
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT:
3 semesters of involvement in athletic participation or involvement; little league through college.
SUBSTITUTIONS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS
Coaching minor courses that duplicate the physical education major are to have substitutions made. The
following courses would serve as substitutes:
PER 210 Officiating................................... 2-4
PER 316 Water Safety Instruction........................ 3
PER 371 Administration of Intramural Sports and
Student Recreation .......................... 2
EDU 265 Human Relations ................................ 2
EDU 320 Adolescent as a Learner (Elementary
Physical Education Majors only).............. 3
AAS 270 Black Identity.................................. 3
AAS 315 Education of the Black Child.................... 3
AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Prejudice.............. 3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children................... 3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing & Strategies .......... 3
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SPE 382 Fundamentals of Speech Communication______ 3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking.................... 3
All substitutions are subject to approval of minor advisor.
E. Dance Emphasis
PER 150 Ballet ..................................... 1
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.................... 1
PER 150 Modern Dance (Technique, Improvisation,
Composition)................................ 2
PER 252 'Rhythms for the Young Child or SPE
224 Introduction to Stagecraft............ 2-3
PER 322 Movement for Stage ......................... 3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology Prereq.: BIO 231)____ 2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning................... 3
'Non-physical education majors. Select 2 or 3 courses. Recommendation: PER 332-3 is suggested as additional course work for coaching preparation.
Select 2 of the following courses:
PER 150 Modern Dance (Creative Movement).............. 2
PER 150 Square and Folk Dance......................... 2
PER 150 Ballroom Dance ............................... 2
PER 150 Beginning Jazz................................ 1
Select 1-4 hours of electives as listed below"
PER 219 Music, Drama-Dance in Recreation.............. 2
PER 306 Care and Prevention of Sports Injuries...... 2
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child or SPE 224
Introduction to Stagecraft................. 2-3
PER 150 Therapeutic Dance............................. 1
PER 150 Afro/Afro-American Ethnic Dance............... 1
PER 150 Mexican/Mexican-American Ethnic Dance_______ 1
SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design and Theatre
Lighting................................... 3
MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music Theory................. 3
MUS 301 Class Instruction I.......................... 1
MUS 301 Music and the Arts (Greek to Baroque) ....... 3
MUS 302 Music and the Arts (Classical to
20th Century).............................. 3
MUS 303 American Music (17th Century to Present) ... 3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity.................. _3
Total Credits ........................................20-22
Those with teaching interest select PER 252: those with performing interest select SPE 224.
These courses also serve as substitutes for PE majors who have course duplication between major and minor.
H. Camping
I. Outdoor Recreation
J. Gerontology
To summarize, Recreation majors have the following
degree requirements or options:
Core Courses.....................................13 hours
Emphasis Area................................. 27 hours
40 hours
Recreation Internship (Recommended for State Registration)..............................10 hours
Each Recreation major will have the option to complete an existing catalog minor or to select a second area of emphasis from the list above for equivalent minor (22 hours minimum).
The selection of course work will be approved by the Chairman of the Department or his designee(s).
NOTE: Demonstrated proficiencies or credit by exam for course content are acceptable in meeting requirements in the Recreation major or minor. Contact the Director of Professional Preparation in Recreation for details.
For students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Recreation,
the following courses are highly recommended for basic studies:
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics..................... 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology................. 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology................ 3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I................ 3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication____ 3
Sciences (HumanAnimal Plant Earth) obtain advisor approval ......................... 6-8
Recreation Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for All Students
A. Core Courses (13 hours)
PER 211 Recreation Leadership and Leisure
Service Systems............................... 4
PER 215 Recreation Facility and Equipment
Maintenance................................... 2
PER 335 Recreation for Special Populations ........... 2
PER 411 Recreation Program Construction and
Control Processes............................. 3
PER 413 Administration and Organization
of Recreation................................. 2
Total Credits ....................................... 13
RECREATION
The major in Recreation is intended to prepare students to enter recreation-related jobs that are available at both local and national levels. The major consists of a common core of courses deemed essential for all recreation personnel and emphasizes field work with various types of recreation, parks, conservation, and other social service agencies.
In conjunction with the core course selections, the student will select one or more areas of emphases. The areas of emphasis provide the student with specialized knowledge and skills related to particular job functions provided by the various recreation related service agencies. The areas of emphases from which the student may select one or more are:
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services
B. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities
C. Arts and Crafts
D. Inner-City Program Specialist
E. Sports and Athletics
F. Performing and Cultural Arts Specialist
(Music Drama Dance)
G. Recreation and Park Administration
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
B. Emphasis Area (27 hours)
Students will be required to select one of ten areas of special emphasis courses designed to provide the student with high degree of specialization in a chosen area of interest. These emphasis areas consist of 27 hours of course work offered by the Department and other disciplines within the College.
C. Internship
PER 489 Recreation Internship..................... 10 hours
This practical learning experience is designed primarily to help students make the transition from the classroom to the practical situation. Opportunity is provided for students to assume normal responsibilities involved in the delivery of services commensurate with their degree emphasis(es). This experience is also recommended for State registration.
Emphasis Areas
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses..................
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Select six hours from the skills and/or methods classes listed below.
Fundamentals of Movement Physical Fitness
Activities for Physical Handicapped
Activities for Mental Handicapped
Sports Programs for physical and mental handicapped
Activities for aged and infirmed
Dance Activities for handicapped
Camping and outing programs for aged
Fitness programs for aged
Wheelchair Activities
Semester
Hours
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.................... 3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development............... 3
PER 231 Introduction to therapeutic Recreation
Services................................... 2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology........................ 2
PER 331 Activity AnalysisRemotivation and
Socialization Techniques..................... 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise........................ 3
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning..................... 3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education .................. 3
NOTE: Areas of study recommended for equivalency of minor for therapeutic emphasis are identified below: Minimum of 21-24 hours as required by department.
Mental Retardation
HSW 104 Behavior Modification....................... 4
HSW111 Introduction to Mental Retardation........... 4
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community............... 4
HSW 311 Human Services for Handicapped Persons ... 4
PSY 340 Psychology of Exceptional Children .......... 3
EDU 340 Education & Training of the Mentally
Retarded Child ............................. 4
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional
Children..................................... 3
Youth Corrections
LEN 102 Prevention & Control of Deliquency & Crime . 3
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and Treatment.... 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community...................... 4
LEN 320 Criminal Justice Organization and
Administration............................... 3
PSY 325 Child Psychology............................ 3
PSY 326 The Psychology of Adolescence............ 3
LEN 331 Classification and Treatment of the Offender. 3
LEN 332 Corrections in the Community............. 3
HSW 345 Crisis Intervention and Legal Issues .......... 4
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency..................... 3
LEN 441 Contemporary Problems in Criminal Justice.. 3
Psychiatric Services
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and
Experience................................... 4
HSW 204 Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy . 4
PSY 241 Social Psychology........................ 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community...................... 4
PSY 321 Abnormal Psychology I ....................... 3
PSY 326 The Psychology of Adolescence............ 3
PSY 327 Adulthood and Senescence .................... 3
PSY 342 Issues in Community-Social Psychology..... 3
PSY 400 Theories of Personality..................... 3
HSW 432 Psychopathology and Mental Health
Clinician ................................... 4
PSY 469 Survey of Psychotherapies................ 3
Drug and Alcohol
HSW 104 Behavior Modification.......................... 4
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and Treatment...... 3
BIO 190 Pharmacy of Drug & Alcohol..................... 3
SOC 201 Social Problems................................ 3
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and
Experience................................ 4
HSW 203 Introduction to Theory and Techniques in
Interviewing and Psychotherapy............ 4
HSW 204 Family Functions, Dysfunction, and Therapy . 4
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community....................... 4
HSW 345 Crisis Intervention & Legal Issues.............. 4
HSW 347 Counseling the Substance Abuser................. 4
SOC 467 Contemporary Sociological Trends
(Interviewing Techniques).................... 3
Special Education
EDU 110 The Elementary Child 1...................... 3
EDU 210 The Elementary Child II.................... 1
EDU 211 The Elementary Child II Laboratory.......... 2
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community.................... 4
HSW 311 Human Services for Handicapped Persons ... 4
EDU 340 Education & Training of the Mentally
Retarded Child .............................. 3
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional
Children.................................... 3
EDU 342 Curriculum Methods and Materials for
Teaching the Mentally Retarded............... 3
EDU 344 Counseling the Parents of Exceptional
Children...'................................. 3
EDU 347 Methods and Materials for Teaching the
Trainable Mentally Retarded Child............ 3
EDU 348 Curriculum Methods & Materials for
Teaching the Mentally Retarded
Adolescent & Adult........................... 3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ....... 3
Early Childhood Education
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education..................... 3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education _____ 2
EDU 231 Child Development ............................ 3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development.............. 3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity................... 3
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child ............... 3
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues: (Child Rearing) ......... 3
HSW 301 The Therapeutic Community.................... 4
EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in early
Childhood Class/room......................... 4
EDU 436 Cultural Influence on Socialization
of Children................................. 4
B. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses
Skills and/or Methods of Teaching....(11 hours)
Gymnastics.................................... 2
Swimming..................................... 1
Diving........................................ 1
Advanced Lifesaving........................... 1
Canoeing.................. Select
Sailing................... 2 out.......... 2
Power Boating............. of 3
Water Polo................
Synchronized Select
Swimming................ 3 out.
Competitive of 4
Swimming................
Scuba Diving..............
PER 210 Techniques of Officiating Aquatic Activities .. 2
PER 316 Water Safety Instructor Certification.......... 3
PER 330 Anatomical
Kinesiology................ Select
PER 332 Biomechanics............... 2 out.......... 5-6
PER 334 Physiology of of 3
Exercise................
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating Operations .. 2
PER 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim ......... 2
PER 455 Swimming Pool Operation and Management . 4


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C. Arts and Crafts (select 27 hours)
IED 101 Introduction to Wood.......................... 4
ART 110 Basic Drawing Methods......................... 3
IED 111 Introduction to Plastics ..................... 4
ART 120 Basic Design and Crafts Methods............... 3
IED 121 General Metals ............................... 4
IED 131 Introduction to Craft Materials and Processes 4
IED 342 General Graphic Arts ......................... 4
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts.................... 2
IED 231 Art Metal, Silversmith, Lapidary.............. 2
IED 241 Introduction to Photography................... 3
IED 381 Industrial Arts for Elementary School......... 2
D. Inner City Program Specialist (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activities Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching .......................... 4
SOC 213 Urban Sociology............................... 3
PSC 220 American State and Local Government........ 4
GEG 261 Urban Geography............................... 3
HSW 345 Crisis Intervention and Legal Issues ......... 4
SOC 415 Sociology of Urban Poor....................... 3
PER 463 Recreation Program for Aged................... 2
PER 465 Recreation Programs and Management
Problems in Urban Ghetto...................... 4
SOC 467 Contemporary Sociological Trends.............. 3
E. Sports and Athletics (Select 27 hours)
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement (Required) .......... 1
PER 150 Physical Fitness (Required) .................. 2
Additional (13) hours of 150 courses.
Student to select any thirteen (13) hours:
PER 210 Officiating................................... 2
PER 250 Activities for Young Child.................... 3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology........................ 2
PER 332 Biomechanics ................................. 3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise........................ 3
PER 371 Administration of Intramural Sports and
Student Recreation ........................... 2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society... 2
F. Performing and Cultural Arts (select 27 hours)
Students are to select one of the following areas: (1) Music, (2) Drama, or (3) Dance for their major emphasis area. It is also recommended that a second area be taken to represent the equivalency of a minor, (minimum of 22 hours).
Music (select 27 hours)
MUS 100 Introduction to Music........................ 3
MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music Theory.................. 3
MUS 161 Class Instruc- i
tion I....................I Select 8 Hrs. 8
MUS 162 Class Instruc- |
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation............... 2
MUS 281 Large Ensemble.............1 Select 1 . 1 or 2
MUS 282 Small Ensemble ...........J
MUS 431 Music Methods for Elementary
School/Classroom Teacher................... 2
MUS 381 Large Ensemble.............1 Select 1 . 1 or 2
MUS 382 Small Ensemble ...........|
MUS 421 Choral Literature ............................ 2
Drama (select 27 hours)
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation............... 2
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre ...................... 3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I........................ 3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft.................... 3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity................... 2
SPE 322 Movement.for Stage ........................... 2
SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design and
Theatre Lighting.............................. 3
SPE 328 Stage Directing............................... 3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I ......................... 1
SPE 427 Theatre: Practicum II......................... 2
Dance (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity: Skills and/or methods of teaching
Square & Folk Dance.....................
Ballroom Dance .........................
Modern Dance (Technique,
improvisation, composition).............
Modern Dance (Creative Movement)........
Tap Dance ..............................
Ballet .................................
Afro/Afro-American Ethnic Dance.........
Mexican/Mexican-American Ethnic Dance..
Dance Activities for Handicapped........
Beginning Jazz..........................
Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation.........
Rhythms for the Young Child.............
Movement for Stage .....................
Anatomical Kinesiology..................
Facilitation of Creativity..............
Physiology of Exercise .................
PER 219 PER 252 SPE 322 PER 330 EDU 233 PER 334
GEG 360 MGT 300 PER 465
MGT 353 PER 353 PER 383 PER 455 MGT 461 PER 481 PER 483
Urban Geography........................
Principles of Management...............
Recreation Programs and Management
Problems in Urban Ghetto...............
Personnel Management...................
Waterfront, Marina and Boating Operations .
Urban Park and Recreation Planning.....
Swimming Pool Operation and Management
Employee Training and Supervision......
Federal Grant and Aid Programs.........
Park and Recreation Management.........
GEG 123 Weather and Climate.......................
GEG 124 Landforms.................................
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses: Skills and/or Methods of Teaching ..............................
Group I
Swimming...................
Advanced Camp Craft Skills .
Trip Crafting ..........
Game and Fish
Activities I.............[ Select
Western Horsemanship I.....\ 8 hours
White Water Boating I......
Fly, Bait, Spin Casting....
Canoeing...................
Sailing....................
Power Boating..............
G. Recreation and Park Administration (select 27 hours)
H. Camping (Select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses: Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching ....................... 1
Swimming...................................
Advanced Lifesaving........................
Canoeing.....................1 Select 2
Sailing......................j out of 3----
Power Boating...............)
Camp Craft Skills..........................
Advanced Camp Craft Skill..................
Triperafting ..............................
Trip Leader................................
Vehicular Travel Activities................
Game & Fish Activities I...................
Game & Fish Activities II..................
Western Horsemanship I ....................
IED 131 Introduction to Craft Materials and Processes
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts...................
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation..............
PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation...............
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and boating Operations...
PER 441 Environmental Education......................
PER 445 Camp Management and Counseling ..............
I. Outdoor Recreation (select 27 hours)
3
3
11
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Group II
Trip Leader.....................
Mountaineering (Rock Climbing) |
White Water Boating II........I Select
Western Horsemanship II......./ 3 hours ..
Game and Fish Activities II .... I Vehicular Travel Activities.../
Industrial Skills
IED 161 Introduction to Power......... 4| Select
IED 101 Introduction to Wood.......... 4> 8
IED 320 Welding Technology............ 4; hours
PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation ..............
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating Operations...
PER 441 Environmental Education .....................
PER 445 Camp Management and Counseling...............
2
2
2
4
J. Gerontology Activity Specialist. (Select 27 hours)
. . Semester
Required Courses Hour>
PER Professional Activity Courses: Skill and/or Methods
PER 150 Activities for Aged and Infirmed ........... 1
PER 150 Fitness Programs for Aged................... 1
PER 150 Camping and Outing Programs for Aged..... 1
PER 150 Wheelchair Activities....................... 1
PER 150 Dance Activities for Handicapped............ 1
PER 217 Recreation, Arts and Crafts................. 2
PER 219 Music, Drama, Dance in Recreation........... 2
PER 233 Advocacy and Social Actions Programs for
the Aged................................. 3
PER 307 Health Problems in Aging.................... 2
PER 331 Activity AnalysisRemotivation, Socialization
Techniques.................................. 3
PER 436 Movement Problems in Gerontology............ 2
PER 463 Recreation Programs for the Aged............ 2
Specified Electives
(Approved in consultation with Program Coordinator) Six hours must be selected from the following courses:
SOC 105 Introduction to Gerontology.................. 3
SOC 205 Sociology of Aging .......................... 3
HES 204 Nutrition ................................... 3
PSY 327 Adulthood and Senescence .................... 3
NOTE: Areas of gerontological study recommended for a contract minor for Therapeutic and/or Gerontology emphasis areas are identified under Health Care Management, Sociology, and Psychology Departments. For additional information contact Gerontology emphasis area program coordinator in each area.
Recreation Minor
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses................ 5
Elect any five (5) hours from the PER 150 listings of Professional Activity Courses.
Contact PER Department for complete listing of course selections available.
PER 211 Recreation Leadership and Leisure Service
Systems...................................... 4
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts ................. 2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation.............. 2
PER 355 Recreation for Special Populations .......... 2
PER 341 Camp and Outdoor Recreation ................. 2
PER 411 Recreation Program Construction and
Control Processes ........................... 3
PER 413 Administration and Organization of
Recreation ................................ 2
Total Credits ........................................ 22
Health and Safety Education
Minor in Health and Safety
The emphasis in Health Education is intended to prepare
students to teach Health Education at either the secondary or elementary level or both levels. This is an excellent area of specialization for the student who is obtaining a teaching major in another area or for those nurses who are interested in the area of School Health Nurse.
Selection of the emphasis in Drivers Education & Safety will enable the student who obtains Teacher Education Certification to teach at the secondary level in Drivers and/or Motorcycle Education.
A. Health Education Emphasis
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and Treatment.
PER 202 Community Health........................
HES 204 Nutrition ..............................
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation...................................
PER 300 School Health Programs ...
PER 391 Safety Education .........
PSY 325 Child Psychology or PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence
Total Credits
B. Driver and Traffic Safety Education Emphasis
LEN 140 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues and Treatment.. PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation..........................
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education............
PER 391 Safety Education ........................
PER 392 Driver Education (Basic and Advanced) ... PER 394 Simulators, Ranges and Behind-the-Wheel
Techniques................................... 3
PER 396 Motorcycle Safety Education................... _2
Total Credits ....................................... 19
PER 100-1 Physical Education Activities (1 +1)
A wide variety of one credit activity classes designed for the interests of the general student body. These classes do not serve the needs of physical education/recreation majors. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
PER 150-1-2 Professional Activity Courses (1 +1) or (2+2) (Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Courses which physical education and recreation majors and minors must take to meet departmental skills requirements in various physical activities. These courses will also cover methods of teaching and field experience assignments May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
PER 160-1 Introduction to Physical Education (1 +1)
For physical education majors. A survey course designed to orient prospective teachers to the field of physical education. Lecture, discussion and field experience.
PER 202-3 Community Health (3 +0)
Designed to provide an in-depth study into health matters involving virtually all citizens for teachers of Health Education. Emphasis is in promoting community health, preventing disorders and disabilities, environmental health and health services.
PER 206-2 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (2 +0)
Designed for use by the general public to prepare people, through providing them with knowledge and skills, to meet the needs of most situations when emergency first aid care is needed. Cardio-Pulmonary respiration is covered.
PER 210-1-2 Officiating (1 +1) (1 +2)
Prerequisite: PER 150 in appropriate sport.
Courses designed for students who wish to acquire or perfect officiating skills. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the classes. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
PER 211-4 Recreation Leadership and Leisure Service Systems (4+1)
Study of development and scope of leisure service systems and principles and practices in recreation leadership services.
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PER 215-2 Recreation Facility and Equipment Maintenance (2+0)
Prerequisite: PER 211.
A study of the design and maintenance problems identified in use of recreation and park facilities and equipment. Emphasis will be directed toward community centers, swimming pools, playfields, building and park designs.
PER 217-2 Recreation Arts and Crafts (2+0)
Course relates to myriad forms of recreational art and craft programs conducted in schools, youth-serving agencies, camps, public and private recreation agencies. Emphasis will be directed toward nature and meaning of crafts, graphic and manipulative arts and instruction methods.
PER 219-2 Music Drama Dance in Recreation (2+1)
Prerequisite: MUS 101, or permission of instructor. Exploration of the skills and techniques of performing arts programs in areas of music, drama, and dance in recreation services.
PER 231-2 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services (2+1)
Prerequisite: PER 211.
Study of the therapeutic recreation services provided for special populations administered by Federal, state, and local health care and treatment facilities. Course includes involvement with various health care facilities in the Denver area.
PER 233-3 Advocacy and Social Action Programs for Aged
(3 + 1)
An exploratory study of advocacy and social action programs representing and providing services for the aged. The course will provide an opportunity for students to become associated/invovled with advocacy and social action programs at the local, state and national level.
PER 250-3 Activities for the Young Child
Course is designed to acquaint the student with appropriate sports, games, gymnastics, and tumbling skills for the young child. Teaching progressions, safety factors, items of equipment spotting techniques, and leadership experiences are included.
PER 252-2 Rhythms for the Young Child (2+2)
Participation and instruction in the fundamental movements, forms, and patterns of creative dance, rhythms, and singing games for children.
PER 258-3 Movement Education (3 + 1)
Participation and instruction in the problem-solving method of teaching movement exploration. Designed for teachers of preschool and elementary children. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the class.
PER 303-3 School Health Programs (3+0)
A course designed to give the prospective early childhood, elementary, and secondary teacher a foundation in school health and safety education, including content for health and safety instruction, promotion of healthful living, and an understanding of the health services program.
PER 306-2 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (2+0)
Prerequisites: PER 206 or current Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Card.
Recognition, cause, prevention, treatment, and various physical therapeutic procedures for sports injuries.
PER 307-2 Health Problems in Aging (2+1)
Prerequisites: (MSC BIO 232) (CCD-A BIO 112)
Designed to acquaint students with current scientific findings and current theories regarding the health problems encountered by older adults in the adults in the aging process. Course includes opportunity for observation and involvement in Recreation and Health Care Facilities.
PER 316-3 Water Safety Instructor Certification (3+1)
Prerequisite: Advanced Livesaving Certificate.
Methods of teaching water safety, skill analysis, and correction. Course leads to Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Certification. Field experience assignments will be a required part of the class.
PER 330-2 Anatomical Kinesiology (2+0)
Prerequisite: BIO 231, or acceptable human anatomy course. A study of the musculature of the human body. Analysis of joint movement and muscular involvement in various physical activities.
PER 331-3 Activity Analysis, Remotivation, and Socialization Techniques (3+1)
Prerequisites: SOC 101, PHY 101, BIO 232.
A study of procedures and techniques used in activity assessment and remotivation in therapeutic recreation rehabilitative settings. Emphasis will be directed toward sociological, psychological, and physiological elements that affect activity participation.
PER 332-3 Biomechanics (2+2)
Prerequisite: PER 330, or permission of instructor.
Application of the principles of mechanics, physics, and mathematics to the analysis of sport activities. Cinematography, motion analysis, and prediction of performance will be essential aspects of this class.
PER 334-3 Physiology of Exercise (2 +2)
Prerequisite: BIO 232, or acceptable human physiology course.
Effect of exercise on the various systems and organs of the body.
PER 335-2 Recreation for Special Populations (2 +0)
Prerequisite: PER 211.
Study related to providing recreation services and activities to those persons who are restricted because of mental, physical, social, cultural, or economic conditions.
PER 340-3 Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education (3 +0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
Course is designed to present alternative instructional strategies on a practical application level to potential teachers of physical education at the secondary level. A cumulative strategies course established to reach those who shortly will go into their student teaching learning experience.
PER 341-2 Camping and Outdoor Recreation (2 + 1)
Prerequisites: PER 150 (Camp Craft Skills; Advanced Camp Craft Skills); and PER 211.
History, trends, objectives, programs, skills and techniques common to camp and outdoor recreation programs.
PER 350-3 Methods of Teaching Physical Education for Children (3+0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
Methods of teaching (traditional, exploratory, combined), techniques of class control and management, program planning, and organization will be covered in this course. Also included will be teacher responsibilities in the total elementary school program.
PER 353-2 Waterfront, Marina and Boating Operations (2+0)
Prerequisites: Canoeing (PER 150), Sailing (PER 150), Powerboating (PER 150); Two of three. Emphasis will be on development of marinas, boating and waterfront programs and facilities, nomenclature in boating, sanitation, marketing (hard and soft goods), use of Federal and state water resources, and existing agency programs.
PER 359-2 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim (2+1)
Prerequisite: PER 316.
Methods of teaching swimming to students with disabilities including: Orthopedic, learning disabilities, mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, sight and hearing difficulties, etc. Course leads to Red Cross Handicapped Swimming Certificate.
PER 362-2 History of Physical Education (1850 to present) (2+0)
A study and analysis of the history of physical education from the mid-1800's to the present.
PER 370-2 Psychology of Coaching (2+0)
Psychology of coaching various sports. An in-depth study of
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motivation of the athlete and how the athlete responds under given conditions.
PER 371-2 Administration of Intramural Sports and Student Recreation (2 +0)
Study of problems and techniques of organization and administration for intramural and recreation programs in schools and colleges.
PER 372-2 Science & Art of Coaching and Athletic Administration (2+0)
Designed to acquaint the athletic coach with everyday administrative aspects of the various sport activities in the school system and recreational setting.
PER 383-3 Urban Park and Recreation Planning (3+0)
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 215, or permission of instructor.
Course of study directed toward the administrative planning and directing the developmental aspects of an urban park and recreation agency. Development of agency objectives, capital improvement, and systems analysis.
PER 391-3 Safety Education (3 + 0)
Provides the student with knowledge about accident prevention in many areas: home, school, physical and recreational activities, traffic and community.
PER 392-4 Driver Education (Basic and Advanced) (4 +0)
A study of the secondary school driver and traffic safety program. Emphasis on methods, materials, and resources for teaching, including discussion, demonstrations and techniques basic to classroom, on-the-street instruction, instructional aid, evaluation and research.
PER 394-3 Simulators, Ranges, and Behind-the-Wheel Techniques (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: PER 392.
Designed to give the teacher a foundation in the use of multiple car driving ranges, behind-the-wheel techniques, and electo-mechanical devices. Emphasizes the use of electro-mechanical devices, films, lesson plans, and their use in curriculum planning and teaching.
PER 396-2 Motorcycle Safety Education (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: PER 392.
Designed to give the teacher the foundation and skills in the organization and conduct of programs for novice motorcycle riders in secondary schools and at the community level. Emphasizes organization, course content, lessons, and development of skills in motorcycle riding.
PER 399-1-2 Field Experience (0 + 3) or (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor.
Provides opportunities for students to gain practical experience assisting in the conduct of sports-type and recreation activities with community agencies, schools, and the College.
PER 411-3 Recreation Program Construction and Control Processes (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: PER 335 and PER 211.
Designed to prepare students for effective program development and budget control processes in various types of leisure service programs. Special attention will be given to programs for public playgrounds, community centers, and regional facilities.
PER 413-2 Administration and Organization of Recreation (2 + 0)
Prerequisites: PER 211, PER 215, PER 335.
Programs in organizing and establishing public recreation and park services. Consideration of legislation, budgeting, staffing, and control processes in providing leisure and park services.
PER 436-2 Movement Problems in Gerentology (2 + 1)
Prerequisites: PER 330 and 334.
Designed to acquaint students with the anatomical and physiological correlates of the human body to the aging process. A study utilizing physical activity as an intervention to adverse conditions associated with aging, course will include opportunity for observation and involvement with recreation and health care facilities.
PER 440-2 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical Education (2 +0)
Prequisite: Junior standing.
An approach to measurement and evaluation in physical education for the student. They will have the opportunity to apply measurement and evaluation in practical situations including administration of fitness tests and interpretation of results. Field experience assignments will be required.
PER 441-2 Environmental Education (2+1)
A study of the development of outdoor education and school camping. Principles of programming, administration, and organization of outdoor education programs will be stressed.
PER 445-4 Camp Management and Counseling (4+1)
Prerequisite: PER 341.
Study of recent trends and philosophies in camp management and counseling related to resident and daycamping programs. Particular attention will be directed to management, leadership, and counseling functions of personnel in the camp environment.
PER 450-3 Perceptual Motor Learning (3 +0)
Survey of perceptual motor theories including historical background, researchers and their work, and assessment techniques.
PER 455-4 Swimming Pool Operation and Management
(4+0)
Prerequisite: PER 316.
Study of the types of swimming facilities; how they are operated and maintained to provide optimum public use. Emphasis on staffing, supervision, program development, maintenance, and management policies.
PER 460-3 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in Physical Education (3 +0)
Prerequisites: Junior standing, PER 160.
The organizational and administrative policies and procedures for curriculum development and conducting and administering physical education programs.
PER 462-3 Adaptive Physical Education (3+0)
Physical education as adapted to the physically and mentally inconvenienced in public schools for recreation/physical education majors/minors, special education, and early childhood students.
PER 463-2 Recreation Programs for the Aged (2 +1)
Prerequisite: PER 211, PER 335, or permission of instructor. The role of recreation service as it relates to understanding the needs and providing programs of services to the elderly. Emphasis will be on program planning for the older adult through recreation programs, and health care facilities.
PER 465-4 Recreation Programs and Management Problems in Urban Ghetto (4 +1)
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 335.
The growth and development of recreation programs related to innercity neighborhoods. Emphasis will be directed to urban program planning, advocacy involvement, political influences, management procedures, and community involvement.
PER 473-2 Sociology of Athletics in American Society (2+0)
To examine and utilize basic sociological concepts and demonstrate their manifestations in areas of recreation and athletics. To analyze the relationship of sports to society.
PER 481-2 Federal Grant and Aid Programs (2 +0)
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 215.
To acquaint the student with the categorical Federal grants-in-aid programs and their impact on state and local governments. Emphasis will be placed on resource agencies in recreation, education, conservation, environment, and beautification.
PER 483-3 Park and Recreation Management (3+0)
Prerequisites: PER 211 and PER 215.
Study of the principles, practices, and programs involved in managing municipal park and recreation systems at the administrative level. Emphasis is on finance, planning,
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systems, personnel practices, legal liabilities, and legislative practices.
PER 489-10 Recreation Internship (0 + 30)
Prerequisites: Recreation major, Senior status, G.P.A. 2.5, completion of three-fourths of major-minor program.
A guided experience which provides for the maturation of educational achievement within the practical environment of a leisure service agency. Supervision is provided by both the instructional staff of college and cooperating agencies.
NOTE: PER 399 requires prior approval for registration for course. Credit may be repeated as course changes.
READING
The Reading Department offers reading improvement courses for all students and a reading minor for elementary or secondary education majors.
The reading improvement courses emphasize development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. A well-equipped Reading Laboratory is used to reinforce classroom instruction. The Reading Laboratory contains materials for use in improving comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills as well as machines for improving reading speed. Any student may use the Laboratory. Students enrolled in the reading improvement courses work on areas identified by a diagnostic reading test administered in each class at the beginning of the semester. Many colleges and universities have used the MSC Laboratory as a model in establishing their reading programs.
The reading minor is designed to produce well-trained classroom teachers. In the sophomore and junior years, students take course work in methods and techniques of teaching reading and supervise a reading group for a semester in a school classroom setting.
In the senior year, students learn to administer a complete reading diagnosis, write a comprehensive case report based on the study of current remedial theory, develop materials for students with reading difficulties, and work on a one-to-one basis with students with severe reading problems. Field experience in metropolitan area schools is an important part of the reading minor.
Reading Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Primary_ 3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate............................ 3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas:
Secondary............................... 2
RDG 360 Practicum in Teaching Reading.......... 3
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials....... 2
RDG 435 Remedial Reading Theories and Diagnosis ... 4
RDG 460 Practicum in Teaching Remedial Reading .... 3-5
20-22
Electives
Additional semester hours selected in consultation with and approved by the faculty in Reading.
Total.................................................. 24
Highly Recommended
RDG 339 Reading Laboratory Experience ............... 2
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers .. 2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom
(competency in Spanish required).............. 3
RDG 100-1 or 2 or 3 Elements of Reading (1 +0, or 2 +0, or
3+0)
Offered under a variety of topics, each 1-credit module covers a basic skill or competency: comprehension, memory and test-taking, note-taking, rate, spelling, and vocabulary.
RDG 102-2 Study Techniques (2+0)
Provides instruction and practice in study skills (i.e., note-taking, studying for tests). Includes lectures, discussions, individualized instruction, and practice sessions. Students encouraged to work individually on specific study problems.
RDG 103-3 Communication Skills (3+0)
Designed to help students improve their communication skills by providing them with information and practice in study skills, reading comprehension and rate, writing mechanics, organization and style, and speaking.
RDG 104-3 Improvement of Reading I (2+2)
Improvement of reading comprehension, speed, vocabulary, and general performance in all college courses. Individual work in the Reading Laboratory required.
RDG 205-1 Advanced Reading: Various Topics (1 +0)
Offered under a variety of topics. Each one-credit module covers an advanced reading skill or competency, such as critical reading and advanced speed reading.
RDG 312-3 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Primary (3 + 0)
Includes reading process, scope and sequence of skill development, techniques of teaching beginning reading, reading materials and terminology, basal reading programs, research and issues related to teaching reading with emphasis on the primary (K-3) level.
RDG 313-3 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate (3+0)
Prerequisite: RDG 312 (may be taken concurrently) or permission of instructor.
Includes content area reading, individualized reading, planning lessons and units, and use of the informal reading inventory with emphasis on the intermediate (4-6) level.
RDG 328-2 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas: Secondary (2+0)
Prerequisite: RDG 312 (may be taken concurrently) or Secondary Education Major.
Approaches to teaching developmental reading at the secondary (Junior-Senior High School) level and to teaching of reading skills in the content areas. Special attention given to preparing lesson plans in various subject matter areas which emphasize teaching reading skills.
RDG 335-3 Methods of Tutoring (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: Junior standing with a 3.00 GPA in major. Requires students to complete a ten-module program, "Methods of Tutoring. Thirty hours of tutoring in the students area(s) of expertise are also required, either in the Skills Reinforcement Center or the Reading Department.
RDG 339-2 Reading Laboratory Experience (0 + 4)
Prerequisite: 6 hours of 300 level reading courses.
Provides reading minors with experience supervising the Reading Laboratory and the Materials Center, acting as teaching assistants in lower division courses, developing course materials, or tutoring.
RDG 353-2 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers
(2 + 1)
Prerequisite: RDG 312.
Covers theories, methods, and techniques for teaching language and reading to the non-English speaker. A minimum of 25 hours of tutoring with a non-English speaker is required.
RDG 358-3 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom
(3 + 0)
Prerequisites: RDG 312 and proficiency in Spanish. Emphasizes the teaching of Spanish reading skills in the bilingual-bicultural classroom, pre-school through third grade. Studies methods and techniques for systematically teaching the primary child to speak and read the Spanish language.
RDG 360-3 Practicum in Teaching Reading (1 +4)
Prerequisite: RDG 313 or permission of instructor. Encompasses the planning, preparing, and presenting of lesson plans for a group of students in developmental
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reading programs. This course is designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the practical application of theoretical concepts of teaching. Forty-eight clock hours of experience in the school are required.
RDG 434-2 Development of Reading Materials (2+0)
Prerequiste: RDG 360 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
Consists of analysis and construction of reading games and materials for use in developmental, remedial, and corrective reading programs.
RDG 435-4 Remedial Reading Theories and Diagnosis (4+0)
Prerequisite: RDG 360 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor.
Incorporates study of the factors which may contribute to reading disability, the means by which these may be diagnosed or determined, the extent to which they are related, and the corrective procedures to be followed in eliminating or mitigating these factors.
RDG 449-2 Current Reading Issues: Variable Topics (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: 6 hours of 300 level reading courses or permission of instructor.
Examines reading topics of current interest in depth. This course may be repeated for credit if different topics are covered.
RDG 460-3-5 Practicum In Teaching Remedial Reading (1+4), (1+6), (1+8)
Prerequisite: RDG 435 or permission of instructor.
Covers administration of diagnostic reading tests to students with reading disabilities. Includes planning and implementation of remediation procedures based on diagnosis. Forty-eight clock hours of tutoring are required for 3 credits; 72 hours for 4 credits; 96 hours for 5 credits.
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School of Engineering Technology
Harold J. Bestervelt, Dean Academic Departments:
Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology Electronics Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology


School of Engineering Technology
School of Engineering Technology
The School of Engineering Technology provides technical education to prepare graduates for employment in a wide variety of technological fields. Engineering Technology is that part of the Engineering field which requires the application of scientific knowledge and engineering methods, combined with the necessary technical skills to carry out and support engineering activities. The program includes courses in Humanities and Social Sciences to broaden the students general education. The various fields of Engineering Technology offer great opportunities for women, due to their demonstrated ability in technical areas and the demands on the part of industry for women with technological skills.
The School of Engineering Technology offers programs in civil, electronic, and mechanical engineering technology with a number of areas of specialization which allow the student to concentrate in certain interest areas. In addition to the Engineering Technology programs, degrees are granted in Meteorology, Surveying, Technical Management and Industrial Marketing.
Effective with this Bulletin Metropolitan State College will phase out all Associate Degree programs and after May 30, 1979 will not admit new students to those programs. Students presently enrolled in an Associate Degree program should contact their department for information concerning completion of the degree requirements.
The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology
The Engineering Technology program provides the student with the opportunity to receive a Bachelor of Science degree in a designated program area. In these programs, students are required to take courses in Science, Mathematics and the application of Engineering principles that prepare him to become a strong member of the technological team required by industry and government. The student may combine business with technology and receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Technical Management or Industrial Marketing.
The four year trained Engineering Technologist fills the gap created by increased emphasis on the development of scientifically oriented engineers, and more efficient utilization of engineering manpower has created a large demand for the technologist. The four year baccalaureate programs are designed to prepare students for greater technical and managerial responsibilities.
Civil Engineering Technology
The specialized fields within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology include programs in Civil Engineering Technology, Drafting, Meteorology, and Surveying. The Meteorology program and the Survey program are separate, specialized four-year programs. Their individual curriculum requirements are listed separately.
Civil Engineering Technology graduates apply engineering principles in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroads, bridges, reservoirs, dams, irrigation works, water systems, airports, and other structures. In planning for a construction project, they may participate in estimating costs, preparing specifications for materials, and participate in surveying, drafting, and design work. During the construction phase, they work closely with the contractor and the superintendent in scheduling field layout, construction activities and the inspection of the work for conformity to specifications. In recent years, a major work area for Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology relates to environmental considerations with particular emphasis on the preparation of environmental impact studies.
Following are the curriculum requirements for the various degrees, minors, and areas of specialization.
Civil Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science
The 4-year Bachelor of Science is awarded upon the completion of the required courses and either a structures or environmental area of specialization or approved catalogue college minor.
Required Technical Studies Hours
CEN 110 Civil Technology............................ 3
CEN 210 Technical Drawing I ........................ 3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II........................ 3
CEN 210 Structural Drawing.......................... 3
CEN 212 Survey Drafting............................. 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ....................... 3
CEN 216 Mechanics IIStrength of Materials.......... 4
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry........................ 2
CEN 251 Surveying Measurements...................... 3
CEN 252 Introduction to Surveying .................. 3
CEN 310 Construction Methods ....................... 3
CEN 312 Engineering Economy......................... 3
CEN 316 Mechanics III Dynamics.................... 3
CEN 317 Mechanics IV................................ 3
CEN 318 Fluid Mechanics............................. 3
CEN 319 Hydrology................................... 3
CEN 400 Senior Seminar.............................. 3
COM 271 Technical Writing.......................... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines ............. 3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I............................ 3
MTH 151 Computing I................................. 4
Subtotal............................................. 64
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101 & 102 English Composition .................... 6
Chemistry................................... 5
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro.............. 3
ECO 202 Principles of EconomicsMicro............... 3
MTH 111 College Algebra ............................ 4
MTH 112 College Trignometry......................... 3
MTH 141 Calculus I.................................. 4
MTH 241 Calculus II ................................ 4
PHY 131/171 General Physics l/General Physics Lab 1. 5
or
PHY 121 College Physics I..........................
PHY 132/172 General Physics ll/General Physics Lab II 5
or
PHY 122 College Physics II
Social/Behavioral Elective................... 3
Humanities Electives......................... 9
Subtotal.............................................. 54
Minor or Area of Specialization 18 (Minimum).......... 18
Total................................................ 136
Structures Area of Specialization Required Technical Studies
CEN 410 Timber Technology........................... 3
CEN 411 Steel Technology............................. 3
CEN 412 Concrete Technology.......................... 3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics.............................. 3
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School of Engineering Technology
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment...................
or
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal............
or
CEN 430 Environmental Technology....................... 3
Approved Technical Elective.................. 3
Total.................................................... 18
Environmental Area of Specialization Required Technical Studies
CEN 140 Introduction to Meteorology.................... 3
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment..................... 3
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal............... 3
CEN 430 Environmental Technology....................... 3
CEN 490 Environmental Impact Statements ............... 3
Approved Technical Elective.................. 3
Total.................................................... 18
Minor in Civil Engineering Technology Required Technical Studies
CEN 110 Civil Technology............................... 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........................... 3
CEN 215 Mechanics IStatics ........................... 3
CEN 251 Surveying Measurements.......................... 3
CEN 310 Construction Methods .......................... 3
Approved Lower Division Technical Elective.. 3
Approved Upper Division Technical Elective.. _3
Total................................................ 21
Minor in Drafting Engineering Technology
Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ......................... 3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II............................ 3
CEN 123 Architectural Drawing........................... 3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry........................... 2
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing..................... 3
Approved Lower Division Technical Elective.. 3
Approved Upper Division Technical Elective.. ^
20
Meteorology
The Meteorologist represents the liaison between meteorological information and the public. He collects, analyzes and, subsequently, translates the information for public use. The public includes such varied groups as large general contractors, public and private utilities, heavy manufacturing, chemical processing plants, agriculture, transportation (including aviation services), government (such as the military and federal agencies), and research organizations.
The Meteorologist studies fundamental meterological theory and analysis practices as well as instrumentation, data processing, and communications concepts. The program is designed to provide the student with the concepts of meteorology while emphasizing one or two chosen areas of public need.
Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Technical Studies
CEN 140 Introduction to Meteorology.................. 3
CEN 141 Aerospace Meterology....................... 2
CEN 241 Meteorological Instrumentation............... 3
CEN 340 Synoptic Meteorology......................... 3
CEN 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory.............. 4
CEN 343 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology.......... 3
CEN 344 Dynamic Meteorology: Atmospheric
Processes.................................... 3
CEN 345 Dynamic Meteorology: Kinematics and
Dynamics .................................... 3
CEN 440 Applied Meteorology.......................... 3
CEN 441 Meteorological Numerical Products............ 2
CEN 442 Urban and Industrial Meteorology............. 3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ........... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines ............... 3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics.................. _4
Subtotal............................................. 42
Technical Electives
Must include a Technology area of concentration or College Minor of not less than eighteen (18) semester
hours, as approved by the Department................... 35
Subtotal .............................................. 77
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101 & 102 English Composition ...................... 6
MTH 111 College Algebra ............................. 4
MTH 112 College Trignometry.......................... 3
MTH 141 Calculus I................................... 4
MTH 241 Calculus II ................................. 4
PHY 121 College Physics I............................. 5
PHY 122 College Physics II ........................... 5
Humanities.................................... 8
Social and Behavioral Science................ _8
Subtotal............................................... 47
Total................................................. 124
Minor in Meteorology Required Technical Studies
CEN 140 Introduction to Meteorology................. 3
CEN 340 Synoptic Meterology.......................... 3
CEN 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory............... 4
CEN 343 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology.......... 3
CEN 440 Applied Meteorology.......................... 3
Approved Technical Electives ............... __4
Total................................................. 20
Surveying
The Bachelor of Science in Surveying is designed to provide basic theoretical training with practical applications for a career as a surveying professional. The intent of this curriculum is to familiarize the student with modern field and computational procedures used in routine and specialized surveying services. The program is flexible, allowing a course of study that fulfills the objectives of the student, while insuring a sound surveying education.
Surveying Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........................ 3
CEN 212 Survey Drafting............................. 3
CEN 251 Surveying Measurements...................... 3
CEN 252 Introduction to Surveying .................. 3
CEN 351 Engineering Surveying....................... 3
CEN 353 Surveying Computations...................... 3
CEN 354 Cadastral Surveying ........................ 3
CEN 356 Cartographic Surveying..................... 3
CEN 451 Geodetic Surveys............................ 3
CEN 452 Introduction to Photogrammetry.............. 3
CEN 453 Land Law for Surveyors...................... 3
CEN 454 Public Land Surveys......................... 3
CEN 455 Applied Astronomy........................... 2
CEN 456 Surveying Data Adjustments.................. 3
CEN 499 Surveying Internship..................(min.) 3
GEL 101 General Geology............................ _3
Subtotal............................................ 47
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition .................. 6
MTH 111 College Algebra ............................ 4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry........................ 3
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School of Engineering Technology
PHY 131/171 General Physics l/General Physics
Lab I....................................... 5
PHY 132/172 General Physics ll/General Physics
Lab II ..................................... 5
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication______ 3
COM 271 Technical Writing........................... 3
Social/Behavioral Electives................. 9
Humanities Electives........................ 6
Subtotal............................................... 44
Approved Electives.............................(min.) 17
Required Math Minor
MTH 141 Calculus I................................... 4
MTH 151 Computing I.................................. 4
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra............................... 2
MTH 241 Calculus II ................................. 4
MTH 321 Statistics................................... 4
MTH Approved Elective .........................(min.) _2
Subtotal.............................................. _20
Total................................................. 128
Minor in Surveying Required Technical Studies
CEN 212 Survey Drafting.............................. 3
CEN 251 Surveying Measurements....................... 3
CEN 252 Introduction to Surveying.................... 3
CEN 351 Engineering Surveys.......................... 3
CEN 353 Surveying Computations....................... 3
CEN 354 Cadastral Surveying ......................... 3
CEN 256 Cartographic Surveying...................... _3
Total.................................................. 21
Civil Engineering Technology
CEN 110-3 Civil Technology (3 + 0)
A broad cross section of topics in contemporary engineering disciplines with emphasis on the tools of engineering problem solving; the problem, the influencing factor, the analysis and the creative design process itself.
CEN 120-3 Technical Drawing (2 + 4)
An introductory course in technical drawing. Covers the use of instruments, lettering, geometric construction, sketching, and orthographies.
CEN 121-3 Technical Drawing II (2 + 4)
Prerequisite: CEN 120.
Continuation of CEN 120 to include advanced study in orthographic projection, dimensioning and sectioning.
CEN 123-3 Architectural Drawing (2 + 4)
Prerequisite: CEN 121.
Introduction to architectural working drawings. Development of plans, sections, elevations, and details.
CEN 140-3 Introduction to Meteorology (3+0)
Introductory course in composition, structure and behavior of the atmosphere. Includes high and low pressure systems, air masses, fronts, clouds and precipitation, local wind systems and tropical storms.
CEN 141-2 Aerospace Meteorology (2 + 0)
Basic meteorological concepts as applied to aerospace are developed. Emphasis on the use of National Weather Service Reports and forecasts which support aviation. Prepares students for FAA private and commercial pilots written examination.
CEN 210-3 Structural Drawing (2+ 4)
Prerequisite: CEN 121.
Study and preparation of necessary drawings of structural members and connections including engineering layout and detail drawing.
CEN 211-3 Computing and Estmating (2 + 4)
Prerequisite: CEN 210.
Methods of taking off quantities from plans; methods of arriving at lump sum and unit prices, and estimating total costs from quantities.
CEN 212-3 Survey Drafting (2 + 4)
Prerequisites: CEN 120, CEN 251
A study of map symbols, contours, sources for map data, and methods used in map plotting. Students prepare survey plats and topographic maps.
CEN 215-3 Mechanics IStatics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MTH 141 (may be taken concurrently). Principles of Statics. Study of vectors, their resolution and composition; forces and couples, force systems and their resultants. Force systems in equilibrium, static friction, moment of areas, centroids, moments of inertia, and radii of gyration of areas. Shear and moment diagrams.
CEN 216-4 Mechanics II Strength of Materials (3 + 3)
Prerequisite: CEN 215.
Theory of strength of materials; stresses and strains in members subjected to tension, compression, and shear; flexural and shearing stresses in beams; deflection of beams; column analysis; principal stresses.
CEN 220-2 Descriptive Geometry (1+3)
Prerequsite: CEN 121.
A graphic study of relative position of points, lines, and planes in space.
CEN 241-3 Meteorological Instrumentation (2 + 2)
Prerequisites: CEN 140 and EET 200.
Acquaints the student with various types and nature of meteorological instrumentation in operations and research field work. Instruments are examined in class and in the field with emphasis upon operation and maintenance.
CEN 242-3 The Use of Radar in Meteorology (2 + 2) Prerequisite: CEN 241, or permission or instructor.
The uses of radar in meteorological observation, analysis, and forecasting. Various types of radars and analysis techniques used with each radar are discussed.
CEN 251-3 Surveying Measurements (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: MTH 112
Introduces the basic operations of surveying: measurement, recording and reducing of angles, distances, and elevation.
CEN 252-3 Introduction to Surveying (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: CEN 251.
Covers theories and procedures more advanced than those in CEN 251 including precise levels, field astronomy, control surveys, and photogrammetry.
CEN 310-3 Construction Methods (3+0)
Prerequisite: Junior Standing.
Application of engineering fundamentals and analyses to methods of improving the quality, while at the same time reducing costs, of contruction.
CEN 312-3 Engineering Economy (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
To use the "Time Value of Money" as a basic for evaluating alternatives in engineering decision-making.
CEN 313-3 Materials Engineering (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
Covers materials used in industry, their properties and how they are measured, characterization of materials, and processing of materials. Includes metals, plastics, and ceramics.
CEN 316-3 Mechanics III Dynamics (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 215 and MTH 241 (MTH 241 may be taken concurrently).
Principles of Dynamics. Kinematics, the study of the geometry motion of a body without reference to the forces
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School of Engineering Technology
which cause the resulting motion; and kinetics, the study of the relation existing between the forces acting on the body, the mass of the body, and the motion of the body.
CEN 317-3 Mechanics IV (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 216.
First principles of structural analysis applied to statically determinate and indeterminate structures.
CEN 318-3 Fluid Mechanics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 316.
Covers physical properties of fluids, hydrostatics, kinematics and dynamics of fluid flow, flow measurements, flow in pipes and open channels, dynamic force and momentum.
CEN 319-3 Hydrology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 318.
Includes the study of the hydrologic cycle, rainfall and runoff, water losses, snowmelt, ground water, unit hydrograph, floods and flood routing, streamflow records, frequency and duration, and water resources planning.
CEN 320-3 Advanced Technical Drawing (2 + 4)
Prerequisite: CEN 220.
Students develop advanced skills in technical drawing.
CEN 330-3 Water Supply and Treatment (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
A study of water and sewerage to include water supply, sources, potability, quantity estimates, distribution, treatment, and usage.
CEN 331-3 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
A continuation of studies in sanitation with emphasis on liquid and solid waste disposal. Fundamentals of treatment, plant design, and plant operation.
CEN 340-3 Synoptic Meteorology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 140 or 141.
An advanced course in meteorological phenomena.
Emphasis on understanding atmospheric stability and the interpretation of surface and upper air patterns. Analysis of synoptic scale weather systems to understand the clouds, precipitation, winds and temperature ranges produced by the systems.
CEN 341-4 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory (2+4)
Prerequisite: CEN 340.
This course is designed to familiarize the student with map analysis and forecasting techniques. Various methods will be examined by application. Operational techniques will be simulated within the laboratory.
CEN 343-3 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 340 and MTH 141.
The basic laws and concepts related to the behavior of the atmosphere. The relationship between meteorology, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are examined. Atmospheric phenomena explained in terms of theory developed.
CEN 344-3 Dynamic Meteorology: Atmospheric Process (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 343 and MTH 241.
The study of physical processes: atmospheric optics, radiation processes in the atmosphere, formation and development of clouds and precipitation, and weather modification by cloud seeding.
CEN 345-3 Dynamic Meteorology: Kinematics and Dynamics (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 343 and MTH 241.
The study of kinematics, the equations of motion, circulation, vorticity, divergence, atmospheric long waves, and energy relationships.
CEN 346-3 Meteorology and Flight Operations (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 141.
The application of meteorological principles to aviation operations. Concentrates upon stability and turbulence, clear-air turbulence, aircraft icing problems, jet-stream weather and airborne radar.
CEN 351-3 Engineering Surveys (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: CEN 252.
A course that introduces EDM, automatic levels, and theodolites to precise traverse procedures, and construction surveys, including extensive work with curves and earthwork.
CEN 353-3 Surveying Computations (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 252 and MTH 214 A course that covers advanced computational procedures encountered in plane surveying including coordinate geometry, astronomical calculations, theory of errors, and computer applications.
CEN 354-3 Cadastral Surveying (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 252.
A study of the subdivision of public lands, resurvey, subdivision survey, and methods of describing real property.
CEN 356-3 Cartographic Surveys (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: CEN 351.
A course that covers cartographic surveying, including mapping control and plane table mapping, and property surveys.
CEN 400-3 Senior Seminar (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Study of selected technological topics and analysis of the interrelationship of engineering technology fields. Each student prepares and presents papers and or projects on suitable subjects on an individual or team basis.
CEN 410-3 Timber Technology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 317.
Timber uses in modern day construction applications are studied. Physical and mechanical propertiesbeams, girders, trusses, decking. Allowable stresses and proper fastenings are examined.
CEN 411-3 Steel Technology (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 317 and MTH 241.
Analysis and application of steel structures including loading stresses in members, selection and application of connectors. Emphasis on practical solutions to problems and influences on design.
CEN 412-3 Concrete Technology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 411.
Analysis and application of concrete structures including columns, beams, slabs, walls and other types.
CEN 413-3 Soils Mechanics (2 + 4)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Soil properties are studied and soil characteristics introduced; methods of sampling and analysis are treated. Variations, in behavior under different loading conditions are analyzed.
CEN 430-3 Environmental Technology (2+3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Covers the fundamentals of environmental sanitation, to include an overview of disease transmission and control; hygienic disposal of wastes; air, ground, and water pollution abatement and control. Field trips to control facilities and agencies.
CEN 431-3 Environmental Technology (2+3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Studies in sanitation technology covering regulatory and control measures. Planning, public relations, and other aspects. Regulatory statues, bodies, regulations, reports, and possible new control arrangements are reviewed and discussed.
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School of Engineering Technology
CEN 440-3 Applied Meteorology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 340.
Designed for teaching students to apply knowledge gained in synoptic meteorology. This course will provide applications of meteorological patterns for planning. Special topics include weather and energy, industrial applications, and mountain weather.
CEN 441-2 Meteorological Numerical Products (2 + 1)
Prerequisite: CEN 345
An examination of the various numerical products that have been developed and are utilized on an operational basis. Included in discussions are barotropic and baroclinic models, data process techniques, and display and presentation methods.
CEN 442-3 Urban and Industrial Meteorology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 345.
Interaction between urban and industrial complexes and the atmosphere. Emphasizes composition and behavior of industrial air pollution sources, effects of air pollution and control techniques.
CEN 443-2 Meteorology and Media (0 + 4)
Prerequisite: CEN 341.
The student will develop analysis and forecast products for daily briefings, newspaper reports, radio and television presentations. Included are public needs and problems associated with each type of media presentation.
CEN 451-3 Geodetic Surveys (2 + 3)
Prerequisites: CEN 356 and MTH 241.
An advanced course in surveying measurement and theory. Coverage includes second-order horizontal and vertical control systems, and the special requirements for geodetic computation of length, azimuth, and elevation.
CEN 452-3 Introduction to Photogrammetry (2 + 3)
Prerequisites: MTH 141, CEN 356.
An introductory course in photogrammetry covering aerial cameras, the geometry of vertical and tilted photographs, flight planning, ground control, and stereo plotters.
CEN 453-3 Land Law for Surveyors (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 354.
A study of the total body of law as it applies to the practice of land surveying. Both statute and common law are covered.
CEN 454-3 Public Land Surveys (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 354.
An in depth study of the U.S. Public Land Survey System. Covers the history and theory of original surveys, retracements, and special surveys.
CEN 455-2 Applied Astronomy for Surveying (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: CEN 356.
A course in spherical geometry, spherical trigonometery, and the study of the celestial sphere with solutions involving direction, time, latitude, and longitude.
CEN 456-3 Surveying Data Adjustments (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: CEN 451, CEN 353, MTH 321.
A course that covers adjustments of control data using least squares and error theory.
Electronics Engineering Technology
Electronics Engineering Technology graduates act as a liaison between the electronic engineer and the skilled worker. They possess some of the know-why" of the engineer and some of the know-how" of the craftsman. Graduates are employed in a variety of positions as engineering technicians or technologists working with engineers and scientists in some of the following functional areas:
Research and Development
Technical activities in research and development are primarily directed towards obtaining new information and new knowledge of the field. The engineering technologist is
a member of the research team, along with scientists and engineers. This specific work may involve the development and manufacture of prototypes, test and evaluation of equipment, or other activities necessary to render technical support to a research project.
Electronic Manufacturing
A graduate employed in a manufacturing facility might be involved in actual manufacturing, fabrication, test, prototype development, calibration, quality control, maintenance, or field service. He may also in some cases become heavily involved in sales engineering.
Manufacturing Plants
In all other areas of industry, the rapid advancement of sophisticated electronic instrumentation is opening vast fields for the engineering technology graduates. Practically all on line control processes are electronically directed. In this area, maintenance, calibration, installation, as well as personnel supervisory positions are available to the engineering technologist.
Services
Service engineering has become a field of its own. This involves extensive activities in the field of computers, communications, instrumentation, new product development, and numerous other activities involving electrical and electronic systems.
The EET curriculum provides a strong foundation in mathematics and science as well as a thorough treatment of the characteristics of electric circuits and electronic devices. In the four-year program, specialization may be achieved by selection of individual programs or areas of emphasis included within the scope of the department offerings.
Following are the specific technical courses required for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Electronic Engineering Technology:
Electronics Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science.
The Bachelor of Science Degree is awarded upon completion of the courses listed below.
Required Technical Courses
EET 110 Circuits I..............................
EET 111 Circuits Lab I..........................
EET 112 Circuits II ............................
EET 113 Circuits Lab II.........................
EET 210 Electronics I...........................
EET 211 Electronics Lab I.......................
EET 212 Electronics II..........................
EET 213 Electronics Lab II......................
EET 232 Digital Circuits I......................
EET 234 Electronic Programming Applications EET 311 Advanced Electrical and
Electronic Circuits I................
EET 312 Advanced Electrical and
Electronic Circuits II...............
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ....................
EET 366 Electrical Measurements ................
EET 410 Senior Project I........................
EET 411 Senior Project II.......................
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology...........................
Upper Division EET Electives.........
Sub Total
Additional Course Requirements
English 101 and 102 Freshman Composition
Math 111 College Algebra.................
Math 112 College Trigonometry............
Semester
Hours
4
1
67
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School of Engineering Technology
Math 141 Calculus I................................... 4
Math 241 Calculus II ................................. 4
Physics 121 College Physics I ........................ 5
Physics 122 College Physics II........................ 5
Humanities Electives ................................. 9
Social/Behavioral Science Electives................... 9
Chemistry 110 Intro to Chemistry or
Chem 120 Gen. Chem 1.............................. 5
COM 271 Intro to Technical Writing.................... 3
Electives (Preferably in Math, Science,
Technology or Business) ......................... _2
Sub Total............................................ 59
Minor or EET Specialization................18 (minimum)
Sub Total............................................ 18
Total............................................... 128
Communications Specialization
Semester
Required EET Courses Hours
EET 331 Pulse Circuits ............................... 3
EET 362 Communication I .............................. 3
EET 363 Communication II.............................. 3
EET 365 Avionics II................................... 3
EET 367 Measurements for Communications Systems . 3
EET 368 Principles of Radar .......................... 2
EET 446 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits............ _4
21
Avionics Specialization
Required Courses
EET 331 Pulse Circuits .............................. 3
EET 364 Avionics I .................................. 3
EET 365 Avionics II.................................. 3
EET 368 Principles of Radar ......................... 2
EET 446 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits......... 4
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion.............. 3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulation............ 3
21
Control Systems Specialization
Required EET Courses
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation .. 4
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications................. 3
EET 446 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits.... 4
EET 447 Servomechanisms Laboratory................ 1
EET 451 Circuit Analysis with Operational Math.. 3
EET 453 Applications of Operational Amplifiers.. _3
18
Computer Technology Specialization
Required Courses
EET 331 Pulse Circuits .............................. 3
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation .. 4
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications.................... 3
EET 436 Introduction to Microprocessors.............. 3
EET 453 Applications of Operational Amplifiers....... 3
Upper Division EET Elective to be chosen
from EET 362 or EET 446 ................... 3
19
Minor in Electronics Engineering Technology
Required EET Courses
EET 110 Circuits I....................................... 4
EET 111 Circuits I Lab................................... 1
EET 112 Circuits II ...............,...................... 3
EET 113 Circuits II Lab................................... 2
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and Electrical
Circuits I...................................... 4
EET 302 Principles of Electronics and Electrical
Circuits II ....................................... 4
Upper Division EET Electives.................... 4
Total......................................................... 22
Technical Management
Technical Management is an interdisciplinary program training students to become technically proficient in order to handle their own jobs effectively and to communicate with and manage technical specialists. Because of the skills, insight, knowledge, and maturity of judgment demanded in the field, the program is on a high level and the 130 semester hour minimum requirement exceeds the traditional 120 hours that most programs demand. Graduates are needed for positions in value engineering, logistics engineering, quality control, maintenance engineering, systems analysis or management, operations research, and field engineering.
This program has been coordinated with several industrial management representatives and is administered jointly through the Schools of Business and Engineering Technology.
Students completing the Technical Management Program requirements are not required to complete a separate minor.
Technical Management Major for Bachelor of Science
General Course Requirements
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition........................ 6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Com................... 3
Humanities Electives......................... 6
ECO 201 Principles of Econ, Macro.................... 3
ECO 202 Principles of Econ, Micro.................... 3
Soc/Behavioral Science Elective.............. 3
*MTH 141 Essentials of Calculus....................... 4
PHY 121 College Physics I............................ 5
COM 271 Introduction to Technical Writing............ 3
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications. _3
Subtotal............................................... 39
Note: MTH 141 requires prerequisite of MTH 112 or MTH 140. Technology Courses
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Tech............. 3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance.............. 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis....................... 4
CEN 110 Civil Technology............................. 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ......................... 3
EET 110 and 111 .Circuits I and Laboratory........... 5
EET 112 and 113 Circuits II and Laboratory........... 5
Electives
A minimum of 20 semester hours of technology courses must be selected in consultation with and approved by the Electronics Technology Department. At least 15 of
these hours must be upper division..................... 20
Subtotal................................................. 46
Business Course Studies
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I..................... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.................... 3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing........... 3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems.............. 3
CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics............ 3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making................... 3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I........................... 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ................................ 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management....................... 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing........................ 3
Electives
A minimum of fifteen (15) additional semester hours must be selected from courses offered by the Management or the Computer and Management Science
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School of Engineering Technology
Departments. These electives must be approved by either the Department of Computer and Management Science or the Electronics Engineering Technology Department and at least 7 of these hours must be
upper division ............................................. 15
Subtotal.................................................... 45
Total...................................................... 130
Industrial Marketing
The Industrial Marketing Program links sales and manufacturing. Specialists are trained to become familiar with designing, manufacturing, branding, packaging, transporting, labeling, pricing, selling, and servicing products. In addition, the curriculum develops an awareness of the policies and practices of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and users of technical goods. Graduates may expect to find positions in retail and wholesale industrial sales positions, in the areas of advertising and promotion, and in the field of marketing planning. Administration of the program is handled jointly through the Departments of Electronics Technology and Marketing. Students completing the Industrial Marketing Program are not required to
complete a separate minor.
Semester
General Course Requirements Hour>
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition ................. 6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Com.................. 3
Humanities Electives......................... 6
ECO 201 Principles of Econ, Macro................... 3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology..................... 3
Soc/Behavioral Science Elective............ 3
MTH 103 Triangle Trig ................................. 1
MTH 131 Finite Math far the Management and
Social Sciences.............................. 4
PHY 125 Physics of Tech, 1.......................... 5
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications . 3
COM 271 Introduction to Technical Writing.......... _3
Subtotal.............................................. 40
Technology Courses
MET 100 Materials and Mfg. Tech...................... 3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance................ 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis......................... 4
CEN 110 Civil Tech..................................... 3
CEN 120 Tech. Drawing I .............................. 3
EET 110 and 111 Circuits I and Laboratory.............. 5
EET 112 and 113 Circuits II and Laboratory............. 5
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours of Technology courses must be selected in consultation with the Electronics Technology Department. 12 of
these hours must be upper division...................... 15
Subtotal................................................ 41
Business Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.................... 3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II................... 3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing....... 3
CMS 201 Principles of Info. Systems................... 3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics............... 3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance............................ 3
MGT 221 Business Law I ............................... 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management...................... 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing....................... 3
MKT 301 Marketing Research............................ 3
MKT 311 Advertising................................... 3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior............................. 3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management.............. _3
Subtotal................................................ 39
Total.................................................. 120
Electronics Engineering Technology
EET 100-2 Survey of Electricity and Electronics tor Non-Technology Majors (2+0)
This survey course explains the basic principles of electricity and electronics in non-mathematical terms. It also provides general information on the operation of devices and equipment of general interest.
EET 106-3 Applied Technical Mathematics (3+0)
Prerequisite: Permission ot instructor.
Designed to assist the student majoring in technology by providing background and understanding in applied mathematics.
EET 110-4 Circuits I (4+0)
Corequisites: MTH 111 and EET 111.
A study of the concepts of electricity and analysis of resistive circuits, single time constant circuits, magnetic circuits, phasors, vectors and reactance.
EET 111-1 Circuits I Laboratory (0+2)
Corequisite: Make be taken concurrently with EET 110 An electrical laboratory course which will supplement theoretical studies and aid in the understanding of basic electrical principles. Provides practical experience in measurements of current, voltage, power, and time voltage and current measurements.
EET 112-3 Circuits II (3+0)
Prerequisite: EET 110 Corequisite: MTH 112 and EET 113. This course is a continuation of EET 110 with studies of AC circuits, impendance concepts, network theorems, electrical measurements and transformers.
EET 113-2 Circuits II Laboratory (0+4)
Corequisite: EET 112.
A laboratory course designed to aid student understanding of alternating current circuits with various combinations of resistance, inductance and capacitance.
EET 200-3 Electric Circuits and Machines (3+0)
Corequisite: MTH 112.
An introductory course in electric circuits for non-EET majors. Covers D.C. and A.C. circuits, generators, motors, and transformers. Introduces elementary electronic devices and circuits.
EET 202-2 Electronic Drafting (1 +2)
A drafting course that treats the main areas of electronics including automation, microelectronics, electric power, and integrated circuits. Includes learning the use of diagrammatic standardized symbols and assembling them into circuit diagrams.
EET 210-4 Electronics I (4 +0)
Prerequisite: EET 112.
Study of electronic devices with emphasis on transistors. Includes device construction, biasing, equivalent circuits, and the analysis of single stage amplifiers.
EET 211-1 Electronics Laboratory I (0+2)
Companion laboratory course to be taken with EET 210.
EET 212-3 Electronics II (3+0)
Prerequisite: EET 210.
Continuation of EET 210 with emphasis on various circuits including amplifiers (small signal and large signal), difference amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, mixers, and voltage regulation. Concepts of feedback, frequency effects, and distortion are also covered.
EET 213-2 Electronics Laboratory II (0+4)
Companion Laboratory course to be taken with EET 212.
EET 230-5 Introduction to Logic and Computer Operations (4+2)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Course for non-EET majors including computer structure, number systems, combinatorial logic and flip-flop utilization, arithmetic and logical processes, BASIC programming using a Minicomputer. Laboratory includes logic experiments and programming.
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School of Engineering Technology
EET 232-3 Digital Circuits I (2 +2)
Prerequisite: EET 210 or 301 or permission of instructor. Logic functions, Boolean Algebra, integrated circuits, asynchronous logic, flip-flops and circuit simplification by Karnaugh maps and Quine-McCluskey method.
EET 234-2 Electronic Programming Applications (2+0)
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, MTH 112 or permission of instructor.
An introductory course designed to introduce the student to digital computers and their usefulness for solution of technology problems using high level languages. Emphasis is given to problems from the field of Electronics Technology.
EET 301-4 Principles of Electronics and Electronics Circuits I (3 +2)
Prerequisites: EET 112 or 200 and MTH 141.
Analysis of the principles, characteristics and operation of electron devices. Study includes vacuum and gas tubes, photo-electricity. Fundamentals of semi-conductors and transistors, and their application in elementary circuits.
EET 302-4 Principles of Electronics and Electronic Circuits II (3 + 2)
Prerequisites: MTH 141 and EET 211 or EET 301, or permission of instructor.
Continuation of EET 301 with emphasis on circuit applications such as amplifiers, detectors, oscillators, modulators, and control systems.
EET 311-4 Advanced Electrical and Electronic Circuits (4+0)
Prerequisites: MTH 241 and EET 212 or EET 302, or permission of instructor.
An advanced course which requires previous knowledge of basic electrical circuits. Study also includes analysis of nonlinear circuit elements within circuits.
EET 312-4 Advanced Electrical and Electronic Circuits II (3+2)
Prerequisite: EET 311, or permission of instructor. Continuation of EET 311.
EET 331 -3 Pulse Circuits (2 + 3)
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor. Analysis of static and regenerative circuits including shaping circuits, multivibrators, blocking oscillators, pulse amplifiers, and transmitter circuits.
EET 333-3 Digital Circuits II (2 +2)
Prerequisite: EET 232 or permission of instructor. Continuation of EET 232. Shift registers and counters, binary arithmetic circuits, memories, multiple mapping and demapping, state variable diagrams and J-K flip-flop programming.
EET 334-4 Minicomputer Programming and Operation (3 +2)
Prerequisites: EET 232, or Junior standing and permission of instructor.
An introductory course designed to teach students how to operate and program a minicomputer. Specifically, students will learn the assembler language for a minicomputer.
EET 341-3 Electric Power Generation (2+2)
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor. Study of electric power generation systems. Primarily includes A.C. and D.C. dynamo construction and operation.
EET 342-3 Electric Power Distribution (3+0)
Prerequisite: EET 341, or permission or instructor. Continuation of EET 341. Study of distribution techniques and equipment employed in electric power distribution and control.
EET 362-3 Communication I (2+2)
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
A study of communications systems, including such topics as Modulation, Noise, Receivers, Pulse Systems, Wave Propagation, and Information Theory. Also covers transmission line characteristics, matching sections, and filters.
EET 363-3 Communication II (2+2)
Prerequisite: EET 362.
Continuation of Communication I. Covers additional subjects of antennas, VLF propagation, wave-guides, microwave measurements, and filters.
EET 364-3 Avionics I (3+0)
Prerequisite: EET 212, or the equivalent.
Provides the student with basic understanding of the operating principles of radio and electronic equipment used in modern aircraft, including the relationships between airborne and ground equipment. Covers the theory of operation and block diagrams of complete systems.
EET 365-3 Avionics II (3+0)
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302.
Covers the information required for First Class RADIO TELEPHONE OPERATORS LICENSE. Includes laws and regulations, radio fundamentals, radiotelephone operation, voice communication procedures, and review of sample examinations.
EET 366-3 Electrical Measurements (2+2)
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302 or permission of instructor. Advanced theory and applications of electrical and electronic instruments and instrumentation devices used in measurements of both physical and electrical quantities.
EET 367-3 Measurements for Communications Systems (2+2)
Prerequisites: EET 362, EET 366.
A continuation of EET 366, with emphasis on measurements for communications circuits including SNR, Noise Figure, Impedance, Admittance, Phase, Power, Frequency, Spectrum Analysis, Fields at high frequencies.
EET 368-2 Principles of Radar (2 +0)
Prerequisite: EET 212 or 302, or permission of instructor.
A course that presents the mathematical explanation of what radar is and how it works. A unified approach to the systems aspects of various types of radars is given in terms of complete block diagrams. Types studied include monostatic and bistatic pulse radar, CW, Doppler, FM-CW Doppler, Pulsed-Doppler, and MTI.
EET 410-1 Senior Project I (1 +0)
Prerequisite: Senior Standing.
Extensive design project to be planned in consultation with faculty advisor(s). Interface with industry and governmental agencies is encouraged.
EET 411-2 Senior Project II (2 +0)
Prerequisite: EET 410.
A continuation of Senior Project I. Students complete design and construction of selected projects. Oral and written reports are required.
EET 435-3 Minicomputer Applications (2+2)
Prerequisites: Previous minicomputer programming
knowledge, or EET 333 and EET 334, or permission of instructor.
Advanced minicomputer course in which students will define interfacing projects and develop the required hardware and software.
EET 436-3 Introduction to Microprocessors (2+2)
Prerequisite: EET 334 or permission of instructor.
Student will work with F8 and 6800 microprocessors. A background in assembly level programming is required. Software programming will be followed by an interface project.
EET 446-4 Servomechanisms and Control Circuits (3+2)
Prerequisite: EET 451, or permission of instructor.
Theory of linear closed loop control systems. Analysis of servomechanisms containing electronic, magnetic, and mechanical devices. Study includes feedback control techniques.
EET 447-1 Servomechanisms and Control Laboratory (0+2)
Prerequisite: EET 311.
A laboratory course designed to utilize the principles of feedback control in experimentation with and study of
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School of Engineering Technology
elementary control systems such as temperature and position control.
EET 451-3 Circuit Analysis with Operational Math (3+0)
Prerequisite: EET 311, or permission or instructor.
Advanced theory in methods of circuit analysis and network synthesis. Study includes matrices, Laplace transform, and advanced operational methods.
EET 453-3 Applications of Operational Amplifers (2+2)
Prerequisite: EET 212, or 302, or permission ot instructor. Introduction to Applications of Integrated Circuit Op Amps. Applications to include inverters, summers, integrators, differentiators, oscillators, active filters, comparators, and multi-vibrators. Special projects to be selected.
Mechanical Engineering Technology
The program has been developed considering the needs of industry. An eleven-member group of technical people from various engineering companies and consulting firms in the greater Denver area serve the Mechanical Engineering Technology Department in an advising capacity. This meaningful relationship assures that the four-year graduate is hired as a technologist... capable of handling a variety of challenging tasks that assist the professional engineer.
The Mechanical Engineering Technology Department offers the Bachelor of Science Degree in MET. It is structured with two distinct areas of emphasis during the final year of study. The student may select to follow: (1) a series of courses with an emphasis on manufacturing; or (2) a group of design and energy-related courses under the designated mechanical emphasis.
The MET program was granted early recognition status of Candidate for Accreditation by the Engineering Technology Committee of the Engineers Council for Professional Development (ECPD). This status was originally granted in June, 1976, and is subject to annual review.
Bachelor of Science/Mechanical Engineering Technology
Required Technical Courses
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology-------- 3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes.......................... 3
MET 220 Mechanics of Materials........................ 3
MET 221 Mechanical Drawing............................... 3
MET 301 Fluid Flow I ................................. 3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .......................... 3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ......................... 3
CEN 316 Mechanics III Dynamics....................... 3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines .................. 3
EET 301 Principles of Electronics/Electronic
Circuits I................................... _4
Subtotal................................................ 31
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102............................................. 6
MTH 111, 112, 141, 151, 241............................. 19
Humanities Elective...................................... 2
Social/Behavioral Science Electives...................... 5
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication 3
PHI 205 Scientific Reasoning............................. 3
Upper Division Elective.................................. 3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro................... 3
COM 271 Technical Writing................................ 3
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry or
CHE 120 General Chemistry................................ 5
PHY 121, 122 College Physics I, College Physics II---- 10
Subtotal................................................ 62
The student then selects from either of the following Sequences I or II:
I. Manufacturing Emphasis;
MET 240 Fundamentals of Welding .................... 3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis...................... 4
MET 310 N/C Computer Programming.................... 3
MET 325 Tool Design and Production Tooling.......... 4
MET 330 Quality Assurance........................... 4
MET 341 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing.... 4
MET 404 Plant Layout................................ 4
MET 408 Computer Aided Manufacturing ............... 3
MET 424 Cost Estimating for Manufacturing........... 4
Subtotal............................................ _33
Total............................................... 126
II. Mechanical Emphasis;
MET 302 Fluid Flow II............................... 3
MET 307 Machine Design I............................ 3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I............................ 3
MET 312 Heat Transfer............................... 3
MET 331 Thermodynamics II .......................... 3
MET 332 Instrumentation Laboratory.................. 3
MET 407 Machine Design II .......................... 3
MET 428 Energy Technology........................... 3
CEN 216 Mechanics II Strength of Materials......... 4
Upper Division Technical Elective..................... 3
Subtotal............................................. 31
Total............................................... 124
The MET Department has structured the following sequence of courses for those wishing to Minor in Mechanical Engineering Technology.
Minor/Mechanical Engineering Technology
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology .... 3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes...................... 3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance............. 3
MET 220 Mechanics of Materials....................... 3
MET 310 N/C Computer Programming..................... 3
MET 400 Project Engineering.......................... 3
Total.................................................. 18
Mechanical Engineering Technology
MET 100-3 Materials and Manufacturing Technology (3+0)
Introductory survey course in manufacturing production processes including a study of primary materials and manufacturing processes in the fabrication of industrial products. It relates these to current national, social, industrial, and international issues and problems.
MET 101-3 Manufacturing Processes (2+2)
Basic fundamentals in the operation of machine tools are introduced. This includes measuring tools, benchwork and layout, and tool grinding. The student performs various machining operations using the engine lathe, milling machine, drills and surface grinders.
MET 131-3 Principles of Quality Assurance (3+0)
Prerequisite: MTH 110.
Defines the scope and function of quality assurance, including basic definitions, quality policy and objectives, manuals and procedures, concept of variation, inspection techniques, metrology, acceptance sampling, process control, customer relations, and product audit.
MET 220-3 Mechanics of Materials (2+2)
Prerequisites: PHY 121, MTH 112.
This classroom and laboratory course deals with the basic understanding of the design properties of metals and non-metals. Stress-strain diagrams are developed and nondestructive and destructive techniques to determine physical properties are used. Heat treatment of metals is studied.
MET 221-3 Mechanical Drawing (2+4)
Prerequisite: CEN 120.
Representation of mechanical components, dimensioning and tolerancing are worked. The student is also introduced
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School of Engineering Technology
to fluid power diagrams, piping and electrical and electronic diagrams.
MET 231-3 Quality Assurance Stat Methods (3+0)
Prerequisites: MET 131 and MTH 121.
An emphasis on statistical analysis using fundamental statistical concepts, the use of the theory of probability, the aspects of specifications and tolerances, the concepts of sampling, aspects of life testing, and some cost aspects of quality decisions.
MET 232-3 Quality Assurance: Reliability (3+0)
Prerequisite: MET 231.
A basic course encompassing the field of reliability engineering, emphasizing the concept and definition of reliability. Useful life and product wearout, effect of chance and wearout failures, series and parallel systems, confidence limits, and reliability testing. Study of consumerism and liability.
MET 240-3 Fundamentals of Welding (2 +2)
Prerequisites: MET 101, 220.
A basic course to acquaint students with the common welding processes. These include fusion welding with the oxacetylene and arc processes, brazing of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, oxacetylene cutting, and introduction to inert-gas welding. Provides a technological understanding of advanced welding techniques used in industry.
MET 300-4 Manufacturing Analysis (2+4)
Prerequisites: MET 100, 310 and 325.
Introduction to the organizational and functional requirements for effective production, tolerance charts, work piece control, planning the sequence of manufacturing and selection of manufacturing equipment.
MET 301-3 Fluid Flow I (2 +2)
Prerequisites: PHY 121 and MTH 112.
It is an introduction to fluid mechanics with basic definitions developed. Fluid statics using Pascals principle are treated. The continuity equation is used for steady and unsteady flow with emphasis given to one-dimensional, incompressible flow applications. Laboratory work includes measuring pressure drop, flow profiles, flowrates, etc., using hydraulic systems.
MET 302-3 Fluid Flow II (2 +2)
Prerequisites: MET 301 and MET 311.
Compressible flow is studied for convergent-divergent nozzles and pipe flow. Fluidics is introduced and dimensional analysis is treated with regard to geometric and kinematic similarity. The laboratory work supports the classroom studies using various gas flow systems.
MET 307-3 Machine Design I (2 +3)
Prerequisites: CEN 216, 316 and MET 220, 221.
The art of planning and devising new or improved machines to accomplish specific purposes is studied. The student is introduced to the fundamental principles required to correctly design the separate elements which compose the machine. The economics of design are stressed along with strength and safety considerations.
MET 310-3 N/C Computer Programming (2+2)
Prerequisites: MET 101, 221 and MTH 112.
Theory and application of computer aided N/C language with programming emphasis on APT and suitable post processors.
MET 311-3 Thermodynamics I (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MTH 141 and PHY 121.
The fundamental laws of thermodynamics are studied. Basic concepts of energy, the thermodynamic system, dimensions and units, and the ideal-gas equation of state are treated. Closed and open systems are studied. Heat engines are introduced. Reversible and irreversible processes are investigated.
MET 312-3 Heat Transfer (2+2)
Prerequisites: MET 311 and MTH 151.
The three basic mechanisms of heat transmission are studied analytically and experimentally. Heat conduction and convection (free and forced) plus radiant (solar) are treated
for both steady-state and transient understandings. The transient study is aided by computer solutions.
MET 325-4 Tool Design and Production Tooling (2+4)
Prerequisites: MET 101, 220, 221 and MTH 112.
Drawing analysis for tooling requirements and tooling cost estimates. Design of tooling for turret lathes, automatic screw machines, multiple spindle lathes and production milling machines.
MET 330-4 Quality Assurance (4+0)
Prerequisites: MET 300, 310,.325 and MTH 141.
Basic functions of quality control in manufacturing organizations: quality control methods as applied to process control, sampling, metrology, reliability, product liability and QC audits.
MET 331-3 Thermodynamics II (2+2)
Prerequisites: MET 311 and MTH 241.
This, the second course in thermodynamics, deals with the consequences of the Second Law. The T dS equations are studied as is entropy and efficiencies of some heat power engines. Standard gas and vapor cycles are investigated. The laboratory work includes various calorimetry, gravimetric and volumetric analyses, nozzles and internal combustion engine tests.
MET 332-3 Instrumentation Laboratory (2+2)
Prerequisite: MET 301.
The student is introduced to standard mechanical tests and measurement techniques, e.g., installing thermocouples, strain gages, positioning static and total probes. ASME and ASTM test codes are studied, as are OSHA standards.
Various physical property and system performance tests are set up, conducted and analyzed.
MET 341-4 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerance (2+4)
Prerequisites: MET 221, 300 and 325.
Dimensioning practices used by major U.S. Metal Product Design Agencies are studied. Tolerance of form, tolerances of position, datums, concentricity, symmetry and functional gaging concepts are also treated.
MET 400-3 Project Engineering (3+0)
Prerequisite: Senior Standing.
The student is introduced to the project or team effort. The need for planning, control and communication is stressed. Critical path methods are used to develop schedules. Figure-of-merit methods are used to select preferred approaches/designs. Technical writing is stressed with an introduction to competitive proposal writing.
MET 404-4 Plant Layout (2+4)
Prerequisites: MET 221, 300, 310 and 330.
Basic principles of plant layout to meet production needs. Application of materials handling devices to the process. Selection and arrangement of production machinery, product and process layout schemes, techniques of making layouts, and balance and flexibility of operations. Managements role is discussed.
MET 407-3 Machine Design II (2+3)
Prerequisites: MET 307 and MTH 151.
The student studies combined stresses, gearing, brakes, curved beams, etc., and undertakes the design of a complete machine. This is the second in the two-course machine design series. The analysis includes computer solutions.
MET 408-3 Computer Aided Manufacturing (2+2)
Prerequisites: MET 300, 310, 330 MTH 151.
Computer applications in configuration control, purchasing, vendor ratings, production control, inventory control and final product acceptance documentation are treated.
MET 424-4 Cost Estimating for Manufacturing (4+0)
Prerequisites: MET 300, 325, 330 and MTH 151.
Manufacturing costs, types of estimates, computer applications to cost estimating, cost estimating controls and cost estimating procedures are studied.
MET 428-3 Energy Technology (2+2)
Prerequisite: MET 331.
Global energy flows, sources and uses of energy are studied.
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School of Engineering Technology
Biological energy and ecosystems are introduced from the viewpoint of the engineering technologist. Energy-related environment problems including air and thermal pollution plus radioactivity are treated.
MET 448-3 Air Conditioning/Refrigeration (3+0)
Prerequisite: MET 312.
Refrigeration cycles are studied. Operation and rating of system components are evaluated with heat flow in condensers, evaporators and cooling towers treated. Control of temperature and humidity along with air handling equipment, ducting, etc., are studied.
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Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary & Urban Studies
School of Liberal Arts
Phillip Boxer, Dean
Academic Departments:
Art
Economics
English
History
Modern Languages Music Philosophy Political Science Psychology
Sociology/Anthropology Speech Communications
Center for Interdisciplinary and Urban Studies
Phillip Boxer, Dean
David Conde, Associate Dean
Urban Interdisciplinary Departments/Programs:
Afro-American Studies Chicano Studies
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration Industrial Communications Urban Studies Womens Studies


School of Liberal Arts
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
The School of Liberal Arts offers flexible programs in the social sciences and humanities directed toward personal, occupational, and professional goals in a rapidly changing world.
Each Liberal Arts department (Art, Economics, English, History, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology-Anthropology, Speech) provides a comprehensive academic program with many options to fulfill the multiple needs of a diverse urban college population.
The Liberal Arts curriculum amplifies the programs of every other academic area of the College by offering the wide range of courses generally included in the total educational mission of an accredited institution.
Liberal Arts studies aim toward the development of perspective and intellectual strength for the endeavors of a lifetime. The School of Liberals Arts is fully engaged in expanding career programs that combine the preparations and broad background elements essential for educational sufficiency in todays urban community.
In harmony with the basic philosophy and goals of Metropolitan State College, the School of Liberal Arts assumes a major role in encouraging and preparing students to participate fully in the challenges and opportunities of modern life. School of Liberal Arts departmental majors and minors, as shown below, lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.
Art
The Art Department offers a full range of studio art courses in the Applied Art areas of graphic communications and advertising design, photography, product and industrial design; the Craft disciplines of clay, metal, and wood; and the Fine Arts of drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Art History studies include contemporary and modern art courses, ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque art. Art Education methods courses may be taken in addition to the Art Major program, enabling students to be certified for teaching art at the secondary school level.
Art Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
Semester
Required Courses Houn
ART 105 Art as a Profession......................... 1
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts I............ 3
ART 112 Drawing Processes and Concepts II .......... 3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts I ............ 3
ART 122 Design Processes and Concepts II............ 3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism
to 1960 .................................... 3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960
to Present.................................. 3
ART 210 Two Dimensional Media and Processes...... 3
ART 220 Three Dimensional Media and Processes..... 3
The above listed required courses in Art comprise an art core program of 25 credit hours, generally to be completed prior to enrollment in Upper Division art courses.
Upper Division requirements include study in the following sub-areas:
A. Applied Arts
Graphic Communications and Advertising Design Photography
Product and Industrial Design
B. Crafts
Ceramics
Design in Wood
Metalwork and Jewelrymaking
C. Fine Arts
Drawing Printmaking
Painting Sculpture
D. Art History
Contemporary and Modern Art Ancient and Medieval Art Renaissance and Baroque Art
Semester
Hours
Twelve credit hours are required with a specific
Art area of A, B, C, or D............................. 12
Eighteen credit hours are required consisting of two courses from each of the remaining
Art areas of A, B, C, or D............................ 18
Six credit hours are elective from any of the Art areas of A, B, C, or D................................. 6
61
Minor requirement for Art Majors is optional.
Art Education
Students seeking secondary credentials in Art must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of Metropolitan State College in addition to all of the Art Major requirements.
Communications Multi Major for Bachelor of Arts
Visual Communications Concentration
See Communications Multi-Major, page 111, for requirements of this Interdisciplinary umbrella program sponsored
by the Department of Art.
Minor in Art
Required Courses in Lower Division
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts I............ 3
ART 112 Drawing Processes and Concepts II .......... 3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts I ............ 3
ART 122 Design Processes and Concepts II............ 3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism
to 1960 .................................... 3
ART 210 Two Dimensional Media and Processes....... 3
ART 220 Three Dimensional Media and Processes..... 3
Electives in Upper Division................. 6
Minimum of one Studio Art course Minimum of one Art History course
Total................................................. 27
ART 100-3 Art Appreciation (3 + 0)
A lecture course primarily for people who are not art majors, but who are interested in acquiring information about the various periods of art as a basis for broadening their knowledge and appreciation of the subject.
ART 105-1 Art as a Profession (1 +0)
Introduces students to the variety of possible careers in the art profession and advises students of why and how to prepare themselves for the profession. Required for all art majors. Must be taken by the end of third semester (transfer students by end of second semester).
ART 110-3 Basic Drawing Methods (0 + 6)
A studio course for the non-art major which introduces basic
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School of Liberal Arts
drawing media and materials. Principles of graphic control are taught with an emphasis toward developing creativity and a personal fine art expression.
ART 111-3 Drawing Processes and Concepts I (0 + 6)
Introduction to media and materials customarily used in drawing and graphics, stressing development of skills, vocabulary, and sensibilities necessary in visual communication.
ART 112-3 Drawing Processes and Concepts II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 111.
Continuation of ART 111 with emphasis on the figure, the challenge of color media, and the elasticity of ideas.
ART 120-3 Basic Design and Crafts Methods (0 + 6)
A studio art course oriented to the study of design and craft through working with a variety of craft media; paper, clay, metal, plastic, and fibers. Oriented to non-art majors.
ART 121-3 Design Processes and Concepts I (0 + 6)
Introductory course in the study of the elements and principles of design. Emphasis is on line, shape, color, and space graphically organized.
ART 122-3 Design Processes and Concepts II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 121.
A continuation of ART 121 with design emphasis including three dimensional form, space, and concept.
ART 201-3 Survey of Modern Art; Impressionism to 1960 (3 + 0)
A survey of modern art that traces the roots of contemporary art theory and techniques back to Impressionism, showing a development of these ideas through Abstract Expressionism.
ART 202-3 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the Present (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ART 201.
A survey of contemporary art that traces the development of contemporary art from the period following Abstract Expressionism to the present with emphasis on art in America.
ART 210-3 Two Dimensional Media and Processes (0 + 6)
Prerequisites: ART 112 and 122.
A foundation course to introduce information and skills needed for personal expression and communication of ideas through the manipulation of various painting and graphic media.
ART 220-3 Three Dimensional Media and Processes (0+6)
Prerequisites: ART 112 and 122.
A foundation course to introduce the knowledge and skills needed for personal expression, communication of ideas, and creation of utilitarian objects. Materials, hand and power tools, and techniques for manipulation of three dimensional form and space are utilized.
ART 301-3 Historical Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art (3 + 0)
A study of the Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic styles of art.
ART 302-3 Historical Survey of Renaissance and Baroque Art
(3 + 0)
A study of the art of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. ART 303-3 History of Art Between World Wars (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ART 201.
An in-depth study of art, architecture, and design in the transitional period between World War I and World War II.
ART 304-3 Modern Art History: Theory and Criticism (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ART 201, 202, and permission of instructor.
A seminar for advanced students involving the reading and discussion of modern writing about the visual arts. Extensive use of library facilities will be required.
ART 305-3 History of African and Afro-American Art (3+0)
History and identification of the tribal arts and crafts of Africa plus a study of contemporary Black artists. Particular
attention is given to modern Black artists in the United States.
ART 310-3 Art Instructional Methods for Elementary School (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: EDU 221.
Lecture-studio course for Elementary Education Majors. Art education theory and philosophy for classroom teaching of art to children is coupled with practical learning of art media and materials.
ART 311-3 Intermediate Drawing I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
A pivotal studio drawing experience where the skills and concepts in graphics are energetically explored.
ART 312-3 Intermediate Drawing II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 311.
A concentrated studio approach to drawing that explores diverse media and image within the context of contemporary idioms.
ART 320-3 Art Instructional Methods for Secondary School (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ART 202, 210, and 220.
For the secondary art teacher. A thorough study of adolescent development in the visual arts; evaluation of methods and processes to motivate and stimulate junior and senior high school students.
ART 321-3 Graphic Communications and Advertising Design I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
An introductory course in advertising design, illustration, and visual communication. Includes instruction relating to the preparation of art work for reproduction.
ART 322-3 Graphic Communications and Advertising Design II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 321.
Continuation of ART 321. Extended investigation into the application of design and illustration toward the solution of specific visual communication problems.
ART 325-3 Art Photography I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
Introduction to photography: materials, techniques, and concepts of picturing. Exploration and usage of basic light-sensitive materials and introduction to ideas about the art of picture-making in relation to special course projects.
ART 326-3 Art Photography II (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 325.
A continuation of concept problems in photographic seeing. Use of straight photo with emphasis on personal vision of traditional subject matter.
ART 341-3 Sculpture I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 220.
Creative approach to the problems of three dimensional design in sculpture. Construction in metals, wood, and plastics.
ART 342-3 Sculpture II (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 341.
Further development of knowledge and skills acquired in ART 341. Addition of techiques of casting in various materials.
ART 351-3 Painting I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
Painting procedure emphasizing methods, processes and techniques. The development of personal forms and images.
ART 352-3 Painting II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 351.
Continuation of ART 351, with emphasis on personal expression.
ART 361-3 Ceramics I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 220.
Introducing clay as a working medium. The instruction includes: Exploration of a variety of handbuilding methods,
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School of Liberal Arts
introduction to ceramic technology, and preparing ware for glazing and firing.
ART 362-3 Ceramics II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 361.
A continued study of ceramic art and technique with emphasis upon competent use of the potters wheel and extension of handbuilding processes. Exploration of ceramic processes at low and high temperature with emphasis on glaze testing, formulation, and usage.
ART 371-3 Serigraph Printmaking (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
Silk screen printing in which students are taught to use silk screen as a means to search for a personal and unique aesthetic image.
ART 372-3 Lithograph Printmaking (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
Black and white and colored lithographic prints are developed through traditional and contemporary techniques.
ART 373-3 Intaglio Printmaking (0+6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 210.
Various intaglio techniques are explored to allow the student to develop a unique personal expression.
ART 374-3 Photo Image Printmaking (0 + 6)
Prerequisites: ART 326, 371 or 372 or 373.
An in-depth investigation of photo printmaking possibilities in developing an aesthetic imagery.
ART 381-3 Product and Industrial Design I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 220.
Aesthetic designing of utilitarian products for the consumer market, relating appearance and functional design to such materials as metal, plastics, and wood.
ART 382-3 Product and Industrial Design II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 381.
A continuation of ART 381, extending industrial designing into corporate image, product packaging, and display.
ART 385-3 Design in Wood I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 220.
A course intended to introduce wood as a media to the artist-craftsman with the intent of creating objects, functional or non-functional, of superb expressive aesthetic quality. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the inherent potentials of the various exotic hardwoods.
ART 386-3 Design in Wood II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 385.
A continuation of ART 385, extending the content to include machine wood working as it applies to sculptural and ornamental forms.
ART 391-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking I (0 + 6)
Prerequisites or Corequisites: ART 202 and 220.
Design quality as a fundamental part of good craftsmanship is emphasized through the basic techniques involved in working nonferrous and precious metals. Course includes basic fabricating techniques, simple stone setting, and lost wax casting.
ART 392-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking II (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 391.
A continuation of ART 391, extending the content to include a variety of basic metal forming techniques: repousee, raising, block forming, forging, matting, and die forming.
ART 411-3 Advanced Drawing III (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 312.
Continued experimentation with the contemporary idioms of ART 312; designed to encourage individual probing and development.
ART 412-3 Advanced Drawing IV (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 411.
Continued experimentation with the contemporary idioms of ART 411; designed to encourage the student to explore visual ideas and systems creatively. A supportive climate for individual directions.
ART 421-3 Graphic Communications and Advertising Design III (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 322.
Continuation of ART 321 with emphasis on the production of finished work for the preparation of a graduate portfolio.
ART 422-3 Graphic Communications and Advertising Design IV (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 421.
A continuation of ART 322.
ART 425-3 Art Photography III (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 326.
Advanced photography: extended projects emphasizing personal vision and approach to media. Introduction to use of non-silver processes and media extensions.
ART 426-3 Art Photography IV (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 425.
Advanced photography: intensive involvement with personal statement resulting in production of photo book or portfolio of photos. Concentration on cohesive body of work over individual piece.
ART 441-3 Sculpture III (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 342.
This course is designed to develop the individuals ability to express his ideas and concepts in various sculptural media.
ART 442-3 Sculpture IV (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 441.
A continuation of ART 441.
ART 451-3 Painting III (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 352.
A continuation of ART 352.
ART 452-3 Painting IV (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 451.
A continuation of ART 451.
ART 461-3 Ceramics III (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 362.
Offers an opportunity to extend the students knowledge of ceramic processes including further experience with varieties of wheel-thrown forms and with combinations of wheel-thrown and handbuilt forms.
ART 362-3 Ceramics IV (0 + 6)
Prerequisite: ART 461.
To promote awareness of the technical and aesthetic possibilities inherent in ceramic processes and to develop a sense of responsibility toward the material. The problems to be approached will be formulated by students in consultation with the instructor.
ART 471-3 Advanced Printmaking I (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 371 or 372 or 373 or 374.
Advanced work in silk-screen, lithography, intaglio, and/or photo printmaking in which the student is directed toward unique individual expression.
ART 472-3 Advanced Printmaking II (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 471.
A further opportunity for the advanced student to develop a unique individual expression in printmaking, with professional control in his chosen area of specialization.
ART 481-3 Product and Industrial Design III (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 382.
Advanced industrial design study with opportunity for students to design furniture and contract interiors as well as consumer products.
ART 482-3 Product and Industrial Design IV (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 481.
A continuation of ART 481, permitting students to individually elect an area of industrial design: consumer products, furniture and appliances, interiors and furnishings, or corporate image design.
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School of Liberal Arts
ART 485-3 Design in Wood III (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 386.
A continuation of ART 386, extending the content to include advanced pneumatic hand tool techniques as they apply to sculptural and functional forms. Students aesthetic growth and development to be stressed.
ART 486-3 Design in Wood IV (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 485.
A continuation of ART 485, extending the content to include advanced jointery processes through which inherent aesthetic and structural potential are recognized. Students aesthetic growth and professionalism to be stressed.
ART 491-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking III (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 392.
A continuation of ART 392 with the content extended to include electro-forming and electro-plating processes as they pertain to the artist-craftsman. Students are required to develop a philosophy on style and methods developed for individuality of aesthetic expression.
ART 492-3 Metalwork and Jewelrymaking IV (0+6)
Prerequisite: ART 491.
A continuation of ART 491, extending the content to include photo etching and various advanced surface embellishment techniques. Student aesthetic growth and professional maturity considered essential at this level.
Economics
Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or limited resources. The study of economics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of his or her specific career objectives. The Bachelor of Arts program has been designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign economies, and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses are provided to develop the students ability in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists.
Employment opportunities in economics are available in national and international business, federal, state, and local government, and in various non-profit organizations.
A program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Business Economics is being proposed for implementation in the near future. Students interested in this program should check with the Department of Economics concerning the status of this program.
Economics Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Hours
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics................ 4
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences ...................... 4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences........................... 3
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory......... 3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ........ 3
ECO 315 Econometrics.............................. 3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought .............. 3
Electives
A minimum of 18 additional semester hours of upper-division Economics courses, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
Minor in Economics
Required Courses
ECO 201 Principles of EconomicsMacro........ 3
ECO 202 Principles of EconomicsMicro........ 3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division Economics courses, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
ECO 150-3 Consumer Economics (3+0)
Economic analysis applied to a variety of consumer problems. Topics include determination of family income, consumer durables, taxation and government services, business-consumer relationships and the role of government services, business-consumer relationships and the role of government in protection and regulation.
ECO 201-3 Principles of EconomicsMacro (3+0)
Introduction to the principles of economics emphasizing an analysis of the economy as a whole. Topics include the methods used in economics, national income accounting, income determination and an analysis of monetary and fiscal policies used by government to combat inflation and unemployment.
ECO 202-3 Principles of EconomicsMicro (3+0)
Introduction to the principles of economics with an emphasis on individual economic units. Topics include consumer choice, production theory, theory of the firm, problems of economic efficiency and problems of economic concentration.
ECO 250-3 Current Economic Issues (3 + 0)
Analysis of selected economic phenomena of contemporary interest to the general public. Discussion of alternatives facing the people concerned. May be repeated for credit when different issues are studied. Concurrent coursework in Principles of Economics recommended.
ECO 301-3 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
Production, price and distribution theory. Value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market structures. Topics include consumer theory, competitive, oligopoly and monopoly pricing and output behavior, pricing or factors of production and welfare theory.
ECO 302-3 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
A survey of major aggregate economic models. Emphasis is on the role of consumption, investment, and government decisions on aggregate economic activity. Topics include an analysis of consumption and investment decisions, income determination models, monetary and fiscal policy and economic growth.
ECO 310-3 Money and Banking (3+0)
Prerequisite: ECO 201.
The study of money as a policy variable affecting economic activity. Money is examined both in its role in exchange and as an instrument of economic policy. The Federal Reserve System, money supply, money demand and their respective effects on macroeconomic activity are stressed.
ECO 315-3 Econometrics (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202 and MTH 121 or CMS 231 or permission of instructor.
Application of mathematical techniques to problems in economics. Emphasis is on application rather than computational methods of mathematical rigor. The problems of acquiring, measuring and using economic data are examined.
ECO 320-3 Economic History of the U.S. (3+0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
Historical trends in American economic organizations and institutions and their development from colonial times to present. Topics include problems of national and regional industrial development, economic stability and trends in income distribution.
ECO 325-3 Labor Economics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ECO 202.
The study of the topics related to the supply of labor, the allocation of labor among uses, the extent and incidence of unemployment, and the determination of wages. Concentration is on application of economic theory to
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understand the behavior of labor and problems of labor markets.
ECO 330-3 State and Local Finance (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ECO 202.
The study of the topics related to state and local fiscal problems. Topics include demand for state and local government services, analysis of state and local tax instruments and their incidence, intergovernmental fiscal coordination, program budgeting and regulation.
ECO 335-3 Urban Economic Analysis (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ECO 202.
Analysis of the structure of urban economic activity and the economic aspects of urban problems. Particular emphasis is on urban poverty, location and differential growth rates of cities, urban transportation problems, housing problems and selected problems in local government finance.
ECO 340-3 Transportation Economics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ECO 202.
Economic analysis applied to specific problems of transport. Topics include the effects of location and transportation costs on firm behavior, public policy and regulation of transportation firms, rate structure and public investment in mass transit and other facilities.
ECO 345-3 Environmental Economics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ECO 202.
An economic analysis of the causes and consequences of environmental degradation and of public policy measures designed to preserve, protect and enhance human environments.
ECO 410-3 Capital Allocation (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202 or permission of instructor.
A broad spectrum survey of capital allocation alternatives from the corporate and individual viewpoint. Study of the peculiarities of various investment vehicles and their special techniques.
ECO 415-3 Mathematical Economics (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 315 or permission of instructor. Mathematical analysis of economic theory. Topics include a wide range of mathematical techniques applied to economic topics such as theory of choice, externalities and public goods, general equilibrium, growth and stability.
ECO 420-3 Economic History of Europe (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202 or ECO 320 or permission of instructor.
Evolution of industrial society with emphasis on the growth and development of English industry and commerce.
ECO 425-3 Economics of Collective Bargaining (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
An examination of the economic aspects and effects of labor unions and collective bargaining. Topics include models of union behavior, bargaining theories, industrial wage differentials, economic consequences of public unionism and the impact of trade unions on employment, output and inflation.
ECO 430-3 Public Finance (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
An analysis of the effects of taxation, government expenditures, fiscal policy and public debt on resource allocation and income distribution. Topics include taxation,, pricing of public services, intergovernmental fiscal relations, and macroeconomic issues in public finance.
ECO 435-3 Regional Economics (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
Introduction to the techniques of regional economic analysis. Regional growth and change and interregional disparities in economic actvity are examined. Topics include economic base analysis, input-output analysis and strategies for regional development.
ECO 440-3 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
An examination of the structure, conduct, and performance of American industries. Questions of public policy in dealing
with problems created by industrial concentration including the regulation of public utilities are examined. Industries are measured against the yardstick of the public interest.
ECO 445-3 International Economics and Finance (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
Fundamental economic concepts for understanding international economic relationships. Topics include international trade theory, capital movements international monetary institutions, balance of payments adjustments and the impact of trade polices on economic development and growth.
ECO 450-3 Business and Economic Forecasting (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201.
The general approaches to predicting macroeonomic activity, and how these techniques are implemented into the management decision process. Topics include data acquisition, quantitative techniques, business cycle theories and macroeconomic forecasting, industry and sales forecasting.
ECO 455-3 Comparative Economic Systems (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
An institutional and theoretical analysis of alternative economic systems. Topics include an analysis of the theoretical Marxian system as well as a comparison of capitalism, socialism and communism.
ECO 460-3 History of Economic Thought (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 201, 202.
Survey of the development of economic thought from ancient to modern times. Topics include the classical school from Smith through Mill; Marxian economics; the marginalists and institutional economics.
ECO 465-3 Advanced Monetary Theory (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: ECO 310 or FIN 350.
An analysis of monetary models and money as a policy determinant and its place in national and international economies. Topics include the importance of interest rates, the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy, examination of portfolio balance models, and disequilibrium international models.
English
The Department of English offers comprehensive and varied programs in literature, language, and writing. A number of the courses in these programs are intended to appeal to students in every school of the College who wish to read and understand the major works of literature, to acquire the ability to express themselves accurately, lucidly, and forcefully, and to develop their intellectural and imaginative powers. More advanced courses are designed for students who are especially interested in one or more of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Among these are courses in journalism and communications. These courses provide students with the opportunity to study and to practice using the modes of expression, verbal and nonverbal, employed by newspapers, television and radio, commercial and industrial firms, and governmental agencies.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts
General Emphasis
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature I ENG 221 American Literature I ENG 231 British Literature I
Semester Hours Required........................... 9
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language ENG 202 English Grammar
Semester Hours Required........................... 3
III. Two of the following courses:
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ENG 212 World Literature II ENG 222 American Literature II ENG 232 British Literature II ENG 233 British Literature III
Semester Hours Required..............................
IV. One of the following courses:
ENG 351 Advanced Composition*
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction, Poetry, or Drama)*
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing
Semester Hours Required..............................
V. One of the following general courses:
ENG 231 Drama in the United States
ENG 322 American Poetry
ENG 323 American Novel
ENG 324 Afro-American Literature
ENG 331 Development of British Drama I
ENG 332 Development of British Drama II
ENG 333 British Novel I
ENG 334 British Novel II
ENG 336 British Poetry
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature ENG 343 Classical Mythology ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences Semester Hours Required........................
VI. Four electives from 300-400 level courses including at least one of from the following:
ENG 401 Seminar in Modern Linguistic Studies ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature ENG 413 Major Authors
ENG 414 Modern Continental, English and American Drama
ENG 431 Shakespeare I: Comedies, Histories and Sonnets
ENG 432 Shakespeare II: Tragedies and Ethical-Problem Plays
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing ENG 461 Literary Criticism
Semester Hours Required................................
Total Semester Hours Required
6
3
3
12
36
Prerequisite: Corresponding lower division course or pass department examination. Lower division prerequisite does not count toward major.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts:
Secondary School Teaching Emphasis*
In compliance with the Colorado State Teacher Certification Act of 1975, this English Education program applies to all students beginning their course work for certification in English after September 1, 1977.
Required Courses for Certification Hours
I. ENG 211 World Literature I ........................ 3
ENG 221 American Literature I..................... 3
ENG 222 American Literature II ................... 3
ENG 231 British Literature I...................... _3
Lower Division Literature: Semester Hours Required . 12
II. ENG 201 Nature of Language........................ 3
ENG 202 English Grammer............................. _3
Lower Division Language: Semster Hours Required .. 6
III. ENG 301 Structure of the English Language........ 3
ENG 303 Semantics ................................
or ENG 302, History of the English Language ...... _3
Upper Division Language: Semester Hours Required 6
IV. ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents .............. 3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition ........................ 3
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools . **
ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary
Schools ................................... 3
ENG 328 Methods and Techniques of Teaching
Reading: Secondary........................ **
COM 376 Instructional Communication................. _3
English Education Core Courses:
Semester Hours Required............................. 12
V. English Electives:
Three upper division English courses (including at least one 400-level) selected in consultation with and approved by designated English Department advisors.
Semester hours required................................. _9
Total Semester Hours Required........................... 45
Candidates for certification are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors, and advisor approval must be obtained before the English Department will endorse a candidate for certification.
'Students seeking secondary credentials in English must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the English major requirements.
While ENG 361 and RDG 328 are required to meet state English Certification requirements, these five semester hours are carried under the Student's Professional Education requirements.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts:
Writing Emphasis
Writing Component
Entry Course:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing Semester hours required..............
Semester
Hours
One of the following writing courses:
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition
Introduction to Technical Writing Advanced Composition Techniques of Critical Writing Workshop: Scribes Magazine
COM 271 ENG 351 ENG 353 ENG 456
Semester hours required................................ 3
Three of the following creative writing courses:
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction)
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Science Fiction)
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Poetry)
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Drama)
COM 374 Script Writing: Film or Television
Semester hours required................................ 9
Exit Course:
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing Semester hours required..............
Literature Component
One of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature I ENG 221 American Literature I ENG 231 British Literature II Semester hours required..............
Each of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature II ENG 272 American Literature II ENG 233 British Literature III Semester hours required ................
One of the following courses:
ENG 321 Drama in the United States
ENG 322 American Poetry
ENG 323 American Novel
ENG 324 Afro-American Literature
ENG 331 Development of British Drama I
ENG 332 Development of British Drama II
ENG 333 British Novel I
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ENG 334 British Novel II ENG 336 British Poetry
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature ENG 343 Classicial Mythology ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences Semester hours required ..........................
One of the following courses:
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature ENG 413 Major Authors
ENG 414 Modern Continental, English, and American Drama
ENG 431 Shakespeare I: Comedies, Histories, Sonnets ENG 432 Shakespeare II: Tragedies and Ethical-Problem Plays
ENG 461 Literary Criticism
Semester hours required ...............................
Total Semester hours required..........................
3
_3
36
English Minor
I. Two of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature I ENG 212 World Literature II ENG 221 American Literature I ENG 222 American Literature II ENG 231 British Literature I ENG 232 British Literature II ENG 233 British Literature III
Semester Hours Required............................... 6
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Langauge ENG 202 English Grammar
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing
COM 271 Introduction to Technical Writing
Semester Hours Required............................... 3
III. Three electives from 300-400 level courses including at least one from the fSTTowing:
ENG 321 Drama in the United States
ENG 322 American Poetry
ENG 323 American Novel
ENG 324 Afro-American Literature
ENG 331 Development of British Drama I
ENG 332 Development of British Drama II
ENG 333 British Novel I
ENG 334 British Novel II
ENG 336 British Poetry
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature ENG 343 Classicial Mythology ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences
Semester Hours Required........................... _9
Total Semester Hours Required..................... 18
; i
English Minor:
Secondary School Teaching Emphasis*
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents ENG 351 Advanced Composition
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools Semester Hours Required............................ 12
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 301 Advanced Study of the Structure of the English Language
ENG 302 History of the English Language ENG 303 Semantics
Semester Hours Required............................ 3
III. Three English Electives from 300-400 level courses selected in consultation with and approved by designated English Department advisors.
Semester Hours Required.......................... 9
Total Semester Hours Required.................... 24
This minor does not satisfy MSC requirements for certification in Secondary English, but does meet minimum requirements for those seeking eligibility to teach English in secondary schools accredited by the North Central Association. Students working toward this minor are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors.
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
The Journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media, including the press, broadcasting, and public relations. Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism beyond JRN 181. Prospective journalism students who might be concerned about such proficiency may request and take a test in standard English usage and composition, designed by the journalism faculty, before registering for any courses beyond Introduction to Journalism. According to the results, the faculty may recommend that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102
before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181. The test in standard English usage will be administered in all 100-level journalism classes.
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies JRN 383 Contemporary Issues JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout
JRN 485 News Media, Propaganda and Public Opinion
JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing
Total Semester Hours Required....................... 36
'Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Journalism Minor
I. Each of the following courses:
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing Semester Hours Required............................... 6
II. Five of the following courses:
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies JRN 383 Contemporary Issues JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout
JRN 485 News Media, Propaganda and Public Opinion JRN 486 Advanced News Writing
Semester Hours Required ......................... 15
Total Semester Hours Required.................... 21
'Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
ENG 100-3 Elements of Composition (3+0)
A course in the fundamentals of sentence structure diction,
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punctuation, and organization. Required of students whose facility in English is below the norm for first-year college students, as determined by tests and a writing sample.
ENG 101-3 Freshman Composition: The Essay (3+0)
A course in the kinds of writing frequently required in college: analytical reports, informative and persuasive composition, and essay examinations. All students must pass a departmental examination before they may take ENG 102.
ENG 102-3 Freshman Composition: Analysis, Research, and Documentation (3+0)
Prerequisite: ENG 101.
The course provides instruction in writing the research paper, documenting it properly, and in writing analytical and interpretive essays.
ENG 106-3 English for Speakers of Other Languages (3 +0)
Development of the basic skills of reading, writing, and speaking English for native and foreign speakers of other languages. Instructions in the fundamentals of English usage.
ENG 111-3 Introduction to Literature: Fiction (3+0)
A critical introduction to selected short stories and short novels, with emphasis on twentieth-century British and American writings.
Recommended for the Humanities general studies requirement.
ENG 112-3 Introduction to Literature: Drama (3+0)
A critical introduction to drama: study of a number of plays, mostly British and American.
Recommended for the Humanities general studies requirement.
ENG 113-3 Introduction to Literature: Poetry (3 +0)
A critical introduction to American and British poetry, from lyric to confessional, through the study of prosody, meaning, and form.
Recommended for the Humanities general studies requirement.
ENG 114-3 Literature of Popular Interest (3+0)
Courses which have an appeal at a given time will be offered under this general title. The specific course or courses will be designated by a descriptive title, such as science fiction, detective fiction, tales of terror. May be repeated for credit under different titles.
ENG 131-3 Introduction to Shakespeare (3+0)
Experience in skills and techniques which help in reading and understanding Shakespeare.
ENG 201-3 The Nature of Language (3 +0)
In the beginning was language! An overview of the dynamic linguistic insights into grammars, language acquisition, social dialects, and language changes, and an evaluation of myths and illusions about language. For majors in humanities and social sciences, but especially appealing to science majors.
ENG 202-3 English Grammar (3 + 0)
A review of Traditional Grammar, a survey of Structural Linguistics, and an introduction to early Generative-Transformational Grammar. Historical background; examination, comparison, and contrast of principles; phonology, morphology, analysis of syntax. Not a course in English usage.
ENG 211-3 World Literature I: Homer to Cervantes (3 + 0)
Literature of Greece, Rome, and other European countries through the Renaissance.
Recommended as the beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 212-3 World Literature II: Descartes to Satre (3 + 0)
Continental literature since the Renaissance.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 221-3 American Literature I (3 + 0)
American literature from the Colonial Period through Walt Whitman.
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 222-3 American Literature II (3 + 0)
American literature from Mark Twain to the present. Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 231-3 British Literature I (3 + 0)
British literature from the Old English period to the Restoration (1660).
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 232-3 British Literature II (3 + 0)
British literature from the Restoration (1660) to the Victorian Period (1832).
Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors
ENG 233-3 British Literature III: Modern Era (3 + 0)
British literature from the Victorian Period to the present. Recommended as a beginning course for English majors and minors.
ENG 251-3 Intermediate Composition (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ENGI 102 or permission of instructor. Examination of rhetorical strategies used in writing effective non-fiction prose. Exercises and discussion on, production and evaluation of essays, critical analyses, and documented papers. Editing techniques and manuscript form conventions.
ENG 252-3 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.
Lectures, group discussions, and exercises in writing fiction, poetry, and drama.
ENG 301-3 Advanced Study of the Structure of the English Language (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ENG 201, or permission of instructor.
An experience in discovery: The patterns of sounds, words, and sentences of English are mastered through a transformational/generative grammar approach. Other grammars are also introduced. Recommended for humanities and social science majors.
ENG 302-3 History of the English Language (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of both the internal history sounds and inflections and the external historythe great political, social, and cultural influences which have combined to make the English language what it is today, including an analysis of regional and dialectal speech.
ENG 303-3 Semantics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of what, how, and why people mean. Where does meaning come from and how is it determined? Course also investigates and applies the syntactic, symbolic, and pragmatic elements of semantics. Especially recommended for Majors in pre-law, communications, law-enforcement, psychology, teaching, and related disciplines.
ENG 321-3 Drama in the United States (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission or instructor.
A study of plays written in the United States from 1714 to the present.
ENG 322-3 American Poetry (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
The study of major American poets from Bradstreet to Frost with emphasis on artistic achievement through analysis of prosody and theme.
ENG 323-3 American Novel. (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of practice, theory, and critical evaluation of the
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American novel from the early nineteenth century to the 1940's.
ENG 324-3 Afro-American Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of the various forms of literature produced by black Americans. The works are considered in the context of the historical and social conditions of the time at which they were written.
ENG 331-3 Development of British Drama I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Plays selected from medieval, sixteenth, and seventeenth century drama to acquaint students with the origin and development of major kinds of plays.
ENG 332-3 Development of British Drama II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Plays selected from the Restoration and eighteenth century and from the transitional period (1880-1920) of British drama to acquaint students with the development of modern plays.
ENG 333-3 British Novel I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of trends in the novel from the beginnings to 1800. ENG 334-3 British Novel II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of trends in the novel from 1800 to present.
ENG 336-3 British Poetry (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of six centuries of British poetry from Chaucer to Yeats and Eliot, with emphasis upon the works of the major poets of each period.
ENG 341-3 Masterpieces of Continental Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Major works by European writers from the classical period to the present. May be repeated for credit if different content is specified.
ENG 342-3 The English Bible as Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of the King James Bible with emphasis on the literary forms and the cultural traditions of the Old and New Testaments.
ENG 343-3 Classical Mythology (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or or permission of instructor.
A study of Greek and Roman myths, their parallels in other mythologies, and their occurrence in literature and criticism. By tracing the modifications of various myths from their most ancient forms to todays poems, the course will acquaint students with the continued vitality of mythology.
ENG 345-3 Literature from Writings in the Sciences (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Study of scientific works of literary merit written by eminent scientists for the general reader.
ENG 346-3 Children's Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of all levels and types of childrens literature for the student who is interested in literature per se and for the student who is planning to become a teacher. An introduction to types and varieties of literature for reading to children as well as reading by children.
ENG 347-3 Literature for Adolescents (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A critical survey of literature for adolescents, including the
contemporary adolescent novel, current poetry and drama, and multicultural/ethic literature. Also focuses on censorship, book selection, non-sexist books, and nonfiction. Recommended for Reading, English and Secondary Majors.
ENG 351-3 Advanced Composition (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of the theoretical and ethical bases of persuasive writing and practice in the principles and techniques which effect constructive persuasion in a pluralistic society.
ENG 352-3 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction, Poetry, or Drama) (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ENG 252, or permission of instructor.
Group discussions and supervised projects in writing imaginative literature. May be repeated for credit for each of the genres.
ENG 353-3 Techniques of Critical Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Methods and practice in writing critical responses to art forms including literature, theatre, and film. The course provides experience in writing journalistic and academic criticism.
ENG 361-3 Teaching English in Secondary Schools (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Investigation, preparation, and presentation of current techniques, materials, and media for teaching English in junior and senior high schools.
ENG 362-3 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ENG 361, or permission of instructor.
Analysis, evaluation, and application of the major systems of teaching composition, techniques of correction and revision, and motivation for writing.
ENG 401-3 Seminar in Modern Linguistic Studies (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Any one of the following: ENG 201, 301, 302, 303, or ANT 337.
Theories and applications: The seminar topics range over the extensive research in linguistic studies from grammars to stylistics and from sidewalk linguisitics to speech acts. Individualized projects.
ENG 411-3 Advanced Studies in Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
The study of selected works chosen as representative of an important school or group within a period. May be repeated for credit under different titles.
ENG 412-3 Selected Themes in Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A study of literary works selected as significant expressions of a theme, idea, or mode. The works studied are not necessarily restricted to a particular period or country. May be repeated for credit under different titles.
ENG 413-3 Major Authors (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
The course traces in representative works the artistic and intellectual development of one or two important writers.
May be repeated for credit under different titles.
ENG 414-3 Modern Continental English, and American Drama (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
A comprehensive survey of the important dramatic works of the last hundred years with emphasis on trends and developments. Plays by German, Scandinavian, Russian, Italian, Spanish, French, British, and American playwrights are included.
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ENG 431-3 Shakespeare I: Comedies, Histories, Sonnets (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Selected comedies, and histories including The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Richard II, 1 & 2 Henry IV, Henry V; selected sonnets.
ENG 432-3 Shakespeare II: Tragedies and Ethical-Problem Plays (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Selected tragedies, and problem plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida, Cymbeline.
ENG 452-3 Advanced Creative Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: ENG 352, or permission of instructor.
Individual instruction and independent projects in writing fiction, poetry, and drama; instruction in submitting work for publication. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
ENG 456 Scribes Magazine Publication (3 + 0)
A creative writing-community service project designed for mature, sophisticated students who will write, edit do PR work, think critically, work independently, and yet work on a group projectthe editing, production, publishing, and distribution of Scribes Magazinea literary journal of, by, for, and about Senior Citizens in the Community.
ENG 461-3 Literary Criticism (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Six semester hours of English above 102, or permission of instructor.
Studies in the major schools of literary criticism from Plato and Aristotle to the twentieth century.
JOURNALISM
JRN 181-3 Introduction to Journalism (3 + 0)
Introduction to journalistic practices, an appraisal of the news media, studying the basic elements of the news story and development of news writing techniques.
JRN 182-3 Beginning Reporting and News Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: JRN 181, or permission of instructor. Concentration on sharpening the basic skills of reporting and news writing, with stress on accuracy and speed in compiling news stories.
JRN 282-3 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: JRN 181, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the techniques of copy editing, headline writing, page layout and dummying, including a survey of print media production methods.
JRN 286-3 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, and 182, or permission of instructor. News gathering and writing techniques in specific fields, such as politics, urban affairs, judicial, crime, sports, and human interest stories.
JRN 381-3 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, 182 and 286 or written approval of a journalism faculty member.
The study of content and writing style of newspaper feature sections, with numerous assignments in developing feature ideas and producing finished stories for the purpose of selling them to newspaper feature sections.
JRN 382-3 Public Relations Writing and Strategies (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181 and 182 or written approval of instructor.
News writing, problem-solving, and publication production for institutions and organizations with emphasis on sound reportorial techniques.
JRN 383-3 Contemporary Issues (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, 282 and 286.
In-depth investigations and writing about political, social, or
economic issues, wherein each student works independently but shares the experience with the entire class.
JRN 384-3 Broadcast News Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 182, 282 and 286 or written permission of instructor.
Writing news and features for radio and television newscasts, with emphasis on clarity and conciseness, with instruction and practical work. The course includes guest appearances by persons working in broadcast journalism.
JRN 481-3 Feature Article Writing for Magazines (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, 182, 286, 381 or written approval of instructor.
Intensive study and application in the techniques and marketing requirements for producing and selling feature articles to magazines.
JRN 482-3 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, 182 and 282.
Advanced instruction and experience in the techniques of copy editing, headline writing, layout, and print media production.
JRN 485-3 News Media, Propaganda and Public Opinion (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, 182 and 286.
An overview of the mass media and its role in society, with emphasis on how the media affects and responds to public opinion and how it resists and abets propaganda.
JRN 486-3 Advanced Reporting and News Writing (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: JRN 181, 182, 282 and 286.
An intensive, high-level experience in advanced reporting and news writing, wherein the student polishes his/her ability to as near a professional level as possible.
History
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Somester
Required Courses Hours
HIS 101 Western Civilization I ......................... 3
HIS 102 Western Civilization II......................... 3
HIS 121 American History I.............................. 3
HIS 122 American History II............................. 3
Electives
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in History is required, 18 hours of which must be Upper Division.
Grade Average
Students majoring in History must maintain at least a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Advising
History majors should consult with a departmental advisor to select the courses in other disciplines which complement their area of concentration in the major.
Minor in History
There are three different options available to students seeking a History minor. I) Regular History option, II) American West History option, III) Twentieth Century Studies History option.
Regular History Option
Required Courses
HIS 101 Western Civilization I ......................... 3
HIS 102 Western Civilization II......................... 3
HIS 121 American History I............................... 3
HIS 122 American History II.............................. 3
Electives
A minimum of 6 additional semester hours in History. The hours must be upper division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor.
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American West History Option
Required Courses
HIS 110 American West ............................ 3
HIS 111 Colorado History I........................ 3
HIS 121 American History I........................ 3
HIS 122 American History II....................... 3
Electives
Nine upper division hours are required at least six of which must be selected from the list below. The remaining three hours may be selected from the list below or with the permission of the History Department they may be chosen from other courses relating to the American West.
HIS 301 History of Denver.......................... 3
HIS 310 American West Seminar...................... 3
HIS 311 Colorado History II ....................... 3
HIS 360 State and Local History.................... 3
Twentieth Century Studies History Option Required Courses
HIS 122 American History II......................., 3
HIS 201 Contemporary World History................ 3
Electives
Fifteen additional upper division hours should be selected from the following areas with a maximum of nine hours in any one area:
A. Modern European History
HIS 323 Nineteenth Century Europe................ 3
HIS 326 Twentieth Century Europe, 1914-1939...... 3
HIS 328 Modern Germany, 1789-1970s............... 3
HIS 329 Nazi Germany............................. 3
HIS 332 History of England II.................... 3
HIS 432 Russia Since 1905 ....................... 3
HIS 465 World War II, 1939-1948 ................. 3
B. Modern American History
HIS 307 Ethnicity in History .................... 3
HIS 308 Contemporary Challenges.................. 1
HIS 309 Futurology .............................. 1
HIS 354 Shaping of Modern U.S., 1877-1920........ 3
HIS 364 Roaring Twenties and Hungry Thirties.. 3
HIS 366 Recent U.S., 1945-1970S.................. 3
HIS 381 Latin America II......................... 3
Upper division history omnibus courses and readings courses will count for Twentieth Century Studies if the course (as indicated by its title) relates to the twentieth century.
Grade Average
Students minoring in History must maintain a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Secondary School Education Certification in Social Sciences:
Students majoring in History may combine their major with other courses in the Social Sciences and in Education to receive Secondary Education Certification. The requirements of this program are included under the Education Department section of this catalog.
Pre-Law Courses
Several history courses are of particular importance to prelaw students. These include HIS 121, HIS 122, and HIS 368. Students interested in pre-law courses are urged to contact the departmental advisor.
HIS 100-3 American Civilization I (3 + 0)
An introduction to contemporary American history and character, with emphasis on those forces and events which are shaping modern America.
HIS 101-3 Western Civilization I (3 + 0)
A survey of the development of the culture and institutions
of Western Civilization: the earliest civilizations of the Middle East, the transitions of the classical Mediterranean world, and the syntheses of Western Europe in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods.
HIS 102-3 Western Civilization II (3 + 0)
The history and culture of Western Civilization from 1715 to the present: the old regime and revolutions, nineteenth century nationalism and liberalism, and the crises of wars and values in the twentieth century.
HIS 110-3 American West (3 + 0)
Treats the growth and development of the Trans-Mississippi West from 1540 to 1900. Special attention will be paid to the economic and social factors which made the West a distinct region.
HIS 111-3 Colorado History I (3 + 0)
History of the growth and development of Colorado with primary emphasis on the nineteenth century. Course treats Native American influence, Spanish, French and United States exploration, mining and trapping: early settlements and pioneer life.
HIS 121-3 American History I (3 + 0)
Surveys the European background of American history, the colonial period, the Revolution, the development of the United States from Washington through Jackson, the sectional differences of the 1840s and 1850s and the Civil War.
HIS 122-3 American History II (3 + 0)
This course covers the immediate background to present day America beginning with the Civil War and culminating with World War II. Such topics as industrialization, emergence of the U.S. as a world power, the First World War, the roaring twenties and the great depression will be treated.
HIS 150-1-3 Popular Culture (1-3 + 0)
A study of the content, trends, genres, tastes, technical developments, and perspectives of popular culture studies. Topics will vary to accommodate student needs and interests. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
HIS 201-3 Contemporary World History (3 + 0)
Course explores the major experiences of man in the twentieth century emphasizing world history and the similarity of mans political, social, and economic experiences in this dynamic century.
HIS 301-3 History of Denver (3 + 0)
Emphasizes the growth and development of Denver. Field trips are utilized to clarify the city's history. Students are acquainted with agencies interested in preserving the citys history.
HIS 302-1 Masterpieces in History: (1+0)
Considers the works of the great historians. Some of the modules offered will be: The Ancients; Romantics and Rationalists; and The Americans. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
HIS 304-2 Ancient Near East (2 + 0)
This course is designed to give the student a greater knowledge of, and a deeper insight into, the nature and processes of Western mans transition from barbarism to civilization in the Middle East and Asia Minor.
HIS 305-3 Classical Greece and Rome (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: HIS 101, or permission of instructor.
This course traces the development of the classical Mediterranean Civilization from its Aegean origins through classical Greece and Republican Rome to the great synthesis of the Roman Empire.
HIS 307-3 Ethnicity in History (3 + 0)
Although concerned with the general problems involved in the study of ethnicity, this course will concentrate on a wide variety of ethnic groups; the topics will change, depending on student needs and interests.
HIS 308-1 Contemporary Challenges (1+0)
This course may examine in depth a major topical issue confronting contemporary America. Topics will vary to accommodate student interests. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
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HIS 309-1 Futurology (1 +0)
This course will examine the historical currents of our time and the direction in which they are taking the United States. Topics will vary to accommodate student interests. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
HIS 310-3 American West Seminar (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: HIS 110, or permission of instructor.
In this seminar students consider various topics relating to the American frontier. Primary emphasis will be on the nineteenth and twentieth century Trans-Mississippi West.
HIS 311-3 Colorado History II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: HIS 111, or permission of instructor.
Course concentrates on Twentieth Century Colorados political, social and economic history. The progressive movement, the Ku Klux Klan's rise to power, the Depression Years and post World War II Colorado are covered in depth.
HIS 312-3 Medieval History (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: HIS 101, or permission of instructor.
Course covers the history and culture of Europe from ca. 325 to 1300 emphasizing such themes as the transition from ancient to medieval civilization, Latin Christianity, the Carolingian empire, the papacy and the development of feudal society.
HIS 314-3 Renaissance and Reformation (3 + 0)
After studying its political, religious, cultural, and economic roots in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, the religious upheaval of the sixteenth century is examined in detail. Also considered is the immediate and long-range effect of the Reformation upon Western Civilization.
HIS 321-3 French Revolution and Napoleon: 1715-1815(3 + 0)
After studying its political, cultural, social, and economic roots in the eighteenth century, the French Revolution is examined in detail. Also considered are the effects of the Revolution and Napoleon upon France and the major countries of Europe.
HIS 323-3 Nineteenth Century Europe (3 + 0)
Covers Europe either as a whole or in interrelated modules, culminating in the tragic climax of World War I: a) nationalism, primarily political history; b) industrialism, social, economic, and intellectual history; c) imperialism, diplomatic history.
HIS 326-3 Twentieth Century Europe, 1914-1939 (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: HIS 102.
Internal developments in the major European nations are analyzed from World War I to 1939. Primary emphasis is placed on the impact of the First World War, Versailles, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism, and international relations.
HIS 327-3 Issues in European History (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: HIS 101, 102, or permission of instructor.
An examination of various problems in European history.
The topics will vary to accommodate student needs and interests. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
HIS 328-3 Modern Germany, 1789-1970's (3 + 0)
The history and culture of Germany are studied against the background of the transformation from the underdeveloped and politically fragmented Holy Roman Empire in 1789 to the industrial giant and world power of the twentieth century.
HIS 329-3 Nazi Germany (3 + 0)
Examines the Hitler regime in theory and practice, in peace and war, as a case study of a police state dictatorship in one of the most highly civilized and industrialized nations of the twentieth century.
HIS 331-3 History of England I (3 + 0)
Studies the institutional and cultural development of the English nation from the earliest times to the death of Queen Anne.
HIS 332-3 History of England II (3 + 0)
Analyzes the social, political, and economic developments that produced modern Great Britain, the British Empire, and the final retreat from power after World War I.
HIS 340-1-3 Biography as History: (Variable Topics) (1-3 + 0)
An in-depth examination of the lives of individuals who personify a major historical issue or theme. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
HIS 341-3 American Colonial History (3 + 0)
This course focuses upon topics and themes in colonial American history which have contributed most to American culture.
HIS 343-3 American Revolution, 1763-1787 (3 + 0)
Analyzes the structure of American society on the eve of the Revolution, the evolution of British imperial policy and the causes of the Revolution. Military and diplomatic aspects of the era are stressed as well as the forces that were making for a more perfect union.
HIS 345-3 The New Nation, U.S., 1787-1848 (3 + 0)
Covers the period from the formation of the Federal Union to the end of the Mexican War with emphasis on political and social history.
HIS 351-3 American Civil War (3 + 0)
Traces the course of the slavery controversy and the other issues that divided the union in the 1850s. Considers the war itself, particularly political, diplomatic, and constitutional issues.
HIS 352-3 Reconstruction and the South (3 + 0)
This course will focus upon the problem of restoring the union after the Civil War and will trace these reconstruction issues into the twentieth century South with special emphasis upon race relations.
HIS 354-3 Shaping of Modern U.S., 1877-1920 (3 + 0)
Traces the rise of industrialism; the organization of laborers and farmers; the growth of American imperialism; the spirit of reform in America and resulting social, political, and constitutional adjustments.
HIS 356-3 U rban History (3 + 0)
A comprehensive survey of urbanization since ancient times. Emphasis will be placed on the historical, social, and economic factors which have shaped urban life. Particular attention will be given to the emergence of the industrial city both in Europe and the United States.
HIS 357-3 Afro-American History I (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: HIS 121, HIS 122, or permission of instructor. Moving from the background of African culture and the slave trade, this course traces the distinctive role of the people of African heritage in the United States to 1876.
HIS 358-3 Afro-American History II (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: HIS 121, HIS 122, or permission of instructor. Continues a study of the role of the people of African heritage in the United States from 1876 to the present. Emphasis is placed on understanding the historical tradition which gives rise to current dilemmas facing America.
HIS 360-3-4 State and Local History (3 + 0) or (3 + 2)
A research/skill course designed to acquaint students with regional history. Emphasis will be placed on student initiated projects, on oral history techniques, and on research development.
HIS 364-3 Roaring Twenties and Hungry Thirties (3 + 0)
Covers the intellectual climate of the Twenties, domestic and foreign policies from Harding through Hoover, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and U.S diplomacy on the eve of World War II. This course can be offered as two modules, (a) on the Twenties and (b) on the Thirties.
HIS 366-3 Recent U.S., 1945-1970s (3 + 0)
This course covers America's role in the postwar world and the interaction between domestic and foreign policy with attention to such topics as The Cold War, Crises in Latin America, the Kennedy Years, and Watergate.
HIS 368-3 The Court in Crisis (3 + 0)
This course will examine the major constitutional developments in the United States from World War I to the present. Special attention will be devoted to the Supreme Court's role in advancing civil rights and civil liberties.
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HIS 371-3 Chinese History to 1800 (3 + 0)
Covers the history of China from its prehistoric beginnings to the arrival of the West in 1800, emphasizing the development of Chinese culture, economy, society, philosophy, and politics.
HIS 373-3 The Modern Far East (3 + 0)
Covers the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the Far East from the first contacts with the modern West (1800) to the present.
HIS 380-3 Latin America I: Empires (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
This course will trace and analyze the political, social, and economic development of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in America from the initial period of exploration and conquest through the institutionalization of the imperial systems.
HIS 381-3 Latin America II: Republics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
A selective analysis of the problems and solutions of the Latin American republics in their attempts to construct viable nation-states. Emphasis will be placed on the liberalism of the nineteenth century and the revolutionary experiences of the twentieth century.
HIS 389-1-2 Readings in History (1-2 + 0)
In this course, a student will read extensively in a selected area. Critiques of the works read will be submitted to the professor directing the reading. The credit is dependent upon the amount read and the quality of the critiques. May be repeated for credit as the title changes.
HIS 400-1 Research Techniques: (1 +0)
Introduces students to specialized research techniques including: research in U.S. public documents, state and municipal archives, and historical research methods. May be repeated for credit as title changes.
HIS 401-3 Methods of Teaching History: Secondary School (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. Ideally should be taken semester before student teaching is done. Examines the relationship between history and the social sciences, explores new curricular approaches, and discusses philosophies of history. The course is methodological and will deal with "new" and traditional approaches to the teaching of United States and World History.
HIS 428-3 Russia to 1905 (3 + 0)
Considers the controversial interpretations of the formation of the Russian state, the emergence of modern Russia, nineteenth century autocracy, the rise of the Intelligentsia, and the 1905 Revolution.
HIS 432-3 Russia Since 1905 (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: HIS 102, HIS 326, or permission of instructor. Explores major developments in the domestic and foreign policies of twentieth century Russia. Emphasis is placed on revolutions, on the social, political and intellectual changes which have come to Soviet Russia, and on the role of such personalities as Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev and Brezhnev.
HIS 465-3 World War II, 1939-1948 (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: HIS 102, HIS 326, or permission of instructor.
A detailed examination of World War II and the early years of the Cold War. Emphasis is placed on the war in Europe, the impact of Nazi rule, on the diplomacy among the wartime allies, and on the collapse of wartime cooperation and the advent of the Cold War, as well as containment.
Of the above courses, the following may be repeated if the topics are changed: HIS 150, HIS 302, HIS 307, HIS 308, HIS 309, HIS 327, HIS 340, HIS 389, and HIS 400.
Modern Languages
The Department of Modern Languages offers major programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign Languages, minor programs in French, German and Spanish, and Teacher Education Programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign
Languages. Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the Department administers several education programs abroad.
Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will register for foreign language courses as follows: No previous study, or less than one year in high school 101; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak 101; one semester in college 102; one year in college211 and/or 231; two years in high school211 and/or 231; or 102, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college212 and/or 232; or 211 and/or 231, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college300 level courses, or 212 and/or 232, if needed.
The above regulations may not be enforceable if the student has had no professional instruction in his chosen language within the last two years. If the benefit of this exception is not possible but the student feels that he has insufficient preparation for the required level, he should strengthen his background by auditing the course recommended by his foreign language advisor.
All students taking courses numbered 101 or 102 in French, German or Spanish will be required two hours per week of language laboratory attendance to equal one of the total five credit hours given per course. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements.
Students seeking secondary credentials in Spanish or in Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish) must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate Proficiency Test.
Major (or Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 or 212 Spanish Reading and Conversa-
sation I or II................................ 3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I............ 3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II .......... 3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation........................ 3
SPA 312' Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice..... 2
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican
Southwest................................. 3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish ... 3
SPA 331 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I ... 3
SPA 332 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II... 3
SPA 340 or 341 Survey of Spanish Literature I or II_ 3
SPA 351 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature___ 3
MDL 381* Teaching Foreign Languages in the
Secondary Schools......................... 3
SPA 411 or 412 Contemporary Spanish or Latin
American Literature.......................... 3
SPA Electives"......................................... 2
Required only when seeking a Teacher Certificate.
"Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval.
Minor in Spanish
Required Courses Houri
SPA 211 or 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or II......................................... 3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I......... 3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II ....... 3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation...................... 3
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SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican
Southwest....................................... 3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish ... 3
SPA Electives*............................................. 3
French
Minor in French
Required Courses
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation............... 3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues.................... 3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar ... 3
FRE 232 French Composition............................ 3
FRE 311 French Survey 1............................... 3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization............... 3
FRE Electives*.......................................... 3
German
Minor in German
Required Courses
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation................ 3
GER 212 German Civilization............................ 3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar .. 3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing............ 3
GER 321 or 322 Survey of German Literature I or II ... 3
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller.................. 3
GER Electives* ........................................ 3
Must be taken with department approval.
Modern Foreign Languages
Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
The composite Modern Language Major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modern languages, at least 12 hours in each. Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen languages must be taken as follows:*
Spanish
SPA 211-212 Spanish Reading and Conversation I, II .. 6
SPA 231-232 Spanish Grammar and Composition I, II . 6
French
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation........... 3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues................ 3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar ... 3
FRE 232 French Composition........................ 3
German
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation........... 3
GER 212 German Civilization....................... 3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar .. 3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing....... 3
Those seeking a Teacher Certificate in Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish) must consult the department for full information regarding program requirements.
Modem Languages
MDL 130-2 Languages for the Professionals (2 + 0)
To afford the students a practical knowledge of a foreign language (Spanish, German, French, etc.) in order to facilitate communication and to provide understanding in a
specific professional field. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
MOL 170-2 Foreign Languages for Travelers (2 + 0)
This course aims to teach the necessary basics needed when traveling in a foreign country. It will give the traveler a minimal command of the basic phrases, salutations, weather, numbers, time, statements of need and desire. May be repeated for credit as the course title changes.
MDL 381-3 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: EDU 321, plus nine hours of intermediate and advanced courses in one foreign language, or permission of instructor.
A course in methods and materials of instruction in Modern Foreign Languages at the secondary level.
'The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval.
French
FRE 101-5 Elementary French I (4 + 2)
A beginners course, with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking, and understanding, supplemented by grammar, reading, and writing.
FRE 102-5 Elementary French II (4+2)
Prerequisite: FRE 101, or one or two years of high school French, or permission of instructor.
Continuation of FRE 101.
FRE 211-3 French Reading and Conversation (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to reinforce the French language the student has learned through drills and other techniques and help him make the transition from highly controlled materials to unedited works offered in advanced courses.
FRE 212-3 Contemporary French Issues (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college French, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Conversation and discussion based on everyday French life subjects. This course is designed to accelerate the acquisition of verbal fluency as well as to inform the student on French daily life and events.
FRE 231-3 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to widen the student's range of active structure, vocabulary, and grammar, as well as reinforce the introductory courses the student has had.
FRE 232-3 French Composition (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to strengthen the students writing skill. At the beginning of the course, the student will apply the principles of pattern practice to writing and will progress from imitation of model sentences to eventual free composition.
FRE 311-3 Survey of French Literature I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Introduction to those areas in literature which will give an insight of French historical and cultural development through selected readings of that time.
FRE 312-3 Survey of French Literature II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Introduction to those areas in contemporary literature, with an emphasis on the different literary schools, aesthetic theories, and literary styles.
FRE 321-2 French Phonetics: Theory and Practice (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent, or permission or instructor.
A course designed to teach the essential facts of French phonology. It is aimed at improving students' pronunciation
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and articulation and introducing them to the field of linguistics.
FRE 331-3 Advanced French Composition and Grammar (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: FRE 231, 232, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to reinforce and develop further the writing skills, thus enabling the student to combine accuracy with imagination and inventiveness in writing French.
FRE 332-3 Advanced Conversation (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: FRE 211 or 212 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to broaden the student skills in French conversation. He will learn more advanced structures of the language as well as other aspects of grammar and idiomatic expressions.
FRE 351-3 French Culture and Civilization (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Survey of those elements which have contributed to the unique French life style. This will include emphasis not only on politics, history, art, geography, philosophy, and current social patterns, but also a look at French preferences in entertainment as well; customs, food, and wine.
FRE 352-3 Modern French Theater (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A sampling of the French dramatists who have contributed not only to literary development but who also have had an impact on society and culture.
FRE 353-3 The French Novel (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A sampling of novels from those which are considered particulary French, in both style and substance.
FRE 414-3 Advanced Textual Analysis (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Three years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course aims at helping the student grasp structural relationships of a literary work and help him read critically and imaginatively.
FRE 440-3 Existentialism (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Three years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is an in-depth study of French Existentialism and its influence on the development of French contemporary literature. It will further analyze the writer's personal view of modern man and his resolution to the problem of man's absurd condition.
German
GER 101-5 Elementary German I (4 + 2)
An introductory course in German, including pronunciation, grammar, and reading, with emphasis on speaking and understanding.
GER 102-5 Elementary German II (4 + 2)
Prerequisite: GER 101, or one or two years of high school German.
Continuation of GER 101.
GER 211-3 German Reading and Conversation (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course shall prepare the student to read and to communicate with ease in German. Emphasis lies on vocabulary and idiomatic phrases used in everyday language.
GER 212-3 German Civilization (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course places emphasis on the broadening of reading and conversational skills. The materials read and discussed will introduce the student to various aspects of German
civilization, from its geography and history to its philosophical and political thought, arts, music, and modern living.
GER 231-3 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to strengthen the grammatical background of the student by reinforcing old and introducing new, more advanced principles of grammar, and to increase his vocabulary.
GER 232-3 German Composition and Free Writing (3+0)
Prerequisite: One year of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to strengthen the students writing skill. It will expose him to various topics of interest to todays college student. In addition to the textbook, informative films will be presented and articles from German newspapers and magazines will be used.
GER 312-2 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A course devoted to the improvement of pronunciation and speech habits based upon an understanding of the phonetics of German. After an introduction to the basic speech mechanism through principles of linguistics, the course will offer practice in pronunciation through the declamation of selected texts.
GER 321-3 Survey of German Literature I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course shall give an insight of German historical and cultural development through selected readings in German literature, from its beginning to the eighteenth century.
GER 322-3 Survey of German Literature II (3+0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A history of German literature of the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including selected readings of principal German authors, lectures on biography and criticism, and recitation. Conducted in German.
GER 323-3 Contemporary German Writers (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
After a rapid survey of philosophical, political, economic, and social backgrounds, the course will emphasize works of distinguished contemporary authors. Lectures on biography and criticism will be interspersed as convenient. A term paper will be assigned. Conducted in German.
GER 331-3 Advanced German Composition and Grammar (3+0)
Prerequisites: GER 231 and 232, or permission of instructor. This course is designed to prepare the student for the demands of the use of literary and scientific German at advanced levels. The student is led into an appreciation of the deeper structures of the language and the functional aspects of grammar in communication.
GER 341-3 Scientific and Commercial German (3+0)
Prerequisite: GER 232, or permission of instructor.
Designed for the understanding of writings in the fields of science and business. Attention is given to the specialized vocabulary, idioms and sentence structure in these fields. Translations on up-to-date topics are from German into English facilitating reading and comprehension.
GER 351-3 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
After a brief survey of the history of the German drama, the works selected will be read and analyzed. Class periods will be devoted to lectures on historical background, biography and criticism, reading, translation of the works for appreciation or alertness, class discussion in German, and oral or written reports.
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GER 411-3 The German Novel of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries (3+0)
Prerequisite: At least three hours of third year college German, or permission of instructor.
The development of the German novel and short novel, with emphasis on the principal writers of prose fiction of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Reports and discussions of representative works, supplemented with lectures on biography and background. Conducted in German.
GER 412-3 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: At least three hours of third year college German, or permission of instructor. Continuation of GER 411. Development of the German drama, with emphasis on the dramatists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Principal works of Tieck, Kleist, Hebbel, Ludwig, Hauptmann, and Brecht, supplemented with lectures on biography and historical background. Conducted in German.
GER 421-3 Advanced Conversation: Present-day Germany (3+0)
Prerequisite: At least three hours of third year college German, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to help the student develop an understanding of present-day Germany. Recent and current socio-economic changes and political trends are emphasized. Articles in recent issues of a leading German periodical are used as basis for classroom discussion, student reports and themes.
Spanish
SPA 101-5 Elementary Spanish (4 + 2)
The basic course in Spanish, with emphasis primarily on pronunciation, speaking, and understanding, supplemented by grammar, reading and writing.
SPA 102-5 Elementary Spanish II (4+2)
Prerequisite: SPA 101, or one or two years of high school Spanish.
Continuation of SPA 101.
SPA 211-3 Spanish Reading and Conversation I (3+0)
Prerequisite: One year of college Spanish, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Intermediate course designed to afford the student the necessary practice to communicate with ease in Spanish. Emphasis lies on vocabulary building, reading of cultural material, and conversation.
SPA 212-3 Spanish Reading and Conversation II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: One year of college Spanish, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Reading and discussion based on different aspects of Hispanic culture. This course continues to emphasize the broadening of reading and conversational skills.
SPA 231-3 Spanish Grammar and Composition I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 102 or two or three years of high school Spanish.
Intermediate course to review and strengthen knowledge of the structure of the Spanish language as a basic for more advanced work in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing.
SPA 232-3 Spanish Grammar and Composition II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 231 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to widen and reinforce the different structures of the Spanish language in order to strengthen the students writing skills.
SPA 310-2 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual Classroom (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish, its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
A practical course designed to help students and teachers with the Spanish terminology used in the different areas of instruction.
SPA 311-3 Advanced Conversation (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An advanced course to broaden and strengthen the students conversational skills, emphasizing current topics in the Hispanic world.
SPA 312-2 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A course in Spanish phonology aimed at improving students pronunciation and introducing them to the field of descriptive linguistics.
SPA 320-3 Culture and Civilization of Spain (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An advanced Spanish conversational approach to the understanding of the traditions and history of Spain, and the national character as expressed in everyday life, based on a reading-lecture-discussion format. Entirely conducted in Spanish, oral presentations by participant students will be required.
SPA 321-3 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An advanced Spanish conversational approach to the chief cultural characteristics of the Hispanic-American world, based on a reading-lecture-discussion format. Entirely conducted in Spanish, oral presentations by participant students will be required.
SPA 322-3 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
A course designed to acquaint the students with the culture, folklore and civilization of the Mexican American in the Southwest. The introductory lectures will deal with the Spanish and Indian heritage. Main concentration will be on the culture and folklore of the people from the arrival of Juan de Onate to the present.
SPA 325-3 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 232 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to introduce the students to the study of literature in the Spanish language. Emphasis will be placed on reading and critical analysis of representative works, main literary trends and terminology. Conducted in Spanish.
SPA 331-3 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I (3+0)
Prerequisite: SPA 232 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Course in the structure of the language to prepare the student for advanced work in conversation, reading, and writing.
SPA 332-3 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 331 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
An advanced study in vocabularly, idioms, and the grammatical structure of the language.
SPA 333-2 Spanish Social and Commercial Correspondence (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 232 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course presents the fundamental points relative to personal and business letters in Spanish, special emphasis on the development of a vocabulary for all types of letters.
SPA 340-3 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 325 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A general survey of the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages through the Romantic Era. Reading of representative works, lecture on biography, criticism, and recitation will be included. Conducted in Spanish.
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SPA 341-3 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 325 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Spanish literature since 1870, including Post-Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, the Generation of 1898, the genero chico and more recent works. Conducted in Spanish.
and music history and to perform an audition in their primary performance area. For specific information concerning advising, placement and auditions, contact the Department of Music.
Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
SPA 351-3 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 325 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the most important works in Latin American literature with an emphasis in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Conducted in Spanish.
SPA 352-3 Contemporary Mexican Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 325 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A course which presents the most representative literary figures of contemporary Mexico. Beginning with the Novel of the Revolution, the student will be reading and discussing the works of living authors, including Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, and Octavio Paz. Conducted in Spanish.
SPA 411-3 Contemporary Spanish Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 340 or 341 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This course involves the study and discussion of the major works in contemporary Spanish literature. The course is designed to provide a meaningful language experience through literature and to give an insight into essential problems common to the Hispanic world. Conducted in Spanish.
SPA 412-3 Contemporary Latin-American Literature (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: SPA 351 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
A course in which the student will be critically reading and discussing the major works of contemporary Spanish American authors in order to appreciate their literary and cultural values and to participate in a meaningful language experience. Conducted in Spanish.
Music
The Bachelor of Arts Degree at Metropolitan State College allows undergraduates to major or minor in music as a part of a liberal arts program. The Department of Music offers a wide range of courses which provide opportunities for students to: 1) enhance their appreciation and enjoyment of music and participate in large and small music ensembles while majoring in another field, 2) gain a broad, general coverage of the field by pursuing the music minor, or 3) prepare themselves as music teachers or performers by majoring in the specialized areas of Music Education or Music Performance. Music majors are not required to complete a minor.
The Music Education major, which prepares the student for certification at levels K-12, is fully accredited by the Colorado State Department of Education. Students seeking teaching credentials in music must satisfy the Teacher Education Program at MSC in addition to all of the requirements of the Department of Music. Requirements for formal admission to the education programs as listed on page 41 of this Bulletin must also be met. Colorado law affecting teacher certification may be changed in the period during which this Bulletin is in effect. Students should contact the Teacher Education Department for modifications. The Music Performance major provides preparation for performance, further graduate specialization or private teaching. In order to pursue this course of study, the student must demonstratethrough auditionthe capability of developing a high level of musicianship in performance.
All students majoring or minoring in music must participate in the departmental advising program prior to each registration period. Transfer students should be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory
Core Requirement for all Music Education Majors
_ . _ Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, II.............
MUS 112, 114, 212 Music Theory Lab I, II, III........
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II.....................
MUS 171, 172, 271, 272 Private Instruction: Primary
Performance Area I, II, III, IV...........
MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Private Instruction:
Secondary Performance Area................
Note: Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Piano.
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Ensemble Music................
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; all eight hours may be earned in one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging.................................
MUS 351 Basic Conducting.............................
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting .........................
MUS 452 Advanced Conducting Lab......................
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate..............................
or
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas:
Secondary.................................
EDU 110 The Elementary Child I.......................
EDU 265 Human Relations .............................
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner..................
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ......
EDU 419 Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (K-6) and
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary:................................ 18
Total............................................. 76-77
In addition to the above core requirement, music education majors must select one of the following emphases:
Instrumental Emphasis
MUS 333 Instrumental Music Methods and Materials ... 2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Instrumental
Music....................................... 1
MUS 341 Violin and Viola Techniques.................. 1
MUS 342 Cello and Bass Techniques................... 1
MUS 343 Flute Techniques............................ 1
MUS 344 Clarinet and Saxophone Techniques........... 1
MUS 345 Brass Techniques............................ 1
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques ......................
Total.................................................. 9
Choral Emphasis
MUS 331 Elementary School Music Methods and
Materials................................. 2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary
School Music.............................. 1
MUS 332 Secondary School Choral Methods and
Materials................................... 2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary
School Choral Music......................... 1
MUS 341 or 342 Violin and Viola Techniques or
Cello and Bass Techniques................... 1
MUS 345 Brass Techniques............................ 1
MUS 421 Choral Literature .......................... _2
Total................................................. 10
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Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts
Core Requirements for all Music Performance Majors
MUS 111, 113, 211, 213 Music Theory I, II, III, IV. 12
MUS 112, 114, 212, 214 Music Theory Lab I, II, III, IV .. 4
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II........................ 6
MUS 171, 172, 271, 272 Private Instruction: Primary
Performance Area I, II, III, IV.............. 8
MUS 373, 374, 473, 474 Performance: Primary
Performance Area V, VI, VII, VIII............ 16
MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Private Instruction:
Secondary Performance Area......................... 2
Note: Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Piano.
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Ensemble Music................... 8
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; all eight hours may be earned in one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
MUS 351 Basic Conducting................................... 2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music.................................. 2
MUS 479 Senior Recital .................................... 1
Music History or Literature Elective.............. _2
Total........................................................ 63
In addition to the above core requirement, music performance majors must select one of the following emphases:
Voice Emphasis
MUS 421 Choral Literature ........................... 2
MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy.............................. 2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting ........................ _2
Total.................................................. 6
Plano Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint............................... 3
MUS 324 Piano Literature ........................... 3
MUS 441 Piano Pedagogy.............................. _2
Total.................................................. 8
Organ Emphasis
MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Private Instruction:
Voice........................................ 2
MUS 310 Counterpoint................................ 3
MUS 421 Choral Literature .......................... 2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting ........................ _2
Total.................................................. 9
Guitar Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint................................... 3
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging .................................. _3
Total.................................................. 6
Woodwind, Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging ................................... 3
MUS 423 Orchestral Literature....................... 3
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting ......................... 2
Total.................................................. 8
Minor in Music
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, III.............. 9
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I........................ 1
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II...................... 6
MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Private Instruction:
Performance Area.......................... 4
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Ensemble Music................ 4
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; all four hours may be earned in
one course number of in any combination of the above numbers.
Total................................................... 24
MUS 100-3 Introduction to Music (3 +0)
Non-technical in nature and designed for students who are not music majors to develop competence in understanding music through guided listening. The elements and sources of music are studied, discussed, and demonstrated.
MUS 101-3 Fundamentals of Music Theory (3+0)
The study of the basic principles of musical notation and structure as they relate to scales, keys, intervals, triads, rhythm and meter. Designed for non-music majors and music majors with insufficient experience to qualify for Music Theory I. No previous training in music is required.
MUS 111-3 Music Theory I (3 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 101, or a passing score on Music Theory I Placement Exam.
Corequisites: MUS 112 and 121.
The study of the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, textural, and formal elements of music through analysis and composition. The development of reading and hearing skills as they relate to these elements. Covers diatonic music based on the triad.
MUS 112-1 Music Theory Lab I (0 +2)
Prerequisite: MUS 101, or a passing score on Music Theory I Placement Exam.
Corequisite: MUS 111 and 121.
The application of reading and hearing skills to the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, textural, and formal elements of music through singing and the use of the keyboard. Covers diatonic music based on the triad.
MUS 113-3 Music Theory II (3 +0)
Prerequisites: MUS 111, 112, and 121 Corequisites: MUS 114 and 122.
Continuation of MUS 111. Covers diatonic seventh chords and elementary chromaticism.
MUS 114-1 Music Theory Lab II (0 +2)
Prerequisites: MUS 111, 112, and 121.
Corequisites: MUS 113 and 122.
Continuation of MUS 112. Covers diatonic seventh chords and elementary chromaticism.
MUS 161-1 Class Instruction I (1 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 101, or a passing score on the Music Theory I Placement Exam.
Class instruction in voice, piano, guitar, the standard band and orchestral instruments, improvisation or score reading. Designed for students with little or no previous training in the area being studied. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 162-1 Class Instruction II (1 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 161.
Continuation of MUS 161. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 171-2 Private Instruction I (0.5+5)
Prerequisite: Performance of successful Private Instruction Audition.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Individual instruction in voice, piano, organ, guitar, the standard band and orchestral instruments or composition. At the end of the semester, the student must perform before a faculty jury committee. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 172-2 Private Instruction II (0.5+5)
Prerequisite: MUS 171.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 171. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
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MUS 201-3 Afro-American Music (3 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 100, or permission of instructor.
A study of the music of black Americans beginning with the heritage of African music and music of the slaves through jazz and influences of jazz on the concert music of European and American composers.
MUS 202-2 Jazz History (2 +0)
To help develop individuals, through the study of jazz, who will be better informed and better able to understand and appreciate the entire realm of the world of music.
MUS 211-3 Music Theory III (3 +0)
Prerequisites: MUS 113, 114, and 122.
Corequisites: MUS 212 and 221.
The study of advanced chromaticism leading to twentieth century techniques. Music of the late nineteenth century, impressionism, and modern schools of composition. Aural recognition of harmonic materials emphasized. Stylistic composition and analysis included.
MUS 212-1 Music Theory Lab III (0 +2)
Prerequisites: MUS 113, 114, and 122.
Corequisites: MUS 211 and 221.
Practical theoretical skills applied to the keyboard. Training in sight-singing, rhythmic coordination, firm sense of pitch, and aural recognition of the materials introduced in MUS 113, Music Theory II. Keyboard realization of advanced chromatic harmony and impressionism.
MUS 213-3 Music Theory IV (3 +0)
Prerequisites: MUS 211, 212, and 221 Corequisites: MUS 214 and 222.
Continuation of MUS 211. More emphasis on complete structural forms, and on contemporary music techniques.
MUS 214-1 Music Theory Lab IV (0 +2)
Prerequisites: MUS 211, 212, and 221.
Corequisites: MUS 213 and 222.
Continuation of MUS 212. Contemporary music.
MUS 221-3 Music History I (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: MUS 111, 112, 113.
A survey of music history and musical style from the music of the early Christian Church through the early eighteenth century.
MUS 222-3 Music History II (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MUS 221.
A survey of music history and musical style from mideighteenth century up to the present time.
MUS 261-1 Class Instruction III (1 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 162.
Continuation of MUS 162. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 271-2 Private Instruction III (0.5 + 5)
Prerequisites: MUS 172, 111, 112, and 121.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 172. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 272-2 Private Instruction IV (0.5 + 5)
Prerequisites: MUS 271, 113, 114, and 122.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 271. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 281-2 Large Ensemble (1 +2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Study of large ensemble literature and performance techniques. Preparation of materials for concert performance. Also serves as a reading lab for conducting classes. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 282-1 Small Ensemble (0 + 2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Study of small ensemble literature and performance techniques. Preparation of materials for recital performance. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 301-3 Music and the Arts: Greek (500 B.C.) through Baroque (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MUS 100, or permission of instructor.
The study of selected examples of music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and literature to show how the various arts relate to each other and respond to the same socio-cultural environment.
MUS 302-3 Music and the Arts: Classical through 20th Century (3 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 100, or permission of instructor.
The study of selected examples of music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and literature to show how the various arts relate to each other and respond to the same socio-cultural environment. May be taken before MUS 301.
MUS 303-3 American Music (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: MUS 100, or permission of instructor.
A historical survey of all American music: "serious, folk, popular, musical comedy, etc., from the seventeenth century to the present. For the non-music major as well as the music major.
MUS 310-3 Counterpoint (3+0)
Prerequisites: MUS 211, 212.
Study of modal vocal polyphony (Lassus, Palestrina) of the sixteenth century, and tonal contrapuntal textures of the eighteenth century (J.S. Bach). Composition in two to four independent voices. All contrapuntal techniques studied in historical perspective, including analysis of polyphonic forms.
MUS 315-3 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging (3+0)
Prerequisites: MUS 211, 212, 341 or 342, 343 or 344, 345 or 346.
The study of the technical capabilities notation of all the instruments and voices, individually and in ensembles. The transcription of instrumental and choral recordings and the composition of scores for band, jazz band, orchestra, and chorus.
MUS 324-3 Piano Literature (3 +0)
Prerequisites: MUS 213, 214, and 222.
Historical survey of piano literature from the sixteenth century to the present including solo, duet, two-piano, and concerto literature.
MUS 331-2 Elementary School Music Methods (2 +0)
Corequisite: MUS 339, Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School Music.
The course is designed for the future elementary school music specialist, or for the individuals who plan to teach music in the elementary school. Emphasis is given to contemporary teaching techniques and materials.
MUS 332-2 Secondary School Choral Methods (2 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 351.
Corequisite: MUS 339, Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School Choral Music.
Instruction and practice in the methods of teaching and techniques used in organizing and directing secondary school choral groups.
MUS 333-2 Instrumental Music Methods and Materials (2+0)
Prerequisite: MUS 351.
Corequisite: MUS 339, Supervised Field Experience: Instrumental Music Methods.
The study of the administration and organization of instrumental music classes at elementary and secondary school levels. Stress is placed on organizing and teaching for a well-rounded instrumental program in the public schools.
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MUS 339-1 Supervised Field Experience (1 +0)
Corequisite: MUS 331, 332, or 333.
This course must be taken concurrently with each of the following courses: MUS 331, 332, 333. The course is designed to provide the music student with supervised experiences working with vocal and instrumental directors in area public schools. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 341-1 Violin and Viola Techniques (1 +0)
Practical instruction in the technique of playing and teaching the violin and viola. Lecture periods are devoted to the organization of string programs in the public schools.
MUS 342-1 Cello and Bass Techniques (1 +0)
Practical instruction in the technique of playing and teaching the cello and bass. Lecture periods are devoted to the organization of string programs in the public schools.
MUS 343-1 Flute Techniques (1+0)
Practical instruction in playing the flute with emphasis on and acquainting students with techniques and materials necessary in teaching this instrument.
MUS 344-1 Clarinet and Saxophone Techniques (1 +0)
Practical instruction in playing the clarinet and saxophone with emphasis on and acquainting students with techniques and materials necessary in teaching these instruments.
MUS 345-1 Brass Techniques (1 +0)
Practical beginning in instruction in playing the brass instruments. Materials for beginning instrumental music in the pubic schools are studied.
MUS 346-1 Percussion Techniques (1 +0)
The study of the methods and materials for teaching beginning percussion in the public schools. Includes practical instruction on the instruments.
MUS 351-2 Basic Conducting (2 + 0)
Prerequisites: MUS 113 and 114, plus one year ot MUS 281 or 381.
Detailed fundamental conducting techniques of the basic patterns. Introduction to orchestral and choral scores.
MUS 365-3 Class Composition (3+0)
Prerequisites: MUS 211 and 212.
The study of the craft of musical composition, from practical, theoretical, and aesthetic points of view, through the discussion and performance of individual writing projects. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 371-2 Private Instruction V (0.5 +5)
Prerequisites: MUS 272, 211, 212, and 221.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation Of MUS 272. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 372-2 Private Instruction VI (0.5 +5)
Prerequisite: MUS 371.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 371. A thirty minute Junior Recital may be substituted for the jury requirement for MUS 372. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 373-4 Performance V (1 +10)
Prerequisites: MUS 272, 211, 212, 221, and successful Performance Concentration Audition. Co-requisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 272. For students concentrating in performance only. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 374-4 Performance VI (1 +10)
Prerequisites: MUS 372 or 373, 213, 214, 222 and successful Performance Concentration Audition. Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 373. For students concentrating in performance only. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 381-2 Large Ensemble (1 +2)
Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor. Continuation of MUS 281. Also serves as a reading lab for conducting classes. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 382-1 Small Ensemble (0 + 2)
Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor. Continuation of MUS 282. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 411-2 Analysis of Music (2 + 0)
Prerequisites: MUS 213 and 214.
Advanced analytical techniques applied to various musical styles. Traditional methods of analysis along with study of twentieth century methods of analysis of Allen Forte, Edward Cone, and Paul Hindemith. Exceptional musical procedures examined. Contemporary music literature stressed.
MUS 421-2 Choral Literature (2 + 0)
Prerequisites: MUS 213 and 214.
A study of the chronological and stylistic development of choral music from the sixteenth century to the present, including the discussion and study of choral forms and major composers of each period of music history.
MUS 423-3 Orchestral Literature (3+0)
Prerequisite: MUS 221.
A study of the orchestral literature from the Baroque through to the twentieth century. This course will be offered every other year.
MUS 431-2 Music Methods for Elementary School Classroom Teachers (2 +0)
Prerequisite: Junior classification.
This course will stress activities which elementary school classroom teachers can incorporate into their curriculum to develop musical concepts in the following areas: singing, listening, creative, rhythmic, instrumental, and reading.
MUS 432-2 Music Methods for Early Childhood (2+0)
Prerequisite: Junior classification.
Methods and materials in music for the teacher of preschool through second-grade children. Concepts developed in the exploration of music; the enjoyment of music; initiation of musical competencies; and development for further learnings in music.
MUS 441-2 Piano Pedagogy (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: MUS 324.
Study of methods, literature, editions, and techniques used in teaching piano privately and in groups.
MUS 442-2 Vocal,Pedagogy (2 + 0)
Prerequisite: MUS 271 (Private Voice I).
Open to juniors, seniors, and advanced special students. A series of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions of the following and similar subjects: psychological and physiological factors in singing; approach to the pupil; methods of some famous teachers; interpretation and materials.
MUS 451-2 Advanced Conducting (2+0)
Prerequisite: MUS 351.
The study of advanced conducting techniques as they relate to studying, marking, reading, rehearsing, and performing the score. Instrumental and choral music is studied.
MUS 452-1 Advanced Conducting Lab (0 + 2)
Prerequisite: MUS 351.
Students will take part in lab band (see course description) as conductors, rather than as performers.
MUS 471-2 Private Instruction VII (0.5+5)
Prerequisite: MUS 372.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
MUS 472-2 Private Instruction VIII (0.5 + 5)
Prerequisite: MUS 471.
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Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 471. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 473-4 Performance VII (1 +0)
Prerequisites: MUS 374 or 472, and successful Performance Concentration Audition.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction area being studied.
Continuation of MUS 374. For students concentrating in performance only. May be repeated for credit in a different area of study.
MUS 474-4 Performance VIII (1 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 473.
Corequisite: At least one other music course and the major ensemble in the private instruction are being studied.
Continuation of MUS 473. For students concentrating in performance only. A fifty-minute Senior Recital may be substituted for the jury requirement for MUS 474. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 479-1 Senior Recital (1 +0)
Prerequisite: MUS 473.
A solo performance of not less than fifty minutes length, required of all students concentrating in performance. Must be approved by means of a Recital Hearing at least three weeks prior to the performance. Graded Pass-Fail.
Philosophy
Philosophy may be thought of as a quest for alternative belief systems and, as such, it is an adventure of the mind. It is a critical investigation into the assumptions and implications associated with all ideas across all disciplines and, in this respect, it is inter-disciplinary in character. However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods and hence, it takes on the character of a specialized discipline. Finally, without ceasing to be critical, philosophic inquiry relies upon imaginative and intuitive insight as well as speculative thought. Therefore, philosophy as a study program enlarges the student's horizons of ideas throughout the various disciplines in the college, while simultaneously providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas. It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical options, to consider alternate points of view, and to penetrate deeply into profound issues. Because of the subject matter, attitudes, and methods employed in philosophy, the student will be much better prepared for leadership in personal life, civic responsibilities, and pursuit of a career.
In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take but one or two courses in philosophy, the Department offers two programs both of which feature flexibility and individualized training:
1. A major for students seeking a solid, general training/background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies in such varied areas as philosophy, the humanities, law, medicine, business, urban planning and development, etc., or as a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the employer, such as, careers in corporate management, government, politics, banking, education, etc.
2. A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their specialized training/background with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase their career options and generally to increase the quality of their lives.
Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses Hours
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy..................... 3
PHI 103 Ethics..........................................
PHI 212 Logic...........................................
PHI 451 A Dialectical History of Philosophy.............
Total................................................... 1
Electives
A minimum of 27 additional hours of Philosophy grouped al least as follows: 10 at the 200 level, 12 at the 300 level and £ at the 400 level, selected in consultation with and approval by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 40 semester hours. It is strongly recommended to students majoring in Philosophy that they include PHI 208-3, Models of Philosophic Reasoning, in their program.
Minor in Philosophy Required Courses
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy......................
PHI 103 Ethics..........................................
PHI 111 Language, Logic and Persuasion .................
Total................................................... 9
Electives
A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which 7 are Upper Division courses in Philosophy selected in consultation with and approval by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 20 semester hours. It is strongly recommended to students minoring in Philosophy that they include PHI 208-3, Models of Philosophical Reasoning, in their programs.
Special Notes on 100-Level Courses
All 100-level courses are survey type and are designed to provide special familiarity with philosophy as a discipline. Some of the skills within this discipline that will be developed are:
identifying assumptions and implications
recognizing arguments
making distinction
developing categories and formulating reasoned evidence
Any of these courses can be taken as a first course in philosophy.
PHI 101-3 Introduction to Philosophy (2 + 0)
A survey of the major areas of philosophical inquiry: the enduring questions and alternative answers which continue to be relevant to contemporary living. Discussion labs will allow for active and individualized student participation.
PHI 102-3 Ideas of the Western World (3 + 0)
An investigation of the historical roots of the Western Philosophical Traditions in Greek and Roman Thought, Medieval European Belief Systems and Modern Philosophical Trends. This tradition is understood as a dynamic process of speculation and criticism.
PHI 103-3 Ethics (3 + 0)
A survey of alternative ethical viewpoints with a focus on the principles of moral action. The implications of these ethical positions for moral living will be emphasized through discussion of selected contemporary moral issues.
PHI 111-3 Language, Logic and Persuasion (3+0)
An informal logic course providing a non-technical introduction to critical thinking including the functions of language, the nature of arguments, ways of judging the validity of arguments, common fallacies committed in communication, and the art of constructing clear and adequate definitions.
PHI 161-3 Living Religions of the East (3 + 0)
An introductory survey of the living traditions of some of the major faiths of the Orient including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto.
PHI 162-3 Western Religious Traditions (3 + 0)
An introductory survey of the major religious traditions of the West and primary emphasis on the Monotheistic Faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
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Special Notes on 200-Level Courses
All 200-level courses are concept/skill-type courses. They are designed to develop such philosophic skills as critical thinking, recognition of issues, reasoned argumentation, knowledgeable judgments, clarity in expression, and familiarity with philosophic resources.
PHI 291-3 is a variable-title course. Students may take the course again for credit with permission of the department.
Although there are no formal prerequisites for 200-level courses, it is recommended that a student have satisfactorily completed at least 3 hours of 100-level philosophy.
PHI 201-2 Man and Morals (2 + 0)
A philosophical study of the way man deals with current moral issues. Students and instructor explore ways in which major ethical systems bear on key moral issues with emphasis on how the student may make more effective practical personal, career, and civic moral judgments.
PHI 202-2 Thinking About the Arts (2+0)
A philosophical study of man as artist and enjoyer. Key issues selected by students and instructor are examined via philosophies of art to enhance the students understanding, enjoyment, and creativity regarding lifelong esthetic experiences and judgments.
PHI 203-2 Man and Society (2 + 0)
A philosophical study of the individual and social nature of man. Types of societies and related social theories are explored to provide various bases for the students philosophical understanding of the individualistic social dimensions of man and the options for persons and societies in the near future.
PHI 204-3 Philosophies of Religion (3 + 0)
A critical investigation of various dimensions and functions of religion to provide a basis for discussion of man as a religious being and the future of religion.
PHI 205-3 Scientific Reasoning (3 + 0)
An introduction to several philosophical ideas (i.e., causality, potential/actual, emergence, information, systems theory) as they relate to systems of increasing organization and complexity.
PHI 206-3 Creativity and Philosophy (3 + 0)
A philosophical study of the nature and uses of creativity in various human enterprises. Creativity in belief systems and life-styles will be academically and artistically explored.
PHI 207-2 Man and His Future (2 + 0)
A philosophical study of the long-range options available to man as a species as he responds to the severe threats and intriguing possibilities raised by current and future social problems. Class will select two or three major futurist issues for concentrated examination.
PHI 208-3 Models of Philosophic Reasoning (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PHI 101-3, Introduction to Philosophy.
A course designed to foster the development of philosophical reasoning skills. The course will focus on three aspects of this reasoning: (1) types of reasons and reason-giving," (2) formulation of philosophical problems,
(3) models of philosophic argument.
PHI 209-3 Biomedical Ethics (3 +0)
An introduction to Philosophical Ethics and its relevance to moral issues generated by the development of technologies in the Life Sciences and medicine. Discussion of moral issues related to genetic screening, abortion, euthanasia, health care distribution and biological research will be included.
PHI 211-3 Ethical and Legal Reasoning (3 +0)
A general introduction to ethical and legal systems and forms of reasoning. Included are exercises to enhance the capacity, ability and inclination to develop ethical and legal approaches to human problems and to employ ethical and legal reasoning in the organization of personal affairs.
PHI 212-3 Logic (3+0)
A general introduction to both informal and formal logic, the systems of rules for judging the validity of deductive and inductive arguments. Included are Aristotelian syllogistic
deduction, modern truth-functional deduction, informal fallacies, inductive argumentation, and scientific method.
PHI 291-3 Experiential Philosophy: (Variable Title) (0+15)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and permission of the Department.
An off-campus course designed to place students into environmentally stressful situations or situationally meaningful environments. A variety of experiences (physical, mental, emotional, etc.) are planned to accompany readings and personal guidance through a philosophical study of self.
Special Notes on 300 level courses
All 300 level courses are depth-probe type courses. They are designed to provide rigorous, scholarly study of philosophic methods, problems, and solutions. Primary sources will be used whenever possible and the student will be expected to do maximal work on his own with direction from the instructor.
PHI 341, 361, and 381 are variable title courses. The subject matter of these courses is variable in order to provide an opportunity for in-depth study in a number of specific areas. The particular subject matter to be investigated in any given semester will be specified in the title as it appears in the class schedule. It is possible to repeat any of these courses for credit provided the subject matter is not the same as in a course previously taken for credit.
PHI 312-3 Philosophy of Language (3+0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and three additional hours in Philosophy.
A survey of the major theories regarding the function of language and the nature of meaning. Particular attention will be paid to the positions of Wittgenstein and Merleau-ponty with some discussion of the writings of Strawson, Russell, Ayer, Chomsky, Heidegger, and Austin.
PHI 321-3 Philosophies of Social Change (3+0)
Prerequisite: Upper division status in the college or six semester hours in Philosophy.
An investigation of emerging options and philosophies of change in three crucial areas of social pattern and theory:
(a) The person in his immediate social environments (b) Changing communities and cultures as structures and systems (c) Global futurism. Course will be self-structuring.
PHI 331-3 Philosophies of Science (3+0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and PHI 205.
An advanced, critical examination of the concepts and problems involved in contemporary science. Physical, biological, and psycho-social sciences are investigated and a modern systems philosophy is examined in detail with an emphasis on information theory.
PHI 341-3 Eastern Philosophies: (Variable Title) (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PHI 161.
An in-depth study of particular ancient and modern schools and movements in Eastern philosophy such as: the philosophies of the Vedas and the Upanishads; Yoga, Vedanta; Buddhist philosophies; Confuciansim, Taoism, Maoism; and Shinto.
PHI 361-3 Religious Studies: (Variable Title) (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and PHI 162.
An in-depth study of specific religious leaders and thinkers, such as Jesus, Paul, Augustine, Muhammad, Aquinas, Maimonides, Luther, Calvin, Tillich, Barth, Bonhoeffer, and Buber.
PHI 371-3 Intuitive Philosophies (3 +0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 plus five hours of Philosophy.
An investigation of philosophies which proceed more from immediately perceived truths than from reasoned evidence. Some of the prominent traditions are Aesthetics, Mythopoetics, Romanticism, Existentialism, Humanistic Psychology and various Eastern and Western mystical and meditational systems.
PHI 381-3 Major Philosophers: (Variable Title) (3 +0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 plus five hours of Philosophy.
An in-depth study of specific philosophers, such as: Plato,
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Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Engels, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Dewey, Wittgenstein, and Whitehead,
Special Notes on 400-Level Courses
All 400-level courses are synthesis-type courses. They are designed to enable students to integrate their studies in Philosophy and to initially formulate a position of their own. Sometimes 400-level courses are team-taught by several members of the faculty so the student has access to their special expertise in a given field. All of these courses have prerequisites; however, special admission is possible through permission of the instructor.
PHI 404-3 Senior Seminar (Variable Title) (3+0)
Prerequisites: Jr. or Sr. standing, Introduction to Philosophy, plus 9 other hours in Philosophy.
A study of the impact of a single philosophical problem upon the conduct of philosophical reasoning both traditional and contemporary. Designed as a senior-level seminar course in which students take responsibility for adopting positions regarding the problems and debating the merits of those positions.
PHI 405-3 Comparative Philosophies (Variable Title) (3 + 0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and Jr. standing (9 additional hours in Philosophy).
The works of two major thinkings will be analytically compared regarding basic assumptions, conclusions, arguments and contemporary relevance. The choice of comparisons is based on students interest and instructor's judgment.
PHI 451-4 A Dialectical History of Philosophy (4 + 0)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and nine other hours in Philosophy.
A study of the dialectical patterns present in the history of philosophy; the attempt to view philosophy as a progression toward more adequate conceptions of man and reality. Designed to unify the study of philosophy in terms of an historical synthesis.
PHI 491-3 World/Regional Studies: (Variable Title) (0 + 15)
Prerequisites: PHI 101 and 12 hours of Philosophy and permission of the Department.
A critical investigation of the belief systems of specific regions of the world. After preparation, the student will live in the region and study the belief systems on location. To be taken concurrently with PHI-499.
Political Science
The study of Political Science is mainly a study of governments: their social and economic environments, how they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how governments interact with one another. It also includes the study of political ideas and values, past and present, and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging man's knowledge of political processes.
The Political Science program provides students with the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often confusing reality of politics. Political Science also offers clusters of courses which prepare students for professional careers or post-graduate education.
Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSC 101 American National Government................... 4
PSC 102 Introduction to Politics....................... 4
PSC 205 Political Theory............................... 3
PSC 402 Special Studies............................... _3
Total.................................................... 14
Electives
A minimum of 18 additional semester hours of Political Science must be completed. At least 12 of these 18
hours must be Upper Division courses (300 and 400 level). Total semester hours for a PSC Major: 32.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Minor in Political Science
Required Courses Houri
PSC 101 American National Government................. 4
PSC 102 Introduction to Politics.................... _4
Total................................................... 8
Electives
A minimum of 10 additional semester hours in Political Science courses. Total Semester hours for a PSC Minor: 18.
Minor in Public Administration
Public Administration is the study of governmental organizations and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Science Department offers a Minor in Public Administration available to students interested in a career in government service, to students presently employed in government who wish to increase their skills and job status, and to students planning to take post-graduate work in Public Administration.
Required Courses Hours
A. Basic courses required for all PA Minors:
PSC 101 American National Government ............. 4
PSC 202 Introduction to Public Administration... 3
B. Two of the following courses:
PSC 322 Public Policy............................. 3
PSC 324 Intergovernmental Relations............... 3
PSC 326 Government Budgeting ..................... 3
PSC 328 Public Personnel Administration........... 3
ACC 320 Government Accounting..................... 3
C. One of the following courses:
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems......... 3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics ............... 4
D. Internship (PSC 299 or 499 Omnibus Courses)
or substitute course...................... (minimum) 3
A governmental Internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a
minimum of three semester hours. This requirement may be waived for students with at least one calendar year of administrative work experience in a government agency.
Total................................................. 19-20
It is recommended that PA Minors also take a course in both public speaking and in technical writing.
Not listed among the regular courses below are a variety of omnibus courses and self-paced courses which are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the semester class schedule for these.
PSC 101-4 American National Government (4 + 0)
Explores the American political process with emphasis on the federal government: how it is organized, formal and informal sources of power and influence, political attitudes and behavior of American citizens, civil rights, constitutional evolution, factors of change and stability.
PSC 102-4 Introduction to Politics (4 + 0)
How and why modern political systems function as they do. Examines basic topics such as political parties, representation, bureaucracy, constitutions, leadership selection, public attitudes and beliefs, system capacity for adaption and change, problems of political research and analysis.
PSC 103-3 Politics in the Media (3 +0)
An analysis of current political issues as portrayed in the
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daily and weekly press and electronic media. Designed to provide students with the background and perspective needed for an informed understanding of the often complex and confusing issues confronting the political system.
PSC 109-3 Readings in Political Science (3+0)
This course provides the opportunity for the student to explore important writings in a selected subject area of political science. A self-paced course under the guidance of the instructor. Topics vary and the course may be repeated for credit.
PSC 200-4 American State and Local Government (4+0)
The organization, powers, functions and practical workings of state, county, town, and city governments of the United States. Special attention is given to federal-state relations and to the Colorado state government and Constitution.
PSC 202-3 Introduction to Public Administration (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
An introduction to public management as a field of study and professional practice. Topics include: the political environment of public administration, organization theory, decision-making, budgetary processes, intergovernmental relations, and ethics and professionalism in public service.
PSC 203-3 Introduction to International Relations (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. Examination of the modern nation-state in its relations with others: diplomacy, nationalism, power and influence, sources of conflict and cooperation. Reviews theoretical attempts to understand international behavior.
PSC 204-2 Political Research (2 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the principle methods and approaches used in political research, including data sources, quantitative methods, systems theory, the use of models, etc. Recommended for Political Science majors.
PSC 205-3 Political Theory (3 +0)
Examination of western political ideas and ideals from Plato through Marx: the hopes and fears, questions and responses, dreams and realities about the state, humanity, justice and politics. Focus is on historical political thinking in relation to present problems.
PSC 206-3 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 + 0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
The types and varieties of governmental systems of other societies, with emphasis on the nations of Western Europe. Examines attempts to develop a valid theoretical framework suitable for the comparative analysis of all political systems.
PSC 309-3 Current Topics in Political Science (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
An in-depth study of an important topic of Political Science. Topics vary according to instructor's choice, and the course may be repeated for credit as the topics change.
PSC 310-4 American Political Parties and Elections and Voting Behavior (4 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
The nature and functions of parties in the U.S. political system: their membership, beliefs, and internal organization. Examines campaign methods and financing, and analyzes the American voter and non-voter based on the latest research findings.
PSC 312-5 American Constitutional Law (4+1)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
How the basic principles and doctrines of the Constitution have been interpreted, altered, and applied in response to the ever-changing social, economic, and political conditions in the United States.
PSC 313-3 The American Presidency (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
The powers and functions of the presidency as the office has changed and evolved, with emphasis on recent experience. Explores styles of presidential leadership, relations with Congress, the bureaucracy, the public, and private interests and the potential for abuse of power and its prevention.
PSC 314-3 The American Congress and Legislative Process (3+0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
The powers and functions of the legislative branch of government: relations with the executive branch; interest group influence; constituent relations. Examines internal organization, traditions, power structure, and recent attempts to reform.
PSC 322-3 Public Policy (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
An analysis of the ongoing development of government policy, covering the main stages of the policy process: agenda building, formulation, authorization, implementation, and evaluation.
PSC 324-3 Intergovernmental Relations (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
Analysis of the functioning of the American federal system and the changing forms of local-state-federal relationships. Surveys recent efforts to develop theories relating to the administrative processes of intergovernmental relations.
PSC 326-3 Government Budgeting and Finance (3+0)
Prerequisite: PSC 202 or permission of instructor.
Budget systems analyzed with an evaluation of administrative techniques of budget control. The legal, social and political aspects of governmental budgets and the budgetary process.
PSC 328-3 Public Personnel Administration (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 202 or permission of instructor.
The analysis of managing, motivating and developing people in public organizations. Surveys the main elements of personnel administration such as selection, evaluation, promotion, training, productivity, and job classification.
PSC 331-3 American Foreign and Military Policy (3+0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
The main trends of U.S. foreign and military policy from the end of World War II to the present, with an exploration of the motives and perceptions behind recent policies and actions. Studies the policy-making process and the relationship between foreign policy and domestic policies.
PSC 332-2 International Law (2 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 203 or permission of instructor.
Past and present efforts of nations to regulate their relations and resolve conflicts through the use of existing legal doctrine, or the development of new law in response to new problems, such as the uses of outer space and ocean resources.
PSC 333-2 International Organizations (2 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 203 or permission of instructor.
The theory and practice of international organizations, with emphasis on the United Nations. Past and present attempts of nations to solve problems or achieve security by means of regional and global organizations, such as the Common Market, the World Bank, NATO, etc.
PSC 346-2 Public Opinion (2+0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or 102 or permission of instructor.
The emphasis is on political opinions and attitudes: how they are measured, the factors which cause the formulation and change of opinions, and the role of public opinion in the political process.
PSC 352-3 American Political Ideas (3+0)
Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
Is there an American political philosophy? A study of some of the significant individuals and ideas that have shaped and are shaping political thinking in America.
PSC 360-3 Comparative Politics Area Studies (3 +0)
Prerequisite: PSC 206 or permission of instructor.
A thorough examination of the political system or systems of a selected foreign nation or geographical region, such as the Soviet Union, Western Europe, or Latin America. Subject matter varies and the course may be repeated for credit.
PSC 402-3 Special Studies (3 +0)
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor.
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