Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1987-1988

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1987-1988
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

Full Text


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Denver, Colorado 80204
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Metropolitan State College Bulletin 1987-88
1006 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204




College Calendar 1987-88
College Calendar 1987-88
Summer Semester 1987
Applications Guaranteed Processing............May 20
Classes begin.....................................June 1
Independence Day* no classes....................July 3
Summer Term ends................................August 7
Autumn Semester 1987
1st Time College Student less than 20 years of age.August 1
All other applicants Guaranteed Processing....August 12
Classes begin...................................August 24
Labor Day* no classes......................September 7
Thanksgiving Holiday* no classes........November 26-27
Autumn exams end.............................December 16
Spring Semester 1988
Applications Guaranteed Processing............January 6
Classes begin...................................January 18
Spring Break no classes....................March 21-25
Spring exams end....................................May 13
Commencement...................................... May 16
College offices also closed during this holiday.
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE HOLIDAY CALENDAR
All College Offices will be Closed
1987
July 3
September 7 November 26, 27 December 25, 28, 29, 30, 31
1988
January 1 May 25
3


Administration
Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado
Date of First Present Term Appointment Expires
Irene S. Sweetkind, Gunnison, Chair ..................................................................... 1975 1987
James B. Osbourn, Denver, Vice Chair..................................................................... 1985 1989
Norman Dean, Greeley..................................................................................... 1983 1989
Mary Ann Buss, Grand Junction ........................................................................... 1981 1987
Vickie L. Ford, Center................................................................................... 1985 1991
Gladys Foster, Littleton ................................................................................ 1977 1989
David M. Herrera, Ft. Collins............................................................................ 1985 1991
Mark Huston, Student, Western State College.............................................................. 1986 1987
Bob Decker, Faculty, Western State College............................................................... 1986 1987
Houston G. Elam, Ph.D., President of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado
Metropolitan State College Officers of Administration
President....................................
Vice President for Academic Affairs..........
Vice President for Business Affairs..........
Vice President for Institutional Advancement Vice President for Student Affairs...........
.....Paul J. Magelli, Ph.D.
....Tobin G. Barrozo, Ph.D.
...Charles W. Norick, B.S.
Harry R. Gianneschi, Ph.D. ....Antonio Esquibel, Ph.D.
Administrative Staff
Office of the President
Assistant to the President for Administration............................................................Charlotte W. Murphy, Ph.D.
Director of Academic Computer Resources..................................................................Melvin Langshaw, M.Ed.
Director of Computer Services............................................................................G. W. Bill Vickers, B.S.
Director of Institutional Research.......................................................................John A. Mukavetz, M.A.
Faculty Assistant to the President............................................................................Larry Langton, Ph.D.
Assistant to the President and Director of Equal Opportunity..........................................Percy A. Morehouse, Jr., Ph.D.
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
Assistant Vice President.........................
Director of Honors Program..................
Director of Professional Development........
Assistant Vice President for Off-Campus Programs
Director of Adult Learning Services.........
Associate Director.......................
Director of Conferences and Workshops.......
Director of Cooperative Education Program...
Assistant Director.......................
Assistant Director.......................
Coordinator..............................
Director of Extended Campus Credit Program..
Associate Director.......................
Coordinator..............................
Faculty Assistant to the Vice President..........
Associate Director of Student Retention.....
......Eugene W. Saxe, Ph.D.
......Alain D. Ranwez, Ph.D.
.....Charles M. Dobbs, Ph.D.
.....Andrew Breckel, III, M.A.
.....Eleanor M. Green, Ed.D.
.. Maureen P. Lancaster, Ed.D.
...Roberta A. Smilnak, Ph.D.
..Susan Warren Lanman, M.A.
..........Jayne James, M.A.
...Leslie W. Hauschildt, M.S.
Barbara Blanco Howard, M.A. .Gwendolyn S. Thornton, M.A.
..John A. Montgomery, M.A.
........Carol Svendsen, M.A.
........Jett B. Conner, Ph.D.
....Christina R. Nasisse, M.A.
Office of the Vice President for Business Affairs
.....Elyse M. Y. Nieto, B.A.
James G. Vanderhye, M.B.A.
..........Sandra L. Jones
........Tim L. Greene, B.S.
David M. McDermott C.P.A. ...Charles M. Norick, C.P.A.
Assistant to the Vice President..............
Associate Vice President for Business Affairs Director of Contract Personnel Services..
Budget Officer............................
Controller...................................
Treasurer....................................
4


Administration
Office of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement
Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement.
Assistant Vice President for Public Affairs.............
Director of College Relations.......................
Director of Alumni Relations............................
Director of Athletics...................................
Director, Grants and Sponsored Projects.................
Director of Publications................................
Director of Sports Information..........................
Gwendolyn A. Thomas, Ph.D.
..........Susan M. Blish, A.B.
..........Nancy Munser, B.A.
...Yvonne L. Spaulding, M.A.
....William M. Helman, M.A.
.......Sandra Rexroat, M.A.
........Patricia J. Kelly, B.A.
......Gregory C. Smith, B.A.
Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs
Associate Vice President................................
Associate Vice President & Dean of Admissions and Records Assistant Vice President................................
Admissions and Records
Associate Dean of Admissions and Records................
Student Information Systems Coordinator.................
Assistant Student Information Systems Coordinator....
Assistant Student Information Systems Coordinator....
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records.............
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records.............
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Records.............
Director of High School/College Relations............
Assistant Director of High School/Community Relations...
Admissions Counselor.................................
Director, Veterans Affairs.............................
Counseling Center
Director of Counseling..................................
Clinical Psychologist...................................
Counseling Psychologist.................................
Coordinator, Program Development........................
Counselor...............................................
Financial Aid
Director, Financial Aid.................................
Associate Director......................................
Associate Director......................................
Counselor...............................................
Counselor...............................................
Counselor...............................................
High School Upward Bound
Director, High School Upward Bound......................
Counselor/Coordinator...................................
Special Services
Director, Special Services..............................
Assistant Director, Counselor...........................
Student Activities
Director, Student Activities............................
Student Health Clinic
Co-Director, Student Health Clinic......................
Co-Director, Student Health Clinic......................
The Metropolitan
Business Manager........................................
Veterans Upward Bound
Director, Veterans Upward Bound.........................
Program Specialist, Veterans Upward Bound...............
...Ron L. Veatch, Ph.D.
Kenneth C. Curtis, Ph.D. ....David Conde, Ph.D.
......John T. Reed, Ph.D.
....Andrea Lynn Doyle, B.S.
........David Yetter, A.B.
....Charles J. Gilbert, B.A.
Alonzo F. Rodriguez, Ph.D. ...Jeffrey W. Johnson, M.S.
....Thomas R. Gray, M.S.
....Pauline R. Reece, M.A.
.......Michael Miera, B.A.
... Gwendolyn Elder, M.P.A. .......Lynn Denzin, M.Ed.
....Floyd C. Kennedy, M.A.
... Thomas R. Holman, Ph.D.
.....Barbara Briggs, Ed.D.
...Susan Richardson, Ph.D.
Barbara 2. Mclntire, M.S.W.
....Cheryl Judson, Ph.D.
...Carol A. Garnett, B.A.
Judith J. Lichtenfeld, B.A.
....Susan McGinley, B.S.
....Minnie Pacheco, M.A.
....Donelyn James, B.S.
Charles Maldonado, B.S. ...Paulette McIntosh, B.S.
Kelly Espinoza, M.A. ...Lyle Smith, M.S.
Yolanda Ortega, B.A.
Billi Mavromatis, B.A. Marilyn Heiberg, B.S.
Kathy B. Lutrey
....Glenn A. Morris, M.A. Charles J. Lindsay, B.A.
5


Administration
Academic Administrators
School of Business
Dean................................
Department Chairs
Accounting......................
Computer and Management Science
Economics.......................
Finance.........................
Management......................
Marketing.......................
Director, Institute for Entrepreneurship... Coordinator of Academic Advising....
...Richard E. Pasternak, Ph.D.
Patricia L. Duckworth, D.B.A.
....Joseph S. Morrell, Ph.D.
...Gerald W. Stone, Jr., Ph.D.
.....David J. Crockett, Ph.D.
......Robert J. Lucas, D.B.A.
....Charles R. Vitaska, Ph.D.
......Courtney Price, D.P.A.
......Lydia G. Vasquez, B.S.
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Dean......................................................................................j.....Larry S. Johnson, Ph.D.
Department Chairs
Art......................................................
Biology..................................................
Chemistry................................................
Earth Science............................................
English..................................................
History..................................................
Mathematical Sciences....................................
Modern Languages.........................................
Music....................................................
Philosophy...............................................
Political Science........................................
Physics..................................................
Psychology...............................................
Sociology /Ant hr op ology...............................
Speech Communications....................................
Director, Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services...
Director, Institute for Womens Studies and Services.........
Coordinator, Womens Services........................
Director of Student Academic Programs........................
Assistant Director...................................
Program Coordinator, Health Careers Science Program
....Rodger A. Lang, M.F.A.
..George C. Becker, Ph.D.
...Jack D. Cummins, Ph.D.
.....H. Dixon Smith, Ph.D.
.......Jan Delasara, Ph.D.
..Stephen J. Leonard, Ph.D.
.......Earl E. Hasz, Ph.D.
.....Juan P. Esteve, Ph.D.
......Hal Tamblyn, D.M.A.
Frederick C. Doepke, Ph.D. ...Cedric W. Tarr, Jr., Ph.D.
.....Jerry H. Wilson, Ph.D.
...Edward W. Karnes, Ph.D.
.......Lois Dilatush, Ph.D.
....W. Thomas Cook, M.A.
... Akbarali Thobhani, Ph.D.
........Jodi Wetzel, Ph.D.
....Shirley J. Sims, M.P.A.
.....David P. Moore, M.A.
.......Nancy Breckel, M.A.
.......Tony Montoya, B.A.
School of Professional Studies
Dean.........................................................................
Department Chairs
Aerospace Science........................................................
Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology...........................
Criminal Justice and Criminology.........................................
Electronics Engineering Technology.......................................
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration...........................
Human Services...........................................................
Director of Community Service Development Program....................
Director of Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol and Addictive Behaviors
Military Science (Army ROTC).............................................
Nursing and Health Care Management.......................................
Physical Education, Recreation and Health................................
Reading..................................................................
Teacher Education........................................................
Technology and Technical Communications..................................
Director of Campus Recreation................................................
Associate Director.......................................................
Director of Clinical Experiences.............................................
Director of Teacher Education Programs/Mesa College..........................
Coordinator of Academic Advising.............................................
....Charles V. Branch, Ed.D.
.........Leroy L. Ohrt, M.A.
.....Eldon Lindimore, Ph.D.
...Joseph G. Sandoval, J.D.
... Larry G. Keating, M.S.E.E. ... Richard A. Hildreth, Ph.D.
...Dolores F. Hickey, Ed.D.
.......Roger M. Kahn, M.A.
..Richard D. Daetwiler, Th.D.
.........LTC Ben Tilley, M.S.
Euphemia G. Williams, Ph.D.
....Marc A. Rabinoff, Ed.D.
....Vincent P. Orlando, Ph.D.
........J. David Reid, Ph.D.
....Robert D. O'Dell, Ed.D.
. Richard A. Feuerborn, M.S.
......Anne McKelvey, M.A.
........Daniel Alfaro, Ph.D.
.......MaryS. Ryder, Ed.D.
........Kelly Espinoza, M.A.
6


Contents
Contents
Page
College Calendar.....................................................................3
Officers of Administration...........................................................4
General Information..................................................................9
Accreditation....................................................................9
Campus...........................................................................9
Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado.........................................10
Admissions Instructions..........................................................10
Financial Aid....................................................................13
Costs...........................................................................15
Student Personnel Services.......................................................15
Academic Information................................................................19
Omnibus Courses..................................................................25
Field Experience/lnternship Courses..............................................26
Requirements for All Degrees.....................................................27
Degrees and Programs Available...................................................30
School of Business..................................................................33
Institute for Entrepreneurship...................................................39
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences................................................42
Division of Humanities...........................................................42
Division of Social Sciences......................................................54
Division of Science and Mathematics..............................................59
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services.................................66
Institute for Womens Studies and Services.......................................68
School of Professional Studies......................................................70
Division of Education............................................................70
Division of Technology...........................................................87
Division of Public Service Professions..........................................102
Course Descriptions................................................................112
Faculty............................................................................189
Alphabetical Index.................................................................199
Campus Map.........................................................................203
Admissions Application.............................................................205
7




The College
The College
Metropolitan State College is the largest public, undergraduate, four-year baccalaureate degree granting, urban college with modified admission standards in the United States. Leaders in quality, baccalaureate education, MSC people students, faculty, staff and alumni work to share actively the responsibility of the future.
Since its creation in 1965, the College has contributed to the vitality of downtown Denver and it has changed the face of learning in the metropolitan area with its phenomenal growth to approximately 14,700 students.
Metropolitan State Colleges success is reflected in the faces of its creative and determined students. Eighteen-year-olds take the first steps toward establishing a career while young professionals seek career advancement. Women re-entering higher education explore new careers and all find new opportunities. The average student is 27 years old, making classes a unique blend of the eagerness of youth and the wisdom that comes with maturity. Because the student population is so diverse, education at MSC is a mutual learning experience for students and professors alike. There is a give and take between young and old, student and teacher all learning from one another.
While MSCs students are committed to learning, the faculty is committed to teaching. Other colleges emphasize research; MSCs more than 335 full-time faculty members are first, and most importantly, teachers. They are available to their students both in the classroom and in their offices for extra help and advice. Many have extensive professional backgrounds, adding an invaluable dimension to their knowledge, and over 80 percent have earned the highest level of academic degree attainable in their fields.
MSC offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in over 55 areas in business, human services, education, engineering technology, liberal arts, professional studies, science, and mathematics. Students can also pursue specific, individualized career choices through a contract major or minor. Several academic programs are the only ones of their type offered in the region, and many enjoy national reputations for excellence.
MSC is not limited to degree-seeking students. A class in the latest computer technology may attract a realtor with a fascination for "high tech. An adult who is already successful in his or her career may take a literature, philosophy, or history class and share a love of ideas. The active businessman or woman may take advantage of an extended campus evening class in management or conversational French at Metro South or Metro North.
MSCs impact upon the metropolitan community continues to grow each year as Denver increasingly becomes a national center of commerce and technology. The College considers itself a partner in Denvers future and seeks ways to contribute to the quality of urban life. MSC students work for local businesses as interns, and many classes revolve around community issues. MSC also extends learning opportunities beyond the boundaries of the Auraria campus through the Division of Off Campus Programs, offering credit classes at locations throughout the metropolitan area, including special seminars and workshops for area professionals.
Additionally, the College reinforces its partnership with the community through jointly sponsored events which both entertain and educate MSC students and the metropolitan community. Lectures by nationally known figures, concerts and plays, foreign study programs and community learning projects
all bring the wealth of MSCs resources into the neighborhoods of metropolitan Denver.
Metropolitan State College provides equal education and employment opportunities for all, regardless of race, color, creed, religion, age, sex, national origin, or veteran status.
Accreditation/Approvals
MSC is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Individual academic programs are accredited by the National League for Nursing, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Association of University Programs in Health Administration. The Civil Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, and the Mechanical Engineering Technology programs are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. The Department of Human Services has approval from the Council for Standards in Human Service Education, and the baccalaureate program in Chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society. The Drug, Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior Counselor program has the approval of the Colorado Department of Health. The Department of Accounting is approved by the Colorado State Board of Accountancy, and the Aerospace Science program has the approval of the Federal Aviation Administration.
Campus
Metropolitan State College moved to new facilities on the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) during the 1976-77 academic year. The 169-acre campus is located adjacent to downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with MSC.
Over one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian homes in Denver's historic Ninth Street Park located within the Auraria site. The campus features a child care center; a block-long gymnasium with a swimming pool; areas for handball, soccer, baseball, and track; a student center; and a library, housing more than 595,000 volumes.
The Auraria Higher Education Center provides a variety of educational opportunities that meet the needs of the urban student. The three Auraria institutions continue to be governed by separate boards and to maintain their distinctive roles and missions. However, the concept of facility sharing affords the MSC student the flexibility of taking lower-division courses at the community college, and graduate, or specialized professional courses at the university. Metropolitan State Colleges four-year degree programs are coordinated with those of the other two institutions, and students may cross register for classes at the three institutions.
The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, political, cultural, and economic practice of the city.
The Auraria Higher Education Center originated with the need to provide permanent facilities for three rapidly growing urban institutions. In 1974, the Colorado legislature created the Auraria Board of Directors to plan the campus, construct the buildings, provide a variety of additional centralized support services, and maintain the facilities. In 1972, the Colorado Legislature
9


The College
appropriated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus. Additional funds were contributed by the City of Denver, the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the State of Colorado. The Auraria Higher Education Center constitutes an example of creative cooperation by government at all levels.
Consortium of State Colleges
The member institutions governed by the Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College, Mesa College, Metropolitan State College, and Western State College. The purpose of the consortium is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions. Such efforts lead to broader educational opportunities for students.
The registering authority of each Consortium member institution can provide any regularly enrolled student in good standing the materials with which the student can enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution.
The enrollment status of the student at the host institution will be determined by the students status at the home institution. Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at a consortium institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution. The process of enrolling as a consortium student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution.
Admissions Instructions
Applications for Admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. To insure guaranteed processing, applications for admission must be, and credentials should be, received at the College not later than four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. All credentials which are received by the College become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student. All transcripts should be sent directly from the issuing institution to Metropolitan State College, 1006 11th Street, Box 16, Denver, Colorado, 80204. Under no circumstances will hand-carried transcripts be accepted.
It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any demographic or academic changes on the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records, it could delay the admission process for subsequent enrollment. Failure to report academic changes to the Office of Admissions and Records may result in rejection or dismissal.
Admission of Freshmen
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the Application for Admission included in the back of this Bulletin. Additional applications are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records at 1006 11th Street, Box 16, Denver, Colorado, 80204; 303/556-3058.
2. A $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The application fee must either be received or waived before the application can be considered.
3. The completed form along with the application fee must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, both the application and all required credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to request that all required credentials be
sent to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records directly from the issuing institution or testing agency in time to meet processing dates.
4. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after a preliminary evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of her or his admission status.
5. A final official high school transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term to insure registration for the subsequent term. Students will not be permitted to register after their initial enrollment unless this final transcript is received.
First-time college students less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment:
1. Applicants must request the following information be submitted directly to the Office of Admission and Records from the high school or testing agency:
a. ACT or SAT test results
b. high school grade point average
c. high school class rank
2. This information may be submitted at the end of the 6th, 7th, or 8th semester of high school. This would constitute an Early Admission Decision program.
3. Metropolitan State College will admit students who are likely to complete an academic program successfully and who meet state requirements for the College as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
4. Applicants who do not meet the stated admission requirements, as well as applicants who have taken the General Equivalency Diploma (GED), will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials, including any letters of recommendation, personal letters, or interviews which may be requested.
First-time college students 20 years of age or older as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment:
1. Applicants must request that the following information be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school or testing agency:
a. high school transcript with date of graduation or
b. GED test scores from the testing agency indicating a minimum average test score of 45
2. Applicants who have graduated from high school or have a GED test score of at least 45 without high school graduation will be admitted as regular students.
3. The ACT is highly recommended for advising purposes, but is not required.
Summer Semester
Traditional, college-aged applicants who are applying for the 1988 Summer Semester and who do not wish to continue at Metropolitan State College after the Summer term, may be admitted under a provisional status and, therefore, are not required to submit admissions credentials.
Traditional, college-aged applicants applying for the 1988 Summer Semester and who wish to continue for the Fall and/or Spring term must meet established admission requirements.
ACT/SAT Requirement
The College will require the ACT or SAT test of all first-time college students who are less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment. High school applicants who do not take the ACT or SAT test while in high school may make arrangements with the MSC Office of Admissions and Records to take the ACT examination only after all national test
10


The College
dates have passed. Contact the Office of Admissions and Records for additional information (556-3058).
GED applicants less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment must also adhere to the ACT/SAT requirement.
Failure to comply with this admissions requirement will result in a hold placed on future registration.
High School Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment Program (SEE) is Metropolitan State Colleges High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE is designed to supplement a students existing education through early participation in college level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students. Typically, the SEE student meets the following criteria:
1. is currently registered in a Colorado high school
2. is following a GPA of 3.0 or better
3. is preferably in his/her senior year of high school
4. can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes
5. has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work.
To apply for admission, the student must, in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Director of High School/College Relations a standard admissions application with the required $10.00 application fee accompanied by the following documents:
1. a high school counselor or administrators recommendation stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance
2. written parental approval
3. an official high school transcript.
Upon receipt of these documents the students record is reviewed and the admissions decision is made. However, if additional or supporting information is required the student may be required to have an admissions interview with an MSC admissions officer.
The admissions decision will be based on the students academic preparation, past performance, the recommendation of the high school official, and the students personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience.
Admission of Transfer Students
Transfer applicants must submit credentials from all colleges and universities previously or currently attending. Transfer applicants must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college attended. Failure to report correctly any former or current college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
Admission to the College for transfer applicants will be based on a 2.00 cumulative grade point average from institutions attended. Students who do not meet these admission requirements, or are unsure of their status, should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for individual consideration.
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the Application for Admission that can be found in the back of this Bulletin. Additional applications are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records. 303/556-3058.
2. A $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and will not apply toward tuition, must accompany the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
3. The completed form, along with the application fee, must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, the application, fee, and all required credentials should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to request that all required credentials be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records, Metropolitan State College, directly from the issuing institution or testing agency in time to meet processing dates.
4. Although an applicants record may be summarized on one transcript, official transcripts from each institution are generally required. This is true even though no credit may have been earned at an institution.
Transfer applicants less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment:
1. Applicants must request that the following information be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school, testing agency, and college or university:
a. high school transcript with high school grade point average and high school class rank
b. ACT or SAT test results
c. transcript from each college or university attended
2. These credentials should be submitted at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. If credentials are missing, there may be a delay in the final admission decision.
3. Metropolitan State College will admit students who are most likely to complete an academic program successfully and who meet state requirements for the College as established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE).
4. Applicants who do not meet admission requirements will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials, including any letters of recommendation, personal letters, or interviews which may be requested.
Transfer applicants 20 years of age or older as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment:
1. Applicants must submit proof of graduation from high school by requesting that a high school transcript with date of graduation be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school or applicants must submit proof of satisfactory completion of the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) with an average score of at least 45 by requesting that official test scores be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the testing agency. These credentials are required prior to a subsequent registration.
2. A high school transcript or GED is not required if the applicant wishes to submit college transcripts which indicate 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of transferable credit (C or better).
3. Applicants who have graduated from high school or have satisfactorily completed a GED will be admitted as regular students.
4. Degree-seeking transfer applicants are required to have all college/university transcripts on file in order to receive a transfer evaluation.
Transfer Credit Evaluation
Once final official transcripts for degree-seeking students are received by the Office of Admissions and Records, the evaluation process begins. The student receives a transfer evaluation card which must be signed by the students major department advisor. The card is then submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. Within approximately four weeks students receive two
11


The College
copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
1. Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent; however, only the credits will be shown on the MSC academic record. Courses with grades of D, F or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer.
2. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
3. A maximum of 70 semester hours will be accepted from a two-year institution. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or combination of two- and four-year institutions.
4. Students earning a two-year degree consisting of at least 60 semester hours from an accredited institution with a GPA of 2.0 or better will be guaranteed 60 semester hours of transfer credit, if they have met the following minimums in the MSC general studies areas as part of the two-year degree. Consideration of CLEP credit toward meeting these minimums will be based on MSC CLEP policy.
Freshman English.....................4 semester hours
Humanities...........................8 semester hours
Science/Mathematics..................8 semester hours
Social/Behavioral Science............8 semester hours
plus 2 additional hours in any one of these areas or in the
Career area........................2 semester hours
30 semester hours
These 60 semester hours of transfer credit may not necessarily fulfill all general studies course requirements for a particular degree program. Students should consult with an advisor in their major department to determine whether additional general studies courses will be required.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for one or more years:
1. Complete the Application for Admission that can be found in the back of this Bulletin. Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records. 303/556-3058.
2. To insure processing, the application should be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. Are not required to submit an application fee.
4. Who have attended other collegiate institutions since last attending MSC must follow the appropriate admissions requirements for transfer students and must have an official transcript sent directly to the College from the issuing institution. Students will not be permitted to register beyond their initial enrollment unless these credentials are received.
5. Applicants who are readmitting after nine years of absence from the College are required to resubmit all credentials. Only nondegree seeking MSC graduates do not have to resubmit credentials.
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the United States on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admissions and Records.
1. Admission of resident aliens (or refugees, parolees,
asylum cases, etc.) and those on temporary visas other
than F-1:
a. Those individuals holding a resident alien card or I-94 form should bring these forms to the Office of Admissions and Records to be copied prior to being accepted to the institution.
b. Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
c. Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
d. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
2. Admission of applicants on student visas (F-1):
a. Application for Admission and fee must be received four weeks prior to the first day of classes for the semester of application.
b. Applicants are required to submit the following documents as par t of their application to the College: application form, application fee, official transcripts from all secondary and post-secondary schools attended, evidence of English proficiency, and financial support documents.
c. Official academic credentials should be submitted in the origina I language as well as in official English translation. Transcripts from American institutions should be sent directly to the College from the issuing institution.
d. English proficiency may be demonstrated by attaining a score of at least 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Only scores from the International or Special Testing programs or from the institutional TOEFL offered through the Auraria Student Assistance Center will be considered.
e. The first semesters tuition and fees will be required prior to course registration for international students. Scholarship recipients are exempt from this requirement.
f. Students are required to complete a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours with a minimum 2.00 (C) grade point average each autumn and spring semester.
g. Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
h. More detailed information is contained in the international student brochure available in the Office of Admissions and Records.
If students are academically admissible and have met the minimum requirements on the English proficiency examination, they will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form 20 (I-20). Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent residents should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Admission and Retention of Minority Students
Metropolitan State College, through its office of Admissions and Records, strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area minority residents. A recruitment network of community-based agencies and organizations assists the College in meeting this objective. In addition, Admissions Officers are available to provide individual counseling regarding general admissions procedures for both new and transfer students. Specific counseling and referral services are also provided in the
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areas of financial aid, career planning, and academic support. Minority residents interested in attending the College are encouraged to contact the Office of Admissions and Records at the earliest possible date. Phone 556-3058 for information.
Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a students tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification and the evidence requested in it should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-state status a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some examples of connections with the state which provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law, and (5) registering to vote. Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent.
Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the College. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. Petitions and all supporting documentation must be submitted by the last working day prior to the first day of the semester for which the change in classification is sought. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the Class Schedule each semester.
Education Policy for Persons Over 62
Older area citizens are encouraged to participate in Metropolitan State Colleges programs and activities.
1. Persons 62 years or older, wishing to enroll for credit, should submit required admissions and registration materials to the Office of Admissions and Records, Central Classroom Building, Room 103, 1006 11th Street. Every attempt will be made to make financial assistance available. A college record of participation will be maintained.
2. Persons 62 years or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend class on a space-available basis, in classes of their choice, at either Metropolitan State College or at Extended Campus locations. There is no cost for these classes. These persons may attend classes beginning the sixth day of each semester. Interested older persons should obtain a registration form from the Metro-Meritus Program in the office of Adult Learning Services. This form must be signed by the instructor granting approval and returned to the Metro-Meritus Office.
Participation on the no-cost, no-credit basis should not contribute to an increased faculty workload and will not involve required homework or examinations. No college records of participation will be maintained.
Financial Aid Procedure
Philosophy
The Metropolitan State College financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the students family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attending Metropolitan State College.
Estimated Expenses
For the 1987-1988 academic year, projected expenses are estimated as follows:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees $1200 $4260
Room and Board 3780 3780
Books and Supplies 400 400
Transportation 720 720
Miscellaneous 810 810
$6910 $9970
Tuition and fees are set by the Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. Additional allowances are made for students with dependents and day care costs.
Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must demonstrate financial need, be a U.S. citizen or have an immigrant visa, and be enrolled as a full-time student. Exceptions exist for part-time students who qualify for the Pell (Basic) Grant, the Colorado Scholarship program, Presidential Scholarships and Guaranteed Student Loan. MSC uses the American College Testing (ACT) Service, a national nonprofit need analysis organization, to determine financial aid eligibility.
Application Procedures
Returning MSC students may request application forms from the Financial Aid Office. Transfer students can obtain application forms from their current college or university. Entering college freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools and/or from the MSC Financial Aid Office; students should obtain forms as early as possible. All applicants must complete the ACT Family Financial Statement. Transferring applicants must supply the MSC Financial Aid Office with financial aid transcripts from all schools previously attended. Detailed information concerning application procedures is available in the MSC Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid Resources
The aid programs introduced below are available to undergraduates only. Students who hold baccalaureate degrees are not eligible for the federal Pell and Supplemental Educational Opportunity grants. The amount of funds made available depends upon the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the students established financial need, duration of the students enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments.
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Grants
Pell (Basic) Grant: Eligibility is restricted to undergraduates enrolled at least half time (6 credit hours a term). The maximum award for Colorado residents is $1770, nonresidents enrolled fulltime may receive up to $2300.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG):
Eligiblity for the SEOG is restricted to undergraduates enrolled full-time in a degree program who demonstrate a high need for financial assistance. The amount of the award varies year to year according to the availability of funds.
Colorado State Grant (CSG): Students enrolled full-time who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. Awards vary from $50 to $2000 per year.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG): Full-time students who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. A maximum award is $2500 per year.
Scholarships
Scholarships administered by the Financial Aid Office are based on scholastic ability.
Presidential Scholarships: The scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. Scholars receive $500 per semester to pay mandatory tuition and fees.
Colorado Scholarships: Grants of $500 per semester, not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year, are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for applications.
Athletic Scholarships: MSC has a limited number of athletic scholarships. Applications and additional information are available from the MSC Athletic Department.
Private Scholarships: The MSC Financial Aid Office does not administer private scholarships. Students should contact academic departments for assistance in locating sources of such scholarships.
Loans
Each of the following is a loan which must be repaid by the student:
National Direct Student Loan (NDSL): Undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students enrolled full-time in a degree program are eligible for this loan. During the freshman and sophomore years, a student may borrow up to $4500; through the junior and senior years and postbaccalaureate study, a student may borrow a total of $9000. The Financial Aid Office provides additional information concerning NDSL loans upon request.
Guaranteed Student Loan: This loan is available to undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students officially admitted to MSC. Applications are available from the students home bank or from any college financial aid office.
Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS Loan): This loan is available to independent, undergraduate students, officially admitted and enrolled at MSC and to parents of dependent, undergraduate students. Applications are available from MSC or the banks which participate in this program. Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing. Terms of the PLUS loan are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office.
Colorado Alternative Student Loan (CASL): This loan is available to undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students officially admitted to MSC and provides credit-based assistance
to (or in behalf of) students whose costs of education are not met by traditional forms of aid. Applications are available from the MSC Financial Aid Office or the Colorado Student Loan program. Terms of the CASL loan are available upon request from the MSC Financial Aid Office.
Additional Loan Programs
Raymond R. Uhl Loan: Established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl, former MSC student killed in Vietnam, this fund is to assist students who need financial help but are not eligible for other types of aid. Maximum loan is $2000 and terms of repayment are arranged according to the individual students circumstances.
Student Support Loans: Student support emergency loans are available through the MSC Student Government Loan Fund. Details of these limited emergency loans are available from the MSC Student Affairs Office.
Emergency Loans: Should there be a delay in the disbursement of funds, the Financial Aid Office is able to advance limited funds to students, provided that financial aid has been awarded previously.
College Work-Study: The State of Colorado and federal work-study programs provide part-time employment during the summer and academic year. Undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students enrolled full-time in a degreegranting program are eligible.
Employment: Many students who do not qualify for work-study find part-time employment to cover a portion of their educational expenses. The Auraria Placement Office assists students in finding part-time jobs.
Other Forms of Assistance
Colorado No-Need Work-Study: Students enrolled at least halftime who are permanent residents of Colorado and are not eligible for other forms of financial aid (except scholarships) are eligible for Colorado No-Need Work-Study funds. Applications and information are available in the Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid as a Form ot Payment: Students who have been awarded financial aid have the option of using that aid as their form of tuition payment during phone registration each semester. Once the award has been verified by the Business Office, the student will not be required to pay the tuition and fee charges until the aid is disbursed. Students receiving any type of financial aid are eligible for this service each semester for which aid has been awarded. Related information is provided in mail-in and phone-in registration materials and in class schedules.
Resource Expectations: Students attending MSC must assume responsibility for the cost of their education. Tax-supported aid programs exist to supplement student financial resources, not to replace them. Prospective financial aid applicants should refer to the Financial Aid Office for details concerning students resource expectations.
The Aid Package
Once student need is determined, an aid package is developed which depends upon the availability of funds and the need of the applicant in relation to that of other students. Although it is not always possible to do so, the Financial Aid Office attempts to meet student needs fully. To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office, applicants must obtain all information and forms from designated sources and submit the required materials to the appropriate office according to established schedules.
Receiving a scholarship has no effect on a students aid if he or she is not receiving funds from GSL, NDSL, SEOG, CSG, CSIG, or College Work-Study. Students receiving aid from any of these programs are limited to a maximum amount of aid. A student
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The College
whose full need has been met prior to receipt of a scholarship will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the scholarship. The reduction will usually be made from the loan or from work-study. If the student's full need has not been met, the scholarship can be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each students situation is treated individually.
Award Notification
When the Financial Aid Office has determined the kind and amount of aid for which a student qualifies, the student is notified of the award by letter. The letter also stipulates the conditions of the award.
Disbursement Procedures: Beginning on the first day of classes each semester, students receiving financial aid must come to the Financial Aid Office for their financial aid check release form. Students must present proof of appropriate enrollment to obtain a check release. All students receiving aid must sign a Registration Compliance form and a Statement of Educational Purpose.
Repayment Policy
Students who withdraw from MSC prior to completion of a term must repay a portion of financial aid received through Pell, CSG, CSIG, SEOG, NDSL, and GSL programs. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSC before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds may be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSC Business Office, and students must provide the Financial Aid Office with evidence of repayment.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Academic Progress Requirements
Financial Aid recipients are required to maintain satisfactory progress towards their educational objectives in order to continue to receive aid. Detailed information outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office. Failure to maintain satisfactory progress may result in cancellation of aid for subsequent terms of school years.
Change in Status
Students must notify the Financial Aid Office of any changes of status of enrollment, family situation, or student resources. The financial aid award may be adjusted to reflect the change in the students resources, and awards may be adjusted during the year by the Financial Aid Office as the result of changes in institutional, state, or federal funding.
Renewal of Financial Aid
Students must apply each year for continued aid. Renewal of financial assistance depends on the students academic performance, financial need, and the availability of student financial aid funds.
Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College Financial Aid policies and procedures.
Costs
The Board of Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.
Tuition and College Service Fees
Tuition and College Service fees are determined by the Legislature and Trustees shortly before the beginning of each
academic year and, therefore, are not available for inclusion in this Bulletin. These costs may be found either in an addendum to this Bulletin or in the current semesters Class Schedule.
However, the cost of tuition and fees for students taking 10 or more hours per semester is projected to be approximately $600 per semester for in-state students and $2130 for out-of-state students. The cost of students taking 9 or fewer hours will be approximately $60 per semester hour for in-state students, and $215 per semester hour for out-of-state students. There is also an additional tuition charge for hours taken in excess of 18 credits per semester. For in-state students, this charge will be approximately $25 per credit hour; for out-of-state students, $100 per credit hour.
TUITION AND FEES ARE PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION
Standard Fees
An Application Fee is required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is nonrefundable and will not be applied to
tuition...........................................$10.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript......................1.00
Special Fees
Returned Check Penalty............................$15.00
Health Insurance: Single coverage is included in the College Service Fee for students taking ten or more semester hours. These students may apply for a waiver if they have other coverage. Optional coverage is available for dependents of students who are enrolled for ten or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
Other Cost Information
The cost of books and supplies averages from $250 to $350 per academic year with the highest cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other expenses will vary according to individual need.
Tuition Adjustments
Please see the insertion to this Bulletin or the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Personnel Services
The Vice President for Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as admissions, records, registration, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, student health services, and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
Conduct of Students
Metropolitan State College policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The College publishes standards of conduct, however, to which students are expected to adhere. The Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook including the Student Due Process Procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at MSC before disciplinary action is imposed), is available in Central Classroom 316.
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The College
Counseling Center
The Center exists for the purpose of providing competent, professional assistance in three related areas to all students presently enrolled at MSC or MSC alumni. These areas are: (1) Academic Support Programs; (2) Career Development and Career Decision-Making; and (3) Counseling for Personal Growth and Change. These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, counseling and educational groups, as well as the traditional one-to-one setting.
Most group programs begin at the start of each semester and interested students should register prior to or during the first week of classes. Students desiring assistance are encouraged to contact the Center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs listed below.
The Counseling Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc.
Academic Support Programs:
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP): A program by which students may receive up to 60 hours of college credit by examination. There are varied requirements and limitations, and those interested in this program should contact the Center regarding their specific situation.
Test Anxiety Reduction: Workshop for students whose anxiety about taking tests interferes with studying and test performance. Participants will learn skills to change the thinking that leads to anxiety, learn to relax, and learn to study and take tests more effectively.
Career Development and Career Decision-Making:
Self-Assessment/Life Planning Workshops: These three-session workshops are held at various times throughout the semester and participants will complete exercises and inventories to indicate interests, values, achievements and personality characteristics. Workshops are free for MSC students and a fee is charged for nonstudents.
Career Assessment Screening: Students who are initiating the career decision-making process will meet for initial screening. Career testing will be carried out and an overview of the process and the services available will be presented. Participants will then be referred to an appropriate program.
Personal Growth and Change:
Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problems that interfere with achieving success at the College. The student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the College, in order to receive assistance. Information disclosed in counseling is held in strictest confidence and is never released without the written consent of the student. Private one-to-one assistance in each of the areas described below is available for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar or group.
Personal Growth and Development Group: Participation in this low-structure group setting is designed to develop skills in communicating honestly, directly, and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through selfexploration in a supportive atmosphere. The group deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts, frustrations, conflicts about school, job, family, sex, loneliness, and dating.
Rational Living Workshop: The workshop provides an opportunity to become acquainted with the fundamentals of Rational Emotive Training and to apply these principles to problem areas specific to each individuals life. The process involves developing an awareness of self and of the emotional self-defeating thought patterns that have been learned. This opportunity to learn effective emotional management and
positive behavior skills is provided through discussions, lecture, role playing, and group interaction.
Anxiety Reduction Workshops: Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning. The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e., relaxation and counter-conditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions. Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program.
Compulsive Eating The Slender Balance: This seven-week educational seminar, jointly sponsored by the MSC Counseling Center and the MSC Student Health Clinic, provides a description and understanding of compulsive eating. Both campus and outside professionals provide relevant information on the psychological and health implications of this pattern.
Introduction to Biofeedback Training: This two-session group designed for those people who want more information about biofeedback training. Demonstrates instrumentation and treatment. Participants who desire treatment will be scheduled for continuation in the lab.
Decision-Making/Goal-Setting: Participants complete an assessment inventory that provides information about the manner of gathering and processing information and making decisions. The results are discussed during the second session and provide a framework for learning additional decision-making and goal-setting techniques.
Assertiveness Training: Participants learn techniques to help eliminate difficulties in asserting themselves. They learn: (1) how to recognize assertion problems; (2) simple ways to rid themselves of anxiety; (3) ways to build assertive skills to deal effectively with a wide variety of common problems.
Stress Reduction/Relaxation Techniques: Students learn and practice a progressive relaxation technique. A theoretical understanding of the benefits and the practical application of relaxation are emphasized.
Stress Management Workshop: A variety of techniques for managing fears, anxiety, and generalized stress are taught.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate Vietnam era veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is done during a 12-week trimester. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided for the participant.
High School Upward Bound
The program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary to succeed in education beyond high school for youth from low-income families who have academic potential but who have inadequate secondary school preparation. The program provides intensive instruction in basic academic skills such as reading, writing, and mathematics. A comprehensive counseling and enrichment program, for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression, and positive attitudes toward learning, is also part of the support program. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target area high schools located in Denver County.
Special Services Program
The purpose of Special Services at Metropolitan State College is to provide educational assistance for selected students who,
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The College
because of financial and/or ofher circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs. Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Interpersonal communication skills courses for college credit and basic skills courses in English and Reading are offered, coupled with tutorial assistance. These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a students basic educational skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a college course load. Other supportive services available are counseling, testing, assistance with financial aid forms, and, when possible, assistance in attending social and cultural events to enhance the students experience at Metropolitan State College.
Servicemens Opportunity College
Metropolitan State College has received recognition as a Servicemens Opportunity College. Further information can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Veterans Services
The Office of Veterans Services is designed to provide student veterans, and veterans in the community, with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutorial and counseling assistance, and many referrals to both on-campus offices and community services. The Office also certifies student veterans and dependents for their VA educational benefits.
Veterans Services coordinates the Colorado Veterans Tuition Assistance program which is a state benefit offering tuition credit for many student veterans who entered the military from Colorado. Individuals should contact the Office for further information and assistance.
Student Health Clinic
The Student Health Clinic is an accessible, outpatient, direct health care clinic located on the Auraria campus in suite 140 of the Student Center. Its primary purpose is to provide patients with quality, economical health care services. The Student Health Clinic stresses the concepts of wellness and preventive medicine. Health education sessions are available, as well as treatment for medical problems.
Any MSC student, faculty, or staff person is entitled to services. The staff will provide medical service for departments, such as physical exams and injections, and is available to speak to classes or groups on health-related topics.
Many professional services are provided by a highly qualified professional staff consisting of physicians, nurse practitioners, and allied health professionals. Evaluation and treatment of illness, birth control information and supplies, screening for and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, pap smears, weight counseling, health care for illness, blood pressure checks, pregnancy testing, minor surgery such as wart removals, hernia and prostate checks, and student health insurance information are just a few of the available services. Evening clinics are available.
Student Health Insurance
The Student Health Insurance is a group mandatory with waiver policy which is automatic for all full-time MSC students. The insurance premium for students taking 10 or more semester hours is included in the student fee assessment each semester. The premiums are paid to Southland Life Insurance Company. The Student Health Clinic coordinates all insurance claims and forwards them to the insurance company for payment of benefits.
Optional coverage is available for dependents of insured students who are enrolled for ten or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
The policy is in effect 24 hours a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of classes of the following semester. Insurance brochures listing other benefits, as well as insurance claim forms and information, are available at the Student Health Clinic, Room 140, Student Center. The group policy number is G 3392.
Student Activities
Metropolitan State Colleges Office of Student Activities offers concerts, dances, leadership development programs, lectures series, art shows and a myriad of other co-curricular activities for the students of Metropolitan State College.
In addition to providing social, cultural and recreational activities, the Office of Student Activities encourages and supports the development of a wide range of professional, social, academic honorary, and special interest student organizations.
The Office of Student Activities is on the first floor of the three-story Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student Center. The activities wing houses the clubs and organizations, the student newspapers, and the administrative offices of the Student Activities staffs of the three colleges on the Auraria campus.
Auraria Student Assistance Center
Established to provide comprehensive services to students at CCD, MSC, and UCD, the Auraria Student Assistance Center functions through offices listed below. The Center also offers formal internship and practicum opportunities for students. Contact the Division Director of the Center regarding these opportunities. The Center is located in Suite 108, Central Classroom Building. For more information, call (303) 556-3474.
Career Services
The Office of Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni at CCD, MSC, and UCD in planning their careers, finding part-time jobs while enrolled, and seeking employment upon graduation. Services offered included workshops, career counseling and assessment, a Career Resource Center, DISCOVER a computerized career guidance system, on-campus interviews with employers, job vacancy listings, and campus-wide career fairs.
Disabled Student Services
The Office of Disabled Student Services provides academic support services to disabled students at MSC and UCD. Services include notetaking, interpreting, counseling, admissions and registration assistance, and handicapped parking permits and information.
Information and Referral Services
This Office is a central information source which provides assistance to prospective students seeking enrollment at CCD, MSC, and UCD. Tri-institutional tours of the Auraria Campus are provided to prospective students on a prearranged basis.
International Programs
The Office of International Programs, assisting students from some 80 countries who attend CCD, MSC, and UCD, provides counseling on immigration issues, host family accommodations, support for personal adjustment, liaison with consulates, missions, embassies and foreign organizations, and other pertinent information for foreign students. The Office also
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provides information on study abroad programs to U.S. and foreign students.
Off-Campus Housing Services
The Office of Off-Campus Housing Services assists Auraria students seeking information on rental and residence hall living opportunities. The Office provides listing of rental properties and roommate-wanted situations and refers students to residence halls at local college campuses.
Vocational Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is a campus branch of the State Department of Social Services. Services offered to help disabled students become employable include job seeking skills training, vocational testing, counseling, tuition assistance, prosthetic devices and referral to additional sources of financial aid.
The Auraria Library
The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Metropolitan State College and the other Auraria institutions. The library has almost 600,000 volumes of books, microforms, and bound periodicals in addition to over 1,900 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. Collection development efforts are focused on providing a strong base for learning/teaching efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections in the fields of public administration, architecture and planning, urban studies, and criminal justice. The main collection is supplemented by the Architecture and Planning Branch Library which is located in Bromley Building, Suite 200, and open to the entire campus. In addition, as a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, the Auraria Library has access to an additional 6,000,000 volumes through inter-library loan as well as being able to access materials across the country.
All students are encouraged to take the self-guided audiotape tour of the library which takes about 50 minutes in order to familiarize themselves with the resources and services available to support their academic pursuits. Special services offered by the library include an online Public Access Catalog, computerized bibliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of U.S. and Colorado government publications, and media listening and viewing facilities. Library rooms are also available for individual study, group conferences, and typing.
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the library also has an internship program and a self-service graphics lab which might be of particular interest to students.
Student Center
The Auraria Student Center serves as the location for out-ofclass activities and services for all Auraria Campus students and
staff. It is the focal point for many cultural, social and recreational activities of the college community. The Center contains a bookstore, gameroom, cafeteria, Mission (3.2% bar), meeting and conference facilities, student activities offices, Health Center, student organizations, and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Centers lower corridor contains a housing board, ride board, and other public transportation information.
The Student Center is located at 9th and Lawrence Streets.
Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center is a nonprofit organization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, faculty and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center. Non-Auraria children may attend on a space available basis only.
The Center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time. It is divided into two toddler, three preschool, and one kindergarten/afterschool classroom. Children must be 18 months to eight years of age to attend.
The philosophy of the Center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide a safe, nurturing environment. The childrens program involves the assessment of individual needs and establishing goals and activities appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually oriented program provided at the Center.
Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time, or hourly basis to accommodate students varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188.
Auraria Department of Public Safety
The Department of Public Safety provides professional law enforcement services for the Auraria Higher Education Center. Peace officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day; trained dispatchers are on duty at all times to receive calls. Calls warranting police or emergency services should be directed through the emergency number at 556-2222.
The types of services provided by Public Safety include: the prevention of crime; investigation of offenses and taking crime reports; responding to first aid and emergency calls for assistance; monitoring of alarm systems throughout the campus; monitoring facilities for suspicious activity and unauthorized use; and enforcement of parking and traffic regulations, including accident reporting.
The members of the Department of Public Safety are dedicated to the service of the Auraria community and the safety of its users.
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Academic Information
Academic Information
The College operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of fifteen weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations. Running concurrently with the sixteen-week courses are modules, scheduled to begin on the first, sixth and eleventh week of the sixteen-week semester. During any sixteen-week semester students may enroll in sixteen-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under Course Load are not exceeded.
The College also offers a ten-week summer term during which students may enroll for either ten-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both. The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year.
Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Students who are planning to take the majority of their classes in the evenings should check with appropriate department chairs about the availability of courses in their major during evening hours. Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a baccalaureate degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons.
Admission and Registration
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College should review the Colleges admission requirements. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible for degree programs.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College are eligible to register each semester.
Students may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the College; however, following two full semesters of absence, students should review their status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated application for readmission will be required.
A student may register for classes in several ways. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing students. Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the College. Address changes may be made with the Office of Admissions and Records.
Registration procedures and dates for module classes are described in the Class Schedule. For further information regarding registration, please call 556-2987.
Academic Advising
Academic advising and tutoring programs are available in the Schools of Business; Letters, Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies. Continuing and prospective students seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator of advising of the preferred school.
Student Academic Programs
Student Academic Programs is a new component established in the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences to serve all freshmen and undeclared majors at Metropolitan State College. The program includes six related academic services: The Freshman Year, academic advising and tutoring for the School, New Student Orientation, Freshman Assessment, the Health Careers Science Program, and the English as a Second Language Program.
The Freshman Year
The Freshman Year Program is designed to unify and coordinate college efforts to help students toward a successful first year. The program provides intensive advising, course selection guidance, and academic monitoring throughout the first year, as well as coordinating academic support services for freshmen.
Academic Advising and Tutoring
Student Academic Programs is responsible for coordinating the advising of the academic majors in the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the advising of all undeclared majors at MSC. Additionally, the program provides tutoring services to students in the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences.
Orientation
All students new to Metropolitan State College and readmit students are encouraged to attend an orientation session. Information is provided concerning college requirements, class scheduling, registration procedures, college services and resources, transfer of credit, academic advising, choice of major, and career counseling. Information is also available regarding special programs offered by the College and its various departments. Orientation sessions are offered to freshmen, transfer students, adults, reentry women, and parents of new freshmen.
Freshman Assessment
All first semester traditional freshmen (less than 20 years of age the first day of the semester) are expected to take the freshmen assessment test battery in addition to participating in the orientation/advising process. The test battery measures skills in the areas of reading, English, and math; scores are used to assist advisors and students in selecting appropriate college-level courses.
Health Careers Science Program
The Health Careers Science Program is designed to help those women and ethnic minority groups who have traditionally been excluded from careers in science and technology. Students are provided with tutoring and other support to assure their success in the science and technology areas.
English as a Second Language
The English as a Second Language Program offers classes to students with limited English proficiency to help them acquire the listening, reading, and composition skills necessary for survival in college classes. The program provides tutoring, intensive academic advising, and monitoring of student progress throughout the students college career.
Student Academic Development
Adult Learning Services
Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from those of younger students. Adults who would like assistance in planning their educational goals or in applying for credit for college-level learning gained through work/life experience may contact the office of Adult Learning Services.
Credit for Prior Learning
In many academic departments at MSC, students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience. Such
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Academic Information
documenting of prior learning is initiated through the office of
Adult Learning Services.
Contract Major/Minor Degree Program
Students may design an individualized interdisciplinary major or minor program when their educational goals are not met by majors and/or minors listed in the MSC Bulletin. Each contract major or minor is supervised by a faculty committee chosen by the student.
Metro-Meritus
Persons 62 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College or at an Extended Campus location, on a space available basis. Metro-Meritus is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting.
International Student Advising
Special academic advising is available for foreign born students; the major emphasis of this advising is on the unique aspects of the foreign students academic study. Assistance is available to assess and place students in English as a Second Language (ESL) classes which are appropriate for their individual needs and which will enhance academic success.
Probation Readmit
Students who have been away from MSC for more than one year and have had below a 2.00 grade point average when they left are required to reenter the College on a Probation or Warning Contract. They will be required to have a readmit interview with a member of the Probation Review Committee and submit a midterm progress report their first semester after returning to school.
Probation Review and Suspension
The Probation Suspension Policy at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide each student with the opportunity to maintain high standards and achieve academic success. The Suspension Policy states that students are required to maintain a grade point average of 2.00 (C) in order to qualify for graduation. When a students grade point average for a semester falls below 2.00, the student will be placed on a warning status.
If a student has failed to show satisfactory progress at the end of the warning semester, the student will be placed on probation subject to suspension at the end of the probation semester if satisfactory progress is not achieved. A probation student may be advised to repeat courses, enroll in specific courses, or limit the number of hours attempted during this probationary semester. A student who is dismissed may petition for readmission after one year.
A students warning or probation status is subject to the students decreasing a deficiency each semester until a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is achieved. The College advises every student placed on warning or probation status to meet with a member of the Probation Review Committee and the students major advisor. A midterm progress report may be required before a student is allowed to register for the following semester.
Students who have been readmitted to the College on probation or warning will have their status changed when they have attempted a minimum of twelve semester hours and maintained a C average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. Students
readmitted on probation or warning will be reviewed for possible
suspension when failing to show satisfactory progress regardless
of the number of hours attempted.
Academic Standards Appeal
The Board on Academic Standards Exceptions is composed of three faculty, two students, and two administrators. An Associate of the Vice President for Academic Affairs serves as chair. This Board provides a final appeal for students wishing to petition for exceptions to existing academic policies. Students wishing to appeal should contact the Office of Admissions and Records.
Womens Services
Women's Services, housed in the Institute for Womens Studies and Services, provides a place and a system of support for women in need of assistance. Womens Services disseminates information regarding on and offcampus educational services, financial aid, and admissions procedures. Womens Services houses a resource library, information from public agencies, and unpublished research papers. Womens Services provides advising and assistance in planning for new educational and professional directions in the students life. Womens Services is considered an extended family whose objective is to give the individual personalized attention, information and referrals, and to help build supportive networks.
Division of Off Campus Programs
The changing nature of society has always created new responsibilities and challenges for educators. During the past decade, those changes have come more rapidly and have been more comprehensive. Preparing people for successful and contributing roles in the society requires careful coordination with many areas of the community, as well as a keen awareness of the educational needs of the nation.
In order to fulfill its educational responsibility, the Division of Off Campus Programs has been designed by Metropolitan State College to meet the diverse higher education needs of the four-county metropolitan area. The offices of Conferences and Seminars, Cooperative Education, Extended Campus Programs, and Adult Learning Services are the core of Off Campus Programs. Through these offices, educational opportunities for students, faculty and the community have been developed. Partnerships have been established between MSC, other institutions and businesses which are creating new models and standards for the development and delivery of innovative, high quality education.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education is a program which places students in work experiences related to their academic major. The purpose of the program is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses.
Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government, and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. The College requires that a student must complete 30 semester hours of college course work with a minimum 2.5 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or
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Academic Information
employer for participation in the program, and each students interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience which lasts for no more than one semester.
The College awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application available from the Co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSC degree requirements. Credit earned for the Co-op Education work experiences are not applicable toward general studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors.
298-1-3 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
An entry level work experience in a private company or an agency of the federal or state government related to the students major supervised by professionals on-the-job in conjunction with an MSC faculty member.
398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor
An advanced work experience in a private company or governmental agency related to the students major and supervised by professionals on-the-job In conjunction with an MSC faculty member.
For more information on the program and the placement opportunities in your academic major, contact the Cooperative Education Office at 1045 9th Street Park. Phone: (303) 556-3290.
Office of Conferences and Seminars
Conferences, seminars and workshops are another facet of MSCs comprehensive effort to provide educational opportunities for the people of metropolitan Denver. The office specializes in conferences, seminars and workshops for professional groups and organizations, and everyone interested in pursuing alternative academic paths. Continuing education credit (CEU) is available as well as the option of college credit for some courses.
Each year, the office organizes and offers over 100 programs on specific topics for people who wish to update their skills and knowledge. Topics are available in health care, teacher recertification, parenting, personal and home finance, careers, and writing for fun and profit. Please call 556-3115 for a brochure in your area of interest or to be placed on a mailing list.
Extended Campus Credit Program
The Extended Campus Credit Program provides fully accredited MSC courses at convenient locations throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Courses are selected and scheduled to accommodate business professionals pursuing career advancement, degree-seeking students, and those interested in personal enrichment. A majority of these classes are offered at Metro South and Metro North; other classes are held in businesses, schools, and other community facilities. Extended Campus classes are open to regular MSC students and other area residents. Tuition rates vary from the regular tuition
schedule. Students may apply and register on-site during the first week of classes or apply earlier through the Extended Campus office (CN 317) to assure seating. Additional information concerning the Extended Campus Credit Program is available at (303) 556-3376.
Metro on the Mall
A new center designed to give downtowners greater access to MSC, Metro on the Mall is located at 1554 California, Suite 200. Open 10:30 to 2:00, Monday through Friday, Metro on the Mall provides information on MSC services such as academic programs, admissions and registration, adult reentry assistance, Cooperative Education, financial aid and special events. In addition, Metro on the Mall serves as a focus for downtown educational activity, offering classes, lecture series, seminars and workshops, open houses and admissions, all at times convenient for downtowners.
International Studies
Metropolitan State College provides opportunities for academically qualified students to participate in study-abroad programs. These programs vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester. For further information, contact the Office of Off Campus Programs.
Interinstitutional Registration Denver Area Colleges
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Denver, Community College of Aurora, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements at MSC subject to specific approval by MSC. In the event a conflict exists between the policies/procedures of MSC and one of the Colleges listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are well advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally.
Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Concurrent Enrollment
Concurrent enrollment differs from interinstitutional enrollment in that the student is currently matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the registering authority of each institution. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both institutions. MSC students enrolling concurrently at other institutions should check with MSC department chairs concerning the acceptance of credits.
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours. One semester hour or one Base Contact Hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of fifteen 50-minute class hours per semester. Time required for class preparation is not a consideration in the calculation of course credit. Omnibus and laboratory courses give one semester hour of credit for each two, three or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2250 minutes for each hour of credit.
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Academic Information
Course Load
The average course load per sixteen-week semester is fifteen or sixteen semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to eighteen semester hours during autumn and spring semesters and up to twelve semester hours during the summer semester. Students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take nineteen or twenty semester hours during fall and spring semesters and those students with grade point averages of 3.50 or higher may take twenty-one semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums must be obtained from the students major department chair and appropriate dean. Authorization for overloads in excess of 21 semester credits is given by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions, following a successful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester. The appeal should begin by obtaining a petition from an Academic Advising Coordinator in the appropriate deans area. For information on the charge per credit hour in excess of 18 refer to the Costs section of this Bulletin.
Course Numbers, Descriptions, and Offerings
Before starting registration, students should study course descriptions for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites.
The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites, they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example, ENG 101-3 is a three-credit course. Following the course title is a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The second number in parentheses indicates the number of laboratory, shop, or field hours. For example, in a science course followed by (3 + 4), the numbers indicate three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory. Such a course would earn five hours of credit, three for lecture and two for laboratory work.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed above the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule, which is printed well in advance of the beginning of each semester, and is available to all students.
The scheduling of courses listed in this Bulletin is based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
Changes in Registration
Students enrolled may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first fifteen percent of each semester (not including weekends). See the current semester Class
Schedule for complete information concerning the tuition and fee refund schedule.
Students who reduce their course load after fifteen percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have adjusted and a twenty-five percent refund, if applicable. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Students reducing their course load after the fourth week of classes through the end of the fourteenth week of classes may receive an NC notation for each course provided faculty approval is granted. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadlline to the Office of Admissions and Records. See the sections on Grades, Notations, Course Load, and Class Attendance in this section.
Proportional time frames are applied for module courses and workshops.
Procedures for adding or dropping a five-week course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If students anticipate a prolonged absence, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot communicate with the instructor, they should contact the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs who will inform instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor determines that a student's absences are interfering with academic progress, that instructor may submit a letter to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs informing that office of the situation.
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which students are allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to their personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance.
Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced. Information on the method of instruction and the nature of program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all students.
Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester are given the notation of NC and must reenroll in and pay for the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during the semester in which the work is completed satisfactorily.
Nontraditional Credit Options in Lieu of Course Requirements
Successful completion of special examinations and/or completion of a prior learning portfolio which, assessed for credit, may be substituted for the completion of course requirements,
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Academic Information
may permit placement in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding credit. A student may earn up to sixty semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using nontraditional credit options. Approved credit of this sort will be posted to the students record after the completion of 8 semester hours of classroom (resident) credit. Nontraditional credit may not be used toward the last twelve credit hours of a degree program, does not substitute for residency requirements, and may not be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for nontraditional credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades.
Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases a department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses in which she or he requests and passes special college examinations. Under this provision a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the College. A fee of $10 per semester hour credit will be charged.
Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded), and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the students graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chair no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chair.
No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the College. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, or auditor.
When students have completed a course in the same discipline, higher in number than the course for which they are seeking examination credit, permission will be granted provided the two courses are unrelated and approval is granted by the appropriate department chairperson and dean. In a given discipline no credit by examination can be obtained for a course lower in a number in a sequence than the highest-numbered course already completed by that student. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the examination for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chair or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove NC or SP notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examples of unrelated subject matter:
ART 212, Human Anatomy for Artists ART 103, Basic Photography Methods ITS 241, Introduction to Photography ITS 101, Introduction to Wood
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to A or B must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for
the course will be recorded without grade reference on the students permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed 8 semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College Board has developed a program of examinations designed to evaluate nontraditional college-level education, specifically including independent study and correspondence work, and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This program, known as the College-Level Examination Program or CLEP, consists of two series of examinations the General Examinations and the Subject Examinations.
The General Examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English Composition, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Math and Social Sciences-History. Based on the results of these examinations, the College may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman general studies requirements areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of most of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. MSC does not allow credit for the English Composition Examination.
The Subject Examination series consists of more than 45 examinations which apply to specific college courses. MSC allows credit for 18 of these examinations. Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be reevaluated according to MSC credit-by-examination standards.
Interested students should contact the Counseling Center for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams.
Credit for Prior Learning
Students may apply for credit for college-level prior learning gained through experience by submitting a prior learning portfolio to the office of Adult Learning Services which will forward it to the appropriate academic department for evaluation and assessment. Credits are awarded on the basis of careful evaluation of the prior learning portfolio which documents the applicants prior learning experience. Students should check with departments for specific departmental guidelines in addition to College guidelines. The award of credit will be recommended by the departments and must receive final approval from the Prior Learning Assessment Committee composed of a faculty representative from each School of the College. Applicants for Credit for Prior Learning will generally be required to take the Portfolio Development Workshop. A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition rate will be assessed for credit awarded. Policies governing nontraditional credit options apply for credit for prior learning. Contact the office of Adult Learning Services for assistance and further information.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles students to substitute their own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
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Academic Information
Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other training programs which have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Records for transfer credit at Metropolitan State College. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD214 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages the students to take courses outside of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational experience. The pass notation has no effect on the grade point average; the failure grade is equivalent to the grade of F.
Students having already completed at least one MSC course with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses taken on a pass-fail basis will apply to major, minor or teacher certification requirements only with the approval of the appropriate department chair. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum graduation credit for these ungraded courses is eighteen credit hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (during the first fifteen percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. If the student requests the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the semester that he will receive a regular letter grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Grades/Notations
Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College are as follows:
A Superior .................4 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
B Above Average.............3 quality points per
semester hour attempted
C Average ......................2 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
D Below Average but Passing .. 1 quality point per semester
hour attempted.
F Failure.......................0 quality points per
semester hour attempted.
NC No Credit
Nl No Credit Incomplete
S Satisfactory (Limited to Student Teaching)
P Pass
X Grade assignment pending. Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade.
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course, a request at registration for no credit, course repetition, or may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of her/ his out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. Incomplete work denoted by Nl must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. The notation has no effect on the grade point average.
The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the students exposure to the course in order to increase the student's proficiency. In order to earn credit, the student must reregister for and pay for the course in a subsequent term. The Nl notation may not be awarded in a self-paced course.
The following minimal requirements shall be required throughout the College and shall be a part of all school, departmental, or individual policies:
1. The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes of each term.
2. During the last week of classes, requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted. The NC (incomplete) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply.
3. A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which she/he enrolls.
4. Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a students absences have reached a point that they jeopardize the students success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Additional requirements for an NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member. School policies shall supersede departmental policies; either school policies or departmental policies shall supersede individual policies.
Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat any course taken at MSC regardless of the original grade earned. By so doing, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the student's MSC academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The courses must carry the same title, course number and credit hours. To effect such a change, the student must reregister and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade and complete the necessary form in the Office of Admissions and Records indicating that the course has been repeated. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree evaluation or earlier, as identified. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional or consortium courses may be treated differently from the above procedure. This policy cannot be utilized for the purpose of altering grades assigned prior to the receipt of a degree from MSC.
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Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of credit hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours attempted. The notations NC, Nl, S, and P have no effect on the grade point average.
Transcripts of Records
A transcript is a certified copy of a students permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1 each. Transcripts will be released by the Office of Admissions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name as recorded while attending MSC, student identification number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropriate reasons. Certified true copies of transcripts from other institutions which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records will be issued upon signed request by the student. A charge of $5 per request is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking MSC courses under the consortium or interinstitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institutions.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the second week of the semester following the completion of the course the following autumn semester in the case of the preceding spring semester. The Grade Appeal Guidelines may be obtained from the students respective dean. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time line, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the MSC Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook. The Handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs. All decisions of the Grade Appeal Committee will be reviewed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Honors and Awards
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the College and community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity. Recognition of students includes:
The Presidents Award (one senior); the Vice President for Academic Affairs Award (one senior); the Vice President for Student Affairs Award (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (juniors and seniors from each school); Whos Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (sophomores, junior and seniors); Association of American University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special
Service Award for Disabled Students, Associated Students of
Metropolitan State College, Charles W. Fisher Award, and the
Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards are available in CN 316; applications are due each year on the last Friday of February. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on Metropolitan State College Honor Lists. The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher. The Vice Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively.
Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSC, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
1. Summa Cum Laude Top 5 percent graduates within each school with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than 3.65
Magna Cum Laude Next 10 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than 3.65.
2. To determine each honors category grade point averages for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer, autumn and spring graduates.
3. To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC prior to the term of graduation.
4. Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Additional information regarding graduation honors is available in the Office of Student Affairs, CN 313.
Omnibus Courses
The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities. Experimental topics courses, seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the Bulletin. Omnibus courses may be offered by all departments in the College.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and credit hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairperson of the department or discipline, and dean of the school before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements. One omnibus course numbered either 190 or 390 of up to three (3) hours credit may be used to satisfy General Studies requirements in each of the areas of Humanities, Science and
25


Academic Information
Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences, provided the course has a prefix of one of the departments within the respective subject matter areas; e.g., HIS 190 may be used in Social and Behavioral Sciences, but not in Science and Mathematics.
The following course numbers are the same for omnibus courses in all disciplines; and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, the course number will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
190 (Credit Variable) Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An introductory level class to study selected topics especially appropriate for lower-division students.
390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
480 (Credit Variable) Workshop
Prerequisite: Approval of department
An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area.
490 (Credit Variable) Seminar
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Presentations, discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed 6 credit hours) Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the students major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/ discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
Field Experience/lnternship Courses
Field experience or experiential education courses are courses whose major instructional activities are conducted outside the regular classroom, but whose syllabi are formally approved by the institution and maintained as an integral part of a department's curriculum. These courses incorporate actual experience with information assimilation and adhere to policies set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Certain programs such as Teacher Education, Nursing, etc., require experiential education courses as a part of their major. Other departments offer experiential education courses, generally as a part of the students major or minor, for credit applicable to graduation requirements.
Five terms identify field experience courses offered at Metropolitan State College: External Laboratory, Practicum, Internship, Student Teaching, and Independent Study.
External Laboratory
A controlled environment or organized activity emphasizing experimentation in which guided observations and participation, under the guidance and supervision of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor, enhance the integration of theory and practice (as in child development). The External Laboratory is distinguished from the on-campus laboratory which is devoted to experimental study in any branch of the natural or applied sciences.
Practicum
A unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
Internship
A work-oriented training period of actual service in an agency, institution, or technical/business establishment that provides an in-depth learning experience for the student under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor as well as the scrutiny and guidance of a faculty member (as in cooperative education).
Student Teaching
Faculty supervised learning experience in which the student applies knowledge gained in the Teacher Education Program to a classroom setting (as in practice teaching).
Independent Study
A student-initiated creative or research project conducted under the direct guidance and supervision of a faculty member of an academic department or discipline (as a thesis or special upper-division project).
Guidelines for Field Experience/lnternship Courses
1. Credit may vary from one to fifteen hours, depending upon the instructional activity.
2. Students are expected to meet the minimum Base Clock Hours established by CCHE policy which requires two to three times the clock hours established for regular classroom instruction.
3. Approved cooperating agencies provide learning opportunities, prepare written statements of assignments, monitor students performance, confer with the supervising faculty member, and provide a written evaluation.
4. An average of one hour a week, minimally, is spent in seminar and discussion or in conference with the adjunct faculty at the field experience locale and/or in conference with the supervising faculty member.
5. The supervising faculty member evaluates students performance and, in consultation with the adjunct faculty member, assigns the grade for the course according to grading policies stated in the College Bulletin.
6. Omnibus courses (299, 397, 498, 499) emphasizing field experiences are subject to guidelines established for regular field-based courses, as well as omnibus course guidelines, and must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs.
299 (Credit Variable) Field Experience/lnternship
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
397 (Credit Variable) Practicum
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor
A class involving a unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
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Academic Information
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed 6 credit hours) Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the students major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
499 (Credit Variable) Advanced Field Experience/ Internship
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
7. Cooperative Educationcourses(298,398-variablecredit) are subject to guidelines established for regular field experience courses as well as Cooperative Education guidelines. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSC degree requirements.
Requirements for All Degrees
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the information provided in this Bulletin concerning regulations and requirements of the College and their program of study.
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) following a curriculum in arts, sciences, or applied sciences to meet requirements for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree; (2) taking programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in business and public services; or (3) enrolling for selected courses to improve general education or vocational competency.
To earn a degree, students must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which they are registered and must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
For degree requirement evaluation purposes, students may select any Metropolitan State College Bulletin in effect while they are enrolled at Metropolitan State College providing that the Bulletin contains their complete program of study. A student interrupting continuous enrollment for one calendar year or more may select only those Bulletins in effect after returning to the institution. Students must complete the general studies, major, minor, and all other degree requirements as outlined in the Bulletin under which they plan to graduate.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice concerning requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for completing these requisites rests with the student. Consequently, students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program and should seek advice. The student should never assume approval to deviate from the stated requirements without a properly signed statement to that effect.
Transfer students should become familiar with the requirements of the College, the general studies, and their major and minor areas.
Graduation Agreement
The official academic evaluation process is initiated when the student completes the Graduation Agreement. Once the student has received program approval from the major department chair and the minor department chair, the student submits the Agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final
review. Workshops are held periodically to assist students in beginning their Graduation Agreements. After the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive an updated Academic Status Report.
The deadline for submitting the Graduation Agreement is approximately eight weeks prior to the start of classes for the semester the student plans to graduate. Specific deadlines appear in the Class Schedule. However, since the student is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of her/his program of study, it is expected that the Agreement will be submitted at least two years prior to the semester of graduation. A Graduation Agreement submitted after the deadline will be reviewed for the following graduation date.
After submitting the Graduation Agreement, a student who feels justified in deviating from College academic requirements may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance. Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions and must be signed by the appropriate dean and department chair.
Students who have met all requirements for graduation may be granted diplomas at the end of the semester in which the work is completed. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the spring semester. Students who officially graduated during any of the previous three semesters are invited but are not required to participate in the spring commencement.
Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College course work.
2. Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (300-and 400-level courses).
3. Complete all general studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see the Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College section of this Bulletin), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement; however, a second emphasis within the first major does not constitute a second major. Coursework used toward meeting requirements for one major or minor may not be used toward meeting requirements for another major or minor.
5. Complete all special requirements of a department and school.
6. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all MSC courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all MSC courses which satisfy requirements for a minor.
7. Complete a Graduation Agreement.
8. Academic Residency (classroom credit)
a. Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College, including the last 10 semester hours applicable to the degree.
b. Complete at least 8 upper-division (300- and 400-level) semester hours of the major and 4 upper-division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College (classroom credit).
c. Students should check with the Office of Admissions and Records before attempting to apply
27


Academic Information
interinstitutional credit to academic residence requirements.
9. Credit Limitations:
a. Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 4 semester hours in physical education activity courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring in Physical Education or Recreation, and only 3 of these may be applied to the career category of general studies.
c. Not more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a bachelors degree for students who are not majoring in Music, and only 3 of these may be applied to the humanities category of general studies.
d. Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a bachelor's degree.
General Studies for Bachelor Degrees
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the general studies distribution requirements listed below. Each of the category requirements may be satisfied by any course within the departments listed including only one omnibus course numbered either 190 or 390 of up to three (3) hours credit in each of the areas of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences, and then only if the course has a prefix of one of the departments within the respective subject matter areas. No omnibus course may be applied to the Freshman Composition or career catagory. Cooperative Education courses cannot be applied or substituted for Freshman Composition or the Career category for General Studies requirements. Not more than 6 semester hours taken in any one department (as indicated by the three-letter course prefix) will apply toward general studies requirements. Each degree candidate must complete English 101 and English 102. The same course may be used toward meeting requirements in the general studies and the major or minor with the approval of the major or minor department chair. The credit value of the course may be considered only once, however, in the upper-division and cumulative credit totals. The Career category is an option within the General Studies. A maximum of 6 semester hours of applicable course work may be applied to the Career category to compensate for less than 10 (but at least 8) semester hours in each of the Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social/Behavioral Science categories. Students should check for specific general studies requirements stipulated by their major. Specific courses are listed in Afro-American Studies, Chicano Studies and Womens Studies because the programs are interdisciplinary.
Credit for cross-listed courses will apply to the General Studies categories according to the course prefix associated with the specific course the student chooses. For example, although CHS 200 and ANT 236 are cross-listed, if a student registers for CHS 200 the course will be applied toward the Humanities category; and if he/she registers for ANT 236 it will be applied toward the Social/Behavioral Science category.
Credits
Freshman Composition (ENG 101 and 102)..................6
Humanities...........................................8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 103 and 108)
Art
Chicano Studies (CHS 200, 201, 202, 340, 341, 351, 352, 420)
English
French
German
Modern Languages
Music
Philosophy
Reading
Spanish
Speech
Womens Studies (WMS 101, 113, 218, 234, 313, 331,
342, 351, 367, 425, 475)
Science and Mathematics..............................8-10
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Meteorology
Physics
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences....................8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 101, 102, 113, 213,
220, 230, 270, 315, 330, 340, 355, 370, 375, 391,
440, 460, 470, 485)
Anthropology
Chicano Studies (CHS 100, 101, 102,211,221,231,
301, 310, 311, 312, 320, 330)
Economics
History
Political Science Psychology Sociology Urban Studies
Womens Studies (101, 113, 218, 234, 313, 331, 342,
351,367, 425, 475)
Career (Optional)....................................0-6
Accounting
Aerospace
Civil Engineering Technology
Communications
Community Service Development
Computer Management Science
Criminal Justice and Criminology
Education
Electronics Engineering Technology Finance
Health Care Management Health Services
Hospitality, Meeting, Travel Administration
Human Services
Technical Communications
Industrial Technology
Journalism
Management
Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technology Military Science
Physical Education and Recreation Social Welfare
Surveying _____
Total................................................36
Requirements for a Second Degree
For an additional bachelors degree, the student will comply with the following:
1. The first bachelors degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College.
2. Student must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of 8 MSC classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department.
3. Student must complete a minor, if required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
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Academic Information
4. The student must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC is required in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
6. General studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.
7. Credit limitations for a bachelors degree will continue to exist for the second degree.
8. A Graduation Agreement must be completed as outlined in this Bulletin.
Family Rights and Privacy Act
Metropolitan State College gives notice that it has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information as directory information under 438(a) (5) (B) of the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Directory information concerning students at the College will be released without the prior consent of the student as permitted by law unless within ten (10) days after registration a student has notified the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records that such information should not be released without his or her consent. Directory information at Metropolitan State College is as follows:
1. name, address and phone listing
2. date and place of birth
3. major and minor fields of study
4. participation in officially recognized activities and sports
5. weight and height of members of athletic teams
6. dates of attendance
7. degrees and awards received
8. most recent previous educational agency or institution attended.
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Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Metropolitan State College is organized into three schools. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described under special sections of this Bulletin prepared by each school. Programs marked with an asterisk (*) do not require completion of a minor.
Bachelors Degree
Minor Major
School of Business
Accounting* X X
Computer and Management Science* X
Data Processing X
Economics ** X X
Finance* X X
Human Resource Management X
Management* X X
Marketing* X X
Production Management X
Real Estate X
Systems Management X
"The Department of Economics offers a B.A. Degree, rather than a B.
Institute for Entrepreneurship
Urban Studies* *** X X
'"Urban Studies offers a B.A. degree and a B.S. degree. School of Professional Studies
Division of Education
Bilingual-Bicultural Education X
Early Childhood Education X X
Elementary Education X
Health and Safety X
Parenting Education X
Physical Education X X
Reading X
Recreation X X
Secondary Education X
Special Education Teacher Certification: X
Early Childhood, Elementary, Thirteen Secondary Fields, and Special Education
Division of Technology
Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics Aviation Management Civil Engineering Technology Drafting Engineering Technology Electronics Engineering Technology Industrial Marketing**
Industrial Technology*
Mechanical Engineering Technology Professional Pilot Surveying
Technical Communications Technical and Industrial Administration*
Technical Management**
* Available as Contract Majors only
Division of Public Service Professions
Criminal Justice and Criminology x x
Health Care Management (Upper-Division) x x
Hospitality, Meeting, and Travel Administration* x
Bachelors Degree
Minor Major
Hotel Administration X
Human Services* X X
Meeting Administration X
Nursing (Upper-Division for R.N.s) X
Restaurant Administration X
Travel Administration X
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Division of Humanities
Art* X X
English X X
French X
German X
Industrial Design* X
Journalism X X
Language and Linguistics X
Modern Languages X
Music X
Music Education* X
Music Performance* X
Philosophy X X
Practical Writing X
Public Relations X
Spanish X X
Speech Communications X X
Speech Pathology-Audiology X
Division of Social Sciences
Anthropology X X
Behavioral Science X
History X X
Political Science X X
Psychology X X
Public Administration X
Sociology X X
Social Welfare* X
Division of Science and Mathematics
Biology X X
Chemistry X X
Computer Science* X
Criminalistics* X X
Geography X
Geology X
Land Use X
Mathematics X X
Meteorology X X
Physics X X
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
Afro-American Studies X X
Bilingual Chicano Studies X
Chicano Studies X
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Womens Studies x
x
X X
X X
X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X
X
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Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Communications Multi-Major
The Communications Multi-Major offers nine areas of emphasis for students with varying educational and career needs. Each student's program is planned with an advisor in the selected area of emphasis. Students may obtain information concerning the major from the department sponsoring the particular area of emphasis in which they are interested.
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech 3
SPE 420 Readers Theatre 3
SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I 3
SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II 3
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting 3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life.......................3
Communications Multi-Major Summary
Area of Emphasis
Communications: Visual Sponsored by Art Communications: Technical Writing and Editing by Technical Communications Communications: Organizational Sponsored Communications Communications: Technical Media Sponsored by Technical Communications
Communications: Broadcasting Sponsored by Speech Communications: Theater Administration Sponsored by Speech
Communications: Sports Sponsored by Physical Education and Recreation
Sem. Hrs.
Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. in Total
Sponsored Areas of In Core In Area of Communic. Sem. Hrs.
Emphasis Communications: Courses Emphasis Electives In Major
by Technical
Visual 6 27 9 42
All Communications Multi-Major areas of emphases comprise 42 semester hours of study, including 6 hours of required core courses as outlined below, courses in the area of emphasis, and a choice of free electives.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Communications: Technical Writing &
Editing Communications: 6 24 12 42
Organizational Communications: 6 24 12 42
Technical Media Communications: 6 24 12 42
Broadcasting Communications: 6 21 15 42
Theatre Administration Communications: 6 18 18 42
Sports 6 27 9 42
Required Core Courses for All Areas of Emphases Hour.
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems ............................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ........................3
Option Requirements.....................................36
Total...................................................42
The Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor offers an area of concentration for students who recognize the increased emphasis on wellness in several professional fields and/or for health conscious individuals who wish to establish a self-
Communications Free Electives List
Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected Communications area of emphasis are acceptable as free electives.
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ........3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication .................3
ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods.........................3
ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods...............3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art:
1960-Present Day ...........................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ..........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II .........................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition .....................3
ENG 303 Semantics ....................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ...................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing .........3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading........3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing.......3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers........3
PHI 144 Logic ........................................3
PSC 322 Public Policy ................................3
PSC 346 Public Opinion ...............................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology.............................3
PSY 342 Issues in Community/Social Psychology ........3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking .....................3
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage........................2
SPE 328 Stage Directing ..............................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ...........3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction.................................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art ...............3
enhancement program. The Multi-Minor is designed to complement a major chosen by a student which is relevant to the students career goals. The student arranges for the minor through one of the following departments: Human Services, Nursing and Health Care Management, Philosophy, Psychology, Physical Education and Recreation, Sociology, or Teacher Education.
The Multi-Minor comprises 24 hours of study as outlined below:
Semester
Required Courses Hour.
HES 105 Dynamics of Health..............................3
HES 204 Nutrition ......................................3
HSW 375 Holistic Health and High Level Wellness.........4
PER 150 Skills and Methods: Teaching
Physical Fitness .............................2
PHI 322 Personal Knowledge and Professional Growth ..3
PSY 275 Introduction to Holistic Health ................3
PSY 303 Research in Health and Wellness.................3
Electives* .................................._3
Total.......................................................24
* Practical experience is an integral part of this minor and contract major. Students are urged to enhance their education through field work. This can be achieved through practicums, internships and cooperative education offerings in one of the above listed departments or by using these elective hours.
Contract Major/Minor Program
Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College, the need arises occasionally for a major that will not fit the existing catalog major
31


Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
or minor and which is individual in nature and meets the specific needs of the students. The Contract Major/Minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific, individual, educational objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor programs. The degree sought may be either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science.
For further information, contact the office of Adult Learning Services.
Community Service Development Program
The Community Service Development Program at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide academic and applied learning opportunities for people who wish to pursue professional careers in the administration of a wide variety of nonprofit organizations. A complete description of the program may be found under Human Services and Urban Studies.
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School of Business
School off Business
The curriculum of this School is designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The School offers the Bachelor of Science degree. The Department of Economics offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, rather than a Bachelor of Science. The Urban Studies Program, housed within the Institute for Entrepreneurship in the School of Business, offers coursework leading to either a Bachelor of Science degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree.
Undergraduate programs within the School of Business are designed:
1. To offer the student the opportunity to receive the baccalaureate degree. This degree program consists of a broad foundation in general education, a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and specific competence in one or more significant functional areas of business.
2. To offer a diverse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those residents of the metropolitan area, and others, who desire to study business-oriented subjects without undertaking a degree program, and to meet the needs of the Denver business and professional community for continuing education programs.
3. To strengthen students powers of imaginative and innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis and sensitivity to social and ethical values.
4. To instill in students a desire for learning that will continue after they have graduated and taken their places in the community.
5. To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering, risk, and progress which is essential to the continued development of the American free enterprise system.
The philosophy of the School of Business is to devote its resources to continued growth of high quality, undergraduate programs. As needs arise and resources become available, additional programs or areas of specialization will be offered. Flexibility of course design, a principal requisite of the School of Business, will continue to dominate the planning of all new programs.
Three-Year Specialist Degree
The Three-Year Specialist Degree program is discontinued effective the end of spring semester, 1987. Students already enrolled in the Three-Year Specialist Degree program should contact the Marketing Department for an advisor.
Bachelor of Arts Economics
Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or limited resources. The study of economics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of her or his specific career objective. The Bachelor of Arts program has been designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign economies, and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses are provided to develop the students ability in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists. Employment opportunities in economics are available in national and international business, federal, state, and local government, and in various nonprofit organizations.
General Studies
Semester
Required Courses Hour*
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition ........................6
Humanities:...........................................8-10
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences ........................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences.............................3
Physical or Biological Science..............3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro...............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro..............3
Electives................................. 3
Career.................................................0-6
Total...................................................36
Required Courses
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics ................. 4
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomics .................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics..................3
ECO 315 Econometrics.................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought................._3
Total...................................................16
Approved Electives
Fifteen (15) hours of upper-division economics
electives selected in consultation with and
approved by the Department of Economics...................15
Total.....................................................31
Minor
Eighteen (18 hours must be completed to fulfill the minor requirement)
Total......................................................18
Free Electives............................................ 35
Program Total.............................................120
Business Emphasis in Economics
This emphasis prepares the student for entry into the growing professions of economics and business. It provides training that will enable the student to enter the profession and provide
33


School of Business
assistance to government and business in solving problems and formulating policies.
General Studies (See General Studies Requirements for Bachelor
of Science Degree in School of Business).................36
Business Core (See Business Core for Bachelor of Science Degree in School of Business)............................33
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory ................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory ................3
ECO 315 Econometrics .....................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought......................J3
Total....................................................12
Approved Electives
Fifteen (15) hours of upper-division economics electives selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of
Economics................................................15
Total....................................................27
Electives Within the School of Business...................9
Electives Outside the School of Business.................15
Program Total...........................................120
Bachelor of Science
Accounting
Computer and Management Science
Finance
Management
Marketing
Urban Studies
The School of Business offers majors in accounting, computer and management science, finance, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax, systems, or governmental accounting. The computer and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding fields of business, data processing, systems, design, or management science. The finance major is designed to prepare students for a career in corporate financial analysis, insurance, personal financial management, international financial management, accounting, real estate, investments, or banking. The major in management provides areas of emphasis in insurance, personnel and human resource management, production, real estate, or managerial entrepreneurship. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of distribution/retailing, promotion/advertising, sales, marketing research, marketing for nonprofit organizations, or marketing management.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the Colleges general specifications for the bachelors degree listed under Requirements for all Degrees. A summary of the course program which she or he must complete within the School of
Business is as follows:
General Studies.............................................36
Business Core...............................................33
Major in School of Business.................................27
Electives Within the School of Business......................9
Electives Outside the School of Business...................15
Total.....................................................120
General Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in accounting, computer and management science, economics (business emphasis), finance, management, or marketing must complete the following general studies requirements:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition ...................6
Humanities:
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .........3
Electives ...................................5
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences .........................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences..............................3
Physical or Biological Science...............3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro...............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro...............3
Electives....................................3
Career:
BEC* 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications ..._3
Total.....................................................36
"Effective summer 1987, BEC 200 will be offered through the Marketing Department.
Business Core
In addition to the general studies requirement, students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
BEC* 301 Business Research and Report Writing ..........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ...............3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making ..................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ..........................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MGT 495 Business Policies .............................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ......................_3
Total.....................................................33
Effective summer 1987, BEC 301 will be offered through the Marketing Department.
Accounting
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I ................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting .............................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I ..................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II .................3
ACC 420 Auditing...................................._3
Total...................................................15
Students must select 12 hours of accounting electives or one of the following areas of emphasis:
Financial Emphasis (CPA)*
ACC 310 Income Tax II ................................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting ......................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ........................3
ACC 452 Advanced Accounting II ......................_3
Total...................................................12
Those planning to sit for the CPA examination should elect MGT 321. Managerial Emphasis (CMA)**
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems............3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting .....................3
34


School of Business
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions ...........3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II ......................._3
Total....................................................12
"Those planning to sit for the CM A examination should elect ECO 350,
MGT 357, and MGT 453.
Tax Emphasis
ACC 310 IncomeTaxll ..................................3
ACC 311 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance...............3
ACC 409 Tax Procedure and Research....................3
ACC 410 Tax Planning .................................3
Total....................................................12
Systems Emphasis
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems............3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting .....................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ..............................3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL .............................._3
Total....................................................12
Governmental Emphasis
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems............3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting.......................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ........................3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II ......................._3
Total....................................................12
Total hours for Accounting Major....27
Business Education and Communications
Major for Bachelor of Science
The Business Education and Communications Department is dissolved effective end of spring semester 1987. Students already enrolled in majors through the BEC department should contact the Marketing Department for an advisor. They will be permitted to complete those BEC programs already in process.
Communications courses will be offered through the Marketing Department (formerly BEC 200, BEC 301, BEC 323); Paralegal courses will be offered through the Management Department until all majors in the program (declared prior to summer 1987) complete degree requirements; Word Processing (BEC 223) will be offered through the Computer and Management Science Department.
Computer and Management Science
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 210 FORTRAN .................................3
CMS 211 COBOL....................................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ............................_3
Total...............................................9
One of the following areas of emphasis must be chosen for an additional eighteen (18) hours:
Information Systems Emphasis
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base
Management ..................................3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware
and Software ................................3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ..............3
Approved CMS electives .................................._9
Total....................................................18
Management Science Emphasis
CMS 331 Business Forecasting Methods ...............3
CMS 431 Management Science Techniques ..............3
CMS 439 Case Studies in Management
Science ...................................3
CMS 440 Simulation of Management
Processes .................................3
Approved CMS electives ................................_6
Total..................................................18
Computer Analyst Emphasis
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming
Assembler .................................3
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management........3
CMS 309 Job Control Language and
Operating Systems .........................3
CMS 314 Advanced Assembler Language ................3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware
and Software ..............................3
Approved CMS electives ................................_3
Total..................................................18
Systems Development Emphasis
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management
Systems ...................................3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL .............................3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software...................................3
CMS 405 Advanced Systems Analysis and
Design Seminar ............................3
CMS 407 Systems Development and Implementation .....3
Choose six (6) additional hours from the following:
CMS 323 Data Communication Systems .................3
CMS 324 Computer Auditability and Control ..........3
CMS 325 Automated Office Systems....................3
CMS 406 Advanced Data Base Systems .................3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ............_3
6
Total..................................................18
Total hours for CMS major..............................27
NOTE: A maximum of 15 semester hours of programming courses is allowed in the CMS major.
Finance
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hour
ACC 309 Income Tax I ..................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Acccounting I ....................3
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions ............3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .........................3
FIN 360 Investments....................................3
FIN 435 Financial Problems and Policy ................_3
Total.....................................................18
Choose nine (9) additional hours from the following to supplement an area of emphasis:
Insurance
FIN 342 Principles of Insurance ........................3
FIN 343 Property and Liability
Insurance .....................................3
FIN 345 Governmental Insurance and
Insured Employee Benefits....................._3
Total.....................................................9
Real Estate
FIN 380 Principles of Real Estate .....................3
35


School of Business
FIN 382 Real Estate Finance.........................3
FIN 384 Real Estate Law ..........................._3
Total.....................................................9
Financial Management
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II .................3
MGT 321 Commercial and Corporate Law ...............3
FIN 342 Principles of Insurance ..................._3
Total.....................................................9
Investments
ACC 410 Tax Planning ...............................3
FIN 460 Securities Analysis.........................3
FIN 380 Principles of Real Estate ................._3
Total.....................................................9
Commercial Banking
ECO 465 Advanced Monetary Theory ...................3
FIN 370 The Management of Commercial
Banks ......................................3
FIN 470 Special Topics in Bank
Management ................................_3
Total.....................................................9
Personal Financial Management
FIN 342 Principles of Insurance ....................3
FIN 380 Principles of Real Estate ..................3
ACC 410 Tax Planning .............................._3
Total.....................................................9
International Financial Management
FIN 410 International Financial Management..........3
MKT 371 International Marketing ....................3
Approved Business Elective .............................._3
Total.....................................................9
Accounting Emphasis
ACC 340 Cost Accounting ............................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II .................3
ACC 310 Income Tax II ............................._3
Total.....................................................9
Semester hours for area of emphasis chosen..............._9
Total hours for major...................................27
Management
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hour
ECO 350 Managerial Economics .......................3
Students select one of the following areas of emphasis: Insurance
FIN 342 Principles of Insurance ....................3
FIN 343 Property and Liability Insurance ...........3
FIN 344 Life and Health Insurance ..................3
FIN 345 Governmental Insurance and
Insured Employee Benefits...................3
FIN 346 Risk Management ............................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making..............3
Approved Management electives .........................J>
Total....................................................24
Management
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business II ...........3
MGT 353 Personnel Management........................3
MGT 355 Production Management ......................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making..............3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ....................3
MGT 461 Cases in Management ............................3
Approved Management electives .........................J>
Total..................................................24
Human Resource Management
MGT 353 Personnel Management......................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations..................3
MGT 375 Performance Appraisal.....................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making............3
MGT 461 Cases in Management ......................3
MGT 462 Compensation Administration...............3
Approved Management electives.........................._6
Total..................................................24
Production Management
ACC 340 Cost Accounting ..........................3
MGT 355 Production Management......................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making.............3
MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management .......3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management ................3
MGT 461 Cases in Management........................3
Approved Management electives.........................._6
Total..................................................24
Real Estate
FIN 380 Principles of Real Estate .................3
FIN 382 Real Estate Finance........................3
FIN 384 Real Estate Law ...........................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making.............3
FIN 484 Real Estate Appraisal .....................3
FIN 485 Commercial and Investment
Real Estate................................3
Approved Management electives........*>................_6
Total..................................................24
Managerial Entrepreneurship
ECO 350 Managerial Economics ......................3
MGT 321 Commercial and Corporate Law ..............3
IEC 412 Management of New Ventures ................3
IEC 422 Cases in Entrepreneurship .................3
IEC 432 New Venture Strategies.....................3
IEC 442 Entrepreneurial Business Planning .........3
Approved College Electives............................._9
Total..................................................27
Semester hours for area of emphasis chosen..........24-27
Total hours for major......................................27-30
Marketing
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hour*
MKT 301 Marketing Research .......................3
MKT 311 Advertising ..............................3
MKT 316 Sales Management .........................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ........................3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management...........3
MKT 456 Advanced Marketing Problems...............3
Plus nine (9) hours of Marketing electives ..........._9
Total hours for major.................................27
Minors Offered by the School of Business
The minors offered by the School of Business are specifically created for nonbusiness majors. Because prerequisite requirements are involved in each set of courses, any student minoring in any of the areas below should contact an advisor.
36


School of Business
Accounting Minor
The Accounting minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of accounting.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ...................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II...................3
ACC 309 Income Tax I ................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting ....................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I ....................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II ...................3
Accounting Electives......................................._3
Total......................................................21
Data Processing Minor
The Data Processing minor is designed to give nonbusiness students a career skill in computer programming for business.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .......3
CMS 210 FORTRAN .................................3
CMS 211 COBOL....................................3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming
Assembler................................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ..............................3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL ..........................3
CMS 314 Advanced Assembler Language ............_3
Total..............................................21
Economics Minor
The Economics minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro ................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro ................3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division Economics courses, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
Finance Minor
The Finance minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of finance.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ...................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II...................3
ACC 309 Income Tax I .................................3
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions ............3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ..........................3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .........................3
FIN 360 Investments..................................._3
Total.....................................................21
Management Minor
The Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with managerial skills to work in a business environment.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I ...........3
MGT 300 Principles of Management...................3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.......................3
MGT 355 Production Management .....................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ...................3
Approved Management Elective ..........................._3
Total...................................................18
Human Resource Management Minor
The Human Resource Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of personnel/HRM in business and government.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 300 Principles of Management.................3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.....................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations..................3
MGT 375 Performance Appraisal.....................3
MGT 462 Compensation Administration...............3
Approved Management Elective ..........................3
Total.................................................18
Marketing Minor
The Marketing minor offers the nonbusiness major an overview and understanding of the functional business area of marketing.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing .................. 3
MKT 311 Advertising ...............................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior .........................3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management............3
Plus six (6) hours of Marketing electives..............._6
Total...................................................18
Production Management Minor
The Production Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the production process and managerial functions as they relate to production and operations.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 300 Principles of Management....................3
MGT 355 Production Management.......................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations....................3
MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management ........3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management ................ 3
MGT 461 Cases in Management ......................._3
Total.................................................18
Real Estate Minor
The Real Estate minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with basic course requirements for GRI, prelicensing preparation, and required education hours for recertification.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
FIN 380 Principles of Real Estate ..................3
FIN 382 Real Estate Finance.........................3
FIN 384 Real Estate Law.............................3
FIN 484 Real Estate Appraisal ......................3
FIN 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate.......3
Approved Management Elective ..........................._3
Total...................................................18
37


School of Business
Systems Management Minor The Systems Management minor is designed to give nonbusiness CMS CMS 231 305
students a basic understanding of business data processing with particular emphasis on systems analysis and design. CMS 322
Semester CMS 441
Required Courses Hours CMS 451
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems CMS 211 COBOL 3 3 Total.
Fundamental Business Statistics ............3
Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design .................................3
Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software.........................
Management Information Systems ..
Data Processing Management ......
38
CO CO CO|* 'CM


School of Business
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity
Through the Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity, the resources of the School of Business, the Urban Studies program, and the various segments of the College will be utilized to provide managerial and academic expertise for urban entrepreneurs. Special attention will be addressed to nontraditional entrepreneurs within the urban focus.
The Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity has introduced entrepreneurial education into the regions academic arena, offering degree program courses for college students, weekend courses for professionals, and entrepreneurial seminars and forums. The purpose of the Institute is to discover, foster, and mold the visions of todays entrepreneurs. It provides students with these special opportunities: (1) learning about entrepreneurship, (2) understanding the entrepreneurial process, and (3) practicing skills that lead to successful entrepreneurship. The curriculum is designed to provide students a unique learning experience that extends beyond the standard textbook/lecture approach. Practical business experience and special expertise are provided by the director, professors, and adjunct professors. The coursework highlights what works and what does not work in todays rapidly changing marketplace. Legal requirements and implications are emphasized. A significant aspect of the curriculum involves participants developing a detailed, workable plan for starting and managing businesses.
Housed within the Institute is the Urban Studies program which offers an interdisciplinary degree.
The Institute for Entrepreneurship
IEC 302 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship..............3
IEC 402 Creativity in Business .......................3
IEC 412 Management of New Ventures....................3
IEC 422 Cases in Entrepreneurship ....................3
IEC 432 New Venture Strategies........................3
IEC 442 Entrepreneurial Business Planning ............3
semester hours for a total of 60 semester hours. The 14 semester hours must be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.
6. All courses listed from outside of URS are as of the 1983-84 MSC Bulletin.
7. There are different requirements for the CSD and Business, Management and Urbanization emphases.
Semester
IEC 302 and 402 are new courses primarily designed for students in one of these categories: (1) business majors (i.e., accounting, marketing, etc.); (2) business minors, and; (3) any students at Metropolitan State College. The remaining four courses (IEC 412, 422, 432, and 442) represent the core of new courses required for the new area of emphasis. Modified versions of all these courses (i.e., one-day seminars, workshops, etc.) will be regularly offered to Denver/Rocky Mountain area students on a noncredit basis.
Students taking a four-year degree program in Business should refer to the Managerial Entrepreneurship Area of Emphasis within the Management department.
Urban Studies MSC/UCD
Core Courses:
Hours
URS 100 URS 200 URS 300 URS 380 URS 489 URS 499*
Total
Introduction to Urban Studies..................3
Inside Look at Urban Institutions..............3
World Patterns of Urbanization.................3
Applied Urban Research Methods.................3
Interdisciplinary Seminar......................4
Internship in Urban Studies....................3
Advanced Writing Course which may be taken from Community Service Development, English
or Communications ..........................*3-4
Statistics which may be taken from Economics, Geography, Mathematics, Psychology or
Sociology ..................................*3-4
...........................................25-27
A Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Urban Studies is offered within the Institute for Entrepreneurship and Creativity. The Bachelor of Science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in quantitative aspects of Urban Studies. Course work is jointly offered by MSC and UCD and there is a common major. The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to learning. To support this approach six areas of emphasis are offered within the major.
1. Local Government Urban Planning
2. Housing Patterns and Alternatives
3. Cultural Lifestyles
4. Transportation and Communication
5. Community Service Development (CSD)
6. Business, Management and Urbanization
Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
The requirements total 46 semester hours and include:
1. 25-27 hours of core courses
2. 9 hours selected from each of four areas of process
3. 12 hours in an area of emphasis to be selected by the student.
4. 6 additional hours for a Bachelor of Science
5. Urban Studies majors who do not wish to pursue a minor in some other discipline will be required to take at least 14
*CSD students may elect to fulfill these requirements within the CSD area of emphasis.
A COURSE IS REQUIRED FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF PROCESS FOR A TOTAL OF AT LEAST 9 HOURS. CSD STUDENTS WILL TAKE ONE COURSE FROM TWO AREAS FOR A TOTAL OF AT LEAST 6 HOURS. SUBSTITUTIONS FOR THESE COURSES SHOULD BE ARRANGED THROUGH THE INSTITUTES ADVISOR.
Urban Spatial Structuring
URS 310 Internal Structure of the City..............3
URS 351 Community Development and Planning..........3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game.......................4
GEG 204 Geography of Denver ........................3
GEG 360 Urban Geography ............................3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning ................3
Urban Political Processes
URS 210 An Analysis of Urban Boundaries ............3
URS 350 Emerging Urban Political Systems............3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game.......................4
PSC 300 American State and Local Government.........4
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration ......3
SOC 371 Politics and Power..........................3
39


School of Business
Urban Economic Processes
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ..............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro ..............3
ECO 330 State and Local Finance.......................3
ECO 335 Urban Economic Analysis.......................3
ECO 340 Transportation Economics .....................3
ECO 345 Environmental Economics.......................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America ...........................3
Urban Social Processes
GEG 132 Geographic Analysis of Current
Social Issues ...............................3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population ......................3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential.........................3
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living .....................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America ...........................3
Areas of Emphasis
In each of the first four following areas of emphasis, the student will select a minimum of 12 hours with a minimum of 6 in Urban Studies. The student may take any combination of interdisciplinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in consultation with an advisor. One of the courses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis.
setting: (2) to provide tools and techniques to analyze these networks: and (3) to increase the students understanding that transportation and communication are interdependent with such factors as land use, politics, and demography. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for a professional career or further graduate training.
URS 228 URS 328 URS 400
URS 289 URS 389 URS 450
Community Service Development
This area of emphasis combines classroom theory and practical experience in a comprehensive format. Students formal classroom experiences are supplemented by at least twenty hours per week during two semesters in placement experiences. All field work will be carefully supervised and student progress will be measured against learning objectives cooperatively developed for each course by the student, agency supervisor, and the College coordinator or faculty member.
This area of emphasis is designed to provide an educational program for a very specific administrative level in nonprofit service agencies and organizations. The directive skills include development and management of volunteer programs, fundraising, proposal writing, program and human resource development.
Local Government Urban Planning
This area of emphasis concentrates on the basic conceptual and theoretical planning processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban government occupations and professions. The area of emphasis is designed for students seeking entry into government occupations or seeking advanced study in Public Administration or Urban Planning beyond the bachelors degree.
URS 250 URS 389 URS 450
URS 289 URS 400 URS 451
URS 351 URS 410 URS 471
Housing Patterns and Alternatives
This area of emphasis will concentrate on the assembly and development of residential land, the nature of public and private programs to provide housing and the maintenance and rebuilding of neighborhoods. A broad range of topics will include the evolution of public intervention in housing and residential renewal, the conflict between physical and human criteria in housing decisions, and constraints on the publics ability to deal with housing issues. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for graduate work and/or employment with a wide range of public and private housing agencies.
URS 171 URS 289 URS 400
URS 230 URS 330 URS 450
URS 250 URS 389 MGT 300
FIN 380
Cultural Lifestyles
This area of emphasis concentrates on the impacts on the urban landscape of the lifestyles of various cultures be they ethnic, racial, chronological, religious, economic, or gender. The consequences of these impacts are viewed as among the most significant determinants of urban structure, form, function, and social interaction. The student is provided with specialized training and experience for entry into professions with public or private agencies which deal directly with these groups within a pluralistic urban environment.
URS 250 URS 389 URS 410
URS 371 URS 400 URS 471
Transportation and Communication
The Transportation-Communication area of emphasis has three basic academic foci: (1) to aid students in refining their perceptions of the various networks that exist in the urban
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses.........................16
2. Selected Electives.................................7
3. CSD Area of Emphasis
CSD 200 Introduction to Community Service
Development .................................1
CSD 201 Principles of Community Service Development ..4
CSD 300 Applied Development and Seminar I ............2
CSD 321 Conflict Resolution and Decision-Making ......2
CSD 341 Development and Use of Inexpensive Media......3
CSD 361 Financial Accountability .....................3
CSD 401 Assessment and Evaluation of Non-Profit
Programs ....................................3
CSD 402 Fundraising and Proposal Writing
for Community Services ......................4
CSD 431 Development and Administration of Volunteer
Programs .........*.........................3
CSD 451 Politics of Agency Survival ..................^
Total....................................................50
Business, Management and Urbanization
This area of emphasis will stress the interrelationships between the private business sector and the public policy and urban life designers and decision-makers. Public sector/private sector/ policy makers cooperation, or the lack thereof, in the future, will have a direct effect on urban lifestyle. Issues to be addressed or focused upon in this emphasis are: the roles of business and urban government in the overall process of urbanization; the functions of managing business and managing government; the importance of sales tax revenues to both business and government and, with less governmental employment in the future, the changes that are in store for small and medium size businesses. This area of emphasis is expressly directed toward the student seeking an undergraduate major in management or administration of government organizations at the local, state or federal level, or in management positions in private industry.
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses.......................25-27
2. Business, Management Urbanization Emphasis..........21
MGT 100 Introduction to Business .....................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
MGT 356 Small Business Management ....................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ......................3
40


School of Business
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions .....................3
Six Hours to be Selected From:
ECO 350 Managerial Economics
MGT 450 Organizational Behavior
MKT 301 Marketing Research
MKT 311 Advertising
MKT 330 Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation
Major for Bachelor of Science Urban Studies
The requirements for the major in Urban Studies leading to the Bachelor of Science degree includes six semester hours in addition to the Bachelor of Arts degree. The six hours must be
taken from the following list of courses.
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ..........3
CMS 210 FORTRAN ....................................3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming -
Assembler ...................................3
CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics ........3
PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for the Social
Sciences.....................................3
PSY 312 Inferential Statistics......................3
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for Management and
Social Sciences..............................4
The Contract Major
A contract major for Urban Studies may be arranged by direct consultation with an Urban Studies faculty advisor within the Economics Department. This major can be developed to meet
specific needs and interests of students that cannot be met through the more conventional structure of the Urban Studies major. For example, a person might want to emphasize an educational or an occupational interest within his or her major such as airport planning and management, water resources management, or community health behavior. The required core courses as listed for the B.A. degree will hold for the contract major. The other 24 semester hours needed for this major will be agreed upon by a committee of faculty advisors from Urban Studies and other affected departments and the student.
Urban Studies Minor
Minors for both the Bachelor of Science degree and the Bachelor of Arts degree are available. The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to her or his occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with the department offering related courses and the students Urban Studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors which will reflect the best possible elective curriculum, and will insure that an urban emphasis is maintained.
Total for the Minor......................21 Semester Hours
Required Courses.........................9 Semester Hours
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies.......................3
URS 200 An Inside Look at Urban Institutions ...............3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing...................3
Elective Courses.............................12 Semester Hours
Twelve additional semester hours are required to complete the minor. The elective courses are to be selected in consultation with a URS faculty advisor.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences offers programs in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Science and Mathematics which are designed to provide a high quality traditional liberal arts education. The programs are structured to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of the urban student and can be directed toward personal, occupational, and professional goals in a rapidly changing world.
Each of the departments within the School provides comprehensive academic programs with many options to fulfill the multiple needs of a diverse urban college population.
The Letters, Arts and Sciences curriculum amplifies the programs of every other academic area of the College by offering the wide range of courses generally included in the total educational mission of an accredited institution.
Letters, Arts and Sciences studies aim toward the development of perspective and intellectual strength for the endeavors of a lifetime. The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences is fully engaged in expanding career programs that combine the preparations and broad background elements essential for educational sufficiency in todays urban community.
In harmony with the basic philosophy and goals of Metropolitan State College, the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences assumes a major role in encouraging and preparing students to participate fully in the challenges and opportunities of modern life. The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences departmental majors and minors lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.
Division of Humanities
The Humanities comprise the offerings of the departments of Art, English, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy and Speech. In each of these areas programs are available leading to the Bachelors degree, and in conjunction with programs in Education, students may become certified teachers in these areas at the secondary level (except Philosophy). Several departments offer more specifically focused emphases within their areas such as the Journalism program and the Pre-Professional Writing program in the Department of English and the Performance major in Music. These areas of emphasis are identified in the individual departmental listings.
Department of Art
The Department of Art offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of: Fine Arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography and sculpture); Applied Arts (advertising design and product and industrial design); Crafts (ceramics, metalwork and jewelry making, and design in wood); and Art History (studies which include an emphasis in contemporary and modern art courses).
Art Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
Semester
Core Requirements For All Art Majors Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I ...........3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II ..........3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ............3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II ...........3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960 ...3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the
Present...................................._3
Total...................................................18
Students may choose one of four areas of emphasis: Art History, Fine Arts, Applied Arts, or Crafts.
Art History Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Art History (upper-division).................................18
Fine Arts.....................................................6
Applied Arts..................................................6
Crafts........................................................6
Electives...................................................._6
Total........................................................42
Fine Arts Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Fine Arts..........................i.........................18
Applied Arts.......................J..........................9
Crafts.............................1..........................9
Art History (upper-division)................................._6
Total........................................................42
Applied Arts Area of Emphasis semester
Hours
Applied Arts.................................................18
Crafts........................................................9
Fine Arts.....................................................9
Art History (upper-division)................................._6
Total........................................................42
Crafts Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Crafts.......................................................18
Applied Arts.......................L........................9
Fine Arts.....................................................9
Art History (upper-division)................................._6
Total..............................L........................42
Total Hours Required.........................................60
(A minimum of 27 upper-division hours required.)
Minor requirements for Art Majors are optional.
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
No Minor is Required
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I ............3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ...........3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II ..........3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art .......................3
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design .................3
ART 245 Beginning Product and Industrial Design .....3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
ART 245 Beginning Product and Industrial Design .........3
ART 300 History of Art Nouveau
or
ART 303 History of Art Between the World Wars...........3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design ..............3
ART 345 Intermediate Product and Industrial Design.......3
ART 445 Advanced Product and Industrial Design I ....3
ART 446 Advanced Product and Industrial Design II ...3
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking ......................4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials & Processes ..............2
ITS 110 Introduction to Plastics I .......................2
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II ......................2
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals:
Cold Metals......................................2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals:
Hot Metals ......................................2
ITS 141 Industrial Drawing: Sketching ....................2
ITS 142 Industrial Drawing: Instruments ..................2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography ......................3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing ......................4
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production .................4
ITS 401 Furniture Construction ...........................4
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering.........................3
Elective Courses ..............................................15
(Selected in consultation with advisor, at least 10 of which must be upper-division).
Total..........................................................84
Art Education
Teacher certification for art majors is available through the Department of Education.
Minor in Art
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I .............3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II ............3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ..............3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II .............3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism
to 1960 .....................................3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to
the Present ................................_3
Subtotal.................................................18
Electives.................................................9
Minimum One Upper-Division Studio Course Minimum One Upper-Division Art History Course
Total.....................................................27
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Communications: Visual
Sponsored by the Department of Art
The Visual Communications area of concentration offers students a sequence of art courses in graphic communications, including drawing and design as well as a broad acquaintance with the visual arts in contemporary and historical perspective.
To become knowledgeable in the arts as related to present day communications media, students have the opportunity to pursue graphic courses in the Fine Arts of Drawing, Painting and Printmaking, or in the Applied Art fields of Graphic
Communications and Advertising Design, Photography and Video.
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems ................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion .................._3
Total....................................................6
Required Lower-Division Courses
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I ...........3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II ..........3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ............3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II ...........3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism
to 1960 ....................................3
Required Art History (Select 3 Hours)
ART 303 History of Art Between the World Wars.......3
or
ART 401 Modern Art History: Theory and Criticism ...3
Required Studio Courses
Fine Arts (select 6 hours)
ART 210 Beginning Life Drawing.........................3
ART 215 Beginning Painting.............................3
ART 225 Beginning Printmaking .........................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography .........................3
Applied Arts (6 hours)
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design ..................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design ...............3
Electives
Six hours elected from
Upper-Division Art Courses................................._6
Total......................................................42
English Department
The Department of English offers instruction in a variety of areas: literature, writing, language and linguistics, secondary education, and journalism. Courses in each area appeal to students in every school of the College who wish to read and understand the literature of the great cultures of the world, to examine the principles underlying how language works, and to cultivate their writing skills.
The department invites students in other disciplines to elect English courses to enhance their general education. Students may also choose a major or minor from different areas of emphasis.
The English major may choose an emphasis in
1. literature
2. secondary education, leading to certification
3. creative writing
4. preprofessional writing
The English minor may choose an emphasis in
1. literature
2. dramatic literature
3. language and linguistics
4. practical writing
5. secondary education
A Journalism degree and two related minors are also available.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis
The English major or minor, Literature Emphasis, encompasses a full range of American, British, and world literature. The program provides a strong foundation of courses in literature and language, sequenced to cultivate a sense of literary development, fostering an increasing familiarity with major works and writers, critical theory, literary terminology, and research materials. Because of their command of the written language, their ability to deal with ideas and concepts as well as facts, and their broader understanding of human nature and social realities, literature majors are valued in many fields of endeavor including academe and the world of business.
Semester
Required Core Hours
Each of the following courses:
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry,
Fiction, Drama ................................3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, Allusion in Literature............3
Each of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes ...........3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman .......3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare .....3
Two of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre.............3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates.........3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson ...........3
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett............3
The following course:
ENG 310 The Roots of British Literary Heritage .........3
Required Upper-Level Courses
ENG 302 History of the English Language ................3
Select three of the following courses:
ENG 321 Development of American Drama ..................3
ENG 323 Development of the American Novel ..............3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama:
Mysteries to Melodrama.........................3
ENG 333 Development of the British Novel ...............3
ENG 340 Development of Modern Poetry ...................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature .........3
Select two of the following courses (at least one from 413):
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature..................3
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature ..................3
ENG 413 Major Authors...................................3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, British, and American
Drama .........................................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies
or
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies .........................3
The following course:
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in Literary
Criticism ...................................._3
TolaI Semester Hours Required...............................45
Secondary School Teaching Area of Emphasis
The education emphasis in English, offered in conjunction with the Colorado State Department of Education certification program, prepares future teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for certification. This program equips students with a wide variety of language principles and skills; practical experience in developing and presenting the process of writing; sound knowledge of approaches to literature and literary genres, periods, and authors (including a special focus on literature for adolescents); and an understanding of communication and media as used in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental
requirements, this program offers students the opportunity to
develop further specialization in writing, language, or literature to
complement the major.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
I. Literature Core Courses:
ENG 221 American Literature I
or
ENG 222 American Literature II ......................3
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry, Fiction,
Drama .......................................3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, Allusion in Literature.........3
ENG 310 The Roots of British Literary Tradition .....3
II. Language/Linguistics Core Courses:
Required for Certification
ENG 302 History of the English Language .............3
Select two of the following:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language.......................3
ENG 202 English Grammar .............................3
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies .............3
ENG 303 Semantics ...................................3
III. Writing/Composition Courses:
ENG 351 Advanced Composition ........................3
ENG 480 Composition Teaching Workshop ...............6
IV. English Education Core Courses:
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents...................3
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools .......3
ENG 363 Teaching Communication.......................3
RDG 328 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading:
Secondary......................................*
V. English Electives:
Two upper division English courses selected in consultation with
and approved by designated English advisor...................6
Suggested Electives:
Writing ENG 352, 353 Language ENG 301, 303, 401 Literature According to interests
Total Semester Hours Required..............................45
' RDG 328 meets the Reading Requirements for English Certification but is carried under the student's Professional Education requirements.
NOTE: Students with a B.A. in English from an accredited institution who are seeking English Certification will receive credit for Sections I and V, in addition to any other courses in Sections II, III. and IV for which they have existing credits.
Creative Writing Emphasis
The Creative Writing Emphasis is designed to give the creative writer extensive practice in various genres of literature as well as a good foundation in appreciation of the English language literary heritage. Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer in finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career.
Semester
Required Core Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 240 Interpreting Literature: Poetry, Fiction,
Drama ............................................3
ENG 244 Myth, Symbol, Allusion in Literature ...............3
II. Two of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes ...............3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman ..........3'
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare .........3
III. Two of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre.................3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates.............3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson ...............3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett.........3
IV. The following course:
ENG 310 The Roots of British Literary Tradition .....3
Required Courses
I. Entry Course:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing.............3
II. General Writing Courses (select one):
ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar ...................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition ....................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition ........................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ..............3
III. Creative Writing Workshops (select any five):
ENG 352 Drama Workshop...............................3
ENG 352 Fiction Workshop.............................3
ENG 352 Magazine Editing Workshop ...................3
ENG 352 Poetry Workshop .............................3
ENG 352 Science Fiction Workshop.....................3
ENG 352 Scriptwriting Workshop.......................3
ENG 352 Writing as a Profession .....................3
ENG 352 Writing for the Markets .....................3
ENG 352 Writing the Novel Workshop ..................3
ENG 352 Writing Your Autobiography...................3
IV. Exit Course:
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing .................._3
Total Semester Hours Required..........................45
Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis
Every profession benefits from having among its members persons who write exceptionally well; rewards tend to accrue to such persons. This emphasis is designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop their writing abilities and, thereby, enhance their career opportunities; for this reason it is expected that the Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis will be a second major for those who pursue it.
The program provides the student with an intensive, coherent sequence of instruction in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing from the English language literary heritage.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition ..................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language
or
ENG 202 English Grammar............................3
ENG 303 Semantics .................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition ......................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ............3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
ENG 363 Teaching Communication ....................3
Students will take six literature courses of which at least two must be upper-division; these courses must be distributed among at least four of the following five areas:
1. World or Continental Literature
2. British Literature: Beginnings to 17th Century
3. British Literature: 17th Century to 19th Century
4. American Literature
5. 20th Century Literature
18
Total Semester Hours Required.................................36
English Minor
Semester
Literature Emphasis Hours
I. One each of the following groups:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes ..................3
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre...........3
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Whitman .....3
ENG 222 American Literature: Dickinson to Oates.......3
ENG 231 British Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare ...3
ENG 232 British Literature: Donne to Johnson .........3
ENG 233 British Literature: Blake to Beckett..........3
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language........................3
ENG 202 English Grammar ..............................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition .....................3
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing..............3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.............3
III. Two electives from the following courses:
ENG 321 Development of American Drama ................3
ENG 322 Development of American Poetry ...............3
ENG 323 Development of the American Novel ............3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama:
Mysteries to Melodrama.......................3
ENG 333 Development of the British Novel .............3
ENG 340 Development of Modern Poetry .................3
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature .......3
IV. Two electives from the following courses (one must be 413):
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature................3
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature ................3
ENG 413 Major Authors.................................3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, British and
American Drama...............................3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies
or
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies......................._3
Total Semester Hours Required.............................24
Semester
Secondary School Teaching Area of Emphasis* Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents....................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition .........................3
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools ........3
ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools ....3
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ..............3
ENG 302 History of the English Language ..............3
ENG 303 Semantics ....................................3
III. Three English Electives from 300-400 level courses selected in
consultation with and approved by designated English Department advisors......................................._9
Total Semester Hours Required.............................24
This minor does not satisfy MSC requirements for certification in Secondary English, but does meet minimum requirements for those seeking eligibility to teach English in secondary schools accredited by the North Central Association. Students working toward this minor are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors.
Dramatic Literature Emphasis
The English minor with emphasis in Dramatic Literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading, writing, and thinking about the texts of drama and to develop these skills into marketable assets. The program is designed to meet needs of anyone involved in the history, teaching, writing, production, or performance of drama. The minor will be useful to students of every aspect of theater (design, building, producing, directing, performing, evaluating), in any medium.
I. Introductory Courses:
ENG 112 Introduction to Drama ....................................3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
A second .course, introductory in nature, is to be selected by agreement of the student and the department advisor. The course need not be an English course, but if not, it should be an introductory course related to the student's major interest in the
use of drama...............................................3
II. Writing Course(s) One of the following courses:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing..............3
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Drama .............3
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Scriptwriting .....3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ...............3
III. Literature Electives (9 hours to be chosen in consultation with an advisor):
ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare...................3
ENG 321 Development of American Drama ................3
ENG 331 Development of British Drama:
Mysteries to Melodrama.......................3
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Drama .............3
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies.........................3
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies .......................3
ENG 413 Major Authors (Playwrights) ..................3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, British, and American
Drama .......................................3
ENG 461 Theories and Techniques in
Literary Criticism ..........................3
IV. Final Study One of the following:
ENG 480 Workshop......................................3
ENG 498 Independent Study ............................3
or
ENG 499 Internship or Practicum ......................3
NOTE: This phase of the English Minor with an emphasis in Dramatic Literature presents the opportunity for students electing the minor to devote significant attention to one in-depth project for completion of the study. The project should be based on the reading of a dramatic text, but should combine this experience with some other area of design, management, performance, or writing. The project should combine the skills of reading drama with those of the associated area of expertise. The project is to be proposed by the student, approved by an advisor in the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor, associated with the other area of expertise fundamental to the study. The study may take the form of a workshop, an independent study, an internship, or a practicum.
Total Semester Hours Required..............................21
Language and Linguistics Minor
The Language and Linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of, and analytical techniques in natural language. It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and, simultaneously, serves the interests of future teachers, students of literature and writing, and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language. Taken in an appropriate order made evident by careful advising, the courses in the program educate students both to use and to appreciate their language. The minor requires students to engage in vigorous, progressively more explicit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language.
Semester
Required Core Hours
ENG 201 The Nature of Language......................3
ENG 202 English Grammar ............................3
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ............3
ENG 302 History of the English Language ............3
ENG 303 Semantics ..................................3
ENG 401 Studies in Linguistics......................3
Any one of the following specific titles:
Applied Linguistics
Descriptive Linguistics
Psycholinguistics
Sociolinguistics
Stylistics
Interdisciplinary Elective Courses (chosen in consultation with and approved by departmental advisor). Any one of the following:
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication .................3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development ...........4
PHI 111 Language, Logic, and Persuasion...............3
SPE 352 Language Acquisitions ....................... 3
Total Semester Hours Required....................21-22
Practical Writing Minor
The Practical Writing Minor is a humanities based, career oriented program enabling students to develop writing skills as an adjunct to any major. Students will be prepared to do the practical writing found in magazines, newspapers, and newsletters. Students completing the program are expected to be versatile writers capable of applying the principles of good writing to different audiences and purposes.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar ...................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language.......................3
ENG 303 Semantics ...................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition ........................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ..............3
Elective Courses (Choose three from the following):
ENG 352 Writing as a Profession .....................3
ENG 398 Cooperative Education: English Internship ...3
ENG 498 Independent Study: Writing Project...........3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and Newswriting .........3
JRN 381 Feature Writing for Newspapers ..............3
JRN 481 Feature Writing for Magazines ...............3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing............3
BEC" 301 Business Research and Report Writing ........3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy...................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ..................._3
Total Semester Hours Required..........................24
BEC courses are in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business.
In addition to pursuing the Practical Writing Minor, some students may wish to seek the Recognition of Competency Award as qualified practical writers. A student seeking this award must apply to the Department Composition Committee before completing nine hours applicable to the minor, and if approved, must work out with the committee a coordinated sequence of courses, one of which must be English 498, Independent Study. The recognition procedure will include development of a portfolio which will be prepared under the guidance of the committee. This portfolio, designed to demonstrate student proficiency, will include such items as a letter in which students describe the development of their skills in writing and the extent to which they see these as valuable to their careers, and two different demonstrations of their ability to write and edit under pressure. The portfolio materials will be juried by at least two members of the Composition Committee. Some of the preparation may carry up to three hours credit under English 498.
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
The Journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media, including the press, and public relations. Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism beyond JRN 181. Prospective Journalism students who might be concerned about such proficiency may request and take a test in standard English usage and composition, designed by the Journalism faculty, before registering for any courses beyond Introduction to Journalism. According to the results, the faculty may recommend
46


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism .................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing .......3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading......3
JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing.....3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers......3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues.........................3
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting ...................3
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum ................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines ......3
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and
Principles of Layout .......................3
JRN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing.........3
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism ...............3
Total Semester Hours Required...........................36
'Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Semester
Journalism Minor Hours
I. Each of the following courses:
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism .................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing .......3
II. Five of the following courses:
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading......3
JRN 286* Intermediate Reporting and News Writing.....3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers......3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues.........................3
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting ...................3
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum ................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines ......3
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and
Principles of Layout........................3
JRN 486 Advanced News Writing ......................3
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism .............._3
Total Semester Hours Required...........................21
"Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Public Relations Minor
The Public Relations Minor prepares students for careers related to institutional and organizational information distribution. Emphasis in the program is on strong news writing skills, problem solving and planning, and publication production.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ..................3
JRN 182 Beginning News Writing and Reporting ........3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copy Reading .....3
JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations.............3
JRN 286 Intermediate News Writing and Reporting......3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.......3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies .....3
JRN 398 Cooperative Education Public Relations ..J3
Total Semester Hours Required...........................24
A suitable basic photography course may, upon approval of the advisor, be substituted for one of the above courses.
In addition, the following courses are strongly recommended as part of the student's general education curriculum.
BEC* 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications
BEC* 301 Business Research and Report Writing
ENG 303 Semantics
ENG 351 Advanced Composition
MGT 300 Principles of Management
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing
MKT 311 Advertising
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior
ENG 201 The Nature of Language
COM 352 Organizational Communication
Other courses may be recommended by the advisor, depending on the students particular needs.
With the approval of the Journalism faculty, Journalism majors may substitute courses from the list of recommended electives for required courses they take as a part of their major.
BEC courses currently in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business.
Modern Languages
The Department of Modern Languages offers major programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign Languages, minor programs in French, German, and Spanish, and Teacher Education Programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign Languages. Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the department administers several education programs abroad.
Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will register for foreign language courses as follows: No previous study, or less than one year in high school 101; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak 101; one semester in college 102; one year in college 211 and/or 231; two years in high school 211 and/or 231; or 102, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college 212 and/or 232; or 211 and/or 231, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college 300 level courses, or 212 and/or 232, if needed.
The above regulations may not be enforceable if the student has had no professional instruction in his chosen language within the last two years. If the benefit of this exception is not possible but the student feels that he has insufficient preparation for the required level, he should strengthen his background by auditing the course recommended by his foreign language advisor. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements.
Students seeking secondary credentials in Spanish or in Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish) must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate Proficiency Test.
Spanish
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I
or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ..........3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.............3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II............3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation ........................3
SPA 312* Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice .......2
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest 3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .3
SPA 331 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I ......3
47


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
SPA 332 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II ......3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II ..............3
SPA 351 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature ....3
MDL 496* Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
Schools .....................................3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish
or
SPA 412 Latin American Literature.....................3
SPA Electives**..........................................._2
Total.....................................................40
Required only when seeking a Teacher Certificate.
* 'Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval.
Minor in Spanish
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I
or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ..........3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I.............3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II............3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation ........................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest 3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish ............3
SPA Electives*..................................................^
Total..........................................................21
French
Minor in French Required Courses
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation...............3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues .................3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar .......3
FRE 232 French Composition ...........................3
FRE 311 French Survey I...............................3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization ..............3
FRE Electives*............................................_3
Total.....................................................21
German
Minor in German Required Courses
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation.............3
GER 212 German Civilization..........................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar......3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing ........3
GER 321 Survey of German Literature I or
GER 322 Survey of German Literature II ..................3
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller ..................3
GER Electives*................................................J3
Total.........................................................21
'Must be taken with department approval.
Modern Foreign Languages Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses
The composite Modern Foreign Languages major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modern languages, at least 12
hours in each. Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen languages must be taken as follows:
Spanish
SPA 211-212 Spanish Reading and Conversation I, II.....6
SPA 231-232 Spanish Grammar and Composition I, II......6
French
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation............3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues ................3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar ....3
FRE 232 French Composition ........................3
German
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation............3
GER 212 German Civilization........................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar.....3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing .......3
The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval.
For those seeking a Teacher Certificate in Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish) the remaining hours mentioned above will be taken in at least one of the following areas of emphasis.
French Area of Emphasis
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation...............3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues ...................3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar .......3
FRE 232 French Composition ...........................3
FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I ................3
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II................3
FRE 321 French Phonetics: Theory and Practice.........2
FRE 331 Advanced French Composition and Grammar ...3
FRE 332 Advanced Conversation ........................3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization ..............3
FRE 352 Modern French Theater
or
FRE 353 The French Novel..............................3
FRE 414 Advanced Textual Analysis
or
FRE 440 Existentialism ...............................3
FRE Electives .............................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
School ......................................3
German Area of Emphasis
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation ..............3
GER 212 German Civilization...........................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar........3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing ..........3
GER 312 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice ........2
GER 321 Survey of German Literature I.................3
GER 322 Survey of German Literature II ...............3
GER 323 Contemporary German Writers...................3
GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar 3
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller ................3
GER 411 The German Novel of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries or
GER 412 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth
Centuries....................................3
GER 421 Advanced Conversation: Present-day Germany 3
GER Electives .............................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
School ......................................3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Spanish Area of Emphasis
Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I
or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ...........3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I..............3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II.............3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation .........................3
SPA 312 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice ........2
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest 3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .3
SPA 331 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I ...3
SPA 332 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II ..3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II.............3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature or
SPA 412 Contemporary Latin-American Literature.......3
SPA Electives.............................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
School ....................................3
Music
Metropolitan State College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Department of Music offers two NASM-accredited degree programs, Music Education and Music Performance, for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in music. Students pursuing these majors are not required to fulfill a minor for graduation. In addition, the Contract Major is available for students seeking a more personalized degree program in music.
The Music Education degree program is designed to prepare students for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at the levels K-12. By taking an additional eighteen semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (EDU 419 and 429), the student becomes eligible for K-12 certification in the State of Colorado. With these additional eighteen hours, this degree program is fully accredited by the Colorado State Department of Education. Students seeking teaching credentials in music must satisfy all requirements of the Teacher Education Program in the Division of Education in addition to all requirements of the Department of Music.
The Music Performance degree program is designed to prepare students for careers in music performance, further graduate specialization or private studio teaching. In order to pursue this course of study, the student must demonstrate, through audition, the capability of developing a high level of musicianship in performance.
Students wishing to gain a broad, general coverage of the field of music may pursue the minor in Music. The department offers a wide range of courses, including some specifically designed for non-music students wishing to enhance their general appreciation and enjoyment of music. Non-music students may also participate in large and small music ensembles, including band, orchestra, choir and chamber music.
All students majoring or minoring in music must participate in the departmental advising program scheduled during the first week of each semester. Transfer students should be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition in their primary performance area. For advising, placement, and audition appointments, contact the Department of Music.
Core Requirement for all Music Education Majors
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, III ..........9
MUS 112, 114, 212 Music Theory Lab I, II, III ........3
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II ................6
MUS 171, 172, 271, 272, 371, 372 Private Instruction l-VI
(Primary Performance Area).................12
MUS 161, 162 Class Piano I, II ........................2
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging ..................................2
MUS 332 Secondary School Choral Methods and
Materials ..................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School
Choral Methods and Materials...........1
MUS 351 Basic Conducting............................2
MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition ............2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music ..........................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting ........................2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .......3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate 3
or
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas:
Secondary...................................3
EDU 110 Elementary Education in U.S.................3
EDU 265 Human Relations ............................3
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner ................3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom .....^
Total....................................................63
In addition to the above core requirement, music education majors must select one of the following emphases:
Choral Emphasis
MUS 161 Class Voice I .................................1
MUS 261, 262 Class Piano III, IV ......................2
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ........14
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All fourteen hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination
of the above numbers.
MUS 331 Elementary School Music Methods and
Materials ...................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School
Music Methods and Materials .................1
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials .............2
MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials ..............2
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials .........2
MUS 421 Choral Literature .........................._2
Total.....................................................28
Instrumental Emphasis
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ........12
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All twelve hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
MUS 333 Elementary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials 2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials 1
MUS 334 Secondary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials 2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials 1
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials 2
MUS 343 Woodwind Techniques and Materials 2
49


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials ..............2
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials .........2
MUS 348 Marching Band Techniques and Materials ......2
Total...................................................28
Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts
Core Requirements for all Music Performance Majors
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, III .............9
MUS 112, 114, 212 Music Theory Lab I, II, III ......3
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II ..................6
MUS 171, 172 Private Instruction I, II (Primary
Performance Area) ...........................4
MUS 273, 274, 373, 374, 473, 474 Performance lll-VIII
(Primary Performance Area)..................24
MUS 161, 162, or 171 Class or Private Instruction
(Secondary Performance Area)................2
Note: Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Piano.
Exception: Students electing the Organ Emphasis must take Class Voice I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Voice.
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ............12
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All twelve hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers. The ensemble experience throughout the baccalaureate degree program should be varied both in size and nature, and should be chosen from those appropriate to the
area of specialization.
MUS 351 Basic Conducting.................................2
MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition..................2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music ...............................2
MUS 479 Senior Recital ..................................1
Music History or Literature Elective............J3
Total.......................................................70
In addition to the above core requirement, all music performance majors must select one of the following emphases:
Voice Emphasis
MUS 141 German Diction and Literature for Singers ....2
MUS 142 French Diction and Literature for Singers ....2
MUS 143 Italian Diction and Literature for Singers....2
MUS 421 Choral Literature ............................2
MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy................................2
Total.....................................................10
Piano Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint..................................3
MUS 324 Piano Literature .............................3
MUS 441 Piano Pedagogy............................... 2
Total......................................................8
Organ Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint .................................3
MUS 421 Choral Literature ............................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting .........................2.
Total......................................................7
Guitar Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint..................................3
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranqinq .................................. 2
Total......................................................5
Woodwind, Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging ...................................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting ......................._2
Total......................................................4
Minor in Music
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, III............9
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I ........................1
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II .....................6
MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Private Instruction:
Performance Area ............................4
MUS 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble....................4
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; all four hours may be earned in one course number of in any combination of the above numbers.
Total.....................................................24
Philosophy
Philosophy is the oldest of intellectual disciplines. Its questions are of the most enduring interest because they are the most fundamental to our intellectual and practical concerns. As such, it can be taken to be a critical investigation into the assumptions and implications associated with all ideas across all disciplines, and, in this respect, it is interdisciplinary in character. However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods, and, hence, it takes on the character of a specialized discipline. Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought recognizing no preestablished limits in terms of the scope of either its interests or its critical examinations. Therefore, philosophy as a study program enlarges the student's horizons of ideas throughout the various disciplines in the college, while simultaneously providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas. It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical options, to consider alternate points of view, and to penetrate deeply into profound issues. Because of the subject matter, attitudes, and methods employed in philosophy, the student will be much better prepared for leadership in personal life, civic responsibilities, and pursuit of a career.
In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take only one or two courses in philosophy, the department offers two programs both of which feature flexibility and individualized training:
1. A major for students seeking a solid, general training/ background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies in such varied areas as philosophy, the humanities, law, medicine, business, urban planning and development, etc., or as a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the employer, such as careers in corporate management, government, politics, banking, education.
2. A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their specialized training/ background with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase their career options and generally to increase the quality of their lives.
The Philosophy program is now jointly offered by the faculties of MSC and UCD who have been combined into a single department. MSC students who either major or minor in philosophy are encouraged to take appropriate UCD courses whenever such courses contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philosophy experience.
50


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHI 144 Logic ............................................3
PHI 300 History of Greek Philosophy....................3
PHI 302 History of Modern Philosophy.................._3
Total.......................................................9
Additional Course Subject Areas Required Lower-Division
Introductory Courses........................................6
Upper-Division
Metaphysics and/or Epistemology.............................3
Ethics and/or Social Philosophy.............................3
One Philosophical Problem or
One Philosopher..........................................3
One Course Relating Philosophy to another field, for example
Religion, Art, Science, or History......................_3
Total......................................................18
Additional Electives at any Level ..........................9
(Selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy)
Total Upper-Division Credit Hours required for Major.......18
Total Credit Hours required for Philosophy Major...........36
Minor in Philosophy
Required Courses
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy ....................3
PHI 103 Ethics ........................................3
PHI 111 Language, Logic and Persuasion................_3
Total.......................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which 7 are upper-division courses in Philosophy selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 20 semester hours.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Philosophy and includes the required courses listed under the Holistic Health and Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Speech Communication
Speech communication is one of the most important human qualities. Proficiency in one of the areas of speech opens up many careers to the graduate.
For instance, in mass communication, radio, television and film, a graduate might aspire to careers in On Air operations, mass media ideas, promotion, public affairs, or radio-television sales. He or she might become a consultant in advertising, a specialist in instructional or educational television or in the public broadcasting service. Careers are open as broadcasting specialists in public relations, public information, business, industry and government are also available.
Speech pathology graduates who meet the standards of the American Speech and Hearing Association may find careers in public and private schools, community clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, private practice, colleges and universities, industry, or state and federal government agencies.
Graduates in rhetoric and public address have achieved success at law, industrial and organizational communication, educational
administration, public relations, speech writing for political figures, teaching, public relations, and theology.
Professional and educational theatre occupations are open to theatre graduates with specialties in stagecraft, sound, engineering, script writing, directing and acting.
Organizational Communication: Meeting Planning, a new field, presents lucrative and satisfying careers to speech graduates specializing in this area of communication. Job opportunities are available in both associations and industry; some MSC graduates in Organizational Communication are achieving success in all areas of government, industry, business and meeting planning.
Speech Communication
Major for Bachelor of Arts
1. 101-3, Fundamentals of Speech Communication course is required of all speech majors and minors.
2. Independent study, topic courses and experiential education courses such as practicums and internships may be taken in each of the areas.
3. Additional semester hours in Speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
4. Total minimum semester hours for a major in Speech Communication: 36.
5. All Speech majors are required to take a minimum of one class in each of the following six program areas, preferably one of the courses designated by an asterisk.
6. The six subject areas include:
Theatre and Oral Interpretation
SPE 221* Introduction to Theatre
SPE 222* Techniques in Acting I
SPE 224* Introduction to Stagecraft
SPE 320* Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry
SPE 322 Movement for Stage
SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design and Theatre Lighting
SPE 328 Stage Directing
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I
SPE 427 Theatre: Practicum: II
Mass Communication (Radio-Television-Film)
SPE 240* Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting
SPE 343* Radio-Television Announcing
SPE or 344* Radio-Television Production
SPE 347* Evolution of Cinematics as ART
SPE 449* Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life
Communication Disorders and Voice Science
SPE 330* Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction
SPE 350* Speech Pathology I
SPE 351* Speech Pathology II
SPE 355 Speech Pathology: Observation I
SPE 356 Speech Pathology: Observation II
SPE 357 Methods of Speech Pathology-Audiology: Diagnostic Procedures
SPE 358 Methods in Speech Pathology: Articulation and Stuttering
SPE 359* Speech Problems in the Schools
SPE 360* Audiology I
SPE 361 Audiology II
SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology-Audiology
SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
SPE 457 Medical Aspects of Speech and Hearing Disorders
SPE 463 Practicum in Audiology Organizational Communication
SPE 310* Business and Professional Speaking SPE 311* Conference Leadership SPE 312* Parliamentary Procedure
Communication Theory
SPE 374* Psychology of Communication
SPE 409 Persuasion in the Greek and Latin Traditions
SPE 410* Techniques of Persuasion
Rhetoric and Public Address
SPE 211* Discussion Methods
SPE 301* Advanced Public Speaking
SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics
SPE 308* Great American Speakers
SPE 309* Argumentation and Advocacy
SPE 405 Advanced Intercollegiate Forensics
SPE 408* Theories and Criticism of Public Address
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech
Speech Education
Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .........3
SPE 211 Discussion Methods ...........................3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre ......................3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I........................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft ...................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television
Broadcasting.................................3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking .....................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy....................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry ........3
SPE 328 Stage Directing ..............................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction..................................3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools ...............3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication...................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion .....................^
Total.....................................................42
Electives Hours for the Secondary Teacher Education Program
A minimum of six semester hours in Speech courses recommended in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. These six hours are to be selected from
the following list:
SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics ......................1
SPE 308 Great American Speakers ........................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry .......3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage..............................2
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I..............................3
SPE 360 Audiology I ....................................3
SPE 408 Theories and Criticism of Public Address........3
SPE 420 Readers Theatre ...............................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I ...........................1
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary
Life ..........................................3
Total minimum hours required for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts: 48 hours.
Students seeking secondary credentials in Speech Education must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the major requirements. Recent changes in Colorado law
affecting teacher certification has necessitated changes in advising procedures. All students in the Speech Education Program who are seeking a certificate must, therefore, contact the Speech Department for modifications, changes and advising relative to changes in Colorado law affecting teachers.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Communications: Broadcasting
Sponsored by the Department of Speech
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications (Interdisciplinary). In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting proficiencies (See CCC advisor).
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems ................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion .................._3
Total.....................................................6
Required Area and Broadcasting Courses
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft .................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television
Broadcasting................................3
TLC 249 Internship in Radio-Television-Film-
Mass Communication .......................1-6
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing.................3
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production ................3
SPE 348 Workshop in Radio/Television Production ....3
TLC 349 Advanced Internship in Radio-Television-
Film-Mass Communication..................1-15
Total....................................................21
Recommended Electives
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction.................................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Arts ............3
SPE 448 Seminar-Practicum in Broadcasting ..........3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life...........................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography ......................3
COM 244 Writing for Radio ..........................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television 3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies ....3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues.........................3
JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing .....................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management....................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ..................._3
or other designated electives
Total Electives..........................................15
Total....................................................42
Communications: Theatre Administration
Sponsored by the Department of Speech
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications (Interdisciplinary). In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting proficiencies (see CCC advisor).
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems .............................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ..................._3
Total.......................................................6
Required Area and Theatre Arts Courses
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre .....................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft ..................3
SPE 299 Internship ..................................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry .......3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction...................................3
SPE 499 Advanced Internship........................._3
Total......................................................18
Recommended Electives
COM 244 Writing for Radio ...........................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television 3
ENG 414 Modern Continental English and American
Drama ........................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage ..........................2
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre ............................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I ........................1
SPE 427 Theatre: Practicum II .......................2
SPE 480 Workshop in Theatre Arts ..................1-3
And/or other designated electives
Total Electives............................................18
Total......................................................42
Communications Free Electives List
Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected Communications area of emphasis are acceptable as electives.
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .......3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication ................3
ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods........................3
ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods..............3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art:
1960-Present Day ...........................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography .......................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ........................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition ....................3
ENG 303 Semantics ...................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ..................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ........3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading.......3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing......3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.......3
PHI 144 Logic .......................................3
PSC 322 Public Policy ...............................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology............................3
PSY 342 Issues in Community/Social Psychology .......3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking ....................3
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage.......................2
SPE 328 Stage Directing .............................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ..........3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction.................................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art ..............3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech ...........................3
SPE 420 Readers Theatre ............................3
SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I .........................1
SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II ........................2
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting ..........3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life...........................3
The Speech Communication Minor
1. The Speech minor is required to take SPE 101-3.
2. All Speech minors are required to take a minimum of one class in at least three of the subject areas adopted for Speech majors. This requirement does not apply to students interested in Teacher Education.
3. The required courses should be taken from one of the starred courses to be agreed upon by the student and advisor.
4. Additional semester hours in Speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
5. Total minimum semester hours for a minor in Speech Communication: 18 semester hours.
Speech Pathology-Audiology Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction..................................3
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I............................3
SPE 351 Speech Pathology II...........................3
SPE 360 Audiology I ..................................3
SPE 361 Audiology II .................................3
SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology-
Audiology .................................1-3
SPE 463 Practicum in Audiology ...................... 1
Total.................................................17-19
Electives
A minimum of two additional in courses selected from the following list in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. Approved Psychology courses may be
substituted for electives.
SPE 352 Language Acquisition ........................3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools ..............3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication .................3
SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology ...............1
Total minimum hours required for a minor in Speech Pathology-Audiology: 21 semester hours.
Telecommunications
Telecommunications is one of the most beneficial internship programs for communication students in broadcasting. Under the auspices of the Department of Speech Communication, the student is afforded the opportunity to gain first-hand experience through 87 current internships in radio, television, and film, provided by industry, government, business, public and commercial telecommunications centers. The student may begin this program upon the completion of six (6) hours in broadcasting-telecommunications courses at MSC. Students should contact the CCC advisor in broadcasting for details relative to eligibility and placement in the telecommunications internships. Internship telecommunications courses are offered every semester during each of the modules as well as on a full semester basis.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Division of Social Sciences
The Social Sciences offers baccalaureate degree programs in Anthropology, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Social Welfare; the interdisciplinary programs in Behavioral Science and Gerontology; and an additional array of areas of emphases and minors designed to develop student understanding of and skills for working with individuals, groups, and large organizations. Courses range from those in the traditional liberal arts core to offerings such as professional internships in social welfare, topics in popular culture, legislative and government internships, and research practicums. Programs will prepare students for a variety of career objectives, including beginning level practice in helping services and social work agencies, graduate education in law and in the various social and behavioral science disciplines, research in the social and behavioral sciences, work with the elderly, public administration, and secondary school teaching in the social sciences.
History
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.....................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715 .................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ........................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ...................._3
Total.......................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in History is required, 18 hours of which must be upper-division.
Grade Average
Students majoring in History must maintain at least a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Advising
History majors should consult with a departmental advisor to select the courses in other disciplines which complement their area of concentration in the major.
Minor in History
There are four different areas of emphasis available to students seeking a History minor. (I) Regular History area of emphasis, (II) American Popular Culture area of emphasis, (III) American West History area of emphasis, (IV) Twentieth Century Studies History area of emphasis.
I. Regular History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.....................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715 .................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ........................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ....................J3
Total.......................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional semester hours in History is required. The hours must be upper-division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor.
II. American Popular Culture Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ..................3
HIS 151 Movies and History............................3
or
HIS 152 Rock Music and Social History
or
HIS 153 Sports in America............................J3
Total....................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional History hours is required, of which 9 must be upper-division. Courses must be related to American Popular Culture.
III. American West History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 110 American West ..............................3
HIS 111 Colorado History I .........................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ...................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ................^
Total.................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional History hours treating the American West is required, all of which must be upper-division.
IV. Twentieth Century Studies History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ..............3
HIS 201 Contemporary World History ..............._3
Total.......................1.........................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional hours treating twentieth century history is required, of which 9 must be upper-division.
Grade Average
Students minoring in History must maintain a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Secondary School Education Certification in Social Sciences;
Students majoring in History may combine their major with other courses in the Social Sciences and in Education to receive Secondary Education Certification. The requirements of this program are included under the Education Department section of this catalog.
Prelaw Courses
Several history courses are of particular importance to legal studies. These include HIS 121, HIS 122, HIS 346, and HIS 368. Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the departmental advisor.
Political Science
The study of Political Science is mainly a study of governments: their social and economic environments, how they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how nation-states interact on the world scene. It also includes the study of political ideas and values, past and present, and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging our knowledge of political processes.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The Political Science program provides students with the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often confusing reality of politics.
Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSC 101 American National Government.....................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas ....................3
PSC 305 Political Theory.................................3
PSC 402 Special Studies ................................_3
Total.......................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours of Political Science must be completed. At least 12 of these 21 hours must be upper-division courses (300- and 400-level). Total semester hours required for a PSC major: 33.
Minor in Political Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSC 101 American National Government ..................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas .................._3
Total.......................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours are required in Political Science courses. Total semester hours required for a PSC minor: 18.
In addition to the scheduled classes, Political Science students are encouraged to enroll for at least one off campus internship. Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of government service. Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student or by the Political Science Department. Interested students should contact the Political Science Department for details.
Minor in Public Administration
Public Administration is the study of governmental organizations and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Science Department offers a minor in Public Administration available to students interested in a career in government service, to students presently employed in government who wish to increase their skills and job status, and to students planning to take post-graduate work in Public
Administration.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
I. Basic courses required for all PA Minors:
PSC 101 American National Government....................3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration ..........3
II. Two of the following courses:
PSC 322 Public Policy ..................................3
PSC 324 Intergovernmental Relations ....................3
PSC 326 Politics of Budgeting ..........................3
PSC 328 Public Personnel Administration ................3
ACC 320 Government Accounting...........................3
III. One of the following courses:
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ..............3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics .....................4
IV. Internship (PSC 299 or 499 Omnibus Courses) or
substitute course.........................(minimum) 3
A governmental internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a minimum of three semester hours. This requirement may be waived for students with at least one calendar
year of administrative work experience in a government agency.
Total...............................................19-20
It is recommended that PA minors also take a course in both public speaking and in technical writing.
Also available to students is a program of courses leading to a Recognition of Completion Award in Public Administration presented by the Political Science Department. Students are presented the Award after successfully completing a selection of courses amounting to 26 credit hours. Contact the Political Science Department for details.
Not listed among the regular courses are a variety of omnibus courses and self-paced courses which are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the semester class schedule for these.
Psychology
The major or minor program is to be planned in consultation with an adviser from the Psychology Department by the beginning of the junior year or upon transfer into the department.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.........................3
PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for Social
and Behavioral Sciences .......................3
PSY 312 Inferential Statistics..........................3
PSY 331 Research Techniques, Experimental I..........3
PSY 332 Research Techniques, Experimental II.........3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology.............._3
Total.........................................,............18
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology, making a total of 39 hours in Psychology.
The field of psychology includes a number of possible areas for future specialization. The department recommends that students sample from among all of these areas:
Area I Experimental Psychology
Area II Clinical Psychology
Area III Social and Community Psychology
Area IV Industrial Psychology
Area V Developmental Psychology
Area VI Gerontology
Area VII Human Factors
Students considering advanced degrees should be aware that most graduate schools require (1) Learning, (2) Sensation and Perception, (3) Physiological Psychology, and often require a mix of courses representing the various subdivisions within the field.
Students interested in the Gerontology area of emphasis must select a minimum of 42 hours (see list under Sociology Gerontology area of emphasis), in addition to the 18 hours of required courses of the Psychology Major. This must be done in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology. The Gerontology Emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 elective hours in the Psychology Major and the minor requirement.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology and includes the required courses listed under the
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Minor in Psychology
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.......................3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology............J3
Total......................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in Psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology are required, making a total of 21 hours in Psychology.
Sociology
The study of Sociology emphasizes understanding people in groups small groups like the family, the all-pervasive bureaucratic organizations of American society, political parties, football crowds, groups in conflict, society as a whole. It includes the study, from a variety of theoretical models, of past and present societies and social processes, and the analysis, using modern research methods, of contemporary social issues.
The Sociology program offers to its majors and minors, and to students from all academic disciplines, courses that focus on important issues and trends in todays complex societies.
Sociology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ....................3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues.........................3
SOC 332 Sociological Theory: Past and Present ........3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences ..............3
SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences.....J3
Total...................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Sociology courses is required, constituting a total of 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in Sociology must be completed at Metropolitan State College by students majoring in the field.
Optional Areas of Concentration in Sociology are as follows:
Each area of concentration includes a number of courses designed to give the student an in-depth exploration of the knowledge, challenges, issues, and research in a specific subdiscipline of Sociology.
I. Business and the Urban Community
This concentration is particularly recommended for Business, Land Use, Urban Studies and Industrial Communications majors, and all students whose career plans are aimed toward management, planning, or administration in the urban setting.
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living
SOC 316 Industry and Occupations
SOC 318 Labor and Management Organizations
SOC 322 Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups
SOC 355 Sociology of Law
SOC 373 Mass Media and Social Behavior
SOC 381 Population Issues
II. Social Deviance
This concentration is particularly recommended for Criminal Justice, Human Services, prelaw, and Psychology majors and all students whose career goals involve working in prevention, treatment, and/or rehabilitation programs.
SOC 201 Current Social Issues
SOC 250 Deviant Behavior in Society
SOC 350 Criminology
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 355 Sociology of Law
SOC 383 Mental Disorders
III. The Family and Alternative Life Styles
This concentration is particularly recommended for Teacher Education, Human Services, and Psychology majors and all
students who plan people-serving careers.
SOC 240 The Chicano Family
SOC 310 Death and Dying
SOC 340 Childhood and Adolescent Socialization
SOC 341 The Family in Transition
SOC 342 Education in a Changing Society
SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles
SOC 344 The Black Family
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency
IV. Medicine and Health
This concentration is particularly recommended for Health Care Management, Nursing, pre-med, and Psychology majors.
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology
SOC 204 Aging in American Society
SOC 310 Death and Dying
SOC 380 Health and Healers
SOC 381 Population Issues
SOC 383 Mental Disorders
V. Social Class and Stratification
This concentration focuses on the various ways in which societies are divided. It is recommended for all students wishing to gain further understanding of conflict and inequality in groups and societies and to explore possible solutions to these problems.
SOC 201 Current Social Issues
SOC 320 Social Classes in America
SOC 322 Race, Sex and Ethnic Groups
SOC 324 Poverty in America
SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles
VI. Changing Social Institutions
This concentration offers a broad overview of the dominant institutions in society, those institutions that provide the framework for our work, family life, and general social interaction.
SOC 320 Social Classes in America
SOC 341 The Family in Transition
SOC 342 Education in a Changing Society
SOC 355 Sociology of Law
SOC 371 Politics and Power
SOC 380 Health and Healers
SOC 391 Religious Movements in America
SOC 430 Social Change
Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences (PSY 311) is strongly recommended for Sociology majors who plan to go on for graduate study and/or have career goals involving research. (This course will not be used as a Sociology elective.)
Sociology majors are also urged to include field experience in their college plans, either through enrolling in SOC 470 or through a Cooperative Education placement.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Gerontology Area of Emphasis
Gerontology deals with the causes and consequences, biological, psychological and social, of aging. Drawing from many fields of academic study, this area of emphasis prepares the student for professional and para-professional careers in human services for the aged population.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
To complete the Gerontology Area of Emphasis, a student selects, (in addition to the 15 hours of required courses in the Sociology major), in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, a minimum of 45 hours from the following list of courses. The Gerontology area of emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 elective hours in the Sociology Major and the minor requirement.
Semester
Hours
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology..................3
SOC 204 Aging in American Society ...................3
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living ....................3
SOC 304 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology ..........3
SOC 310 Death and Dying .............................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America ..........................3
SOC 341 The Family in Transition ....................3
SOC 380 Health and Healers ..........................3
SOC 381 Population Issues ...........................3
SOC 383 Mental Disorders ............................3
SOC 470 Advanced Field Internship....................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment ..................3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development .............3
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues in Psychology:
Death and Dying ............................3
PSY 327 Adulthood and Aging..........................3
PSY 493 Seminars in Developmental Psychology:
Senescence.................................3
PSY 499 Field Placement in Gerontology...............3
HES 105 Dynamics of Health...........................3
HES 204 Nutrition ...................................3
Minor in Sociology
Required Courses
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ...................3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in Sociology courses, selected in consultation with a department advisor is required, bringing the total to 18 semester hours. At least 6 upper-division semester hours of the minor must be completed at Metropolitan State College.
It is suggested that students consider focusing their elective choices in one of the areas of concentration in Sociology.
Anthropology
Anthropology is the exploration of human diversity. The combination of cultural, archaeological, and biological perspectives offers a viewpoint that is unique in studying the problems related to the survival and well-being of the human species. From the living and vanished cultures of Colorado to those of New Guinea or South America, Anthropology can be applied to assist our understanding of human differences.
Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory..........3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.........3
ANT 210 Human Evolution ..............................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication .................3
ANT 264 Principles of Archaeology...................._3
Total......................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Anthropology is required, bringing the total to 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in Anthropology must be completed at Metropolitan State College by students majoring in the field.
Students desiring Teacher Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Minor in Anthropology
The minor provides an opportunity for students to bring a unique anthropological perspective to their already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural differences would benefit from selecting a focus in cross-cultural contact,
archaeology, or human diversity.
Required Courses
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory..........3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .........^
Total......................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in Anthropology is required, bringing the total to 21 semester hours. At least 6 upper-division semester hours must be completed at Metropolitan State College.
Behavioral Science
Major for Bachelor of Arts
This is a distributed major, offering students a structured overview of the social and behavioral sciences, emphasizing breadth of coverage rather than in-depth studies. Particularly applicable for secondary education majors.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ..........3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics: Macro..................3
HIS 366 Recent U.S., 1945 to the Present................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas .....................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology......................_3
Total........................................................18
Electives
A minimum of 18 additional upper-division elective hours in Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology is required, bringing the total to 36 semester hours. No more than 6 upper-division hours may be in any one discipline and must be selected in consultation with, and have the approval of, the advisor. Three hours of field study are recommended in this 18 hours of electives. At least 12 upper-division hours must be completed at Metropolitan State College by students majoring in this field. Each student in this major must have the preliminary approval of an assigned advisor.
Students desiring Teacher Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
No Minor Offered
Social Welfare
Major for Bachelor of Science
The Social Welfare program offers preparation for beginning professional practice in helping services, corrections and social work agencies. Students are also encouraged to pursue graduate degrees such as the M.S.W. and the Ph.D. or D.S.W.
The basic objectives of the Social Welfare degree program are to enable students to achieve effective active participation in community affairs based upon an understanding of complex social welfare programs, to facilitate entry into beginning level practice, and to encourage graduate study.
The curriculum reflects these objectives in its required courses which focus upon field experience; methods of helping individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
communities; human growth and development; human diversity; social policy analysis and research. Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding and coping with bureaucratic processes and structures.
The field of social welfare includes the following specialty areas: Child Welfare, Family Social Work, Correctional Services, Social Services (public assistance agencies), Medical and Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, Aging, Private Practice, Industrial Social Work and others.
Students who major in Social Welfare are not required to complete a minor.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 101 Freshman Composition .........................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition .........................3
Career...................................................0-6
Science/Mathematics.....................................8-10
Social/Behavioral Science...............................8-10
Humanities..............................................8-10
Total.....................................................36
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SWF 101 Introduction to Social Welfare
Services ....................................3
SWF 104 Human Behavior and the Social Environment ... 4
SWF 105 Family Social Services........................4
SWF 201 Social Welfare Services and Populations
at Risk .....................................3
SWF 202 Social Welfare Services and Women ..............3
SWF 241 Practicum in Social Welfare Services ...........6
SWF 378 Social Welfare Policy ..........................3
SWF 379 Research in Social Welfare .....................3
SWF 401 Practice in Social Welfare Services ............4
SWF 441 Cross-cultural Social Welfare Services..........4
SWF 479 Professional Internship ......................._6
Total.......................................................43
Electives in Social Welfare.................................10
Credits to be selected from the following:
SWF 301 Social Welfare Services for
Children and Adolescents ......................4
SWF 302 Case Management in Social Welfare
Services ......................................4
SWF 303 Social Services for Adults and Aging............4
SWF 480 Workshop (Variable Topics) ...................2-4
SWF 490 Seminar (Variable Topics) ....................2-4
SWF 498 Independent Study ............................JN8
Total.......................................................53
Case Management Program
The Social Welfare program and the Human Services Department have developed a joint program in Case Management and Developmental Disabilities. The purpose of the program is to train individuals interested in performing the functions of a case manager. Required courses are listed under the Department of Human Services. For further information call 556-3167.
Contract Minor Available.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Division of Science and Mathematics
The Division of Science and Mathematics includes the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Physics.
The degree programs and course work are structured to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of the urban student. The Division offers interdisciplinary, career-oriented bachelors degree programs in the traditional areas of science and mathematics as well as those areas oriented toward more specific career objectives such as training for the health related fields, criminalistics, land-use, applied mathematics, computer science, statistics, air pollution monitoring and occupational health and safety.
In cooperation with other institutions, it is possible for a student to receive a B.S. or a B.A. degree from Metropolitan State College and certification in Medical Technology from another approved institution.
Biology
The Department of Biology offers two majors, the Bachelor of Science in Biology and the Bachelor of Arts in Biology. Within these majors, the student may emphasize Botany, Zoology or Microbiology, together with paramedical and general studies. Supportive courses associated with Criminalistics and the Drug and Alcohol Institute, as well as general courses for enrichment of the nonscience students background, are offered by the department.
Students seeking Secondary Certification in Science should see the Department of Teacher Education.
A Biology minor is offered to students with related majors or a special interest in the field.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology...............4
BIO 210 General Botany Two out
BIO 220 General Zoology of three
BIO 240 General Microbiology courses .........9-10
BIO 360 General Genetics .............................3
BIO 355 Urban Ecology, or BIO 454, Plant
Ecology, or BIO 455, Animal Ecology .........4
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series approved by the Department of Biology must be completed to bring the total of Biology courses approved for the major to 40 credit hours. At least 14 of these credit hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology.
Total Hours Required in Biology...........................40
Required Non-Biology Courses
One year of college General Chemistry, one semester of upper-division Organic Chemistry, one semester of upper-division Biochemistry, one year of Mathematics starting with MTH 111 are requisites for the Biology Major.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ..............4
BIO 210 General Botany Two out
BIO 220 General Zoology of three
BIO 240 General Microbiology courses ........9-10
BIO 360 General Genetics .............................3
BIO 355 Urban Ecology, or BIO 454, Plant
Ecology, or BIO 455, Animal Ecology .........4
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series approved by the Department of Biology must be completed to bring the total of
Biology courses approved for the major to 40 credit hours. At least 14 of these credit hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology.
Total Hours Required in Biology........................40
Required Non-Biology Courses
One year of General Chemistry (equivalent to the present courses CHE 110 and CHE 111).
Botany Area of Emphasis
Requirements for either a B.A. or a B.S. degree in Biology must be satisfied, and the 40 hours of Biology courses must include BIO 210, General Botany; BIO 454, Plant Ecology; and 15 semester credit hours from the following Botany electives:*
Semester
Course Hours
BIO 314 Plant Physiology ..........................5
BIO 315 Plant Hormones.............................2
BIO 316 Plant Anatomy and Morphology ..............4
BIO 317 Evolution of Flowering Plants..............3
BIO 318 Vascular Plant Taxonomy....................4
BIO 412 Algology ..................................4
BIO 416 Mycology...................................4
BIO 456 Field Methods in Plant Ecology.............2
Microbiology Area of Emphasis
Students must satisfy requirements for the B.S. Biology degree program, including BIO 240, General Microbiology; and one course from each of the categories of Organismal, Medical, or Advanced Microbiology courses listed below, plus additional courses from these three lists as well as appropriate omnibus courses selected in consultation with the Microbiology faculty to complete 20 semester hours of upper-division electives and a total of 40 semester credit hours in Biology:*
Semester
Organismal Hours
BIO 340 Bacteriology..................................4
BIO 412 Algology .....................................4
BIO 416 Mycology......................................4
BIO 422 Protozoology..................................3
BIO 444 Virology......................................4
Semester
Medical Hours
BIO 327 Parasitology .................................4
BIO 335 Immunology ...................................4
BIO 445 Pathogenic Microbiology.......................5
Semester
Advanced Microbiology Hours
BIO 305 Cell and Molecular Biology....................4
BIO 446 Microbial Biochemistry .......................5
BIO 447 Microbial Genetics............................3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Zoology Area of Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements for the B.S. Degree in Biology and must include in the 40 semester hours of Biology courses BIO 220, General Zoology; BIO 455, Animal Ecology; and 15 semester credit hours from the following list of Zoology electives:*
Semester
Course Hours
BIO 321 Histology ...................................4
BIO 322 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy ..............5
BIO 325 Arthropod Zoology ...........................4
BIO 327 Parasitology ................................4
BIO 334 Endocrinology................................3
BIO 336 Animal Physiology ...........................4
BIO 422 Protozoology.................................3
BIO 425 Entomology...................................4
BIO 427 Herpetology .................................3
BIO 428 Ornithology .................................4
BIO 429 Mammalogy ...................................3
BIO 481 Introduction to Vertebrate
Embryology..................................4
BIO 494 Vertebrate Evolution.........................3
BIO 301, Microtechnique, and BIO 305, Cell and Molecular Biology, are both applicable to the fields of Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis.
Minor in Biology
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology 4
BIO 210 General Botany
BIO 220 General Zoology Two out of
BIO 240 General Microbiology these four .. 9-13
BIO 231, 232 Human options
Anatomy and Human Physiology
BIO 360 General Genetics One out of
BIO 355 Urban Ecology these four .. 3-4
BIO 454 Plant Ecology options
BIO 455 Animal Ecology
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series, approved by the Department of Biology, must be completed to bring the total of Biology courses approved for the minor to 24 credit hours.
Total Hours Required in Biology................24
Medical Technology Program
See chair of Biology Department for details.
Chemistry
The Department of Chemistry offers three majors, and is accredited by the American Chemical Society. These majors are the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (minimum 48 hours), the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry (minimum 37 hours), and the Bachelor of Science in Criminalistics (minimum 97 hours). In addition, a Bachelor of Science degree program in Chemistry with an emphasis in Occupational Health and Safety as well as minors in Chemistry and Criminalistics are available. The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry should be chosen by students who plan a career in Chemistry or plan to attend graduate school in Chemistry. The Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry is designed for students who plan a career in a field related to chemistry but who do not intend to attend graduate school in Chemistry. This option, requiring fewer hours, may be especially attractive to those wishing a second major and to students desiring Secondary Education Certification. Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identification, and comparison of physical evidence
for criminal or civil court proceedings. Criminalists must be trained in an assortment of disciplines including Chemistry, Biology, Law Enforcement, Physics, and Mathematics. The four-year Criminalistics curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and includes a half-time internship in a criminalistics laboratory during the senior year. Students are encouraged to complete all of the requirements for an American Chemical Society approved chemistry degree while completing the criminalistics degree program. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in criminalistics and have completed the requirements for graduate school in Chemistry, graduate school in Criminalistics, medical school, dental school, and law school. No minor is required for the Criminalistics major.
Students electing the Chemistry major with the Occupational Health and Safety emphasis will be trained in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazards in the workplace. This area of emphasis includes Chemistry courses equivalent to those required for the Bachelor of Arts major in Chemistry as well as supporting Science and Mathematics courses. In addition, courses in Instrumental Analysis, Toxicology, Safety, and Occupational Health and Safety will be required. An internship during the junior or senior year is required and gives valuable practical experience. Graduates of the program are prepared for immediate employment in the field of occupational health and safety or the field of chemistry. Graduates in this area also meet the admissions requirements for medical school, dental school, veterinary school, and graduate school in Industrial Hygiene or Chemistry. For further information, contact the Chemistry Department.
Students seeking Secondary Education credentials in Science should consult the Teacher Education Program of MSC for requirements.
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry I .........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II.........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory.............2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I .........................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II.........................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I...............2
CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II .............2
CHE 325 Physical Chemistry I ........................4
CHE 326 Physical Chemistry II .......................4
CHE 328 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I .............2
CHE 329 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II ............2
Electives
A minimum of ten semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required. If a degree which meets American Chemical Society approval criteria is sought, CHE 430, Inorganic Chemistry, CHE 410, and CHE 411, Instrumental Analysis and Laboratory must be taken.
Total Hours Required.....................................48
Occupational Health and Safety Area of Emphasis
The Occupational Health and Safety area of emphasis may be applied in lieu of the elective hours in the Chemistry Major and the minor requirement.
The required courses do not include CHE 325 and CHE 326, Physical Chemistry I and II, and CHE 328 and CHE 329, Physical Chemistry Laboratory I and II.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 250 Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety 3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry.................5
CHE 350 Occupational Safety .........................3
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis .......................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory ............2
CHE 415 Instrumentation and Analysis in the
Occupational Environment ....................4
CHE 420 Evaluation and Control of Air Quality .......3
CHE 425 Principles of Occupational Health and Safety ....3
CHE 431 Biochemistry I ..............................5
CHE 450 Occupational Toxicology .....................3
CHE 475 Occupational Health and Safety Internship ...8
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology .............4
BIO 232 Human Physiology ............................4
BIO 240 General Microbiology ........................4
PHY 201 College Physics I............................5
MTH 141 Calculus I ..................................4
MTH 320 Biostatistics ...............................3
Electives
The following courses are recommended as electives: SPE 101-3, COM 261-3, ECO 201-3, and MGT 357-3.
Total Hours Required (Major and Minor)...................92
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hour
CHE 120 General Chemistry I .......................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II ......................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis ............................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory..................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I .......................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II ......................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I.............2
CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II............2
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry................5
Electives
A minimum of six additional semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required.
Total Hours Required.......................................37
Criminalistics Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry I..........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II ........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis .......................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory.............2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I .........................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II ........................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I..............2
CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II..............2
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry.................5
CHE 370 Criminalistics I ............................3
CHE 371 Criminalistics II ...........................3
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis .......................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory ............2
CHE 431 Biochemistry I ..............................5
CHE 470 Criminalistics Internship I .................7
CHE 471 Criminalistics Internship II ................7
PHY 201 College Physics I............................5
or
PHY 231 General Physics I ...........................4
and
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I ................1
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology..............4
BIO 240 General Microbiology ........................4
BIO 360 General Genetics ..............................3
CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System..3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law.......................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures..............3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law.............................3
MTH 141 Calculus I ....................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ..................._4
Total Hours Required (Major and Minor).....................97
Minor in Chemistry
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry I .......................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II ......................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis ............................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory..................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I .......................4
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I.............2
Electives
A minimum of five additional semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required.
Total Hours Required.....................................26
Minor in Criminalistics
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry........................5
CHE 270 Introduction to Criminalistics ..................4
CHE 275 Arson and Explosives ............................3
CHE 276 Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs 1
CHE 370 Criminalistics I ................................3
CHE 371 Criminalistics II ...............................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures..............._3
Total Hours Required........................................22
Earth Sciences
The Earth Sciences Department is comprised of three basic disciplines: Geography, Geology, and Meteorology. The Department of Earth Sciences offers course work leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Land Use and a Bachelor of Science in Meteorology. The Bachelor of Science degree program is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment.
Minor programs are available in Geology, Geography and Meteorology. Students wishing Teaching Certification in either Science or Social Studies have the opportunity to develop a core of courses in Geology, Geography, or Meteorology. For details on these programs, students should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Land Use
The Land Use program is very broad scoped and can be utilized for a number of career objectives. This is the reason for several areas of emphasis. Career opportunities exist in such areas as planning agencies, cartography, geologic drafting, air photos and satellite imagery interpretation, environmental and resource management organizations, travel and transportation, mining and mineral companies, residential and industrial development, recreational land use, population analysis, and a variety of other interrelated fields. The program also provides a good basis for continued study at the graduate level.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Core Hours
MTH 120 Statistics for Land Use I .........................2
GEG 321 Introduction to Cartography.......................3
GEG 361 Principles of Land Use ...........................3
GEG 380 Statistics for Land Use II .......................2
GEG 495 Internship (or Field Methods) ...................._2
Total........................................................12
GEL 311 Introduction to Stratigraphy (required) 3
GEL 312 Geomorphology 4
GEL 331 Structural Geology (required) 5
GEL 342 Soil Resources 4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources 4
GEL 400 Environmental Geology 3
Structured Electives
Each student must take eleven additional upper-division hours,
Required Area of Emphasis
Each student shall select one of the following areas of emphasis. Within the area of emphasis the student will take 19 hours among the courses listed. Not more than 6 of these 19 hours may be lower-division.
Required Courses semester
Urban Land Use Hours
GEG GEG 132 136 Geography of Social Issues Geography of Economic Activities ..3 .3
GEG 204 Geography of Denver .3
GEG 300 Historical Geography of the U.S .3
GEG 360 Urban Geography (required) .3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population .3
GEG 363 Land Use and Transportation .3
GEG 392 Directed Study in Land Use ..2
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning (required) .3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential ..3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..2
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry .. 1
Land Use Techniques
GEG 112 Orienteering .. 1
GEG 122 Map Use ..2
GEG 322 Intermediate Cartography (required) ..3
GEG 392 Directed Study in Land Use .2
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning ..3
GEG 484 Remote Sensing ..3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..2
SUR 251 Surveying I ..3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I ..3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ..3
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry .. 1
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN (required) ..4
URS 351 Community Development and Planning ..3
Resources and Environment
GEG 140 World Resources .3
GEG 340 Water Resources .3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population ..3
GEG 392 Directed Study in Land Use ..2
GEG 422 Climate and Land Use ..3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning ..3
GEG 464 Land Use: Recreation ..3
GEG 484 Remote Sensing (required) .3
GEL 342 ..4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources ..4
GEL 400 Environmental Geology (required) ..3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..2
BIO 355 Urban Ecology ..4
ECO 345 Environmental Economics (required) .3
Geologic Area of Emphasis
(Note: Students selecting this area of emphasis will be required to
minor in Geology.)
GEL 115 Oceanography .............................3
GEL 120 Gemology..................................2
GEG 124 Landforms.................................3
GEG 484 Remote Sensing ...........................3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ......................2
GEL 203 Geology of Colorado ......................3
GEL 215 Geomorphology of the U.S..................3
GEL 309 Introduction to Sedimentation (required)..4
approved by the Earth Sciences Department, to bring the total in the major to 42 hours. These hours may be taken outside the Earth Sciences Department with prior approval. A list of suggested, related courses in other departments is maintained in the Earth Sciences office.
Electives should be selected to provide an integrated and well-planned pattern of courses. The freedom to select certain courses, both within the areas of emphasis, and the structured electives, allows students the opportunity to somewhat individualize and self-design their programs, in keeping with their vocational goals.
Total Hours Required.........j..........................42
Required Minor
Except for the Geologic Area of Emphasis, the field of study selected as a minor is at the option of the student.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Science
To fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Science with a major in Land Use, a student must complete the requirements as listed above under the Bachelor of Arts; however, the student must minor in one of the sciences, or science-oriented fields as approved by the Earth Sciences Department.
Minor in Geology
Semester
Required Courses Hours
GEL 101 General Geology...............................4
GEG 124 Landforms.....................................3
GEL 103 Historical Geology ...........................4
GEL 301 Mineralogy I .................................4
GEL 302 Mineralogy II ................................4
GEL 320 Petrology.....................................4
Electives
A minimum of 3 additional semester hours of Earth Science courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Earth Sciences.
Total Hours Required.................................26
Minor in Geography Required Courses
GEG 112 Orienteering .....................1
GEG 122 Map Use....................................2
GEG 123 Weather and Climate.................3
or
GEG 124 Landforms..................................3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography ...........3
Structured Electives
A minimum of 13 additional hours of electives must be selected in consultation with a member of the Department of Earth Science faculty. At least one course must be selected from each of the following groups to satisfy this requirement:
Physical Geography and Earth Resources
GEG 140 World Resources ...........................3
GEG 340 Water Resources ...........................3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
GEL 342 Soil Resources: Genesis and Morphology .....4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources ...............4
Spatial Analysis and Planning
GEG 360 Urban Geography ............................3
GEG 361 Principles of Land Use .....................3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population ....................3
Regional Geography
GEG 202 Geography of Colorado ......................3
GEG 204 Geography of Denver ........................3
GEG 210 Geography of Latin America .................2
GEG 220 Geography of the U.S........................3
GEG 300 Historical Geography of the U.S............J3
Total Hours Required...................................22
Meteorology
The meteorologist represents the liaison between meteorological information and the public. She or he collects, analyzes and, subsequently, translates the information for public use. The public includes such varied groups as large general contractors, public and private utilities, heavy manufacturing, chemical processing plants, agriculture, transportation (including aviation services), government (such as the military and federal agencies), and research organizations. The meteorologist studies fundamental meteorological theory and analysis practices as well as instrumentation, data processing, and communications concepts. The program is designed to provide the student with the concepts of meteorology while emphasizing one or two chosen areas of public need.
Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology..........3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ...............2
MTR 241 Meteorological Instrumentation ......3
MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology ................3
MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory .....4
MTR 343 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology .3
MTR 344 Dynamic Meteorology: Atmospheric
Processes ..............................3
MTR 345 Dynamic Meteorology: Kinematics and
Dynamics ..............................3
MTR 441 Meteorological Numerical Products....2
MTR 442 Urban and Industrial Meteorology ....3
MTR 444 Climatology .........................3
MTR 445 Consulting Meteorology ..............1
MTR 450 Mesometeorology and Forecasting......3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.......3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics...........4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN......._4
Subtotal...............................................47
Minor
Must include a minor of not less than (18) semester hours, as
approved by the department.............................30
Subtotal...............................................77
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101 & 102 English Composition ......................................6
MTH 111 College Algebra .....................4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry ................3
MTH 141 Calculus I ..........................4
MTH 241 Calculus II .........................4
PHY 201 College Physics I....................5
PHY 202 College Physics II...................5
Humanities ..............................................8
Social and Behavioral Science............................_8
Subtotal...............................................47
Total..................................................124
Minor in Meteorology
Smstor
Required Courses Hours
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology...................3
MTR 242 Use of Radar and Satellites in Meteorology ...3
MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology .........................3
MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory ..............4
MTR 444 Climatology...................................3
Approved Electives ......................................._4
Total.....................................................20
Mathematical Sciences
The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in Mathematics and a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science. It also offers a minor program in Mathematics that complements such majors as engineering technology, the physical sciences, and business. A minor in Computer Science is in the process of obtaining approval.
The department provides courses in several emphasis areas encompassing a variety of significant mathematical ideas. Thus, for those primarily interested in the use of mathematics in the study of some aspect of the physical or human world, courses that stress the classical and current development and applications in analysis, computer science, statistics and probability, business and economics, technical mathematics, and operations research are available.
A degree in mathematics is useful in a variety of professional fields including, among many others, business, economics, computer science, government, education, technology, and science. Students are invited to consult with the department concerning career potentials.
The degree program in computer science, created in 1986, adheres to nationally recognized standards and provides students with a more technical alternative to the Emphasis in Computer Science. Please contact the director of Computer Science in the Mathematics Department for more information about this new program.
Major in Mathematics for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor
of Science
The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers course work leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. The student may choose either degree consistent with her or his career objectives.
All majors in Mathematics are required to complete a minimum of 36 hours consisting of the following basic core of courses (with a required minimum grade of C in each of these core courses) and elective s:
8mstr
Basic Core Hours
MTH 141 Calculus I ...................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II ..................................4
MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs ..........._3
Total.......................................................11
Electives
The student must complete a coherent program of Mathematics courses, including 19 upper-division hours, to be planned in consultation with the students advisor and approved by the department. This program must be formulated before the last 10 credit hours of Mathematics are taken. The only courses applicable to the major as electives are MTH 151, 214, 242, and any upper-division course.
63


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The student may choose to complete one of five emphases previously approved by the department. These emphases are: Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Mathematics, Secondary Education, and Statistics and Probability, as outlined below:
Applied Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in Applied Mathematics is designed to meet the needs of the scientific, technical, and computer based economy
and to prepare the student for graduate study.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core..................................................11
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................4
MTH 242 Calculus III ..................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ....................4
MTH 342 Differential Equations ........................4
MTH 344 Partial Differential Equations ................3
MTH 448 Numerical Analysis I ..........................3
MTH 449 Numerical Analysis II .........................3
A minimum of three hours chosen from the following courses:
MTH 314 Linear Algebra ................................3
MTH 322 Statistical Methods............................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I .....................4
MTH 347 Applied Combinatorial Mathematics..............3
MTH 421 Probability Theory ............................4
MTH 445 Complex Variables ............................_3
Total Hours Required........................................39
Computer Science Emphasis
This emphasis studies the fundamental concepts of computer science as well as processes of analyzing, designing, implementing, and testing computer software systems. The Computer Science Emphasis is designed to prepare individuals to enter this ubiquitous field.
The Computer Science offerings undergo frequent revision and development. Such changes may necessitate special arrangements to accommodate students already in progress. Students are directed to consult advisors in the department for information concerning any changes.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core (CSI 310 replaces MTH 310).................11
CSI 110 Computer Science I .........................3
CSI 120 Computer Science II ........................3
CSI 210 Computer Organization and Architecture......3
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra* .............................2
CSI 311 Data Structures ............................3
CSI 312 Computer Systems ...........................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ..................4
CSI 410 Assembler Language Programming..............3
CSI 411 File Structures ............................3
CSI 421 Software Development and Engineering ......_3
Total Hours Required....................................41
*MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214.
Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in Mathematics prepares the student for further specialized study at the graduate level as well as being adaptable for preparation for positions in business, industry, and government.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core............................................11
MTH 242 Calculus III ..............................4
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ........................3
MTH 411 Abstract Algebra II .......................3
MTH 441 Advanced Calculus I .......................3
MTH 442 Advanced Calculus II ...........................3
A minimum of 9 hours chosen from MTH 151, MTH 214, or any
upper-division mathematics courses....................._9
Total Hours Required...................................36
Secondary Education Emphasis
The emphasis in Secondary Education is for the preparation of classroom feachers of mathematics for secondary schools. Students seeking secondary credentials in Mathematics must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all
of the Mathematics major requirements.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core...............................................11
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN.................4
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ...........................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ...................4
MTH 360 History of Mathematics .......................3
MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics...............3
MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry.......................3
A minimum of 5 hours chosen from MTH 214, MTH 242, or any upper-division mathematics courses; at least 3 hours must be in
upper-division courses...................................._5
Total Hours Required......................................36
Statistics and Probability Emphasis
The emphasis in Statistics and Probability stresses the application of the principles and methods of statistics and probability in the biological, physical, and social sciences and engineering. This emphasis also prepares the student for graduate study.
Semester
Required Courses Hour*
Basic Core..................................................11
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN .................4
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra* ...............................2
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ....................4
MTH 322 Statistical Methods............................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I .....................4
MTH 421 Probability Theory ............................4
MTH 422 Stochastic Processes ........................._4
Total Hours Required........................................37
*MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214.
Minor in Mathematics
Semester
Basic Core Hours
MTH 141 Calculus I ................................ 4
MTH 241 Calculus II .................................4
Electives
A minimum of 12 hours are to be selected from MTH 151, 214, 242, or upper-division courses. At least 4 hours must be taken at
the upper-division level...................................12
Total Hours Required.......................................20
Major in Computer Science for Bachelor of Science
The department offers a complete degree program in Computer Science which adheres to the nationally recognized standards set by the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board. Students are encouraged to contact the departmental director of Computer Science for further details. No minor is required in the CSI program.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CSI 110 Computer Science I .........................3
CSI 120 Computer Science II ........................3
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
CSI 210 Computer Organization and Architecture........3
CSI 310 Discrete Mathematics..........................3
CSI 311 Data Structures ..............................3
CSI 312 Computer Systems .............................3
CSI 320 Algorithm Analysis............................3
CSI 321 Comparison of Programming Languages ..........3
CSI 411 File Structures ..............................3
CSI 420 Computing Theory .............................3
CSI 421 Software Development and Engineering ........_3
Total.....................................................33
Required Ancillary Courses
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing............ 3
CSI XXX Upper-division elective ......................3
CMS XXX Upper-division course subject to
preapproval by advisor.......................3
EET XXX Course subject to preapproval by
advisor ...................................._4
Total.....................................................13
Required Mathematics Courses
MTH 141 Calculus I ...................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II ..................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ...................4
Select a minimum of 7 hours from the following:
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra ...............................2
MTH 242 Calculus III .................................4
MTH 342 Differential Equations .......................4
MTH 448 Numerical Analysis I ........................ 3
Total.....................................................19
Required Laboratory Science Courses
PHY 231 General Physics I and
232 Laboratory ............................5
PHY 233 General Physics II and
234 Laboratory ..........................._5
Total.....................................................10
Subtotal..................................................75
General Studies and free electives........................45
Total Hours Required for Major...........................120
Physics
The Department of Physics offers course work leading to a Bachelor of Science and to a Bachelor of Arts. A minor in Physics is also offered. Undergraduates preparing for work in industry or for graduate study should take the Bachelor of Science in Physics. Students preparing to teach secondary school Physics should take the Bachelor of Arts in Physics in addition to satisfying the requirements for certification in Science. See Department of Teacher Education for details.
The Department of Physics also offers a course in astronomy which is primarily designed as a general interest course and satisfies general studies requirements in Science.
Physics Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I ............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ...........................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I ................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II ...............1
PHY 281 Modern Physics ...............................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics ............................3
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics .........................4
PHY 381 Quantum Mechanics.............................3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours of upper-division Physics courses selected in consultation with and approved by
the Department of Physics.............................15
Total Hours Required..................................38
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 or PHY 125-126 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
The student is urged to take one year of General Chemistry and one year of Electronics. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the students advisor in the Department of Physics.
Physics Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I ............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ...........................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I .................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II ................1
PHY 281 Modern Physics ...............................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics ............................3
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics .........................4
PHY 333 Electricity and Magnetism ....................4
PHY 341 Thermal Physics...............................3
PHY 371 Physics Laboratory I .........................1
PHY 372 Physics Laboratory II ........................1
PHY 381 Quantum Mechanics.............................3
PHY 471 Advanced Physics Laboratory I ................1
PHY 481 Atomic and Molecular Structure ...............3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours in upper-division Physics courses must be selected and approved by the
Department of Physics.................................12
Total Hours Required..................................48
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 or PHY 125-126 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
The student is urged to take one year of General Chemistry and one year of Electronics. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor in the Department of Physics.
Minor in Physics
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I ........................4
PHY 233 General Physics II .......................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I .............1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II ............1
PHY 281 Modern Physics ...........................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics ..............................3
Electives
A minimum of 8 additional semester hours in upper-division Physics courses must be selected and approved by the
Department of Physics.................................J5
Total Hours Required.................................24
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 or PHY 125-126 may be substituted for the PHY 231 -233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
65


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture and offers a major and a minor in Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies. The Institute provides the student with academic skills leading to better understanding of social interaction and provides services at the local, national and international level. Through the Institute, students can study with faculty from diverse academic backgrounds and can travel and study in Spain, Africa, Mexico, etc.
Afro-American Studies
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services offers a range of courses in Afro-American Studies that present the dimension of the Black Experience in this country. These courses encompass and afford a comprehensive understanding of the African heritage. They present African links and potential; contributions of Black people in the growth and development of the U.S.; Black culture and lifestyles; the Black community; political activity and potential; religious development and importance; community service and resource assistance; and prognosis and potential for social change. The courses may be used in the general studies requirements and as electives for graduation.
Students are urged to consult with the faculty in Afro-American Studies about new courses now being designed as well as special offerings.
The Major in Afro-American Studies (which leads to a Bachelor of Arts Degree) and the Minor program must be planned in consultation with an Advisor in the AAS Department.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Afro-American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hour*
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies.........3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle: USA
Philosophy, Action (SOC 116) ................3
One African Heritage Course .................3
AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice
(PSY 370) ..................................3
AAS 485 Black Survival Strategies ..................3
MUS 201 Topics in Ethnic Music: Variable Title
ART 306 African-American Visual
Traditions One to be
AAS 324 Afro-American Literature (ENG selected .......3
324)
AAS 499 Field Experience in the Black Community ....._3
Total.....................................................21
Electives
18 hours. (Related courses may be selected, upon consultation with the advisor, in Chicano Studies and Urban Studies.) Total hours for the major are 39.
Minor in Afro-American Studies
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies..........3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle: USA
Philosophy, Action (SOC 116) ................_3
Total.......................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours are required in Afro-American courses, 3 hours of which must be an African course, selected in consultation with and approved by the Afro-American
Studies advisor assigned the student. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Chicano Studies
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Bilingual Chicano Studies. The Chicano and other Hispanic historical experiences are used as points of departure toward expanding awareness of a multicultural world by using the community and the world as a laboratory and assisting in the preparation of scholars, human science providers, teachers, technologists and persons needing an international experience. Areas of emphasis within three specialties include focus upon research and theory.
Major for Bachelor of Arts in Bilingual Chicano Studies
This program is organized around three areas of emphasis: Intercultural/lntracultural, Community Service, and Bilingual/ Bicultural. The requirements include core courses in the major; specific offerings in at least one of the areas of emphasis and a Spanish language proficiency appropriate to the area of emphasis plus selected and approved electives which can be applied to other degrees. Minimum number of hours to complete the major vary with each area of emphasis:
Intercultural/lntracultural....................43 Semester Hours
Community Service..............................43 Semester Hours
Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Studies...........47 Semester Hours
Required Core Courses
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies ....3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (HIS 191) ....3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexican and U.S. Periods (HIS 192) ....3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican and Chicano (ANT 236) ....3
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature (ENG 241) 3
Total. .15
Intercultural/lntracultural Area of Emphasis
This area of emphasis will concentrate on the generation of information relative to the conceptual and theoretical foundations which demonstrate the Chicano perspective. Focus is on language, ideology, and culture. The specific intent of the discipline is one which also supports other disciplines, prepares a student for advance study at the graduate level, or develops a candidate's skills as a specialist with socio-cultural knowledge.
A minimum of six semester hours from among the following courses are required:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHS 202 Chicano Poetry and Drama ....................3
CHS 211 The Chicano in Aztlan........................3
CHS 351 Aztlan Myth and Reality......................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication ................3
SOC 322 Race, Sex and Ethnic Groups ............,....3
SOC 324 Poverty in America ..........................3
66


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Language Proficiency Requirement
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I..........................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II ........................5
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and/or SPA 212
Conversation I or II ........................3
OR proficiency equivalent to the above.
Approved Electives
A minimum of nine semester hours of electives, selected in consultation with the Institute Director, is required.
Community Service Area of Emphasis
This area of emphasis will concentrate on professional development for those wishing to serve in community-based projects and agencies which address community needs. Much of the conceptual, theoretical and applied experiences are designed to better equip the practitioner in professional and paraprofessional programs in the community.
The following courses are required for individuals who are involved in the community service area of emphasis.
CHS 310 The Chicano Community I ...................4
CHS 311 The Chicano Community II ................4
CHS 312 The Chicano Community III ................4
In addition a minimum of 3 hours is to be selected from the
following:
CHS 221 The Chicano Family ........................3
CHS 320 Chicano and the Law........................3
BEC* 301 Business Research and Report Writing ......3
BEC* 325 Family Law ................................3
ACC 320 Government Accounting......................3
HSW 101 Introduction to Human Services and
Community Resources .......................4
Other courses focusing on strategies to assist in the preparation toward service in the Chicano community, designed by departments and approved by the chair, may be substituted.
*BEC courses in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business.
Language Proficiency
This requirement same as that of the Intercultural/lntracultural concentration.
Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Area of Emphasis
The area of emphasis concentrates on the preparation of professionals. It is a composite area of emphasis with significant participation of Chicano Studies, the Spanish program, and the Bilingual unit in the Center for Education.
The courses listed below are basic requirements for the Bilingual/ Bicultural Chicano area of emphasis. In addition, a course sequence in Spanish to support this area of emphasis is required. For those wishing teaching certificate information, please contact the Bilingual/Bicultural Program Coordinator.
Candidates seeking admission for Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Area of Emphasis should first take a Spanish language proficiency test which sets minimum requirements as a prerequisite to this program, or secure permission of any department chair of those departments listed.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children .................3
or
CHS 341 Chicano Folklore of the Southwest .............3
EDU 351 Perspective in Bilingual/Bicultural Education .4
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials for
the Bilingual/Bicultural Classroom..........._4
Total......................................................14
Spanish Language Requirement
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I ..........................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II..........................5
or their equivalent
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II or
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation ......................3
SPA 231 Spanish Composition I
or
SPA 232 Spanish Composition II .....................3
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual
Classroom .................................2
SPA 352 Contemporary Mexican Literature ............3
or other courses designed by the above departments and approved by the chair as relevant to the intent of the concentration.
No Electives
Minor in Chicano Studies
The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with the Department of Chicano Studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors which reflect the best possible elective curricula and which will insure that a relevant emphasis is maintained. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies .............3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America: the Pre-Columbian
and Colonial Periods .......................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexican and U.S. Periods..................3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican
and Chicano.................................3
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature ................^
Total....................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 6 semester hours of electives are required to complete the minor. The courses are to be selected in consultation with a Chicano Studies faculty advisor.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
The Institute for Womens Studies and Services was formed in 1985. It merged the Womens Resource Center and the Department of Womens Studies. The goals of the Institute are:
1. To offer academic course work in Womens Studies, including a minor and a contract major.
2. To foster the inclusion of material concerning women and minorities across the curriculum
3. To provide services for student women, including advising, scholarship assistance, and developmental experiences, such as workshops, conferences, and seminars.
4. To identify and encourage faculty and administrative mentors for student women.
5. To facilitate collaborative interdisciplinary research.
6. To continue development of cooperative ventures with women's organizations in education, business, government, and the community.
Projects
1. A Western States Project on Women in the Curriculum grant was awarded to the Institute in 1985. The purpose of the grant is to incorporate the new scholarship concerning women into the college curriculum. Additional professional development funds further this objective.
2. In cooperation with the Colorado Council on the Future of Women in the Workplace, the Institute offers women students opportunities to interact with and learn from professional women in education, business, and government.
3. The Institute conducts the Denver Area Teaching and Research Colloquium on Women, bringing together faculty and students from six metropolitan institutions to share results of curriculum development and feminist scholarship.
Womens Studies
Women's Studies is currently effecting changes in requirements for the contract major and minor. This process includes alterations in and additions to course offerings. Please contact the Institute in August/September 1987 to ascertain the current status of requirements and offerings.
Contract Major
Through Adult Learning Services, students may construct an individualized interdisciplinary major combining work in Womens Studies with work in other disciplines. Students should consult the director of the Institute and the director of Adult Learning Services to initiate planning. The Womens Studies contract major is appropriate both for the general student and for students who expect to work specifically with female populations. If the bachelors degree in Women's Studies is to be the terminal degree, faculty strongly recommend a double major.
A Womens Studies degree might be combined effectively with majors in management, organizational development, psychology, education, nursing, human services, law enforcement, advertising, public relations, marketing, finance, and other fields appropriate to the students interest. Students are thus prepared to work with both general and female populations in a variety of areas.
Employment opportunities for Womens Studies students may be found in managing womens resource centers and battered womens shelters. Students might also work in community
counseling and consulting or develop workshops or special programming for women in business and industry. Alumnae are also employed in banking and as executives in professional associations. Students who plan to work in education, law, or medicine may find a Womens Studies degree a useful base for graduate or professional study.
Minor
Also interdisciplinary, the Womens Studies Minor uses faculty expertise from many different departments. The objectives of both the Contract Major and the Minor include: a heightened awareness for women themselves; a review of the cultural patterns which define women; the study of the historical achievements of women in all disciplines; and the exploration of emerging needs and opportunities for women. Emphasis is at once on both personal and professional growth. These objectives are met within the context of the new scholarship on women, including minority women, and international women.
The courses are appropriate for students in Education, Guidance and Counseling, Law Enforcement, Human Services, Business Management, Advertising, Public Relations, Communication, Liberal Arts, and the Behavioral and Applied Sciences.
Men are welcome and encouraged to study the scholarhip which focuses on women. They may find from such study a conceptual framework that will enable them to better understand, appreciate, and work with women.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
WMS 101 Introduction: Women in Transition.............3
WMS 218 Rational Assertiveness Training ..............3
WMS 331 Legal Rights of Women ........................3
WMS 351 Feminist Theories ............................3
WMS 475 New Women in the World Seminar............._3
Total.........................J...........................15
Electives
In addition to the core courses, nine (9) semester hours of electives acceptable to or taught through the department will be required, bringing the total number of semester hours credit for a Women's Studies minor to 24. These courses, some of which are interdisciplinary, are selected in consultation with the Womens Studies faculty and approved by the Institute.
Additional Study
Women's Studies core courses are supplemented each semester by topics, current issues, and "cluster courses (WMS 342, 367, and 425); in addition, students should check the class schedule for other relevant offerings. Appropriate electives are often listed in other departments and may be cross-listed with Womens Studies. For example, students may take WMS 331, The Legal Rights of Women for either Womens Studies credit or for credit in Criminal Justice and Criminology (CJC 371). Similar offerings are available in Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Technical Communications. Additional courses in other departments are cross-referenced for the students information. While these may not have Women's Studies course numbers (instead they will have course numbers in other departments), they may, with permission of the Women's Studies faculty, count toward elective credits for the Contract Major or Minor. Examples include: PSY 295, The Psychology of Sex Roles and SWF 202, Social Welfare with Women. Students should check the class schedule each semester for appropriate cross-listed and cross-referenced courses.
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School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Womens Services
This component of the Institute provides a place and a system of support for women students who seek information, referral to specific resources, and support groups. Womens Services disseminates information regarding on and off campus educational services, financial aid, and admissions procedures.
Womens Services houses a resource library and information from public agencies. A scholarship file is maintained here, and staff provide advising and assistance in planning for new educational and professional directions in the students life. Womens Services objective is to give the individual student personalized attention and provide supportive networks.
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School of Professional Studies
School of Professional Studies
The School of Professional Studies offers many and varied degree and teaching certification programs. Every program is designed not only to prepare graduates for success in a specific career, but to provide a broad educational background for career and life enhancement.
The major purpose of the School is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and performance competencies needed to successfully enter a chosen profession. The School of Professional Studies includes three divisions, twelve departments, and twelve other administrative units.
The Division of Education consists of three academic departments: Teacher Education; Reading; and Physical Education, Recreation and Health. The Division also includes a Parent/Child Development Center, an Educational Resource Center, a Reading Laboratory, six Denver Public Schools/Metropolitan State College Laboratory Schools, a Teacher Assessment Program, and the Resource Access Program (RAP).
The three academic departments in the Division of Education offer five major and eight minor degree programs. Teacher certification programs are offered in Early Childhood, Elementary Education, Special Education, and fourteen secondary education fields.
The Division of Technology consists of four departments: Aerospace Science, Civil Engineering and Environmental Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, and Technology and Technical Communications. The four academic departments offer ten major and eleven minor degree programs.
The Division of Public Service Professions consists of five departments: Criminal Justice and Criminology, Hospitality, Meeting, and Travel Administration, Human Services, Military Science, and Nursing and Health Care Management; the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behaviors and the Community Service Development Program. The five academic departments offer five majors and eight minor degree programs.
In addition to the many and diverse degree programs offered in the twelve academic departments, student support programs also are available: the Student Advising Program, the Basic Skills Testing and Remediation Program, and the Campus Recreation Program. Other administrative units within the School include the Office of Clinical Experiences and the Mesa/Metro Teacher Education Program located in Grand Junction, Colorado.
There are over one hundred-ninety full-time and part-time faculty, seventeen administrators, and twenty-six support personnel in the School of Professional Studies that are highly committed to assisting each student attain their career goals.
Division of Education
The Division of Education is composed of the Department of Teacher Education; the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health; the Department of Reading; Parenting Education, and a Child Development Center. Other units within the School include the Mesa/Metro Teacher Education Program, and the Education Resource Center.
The Teacher Certification Program at Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
The Department of Teacher Education offers majors in Early Childhood and Elementary Education, as well as minors in Early Childhood and Special Education. Professional courses leading to certification in the areas of Early Childhood Education, Secondary Education, and Special Education are also offered. The major in Elementary Education includes the courses needed for certification.
The Division of Education, with the cooperation of the Modern Languages Department and Chicano Studies (located in the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services), offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education.
The Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health offers a major in Physical Education with six emphasis areas and a major in Recreation with two emphasis areas with minors in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health and Safety.
The Department of Reading offers one of the few undergraduate Reading minors in the area with numerous courses in the teaching of developmental and remedial reading. The department also offers reading improvement courses. The well equipped Reading Laboratory offers an opportunity for the individualized work in a variety of materials which include development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. It is open to all students whether or not they are enrolled in a Reading course.
The Office of Clinical Experiences serves to integrate the laboratory experiences in the professional education programs. In addition to the student teaching programs, requests for observations, research projects and studies, and tutoring situations, utilizing off-campus laboratory settings are coordinated through this office.
The Child Development Center is a preschool laboratory which serves as a training facility for students enrolled in early childhood and other educational programs. The Center provides a setting for college students to observe and participate in an on-going educational program for young children.
The Laboratory Schools are a cooperative endeavor of Metropolitan State College and the Denver Public School System. The purposes of the Laboratory Schools are: (1) to provide more effective education for the Elementary School pupils and the Division of Education students; (2) to provide professional development and collaborate opportunities for both faculties; and (3) to fully utilize all available resources of the Auraria campus and communities.
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School of Professional Studies
The Mesa/Metro Teacher Education Certification Program is housed on the Mesa College Campus in Grand Junction, Colorado. This Consortium program provides the opportunity for students on the Western Slope to enroll in and graduate from Metros teacher education program on the Mesa Campus.
The Education Resource Center is a facility designed to provide materials and resources for teacher education students and faculty members for course work, field experiences and laboratories. The Resource Center presents guest lectures, workshops and seminars. The Campus Recreation Program is a comprehensive leisure service that provides students the opportunity to participate in a variety of recreational activities. The program consists of five major components: Informal Recreation, Intramural Leagues, Club Sports, Special Events, and an Outdoor Adventure Program. All activities and programs are specifically designed to enhance student life experiences at Metropolitan State College, especially in terms of socialization, health, and fitness.
Campus Recreation is located in the Physical Education Recreation Building and provides ninety hours of programs each week in the swimming pool, weightroom, gymnasium, racquetball courts, dance studio, and athletic fields. Semester facility schedules are available in the campus recreation office.
Teacher Education Programs
The purpose of the programs in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students in these programs must meet the general studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a bachelors degree stipulated earlier in this Bulletin.
COLORADO LAW AFFECTING TEACHER CERTIFICATION MAY BE CHANGED IN THE PERIOD DURING WHICH THIS BULLETIN IS IN EFFECT. STUDENTS SHOULD CONTACT THE TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT FOR MODIFICATIONS.
The Department of Teacher Education accepts no course work older than 7 years as substitutes for required courses in the certification sequence and, in certain instances, may not accept more recent coursework if there have been significant changes in content in more recent years.
All students enrolled at Metropolitan State College who wish to prepare for teaching careers and be certified by the Colorado Department of Education are required to pass the California Achievement Test in mathematics, spelling and language usage prior to or during the semester they take their first class in the professional education sequence. A score at or above the 75th percentile must be attained. Students must also pass a public speaking course with a grade of B or better or satisfactorily complete an oral examination. Students should take speech as a part of their General Studies. These tests are in addition to other requirements for admission to the professional training, as listed in this Bulletin.
STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE ADDITIONAL TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES UNTIL THEY PASS THE CALIFORNIA ACHIEVEMENT TEST.
Students who fail one or more of the examinations will be notified so that appropriate remedial instruction can be recommended to them. They will be provided with a list of remedial resources for each area in which remediation is needed. Students are expected to take the initiative to seek out these resources and bring their skills in the identified areas up to an acceptable level. Students may take the examination(s) no more than four times within five years.
In addition, the following requirements must be met for formal admission to the Teacher Education programs:
1. Prior to or during their first course in the professional education sequence, students must present evidence of having met ONE of the following:
a. A rank in the top two quartiles of the candidates high school graduating class.
b. A score at or above 19 on the American College Test (ACT) or a score of 950 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
c. A grade point average of at least 2.50 on a 4.00 scale for at least 30 semester hours of the most recent college or university course work.
Students must also show evidence of having worked successfully with children or young people.
2. Before being admitted to any 300-level course in education, certification students must present evidence that they:
a. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all college work attempted.
b. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all in education courses attempted to date (which may only be one introductory course).
Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees.
3. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours of college work (except elementary).
4. Completion of a Declaration of Intention form, to be filed in the Teacher Education Department office. Normally, students complete this form while enrolled in their first course in education.
5. For students seeking credit for courses taken at this or at another institution that might be equivalent to the required courses described in this section, completion of a formal program plan or evaluation for advanced standing is required in consultation with their advisor, with the results of this evaluation to be filed in the Teacher Education Department office.
6. Completion of 200 clock hours of experience with children or youths by the end of the sophomore year. A minimum of 50 hours must be completed by the end of the students first semester of education coursework (i.e., EDU 100, EDU 110, or EDU 221). This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church groups, as well as other boys and girls clubs, camps, recreational programs, teacher aiding, etc.
The following requirements must be met for admission to student teaching:
1. Completion of a minimum of 90 semester hours of college work. Students transferring from other institutions, where more than 70 semester hours are being transferred into Metropolitan State College, or those who already hold degrees must complete a minimum of 20 semester hours and two semesters before they can be admitted to student teaching.
2. Students must present evidence that they:
a. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all college work attempted.
b. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 in all education courses attempted to date.
(Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees.
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School of Professional Studies
Under-graduate and post-graduate transfer students should check with their Teacher Education Department advisor concerning special GPA requirements.)
3. Completion of all professional courses required for certification.
4. Completion of all subject area courses in the students teaching area(s) required by North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
5. Completion of all items in the personal student teaching folder, to be obtained in the Department of Teacher Education.
6. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and/or evaluations from prestudent teaching field experiences.
7. A physical examination report including tuberculosis clearance, on file with the Student Health Services.
8. Approval by the appropriate screening committee when applicable.
9. Completion of formal application for student teaching, to be submitted to the Department of Teacher Education not later than the following dates:
For fall semester
student teaching Last working day of February For spring semester
student teaching Last working day of September
Students who have completed student teaching requirements at another institution may request to take student teaching for six semester hours.
Early Childhood Education
The Department of Teacher Education offers the following programs in Early Childhood Education:
1. A major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
2. A teacher certification program meeting requirements for certification to teach early childhood in the public schools of Colorado (preschool through the second grade).
3. A minor in Early Childhood Education.
4. All the necessary courses to meet the education requirement qualifications set by the State Department of Social Services for day care directors and group leaders.
5. In-home child care and education.
Early Childhood Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement..........1
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education ....................3
EDU 132 Lab in Early Childhood Education..............2
EDU 231 Child Development ............................3
EDU 232 Lab in Child Development .....................2
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Young Children................3
EDU 265 Human Relations ..............................3
EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in the
Early Childhood Classroom ..................4
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development ...........4
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational
Process ....................................4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood
Classroom ..................................3
EDU 436 Cultural Influences on the Socialization
of Children ................................4
EDU 438 Lab in Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom ........................2
Choose one from the following:
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ..................2
EDU 412 Math and Science Teachinn Children Methods for 3
EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for
EDU 415 Teaching Children Art Methods for the Classroom 2
MUS 432 Teacher: Pre-Primary 6 Music Methods for Early Childhood 3 2
Total. 40-41
A student majoring in Early Childhood Education must complete the requirements for a minor. Recommended minors include Reading, Bilingual-Bicultural, Parent Education, Special Education, Psychology, and Sociology; other minors must be approved by the department. Areas of emphasis which are equivalent to a minor are Language Arts, Science and Math, Urban Studies Education, Music and Movement, and Human and Community Resources. Contact your advisor for areas of emphasis requirements.
Requirements for Public School Teacher Certification
In addition to completing a major in Early Childhood Education, students wishing certification must satisfy the following
requirements:
Semester
Required in Education Hours
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural
Education ...................................3
EDU 315 Foundations of Urban and
Multicultural Education Lab .................2
EDU 316 Curriculum Development:
Pre-Primary 6 .............................3
EDU 317 Curriculum Development:
Pre-Primary 6 Lab..........................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Regular
Classroom ...................................3
EDU 439 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Early Childhood ............................12
Required in Reading
RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read ..........3
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary.........j...........................3
Required Courses in General Studies
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication ...............................3
MTH 261 Mathematics for the
Elementary School Teacher ...................3
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non-Majors .............._3
Total....................................................40
Areas of Emphasis: Early Childhood Education (ECE)
Semester
Language Arts Area of Emphasis Hours
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary......................................3
RDG 360 Practicum in Reading .......................3
EDU 410 Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children................3
EDU 411 LAB-Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children................2
ENG 346 Childrens Literature.......................3
Electives ...................J..........................._5
Total....................................................19
Electives
Five hours to be selected from the following list or in consultation
with faculty in ECE.
RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read ............3
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials..............2
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School of Professional Studies
ENG 202 English Grammar.................................3
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ....................2
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools .................3
Human Community Resources Area of Emphasis
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography ................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology .........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ......................3
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education ..............3
EDU 315 Laboratory in Urban and Multicultural
Education .....................................2
Electives .................................................._5
Total.......................................................19
Electives
Five hours to be selected from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE:
EDU 410 Language Arts & Social Studies Methods for
Teaching Children...........................3
EDU 411 LAB-Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children...............2
GEG 360 Urban Geography .............................3
HIS 111 Colorado History.............................3
HIS 301 History of Denver............................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest .....3
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies........3
HSW 101* Introduction to Human Services & Community
Resources ..................................4
PSY 241 Social Psychology............................3
HSW 202* Small Group Dynamics.........................4
HSW Human Services, Division of Public Service Professions
Science and Mathematics Area of Emphasis
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics........................3
MTH 261 Mathematics for the Elementary School
Teacher ...................................3
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................3
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non-Majors ................3
Electives ............................................... 6
Total....................................................18
Electives
Six hours (with at least one course in physical science) from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE:
GEL 101 General Geology .............................4
GEG 123 Weather and Climate..........................3
GEG 124 Landforms....................................3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy ...................3
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................3
EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................2
Urban Studies Area of Emphasis
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies........3
AAS 315 Education of the Black Child ................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexico and U.S. Periods.....................3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children ...............3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education ..................................4
Electives ..............................................._3
Total....................................................19
Electives
Three hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE:
AAS 330 The Black Community .........................3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the
Mexican and Chicano.........................2
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature .................3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials
for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom .......4
REC 465 Recreation Programs and Management
in the Inner City ............................4
SOC 201 Current Social Issues.........................3
Music and Movement Education Specialty
MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music Theory..................3
MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood ............2
PEH 258 Movement Education............................3
PEH 450 Psychology of Motor Learning .................3
Electives ................................................._7
Total......................................................18
Electives
Five hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with
faculty in ECE:
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Young Children..................3
MUS 161 Folk Guitar I .................................1
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.......................1
PER 150 Modern Dance I ................................1
PEH 250 Activities for the Young Child.................3
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...................2
PEH 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children .................................3
PEH 462 Adaptive Physical Education ...................3
Minor in Early Childhood Education
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement........1
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education ..................3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education.....2
EDU 231 Child Development ..........................3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development ............2
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Children .....................3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development ..........4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom ....................... 3
Total...................................................21
Highly Recommended:
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process EDU 335 Assessment & Measurement in the Early Childhood Education Classroom
Child Care Director Qualifications
Early Childhood majors and minors should take:
HES 204 Nutrition
Students seeking only Child Care Director qualifications should contact the Colorado Department of Social Services. MSCs suggested program is listed below.
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education ....................3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education.......2
HES 204 Nutrition ....................................3
Psychology...................................3
Sociology ...................................3
Elementary Level
Teacher Certification and/or a Bachelor of Arts degree at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program. Students must complete a minor. Substitutions for any of the requirements must be approved by the chair of the Department of Teacher Education.
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School of Professional Studies
Special certification to teach at the Elementary level in Physical Education, Art and Music is available.
All candidates for the certificate to teach in the elementary schools will declare their intentions at the earliest possible date.
They will make arrangements in EDU 110, Elementary Education in the United States, to satisfy the following requirements:
1. Two hundred clock hours of community service by the end of the sophomore year. Fifty clock hours must be completed by the end of EDU 110. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church group, teacher aiding, etc.
2. Evidence of proficiency in reading, handwriting, spelling, new math concepts, speech, and grammar.
Elementary Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
THE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION HAS REQUIRED MAJOR CHANGES IN THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR. THESE CHANGES ARE ANTICIPATED TO BE EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1988. CHECK WITH THE
DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION FOR A LISTING OF THE NEW REQUIREMENTS.
Semester
Required Courses (in recommended sequence) Hours
EDU 110 Elementary Education in the United States ....3
EDU 231 Child Development ............................3
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary School...............2
EDU 265 Human Relations ..............................3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education ................3
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education ............3
EDU 315 Urban and Multicultural Education
Laboratory .................................2
EDU 316 Curriculum Development:
Pre-Primary 6 ............................3
EDU 317 Curriculum Development:
Pre-Primary 6 LAB ........................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom .......3
EDU 410 Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children...............3
EDU 411 LAB-Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children...............2
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................3
EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................2
EDU 415 Art Methods for the Classroom Teacher:
Pre-Primary 6 ............................3
EDU 419* Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6) ................6, 8, 10 or 12
EDU 469** Professional Practicum........................._6
Total.................................................52-58
'Proposed changes are under consideration pertaining to Student Teaching. Check status of credit hours required with department chair.
* 'EDU 469 Professional Practicum may not be required in some instances. Consult with department chair.
(Students lacking proficiency in any area may be required to take additional course work to remedy the lack of proficiency.)
When planning to teach in grades K-3, the following courses are
strongly recommended:
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education..................3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education ...2
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development ...........2
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development ........4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom ......................3
Courses Required or Strongly Recommended in the Academic Areas*:
Humanities
SPE 101** Fundamentals of Speech Communications .....3
ENG 346 Childrens Literature........................3
MUS 431** Music Methods for Elementary School
Classroom Teachers.........................2
RDG 312** Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary....................................3
RDG 313** Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate............................. 3
Career
ITS 381 Industrial Arts for the Elementary School....2
REC 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts ..................2
PEH 250** Activities for the Young Child.............3
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .................2
PEH 258 Movement Education...........................3
PEH 300** School Health Programs ....................3
PEH 450 Psychology of Motor Learning ...........3
Social Science/Behavioral Science
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ....................3
HIS 122 American History Since 1865 .................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology......................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology ......................3
Mathematics/Science
MTH 261** Mathematics for the Elementary School
Teacher .........J.........................3
A minimum of one course from each of the following sciences is highly recommended:
Earth or Biological Science
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non-Majors ..................3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy .....................3
GEG 100 World Regional Geography ......................5
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography ...............3
GEL 101 General Geology ..............................4
Physical Science
PHY 108 Physical Science for Teachers ................3
Courses may count toward basic studies, but not more than six semester hours in any one department will qualify to meet those requirements. **This course required.
Elementary Educational Services and Resources Major
This is an alternative major for those students who decide they do not wish to major in and be certified to teach in elementary education. This major affords the student the study and the experience in professional fields which are supplementary to Elementary Education; for example, exceptional education, parent education, and educational resources.
The students major in this field of study is to be designed through consultation with a faculty advisor in Elementary Education.
Secondary Level
Students may be certified at the secondary level, being endorsed to teach in the following areas: Art*, Business Education and Communication, English, Industrial Arts, Mathematics, Modern Languages, Music, Physical Education, Science**, Social Studies***, Spanish and Speech.
Students should ask for advisors in the Department of Teacher Education as well as in the departments of their major and minor fields of study.
The student is cautioned to check with his advisor for changes mandated by new Colorado law. Students are required to pass the California Achievement Test by the end of the first Education course taken (i.e., EDU 221).
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School of Professional Studies
In addition to a major in the above areas, students must complete the following professional course program:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Social and Cultural Bases of Secondary Schools
A block of two courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools ...................................3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary
Schools ...................................2
Psychological and Physiological Bases of Secondary Education
A block of three courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner .................3
RDG 328 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas,
Secondary...................................3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ......3
In lieu of EDU 360, Physical Education Majors take:
PEH 462 Adaptive Physical Education..................3
Processes of Teaching in the Secondary Schools
A block of three courses to be taken concurrently and not earlier than two semesters before student teaching.
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom
Management ...............................3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials
Construction .............................2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education .............3
Teaching Practice
EDU 429* Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary......................6, 8, 10 or 12
Proposed changes are under consideration pertaining to Student Teaching. Check status of credit hours required with the department chair.
In addition to the field experiences included in the required courses, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of experience with adolescents in the age bracket that they intend to teach. This may be accomplished through work with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church groups, volunteer tutor programs, or similar activities.
Students should plan their experience in consultation with their advisor, who will need to sign a form indicating his or her approval.
Students who seek Secondary Certification should also check the general certification requirements listed under Teacher Education Program.
Before enrolling for student teaching, students are directed to take a course in methods of teaching their major and minor field of study offered in the respective departments.
Recent certification changes by the Colorado Department of Education may change the number of credits and total weeks actually spent student teaching. Contact the Department of Teacher Education or the Office of Clinical Experiences for current status of student teaching requirements. In some instances, students may split the student teaching assignments between different subjects, schools, or grade levels upon consultation with their advisor.
'See Art Certification Program requirements listed below.
**See Science Certification Program requirements listed below.
***See Social Studies Certification Program requirements listed below.
Art Certification: K-12
Requirements: Art Major (Available through the Art Department)
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 211 Laboratory in the Elementary School .........2
EDU 221 Processes of Education in
Urban Secondary Schools......................3
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban
Secondary Schools............................2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner .................3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum
and Classroom Management ................... 3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and
Materials Construction ......................2
or
EDU 316 Curriculum Development: Pre-
Primary 6 .................................6
and
EDU 317 Curriculum Development: Pre-
Primary 6:Lab..............................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ......3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content
Areas: Secondary ............................3
EDU 401 Art Methods/Materials: K-12 .................4
EDU 404 Fiber/Textile Crafts: Methods K-12 ..........2
EDU 419** Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6) ...................6, 8, 10, 12
EDU 429** Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary (6-12) ...................6, 8, 10, 12
Electives
EDU 402 Arts Institute Workshop: Integrating the
Arts for Gifted & Talented ..................2
EDU 403 Integrating the Arts: Field Experience
for Gifted & Talented .......................1
EDU 416 Integrating Art into the
K-6 Curriculum Practicum ....................3
Colorado Department of Education requires this course.
"Student Teaching is comprised of daily full-time work during sixteen weeks, split 8 and 10 weeks between elementary and secondary levels for K-12. Check status of credit hours required for student teaching with department chair.
Strongly Recommended Coursework
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education ...................3
Science Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sampling from additional areas of science and mathematics. The program satisfies both major and minor requirements, so no further minor is required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College in one of the following areas:
Biology
Chemistry
Earth-Space Science Physics
Please consult with the department involved or with the Teacher Education Department for a list of approved and/or required courses.
Science Support Area
Students must complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis other than that of the major.
Semester
Biology Hour*
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ..............4
BIO 210 General Botany ...............................5
BIO 220 General Zoology ..............................5
BIO 355 Urban Ecology ................................4
or
BIO 360 General Genetics .............................3
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School of Professional Studies
Chemistry
CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis.........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Lab.....................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ..........................4
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab.........................2
Earth Science
GEL 101 General Geology...............................4
GEL 103 Historical Geology ...........................4
GEG 100 World Regional Geography .....................5
GEG 123 Weather and Climate...........................3
GEG 124 Landforms................................... 3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy ....................3
Mathematics
MTH 141 Calculus I ...................................4
MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs ..........3
MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics...............3
10 additional hours to be selected from:
MTH 241 Calculus II ..................................4
CSI 110 Computer Science I ...........................3
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ...........................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ...................4
MTH 360 History of Mathematics .......................3
MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry.......................3
Physics
PHY 231 General Physics I ............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ...........................4
PHY 232 General Physics Lab I.........................1
PHY 234 General Physics Lab II........................1
Plus 8 additional hours in Physics
A support area in Computer Science is being proposed. Check with the Teacher Education Department or Mathematics Department for further information.
General Requirements
These may be fulfilled in the academic major or teaching area of emphasis.
Choose at least one course from each of the following areas:
Biology
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology...............4
Chemistry
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry.....................5
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ..........................5
Earth Science
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy ....................3
or
GEG 100 World Regional Geography .....................5
or
GEL 101 General Geology...............................4
Physics
PHY 201 College Physics...............................5
or
PHY 231 General Physics I ............................4
Mathematics
MTH 111 College Algebra ..............................4
or
MTH 112 College Trigonometry .........................3
or
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics.....................4
or
MTH 140 Pre-calculus Mathematics......................4
or
MTH 141 Calculus I ........J...........................4
or
CSI 110 Computer Science I ...........................3
or
MTH 320 Biostatistics .<..........................3
or
MTH 360 History of Mathematics .......................3
Science
This course is required:
SCI 395 Methods of Teaching Science...................3
Notes
Physics majors should choose AST 104 and MTH 151 to meet certification requirements.
Students who elect the Earth Science or Physics teaching areas of emphasis must choose at least one upper-division course in addition to SCI 395.
Permission is being sought for mathematics to be included as an area of emphasis. Check with the Teacher Education Department.
Social Studies Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of Social Science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sampling from every social/behavioral science.
The program meets both major and minor requirements; an additional minor is not required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College in one of the following areas:
Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Behavioral Science
Bilingual Chicano Studies
Economics
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Please consult with the department involved or with the Teacher Education Department for list of approved and/or required courses.
Social Studies Area of Emphasis
Students must complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis. History must be selected unless the academic major is History.
History (18 semester hours)
HIS 101 Western Civilization I .........................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization II ........................3
HIS 121 American History I ..............................3
HIS 122 American History II ...........................3
Six (6) additional upper-division History hours selected in consultation with the department.
Reading courses will not apply.
Afro-American Studies (12 semester hours)
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies.......3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle................3
Six (6) additional hours in Afro-American Studies; three (3) must be upper-division. Afro-American History suggested. Students
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School of Professional Studies
are reminded to take Afro-American Studies and Chicano
Studies courses as listed under general requirements. Anthropology (12 semester hours)
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory...........3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .........3
Six (6) additional upper-division hours in Anthropology Chicano Studies (12 semester hours)
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies ...............3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America........................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest .......3
Three (3) additional upper-division hours in Chicano Studies. Economics (18 semester hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro................3
Twelve (12) additional upper-division hours in Economics. Geography (12 semester hours)
GEG 123 Weather and Climate............................3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography ...............3
GEG 140 World Resources ...............................3
GEG 422 Climate and Land Use ..........................3
Political Science (12 semester hours)
PSC 101 American National Government...................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas ...................3
PSC 300 American State and Local Government............4
PSC 305 Political Theory ..............................3
Psychology (12 semester hours)
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology........................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology ........................3
Six (6) additional hours of electives. Suggested: PSY 216, 221, 241, 295.
Sociology (12 semester hours)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ...................3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences .............3
Six (6) additional hours of electives, three (3) of which must be
upper-division.
General Requirements
(Some may be satisfied in academic major or support area.)
HIS 401 Methods of Teaching Social Science
Select one course from each of the following areas: Afro-American Studies*
Anthropology Chicano Studies Economics Geography**
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
*Afro-American History or other course dealing with Afro-American experience in the United States.
**GEG 100-5 World Regional or GEG 140-3 World Resources suggested. These credits are to be taken as part of General Studies.
Special Education Minor
The minor in Special Education is designed to prepare teachers, physical educators, recreation therapists, counselors, and professionals in human services to work effectively with exceptional children in any educational setting. The courses listed below provide classes totaling nineteen (19) semester hours for completion of the minor. Students who wish to gain endorsement for teaching the educable mentally handicapped
(EMH) child must complete the minor, six hours of additional coursework as indicated below, and student teaching. The courses listed below are requirements for certification for students in the areas of Early Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Education. Students pursuing an endorsement must begin coursework by September 1, 1988. Mandated changes in certification requirements will go in effect after that date and may affect the current endorsement requirements.
Semester
Core Courses: Hours
EDU 340 Education and Training of the Mentally
Retarded Child...............................4
EDU 343 Field Testing Remedial Techniques in
Special Education ...........................3
EDU 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children ...3
EDU 349 Education of the Learning Disabled Child .....3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom .......3
PEH 462 Adaptive Physical Education ................._3
Total....................................................19
Additional requirements for Special Education endorsement K-12:
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional
Children.....................................3
EDU 342 Curriculum Methods and Methods for Teaching
the Mentally Retarded K-12 ..................3
EDU 449* Seminar and Student Teaching:
Special Education: Elementary
(EMH) ...........................6, 8, 10 or 12
or
EDU 479* Seminar and Student Teaching:
Special Education: Secondary (EMH) ........._6
Total hours required for Special Education Minor..........31
HSW 104 Behavior Modification is highly recommended, but is not a required course for either a minor or certification.
Check status of credit hours required for student teaching with department chair.
Bilingual-Bicultural Education Minor
The Division of Education offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education. The minor is an interdisciplinary program sponsored by Chicano Studies, the Teacher Education Department, the Modern Language Department, and the Reading Department. The principal objective of the Bilingual-Bicultural minor is to prepare future teachers who will be able to conduct all phases of classroom instruction in a bilingual and bicultural setting. In the developmental sequence, the minor will provide the potential teacher with a background of the Mexican heritage and with an understanding of present day Hispano/Chicano culture. Proficiency in the Spanish language is required of all students before they complete the minor. This proficiency will prepare the teacher to understand and further develop the native tongue of bilingual-bicultural children, while offering a second language to many other children. In addition, the minor will provide the teacher with sufficient field and academic experiences and resources in order to develop, implement, and evaluate curricular methods, techniques, and materials in the bilingual-bicultural classroom. For students who do not student teach in a bilingual-bicultural program, the Practlcum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education will be required.
Semester
Required Courses and Recommended Sequence Hours
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the American Southwest: Mexican and U.S. Periods ..3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural Education ..4
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers .... ..2
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual Classroom ...2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom . ...3
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School of Professional Studies
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials
for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom ............4
CHS* Electives...........................................3
SPA* Electives.........................................._3
Total.............................................................24
'Must be advanced courses and taken with the approval of the Bilingual advisor.
Courses Strongly Recommended in Chicano Studies and Spanish
CHS 310 Chicano Community Organization ................2
CHS 330 Education of the Chicano Child.................3
CHS 410 Seminar: Mexican and Chicano Art ..............3
SPA 322 Culture and Folklore of the Mexican
Southwest ...................................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation .........................3
SPA 312 Spanish Phonetics and Diction .................3
Required when student teaching in a bilingual-bicultural program is not completed:
EDU 452 Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education...3
Preparation Requirements
Language Proficiency: Proficiency in oral and written Spanish will be determined by a committee composed of Spanish-speaking members of the Modern Language Department, Chicano Studies, and the Center for Education. The Four Skills Exam is used as the proficiency measure. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory score on the proficiency examination will be required to take sufficient Spanish classes to enable them to pass the proficiency examination. The following courses are designed to help students meet the proficiency requirements before the completion of the
Bilingual-Bicultural minor:
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I...........................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II ............5
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I .........3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II.........3
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Education and includes the required courses listed under the Holistic Health and Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Parenting Education
The purpose of the Parenting Education minor is two-fold. First, the program is designed to provide students entering professions where they will deal with children and families with the information and skills necessary to conduct parenting education programs. Second, the program addresses a need identified in the community for people with specific preparation for the role of parent educator. Many agencies offer or are interested in offering parent education programs, yet no specific preparation for that role has been available. This minor is designed both to make the field of parent education more credible by providing students with education for that role and to give students a set of skills that are increasingly in demand, but rarely found.
This minor is seen as particularly appropriate for students entering family- and child-related fields, including (but not limited to): Education, Health Care Management, Human Services, Law Enforcement (especially juvenile justice). Nursing (and Nurse Practitioner programs), Psychology, Sociology, Social Welfare, Speech, and Womens Studies. People entering these fields might well be in a position to develop and conduct parent education programs; a minor in Parenting Education should serve them well in the employment market. Other fields, also, might provide opportunities to utilize this background; parent education happens in settings ranging from churches to industry, and is not limited to educational settings in the usual sense.
The Parenting Education minor encompasses three areas of preparation. One set of classes is intended to give students basic information necessary to effective parenting (child development, parenting techniques, family management, health care, etc.). The second facet of the program gives students the skills necessary for developing and conducting parent education programs (group techniques, program development, counseling techniques, etc.). The third component of the program entails actual field experience working in parent education programs; this experience is incorporated into a number of classes and is the central component of the final course in the minor. A field experience is required in the last semester. Placement opportunities include parent education in hospitals, social service agencies, public and private schools, and business and industry. Students work closely with a PAR advisor to ensure an appropriate field placement.
Minor in Parenting Education
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PAR 107 Introduction to Parenting Education...........3
EDU 231 Child Development
or
PSY 325 Child Psychology .............................3
PSY 295 Child Rearing ................................3
PSY 295 Principles of Counseling .....................3
or
HSW 203 Introduction to Theory and Techniques
in Interviewing and Psychotherapy ...........4
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and Experience 4
or
EDU 265 Human Relations ..............................3
PAR 207 Home and Family Management ...................3
HES 307 Parental Health Care Issues ..................3
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process 4
Field Placement: A minimum of 3 hours from the courses listed: EDU 431 is a prerequisite for any field placement in Parent Education. The program director works closely with students and community agencies in setting up appropriate field placements. Seminar in Developmental Psychology
Post Student Teaching
Professional Internship
Nursing Process: Application
Parent Education Field Placement
Minimum hours required for the minor are 27-31 (depending on courses selected). If the PAR minor is combined with a major in any of the following departments (EDU, HSW, NUR, PSY), the combined total semester hours for major and minor must be 60 hours. Such a program must include all courses required for the major and those listed here as required for the PAR minor. Approval by both departments will be necessary for such a combined program.
PSY 493
or
EDU 469
or
HSW ' 479
or
NUR 485
or
PAR 499
Note: For descriptions of other courses included in the minor, see appropriate department listings: EDU Education; HES Health Services; HSW Human Services; NUR Nursing; PSY Psychology; SOC Sociology; WMS Womens Studies
Parenting Education Program
Prerequisites: A degree (B.A., B.S., M.S., M.A.) in a field such as Education, Psychology, Social Welfare, Human Services, Child Development, or Nursing.
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School of Professional Studies
Semester
Required Courses Hourt
PAR 107 Introduction to Parenting Education..........3
PAR 207 Home and Family Management ..................3
HES 307 Parental Health Care Issues..................3
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational
Process ....................................4
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues: Child Rearing ..........3
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and
Experiences ................................4
or
HSW 465 Group Facilitation and Group Counseling .....4
PAR 499 Field Placement ............................ 4
or
Approved Electives upon consultation with an advisor
Total....................................................24
Suggested Electives
PAR 480 Special Topics in Parent Education
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence
HSW 204 Family Functioning, Dysfunction and Therapy
SOC 341 The Family in Transition
WMS 101 Women in Transition
WMS 218 Rational Assertiveness Training
EDU 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children
HSW 104 Behavior Modification
CHS 221 The Chicano Family
SWF 104 Human Behavior and the Social Environment
SWF 105 Family Social Services
SWF 301 Social Welfare Services for Children and Adolescents
AAS 355 The Black Family
Physical Education
The major in Physical Education is designed to emphasize areas for certification in elementary, secondary, and K-12 physical education levels and in alternative allied physical education fields. The alternatives to certification in Physical Education are emphasis areas in: (1) Sport and Allied Fields area of emphasis, (2) Athletic Training emphasis, (3) a department sponsored Sports Communication Multi-Major, and (4) Adult Fitness and Exercise Science.
Minors in Physical Education include emphasis areas in: Elementary Physical Education, Secondary Physical Education, Sport and Allied Fields, Coaching, Dance, Athletic Training, Adult Fitness and Exercise Science, and Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor.
Students seeking teaching credentials in Physical Education must satisfy the Teacher Education Program at MSC in addition to all of the requirements of the Department of Physical Education. Requirements for formal admission to the education programs as listed under the Teacher Education Programs section of this Bulletin must also be met. Colorado law affecting teacher certification may be changed in the period during which this Bulletin is in effect. Students should contact the Teacher Education Department for modifications.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
A. Elementary Area of Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
a. Basic Skills (All of the following):
Fundamentals of Movement......................1
Physical Fitness ..............................2
Tumbling ......................................1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following)
Volleyball.....................................2
Basketball ....................................2
Soccer/Speedball ..............................2
Football/Flag Football ........................2
Softball......................................2
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey ....................2
c. Miscellaneous (2 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance.........................2
Track and Field...............................2
Wrestling ....................................2
Advanced Lifesaving ..........................1
Racquetball and Handball ...................._2
Total Credits..............................................15
2. Additional Elementary Activity Courses
PEH 250 Activities for the Young Child.................3
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...................2
PEH 258 Movement Education............................_3
Total Credits...............................................8
3. Theory Classes (All of the following):
PEH 160 Introduction to Physical Education ............2
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise.........................3
PEH 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education and Recreation .....................3
PEH 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children .................................3
PEH 450 Psychology of Motor Learning ..................3
PEH 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education ............3
Approved electives ........................................ 3
Total Credits..............................................23
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PEH 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross.
Total Minimum Hours for Major..............................46
To obtain certification by the State of Colorado, all Elementary Physical Education teachers must also complete the following courses:
EDU 110 Elementary Education in the United States.....3
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education .............3
EDU 315 Foundations of Urban and Multicultural
Education
Laboratory ...................................2
EDU 361 Use of Media in Education .....................3
PEH 462 Adaptive Physical Education ...................3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading
Intermediate................................. 3
Total Credits..............................................17
Highly recommended, but not required:
EDU 231 Child Development .............................3
EDU 265 Human Relations ...............................3
B. Secondary Area of Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Secondary Physical Education majors must present proof of proficiency in fifteen different activities. A total of 23 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by: (1) receiving a passing grade of C or better in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
Semester
Hours
a. Basic Skills (All of the following):
Swimming......................................1
Fundamentals of Movement......................1
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School of Professional Studies
Physical Fitness....................................2
Tumbling............................................1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following):
Volleyball..........................................2
Football/Flag Football..............................2
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey...........................2
Soccer/Speedball....................................2
Softball............................................2
Basketball..........................................2
c. Individual Sports (5 of the following):
Advanced Lifesaving.................................1
Gymnastics..........................................2
Track and Field.....................................2
Tennis..............................................2
Archery and Badminton...............................2
Golf................................................2
Racquetball and Handball............................2
Personal Defense....................................2
d. Miscellaneous (3 of the following):
Square and Folk Dance...............................2
Ballroom Dancing....................................2
Wrestling...........................................2
Modern Dance (creative movement)....................2
Weight Training...................................._2
Total Credits..............................................23
2. Theory Courses (All of the following):
PEH 160 Introduction to Physical Education ............2
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
PEH 332 Biomechanics...................................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise.........................3
PEH 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education ...........................3
PEH 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education and Recreation .....................3
PEH 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education ............3
Approved electives ......................................._3
Total Credits..............................................23
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PEH 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross. Total Minimum Hours for Major..............................46
To obtain a certificate from the State of Colorado, all Secondary Physical Education majors must also complete the courses required by the Department of Teacher Education for Secondary Level Certification as listed under Secondary Level in the Education section of the catalog. The only exception to that listing is that Secondary Physical Education majors must substitute PEH 462, Adaptive Physical Education, for EDU 360.
C. K-12 Area of Emphasis in Physical Education Major
1. Professional Activities (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Students desiring K-12 Certification must be proficient in 16 different activities, selected from the categories below. A maximum of 25 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by: (1) receiving a passing grade of C or better in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
Semester
Hours
a. Basic Skills (All of the following):
Swimming........................................1
Fundamentals of Movement........................1
Physical Fitness................................2
Tumbling...............L............................1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following):
Volleyball..........................................2
Football/Flag Football.1............................2
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey...........................2
Soccer/Speedball....................................2
Softball.......................................... 2
Basketball..........................................2
c. Individual Sports (5 of the following):
Advanced Lifesaving.................................1
Gymnastics..........................................2
Track and Field.....................................2
Tennis................J.............................2
Archery and Badminton J.............................2
Golf................................................2
Racquetball and Handball............................2
Personal Defense.......J............................2
d. Miscellaneous (3 of the following):
Square and Folk Dance...............................2
Ballroom Dancing....................................2
Wrestling...........................................2
Modern Dance (creative movement)....................2
Modern Dance (improvisation, technique,
composition)..........1.............................2
Weight Training...................................._2
Total Credits..............................................25
2. Theory Classes
PEH 160 Introduction to Physical Education ............2
PEH 250 Activities for the Young Child.................3
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...................2
PEH 258 Movement Education.............................3
PEH 306 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries ......3
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
PEH 332 Biomechanics...................................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise.........................3
PEH 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education ...........................3
PEH 346 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education and Recreation......................3
PEH 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children .................................3
PEH 450 Psychology of Motor Learning ..................3
PEH 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education.............3
PEH 399* Field Experience (K-12) ......................_2
Total Credits..............................................39
Total Minimum Hours for Major..............................64
This course must be taken during the senior year in a secondary school at the level in which the student does not do student teaching.
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PEH 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross.
3. The following Teacher Education Classes are required for
Certification
EDU 110 Elementary Education in the United States ....3
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools ......................................3
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary Schools ..2
EDU 231 Child Development ............................3
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner ..................3
PEH 462 Adaptive P.E. (In lieu of EDU 360)............3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading
Intermediate..................................3
or
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading Content Areas:
Secondary.....................................3
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School of Professional Studies
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ........._3
Total..............................................23-26
Student teaching must be taken for 18 credits in a combination of elementary and secondary. In that this program enables a person to gain certification to teach physical education in both secondary and elementary school programs, the minor requirements are considered fulfilled.
Semester
D.Sport and Allied Fields Area of Emphasis Hours
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or Methods
of Teaching) (Select any 12) ...............12
PEH 160 Introduction to Physical Education ...........2
PEH 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)..................................2
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology .......................3
PEH 332 Biomechanics..................................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise........................3
PEH 362 Trends and Issues in Physical Education.......2
REC 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ...3
Approved electives .......................................13
To be Selected in accordance with students intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an advisor in PER Department and approved by the chair.
Total minimum hours for Major.............................43
E. Athletic Training Area of Emphasis
The major emphasis area is designed for those primarily interested in athletic training at the high school, college or professional level and is complimentary to allied fields, e.g., Biology.
Semester
Hours
PER 150 Physical Fitness (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching).........................2
PER 150 Weight Training (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching).........................2
PEH 206 Standard First Aid and CPR.....................2
PEH 300 School Health Programs ........................3
PEH 306 Care and Prevention of
Athletic Injuries............................3
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
PEH 332 Biomechanics...................................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise.........................3
PEH 370 Psychology of Coaching ........................2
PEH 462 Adaptive P.E...................................3
PEH 478 Advanced Techniques in Athletic
Training ....................................3
PEH 489 Internship ...................................10
HES 204 Nutrition .....................................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment ....................3
BIO 231 Human Anatomy .................................4
BIO 232 Human Physiology ............................. 4
Total Minimum Hours for Major............................53
Requirements to enter and complete program:
1. Application to be made between completion of 60 and 90 semester hours (20 semester hours minimum at MSC).
2. 2.75 cumulative GPA minimum requirement upon acceptance and to be maintained through graduation. Junior standing.
3. 1800 additional volunteer hours of work with a certified athletic trainer. Required to obtain National Athletic Training Association (NATA) certification but are not required for graduation.
4. Pass the NATA certification exam and all other requirements of NATA (not required for graduation).
F. Adult Fitness and Exercise Science Emphasis
Adult Fitness and Exercise Science is an emphasis program for those seeking an entrance into the adult fitness profession as an instructor or who have future aspirations in the exercise science field through advanced degree work in exercise physiology. For those interested and capable of pursuing an advanced graduate degree with adult fitness and exercise science as a foundation, there are careers in research, college teaching and private corporate fitness program development exercise science.
Semester
1. Professional Activity Courses: Hours
PER 150 S/M of Stress Management .....................2
PER 150 S/M of Physical Fitness.......................2
PER 150 S/M of Weight Training ......................_6
Total Credits.............................................6
2. Basic Theory Courses:
HES 204 Nutrition ....................................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology.............................3
PEH 306 Care and Prevention of Sport
Injuries ....................................3
REC 307 Health & Movement Problems in
the Aging Adult .............................3
PEH 330 Kinesiology...................................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise........................3
PEH 378 Fitness Programs for Special
Populations..................................2
PEH 466 Legal Liability Educators,
Coaches, Administrators......................3
PEH 484 Comparative Fitness Programs..................2
PEH 468 Advanced Exercise Assessment
Techniques...................................2
PEH 489 Exercise Science Internship .................10
PEH Approved Electives........................... 2
(Selected in accordance with students intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an advisor in the PER Department and approved by the chair of the PER Department.)
Total Credits.............................................39
Total Minimum Hours for Major.............................45
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Sports
Sponsored by the Department of Physical Education, Recreation and Health
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communication. It is imperative that an area of emphasis advisor be consulted. Sports Communication Multi-Majors are expected to engage in practical experiential situations in either Sports Broadcasting or Sports Journalism. At least one three-semester-hour internship in these areas must be considered the minimum. At least 50 percent of all major course work should be completed prior to the internships in Journalism.
Semester
Required Core Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and
Systems .....................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or ...............3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion .................... 3
Total.....................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and TV
Broadcasting.................................3
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing
(Prerequisite: SPE 240) .....................3
or
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production
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(Prerequisite: SPE 240) .....................3
SPE 348 Radio and TV Production Workshop
(Prerequisites: SPE 240 & 343 or 344)........3
COM 378 Communications Law ..........................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ..................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and
Newswriting .................................3
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.....................1
PER 150 (Select one two-hour PER 150 Course) ........2
PEH 370 Psychology of Coaching ......................2
REC 473 Sociology of Athletics in American
Society ................................... 3
PEH 498 Independent Study Sports Commmunication
(Must develop and research sports topics related to specific sports,
for two one-hour courses ..................._2
Total Hours...............................................28
Recommended Electives
Student must take electives in 3 different areas; 3 hours must be
in PER.
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft ...................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction..................................3
SPE 347 Evolution and Cinematics and Art .............3
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting ...........3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio and TV on Contemporary
Life ........................................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and
Copyreading .................................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News
Writing......................................3
JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing .......................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines ........3
JRN 485 News Media, Propaganda and Public
Opinion......................................3
PEH 210 Officiating...................................2
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology .......................3
PEH 332 Biomechanics..................................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise........................3
PEH 362 Trends and Issues in Physical Education.......2
PEH 372 Science and Art of Coaching and
Athletic Administration .....................2
COM 244 Writing for Radio ............................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television 3
JRN 499 Omnibus Courses (Related to Sports
Communication, i.e., Sports Writing,
Photojournalism) Select Three .............._3
Category Total.................................9
Total Minimum Hours for Major.............................43
Physical Education Minor
The Physical Education Minor Emphasis Areas are for nonphysical education majors. Programs are open to all other disciplines of study within the College. The primary objective is to provide instructional studies in a liberal arts institution in physical education, thereby enhancing one's knowledge, understanding and skillful utilization of physical education pursuits toward improving their quality of life.
Minor programs will not meet requirements for teacher certification with the State Department of Education in Colorado.
Semester
A. Elementary Area of Emphasis Hour*
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)........................4
PEH 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (or valid American Red Cross Card. If student has valid Red Cross Card, 2 hours PE electives must
be substituted) ...2
PEH 250 Activities for the Young Child ...3
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...2
PEH 258 Movement Education ...3
PEH 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education for Children ...3
PEH 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development in Physical Education 3
Total Credits.............................................20
B. Secondary Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement......................1
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................8
PEH 206 Standard First Aid and CPR (or valid American
Red Cross Card. If student has valid Red Cross Card, 2 hours PE electives must be
substituted) .................................2
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise........................3
PEH 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary P.E.............3
Approved electives (150 or above)............_3
Total Credits.............................................20
C. Sport and Allied Fields Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................6
PEH 160 Introduction to Physical Education ...........2
PEH 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation (or valid American Red Cross Card. If student has valid Red Cross Card, 2 hours PE or REC electives
must be substituted)..........................2
PEH 362 Trends and Issues in Physical Education........2
REC 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ....3
Approved electives: Selected in accordance with students intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an advisor
in PER Department........................................._7
Total Credits............................................ 22
D. Coaching Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................1
PER 150 Weight Training (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................2
PER 150 Physical Fitness (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................2
PER 150 Select from: Volleyball, Soccer, Basketball,
Softball (Skills and/or Methods of
Teaching) ....................................2
PER 150 Select from: Gymnastics, Track & Field,
Tennis, Golf, and Aquatics (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................2
PEH 306 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries ......3
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise.........................3
PEH 370 Psychology of Coaching ........................2
PEH 372 Science and Art of Coaching and Athletic
Administration ...............................2
REC 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ... 3
Total Credits..............................................25
Additional Requirement for Coaching Area of Emphasis
3 semesters of involvement in athletic participation or involvement; little league through college coaching.
PEH 332-3 is suggested as an additional course for coaching preparation.
Substitutions for Coaching Area of Emphasis
The following courses would serve as substitutes:
PEH 210 Officiating..........................................2-4
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PEH 316 Water Safety Instructor Certification .........3
REC 371 Administration of Intramural Sports
and Student Recreation .......................2
EDU 265 Human Relations ...............................3
EDU 320 Adolescent as a Learner (Elementary
Physical Education Majors only) ..............3
AAS 270 Philosophy of Black Consciousness..............3
AAS 315 Education of the Black Child ..................3
AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Prejudice.............3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children .................3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing & Strategies .........3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking ......................3
PEH 466 Legal Liability for Physical Educators,
Coaches, & Administrators.....................3
All substitutions are subject to approval of minor advisor.
E. Dance Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.......................1
PER 150 Repertory Choreography.........................2
PER 150 Improvisation and Choreography.................2
PER 150 Ballroom Dancing ..............................2
PER 150 Teaching Dance (Ballet/Jazz/Modern)............2
PEH 244 Dance Production ..............................3
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
PEH 450 Psychology of Motor Learning ..................3
Select one of the following electives:
PER 150 Rhythmic Activities for Special
Populations ..................................2
or
PEH 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...................2
or
PEH 306 Care & Prevention of Athletic
Injuries ...................................._3
Total Credits...........................................20-21
F. Athletic Training Area of Emphasis for P.E. Majors.
The minor emphasis area is designed for the elementary, secondary, and K-12 Physical Education emphasis major. The minor emphasis is basically an extension of the major emphasis designed to provide NATA certification in athletic training and
pair with certification in teacher education.
HES 204 Nutrition ......................................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment .....................3
PEH 300 School Health Programs .........................3
PEH 306 Care and Prevention of
Athletic Injuries..............................3
PEH 370 Psychology of Coaching .........................2
PEH 462 Adaptive P.E....................................3
PEH 478 Advanced Techniques in Athletic
Training ......................................3
PEH 489 Internship ....................................10
Total Credits..............................................30
Requirements to enter and complete program:
1. Completion of major in Physical Education Teacher Education Certification Program. Elementary emphasis Physical Education majors must take PEH 332 Biomechanics.
2. Application to be made between completion of 60 and 90 semester hours (20 semester hours minimum at MSC).
3. 2.75 cumulative GPA minimum requirement upon acceptance and maintained through graduation.
4. 1800 additional volunteer hours work with a certified athletic trainer. Required to obtain NATA certification but are not necessary for graduation.
5. Pass the NATA certification exam and all other requirements of NATA. Not required for graduation.
G. Adult Fitness and Exercise Science Emphasis
HES 204 Nutrition ......................................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology...............................3
REC 307 Health & Movement Problems
in the Aging Adult .........................3
PEH 378 Fitness Programs for Special
Populations ................................2
PEH 399 Exercise Science Field Experience .........1-2
PEH 484 Comparative Fitness Programs.................2
PEH 468 Advanced Exercise Assessment
Techniques..................................2
PEH Electives (select based on
Exercise Science needs).................... 3
Total Credits.......................................19-20
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Physical Education and Recreation and includes the required courses listed under the Holistic Health and Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Recreation
The major in Recreation is intended to prepare students to enter recreation-related jobs that are available at both local and national levels. The major consists of a common core of courses deemed essential for all recreation personnel and emphasizes field work with various types of recreation, parks, conservation, and other social service agencies.
In conjunction with the core course selections, the student will select one area of emphasis. The areas of emphasis provide the student with specialized knowledge and skills related to particular job functions provided by the various recreation-related service agencies. The areas of emphasis from which the student may select are:
1. Therapeutic Recreation Services
2. Recreation and Park Administration
In summary, Recreation majors have the following degree
requirements or options:
A. Core Courses.....................................18 hours
B. Emphasis Area..........................................27
C. Internship (Required for state registration)...........12
Total...............................................57 hours
The selection of course work will be approved by the chair of the department.
For students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Recreation, the following courses are highly recommended for basic studies:
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ...................3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology ..................3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ..................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ...........3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ........3
Sciences (Human-Animal-Plant-Earth) to be selected with advisor approval........................................6-8
Recreation Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for All Students semester
A. Core Courses (18 hours) Hours
REC 187 Introduction to Recreation and
Leisure Services ...........................2
REC 211 Leadership Techniques in Leisure
Services ...................................3
REC 235 Leisure Education & Recreation
for Special Populations ....................3
PEH 346 Evaluation & Measurement in Physical
Education and Recreation ...................3
REC 387 Recreation Internship Seminar................1
REC 411 Recreation Program Construction
& Control Processes ........................3
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REC 413 Administration of Recreation &
Leisure Resources ........................._3
Total Credits............................................18
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PEH 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
B. Emphasis Area (27 hours)
Students will be required to select one of two areas of special emphasis courses designed to provide the student with high degree of specialization in a chosen area of interest. These emphasis areas consist of 27 hours of course work offered by the department and other disciplines within the College.
C. Internship
REC 489 Recreation Internship ........................12 hours
This practical learning experience is designed primarily to help students make the transition from the classroom to the practical situation. Opportunity is provided for students to assume normal responsibilities involved in the delivery of services commensurate with degree emphasis. This experience is also required for state registration.
Total hours..................................................57
Areas of Emphasis
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services (select 27 hours)
Select six hours from the Skills and/or Methods of Teaching (S/M/T) classes listed below. Students may also substitute PEH 480 omnibus (activity related) courses as approved by their
advisor and chair of the department.
PER 150 S/M/T Activity and Fitness Programs for
the Elderly...................................2
PER 150 S/M/T Rhythmic Activities for
Special Populations ..........................2
PER 150 S/M/T Camping for Special Populations..........2
PER 150 S/M/T Sports Programs for Special
Populations ................................._2
Total Credits...............................................6
Theory Courses:
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ........................3
REC 333 Introduction to Therapeutic
Recreation Services...........................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise.........................3
REC 337 Group Leadership in Therapeutic
Recreation....................................3
REC 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim ..............2
REC 437 Techniques in Therapeutic
Recreation................................... 3
Total Credits..............................................17
Electives Select four hours from the following:
PER 150 Stress Management .............................2
REC 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts ....................2
PEH 380 Fitness Programs for Special
Populations ..................................2
REC 463 Recreation Programs for the
Elderly ....................................._3
Total Credits...............................................4
Total Hours Required for Emphasis..........................27
Total Hours Required for Core..............................18
Total Hours Required.......................................45
NOTE: Areas of study recommended for minor for students with a Therapeutic emphasis of study include: Physical Disabilities; Psychiatric Disorders; Corrections, Drug and Alcohol; Special Education; Early Childhood Development; and Gerontology. Consult with advisor in Recreation.
B. Recreation and Park Administration (select 27 hours)
PER 150 S/M of Teaching Physical Education
(Select six hours from 150 series)...........6
REC 215 Maintenance of Recreation
Facilities & Equipment.......................3
REC 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation ....................3
REC 383 Open Space & Leisure Resource
Development..................................3
REC 455 Management of Aquatic Resources ...................3
REC 481 Grants and Financial Aid Programs
in Recreation................................3
Electives Select six hours from the following:
MGT 300 Principles of Management...........................3
MGT 353 Personnel Management...............................3
MKT 330 Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations .............3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ................ 3
Total Hours Required for Emphasis.........................27
Total Hours Required for Core.............................18
Total Hours Required......................................45
Recreation Minor
The Recreation Minor Emphasis Areas are for non-Recreation majors, but are open to all other disciplines of study within the College. The primary objective is to provide instructional studies in a liberal arts institution in leisure studies and resource development thereby enhancing ones knowledge, understanding and skillful utilization of recreational pursuits toward improving their quality of life.
A. Recreation Administration Area of Emphasis
REC 211 Leadership Techniques in Leisure
Service ....................................3
REC 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities
and Equipment ..............................3
REC 383 Open Space & Leisure Resource
Development.................................3
REC 411 Recreation Program Construction and
Control Processes ....,.....................3
REC 413 Administration of Recreation and Leisure
Resources ..................................3
REC 455 Management of Aquatic Resources ..............3
REC 465 Urban Recreation Program Services ............3
REC 481 Grants and Financial Aid Programs in
Recreation................................._3
Total Hours Required....................................24
B. Therapeutic Recreation Area of Emphasis
PER 150 S/M/T Physical Education and
Recreation Activities.......................4
(Select in consultation with departmental advisor.)
Select four hours from the following:
PER 150 S/M/T Rhythmic Activities for Special
Populations ..................................2
PER 150 S/M/T Camping for Special Populations..........2
PER 150 S/M/T Sports Programs for Special
Populations ..................................2
PER 150 S/M/T Fitness Programs for the Elderly........_2
Total Credits...............................................4
REC 235 Leisure Education & Recreation for
Special Populations ..........................3
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PEH REC 330 333 Anatomical Kinesiology Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services 3 3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise 3
REC 337 Group Leadership in Therapeutic Recreation 3
REC 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim REC 437 Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation Total Hours Required 2 3 24
C. General Recreation Area of Emphasis
PER 150 S/M/T Physical Education and Recreation Activities (Select 4 hours in consultation
with advisor)................................4
REC 187 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure
Services ....................................2
REC 211 Leadership Techniques in Leisure
Services ....................................3
REC 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities
and Equipment ...............................3
REC 235 Leisure Education & Recreation for
Special Populations..........................3
REC 341 Camp and Outdoor Recreation ..................2
REC 411 Recreation Program Construction &
Control Processes ...........................3
REC 413 Administration of Recreation & Leisure
Resources .................................. 3
Total Hours Required......................................23
D. Aquatic Recreation Area of Emphasis
PER 150 S/M/T Physical Education and
Recreation Activities.......................6
Select six hours from the following:
PER 150 S/M/T Swimming...........................2
PER 150 S/M/T Advanced Life Saving ..............2
PER 150 S/M/T Competitive Swimming & Diving .....2
PER 150 S/M/T Synchronized Swimming .............2
PER 150 S/M/T Water Polo ......................._2
Total Credits........................................6
REC 187 Introduction to Recreation and
Leisure Services ...........................2
REC 215 Maintenance of Recreation Facilities
and Equipment ..............................3
PEH 316 Water Safety Instructor .................3
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology ..................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise...................3
REC 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim ........2
REC 455 Management of Aquatic Resources........._3
Total Hours Required....................................25
E. Gerontology Activity Specialist Area of Emphasis
PER 150 S/M/T Physical Education and Recreation
Activity Courses.............................6
Select six hours from the following:
PER 150 S/M/T Activity & Fitness Program for
the Elderly ...................................2
PER 150 S/M/T Camping for Special Populations ...........2
PER 150 S/M/T Sports Programs for Special
Populations ...................................2
PER 150 Rhythmic Activities for Special
Populations .................................._2
Total Credits.................................................6
REC 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts .................2
REC 233 Advocacy and Social Action Program
for the Aged .............................3
REC 307 Health & Movement Problems in the
Aging Adult ...............................3
PEH 330 Anatomical Kinesiology .....................3
PEH 334 Physiology of Exercise......................3
REC 463 Recreation Programs for the Elderly ......._3
Total Hours Required...................................23
NOTE: Minor programs will not meet requirements for professional registration with the Colorado Parks and Recreation Society or the National Recreation and Park Association or the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification.
Health and Safety Education
Minor in Health and Safety
The emphasis in Health Education is intended to prepare students to teach Health Education at either the secondary, elementary, or both levels. This is an excellent area of emphasis for the student who is obtaining a teaching major in another area or for those nurses who are interested in the area of School Health Nurse.
Health Education Area of Emphasis
CJC 351 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues
and Treatment ..............................3
PEH 202 Community Health ............................3
HES 204 Nutrition ...................................3
PEH 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation ..............................2
PEH 300 School Health Programs ......................3
PEH 391 Safety Education ............................3
PSY 325 Child Psychology or
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence..................._3
Total..................................................20
Reading
The Reading Department offers reading improvement courses for all students and a reading minor for early childhood, elementary and secondary education majors.
The reading improvement courses emphasize development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. A well-equipped Reading Laboratory is used to reinforce classroom instruction. The Reading Laboratory contains materials for use in improving comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills as well as machines for improving reading speed. Any student may use the Laboratory. Students enrolled in the reading improvement courses work on areas identified by a diagnostic reading test administered in each class at the beginning of the semester. Many colleges and universities have used the MSC Laboratory as a model in establishing their reading programs.
The reading minor is designed to produce well-trained classroom teachers. In the sophomore and junior years, students take course work in methods and techniques of teaching reading and receive supervised experience teaching groups of children in a school classroom setting.
In the senior year, students learn to administer a complete reading diagnosis, write a comprehensive case report based on the study of current remedial theory, develop materials for students with reading difficulties, and work in the reading clinic on a one-to-one basis with children who have severe reading problems.
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Reading Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hour
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Primary ......3
RDG 310* Preparing the Young Child to Read ...........3
RDG 313* Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate ..3
RDG 360 Practicum in Teaching Reading ................3
RDG 425 Remedial Reading Theories and Diagnosis ......4
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials .............2
RDG 460 Practicum in Teaching Remedial Reading ......_3
Total..................................................18
Highly Recommended
RDG 328 Reading in the Content Areas ...............
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers .. RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom
(competency in Spanish required)..........3
Early Childhood Education majors take RDG 310; Elementary Education majors take RDG 313.
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Division of Technology
The Division of Technology provides technical education to prepare graduates for employment in a wide variety of technical fields. Instruction emphasizes the development of technical competence at a level suitable for success in the various areas offered. The programs include courses in Humanities and Social Sciences to broaden the students general education. The various fields housed in this Division offer great opportunities for women, due to their demonstrated ability in technical areas and the demands on the part of industry for women with technological skills.
The Division of Technology offers degree programs in Aviation Management and Professional Pilot; Civil Engineering Technology and Surveying, Electrical Engineering Technology; Industrial Technology, Technical and Industrial Administration and Industrial Design; Mechanical Engineering Technology; and Technical Communications. Contract Majors are available in Industrial Marketing and Technical Management.
Department of Aerospace Science
Colorado is one of the nations aerospace centers. Military installations, major aerospace industries, increased interest in private and corporation flying, and the airlines that serve Denver provide employment opportunities. Local Federal Aviation Administration and other government offices offer excellent sources for information. Because of this proximity, students also have the opportunity to visit these facilities and to take courses that are taught by personnel from the various organizations. The baccalaureate degree programs described below have been carefully planned to meet the needs of both the student and of industry. All of the technical courses have been developed in cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration and prospective employers; students completing them are eligible to take a variety of FAA examinations leading to certification.
The Aviation Management program prepares the graduate to enter a wide variety of administrative positions within the various segments of the aviation industry.
The Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) courses are not offered by Metropolitan State College. However, students holding a valid FAA Airframe and Powerplant certificate may apply for 30 hours of credit to apply toward a BS degree providing certain validation papers are presented with the application.
All programs in the Department of Aerospace Science have been developed to meet the College Aviation Accreditation Guidelines of the University Aviation Association.
The Airway Science emphasis is an approved FAA Program. Upon completion of the requirements, which include the Systems Management Minor, a student can be registered with the FAA Airway Science Directory in Washington, D.C. As new employees are needed in a variety of FAA related positions, they may be contacted through this directory. Students majoring in any of the Airway Science emphases must minor in Systems Management.
Bachelor of Science
The Department of Aerospace Science offers baccalaureate degree programs with majors in the following areas:
Aviation Management (AMG)
General Aviation Emphasis
Airway Science Management Emphasis
Aviation Maintenance Emphasis
Airway Science Maintenance Management
Emphasis
Professional Pilot (PPT)
General Aviation Emphasis
Flight Engineer Emphasis
Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management
Emphasis
Minors
Aviation Management (AMG)
Professional Pilot (PPT)
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics (APL)
These programs combine a thorough, practical and technical training background with a general college education to prepare a graduate for a wide variety of careers in the aerospace industry. These four-year baccalaureate degree programs have been developed upon the two-plus-two concept (a B.S. degree program built upon a AAS two-year degree). This concept makes it extremely easy for a community/junior college graduate in an aerospace program to transfer to MSC and earn a Bachelor of Science degree in our aviation program. In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree, the student must comply with the Colleges general requirements for the Bachelor's degree listed in this Bulletin under Requirements for All Degrees
FAA Approved Ground School
MSC Aerospace Science Department is a fully certified and approved Ground School for the Private, Instrument and Commercial FAA Ratings, approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Veterans Administration flight students should see the Aerospace Science Department Chair for information on approved flight training program.
Flight Courses
Flight training is contracted for, by the student, with the flight training schools under contract with MSC. In order to enroll in all flight courses and receive credit, the student must fly with MSCs contract flight schools.
The cost of the flight training is in addition to regular tuition and college services fees. This cost will vary depending upon how frequently the student is able to fly during the semester and how much total time the student requires to gain the necessary proficiency. The College instructor helps the student achieve an understanding of the relationship of flight theory to flight practice in order to acquire the knowledge required to meet FAA certification standards. Flights are scheduled by the student with the contract flight training school. All flight training normally must be completed during the appropriate academic semester to receive credit for the course during that period.
Credit by Examination Procedures
The basic provision for obtaining credit-by-examination (a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit) is outlined in this Bulletin under Academic Information. The following procedures are established by the Department of Aerospace Science to implement this provision:
1. A student entering MSC for the first time must make application for credit by examination during the first three weeks of the first semester. All examinations must be completed within the first semester.
2. A student will not be approved to take a course of a lower number than any course she or he has taken previously.
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School of Professional Studies
3. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course, the examination for the lower numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester.
4. No examinations will be graded during the summer session.
5. Courses authorized for credit by examination and the appropriate FAA license and/or rating are listed below:
Hours
Course Title FAA Required Credit
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals Private 3
AES 135 Air Navigation I Private 3
AES 150 Private Flight Private 2
AES 236 Instrument Ground Instrument 3
AES 250 Commercial Instrument
Flight I Commercial 2
AES 251 Commercial Instrument
Flight II Commercial 2
AES 352 Commercial Instrument
Flight III Commercial 2
AES 336 Commercial Ground Commercial 3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and
Propulsion Fit. Engineer 3
AES 403 Aerodynamics Fit. Engineer 3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance Fit. Engineer 3
AES 450 Flight Multi-Engine Multi-Engine 1
AES 451 Flight Instructor Fit. Instructor 1
AES 452 Flight Instructor-Instrument Fit. Instructor 1
AES 453 Fit. Instructor-Multi-Engine Fit. Inst. Multi 1
AES 455 Flight Helicopter Helicopter 1
AES 457 Airline Transport Piiot ATP Rating 1
Bachelor of Science Degree in Aerospace Science Programs
A summary of the course program and semester hours which a student must complete for a Bachelor of Science degree is as follows:
Semester
Hours
General Studies......................................37-39
Major (Select One)...................................49-59
Aviation Management General Aviation
or Airway Science Management....................49
Aviation Maintenance
or Airway Science Maintenance Management*.......59
Professional Pilot
General Aviation*...............................51
Flight Engineer**...............................59
or Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management**
Minor (Select One)**.................................18-36
Business Minor/Meteorology
Average Semester Hours of Minor.....................20
Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Minor***..............36
Free Electives........................................0-16
Total..............................................120-124
A recommended sequence for taking all courses in a selected major or minor and a list of required general studies may be obtained from the Department of Aerospace Science.
General Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in aerospace science programs must complete the following general studies requirements:
Freshman Composition..................................6
(ENG 101 and 102)
Career................................................6
BEC 200-3 Business Communications (Check with Dean, School of Business
for status of this course) or
COM 261-3 Introduction to Technical Writing
Plus, select a minimum of 3 hours from the following courses: CMS 201-3 Principles of Information Systems ACC 201-3 Principles of Accounting I****
CJC 201-3 Introduction to Private Security
Humanities................................................8
SPE 101-3 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Select one of the following courses:
SPE 211-3 Discussion Methods
SPE 301-3 Advanced Public Speaking
SPE 310-3 Business and Professional Speaking
SPE 311-3 Conference Leadership
Approved Elective.....................................2
Science and/or Mathematics.........................8-10
Mathematics......................................3-5
Select One of the Following Options:
1. MTH 101-2 Beginning Algebra MTH 102-1 Beginning Geometry MTH 103-1 Triangle Trigonometry MTH 104-1 Elementary Mathematics for Business and Economics 2.. MTH 110-4 Intermediate Algebra MTH 103-1 Triangle Trigonometry
3. MTH 111-4 College Algebra MTH 103-1 Triangle Trigonometry
4. MTH 112-3 College Trigonometry
5. MTH 131-4 Finite Mathematics for the
Management and Social Sciences
PHY 125 Physics of Technology 1.........................5
Social and/or Behavioral Science............................9
ECO 201-3 Principles of Economics Macro****
ECO 202-3 Principles of Economics Micro* *
PSY 101-3 Introduction to Psychology
Total................................................. 37-39
*AII Professional Pilot majors must possess a minimum of the FAA Private, Instrument and Commercial Ratings to receive a Bachelor of Science degree.
* 'Students choosing a major in any of the Airway Science emphases must minor in Systems Management. Other majors may minor in any area of the School of Business, A&P, Meteorology or as approved by the Aerospace Science Department.
""The credit hours awarded are based on the number of clock hours required by the Federal Aviation Administration for the award of the A&P license and the credits normally awarded by junior/community colleges, thus the increased number of hours for the Aviation Maintenance emphasis major or A&P minor.
""Required for all Aerospace Science majors who minor in Business.
Aviation Management (AMG)
Major for Bachelor of Science
General Aviation Emphasis or Airway Science Management Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals.........................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I .............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ........................2
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments
and Navigation...j...........................2
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load
Planning ....................................3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and
Propulsion ..................................3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and
Regulations .................................3
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School of Professional Studies
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk
Management ................................3
AES 323 Commuter Airline
Management ................................3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations ...............3
AES 386 Aviation Safety.............................3
AES 420 Airport Planning............................3
AES 421 Airport Management .........................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing .............:......3
AES 424 Air Cargo...................................3
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems.................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting ........................ 3
Total..................................................49
Suggested Electives
AES 205 Aviation History and Future
Development................................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ............3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations ..........3
AES 360 Space Flight................................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology
of Flight .................................3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation ............3
AES 403 Aerodynamics ...............................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance .......................3
Aviation Maintenance Area of Emphasis
Students who wish to enroll in the Aviation Management major with the Aviation Maintenance area of emphasis should complete an A&P program prior to or while attending MSC.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
A&P FAA Certificate ....................................30
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation .......2
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations..........3
AES 322 Aviation Law and
Risk Management ............................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology ...............3
AES 386 Aviation Safety.............................3
AES 420 Airport Planning............................3
AES 421 Airport Management .........................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing .................3
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems..................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting ........................._3
Total...................................................59
Suggested Electives
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning..............3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management .................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management .............3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations ...........3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations ................3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation .............3
AES 403 Aerodynamics ................................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance ........................3
Professional Pilot (PPT)
Major for Bachelor of Science General Aviation Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals .......................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I ............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .......................2
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation ........2
AES 236 Instrument Ground ...........................3
AES 270 Simulator Cross Country Flight...............2
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion ............3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations..........3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management ................3
AES 336 Commercial Ground ..........................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations ..........3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations ...............3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology
of Flight ..................................3
AES 386 Aviation Safety.............................3
AES 403 Aerodynamics ...............................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance .......................3
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems.................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting ......................... 3
Total...................................................51
Suggested Electives
AES 205 Aviation History and Future
Development ................................3
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning.............3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management............3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management .............3
AES 360 Space Flight ................................3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation .............3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ..................3
AES 424 Air Cargo....................................3
Flight Engineer or Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management Area of Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals ........................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I .............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ........................2
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation .........2
AES 236 Instrument Ground ............................3
AES 270 Simulator-Cross Country Flight................2
AES 300* Aircraft Systems and Propulsion .............3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations............3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management ..................3
AES 336 Commercial Ground ............................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations ............3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations .................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology
of Flight ..................................3
AES 386 Aviation Safety...............................3
AES 403* Aerodynamics ................................3
AES 404* Aircraft Performance ........................3
AES 413* Flight Engineer Duties and
Responsibilities............................4
AES 414* B-727 Systems................................4
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems...................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting ........................._3
Total....................................................59
*ln order to comply with the requirements for the FAA Flight Engineers written examination, these courses must be scheduled within a concentrated time period and with a minimum number of clock hours.
The Flight Engineer's program should be taken during the students senior year.
Suggested Electives
AES 205 Aviation History ..........................3
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning............3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management...........3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ...........3
AES 360 Space Flight ..............................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ................3
AES 424 Air Cargo..................................3
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School of Professional Studies
Minors
The following aerospace minors are designed primarily to afford majors in other areas within the College with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the aerospace world and sufficient familiarity with aviation skills to use in furtherance of their primary job. Aerospace majors normally may not elect the aviation management or professional pilot minors.
Aviation Management Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals .....................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I ..........................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .....................2
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations.........3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management.........._3
Total...................................................14
Plus nine hours selected from the following courses:
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion ...........3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management ...............3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ...........3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight ....3
AES 386 Aviation Safety............................3
AES 420 Airport Planning...........................3
AES 421 Airport Management ........................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ................3
AES 424 Air Cargo..................................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and
Job Targeting ..............................3
Total...................................................j9
Total...................................................23
Professional Pilot Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals......................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I ..........................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .....................2
AES 236 Instrument Ground .........................3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion ...........3
AES 336 Commercial Ground .........................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations .........3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight ....3
AES 386 Aviation Safety..........................._3
Total...................................................26
In addition, all Professional Pilot minors must possess, as a minimum, FAA Private, Commercial, and Instrument Ratings.
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics Minor
Students who wish to enroll in the Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Mechanics Minor should complete an A&P program prior to or while attending MSC.
Required Courses
Completion of an FAA approved A&P Program with appropriate
college credit (usual semester hours awarded)...............30
Plus:
AES 386 Aviation Safety...............................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing .................._3
Total.......................................................36
Air Force ROTC Program
Students may register and receive credit at Metropolitan State College for Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The Air Force Department of Aerospace Studies offers two Air Force ROTC
programs leading to a commission in the active Air Force upon earning a baccalaureate degree.
Four-Year Program. The four-year program consists of the General Military Course (GMC) and the Professional Officer Course (POC). Emphasis is focused upon basic leadership qualities and preparation for the Air Force while enrolled in a baccalaureate degree program. Upon completion of the GMC, students attend a four-week field training camp at an air force base. Field training is designed to encourage leadership development and to introduce students to the active Air Force environment. The POC taken during the last two years prepares students for active duty through practical experiences as a cadet officer. In this phase, students will concentrate on advanced leadership training in final preparation for an Air Force commission. Four-year programs are available to students with a minimum of 8 semesters remaining at Metropolitan State College. Application for these programs should be made after consultation with the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado.
Two-Year Program. The two-year program consists of the Professional Officer Course (POC) and a six-week field training camp. Students with two years of full-time college remaining at the undergraduate, graduate level, or both, are eligible to apply. Once selected, students must successfully complete the six-week field training which includes 60 hours of academic study in addition to the regular curriculum of the four-week camp. The POC phase is identical to that explained in the four-year program.
Students should contact the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado, for specific requirements and options available based on each students status at the time of program entry. Students who are veterans of military service have participated in Junior ROTC, Civil Air Patrol or similar organizations may have a portion or all of the GMC waived by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. Applications are accepted between November 1 and March 15.
Flight Training: Expense-paid ground school and flight training are open to cadets approved and qualified for future USAF pilot training.
Air Force College Scholarship Program: Students participating in Air Force ROTC may be eligible to compete for Air Force ROTC College Scholarships. Students selected for this program are placed on grants that pay tuition, book costs, nonrefundable education fees, and subsistence of $100 per month, tax free. All cadets enrolled in the Professional Officer Course receive $100 per month during the regular academic year. Students are also eligible to compete for two-, three-, or four-year scholarships open to both men and women.
For further information, contact:
Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies Air Force ROTC Detachment 105 Folsom Stadium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80309 Telephone: 492-8351
Program of Study
Four-Year Program
The following courses are required during the first two years:
Semester
Hours
AFR 103 Development of Air Power I ....................1
AFR 104 Development of Air Power II ...................1
AFR 203 U. S. Military Forces I .......................1
AFR 204 U. S. Military Forces II ......................1
The following courses are required during the last two years of the program:
AFR 301 USAF Management and Leadership I ...................3
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School of Professional Studies
AFR 302 USAF Management and Leadership II ........3
AFR 401 National Security Forces I ..................3
AFR 402 National Security Forces II .................3
Two-Year Program
Veterans of military service, reservists, students with Junior ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, or equivalent experience, may be allowed advanced placement for all or a portion of the first two years. Students who successfully complete the six-week summer camp are allowed to enroll in the program at the 300 course level. ALL students must complete the courses listed under the second paragraph of the four-year program above.
Supplemental Courses and Language Requirements
All AFROTC scholarship students in the General Military Course must successfully complete a course in English composition before they can advance to the Professional Officer Course. All AFROTC scholarship students must also successfully complete a course in an Indo-European or Asian language prior to commissioning. All Professional Officer Course students must successfully complete a course in mathematical reasoning prior to commissioning.
Army ROTC Program
Students may enroll in Army ROTC classes available on campus in the Department of Military Science. For further details and program offerings, refer to the Military Science section of this Bulletin.
Civil Engineering Technology
The specialized fields within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology include programs in Civil Engineering Technology, Drafting, and Surveying. The Surveying program is a separate, specialized four-year program. The individual curriculum requirements are listed separately.
Civil Engineering Technology graduates apply engineering principles in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroads, bridges, reservoirs, dams, irrigation works, water systems, airports, and other structures. In planning for a construction project, they may participate in estimating costs, preparing specifications for materials, and participate in surveying, drafting, and design work. During the construction phase, they work closely with the contractor and the superintendent in scheduling field layout, construction activities and the inspection of the work for conformity to specifications. In recent years, a major work area for Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology relates specifically to environmental problems. This includes design and construction of water supply facilities, design of waste-water collection and treatment facilities, design of air pollution control facilities, and design of solid and toxic waste disposal facilities. The development of environmental impact studies and environmental impact reports are also included in this area.
Following are the curriculum requirements for the various degrees, minors, and areas of emphasis.
Civil Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science
The 4-year Bachelor of Science is awarded upon the completion of the required courses and either a structures, environmental or surveying area of emphasis or an approved minor.
This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) which was formerly the Engineers Council for Professional Development (ECPD).
Semester
Required Technical Studies Hours
CEN 110 Civil Technology............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II .......................3
CEN 210 Structural Drawing..........................3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ......................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry........................2
SUR 151 Surveying I ................................3
SUR 252 Surveying II ...............................3
CEN 310 Construction Methods........................3
CEN 312 Engineering Economy.........................3
CEN 313 Mechanics of Materials .....................3
CEN 314 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory.........1
CEN 316 Mechanics II Dynamics.....................3
CEN 317 Introduction to Structural Analysis ........3
CEN 318 Fluid Mechanics I ..........................3
CEN 319 Fluid Mechanics II .........................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing...........3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I ...........................3
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN...............4
Approved Technical Electives (CEN)......................._6
Subtotal.................................................61
Additional Course Requirements
Chemistry ................................................5
ENG 101 & 102 English Composition.....................6
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro.............3
or
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro
MTH 111 College Algebra ............................4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry .......................3
MTH 141 Calculus I .................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II ................................4
PHY 231 & 232 General Physics l/General Physics Lab I
or
PHY 201 College Physics I...........................5
PHY 233 & 234 General Physics ll/General Physics Lab II
or
PHY 202 College Physics II..........................5
Social/Behavioral Electives ..............................6
Humanities Electives....................................._9
Subtofa/.................................................54
A Minor or Area of Emphasis 18 (minimum).................18
Total...................................................133
Environmental Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment .................3
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal...........3
CEN 332 Environmental Impact Statements.............3
CEN 430 Environmental Technology....................3
CEN 431 Environmental Technology Practices..........3
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology................_3
Total....................................................18
Structures Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
CEN 410 Structural Design ..........................3
CEN 411 Steel Design................................3
CEN 412 Concrete Design I ..........................3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics.............................3
CEN 414 Concrete Design II .........................3
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment .................3
or
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal ..........3
or
CEN 430 Environmental Technology ...................3
or
CEN 431 Environmental Technology Practices........._3
Total....................................................18
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School of Professional Studies
Engineering and Land Surveying Area of Emphasis
Required Technical Studies
SUR 262 Survey Drafting ...........................3
SUR 253 Route Surveying ...........................3
SUR 354 Boundary Law I ............................3
SUR 454 Boundary Law II............................3
SUR 453 Site Planning..............................3
Surveying Elective .......................3^4
Total..............................................18 or 19
Control Surveying and Mapping Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
SUR 262 Survey Drafting ...........................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I ..........................3
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys.......................3
SUR 345 Electronic Instrumentation for Surveying ..3
SUR 474 Geodetic and Special Surveys ...............4
SUR 453 Site Planning.............................._3
Total....................................................19
Minor in Civil Engineering Technology Required Technical Studies
CEN 110 Civil Technology............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........................3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics ......................3
SUR 251 Surveying I ................................3
CEN 310 Construction Methods........................3
Approved Lower-Division Technical Elective ...............3
Approved Upper-Division Technical Elective .............._3
Total....................................................21
Minor in Drafting Engineering Technology Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II .......................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry........................2
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing ......................3
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing .................3
Approved Lower-Division Technical Elective ...............3
Approved Upper-Division Technical Elective..............._3
Total....................................................20
Surveying
The Bachelor of Science in Surveying is designed to provide basic theoretical training with practical applications for a career in surveying and mapping. The intent of this curriculum is to familiarize the student with modern field, computational mapping and legal procedures used in routine and specialized surveying services. The program is flexible, allowing a course of study that fulfills the objectives of the student, while insuring a sound surveying education.
Surveying Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Technical Studies Hours
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........................3
SUR 151 Surveying I ................................3
SUR 252 Surveying II ...............................3
SUR 253 Route Surveying ............................3
SUR 262 Survey Drafting ............................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I ...........................3
SUR 271 Astronomy for Surveyors ....................2
SUR 345 Electronic Instrumentation for Surveying ...3
SUR 354 Boundary Law I..............................3
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys........................3
SUR 376 Surveying Data Adjustments..................3
SUR 448 Geodesy .....................................3
SUR 453 Site Planning................................3
SUR 454 Boundary Law II..............................3
SUR 465 Photogrammetry II ...........................3
SUR 474 Geodetic and Special Surveys ................4
GEL 101 General Geology..............................4
GEG 484 Remote Sensing of the Environment .........._3
Subtotal............................................... 55
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition ...................6
MTH 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics ....................4
PHY 231 & 232 General Physics I/
General Physics Lab I......................5
PHY 233 & 234 General Physics II/
General Physics Lab II.....................5
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ........3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing............3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.....................3
Social/Behavioral Electives .............................9
Humanities Electives...................................._6
Subtotal....................1...........................44
Approved Technical Electives.............................7
Required Math Minor
MTH 141 Calculus I ..................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN................4
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra J.............................2
MTH 241 Calculus II .................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ..................4
Approved Math Elective ............................(min.) 2
Subtotal................................................20
Total..................................................129
Minor in Surveying Required Technical Studies
SUR 151 Surveying I .................................3
SUR 252 Surveying II ................................3
SUR 262 Survey Drafting .............................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I.............................3
SUR 271 Astronomy for Surveyors .....................2
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys.........................3
SUR 465 Photogrammetry II..........................._3
Total...................................................20
Electronics Engineering Technology
Electronics Engineering Technology graduates possess some of the "know-why of the engineer and some of the know-how" of the technician.
Graduates are employed in a variety of positions as technologists working in some of the following functional areas:
Research and Development
Technical activities in research and development are primarily directed towards obtaining new information and new knowledge of the field. The engineering technologist is a member of the research team. This specific work may involve the development and construction of prototypes, test and evaluation of equipment, or other activities necessary to render technical support to a research project.
Electronic Manufacturing
A graduate employed in a manufacturing facility might be involved in actual manufacturing, fabrication, test, prototype development, calibration, and quality control. In some cases, students may also become heavily involved in sales engineering.
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School ol Professional Studies
Manufacturing Plants
In all other areas of industry, the rapid advancement of sophisticated electronic instrumentation is opening vast fields for the engineering technology graduates. Practically all on-line control processes are electronically directed. In this area, technical, as well as personnel supervisory positions are available to the engineering technologist.
Services
Service engineering has become a field of its own. This area involves extensive activities in the fields of computers, communications, instrumentation, new product development, and numerous other activities involving electrical and electronic systems.
Design
Some technologists design electronic equipment and systems, where the design is application oriented.
The EET curriculum provides a foundation in mathematics and science as well as a thorough treatment of the characteristics of electric circuits and electronic devices. In this four-year program, specialization may be achieved by selection of an area of emphasis in computers, communications (including satellite, fiber optics, microwave, and laser), control systems (including robotics) and power (including solar energy).
Electronics Engineering Technology
Major for Bachelor of Science
Because the program emphasizes applications of theory, students are required to take concurrent laboratory courses. In the EET 100 and EET 200 series of courses, students who drop or change to No Credit in the theory/laboratory course must make the same change in the companion laboratory/theory course.
The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded upon completion of the courses listed below. Students should contact the department for recent changes to this major.
Semester
Required Technical Courses Hours
EET 110 Circuits I ....................................4
EET 111 Circuits Lab I ................................1
EET 112 Circuits II ...................................4
EET 113 Circuits Lab II................................2
EET 210 Electronics I .................................4
EET 211 Electronics Lab I .............................1
EET 212 Electronics II ................................3
EET 213 Electronics Lab II ............................2
EET 232 Digital Circuits I ............................3
EET 234 Technical Programming Applications ............2
EET 311 Advanced Circuits I ...........................4
EET 312 Advanced Circuits II ..........................4
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ...........................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors................3
EET 362 Communication I................................3
EET 371 Automatic Control Systems I ...................3
EET 410 Senior Project I ..............................1
EET 411 Senior Project II .............................2
CEN 200 Statics and Dynamics ..........................4
Upper-Division EET Electives .............................._8
Subtotal...................................................61
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102 English Composition ...........................6
MTH 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics ......................4
(MTH 111 and MTH 112 may be substituted)
MTH 141 Calculus I ....................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II ...................................4
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
PHY 202 College Physics II...........................5
CSI 110 Computer Science I ..........................3
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry I .........................5
COM 261 Introduction to Technical
Writing.....................................3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communications .......3
Humanities Electives......................................5
Social/Behavioral Science Electives......................ji
Subtotal.................................................55
Minor or EET Area of Emphasis.....................(min.) 18
(An area of Emphasis is recommended; minor must be approved by EET Chair).
Subtotal.................................................73
Total.............................................(min.) 134
Communications Area of Emphasis
Semester
Required EET Courses Hours
EET 331 Pulse Circuits...............................3
EET 363 Communication II.............................4
EET 367 Measurements for Communications .............4
EET 462 Communications III ..........................4
Upper-Division EET Electives..............................3
Subtotal.................................................18
Power Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
EET 341 Electric Power Generation ...................3
EET 342 Electric Power Distribution..................3
EET 343 Power Generation Using Solar Energy .........3
EET 441 Simulation of Building Energy ...............5
MET 311 Thermodynamics ..............................3
MET 312 Heat Transfer...............................J3
Subtotal.................................................20
Control Systems Area of Emphasis
Required EET courses
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation ......4
EET 372 Control Systems Laboratory ..................1
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications....................3
EET 436 Microprocessor Applications .................3
EET 471 Automatic Control Systems II ................4
Upper-Division EET Elective.............................._3
Subtotal.................................................18
Computer Technology Area of Emphasis
Required EET Courses
EET 331 Pulse Circuits...............................3
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation ......4
EET 432 Digital Filters .............................3
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications....................3
EET 436 Microprocessor Applications .................3
Upper-Division EET Elective.............................._2
Subtotal.................................................18
Minor in Electronics Engineering Technology
Required EET Courses
EET 110 Circuits I ..................................4
EET 111 Circuits I Lab ..............................1
EET 112 Circuits II..................................4
EET 113 Circuits II Lab..............................2
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and Electrical
Circuits I .................................4
EET 302 Principles of Electronics and Electrical
Circuits II ................................4
Upper-Division EET Electives ............................_4
Total....................................................23
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School of Professional Studies
Technical Management
Students desiring to study Technical Management must contact the Department of Electronics Engineering Technology to establish a contract major. As of fall semester 1990, the program will no longer be offered as described. Students declaring a Technical Management major prior to this Bulletin should consult the Department of Electronics Engineering Technology concerning program completion. Students desiring to develop a major combining business and engineering technology courses should confer with the department chair and may develop a contract major through Adult Learning Services.
Technical Management is an interdisciplinary program training students to become technically proficient in order to handle their own jobs effectively and to communicate with and manage technical specialists. Graduates are needed for positions in value engineering, logistics engineering, quality control, maintenance engineering, systems analysis or management, operations research, and field engineering. This program has been coordinated with several industrial management representatives and is administered jointly through the School of Business and Department of Electronics Engineering Technology.
Students completing the Technical Management program requirements are not required to complete a separate minor.
Technical Management Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
General Course Requirements Hours
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition .....................6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .........3
Humanities Electives ........................6
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ..............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro ..............3
Soc/Behavioral Science Elective..............3
MTH 141* Calculus I ...................................4
PHY 201 College Physics I........................... 5
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.............3
BEC**200 Business and Interpersonal Communications ..._3
Subtotal..................................................39
*MTH 141 requires prerequisite of MTH 112 or MTH 140.
**BEC courses in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business. Technology Courses
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Tech .............3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance ..............3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis .......................3
CEN 110 Civil Technology..............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ..........................3
EET 110, 111 Circuits I and Laboratory................5
EET 112, 113 Circuits II and Laboratory ..............6
Electives
A minimum of 20 semester hours of technology courses must be selected in consultation with and approved by the Electronics Engineering Technology Department. At least 15 of these hours
must be upper-division.....................................20
Subtotal...................................................47
Business Course Studies
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
BEC* 301 Business Research and Report Writing ..........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics ...........3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision-Making ..................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ..........................3
MGT 221 Business Law I ................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing .......................3
*BEC courses in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business.
Electives
A minimum of fifteen (15) additional semester hours must be selected from courses offered by the Management or the Computer and Management Science Departments. These electives must be approved by either the Department of Computer and Management Science or the Electronics Engineering Technology Department and at least 7 of these hours
must be upper-division........................................ 15
Subtotal.......................................................45
Total.........................................................131
Industrial Marketing
Students desiring to study Industrial Marketing must contact the Department of Electronics Engineering Technology to establish a contract major. As of fall semester 1990, the program will no longer be offered as described. Students declaring an Industrial Marketing major prior to this Bulletin should consult the Department of Electronics Engineering Technology concerning program completion. Students desiring to develop a major combining business and industry courses should confer with the department chair and may develop a contract major through Adult Learning Services.
The Industrial Marketing program links sales and manufacturing. Specialists are trained to become familiar with designing, manufacturing, branding, packaging, transporting, labeling, pricing, selling, and servicing products. The curriculum develops an awareness of the policies and practices of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and users of technical goods. Graduates may expect to find positions in retail and wholesale industrial sales positions, in the areas of advertising and promotion, and in the field of marketing planning. Administration of the program is handled jointly through the Electronics Engineering Technology and the Marketing departments. Students completing the Industrial Marketing program are not required to complete a separate minor.
Semester
General Course Requirements Hours
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition ....................6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ........3
Humanities Electives ........................6
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro .............3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology......................3
Soc/Behavioral Science Elective..............3
MTH 103 Triangle Trig...I.......................... 1
MTH 131 Finite Math for the Management and
Social Sciences ..l..........................4
PHY 125 Physics of Tech, I...........................5
BEC* 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications ....3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing..........._3
Subtotal..................................................40
*BEC courses in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business. Technology Courses
MET 100 Materials and Mfg. Tech......................3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance .............3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis ......................4
CEN 110 Civil Tech................................. 3
CEN 120 Tech. Drawing I .............................3
EET 110, 111 Circuits I and Laboratory.....................5
EET 112, 113 Circuits II and Laboratory....................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours of technology courses must be selected in consultation with the Electronics Engineering Technology Department; 12 of these hours must be
upper-division............................................... 15
Subtotal.....................................................42
94


School of Professional Studies
Business Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ...................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II...................3
BEC* 301 Business Research and Report Writing .........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ............3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ..............3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance ...........................3
MGT 221 Business Law I ...............................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ......................3
MKT 301 Marketing Research ...........................3
MKT 311 Advertising ..................................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ............................3
MKT 445 Seminar in Marketing Managment..............._3
Subtotal.................................................39
Total....................................................121
'BEC courses in transition. Check status with Dean, School of Business.
Technology and Technical Communications
The department offers degree programs in Industrial Technology, Technical and Industrial Administration, Industrial Design, Mechanical Engineering Technology and Technical Communications. For specific information see the detailed listings for each major.
Industrial Technology
The Industrial Technology program offers the following majors:
Bachelor of Science:
Industrial Technology (ITS)
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Rehabilitation Therapy Area of Emphasis Business Area of Emphasis Internship Area of Emphasis Technical and Industrial Administration (TIA)
Bachelor of Arts:
Industrial Design (IND)
Minors:
Industrial Technology Industrial Arts Teaching
General Studies
Courses offered in the program may be applied toward the career category of the general studies requirements of the college and provide students with the opportunity to explore areas of individual interest.
Credit by Examination
Often students selecting the Industrial Technology major have extensive experience in business, industry or the military that parallels the content of some of the courses. To receive credit for such experience the student must contact the department chair for evaluation.
Industrial Technology Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Technology, the student must meet the Colleges general specifications for the baccalaureate degree and must complete the courses required for one of the four areas of emphasis (Industrial Arts Teaching, Rehabilitation Therapy, Business, or Internship) as listed below.
No minor required.
Semester
General Studies Hours
Freshman Composition.......................................6
ENG 101,
ENG 102 Freshman Composition ..............................6
Humanities..............................................8-10
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication.....................3
Electives* .....................5-7
Science and/or Mathematics..............................8-10
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics..............3
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics............4
Elective........................1-3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences Electives*............8-10
Career...................................................3-6
COM 261 Introduction to Technical
Writing...........................3
Elective........................1-3
Total.....................................................36
"See Rehabilitation Therapy Area of Emphasis and Electricity/Electronics Specialty for required General Studies courses for these particular programs.
Industrial Technology Core
The following core courses are required for all Industrial
Technology areas of emphasis.
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking .....................4
ITS 102 Introduction to Industrial
Technology .....................................1
ITS 103 Finishing Materials and Processes..............2
ITS 110 Introduction to Plastics I ....................2
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals: Cold Metals..2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals: Hot Metals ...2
ITS 141 Industrial Drawing: Sketching ...................2
ITS 142 Industrial Drawing: Instruments .................2
ITS 150 Introduction to Graphic Arts I ...............2
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II ...............2
ITS 166 Introduction to Power............................3
ITS 171** Consumer Electricity and Electronics:
Communication Systems...........................2
ITS 172** Consumer Electricity and Electronics: Control
Systems ........................................2
ITS 175 Consumer Electricity and
Electronics:
Residential Systems ...............3
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production ................^
Total.........................................................35
** Electricity/Electronics Specialty students substitute EET 210-4, Electronics I.
I. Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis
Graduates meet all the state requirements for a secondary teaching credential and are qualified to teach Industrial Arts in both junior and senior high schools. Courses are also offered
which are designed for those already in teaching and desire to further their professional growth.
General Studies..............................................36
Industrial Technology Core...................................35
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Requirements.......18
ITS 260 Principles of Automotive
Systems ...........................4
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of
Teaching Industrial Arts ..........3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration of
Industrial Arts ...................3
ITS Upper-Division Electives (must be
in 2 different areas) .............8
Teaching Certification Requirements..........................34
EDU 221 Process of Education in Urban
Secondary Schools..................3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban
95


School of Professional Studies
Secondary Schools.................2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner .......3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum
and Classroom Management .........3
EDU 322 Field Experiences in Tutoring and
Materials Construction ...........2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the
Classroom.........................3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education .....3
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary........................12
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content
Area: Secondary ..................3
Total.....................................................123
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Electricity/ Electronics Speciality
General Studies............................................36
Science and/or Mathematics*
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry .............1
MTH 111 College Algebra ...................4
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics............4
Industrial Technology Core.................................35
Electricity/Electronics Specialty Core.....................16
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.....3
EET 211 Electronics Laboratory ............1
EET 232 Digital Circuits I ................3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ...............3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors .... 3
EET 436 Microprocessors Applications.......3
Industrial Arts Teaching Emphasis Requirements..............6
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of
Teaching Industrial Arts .........3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration
of Industrial Arts................3
Teacher Certification Requirements.........................34
Total.....................................................127
Required for Specialty
II. Rehabilitation Therapy Area of Emphasis
Students selecting Rehabilitation Therapy must complete requirements for the Industrial Arts teaching credential as well as the requirements for the Manual Arts Therapy Certificate. Completion of the course of study qualifies the student to be certified by the Veterans Administration.
General Studies............................................36
Where asterisks are indicated in Industrial Technology General Studies requirements, the following courses must be completed in addition to the courses required for General Studies.
Humanities
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy ............................3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ...........3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues................3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology ..........3
Industrial Technology Core....................................35
Teaching Certification Requirements (See Industrial Arts Teaching Emphasis for Courses)................................34
Industrial Arts Teaching Emphasis Requirements................14
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts ...............4
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of
Teaching Industrial Arts ..........3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration
of Industrial Arts ................3
ITS Upper-Division Elective .............4
Rehabilitation Therapy Requirements...........................18
ITS 499 Institutional Internship ............6
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment ..........3
PSY 241 Social Psychology.................3
PSY 321 Abnormal Psychology...............3
PSY 400 Theories of Personality................3 ____
Total....................................................137
III. Business Area of Emphasis
Selection of the Business Emphasis prepares students to enter business and industry in a variety of capacities. Sales, manufacturing, management and small business operation provide diverse opportunities for graduates. Within this Emphasis, speciality areas are available in:
-Automotive -Graphics
-Drafting -Metals
-Electricity/Electronics -Woods
General Studies.............................................36
Science and/or Mathematics for Electricity/Electronics Specialty
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry .............1
MTH 111 College Algebra ...................4
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics............4
Industrial Technology.......................................35
Business Core...............................................24
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ........3
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation ...........3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics
Macro .............................3
MGT 221 Legal Environment of Business I .... 3
MGT 300 Principles of Management...........3
MGT 321 Commercial and Corporate Law .... 3
MGT 356 Small Business Management .........3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ...........3
Speciality Areas....................................... 16-24
Automotive
ITS 260 Principles of Automotive
Systems ...........................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Ignition,
Carburetor and Emission Systems 4 ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Electrical
Systems .........1................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems:
Autobody Fundamentals .............4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Engine
Overhaul...........................4
ITS 420 Welding Technology ................4
Drafting
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing .......4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts .............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies .................5
CEN 210 Structural Drawing.................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry...............2
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing .............3
Electricity/Electronics
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines......3
EET 211 Electronics Laboratory .............1
EET 232 Digital Circuits I .}...............3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors .... 3
EET 436 Microprocessor Applications ........3
Graphics
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography ........3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing ........4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts ..............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies .................5
TEI 200 Airbrush I (CCD Course) ...........6
96


School of Professional Studies
Metals
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II .......2
ITS 231 Art Metal, Silversmith and
Lapidary .........................2
ITS 321 Advanced Metalworking .............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing .......4
ITS 420 Welding Technology ................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies ................5
Wood
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II .......2
ITS 301 Advanced Woodworking ..............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing .......4
ITS 345 Facility Planning..................3
ITS 401 Furniture Construction ............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies ................5
Electives..................................................1-9
Total......................................................120
IV. Internship Area of Emphasis
Under this program students receive on-the-job training by working in business and industry in a capacity related to their own speciality area. Employment opportunities are comparable to those in the Business Area of Emphasis. Within this emphasis,
speciality areas are available in:
-Automotive -Graphics
-Drafting -Metals
-Electricity/Electronics -Woods
General Studies.............................................36
Science and/or Mathematics for E/E Specialty
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry ..............1
MTH 111 College Algebra ....................4
PHY 100 Introductions to Physics............4
Industrial Technology Core..................................35
Business Core................................................9
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I .........3
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation ............3
MGT 300 Principles of Management............3
Internship..................................................12
Specialty Areas..........................................16-24
Automotive
ITS 260 Principles of Automotive
Systems ...........................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Ignition,
Carburetor and Emission Systems 4 ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Electrical
Systems ...........................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems:
Autobody Fundamentals .............4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Engine
Overhaul...........................4
ITS 420 Welding Technology .................4
Drafting
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing ........4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts ..............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies .................5
CEN 210 Structural Drawing..................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry ...............2
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing...............3
Electricity/Electronics (E/E)
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines......3
EET 211 Electronics Lab ....................1
EET 232 Digital Circuits I .................3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors .... 3
EET 436 Microprocessors Applications.......3
Graphics
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography .......3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing .......4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts .............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies .................5
TEI 200 Airbrush I ........................6
(CCD Course)
Metals
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II .......2
ITS 231 Art Metal, Silversmith and
Lapidary ..........................2
ITS 321 Advanced Metalworking .............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing .......4
ITS 420 Welding Technology ................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies .................5
Wood
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II .......2
ITS 301 Advanced Woodworking ..............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing .......4
ITS 345 Facility Planning..................3
ITS 401 Furniture Construction ............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies .................5
Total......................................................120
Industrial Technology Minor
This minor must be approved in writing by the chair of the department. The chair must approve the plan of study and will take into account the student's previous experience and future occupational goal.
Industrial Arts Teaching Minor...............................22
Required Courses
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production ... 4 ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of
Teaching Industrial Arts ..........3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration of
Industrial Arts ...................3
ITS Lower-Division Elective ............8
ITS Upper-Division Elective ............4
Technical and Industrial Administration Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
The Technical and Industrial Administration Major builds on the technical expertise attained through completion of an Associate of Applied Science, Associate of Science, or Associate of Arts degree with specialties from within the fields of Trade and Industry (T&l) or Technical Education. This major provides students with an increased opportunity for career mobility and advancement in jobs related to, or associated with, their technical background.
Students who have met MSCs general studies requirements should be able to complete the BS degree in four to five semesters. Technical credits earned in the Associate degree will be accepted and applied toward requirements for a minor. Students entering this program must possess an Associate degree and complete the following requirements.
General Studies...........................................36
Technical and Industrial Administration Core..............20
ITS 370 Industrial Safety..................3
ITS 371 Development in Industrial and
Technical Processes...............3
ITS 372 Characteristics of Industrial and Technical Personnel Selection,
97