Citation
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1986-1987

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin, Metropolitan State College, 1986-1987
Alternate Title:
Metropolitan State College bulletin
Creator:
Metropolitan State College (Denver, Colo.)
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Publication Date:

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
18507087 ( OCLC )

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Metropolitan State College 1006 11th St., Box 16 Denver, Colorado 80204
Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage PAID
Denver, CO Permit 973


Metropolitan State College Bulletin 1986-87
1006 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204


College Calendar 1986-87
College Calendar 1986-87
Summer Semester 1986
Applications should be received by..............May 21
Classes begin...................................June 2
Independence Day* no classes .................July 4
Summer Term ends................................August 8
Autumn Semester 1986
1st Time College Student less than 20 years of age ..August 2
All other applicants...............................August 21
Classes begin ..................................August 27
Labor Day* no classes......................September 1
Thanksgiving Holiday* no classes........November 27-28
Autumn exams end .............................December 19
Spring Semester 1987
Applications should be received by.............January 7
Classes begin ..................................January 19
Spring Break no classes......................March 23-27
Spring exams end....................................May 15
Commencement...........................................May 17
"College offices also closed during this holiday.
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE HOLIDAY CALENDAR
All College Offices will be Closed
1986
July 4
September 1 November 27, 28 December 25, 26, 29, 30, 31
1987
January 1 May 26
2


Contents
Contents
Page
College Calendar ......................................................................2
General Information....................................................................5
Accreditation.......................................................................5
Campus..............................................................................5
Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado ...........................................6
Admissions Instructions.............................................................6
Financial Aid ......................................................................9
Costs..............................................................................11
Student Personnel Services ........................................................11
Academic Information..................................................................15
Omnibus Courses....................................................................21
Field Experience/lnternship Courses ...............................................22
Requirements for All Degrees ......................................................22
Degrees and Programs Available.....................................................25
School of Business....................................................................28
Institute for Entrepreneurship.....................................................36
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences..................................................38
Division of Humanities ............................................................38
Division of Social Sciences........................................................50
Division of Science and Mathematics ...............................................55
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services...................................62
Institute for Womens Studies and Services.........................................64
School of Professional Studies........................................................65
Division of Education .............................................................65
Division of Technology.............................................................81
Division of Public Service Professions.............................................95
Course Descriptions..................................................................105
Trustees ............................................................................180
Administration.......................................................................180
Academic Administrators .............................................................182
Faculty..............................................................................183
Alphabetical Index ..................................................................192
Campus Map ..........................................................................196
Admissions Application ..............................................................197
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The College
The College
Metropolitan State College is a leader in quality, baccalaureate education. MSC people students, faculty, staff and alumni work to share actively the responsibility of the future.
Since its creation in 1965, this exciting, four-year college has contributed to the vitality of downtown Denver. And it has changed the face of learning in the metropolitan area with a phenomenal growth to approximately 14,700 students.
Metropolitan State Colleges success is reflected in the faces of its creative and determined students. Eighteen-year-olds take the first steps toward establishing a career while young professionals seek career advancement. Displaced homemakers learn new skills, and all find new opportunities. The average student is 27 years old, making classes a unique blend of the eagerness of youth and the wisdom that comes with maturity. Because the student population is so diverse, education at MSC is a mutual learning experience for students and professors alike. There is a give and take between young and old, student and teacher all learning from one another.
While MSC's students are committed to learning, the faculty is committed to teaching. Other colleges emphasize research; MSC's more than 335 full-time faculty members are first, and most importantly, teachers. They are available to their students both in the classroom and in their offices for extra help and advice. Many have extensive professional backgrounds, adding an invaluable dimension to their knowledge, and over 80 percent have earned the highest level of academic degree attainable in their fields.
MSC offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in over 55 areas in business, human services, education, engineering technology, liberal arts, professional studies, science and mathematics. Students can also pursue specific, individualized career choices through a contract major or minor. Several academic programs are the only ones of their type offered in the region, and many enjoy national reputations for excellence.
MSC is not limited to degree-seeking students. A class in the latest computer technology may attract a realtor with a fascination for high tech. A homemaker with a life-long love of Shelley and Keats may find personal growth in a literature class. The active businessman or woman may take advantage of an extended evening class in management or conversational French at Metro South or Metro North.
MSCs impact upon the metropolitan community continues to grow each year as Denver increasingly becomes a national center of commerce and technology. The College considers itself a partner in Denver's future and seeks ways to share resources to contribute to the quality of urban life. MSC students work for local businesses as interns, and many classes revolve around community issues. MSC also extends learning opportunities beyond the boundaries of the Auraria campus through the Division of Off Campus Programs, offering credit classes at locations throughout the metropolitan area, including special seminars and workshops for area professionals.
Additionally, the College reinforces its partnership with the community through jointly sponsored events which both entertain and educate MSC students and the metropolitan community. Lectures by nationally known figures, concerts and plays, foreign study programs and community learning projects all bring the wealth of MSCs resources into the neighborhoods of metropolitan Denver.
Metropolitan State College provides equal education and employment opportunities for all, regardless of race, color, creed, religion, age, sex, national origin, or veteran status.
Accreditation/Approvals
MSC is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, the National League for Nursing, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the Council for Standards in Human Service Education, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Association of University Programs in Health Administration. The Civil Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology and the Mechanical Engineering Technology programs are accredited by ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. The Department of Human Services has approval from the Council for Standards in Human Service Education, and the baccalaureate program in Chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society.
Campus
Metropolitan State College moved to new facilities on the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) during the 1976-77 academic year. The 169-acre campus is located adjacent to downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with MSC.
Over one million square feet of space for classrooms, laboratories and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative offices are in restored Victorian homes in Denver's historic Ninth Street Park located within the Auraria site. The campus features a child care center; a block-long gymnasium with a swimming pool; areas for handball, soccer, baseball and track; a student center; and a library housing more than 595,000 volumes.
The Auraria Higher Education Center provides a variety of educational opportunities that meet the needs of the urban student. The three Auraria institutions continue to be governed by separate boards and to maintain their distinctive roles and missions. However, the concept of facility sharing affords the MSC student the flexibility of taking lower-division courses at the community college, and graduate, or specialized professional courses at the university. Metropolitan State College's four-year degree programs are coordinated with those of the other two institutions, and students may cross register for classes at the three institutions.
5


The College
The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social, political, cultural and economic practice of the city.
The Auraria Higher Education Center originated with the need to provide permanent facilities for three rapidly growing urban institutions. In 1974, the Auraria Board of Directors was created by the Legislature to plan the campus, construct the buildings, provide a variety of additional centralized support services and maintain the facilities. In 1972, the Colorado Legislature appropriated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus. Additional funds were contributed by the City of Denver, the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the State of Colorado. The Auraria Higher Education Center constitutes a creative example of cooperation by government at all levels.
Consortium of State Colleges
The member institutions governed by the Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College, Mesa College, Metropolitan State College, and Western State College. The purpose of the consortium is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions. Such efforts lead to broader educational opportunities for students than can be offered by any one of the institutions.
The registering authority of each Consortium member institution can provide any regularly enrolled student in good standing the materials with which the student can enroll temporarily in any other member institution without incurring additional matriculation costs. Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution.
The enrollment status of the student at the host institution will be determined by the students status at the home institution. Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at a consortium institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution. The process of enrolling as a consortium student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration period at the host institution.
Admissions Instructions
Applications for Admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. To insure guaranteed processing, applications for admission must be, and credentials should be, received at the College not later than twelve weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. All credentials which are received by the College become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student. All transcripts should be sent directly from the issuing institution to Metropolitan State College, 1006 11th Street, Box 16, Denver, Colorado, 80204. Under no circumstances will hand-carried transcripts be accepted.
It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any demographic or academic changes on the application for admission prior to the first day of classes. If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records, it could delay the admission process for subsequent enrollment. Failure to report academic changes to the Office of Admissions and Records may result in rejection or dismissal.
Admission of Freshmen
First-time college students less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment:
1. Applicants must request the following information be submitted directly to the Office of Admission and Records from the high school or testing agency:
a. ACT or SAT test results
b. high school class rank
c. high school grade point average
2. This information may be submitted at the end of the 6th, 7th, or 8th semester of high school. This would constitute an Early Admission Decision program.
3. An applicant must meet two of the following three criteria to be eligible for admission:
a. a composite score of 19 on the ACT or a combined score of 810 on the SAT
b. 2.5 high school GPA
c. upper % high school class rank
4. Applicants who do not meet these requirements, as well as applicants who have taken the General Equivalency Diploma (GED), will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials, including any letters of recommendation, personal letters, or interviews which may be requested.
First-time college students 20 years of age or older as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment:
Applicants who are over 20 years of age who do not meet the above minimum admission requirements should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for Individualized admissions Information.
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the Application for Admission included in the back of this Bulletin. Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records at 1006 11th Street, Box 16, Denver, Colorado, 80204; 303/556-3058.
2. The completed form along with the application fee must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, both the application and all required credentials must be received at least four weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. It is the students responsibility to request that a transcript or appropriate test scores be sent to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records directly from the issuing institution or testing agency in time to meet processing dates.
3. A $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and will not apply toward tuition, must be sent with the application for admission. The application fee must either be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. Upon receipt of the above credentials, and after a preliminary evaluation has been made, the applicant will be informed of her or his admission status.
5. A final official high school transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term to insure registration for the subsequent term. Students will not be permitted to register after their initial enrollment unless this final transcript is received.
6. All other credentials are required four weeks before the expected term of enrollment.
Admission Through ACT/SAT
If, when the student takes the ACT or SAT, she or he indicates Metropolitan State College as one of the college choices to receive the ACT or SAT Profile Reports, the following admission procedures shall apply:
1. A letter of explanation and an application form will be sent to the student.
2. If the student wishes to be considered for admission, she or he should complete the form, have the high school counselor sign it, and return it to MSC along with the student's high school cumulative grade point average and high school class rank through the last completed semester (6th, 7th, 8th).
3. There is NO application fee.
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The College
4. The ACT and SAT Profile Reports and the application form will be used in lieu of a formal application.
5. The applicant will be considered for admission based on the admission criteria listed previously for first-time college students less than 20 years of age.
6. The applicant must request that a final official transcript (with date of graduation posted) be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the high school.
ACT/SAT Requirement
The College will require the ACT or SAT test of all first-time college students who are less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment. High school applicants who do not take the ACT or SAT test while in high school may make arrangements with the MSC Office of Admissions and Records to take the ACT examination only after all national test dates have passed. Contact the Office of Admissions and Records for additional information (556-3058).
GED applicants less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment must also adhere to the ACT/SAT requirement.
Failure to comply with this admissions requirement will result in a hold placed on future registration.
High School Student Education and Enrichment Program
The Student Education and Enrichment Program (SEE) is Metropolitan State College s High School Concurrent Enrollment Program for college-ready students. SEE is designed to supplement a students existing education through early participation in college level classes. This advanced program should not be interpreted as an alternative to high school completion but is, instead, a cooperative college/high school effort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualified high school students. Typically, the SEE student meets the following criteria:
1. is currently registered in a Colorado high school
2. is following a GPA of 3.0 or better
3. is preferably in his/her senior year of high school
4. can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes
5. has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work.
To apply for admission, the student must, in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Director of High School/College Relations a standard admissions application with the required $10.00 application fee accompanied by the following documents:
1. a high school counselor/administrator's recommendation stating how the student will benefit from early college attendance
2. written parental approval
3. an official high school transcript.
Upon receipt of these documents the students record is reviewed and the admissions decision is made. However, if additional or supporting information is required the student may be required to have an admissions interview with an MSC admissions officer. The admissions decision will be based on the students academic preparation, past performance, the recommendation of the high school official and the students personal motivation and readiness for a traditional college experience.
Admission of Transfer Students
Transfer applicants must submit credentials from all colleges and universities previously or currently attending. Transfer applicants must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college attended. Failure to report correctly any former or current college or university record may result in loss of credit and/or dismissal.
Admission to the College for transfer applicants will be based on a 2.00 grade point average from each institution attended. Students who do not meet these admission requirements should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for individual consideration.
To apply for admission:
1. Complete the Application for Admission that can be found in the back of this Bulletin. Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records. 303/556-3058.
2. Complete the application for admission and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, the application must be received by the College at least twelve weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and will not apply toward tuition, must accompany the application for admission. The fee must be received or waived before the application can be considered.
4. A high school transcript is requested when the applicant has less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours of transferable college credits.
5. Students are required to have official transcripts sent directly to the College from the issuing institution. Students will not be permitted to register beyond their initial enrollment unless these credentials are received. Although an applicants record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript, official transcripts from each institution attended are required. This is true even though no credit may have been earned at an institution. The only exception is for a non-degree-seeking student who already has an undergraduate degree. For these students, the only official transcript required is the transcript from the institution granting the undergraduate degree.
Transfer Credit Evaluation
Once final official transcripts for degree-seeking students are received by the Office of Admissions and Records, the evaluation process begins. The student receives a transfer evaluation card which must be signed by the student's major department advisor. The card is then submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. Within approximately four weeks students receive two copies of the transfer credit evaluation, one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs.
Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines:
1. Grades earned must be A, B, C or equivalent; however, only the credits will be shown on the MSC academic record. Courses with grades of D, F or similar grades will not be accepted in transfer.
2. Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College.
3. A maximum of 70 semester hours will be accepted from a two-year institution. A maximum of 90 semester hours of credit will be given for acceptable work completed at a four-year institution or combination of two- and four-year institutions.
4. Students earning a two-year degree consisting of at least 60 semester hours (possibly excluding CLEP) from an accredited institution with a GPA of 2.0 or better will be guaranteed 60 semester hours of transfer credit, if they have met the following minimums in the MSC general studies areas as part of the two-year degree.
Freshman English.............................4 semester hours
Humanities...................................8 semester hours
Science/Mathematics..........................8 semester hours
Social/Behavioral Science ...................8 semester hours
plus 2 additional hours in any
one of these areas or in the
Career area ................................2 semester hours
30 semester hours
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The College
These 60 semester hours of transfer credit may not necessarily fulfill all general studies course requirements for a particular degree program. Students should consult with an advisor in their major department to determine whether additional general studies courses will be required.
Admission of Previously Enrolled Students
Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for one or more years:
1. Complete the Application for Admission that can be found in the back of this Bulletin. Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records. 303/556-3058.
2. Complete the Application for Re-admission and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. To insure processing, the application should be received at least twelve weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
3. Are not required to submit an application fee.
4. Who have attended other collegiate institutions since last attending MSC must follow the admissions requirements for all transfer students and must have an official transcript sent directly to the College from the issuing institution. Students will not be permitted to register beyond their initial enrollment unless these credentials are received.
(a) An applicant who was previously admitted as non-degree seeking and wishes to maintain this status, but in the interim has attended other colleges or universities, is required to have an official transcript sent directly to the College from the issuing institution.
(b) An applicant who was previously admitted as a non-degree student but now wishes to seek a degree at MSC is required to have one official transcript from all previously attended colleges or universities sent directly to the College from the issuing institution.
5. Applicants who are readmitting after nine years of absence from the college are required to resubmit all credentials. Only non-degree seeking MSC graduates do not have to resubmit credentials.
Admission of Special Students
This special student category will permit students to register for classes without having to submit any official transcripts. SPECIAL STUDENTS MUST MEET THE NORMAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS OF ALL STUDENTS, and may earn not more than 18 semester hours of credit. In order to register for classes subsequent to earning 18 semester hours of credit, a student is required to have all required transcripts sent directly to the College from the issuing institutions.
Admission of International Students
All students who declare a country of citizenship other than the United States on their applications for admission must contact the Office of Admissions and Records.
1. Admission of resident aliens (or refugees, parolees, asylum cases, etc.):
(a) Those individuals holding a resident alien card or I-94 form should bring these forms to the Office of Admissions and Records to be copied prior to being accepted to the institution.
(b) Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought.
(c) Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examination.
(d) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
2. Admission of applicants on student visas (F-1):
(a) International students will be admitted to Metropolitan State College for the autumn semester only. Exceptions must be approved by the Office of Admissions and Records.
(b) Application for Admission and all necessary supporting credentials must be received four weeks prior to the first day of walk-in registration for the autumn semester.
(c) Applicants are required to submit the following documents as part of their application to the College: application form, application fee, official transcripts from all secondary and post-secondary schools attended, evidence of English proficiency, and financial support documents.
(d) Official academic credentials should be submitted in the original language as well as in official English translation. Transcripts from American institutions should be sent directly to the College from the issuing institution.
(e) English proficiency may be demonstrated by attaining a score of at least 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Only scores from the International or Special Testing programs or from the institutional TOEFL offered through the Auraria Student Assistance Center will be considered.
(f) An advance deposit of one semester's tuition and fees will be required of international students. Scholarship recipients are excluded.
(g) Students are required to complete a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours with a minimum 2.00 (C) grade point average each autumn and spring semester.
(h) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters.
If students are academically admissible and have met the minimum requirements on the English proficiency examination, they will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form 20 (I-20). Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent immigrants should be forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Admission and Retention of Minority Students
Metropolitan State College, through its office of Admissions and Records, strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area minority residents. A recruitment network of community-based agencies and organizations assists the College in meeting this objective. In addition, Admissions Officers are available to provide individual counseling regarding general admissions procedures for both new and transfer students. Specific counseling and referral services are also provided in the areas of financial aid, career planning, and academic support. Minority residents interested in attending the College are encouraged to contact the Office of Admissions and Records at the earliest possible date. Phone 556-3058 for information.
Tuition Classification
A student is classified as an in-state or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon information supplied by the student on the application for admission and is made in accordance with the Colorado Tuition Classification Law, CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a student's tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petition for In-State Tuition Classification and the evidence requested in it should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status.
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The College
The tuition classification statute requires that in order to qualify for in-state status a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester for which such classification is sought.
Domicile for tuition purposes requires two inseparable elements:
(1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. Some examples of connections with the state which provide objective evidence of intent are: (1) payment of Colorado state income tax, (2) permanent employment in Colorado, (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado, (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state, such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law, and (5) registering to vote. Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent.
Any questions regarding the tuition classification law should be directed to an admissions officer at the College. In order to qualify for in-state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes for that semester. Petitions and all supporting documentation must be submitted by the last working day prior to the first day of the semester for which the change in classification is sought. The dates for qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the class schedule each semester.
Education Policy for Persons Over 62
Older area citizens are encouraged to participate in Metropolitan State College's programs and activities.
1. Persons 62 years or older, wishing to enroll for credit, should submit required admissions and registration materials to the Office of Admissions and Records, Central Classroom Building, Room 103, 1006 11th Street. Every attempt will be made to make financial assistance available. A college record of participation will be maintained.
2. Persons 62 years or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend class on a space-available basis, in classes of their choice, at either Metropolitan State College or at Extended Campus locations. There is no cost for these classes. These persons may attend classes beginning the sixth day of each semester. Interested older persons should obtain a registration form from the Metro-Meritus Program in the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center. This form must be signed by the instructor granting approval and returned to the Metro-Meritus Office.
Participation on the no-cost, no-credit basis should not contribute to an increased faculty workload and will not involve required homework or examinations. No college records of participation will be maintained.
Financial Aid Procedure
Philosophy
The Metropolitan State College financial aid program provides assistance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment are available singly or in various combinations to meet the difference between what the student and the students family could reasonably be expected to provide and the expected cost of attendinq Metropolitan State College.
Estimated Expenses
For the 1986-1987 academic year, projected expenses are estimated as follows:
Resident Nonresident
Tuition and Fees $1110 $3930
Room and Board 3690 3690
Books and Supplies 370 370
Transportation 670 670
Miscellaneous 760 760
$6600 $9420
Tuition and fees are set by the Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice. Additional allowances are made for students with dependents and day care costs.
Eligibility and Need
To qualify for financial aid, a student must demonstrate financial need, be a U.S. citizen or have an immigrant visa, and be enrolled as a full-time student. Exceptions exist for part-time students who qualify for the Pell (Basic) Grant, the Colorado Scholarship program, Presidential Scholarships and Guaranteed Student Loan. MSC uses the American College Testing (ACT) Service, a national nonprofit need analysis organization, to determine financial need.
Application Procedures
Returning MSC students may request application forms from the Financial Aid Office. Transfer students can obtain application forms from their current college or university. Entering college freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools and/or from the MSC Financial Aid Office; students should obtain forms as early as possible. All applicants must complete the MSC institutional application form and submit a Family Financial Statement. Transferring applicants must supply the MSC Financial Aid Office with financial aid transcripts from all schools previously attended. Detailed information concerning application procedures is available in the MSC Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid Resources
The aid programs introduced below are available to undergraduates only. Students who hold baccalaureate degrees are not eligible for the federal Pell and Supplemental Educational Opportunity grants. The amount of funds made available depends upon the maximum award allowed by regulation of each program, the students established financial need, duration of the student's enrollment, and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governments.
Grants
Pell (Basic) Grant: Eligibility is restricted to undergraduates enrolled at least half time (6 credit hours a term). The maximum award for Colorado residents is $1770, non-residents enrolled full-time may receive up to $2100.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG): Eligiblity for the SEOG is restricted to undergraduates enrolled full-time in a degree program who demonstrate a high need for financial assistance. The amount of the award varies year to year according to the availability of funds.
Colorado State Grant (CSG): Students enrolled full-time who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. Awards vary from $100 to $1500 per year.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG): Full-time students who are permanent residents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. A maximum award is $2000 per year.
Scholarships
Scholarships administered by the Financial Aid Office are based on scholastic ability.
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The College
Presidential Scholarships: The scholarships include four-year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. Scholars receive $450 per semester to pay mandatory tuition and fees.
Colorado Scholarships: Grants not exceeding the cost of resident tuition and mandatory fees per academic year are available through the academic departments. Recipients must be Colorado residents. Interested students should contact their departments for applications.
Athletic Scholarships: MSC has a limited number of athletic scholarships. Applications and additional information are available from the MSC Athletic Department.
Private Scholarships: The MSC Financial Aid Office does not administer private scholarships. Students should contact academic departments for assistance in locating sources of such scholarships.
Loans
Each of the following is a loan which must be repaid by the student:
National Direct Student Loan (NDSL): Undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students enrolled full-time in a degree program are eligible for this loan. During the freshman and sophomore years, a student may borrow up to $3000; through the junior and senior years and postbaccalaureate study, a student may borrow a total of $6000. The Financial Aid Office provides additional information concerning NDSL loans upon request.
Guaranteed Student Loan: This loan is available to undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students officially admitted to MSC. Applications are available from the student's home bank or from any college financial aid office.
Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS Loan): This loan is available to independent, undergraduate students, officially admitted and enrolled at MSC and to parents of dependent, undergraduate students. Applications are available from MSC or the few banks which participate in this program. Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing. Terms of the PLUS loan are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office.
Additional Loan Programs
Raymond R. Uhl Loan: Established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl, former MSC student killed in Vietnam, this fund is to assist students who need financial help but are not eligible for other types of aid. Maximum loan is $2000 and terms of repayment are arranged according to the individual student s circumstances.
Student Support Loans: Student support emergency loans are available through the MSC Student Government Loan Fund. Details of these limited emergency loans are available from the MSC Student Affairs Office.
Emergency Loans: Should there be a delay in the disbursement of funds, the Financial Aid Office is able to advance limited funds to students, provided that financial aid has been awarded previously.
College Work-Study: The State of Colorado and federal work-study programs provide part-time employment during the summer and academic year. Undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students enrolled full-time in a degree-granting program are eligible. Students awarded work-study funds must provide the Financial Aid Office with proof of job placement to be eligible to receive any other aid awarded.
Employment: Many students who do not qualify for work-study find part-time employment to cover a portion of their educational expenses. The Auraria Placement Office assists students in finding part-time jobs.
Other Forms of Assistance
Colorado No-Need Work-Study: Students enrolled at least half-time who are permanent residents of Colorado and are not eligible for other forms of financial aid (except scholarships and Guaranteed Student Loans) are eligible for Colorado No-Need Work-Study funds. Applications and information are available in the Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid as a Form of Payment: Students who have been awarded financial aid have the option of using that aid as their own form of tuition payment during mail-in registration each semester. Once the award has been verified by the Business Office, the student will not be required to pay the tuition and fee charges until the aid is disbursed. Students receiving any type of financial aid are eligible for this service each semester for which aid has been awarded. Related information is provided in mail-in and phone-in registration materials and in class schedules.
Resource Expectations: Students attending MSC must assume responsibility for the cost of their education. Tax-supported aid programs exist to supplement student financial resources, not to replace them. Prospective financial aid applicants should refer to the Financial Aid Office for details concerning students resource expectations.
The Aid Package
Once student need is determined, an aid package is developed which depends upon the availability of funds and the need of the applicant in relation to that of other students. Although it is not always possible to do so, the Financial Aid Office attempts to meet student needs fully. To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office, applicants must obtain all information and forms from designated sources and submit the required materials to the appropriate office according to established schedules.
Receiving a scholarship has no effect on a student's aid if he or she is not receiving funds from NDSL, SEOG, CSG, CSIG, or College Work-Study. Students receiving aid from any of these programs are limited to a maximum amount of aid. A student whose full need has been met prior to receipt of a scholarship will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the scholarship. The reduction will usually be made from the loan or from work-study. If the student's full need has not been met, the scholarship can be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each student's situation is treated individually.
Award Notification
When the Financial Aid Office has determined the kind and amount of aid for which a student qualifies, the student is notified of the award by letter. The letter also stipulates the conditions of the award.
Disbursement Procedures: Beginning on the first day of classes each semester, students receiving financial aid must come to the Financial Aid Office for their financial aid check release form. Students must present proof of appropriate enrollment to obtain a check release. All students receiving aid must sign a Registration Compliance form and a Statement of Educational Purpose.
Repayment Policy
Students who withdraw from MSC prior to completion of a term must repay a portion of financial aid received through Pell, CSG, CSIG, SEOG, NDSL, and GSL programs. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSC before the end of the current academic year or before additional Title IV funds may be disbursed to the student, whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSC Business Office, and students must provide the Financial Aid Office with evidence of repayment.
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The College
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Academic Progress Requirements
Financial Aid recipients are required to maintain satisfactory progress towards their educational objectives in order to continue to receive aid. Detailed information outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office. Failure to maintain satisfactory progress may result in cancellation of aid for subsequent terms of school years.
Change in Status
Students must notify the Financial Aid Office of any changes of status of enrollment, family situation, or student resources. The financial aid award may be adjusted to reflect the change in the student s resources, and awards may be adjusted during the year by the Financial Aid Office as the result of changes in institutional, state, or federal funding.
Renewal of Financial Aid
Students must apply each year for continued aid. Renewal of financial assistance depends on the student's academic performance, financial need, and the availability of student financial aid funds.
Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College Financial Aid policies and procedures.
Costs
The Board of Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado, the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuition and fees for any semester without notice.
Tuition and College Service Fees
Tuition and College Service fees are determined by the Legislature and Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year and, therefore, are not available for inclusion in this Bulletin. These costs may be found either in an addendum to this Bulletin or in the current semester's Class Schedule.
However, the cost of tuition and fees for students taking 10 or more hours per semester is projected to be approximately $550 per semester for in-state students and $1960 for out-of-state students. The cost of students taking 9 or fewer hours will be approximately $52 per semester hour for in-state students, and $190 per semester hour for out-of-state students. There is also an additional tuition charge for hours taken in excess of 18 credits per semester. For in-state students, this charge will be approximately $25 per credit hour; for out-of-state students, $100 per credit hour.
TUITION AND FEES ARE PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION
Standard Fees
An Application Fee is required of all applicants for admission to the College. This fee is nonrefundable and will not be applied to
tuition..................................................... $10.00
Transcript Fee, per transcript..................................1.00
Special Fees
Returned Check Penalty ........................ $10.00
Health Insurance: Single coverage is included in the College Service Fee for students taking ten or more semester hours. These students may apply for a waiver if they have other
coverage. Optional coverage is available for dependents of students who are enrolled for ten or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
Other Cost Information
The cost of books and supplies averages from $250 to $300 per academic year with the highest cost during the first semester of attendance. Other costs such as room, board, clothing, transportation, and other expenses will vary according to individual need.
Tuition Adjustments
Please see the insertion to this Bulletin or the Class Schedule for the current semester.
Student Personnel Services
The Vice President for Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs, such as admissions, records, registration, educational and vocational testing, vocational and special counseling, financial aid, student health services, and student activities. Special help is provided for students who are having difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature.
Conduct of Students
Metropolitan State College policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent with good work and orderly conduct. The College publishes standards of conduct, however, to which students are expected to adhere. The Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook including the Student Due Process Procedure (the procedural rights provided to students at MSC before disciplinary action is imposed), is available in CN 316.
Counseling Center
The Center exists for the purpose of providing competent, professional assistance in three related areas to all students presently enrolled at MSC or MSC alumni. These areas are: (1) Academic Support Programs; (2) Career Development and Career Decision-Making; and (3) Counseling for Personal Growth and Change. These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes, workshops, seminars, counseling and educational groups, as well as the traditional one-to-one setting.
Most group programs begin at the start of each semester and interested students should register prior to or during the first week of classes. Students desiring assistance are encouraged to contact the Center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs listed below.
The Counseling Center is an accredited member of the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc.
Academic Support Programs;
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP): A program by which students may receive up to 60 hours of college credit by examination. There are varied requirements and limitations, and those interested in this program should contact the Center regarding their specific situation.
Test Anxiety Reduction: Workshop for students whose anxiety about taking tests interferes with studying and test performance. Participants will learn skills to change the thinking that leads to anxiety, learn to relax, and learn to study and take tests more effectively.
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The College
Career Development and Career Decision-Making: Self-Assessment/Life Planning Workshops: These three-session workshops are held at various times throughout the semester and participants will complete exercises and inventories to indicate interests, values, achievements and personality characteristics. Workshops are free for MSC students and a fee is charged for non-students.
Career Assessment Screening: Students who are initiating the career decision-making process will meet for initial screening. Career testing will be carried out and an overview of the process and the services available will be presented. Participants will then be referred to an appropriate program.
Personal Growth and Change:
Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problems that interfere with achieving success at the College. The student must initiate contact, or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the College, in order to receive assistance. Information disclosed in counseling is held in strictest confidence and is never released without the written consent of the student. Private one-to-one assistance in each of the areas described below is available for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar or group.
Personal Growth and Development Group: Participation in this low-structure group setting is designed to develop skills in communicating honestly, directly, and comfortably with other people and to promote personal growth and change through self-exploration in a supportive atmosphere. The group deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts, frustrations, conflicts about school, job, family, sex, loneliness, and dating.
Rational Living Workshop: The workshop provides an opportunity to become acquainted with the fundamentals of Rational Emotive Training and to apply these principles to problem areas specific to each individuals life. The process involves developing an awareness of self and of the emotional self-defeating thought patterns that have been learned. This opportunity to learn effective emotional management and positive behavior skills is provided through discussions, lecture, role playing and group interaction.
Anxiety Reduction Workshops: Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning. The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e., relaxation and counter-conditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions. Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program.
Compulsive Eating The Slender Balance: This seven-week educational seminar, jointly sponsored by the MSC Counseling Center and the MSC Student Health Clinic, provides a description and understanding of compulsive eating. Both campus and outside professionals provide relevant information on the psychological and health implications of this pattern.
Introduction to Biofeedback Training: This two-session group designed for those people who want more information about biofeedback training. Demonstrates instrumentation and treatment. Participants who desire treatment will be scheduled for continuation in the lab.
Decision-Making/Goal-Setting: Participants complete an assessment inventory that provides information about the manner of gathering and processing information and making decisions. The results are discussed during the second session and provide a framework for learning additional decision-making and goal-setting techniques.
Assertiveness Training: Participants learn techniques to help eliminate difficulties in asserting themselves. They learn: (1) how to recognize assertion problems; (2) simple ways to rid themselves of anxiety; (3) ways to build assertive skills to deal effectively with a wide variety of common problems.
Stress Reduction/Relaxation Techniques: Students learn and practice a progressive relaxation technique. A theoretical understanding of the benefits and the practical application of relaxation are emphasized.
Stress Management Workshop: A variety of techniques for managing fears, anxiety, and generalized stress are taught.
Veterans Upward Bound
Veterans Upward Bound at Metropolitan State College is a federally funded program designed to identify, recruit, and motivate Vietnam era Veterans to use their VA benefits in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education.
Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutorial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical programs is maximized. This is done during a 12-week trimester. Ancillary services such as career counseling, financial aid advisement, psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided for the participant.
High School Upward Bound
The program is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary to succeed in education beyond high school for youth from low-income families who have academic potential but who have inadequate secondary school preparation. The program provides intensive instruction in basic academic skills such as reading, writing, and mathematics. A comprehensive counseling and enrichment program, for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression, and positive attitudes toward learning, is also part of the support program. The students are recruited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target area high schools located in Denver County.
Special Services Program
The purpose of Special Services at Metropolitan State College is to provide educational assistance for selected students who, because of financial and/or other circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participation in higher education programs. Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of individual need. Interpersonal communication skills courses for college credit and basic skills courses in English and Reading are offered, coupled with tutorial assistance. These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a student's basic educational skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a college course load. Other supportive services available are counseling, testing, assistance with financial aid forms, and, when possible, assistance in attending social and cultural events to enhance the students experience at Metropolitan State College.
Servicemens Opportunity College
Metropolitan State College has received recognition as a Servicemen's Opportunity College. Further information can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Veterans Services
The Office of Veterans' Services is designed to provide student veterans, and veterans in the community, with a variety of outreach, recruitment, and retention services. These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutorial and counseling assistance, and many referrals to both on-campus offices and community services. The Office also certifies student veterans and dependents for their VA educational benefits. Veterans Services coordinates the Colorado Veterans' Tuition Assistance program which is a state benefit offering tuition credit for many student veterans who entered the military from
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The College
Colorado. Individuals should contact the Office for further information and assistance.
Student Health Clinic
The Student Health Clinic is an accessible, outpatient, direct health care clinic located on the Auraria campus in suite 140 of the Student Center. Its primary purpose is to provide patients with quality, economical health care services. The Student Health Clinic stresses the concepts of wellness and preventive medicine. Health education and counseling sessions are available, as well as treatment for medical problems.
Any MSC student, faculty, or staff person is entitled to services. The staff will provide medical service for departments, such as physical exams and injections, and are available to speak to classes or groups on health-related topics.
Many professional services are provided by a highly qualified professional staff consisting of physicians, nurse practitioners, and allied health professionals. Evaluation and treatment of illness, birth control information and supplies, screening for and treatment of venereal diseases, pap smears, weight counseling, health care for illness, blood pressure checks, pregnancy testing, minor surgery such as wart removals, hernia and prostate checks, and student health insurance information are just a few of the available services. Evening clinics are available.
Student Health Insurance
The Student Health Insurance is a group mandatory with waiver policy which is automatic for all full-time MSC students. The insurance premium for students taking 10 or more semester hours is included in the student fee assessment each semester. The premiums are paid to Southland Life Insurance Company. The Student Health Clinic coordinates all insurance claims and forwards them to the insurance company for payment of benefits.
Optional coverage is available for dependents of insured students who are enrolled for ten or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
The policy is in effect 24 hours a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of classes of the following semester. Insurance brochures listing other benefits, as well as insurance claim forms and information, are available at the Student Health Clinic, Room 140, Student Center. The group policy number is G 3392.
Student Activities
Metropolitan State College's Office of Student Activities offers movies, dances, leadership development programs, lectures series, art shows and a myriad of other co-curricular activities for the students of Metropolitan State College.
In addition to providing social, cultural and recreational activities, the Office of Student Activities encourages and supports the development of a wide range of professional, social, academic honorary, and special interest student organizations.
The Office of Student Activities is on the first floor of the three-story Student Activities Center wing of the Auraria Student Center. The activities wing houses the clubs and organizations, the student newspapers, and the administrative offices of the Student Activities staffs of the three colleges on the Auraria campus.
Auraria Student Assistance Center
Established to provide comprehensive services to students at CCD, MSC, and UCD, the Auraria Student Assistance Center functions through offices listed below. The Center also offers formal internship and practicum opportunities for students. Contact the Division Director of the Center regarding these
opportunities. The Center is located in Suite 108, Central Classroom Building. For more information, call (303) 556-3474.
Career Services
The Office of Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni at CCD, MSC, and UCD in planning their careers, finding part-time jobs while enrolled, and seeking employment upon graduation. Services offered included workshops, career counseling and assessment, a Career Resource Center, DISCOVER a computerized career guidance system, on-campus interviews with employers, job vacancy listings, and campus-wide career fairs.
Disabled Student Services
The Office of Disabled Student Services provides academic support services to disabled students at MSC and UCD. Services include notetaking, interpreting, counseling, admissions and registration assistance, and handicapped parking permits and information. The Office also assists in the coordination of the Resource Center for Disabled Persons located in the Auraria Library.
Information and Referral Services
This Office is a central information source which provides assistance to prospective students seeking enrollment at CCD, MSC, and UCD. Tri-institutional tours of the Auraria Campus are provided to prospective students on a pre-arranged basis.
International Student Services
The Office of International Student Services, assisting students from some 80 countries who attend CCD, MSC, and UCD, provides counseling on immigration issues, host family accommodations, support for personal adjustment, liaison with consulates, missions, embassies and foreign organizations, and other pertinent information for foreign students. The Office also provides information on study abroad programs to U.S. and foreign students.
Off-Campus Housing Services
The Office of Off-Campus Housing Services assists Auraria students seeking information on rental and residence hall living opportunities. The Office provides listing of rental properties and roommate-wanted situations and refers students to residence halls at local college campuses.
Vocational Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is a campus branch of the State Department of Social Services. Services offered to help disabled students become employable include job seeking skills training, vocational testing, counseling, tuition assistance, prosthetic devices and referral to additional sources of financial aid.
The Auraria Library
The Auraria Library provides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Metropolitan State College and the other Auraria institutions. The library has almost 600,000 volumes of books, microforms, and bound periodicals in addition to over 1,900 current periodical and newspaper subscriptions. Collection development efforts are focused on providing a strong base for learning/teaching efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections in the fields of public administration, design and planning, urban studies, and criminal justice. The main collection is supplemented by the Design and Planning Branch Library which is located in Bromley Building, Suite 200, and open to all campus personnel. In addition, as a member of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, the Auraria Library has access to an additional 6,000,000 volumes through inter-library loan as well as being able to access materials across the country.
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The College
All students are encouraged to take the self-guided audiotape tour of the library which takes about 50 minutes in order to familiarize themselves with the resources and services available to support their academic pursuits. Special services offered by the library include an online Public Access Catalog, computerized bibliographic searches, library orientation and instruction for groups and individuals, a depository of U.S. and Colorado government publications, and media listening and viewing facilities. Library rooms are also available for individual study, group conferences and typing.
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the library also has an internship program and a self-service graphics lab which might be of particular interest to students.
and enforcement of parking and traffic regulations, including accident reporting.
The members of the Department of Public Safety are dedicated to the service of the collegiate community at Auraria and the safety of its users.
Student Center
The Auraria Student Center serves as the location for out-of-class activities and services for all Auraria Campus students and staff. It is the focal point for many cultural, social and recreational activities of the college community. The Center contains a bookstore, gameroom, cafeteria, Mission (3.2% bar), meeting and conference facilities, student activities offices, Health Center, student organizations, and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Centers lower corridor contains a housing board, ride board, and other public transportation information.
The Student Center is located at 9th and Lawrence Streets.
Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center is a nonprofit organization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, faculty and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center. Non-Auraria children may attend on a space available basis only.
The Center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time. It is divided into two toddler, three preschool, and one kindergarten/afterschool classroom. Children must be 18 months to eight years of age to attend.
The philosophy of the Center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide a safe, nurturing environment. The children's program involves the assessment of individual needs and establishing goals and activities appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually oriented program provided at the Center.
Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time, or hourly basis to accommodate students varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188.
A drop-in center is available for the special child care needs of students, faculty and staff during pre-finals and finals week of spring and fall semesters. The Center is housed in the Student Center and is fully licensed by State Social Services. Parents are encouraged to make reservations in advance at the number listed above.
Auraria Department of Public Safety
The Department of Public Safety provides professional law enforcement services for the Auraria Higher Education Center. Sworn peace officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day; each day of the week trained dispatchers are on duty at all times to receive calls. Calls warranting police or emergency services should be directed through the emergency number at 556-3271.
The types of services provided by Public Safety include: the prevention of crime; investigation of offenses and taking crime reports; responding to first aid and emergency calls for assistance; monitoring of alarm systems throughout the campus; monitoring facilities for suspicious activity and unauthorized use;
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Academic Information
Academic Information
The College operates on the semester system with each semester during the academic year consisting of fifteen weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations. Running concurrently with the sixteen-week courses are modules, scheduled to begin on the first, sixth and eleventh week of the sixteen-week semester. During any sixteen-week semester students may enroll in sixteen-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both, as long as the limitations outlined under Course Load" are not exceeded.
The College also offers a ten-week summer term during which students may enroll for either ten-week courses, five-week courses, or combinations of both. The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year. Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed. Students who are planning to take the majority of their classes in the evenings should check with appropriate department chairpersons about the availability of courses in their major during evening hours. Enrollment can be on a full-time or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a baccalaureate degree, improving vocational or professional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons.
Admission and Registration
Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College should review the Colleges admission requirements. Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible for degree programs.
All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College are eligible to register each semester.
Students may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the College; however, following two full semesters of absence, students should review their status with the Office of Admissions and Records to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required.
A student may register for classes in one of two ways: (1) by mail approximately eight to ten weeks prior to the beginning of the semester; or (2) by direct computer registration just prior to the beginning of classes. Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing students. Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the College. Address changes may be made with the Office of Admissions and Records.
Registration procedures and dates for five-week modules are described in the Class Schedule. For further information regarding registration, please call 556-2987.
Academic Standards
The Board on Academic Standards Exceptions is composed of three faculty, two students and two administrators. An Associate Vice President for Student Affairs serves as chair. This Board provides a final appeal for students wishing to petition for exceptions to existing academic policies. Students wishing to appeal should contact the Office of Admissions and Records.
Academic Advising
Academic advising and tutoring programs are available in the schools of Business; Letters, Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies. Continuing and prospective students seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator of advising of the preferred school.
Student Academic Development and Assessment Center (SADAC)
SADAC's goal is to develop and implement programs responsive to the educational needs of MSC's diverse population. The responsibilities of the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center include the following programs:
Adult Learning and Assessment
Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from those of younger students. Adults who would like assistance in planning their educational goals or in applying for credit for college-level learning gained through work/life experience may contact the Center.
Credit for Prior Learning
In many academic departments at MSC, students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience. Such documenting of prior learning is initiated through the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center.
Contract Major/Minor Degree Program
Students may design an individualized interdisciplinary major or minor program when their educational goals are not met by majors and/or minors listed in the MSC Bulletin. Each contract major or minor is supervised by a faculty committee chosen by the student.
Career Support in Science and Technology
This program is designed to help those women and ethnic groups who have been traditionally excluded from careers in science and technology. Students are provided with support and tutoring, as needed, in order to ensure successful experiences in the sciences and technology subject areas.
Metro-Meritus
Persons 62 or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invited to attend classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College or at an Extended Campus location, on a space available basis. Metro-Meritus is designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting.
Metro on the Mall
Beginning in January of 1986, MSC will open an office on the 16th Street Mall at 16th and California. This office will provide a number of educational services to the urban citizens who work within a short distance of this location. Activities will include admissions information, information on academic programs, academic advising with a particular emphasis on adults, financial aid information and short workshops and seminars.
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Academic Information
Orientation
All new students to Metropolitan State College will be provided with information on college requirements and programs, class scheduling, registration, college services and resources and academic advising. Orientation is mandatory for all students new to MSC.
Freshmen Assessment Testing
The College has instituted a plan to help first year college students who have not previously attended a college to be more successful. All first semester freshmen are required to take a series of short tests. These tests measure skills in the basic areas of reading, English, and math. Test scores will be used to assist in the advisement of students in selecting college level courses. The tests are mandatory and take approximately one and one half hours to complete.
International Student Advising
Special academic advising is available for foreign born students; the major emphasis of this advising is on the unique aspects of the foreign students academic study. Assistance is available to assess and place students in English as a Second Language (ESL) classes which are appropriate for their individual needs and which will enhance academic success.
Probation Re-admit
Students who have been away from MSC for more than one year and have had below a 2.00 grade point average when they left are required to re-enter the College on a Probation or Warning Contract. They will be required to have a re-admit interview with a member of the Probation Review Committee and submit a mid-term progress report their first semester after returning to school.
Probation Review and Suspension
The Probation Suspension Policy at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide each student with the opportunity to maintain high standards and achieve academic success. The Suspension Policy states that students are required to maintain a grade point average of 2.00 (C) in order to qualify for graduation. When a students grade point average for a semester falls below 2.00, the student will be placed on a warning status.
If a student has failed to show satisfactory progress at the end of the warning semester, the student will be placed on probation subject to suspension at the end of the probation semester if satisfactory progress is not achieved. A probation student may be advised to repeat courses, enroll in specific courses, or limit the number of hours attempted during this probationary semester. A student who is dismissed may petition for re-admission after one year.
A student's warning or probation status is subject to the students decreasing a deficiency each semester until a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is achieved. The College advises every student placed on warning or probation status to meet with a member of the Probation Review Committee and the students major advisor. A mid-term progress report may be required before a student is allowed to register for the following semester. Students who have been readmitted to the College on probation or warning will have their status changed when they have attempted a minimum of twelve semester hours and maintained a C" average, or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission, for all course work attempted at Metropolitan State College. Students re-admitted on probation or warning will be reviewed for possible suspension when failing to show satisfactory progress regardless of the number of hours attempted. After removal from probation or warning, the student will be subject to the standard policy outlined above.
Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period, a student may apply for reinstatement through the Probation Review Committee. No student may re-enter after academic suspension without the written approval of the Probation Review Committee.
Womens Services
Womens Services, housed in the Institute for Womens Studies and Services, provides a place and a system of support for women in need of assistance. Womens Services disseminates information regarding on and off-campus educational services, entitlements through financial aid, and admissions procedures. Women's Services houses a resource library, a resource file of news clippings, information from public agencies, and research papers. Womens Services provides peer-counseling and assistance in planning for new career directions in the student's life. Women's Services is considered an extended family whose objective is to give the individual personalized counseling, referrals and supportive networks.
Division of Off Campus Programs
The changing nature of society has always created new responsibilities and challenges for educators. During the past decade, those changes have come more rapidly and have been more comprehensive. Preparing people for successful and contributing roles in the society requires careful coordination with many areas of the community, as well as a keen awareness of the educational needs of the nation.
In order to fulfill its educational responsibility, the Division of Off Campus Programs has been designed by Metropolitan State College to meet the diverse higher education needs of the four-county area. The Departments of Special Academic Programs, Cooperative Education, Extended Campus Programs, and Intercultural Services are the core of Off Campus Programs. Through these departments, educational opportunities for students, faculty and the community have been developed. Partnerships have been established between MSC, other institutions and businesses which are creating new models and standards for the development and delivery of innovative, high quality education.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education is a program which places students in work experiences related to their academic major. The purpose of the program is to integrate academic training with actual work experience. This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school, and earn money to help defray college expenses.
Students work in large corporations, small businesses, government, and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area. Most co-op students are paid by their employers, but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available, volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience.
Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors. The College requires that a student must complete 30 semester hours of college course work with a minimum 2.5 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for registration with co-op. No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the prog'am, and each student's interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator.
Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar. The alternating plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent in full-time study. The parallel schedule places students in
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Academic Information
a job while they simultaneously attend school. These positions are usually part-time. The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience which lasts for no more than one semester.
The college awards academic credit for supervised cooperative education placements. Students must complete a credit application available from the Co-op office, and this application must be approved by a faculty member from the department in which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSC degree requirements. Credit earned for the Co-op Education work experiences are not applicable toward general studies requirements. Additional departmental restrictions may apply to certain majors.
298-1-3 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.
An entry level work experience in a private company or an agency of the Federal or State government related to the student's major supervised by professionals on-the-job in conjunction with an MSC faculty member.
398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor
An advanced work experience in a private company or governmental agency related to the student's major and supervised by professionals on-the-job in conjunction with an MSC faculty member.
For more information on the program and the placement opportunities in your academic major, contact the Cooperative Education Office at 1045 9th Street Park. Phone: (303) 556-3290.
Special Academic Programs
Special Academic Programs is another facet of MSCs continuing effort to provide educational opportunities for the people of metropolitan Denver. The office specializes in workshops, seminars, and conferences for professional groups and organizations with specific educational needs. These programs often have a credit/non-credit option to allow participants to earn academic credit from MSC if they desire. In some cases, Continuing Education Units are offered.
Each year the Department organizes and offers 30-40 professional development programs for specific groups who wish to update their skills in professional areas such as education, journalism, nursing, psychology, sociology, and holistic health. Professional organizations are encouraged to contact the office if they have educational needs that can be met through workshops and seminars.
Extended Campus Credit Program
The Extended Campus Credit Program provides fully accredited MSC courses at convenient locations throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Courses are selected and scheduled to accommodate business professionals pursuing career advancement, degree-seeking students, and those interested in personal enrichment. A majority of these classes are offered at Metro South (West Middle School, 5151 S. Holly St.) and Metro North (Front Range Community College, 3645 W. 112th Ave.) Other classes are held in businesses, schools, and other community facilities. Extended Campus classes are open to regular MSC students and other area residents. Tuition rates vary from the regular tuition schedule. Students may apply and register on-site during the first week of classes or apply earlier through the Extended Campus office to assure seating.
International Studies
Metropolitan State College provides opportunities for academically qualified students to participate in study-abroad programs. These programs vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester. For further information, contact the Office of Off Campus Programs.
Interinstitutional Registration
Denver Area Colleges
Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College may register for courses at Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Denver, Community College of Aurora, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Courses taken at these institutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requirements at MSC subject to specific approval by MSC. In the event a conflict exists between the policies/procedures of MSC and one of the Colleges listed above, the most restrictive policy prevails. Students are well advised to confer with department chairs and/or coordinators of academic advising before registering interinstitutionally.
Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other institutions is available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Concurrent Enrollment
Concurrent enrollment differs from interinstitutional enrollment in that the student is currently matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropolitan State College and another college at the same time must obtain a letter of permission from the registering authority of each institution. Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both institutions. MSC students enrolling concurrently at other institutions should check with MSC department chairs concerning the acceptance of credits.
Semester Hours Credit
Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours. One semester hour or one Base Contact Hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes; this translates to a minimum of fifteen 50-minute hours per semester and normally about two hours per week of preparation by the student outside of class. Omnibus and laboratory courses give one semester hour of credit for each two, three or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2250 minutes for each hour of credit.
Course Load
The average course load per sixteen-week semester is fifteen or sixteen semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to eighteen semester hours during autumn and spring semesters and up to twelve semester hours during the summer semester. Students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.25 or higher may take nineteen or twenty semester hours during fall and spring semesters and those students with grade point averages of 3.50 or higher may take twenty-one semester hours. Authorization for overloads without these grade point average minimums must be obtained from the student's major department chairperson and appropriate dean. Authorization for overloads in excess of 21 semester credits is given by the Board on Academic Standards Exceptions, following a successful formal appeal prior to the beginning of the semester. The appeal should begin by obtaining a petition from an Academic Advising Coordinator in the appropriate deans area. For information on the charge per credit hour in excess of 18 refer to the Costs section of this Bulletin.
Course Numbers, Descriptions, and Offerings
Before starting registration, students should study Course Descriptions for information on the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites.
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The first digit in a course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores, 300 through 399 primarily for juniors, and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if, in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites, they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course.
After each course number is a figure specifying the semester hours of credit. As an example, English 101-3 is a three-credit course. Following the course title is a second set of numbers in parentheses indicating the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The second number in parentheses indicates the number of laboratory, shop, or field hours. For example, in a science course followed by (3 + 4), the numbers indicate three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory. Such a course would earn five hours of credit, three for lecture and two for laboratory work.
Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the course, this information is listed above the course description.
A list of all courses, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is published in the Class Schedule, which is printed well in advance of the beginning of each semester, and is available to all students.
The schedule according to which the courses listed in this Bulletin are taught during the year is based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds available.
Changes in Registration
Students enrolled may adjust schedules by dropping and/or adding classes during the first fifteen percent of each semester (not including weekends). See the current Semester Class Schedule for complete information concerning the tuition and fee refund schedule.
Students who reduce their course load after fifteen percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have adjusted and a twenty-five percent refund, if applicable. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Students reducing their course load after the fourth week of classes through the end of the fourteenth week of classes may receive an NC notation for each course provided faculty approval is granted. An NC/Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadlline to the Office of Admissions and Records. See the sections on Grades, Notations, Course Load, and Class Attendance in this Section.
Proportional time frames are applied for module courses and workshops.
Procedures for adding or dropping a five-week course after the course has begun are described in the current Class Schedule.
Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point at which they jeopardize success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
If students anticipate a prolonged absence because of illness, they should contact their instructors. If they find that they cannot, they should contact the Associate Vice President for Student, Affairs who will inform the instructors of the reasons for the anticipated absence.
Whenever an instructor thinks that a student's absences are interfering with academic progress, she/he may submit a letter to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs informing him of the situation.
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning
Adaptive Self-Paced Learning is a phrase used to describe classes in which students are allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to their personal learning needs and learning style. Students may proceed rapidly, finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly without time limitations that might interfere with the mastery of each required skill.
This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors, student proctors, and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance.
Self-paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced. Information on the method of instruction and the nature of program is available in each department. Self-paced courses are optional and are open to all students.
Students who do not complete the work of a self-paced course during a semester are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in and pay for the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course. A letter grade is awarded during the semester in which the work is completed satisfactorily.
Nontraditional Credit Options in Lieu of Course Requirements
Successful completion of special examinations and/or completion of a prior learning portfolio which, assessed for credit, may be substituted for the completion of course requirements, may permit placement in advanced courses, or may be used as the basis for awarding credit. A student may earn up to sixty semester hours of credit toward degree requirements using nontraditional credit options. Approved credit of this sort will be posted to the student's record after the completion of 8 semester hours of classroom (resident) credit. Nontraditional credit may not be used toward the last twelve credit hours of a degree program, does not substitute for residency requirements, and may not be used to challenge prerequisite courses for courses already completed. Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for nontraditional credit, and some institutions may not accept transfer credits which do not include letter grades.
Departmental Course Examinations
In special cases a department may grant a student credit toward graduation for college courses in which she or he requests and passes special college examinations. Under this provision a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the College. A fee of $10 per semester hour credit will be charged. Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded), and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course, provided the student has no previous collegiate enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the student's graduation requirements. Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department chairperson no later than the third week of classes in a semester. Permission for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upon recommendation of the department chairperson.
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No application for credit by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seeking curriculum in the College. Credit by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom credit hours of completing degree requirements. No credit by examination can be obtained for a course in which a student has been officially enrolled at Metropolitan State College or at another institution, whether or not the course has been completed and a grade awarded. Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses attended as a listener, visitor, or auditor.
When students have completed a course in the same discipline, higher in number than the course for which they are seeking examination credit, permission will be granted provided the two courses are unrelated and approval is granted by the appropriate department chairperson and dean. In a given discipline no credit by examination can be obtained for a course lower in a number in a sequence than the highest-numbered course already completed by that student. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course in a sequence, the examination for the lower-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester. Exceptions must be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions following endorsement of the department chairperson or dean. Examinations cannot be taken to raise grades, to remove failures, or to remove NC or SP notations. Credit by examination is not applicable toward academic residence requirements.
Examples of unrelated subject matter:
ART 212, Human Anatomy for Artists ART 103, Basic Photography Methods ITS 241, Introduction to Photography ITS 101, Introduction to Wood
Examination for credit will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examination for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to A or B must be attained on the examination in order to receive credit, but credits so earned for the course will be recorded without grade reference on the student's permanent record. Credits in courses for which credit is earned by examination are not considered in computing college grade point averages.
Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed 8 semester hours of credit at Metropolitan State College and after an evaluation of all possible transfer credits has been completed.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The College Board has developed a program of examinations designed to evaluate non-traditional college-level education, specifically including independent study and correspondence work, and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This program, known as the College-Level Examination Program or CLEP, consists of two series of examinations the General Examinations and the Subject Examinations.
The General Examination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English Composition, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Math and Social Sciences-History. Based on the results of these examinations, the College may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman general studies requirements areas. Thus, the successful student may test out of most of the traditional courses required during the freshman year. MSC does not allow credit for the English Composition Examination.
The Subject Examination series consists of more than 45 examinations which apply to specific college courses. MSC allows credit for 18 of these examinations. Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series, making a total of 60 semester hours of credit obtainable under a combination of the two series of examinations.
Credit obtained under CLEP at another institution will be reevaluated according to MSC credit-by-examination standards. Interested students should contact the Counseling Center for complete information about this program before registering to take any of these exams.
Credit for Prior Learning
Students may apply for credit for college-level prior learning gained through experience by submitting a prior learning portfolio to the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center which will toward it to the appropriate academic department for evaluation and assessment. Credits are awarded on the basis of careful evaluation of the prior learning portfolio which should demonstrate that the applicant's prior learning is equivalent to the learning objectives described in course syllabi for courses taught at Metropolitan State College. Students should check with departments for specific departmental guidelines in addition to College guidelines. The award of credit will be recommended by the departments and must receive final approval from the Prior Learning Assessment Committee composed of a faculty representative from each School of the College. Applicants for Credit for Prior Learning will generally be required to take the Portfolio Development Workshop. A fee of one-half the part-time student tuition rate will be assessed for credit awarded. Policies governing nontraditional credit options apply for credit for prior learning. Contact the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center for assistance and further information.
Attainment Examinations
Any student may take attainment examinations in certain departments for the purpose of waiving specific graduation requirements. Passing such an examination, although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation, entitles the student to substitute a subject of her/his own choice for the required subject. The examination is approximately the equivalent of the final examination in the course.
Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have performed satisfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school, and who have passed appropriate Advanced Placement Examinations conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, may submit the results to the Office of Admissions and Records for consideration for college credit. This office, in consultation with the appropriate department chairperson, determines the amount and nature of the credit and/or advanced placement granted.
Credit for Military Training and Other Training Programs
Military training and other training programs which have been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Records for transfer credit at Metropolitan State College. For formal military training, copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD214 should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records. For other training, official ACE transcripts should be submitted.
Pass-Fail Option
The pass-fail option encourages the students to venture out of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational experience. The pass notation has no effect on the grade point average; the failure grade is equivalent to the grade of F.
Students having already completed at least one MSC course with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade. Courses taken on a pass-fail basis will apply to major, minor or teacher certification requirements only with the approval of the appropriate department chairperson. Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option. Maximum
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graduation credit for these ungraded courses is eighteen credit hours, earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or module.
A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (during fifteen percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass-fail grading. If the student requests the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the semester that he will receive a regular letter-grade in the course. Once approved, the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable.
Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of their choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option.
Final Examinations
It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit, with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects.
Grades/Notations
Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan
State College are as follows:
A Superior...................4 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
B Above Average .............3 quality points per semester
hour attempted
C Average....................2 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
D Below Average but Passing ... 1 quality point per semester
hour attempted.
F Failure....................0 quality points per semester
hour attempted.
NC No Credit
Nl No Credit Incomplete
S Satisfactory (Limited to Student Teaching)
P Pass
X Grade assignment pending. Student must see faculty for an
explanation or assignment of grade.
The No Credit (NC) notation is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course, a request at registration for no credit, course repetition, or may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final examination and/or did not complete all of her/his out-of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization. Incomplete work denoted by Nl must be completed within one calendar year or earlier, at the discretion of the faculty member. The notation has no effect on the grade point average.
The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student and/or the faculty have decided to extend the student's exposure to the course in order to increase the student's proficiency. In order to earn credit, the student must re-register for and pay for the course in a subsequent term. The Nl notation may not be awarded in a self-paced course.
The following minimal requirements shall be required throughout the College and shall be a part of all school, departmental, or individual policies:
1. The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes of each term.
2. During the last week of a term, requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted. The NC (incomplete) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply.
3. A written policy statement describing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which she/he enrolls.
4. Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point that they jeopardize her/his success in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course.
Additional requirements for an NC notation may be set by each school, department, and/or faculty member. School policies shall supersede departmental policies; either school policies or departmental policies shall supersede individual policies.
Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands)
A student may repeat any course taken at MSC regardless of the original grade earned. By so doing, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the student's MSC academic record. The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation. The courses must carry the same title, course number and credit hours. To effect such a change, the student must re-register and pay tuition for the course in question, complete the course with a letter grade and complete the necessary form in the Office of Admissions and Records indicating that the course has been repeated. Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree evaluation or earlier, as identified. Credit duplication involving transfer, interinstitutional or consortium courses may be treated differently from the above procedure. This policy cannot be utilized for the purpose of altering grades assigned prior to the receipt of a degree from MSC.
Quality Points
The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received. The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of credit hours attempted.
To be eligible for a degree, a candidate must, in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements, have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours attempted. The notations NC, Nl, S, and P have no effect on the grade point average.
Transcripts of Records
A transcript is a certified copy of a student's permanent record and shows the academic status of the student at time of issuance. Copies are available at $1 each. Transcripts will be released by the Office of Admissions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the students full name as recorded while attending MSC, student identification number, last term of attendance, number of copies desired, and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropriate reasons. Certified true copies of transcripts from other institutions which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records will be issued upon signed request by the student. A charge of $1 per copy page is assessed for this service. Students from other institutions taking MSC courses under the consortium or inter-iristitutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institutions.
Student Grade Appeal Procedure
If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course, they must make their request for a change before the end of the second week of the semester following the completion
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of the course the following autumn semester in the case of the preceding spring semester. The Grade Appeal Guidelines may be obtained from the student's respective dean. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate a grade appeal within the time line, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the MSC Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook. The Handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more, but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more, but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more.
Honors and Awards
Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadership and service to the College and community, excellence in scholastic achievement, and outstanding personal character and integrity. Recognition of students includes:
The Presidents Award (one senior); the Vice President for Academic Affairs Award (one senior); the Vice President for Student Affairs Award (one senior); Outstanding Student Awards (juniors and seniors from each school); Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges (sophomores, juniors, and seniors); Association of American University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman). Other awards include Special Service Award for Disabled Students, Associated Students of Metropolitan State College, Charles W. Fisher Award, and the Colorado Engineering Council Award.
Information and applications for these awards are available in CN 316; applications are due each year on the last Friday of February. Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation.
In addition to annual awards, students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on Metropolitan State College Honor Lists. The Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher. The Vice Presidents Honor List carries the names of students who, at the time of computation, have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3.50 and 3.84, inclusively.
Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSC, then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours.
Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in their baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College. Honors designations are determined according to the following criteria:
1. Summa Cum Laude Top 5 percent graduates within each school with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than 3.65 Magna Cum Laude Next 10 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than 3.65.
2. To determine each honors category grade point averages for the previous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order. This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer, autumn and spring graduates.
3. To qualify for graduation honors recognition, a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC prior to the term of graduation.
4. Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors.
Omnibus Courses
The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities. Experimental topics courses, seminars, and workshops deal with novel subjects and current problems. Independent study allows students to investigate problems of
special interest. Supervised field study and internships, conducted cooperatively with business, industry, government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportunities. Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the Bulletin. Omnibus courses may be offered by all departments in the College.
A specific course plan for topic and group workshop courses, which covers content and credit hours, must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairperson of the department or discipline, and dean of the school before such a course can be listed in the schedule of classes. These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individualized) or an independent study course.
No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omnibus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements. One omnibus course numbered either 190 or 390 of up to three (3) hours credit may be used to satisfy General Studies requirements in each of the areas of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences, provided the course has a prefix of one of the departments within the respective subject matter areas; e.g., HIS 190 may be used in Social and Behavioral Sciences, but not in Science and Mathematics.
The following course numbers are the same for omnibus courses in all disciplines; and, when listed in class schedules, registration forms and college records, the course number will carry the prefix of the discipline in which the course is offered. In addition to prerequisites listed under a course and the approvals outlined above, other prerequisites appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added.
190 (Credit Variable) Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
An introductory study of selected topics especially appropriate for lower-division students.
299 (Credit Variable) Field Experience/lnternship
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor An in-depth inquiry into selected problems.
480 (Credit Variable) Workshop
Prerequisite: Approval of department
An advanced program of study, often of concentrated nature, designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline. Involves independent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area. 490 (Credit Variable) Seminar
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Presentations, discussions, reports, and critiques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered.
498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed 6 credit hours). Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chair
Independent investigation of problems within the student s major discipline. The course must be offered in that department/ discipline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area.
499 (Credit Variable) Advance Field Experience/lnternship
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
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An advanced level supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the students major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring.
Field Experience/lnternship Courses
Field experience or experiential education courses are courses whose major instructional activities are conducted outside the regular classroom, but whose syllabi are formally approved by the institution and maintained as an integral part of a department's curriculum. These courses incorporate actual experience with information assimilation and adhere to policies set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Certain programs such as Teacher Education, Nursing, etc., require experiential education courses as a part of their major. Other departments offer experiential education courses, generally as a part of the student's major or minor, for credit applicable to graduation requirements.
Five terms identify field experience courses offered at Metropolitan State College: External Laboratory, Practicum, Internship, Student Teaching, and Independent Study.
External Laboratory
A controlled environment or organized activity emphasizing experimentation in which guided observations and participation, under the guidance and supervision of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor, enhance the integration of theory and practice (as child in development). The External Laboratory is distinguished from the on-campus laboratory which is devoted to experimental study in any branch of the natural or applied sciences.
Practicum
A unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a practicum in reading).
Internship
A work-oriented training period of actual service in an agency, institution, or technical/business establishment that provides an in-depth learning experience for the student under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor as well as the scrutiny and guidance of a faculty member (as in cooperative education). Student Teaching
Faculty supervised learning experience in which the student applies knowledge gained in the Teacher Education Program to a classroom setting (as in practice teaching).
Independent Study
A student-initiated creative or research project conducted under the direct guidance and supervision of a faculty member of an academic department or discipline (as a thesis or special upper division project).
Guidelines for Field Experience/lnternship Courses
1. Credit may vary from one to fifteen hours, depending upon the instructional activity.
2. Students are expected to meet the minimum Base Clock Hours established by CCHE policy which requires two to three times the clock hours established for regular classroom instruction.
3. Approved cooperating agencies provide learning opportunities, prepare written statements of assignments, monitor students' performance, confer with the supervising faculty member, and provide a written evaluation.
4. An average of one hour a week, minimally, is spent in seminar and discussion or in conference with the adjunct faculty at the field experience locale and/or in conference with the supervising faculty member.
5. The supervising faculty member evaluates students' performance and, in consultation with the adjunct faculty
member, assigns the grade for the course according to grading policies stated in the College Bulletin.
6. Omnibus courses (299, 498, 499) emphasizing field experiences are subject to guidelines established for regular field-based courses and must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs.
Requirements for All Degrees
Students are responsible for full knowledge of the information provided in this Bulletin concerning regulations and requirements of the College and their program of study.
The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives: (1) following a curriculum in arts, sciences, or applied sciences to meet requirements for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree; (2) taking programs, which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in business and public services; or (3) enrolling for selected courses to improve general education or vocational competency.
To earn a degree, students must satisfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which they are registered and must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative average of 2.00 or higher.
For degree requirement evaluation purposes, students may select any Bulletin in effect while they are enrolled at Metropolitan State College providing that the Bulletin contains their complete program of study. A student interrupting continuous enrollment for one calendar year or more may select only those Bulletins in effect after return to the institution. Students must complete the general studies, major, minor, and all other degree requirements as outlined in the Bulletin under which they plan to graduate.
While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently, students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume approval to deviate from the stated requirements without a properly signed statement to that effect. Transfer students should become familiar with the requirements of the College, the general studies, and their major and minor areas.
Graduation Agreement
The official academic evaluation process is initiated when the student completes the Graduation Agreement. Once the student has received program approval from the major department chairperson and the minor department chairperson, the student submits the Agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. Workshops are held monthly to assist students in beginning their Graduation Agreements. After the completion of each subsequent semester of academic work, the student will receive an updated Academic Status Report.
The deadline for submitting the Graduation Agreement coincides with the deadline for submitting early (mail) registration for the semester the student plans to graduate. However, since the student is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of her/his program of study, it is expected that the Agreement will be submitted at least two years prior to the semester of graduation. A Graduation Agreement submitted after the deadline will be reviewed for the following graduation date.
After submitting the Graduation Agreement, a student who feels justified in deviating from College academic requirements may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance Valid reasons for variances must accompany all petitions and must be signed by the appropriate Dean and department chairperson.
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Students who have met all requirements for graduation may be granted diplomas at the end of the semester in which the work is completed. A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the Spring Semester. Students who officially graduated during any of the previous three semesters are invited but are not required to participate in the spring commencement.
Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees
To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others stipulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate.
1. Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College course work.
2. Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (300-and 400-level courses).
3. Complete all general studies requirements listed for the degree and major.
4. Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours. With certain exceptions (see major department), complete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors, the second major satisfies the minor requirement; however, a second emphasis within the first major does not constitute a second major. Coursework used toward meeting requirements for one major or minor may not be used toward meeting requirements for another major or minor.
5. Complete all special requirements of a department and school.
6. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher in all MSC courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all MSC courses which satisfy requirements for a minor.
7. Complete a Graduation Agreement.
8. Academic Residency (classroom credit)
a. Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College, including the last 10 semester hours applicable to the degree.
b. Complete at least 8 upper-division (300- and 400-level) semester hours of the major and 4 upper-division hours of the minor at Metropolitan State College (classroom credit).
c. Students should check with the Office of Admissions and Records before attempting to apply interinstitu-tional credit to academic residence requirements.
9. Credit Limitations:
a. Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus-numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requirements.
b. Not more than 4 semester hours in physical education activity courses will be counted toward a Bachelor's Degree for students who are not majoring in Physical Education or Recreation, and only 3 of these may be applied to the career category of general studies.
c. Not more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be counted toward a Bachelor's Degree for students who are not majoring in Music, and only 3 of these may be applied to the humanities category of general studies.
d. Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension and/or correspondence may be applied toward a Bachelors Degree.
General Studies for Bachelor Degrees
Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are required to meet the general studies distribution requirements listed below. Each of the category requirements may be satisfied by any course within the
departments listed including only one omnibus course numbered either 190 or 390 of up to three (3) hours credit in each of the areas of Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences, and then only if the course has a prefix of one of the departments within the respective subject matter areas. No omnibus course may be applied to the Freshman Composition or career catagory. Not more than 6 semester hours taken in any one department (as indicated by the three-letter course prefix) will apply toward general studies requirements. Each degree candidate must complete English 101 and English 102. The same course may be used toward meeting requirements in the general studies and the major or minor with the approval of the major or minor department chairperson. The credit value of the course may be considered only once, however, in the upper-division and cumulative credit totals. The career category is an option within the General Studies. A maximum of 6 semester hours of applicable course work may be applied to the career category. Students should check for specific general studies requirements stipulated by their major. Specific courses are listed in Afro-American Studies, Chicano Studies and Women's Studies because the programs are interdisciplinary.
Credit for cross-listed courses will apply to the General Studies categories according to the course prefix associated with the specific course the student chooses. For example, although CHS 200 and ANT 236 are cross-listed, if a student registers for CHS 200 the course will be applied toward the Humanities category; and if he/she registers for ANT 236 it will be applied toward the Social/Behavioral Science category.
Credits
Freshman Composition (ENG 101 and 102)...................6
Humanities............................................8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 103, and 108)
Art
Chicano Studies (CHS 200, 201, 202, 340, 341, 351, 352, 420)
English
French
German
Modern Languages
Music
Philosophy
Reading
Spanish
Speech
Science and Mathematics..............................8-10
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Meteorology
Physics
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences....................8-10
Afro-American Studies (AAS 101, 102, 113, 213,
220, 230, 270, 315, 330, 340, 355, 370, 375, 391,
440, 460, 470, 485)
Anthropology
Chicano Studies (CHS 100, 101, 102, 211, 221, 231,
301, 310, 311, 312, 320, 330)
Economics
History
Political Science Psychology Sociology Urban Studies Womens Studies
Career (Optional)....................................0-6
Accounting
Aerospace
Business Education and Communication
23


Academic Information
Civil Engineering Technology Communications
Community Service Development Computer Management Science Criminal Justice and Criminology Education
Electronics Engineering Technology Finance
Health Care Management Health Services
Hospitality, Meeting, Travel Administration
Human Services
Technical Communications
Industrial Technology
Journalism
Management
Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technology Military Science
Physical Education and Recreation
Social Work
Surveying
Total...................................................36
Requirements for a Second Degree
For an additional Bachelor's Degree, the student will comply with the following:
1. The first Bachelors Degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College.
2. Student must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of 8 MSC classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department.
3. Student must complete a minor, if required by the major department for the contemplated degree.
4. The student must spend at least two additional semesters in residence.
5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC is required in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree.
6. General studies will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department.
7. Credit limitations for a Bachelors degree will continue to exist for the second degree.
8. A Graduation Agreement must be completed as outlined in this Bulletin.
Family Rights and Privacy Act
Metropolitan State College gives notice that it has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information as directory information under 438(a) (5) (B) of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Directory information concerning students at the College will be released without the prior consent of the student as permitted by law unless within ten (10) days after registration a student has notified the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records that such information should not be released without his or her consent. Directory information at Metropolitan State College is as follows:
1. name, address and phone listing
2. date and place of birth
3. major and minor fields of study
4. participation in officially recognized activities and sports
5. weight and height of members of athletic teams
6. dates of attendance
7. degrees and awards received
8. most recent previous educational agency or institution attended.
24


Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Metropolitan State College is organized into three schools. These are listed below with the majors and minors offered by each. The curriculum requirements for each of the programs are described under special sections of this Bulletin prepared by each school. Programs marked with an asterisk (*) do not require completion of a minor.
Bachelors Degree
Minor Major
School of Business
Accounting X X
Business Communications X
Business Education and Communications** X
Computer and Management Science X
Data Processing X
Economics *** X X
Finance X X
Human Resource Management X
Management X X
Marketing X X
Office Administration X
Production Management X
Real Estate X
Systems Management X
Institute for Entrepreneurship
Urban Studies* X X
"In addition to the B.S. degree, a 3-year specialist degree is offered with
options in Administrative Assistant, Administrative Office Management,
and Legal Assistant (paralegal).
'"The Department of Economics offers a B.A. Degree, rather than a B.S.
School of Professional Studies
Division of Education
Bilingual-Bicultural Education X
Early Childhood Education X X
Elementary Education X
Health and Safety X
Parenting Education X
Physical Education X X
Reading X
Recreation X X
Secondary Education X
Special Education X
Teacher Certification:
Early Childhood, Elementary, Thirteen Secondary Fields, and Special Education
Division of Technology
Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics x
Aviation Management x x
Civil Engineering Technology x x
Drafting Engineering Technology x
Electronics Engineering Technology x x
Industrial Design* x
Industrial Marketing* x
Industrial Technology* x x
Mechanical Engineering Technology* x x
Professional Pilot x x
Surveying x x
Technical Communications x
Technical and Industrial Administration* x
Technical Management* x
Bachelors Degree
Division of Public Service Professions Minor Major
Criminal Justice and Criminology Health Care Management (Upper- X X
Division) Hospitality, Meeting, and Travel X X
Administration* X
Hotel Administration X
Human Services* X X
Meeting Administration X
Nursing (Upper-Division for R.N.s) X
Restaurant Administration X
Travel Administration School of Letters, Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities X
Art* X X
English X X
French X
German X
Industrial Design X
Journalism X X
Language and Linguistics X
Modern Languages X
Music X
Music Education* X
Music Performance* X
Philospphy X X
Practical Writing X
Public Relations X
Spanish X X
Speech Communications X X
Speech Pathology-Audiology Division of Social Sciences X
Anthropology X X
Behavioral Science X
History X X
Political Science X X
Psychology X X
Public Administration X
Sociology X X
Social Work Division of Science and Mathematics X
Biology X X
Chemistry X X
Criminalistics* X X
Geography X
Geology X
Land Use X
Mathematics X X
Meteorology X X
Physics X X
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
Afro-American Studies X X
Bilingual Chicano Studies X
Chicano Studies X
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Women's Studies X
25


Degrees and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College
Communications Multi-Major
The Communications Multi-Major offers nine areas of emphasis for students with varying educational and career needs. Each student's program is planned with an advisor in the selected area of emphasis. Students may obtain information concerning the major from the Department sponsoring the particular area of emphasis in which they are interested.
Area of Emphasis
Communications: Visual Sponsored by Art Communications: Industrial Media Sponsored by Technical Communications
Communications: Industrial-Organizational Sponsored by Technical Communications
Communications: Industrial-Specialist Sponsored by Technical Communications
Communications: Broadcasting Sponsored by Speech Communications: Meeting Planning Sponsored by
Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration Communications: Theater Administration Sponsored by Speech
Communications: Business Sponsored by Business Education and Communications Communications: Sports Sponsored by Physical Education and Recreation
All Communications Multi-Major areas of emphases comprise 42 semester hours of study, including 6 hours of required core courses as outlined below, courses in the area of emphasis, and a choice of free electives.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Core Courses for All Areas of Emphases Semester
Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems.................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.......................3
Option Requirements ..................................36
Total.................................................42
Communications Free Electives List
Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected Communications area of emphasis are acceptable as free
electives.
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..........3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication ..................3
ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods..........................3
ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods ...............3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art:
1960-Present Day .............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ..........................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition.......................3
ENG 303 Semantics......................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism.....................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing...........3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading ........3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing........3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers.........3
PHI 144 Logic..........................................3
PSC 322 Public Policy..................................3
PSC 346 Public Opinion ................................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology..............................3
PSY 342 Issues in Community/Social Psychology..........3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking.......................3
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage.........................2
SPE 328 Stage Directing................................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ............3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction ..................................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art 3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech 3
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre 3
SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I 3
SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II 3
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting 3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life ........................3
Communications Multi-Major Summary
Sem. Hrs.
Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. in Total
Areas of In Core In Area of Communic. Sem. Hrs.
Emphasis Communications: Courses Emphasis Electives In Major
Visual Communications: Industrial 6 27 9 42
Media Communications: Industrial- 6 24 12 42
Organizational Communications: Industrial Spe- 6 24 12 42
cialist Communications: 6 24 12 42
Broadcasting Communications: Meeting Plan- 6 21 15 42
ning Communications: Theatre Admin- 6 18 18 42
istration Communications: 6 18 18 42
Business Communications: 6 24 12 42
Sports 6 27 9 42
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor offers an area of concentration for students who recognize the increased emphasis on wellness in several professional fields and/or for health conscious individuals who wish to establish a self-enhancement program. The Multi-Minor is designed to complement a major chosen by a student which is relevant to the student's career goals. The student arranges for the minor through one of the following departments: Human Services, Nursing and Health Care Management, Philosophy, Psychology, Physical Education and Recreation, Sociology, or Teacher Education.
The Multi-Minor comprises 24 hours of study as outlined below:
Required Courses semester
Hours
HES 105 Dynamics of Health..............................3
HES 204 Nutrition ......................................3
HSW 375 Holistic Health and High Level Wellness ........4
PER 150 Skills and Methods: Teaching
Physical Fitness ...............................2
PHI 322 Personal Knowledge and Professional Growth......3
PSY 275 Introduction to Holistic Health.................3
PSY 303 Research in Health and Wellness ................3
Electives*......................................3
Total........................................................24
* Practical experience is an integral part of this minor and contract major. Students are urged to enhance their education through field work. This can be achieved through practicums, internships and cooperative education offerings in one of the above listed departments or by using these elective hours.
26


Contract Major/Minor Program
Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College, the need arises occasionally for a major that will not fit the existing catalog major or minor and which is individual in nature and meets the specific needs of the students. The Contract Major/Minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a Contract Major/Minor Advising Committee to enable the student to attain a specific, individual, educational objective which cannot be satisfied by any existing catalog major and/or minor programs. The degree sought may be either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science.
For further information, contact the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center.
Community Service Development Program
The Community Service Development Program at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide academic and applied learning opportunities for people who wish to pursue professional careers in the administration of a wide variety of nonprofit organizations. A complete description of the program may be found under Human Services and Urban Studies.


School of Business
School of Business
The curriculum of this School is designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business, and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business. The School offers two degrees the Three-Year Specialist Degree, and the Bachelor of Science. The Department of Economics offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, rather than a Bachelor of Science. The Urban Studies Program, housed within the Institute for Entrepreneurship in the School of Business, offers coursework leading to either a Bachelor of Science degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree.
Undergraduate programs within the School of Business are designed:
1. To offer the student the opportunity to receive the baccalaureate degree. This degree program consists of a broad foundation in general education, a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and specific competence in one or more significant functional areas of business.
2. To offer a diverse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those residents of the metropolitan area, and others, who desire to study business-oriented subjects without undertaking a degree program, and to meet the needs of the Denver business and professional community for continuing education programs.
3. To strengthen students' powers of imaginative and innovative thinking, self-reliance, creative independent analysis and sensitivity to social and ethical values.
4. To instill in each student a desire for learning that will continue after he has graduated and taken his place in the community.
5. To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering, risk, and progress which are essential to the continued development of the American free enterprise system.
The philosophy of the School of Business is to devote its resources to continued growth of high quality, undergraduate programs. As needs arise and resources become available, additional programs or areas of specialization will be offered. Flexibility of course design, a principal requisite of the School of Business, will continue to dominate the planning of all new programs.
Three-Year Specialist Degree
The Department of Business Education and Communications offers a three-year degree with a choice from three areas of emphasis currently in strong demand. The areas of emphasis take into consideration work experience credit, permit additional specialization and include a field of experience requirement for a partial on-the-job training. The student has the opportunity later to obtain a bachelor's degree by completing limited additional requirements for a contract major.
Students seeking a three-year degree in business for any of the areas of emphasis given below must complete the following general studies requirements:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition ..............6
Humanities:
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ...........3
Elective .....................................3
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathemathics for the Management
and Social Sciences...........................4
Laboratory Science............................3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ...........3
Elective .....................................3
Career:
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications.......3
Total.....................................................28
In addition, all three-year degree students must complete the following abbreviated business core:
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing...........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ....................3
MGT 221 Business Law I.................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
Total.......................................................21
Three-year degree students should choose one of the following areas of emphasis as their major area of interest:
Areas of Emphasis Administrative Assistant*
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BEC 102 Intermediate Typewriting ....................3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines............3
BEC 112 Intermediate Gregg Shorthand
(Gregg or Speedwriting) .....................3
BEC 113 Advanced Shorthand ..........................3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures .............3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic..........................3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis ..............3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business...........................3
BEC 499 Field Experience.............................5
MGT 321 Business Law II..............................3
ECO 350 Managerial Economics.........................3
Upper-Division Business Electives.............6
Total.....................................................41
"Life Experience credit hours for the successful completion of the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination may be applied to the completion of this option.
28


School of Business
Administrative Office Management
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I .................................3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines.............3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures ..............3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic...........................3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis ...............3
BEC 355 Records Management ...........................3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business............................3
BEC 499 Field Experience..............................5
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ...................................3
or
CMS 331 Business Forecasting Methods..................3
MGT 321 Business Law II...............................3
MGT 353 Personnel Management..........................3
or
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ......................3
Electives ....................................6
Total.....................................................41
Paralegal**
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I .................................3
BEC 232 Legal Method, Research and Writing ...........3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic...........................3
BEC 324 Litigation....................................3
BEC 325 Family Law ...................................3
BEC 326 Probate Decedents' Estates
Wills Trusts ...............................3
BEC 327 The Law of Business Organizations.............3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business............................3
BEC 499 Field Experience..............................5
MGT 321 Business Law II...............................3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate ....................3
Electives
Choose a minimum of 6 credits from the following courses ..6
CJC 101 Introduction to the
Criminal Justice System ......................3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law......................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom
Procedures....................................3
PSC 300 American State and Local
Government....................................4
MGT 384 Real Estate Law...............................3
Total.....................................................41
A four-year paralegal program is presently being considered.
Bachelor of Arts Economics
Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or limited resources. The study of economics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions. This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of her or his specific career objective. The Bachelor of Arts program has been designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign economies, and the quantitative tools necessary for independent analytical research and thought. Specialized courses are provided to develop the student's ability in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis. Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as professional economists. Employment opportunities in economics are available in national and international business, federal, state, and local government, and in various non-profit organizations.
General Studies
Semester
Hours
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition...........................6
Humanities: ............................................8-10
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences...........................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences...............................3
Physical or Biological Science ...............3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ...............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro................3
Electives ....................................3
Career .............................................. 0-6
Total.....................................................36
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics.....................4
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomics ...................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics ...................3
ECO 315 Econometrics...................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought....................3
Total.................................................. 16
Approved Electives
Fifteen (15) hours of upper-division economics
electives selected in consultation with and
approved by the Department of Economics ..................15
Total.....................................................31
Minor
Eighteen (18 hours must be completed to fulfill the minor
requirement)
Total......................................................18
Free Electives.............................................35
Program Total.............................................120
Business Emphasis in Economics
This emphasis prepares the student for entry into the growing professions of economics and business. It provides training that will enable the student to enter the profession and provide assistance to government and business in solving problems and formulating policies.
General Studies (See General Studies Requirements for Bachelor
of Science Degree in School of Business)..................36
Business Core (See Business Core for Bachelor of Science Degree in School of Business).............................33
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory..................3
ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory .................3
ECO 315 Econometrics.......................................3
ECO 460 History of Economic Thought........................3
Total.....................................................12
Approved Electives
Fifteen (15) hours of upper-division economics electives selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics..............................................15
Total.....................................................27
Electives Within the School of Business....................9
Electives Outside the School of Business .................15
Program Total...........................................120
29


School of Business
Bachelor of Science
Accounting
Business Education and Communications
Computer and Management Science
Finance
Management
Marketing
Urban Studies
The School of Business offers majors in accounting, business education and communications, computer and management science, finance, management, and marketing. The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industrial, tax, systems, or governmental accounting. The business education major prepares students to teach business subjects in public and private junior and senior high schools and community colleges. The computer and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding fields of business, data processing, systems, design, or management science. The finance major is designed to prepare students for a career in corporate financial analysis, insurance, real estate, investments, the extractive industries, or banking. The major in management provides areas of emphasis in insurance, personnel and human resource management, production, real estate, or small business management. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of distribution/retailing, promotion/advertising, sales, marketing research, marketing for nonprofit organizations, or marketing management.
In order to be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the College's general specifications for the bachelor s degree listed under Requirements for all Degrees. A summary of the course program which she or he must complete within the School of Business is as follows except for the Communications Multi-Major Business Option. See the Communications Multi-Major section under Special Programs of this Bulletin.
General Studies.............................................36
Business Core ..............................................33
Major in School of Business.................................27
Electives Within the School of Business...................9
Electives Outside the School of Business ..................15
Total.....................................................120
General Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in accounting, business education and communications, computer and management science, economics (business emphasis), finance, management or marketing must complete the following general studies requirements:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition...........................6
Humanities:
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .........3
Electives ....................................5
Science and Mathematics:
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management
and Social Sciences...........................4
MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and
Social Sciences...............................3
Physical or Biological Science ...............3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences:
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ..............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro...............3
Electives ....................................3
Career:
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications.....3
Total....................................................36
Business Core
In addition to the general studies requirement, students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing...........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics .................3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making.....................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ..........................3
MGT 221 Business Law I.................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MGT 495 Business Policies..............................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing........................3
Total.......................................................33
Accounting
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I .................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting...............................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I.....................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II....................3
ACC 420 Auditing......................................3
Total......................................................15
Students must select 12 hours of accounting electives or one of the following areas of emphasis:
Financial Emphasis (CPA)*
ACC 310 Income Tax II .....................................3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting .........................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ...........................3
ACC 452 Advanced Accounting II...........................3
Total.......................................................12
Those planning to sit for the CPA examination should elect MGT 321.
Managerial Emphasis (CMA)**
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems ............3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting ........................3
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions ..............3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II ...........................3
Total.........................1.............................12
"Those planning to sit for the CMA examination should elect ECO 350, MGT 357, and MGT 453
Tax Emphasis
ACC 310 Income Tax II ...............................3
ACC 409 Tax Procedure and Research ..................3
ACC 410 Tax Planning ................................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ........................3
Total...................................................12
Systems Emphasis
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems ..........3
ACC 341 Advanced Cost Accounting .....................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design .................................3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL................................3
Total...................................................12
30


School of Business
Governmental Emphasis
ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems ...........3
ACC 320 Governmental Accounting ......................3
ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I.........................3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .........................3
Total....................................................12
Oil and Gas Emphasis***
FIN 320 Financial Management in the
Extractive Industries .......................3
ACC 445 Oil and Gas Accounting........................3
ACC 455 Taxation of Natural Resources ................3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .........................3
or
FIN 410 International Financial
Management...................................3
Total....................................................12
Semester
Required Education Courses Hours
EDU 221 Processes of Education in
Urban Secondary Schools......................3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban
Secondary Schools............................2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner..................3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum
and Classroom Management School Teachers .. .3 EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring
and Materials Construction ..................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the
Classroom ...................................3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education.................3
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary ..................................12
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in Content
Areas: Secondary............................ 3
Total...................................................34
Total hours for Accounting Major................27
Consult with department for emphasis status.
Business Education and Communications
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BEC 102 Intermediate Typewriting .....................3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis ...............3
BEC 360 Principles of Business Education..............2
BEC 361 Methods of Teaching Typewriting...............3
Total...................................................11
Students must choose two of the following teaching specialties*.........................................16-18
Bookkeeping and Accounting
ACC 209 Personal Income Taxes........................3
or
ACC 309 Income Tax I ................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting..............................3
or
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I.....................3
BEC 363 Methods of Teaching..........................3
Bookkeeping, Accounting, and
Basic Business Subjects ....................3
Consumer Economics and Basic Business
BEC 363 Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping,
Accounting, and Basic Business Subjects ....3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business............................3
FIN 225 Personal Money Management ....................3
Data Processing
BEC 498 Independent Study Teaching Data
Processing..................................2
CMS 211 COBOL ........................................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design .................................3
*To teach business courses at the public school level in Colorado, a vocational education credential is required. The three courses needed for vocational certification are available through extension courses offered by Colorado State University or the University of Northern Colorado. The specific courses are: Foundations/Philosophy of Vocational Education; Coordinating Techniques; and Youth Organizations.
Secretarial
BEC 112 Intermediate Shorthand .......................3
or
BEC 114 Beginning Speedwriting........................3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures ..............3
BEC 362 Methods of Teaching Stenography...............2
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Business
Sponsored by the Department of Business Education and Communications
This communication area of emphasis gives the student an exposure to basic areas of business study and provides the student with the theory and practice most commonly used in contemporary business communication (See a BEC advisor). In addition, the student must complete the General Studies for a bachelor's degree and select a suitable minor.
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems....................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion........................3
Total.......................................................6
Required area of emphasis courses
24 hours from the following
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I......................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II.....................3
BEC 200* Business and Interpersonal
Communications.................................3
BEC 301* Business Research and Report Writing...........3
BEC 323* Listening and Logic............................3
BEC 499 Advanced Field Experience/lnternship ........arr.
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ..............3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ................3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making....................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ...........................3
MGT 221 Business Law I..................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management........................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.........................3
24
This course is specifically required.
Electives
Twelve hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis
and/or the free electives list................................12
Total hrs. for multi-major....................................42
Computer and Management Science
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 210 FORTRAN................................3
CMS 211 COBOL .................................3
31


School of Business
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design .....................................3
Total........................................................9
One of the following areas of emphasis must be chosen for an additional eighteen (18) hours:
Information Systems Emphasis
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base
Management..................................3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware
and Software................................3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems .............3
Approved CMS electives...................................9
Total...................................................18
Management Science Emphasis
CMS 331 Business Forecasting Methods.................3
CMS 431 Management Science Techniques ..............3
CMS 439 Case Studies in Management
Science.....................................3
CMS 440 Simulation of Management
Processes...................................3
Approved CMS electives...................................6
Total...................................................18
Computer Analyst Emphasis
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming
Assembler...................................3
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management ........3
CMS 309 Job Control Language and
Operating Systems ..........................3
CMS 314 Advanced Assembler Language..................3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware
and Software................................3
Approved CMS electives...................................3
Total...................................................18
Systems Development Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management
Systems.....................................3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL...............................3
CMS 322 Hardware and Software........................3
CMS 405 Advanced Analysis and Design.................3
CMS 407 Systems Development and Implementation ......3
Choose six (6) additional hours from the following:
CMS 323 Data Communications..........................3
CMS 324 Computer Control and Auditability............3
CMS 325 Office Automation ...........................3
CMS 406 Advanced Data Base Management................3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ..............3
6
Total...................................................18
Total hours for CMS major...............................27
NOTE: A maximum of 15 semester hours of programming courses is allowed in the CMS major.
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions ................3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II ...........................3
FIN 360 Investments .......................................3
FIN 435 Financial Problems and Policy .....................3
Total.........................................................18
Choose nine (9) additional hours from the following to supplement an area of emphasis:
Insurance
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance..........................3
MGT 343 Property and Liability
Insurance......................................3
MGT 345 Governmental Insurance and
Insured Employee Benefits......................3
Total........................................................9
Real Estate
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate ......................3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance..............................3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law..................................3
Total........................................................9
Financial Management
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II.......................3
MGT 321 Business Law II..................................3
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance .........................3
Total........................................................9
Investments
ACC 410 Tax Planning ....................................3
FIN 460 Securities Analysis..............................3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate .......................3
Total........................................................9
Extractive Industries* **
FIN 320 Financial Management in the
Extractive Industries .........................3
ACC 445 Oil and Gas Accounting...........................3
ACC 455 Taxation of Natural Resources ...................3
Total......................................................9
'Those selecting Extractive Industries as their area of emphasis must elect Geology to fulfill Science requirement.
"Consult with department for emphasis status.
Commercial Banking
ECO 465 Advanced Monetary Theory ...................3
FIN 370 The Management of Commercial
Banks..........|............................3
FIN 470 Special Topics in Bank
Management..................................3
Total..................................................9
Personal Financial Management
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance ..................3
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate ................3
ACC 410 Tax Planning .............................. 3
Total..................................................9
International Financial Management
Finance
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 309 Income Tax I .....................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Acccounting I........................3
FIN 410 International Financial Management .............3
MKT 371 International Marketing.........................3
Approved Business Elective ....................................3
Total...........................................................9
32


School of Business
Accounting Emphasis
ACC 340 Cost Accounting.....................................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II..........................3
ACC 310 Income Tax II ......................................3
Total.......................................................9
Semester hours for area of emphasis chosen .................9
Total hours for major......................................27
Management
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 350 Managerial Economics.........................3
Students select one of the following areas of emphasis:
Insurance
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance .....................3
MGT 343 Property and Liability Insurance.............3
MGT 344 Life and Health Insurance....................3
MGT 345 Governmental Insurance and
Insured Employee Benefits....................3
MGT 346 Risk Management..............................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making...............3
Approved Management electives ...........................6
Total...................................................24
Management
MGT 322 Legal Environment of Business ...............3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.........................3
MGT 355 Production Management........................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making...............3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior .....................3
MGT 461 Cases in Management..........................3
Approved Management electives............................6
Total...................................................24
Human Resource Management
MGT 353 Personnel Management.........................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations ....................3
MGT 375 Performance Appraisal .......................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making...............3
MGT 461 Cases in Management..........................3
MGT 462 Compensation Administration .................3
Approved Management electives ...........................6
Total...................................................24
Production Management
ACC 340 Cost Accounting..............................3
MGT 355 Production Management........................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making...............3
MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management .........3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management ..................3
MGT 461 Cases in Management..........................3
Approved Management electives ...........................6
Total...................................................24
Real Estate
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate ...................3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance..........................3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law..............................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making...............3
MGT 484 Real Estate Appraisal ......................3
MGT 485 Commercial and Investment
Real Estate...............................3
Approved Management electives .........................6
Total.................................................24
Small Business Management
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation ....................3
MGT 321 Business Law II.............................3
MGT 356 Small Business Management...................3
MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making..............3
MGT 457 Advanced Topics in Small Business...........3
MGT 458 Real Cases in Small Business ...............3
Approved Management electives .........................6
Total.................................................24
Semester hours for area of emphasis chosen ...........24
Total hours for major.................................27
Marketing
Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MKT 301 Marketing Research........................3
MKT 311 Advertising...............................3
MKT 316 Sales Management .........................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ........................3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management...........3
MKT 456 Advanced Marketing Problems ...........3
Plus nine (9) hours of Marketing electives.............. 9
Total hours for major................................27
Minors Offered by the School of Business
The minors offered by the School of Business are specifically created for nonbusiness majors. Because prerequisite requirements are involved in each set of courses, any student minoring in any of the areas below should contact an advisor.
Accounting Minor
The Accounting minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of accounting.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
ACC 309 Income Tax I ..................................3
ACC 340 Cost Accounting................................3
ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I......................3
ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II.....................3
Accounting Electives...........................3
Total.......................................................21
Business Communications Minor
The Business Communications minor is designed to give nonbusiness students some orientation to the business field, especially in areas that deal heavily with any aspect of communications.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal
Communications...............................3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report
Writing .....................................3
33


School of Business
BEC 323 Listening and Logic............................3
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and
Systems.......................................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ............3
Total.....................................................15
Choose six (6) hours of electives from the following courses:
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures ...............3
BEC 223 Word Processing................................3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis ................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information
Systems.......................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
Semester hours of electives chosen.........................6
Hours for minor...........................................21
Data Processing Minor
The Data Processing minor is designed to give nonbusiness students a career skill in computer programming for business.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .........3
CMS 210 FORTRAN....................................3
CMS 211 COBOL .....................................3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming
Assembler.................................3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ...............................3
CMS 311 Advanced COBOL.............................3
CMS 314 Advanced Assembler Language................3
Total..............................................21
Economics Minor
The Economics minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and institutions, as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical research and thought.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro................3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours of upper-division Economics courses, selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics.
Finance Minor
The Finance minor is designed to provide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportunity to develop some knowledge of finance.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
ACC 309 Income Tax I ..................................3
FIN 300 Financial Markets and Institutions ............3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ..........................3
FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .........................3
FIN 360 Investments....................................3
Total......................................................21
Management Minor
The Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with managerial skills to work a business environment.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 221 Business Law I................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.....................3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.........................3
MGT 355 Production Management........................3
MGT 453 Organizational Behavior .....................3
Approved Management Elective.............................3
Total...................................................18
Human Resource Management Minor
The Human Resource Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of personnel/HRM in business and government.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 300 Principles of Management...................3
MGT 353 Personnel Management.......................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations ..................3
MGT 375 Performance Appraisal .....................3
MGT 462 Compensation Administration ...............3
Approved Management Elective............................3
Total..................................................18
Marketing Minor
The Marketing minor offers the nonbusiness major an overview and understanding of the functional business area of marketing.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.....................3
MKT 311 Advertising.................................3
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ..........................3
MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing Management.............3
Plus six (6) hours of Marketing electives ...............6
Total...................................................18
Office Administration Minor
The Office Administration minor attempts to develop a moderate degree of skills while emphasizing promotional possibilities to supervisory and beginning office management positions.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BEC 102 Intermediate Typewriting .....................3
BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines.............3
BEC 111 Beginning Gregg Shorthand.....................3
BEC 222 Office Practices and Procedures ..............3
BEC 354 Office Management and Analysis ...............3
Choose one of the following elective courses:..............3
BEC 223 Word Processing.................................3
BEC 323 Listening and Logic.............................3
BEC 402 Ethics in Business..............................3
Total.....................................................18
Production Management Minor
The Production Management minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the production process and managerial functions as they relate to production and operations.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 300 Principles of Management.....................3
MGT 355 Production Management........................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations ....................3
MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management .........3
MGT 455 Systems-Project Management ..................3
MGT 461 Cases in Management...........................3
Total...................................................18
34


School of Business
Real Estate Minor
The Real Estate minor is designed for non-business majors and provides them with basic course requirements for GRI, prelicensing preparation, and required education hours for recertification.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MGT 380 Principles of Real Estate .......................3
MGT 382 Real Estate Finance..........................3
MGT 384 Real Estate Law..............................3
MGT 484 Real Estate Appraisal .......................3
MGT 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate.......3
Approved Management Elective..............................3
Total....................................................18
Systems Management Minor
The Systems Management minor is designed to give non-business students a basic understanding of business data processing with particular emphasis on systems analysis and design.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ............3
CMS 211 COBOL ........................................3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ..............3
CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis
and Design ..................................3
CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and
Software ....................................3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ...............3
CMS 451 Data Processing Management....................3
Total...................................................21
35


Institute for Entrepreneurship
Institute for Entrepreneurship
Through the Institute, the resources of the School of Business, the Urban Studies program, and the various segments of the College will be utilized to provide managerial and academic expertise for urban entrepreneurs. Special attention will be addressed to nontraditional entrepreneurs within the urban focus. Within the Institute will be housed the Urban Studies Program, an interdisciplinary degree which offers the following academic programs:
Urban Studies MSC/UCD
The Institute offers course work leading to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Urban Studies. The Bachelor of Science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in quantitative aspects of Urban Studies. Course work is jointly offered by MSC and UCD and there is a common major. The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to learning. To support this approach six areas of emphasis are offered within the major.
1. Local Government Urban Planning
2. Housing Patterns and Alternatives
3. Cultural Lifestyles
4. Transportation and Communication
5. Community Service Development (CSD)
6. Business, Management and Urbanization
Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
The requirements total 46 semester hours and include:
1. 25-27 hours of Core Courses
2. 9 hours selected from each of four areas of Process
3. 12 hours in an area of emphasis to be selected by the student.
4. 6 additional hours for a Bachelor of Science
5. Urban Studies Majors who do not wish to pursue a minor in some other discipline will be required to take at least 14 semester hours for a total of 60 semester hours. The 14 semester hours must be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.
6. All courses listed from outside of URS are as of the 1983-84 MSC Bulletin.
7. There are different requirements for the CSD and
Business, Management and Urbanization emphases.
Core Courses: Semester
Hours
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies..................3
URS 200 Inside Look at Urban Institutions .............3
URS 300 World Patterns of Urbanization ................3
URS 380 Applied Urban Research Methods ................3
URS 489 Interdisciplinary Seminar.............4
URS 499* Internship in Urban Studies ............3
Advanced Writing Course which may be taken from Community Service Development, English
or Communications .......................*3-4
Statistics which may be taken from Economics, Geography, Mathematics, Psychology or Sociology ...............................3-4
Total.................................................25-27
*CSD students may elect to fulfill these requirements within the CSD area of emphasis.
A COURSE IS REQUIRED FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF PROCESS FOR A TOTAL OF AT LEAST 9 HOURS. CSD STUDENTS WILL TAKE ONE COURSE FROM TWO AREAS FOR A TOTAL OF AT LEAST 6 HOURS. SUBSTITUTIONS FOR THESE COURSES SHOULD BE ARRANGED THROUGH THE INSTITUTE'S ADVISOR.
Urban Spatial Structuring
URS 310 Internal Structure of the City 3
URS 351 Community Development and Planning 3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game 4
GEG 204 Geography of Denver 3
GEG 360 Urban Geography..............................3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning..................3
Urban Political Processes
URS 210 An Analysis of Urban Boundaries .............3
URS 350 Emerging Urban Political Systems ............3
URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game........................4
PSC 300 American State and Local Government .........4
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration .......3
SOC 371 Politics and Power...........................3
Urban Economic Processes
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro..............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro..............3
ECO 330 State and Local Finance .....................3
ECO 335 Urban Economic Analysis......................3
ECO 340 Transportation Economics.....................3
ECO 345 Environmental Economics......................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America...........................3
Urban Social Processes
GEG 132 Geographic Analysis of Current
Social Issues ..............................3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population .....................3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential .......................3
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living.....................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America...........................3
Areas of Emphasis
In each of the first four following areas of emphasis, the student will select a minimum of 12 hours with a minimum of 6 in Urban Studies. The student may take any combination of interdisciplinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in consultation with an advisor. One of the courses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis.
Local Government Urban Planning
This area of emphasis concentrates on the basic conceptual and theoretical planning processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban government occupations and professions. The area of emphasis is designed for students seeking entry into government occupations or seeking advanced study in Public Administration or Urban Planning beyond the bachelors degree.
URS 250 URS 389 URS 450
URS 289 URS 400 URS 451
URS 351 URS 410 URS 471
Housing Patterns and Alternatives
This area of emphasis will concentrate on the assembly and development of residential land, the nature of public and private programs to provide housing and the maintenance and rebuilding of neighborhoods. A broad range of topics will include the evolution of public intervention in housing and residential renewal, the conflict between physical and human criteria in housing decisions, and constraints on the public's ability to deal with housing issues. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for graduate work and/or employment with a wide range of public and private housing agencies.
URS 171 URS 289 URS 400
URS 230 URS 330 URS 450
URS 250 URS 389 MGT 300
MGT 380
Cultural Lifestyles
This area of emphasis concentrates on the impacts on the urban landscape of the lifestyles of various cultures be they ethnic,
36


Institute for Entrepreneurship
racial, chronological, religious, economic, or gender. The consequences of these impacts are viewed as among the most significant determinants of urban structure, form, function, and social interaction. The student is provided with specialized training and experience for entry into professions with public or private agencies which deal directly with these groups within a pluralistic urban environment.
URS 250 URS 389 URS 410
URS 371 URS 400 URS 471
Transportation and Communication
The Transportation-Communication area of emphasis has three basic academic foci: (1) to aid students in refining their perceptions of the various networks that exist in the urban setting;
(2) to provide tools and techniques to analyze these networks; and
(3) to increase the students understanding that transportation and communication are interdependent with such factors as land use, politics and demography. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for a professional career or further graduate training.
URS 228 URS 328 URS 400
URS 289 URS 389 URS 450
administration of government organizations at the local, state or federal level, or in management positions in private industry.
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses......................25-27
2. Business, Management Urbanization Emphasis........21
MGT MGT 100 300 Introduction to Business Principles of Management 3 3
MGT 356 Small Business Management 3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing
FIN 300 Principles of Finance 3
Six Hours to be Selected From:
ECO 350 Managerial Economics
MGT 454 Organizational Behavior
MGT 457 Advanced Topics in Small Business
MKT 301 Marketing Research
MKT 311 Advertising
MKT 330 Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation
Major for Bachelor of Science Urban Studies
Community Service Development
This area of emphasis combines classroom theory and practical experience in a comprehensive format. Students' formal classroom experiences are supplemented by at least twenty hours per week during two semesters in placement experiences. All field work will be carefully supervised and student progress will be measured against learning objectives cooperatively developed for each course by the student, agency supervisor and the College coordinator or faculty member.
This area of emphasis is designed to provide an educational program for a very specific administrative level small, community-based, non-profit service agencies and organizations. The directive skills include development and management of volunteer programs, fund-raising, proposal writing, program and
human resource development.
Course Requirements Include:
1. URS Required Core Courses.........................16
2. Selected Electives.................................7
3. CSD Area of Emphasis
CSD 200 Introduction to Community Service
Development................................1
CSD 201 Principles of Community Service Development 4
CSD 300 Applied Development and Seminar I ..........2
CSD 321 Conflict Resolution and Decision-Making ....2
CSD 341 Development and Use of Inexpensive Media ...3
CSD 401 Assessment and Evaluation of Non-Profit
Programs ..................................3
CSD 402 Fundraising and Proposal Writing
for Community Services.....................4
CSD 431 Development and Administration of Volunteer
Programs ..................................3
CSD 451 Politics of Agency Survival ................3
Total...................................................47
Business, Management and Urbanization
This area of emphasis will stress the interrelationships between the private business sector and the public policy and urban life designers and decision-makers. Public sector/private sector/ policy makers' cooperation, or the lack thereof, in the future, will have a direct effect on urban lifestyle. Issues to be addressed or focused upon in this emphasis are: the roles of business and urban government in the overall process of urbanization; the functions of managing business and managing government; the importance of sales tax revenues to both business and government and, with less governmental employment in the future, the changes that are in store for small and medium size businesses. This area of emphasis is expressly directed toward the student seeking an undergraduate major in management or
The requirements for the major in Urban Studies leading to the Bachelor of Science degree includes six semester hours in addition to the Bachelor of Arts degree. The six hours must be
taken from the following list of courses.
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems............3
CMS 210 FORTRAN .....................................3
CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming .................3
CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics .........3
PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for the Social
Sciences ...................................3
PSY 312 Inferential Statistics.......................3
MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for Management and
Social Sciences ............................4
The Contract Major
A contract major for Urban Studies may be arranged by direct consultation with an Urban Studies Faculty Advisor within the Economics Department. This major can be developed to meet specific needs and interests of students that cannot be met through the more conventional structure of the Urban Studies major. For example, a person might want to emphasize an educational or an occupational interest within his or her major such as airport planning and management, water resources management or community health behavior. The required core courses as listed for the B.A. degree will hold for the contract major. The other 24 semester hours needed for this major will be agreed upon by a committee of faculty advisors from Urban Studies and other affected departments and the student.
Urban Studies Minor
Minors for both the Bachelor of Science degree and the Bachelor of Arts degree are available. The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to her or his occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with the department offering related courses and the students' Urban Studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors which will reflect the best possible elective curriculum, and will insure that an urban emphasis is maintained.
Total for the Minor....................21 Semester Hours
Required Courses.......................9 Semester Hours
URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies.......................3
URS 200 An Inside Look at Urban Institutions................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing...................3
Elective Courses.............................12 Semester Hours
Twelve additional semester hours are required to complete the minor. The elective courses are to be selected in consultation with a URS faculty advisor.
37


School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences offers programs in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Science and Mathematics which are designed to provide a high quality traditional liberal arts education. The programs are structured to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of the urban student and can be directed toward personal, occupational, and professional goals in a rapidly changing world.
Each of the departments within the School provides comprehensive academic programs with many options to fulfill the multiple needs of a diverse urban college population.
The Letters, Arts and Sciences curriculum amplifies the programs of every other academic area of the College by offering the wide range of courses generally included in the total educational mission of an accredited institution.
Letters, Arts and Sciences studies aim toward the development of perspective and intellectual strength for the endeavors of a lifetime. The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences is fully engaged in expanding career programs that combine the preparations and broad background elements essential for educational sufficiency in todays urban community.
In harmony with the basic philosophy and goals of Metropolitan State College, the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences assumes a major role in encouraging and preparing students to participate fully in the challenges and opportunities of modern life. The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences departmental majors and minors lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.
Division of Humanities
The Humanities comprise the offerings of the departments of Art, English, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy and Speech. In each of these areas programs are available leading to the Bachelor's degree, and in conjunction with programs in Education, students may become certified teachers in these areas at the secondary level (except Philosophy). Several departments offer more specifically focused emphases within their areas such as the Journalism program and the Preprofessional Writing program in the Department of English and the Performance major in Music. These areas of emphasis are identified in the individual departmental listings.
Department of Art
The Department of Art offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of: Fine Arts (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography and sculpture); Applied Arts (advertising design and product and industrial design); Crafts (ceramics, metalwork and jewelry making, and design in wood); and Art History (studies which include an emphasis in contemporary and modern art courses).
Art Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
Semester
Core Requirements For All Art Majors Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I.............3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II............3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I..............3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II.............3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960 .3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to the
Present ......................................3
Total....................................................18
Students may choose one of four areas of emphasis: Art History, Fine Arts, Applied Arts, or Crafts.
Art History Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Art History (upper division) .................................18
Fine Arts......................................................6
Applied Arts ..................................................6
Crafts ........................................................6
Electives......................................................6
Total.........................................................42
Fine Arts Area of Emphasis semester
Hours
Fine Arts.....................................................18
Applied Arts ..................................................9
Crafts ........................................................9
Art History (upper division) ..................................6
Total.........................................................42
Applied Arts Area of Emphasis semester
Hours
Applied Arts .................................................18
Crafts ........................................................9
Fine Arts......................................................9
Art History (upper division) ................................6
Total.........................................................42
Crafts Area of Emphasis Semester
Hours
Crafts .......................................................18
Applied Arts ..................................................9
Fine Arts......................................................9
Art History (upper division) ................................6
Total.........................................................42
Total.........................................................60
(A minimum of 27 upper division hours required.)
Minor requirements for Art Majors is optional.
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
No Minor is Required semester
Required Courses Hours
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I.................3
38


Division of Humanities
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II.................3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art ............................3
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design ....................3
ART 245 Beginning Product and Industrial Design .........3
ART 300 History of Art Nouveau
or
ART 303 History of Art Between the World
Wars .............................................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design .................3
ART 345 Intermediate Product and Industrial
Design............................................3
ART 445 Advanced Product and Industrial
Design I .........................................3
ART 446 Advanced Product and Industrial
Design II ........................................3
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking .....................4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials & Processes..................2
ITS 110 Introduction to Plastics I.......................2
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II......................2
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals:
Cold Metals ......................................2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals:
Hot Metals........................................2
ITS 141 Industrial Drawing: Sketching.....................2
ITS 142 Industrial Drawing: Instruments ..................2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography.......................3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.......................4
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production..................4
ITS 401 Furniture Construction............................4
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering.........................3
Elective Courses ................................15
(Selected in consultation with advisor, at least 10 of which must be upper-division).
Total..........................................................84
Art Education
Teacher certification for art majors is available through the Department of Education.
Minor in Art
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I.............3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II............3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I..............3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II.............3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism
to 1960 .....................................3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 to
the Present..................................3
Sub Total................................................18
Electives.................................................9
Minimum One Upper-Division Studio Course Minimum One Upper-Division Art History Course
Total....................................................27
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Communications: Visual Sponsored by the Department of Art
The Visual Communications area of concentration offers students a sequence of art courses in graphic communications, including drawing and design as well as a broad acquaintance with the visual arts in contemporary and historical perspective.
To become knowledgeable in the arts as related to present day communications media, students have the opportunity to pursue graphic courses in the Fine Arts of Drawing, Painting and Printmaking, or in the Applied Art fields of Graphic Communications and Advertising Design, Photography and Video.
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems...............................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion......................3
Total.....................................................6
Required Lower-Division Courses
ART 110 Drawing Processes and Concepts I..............3
ART 111 Drawing Processes and Concepts II.............3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I...............3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II..............3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impressionism to 1960...3
Required Art History (Select 3 Hours)
ART 303 History of Art Between the World Wars ........3
or
ART 401 Modern Art History: Theory and Criticism......3
Required Studio Courses Fine Arts (select 6 hours)
ART 210 Beginning Life Drawing........................3
ART 215 Beginning Painting ...........................3
ART 225 Beginning Printmaking.........................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography ........................3
Applied Arts (6 hours)
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design .................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising Design ..............3
Electives
Six hours elected from
Upper-Division Art Courses................................6
Total.....................................................42
English Department
The Department of English offers instruction in a variety of areas: English Literature, American Literature, and World Literature; language and linguistics; writing, non-fiction as well as poetry, fiction, and drama. Courses in each area appeal, variously, to students in every school of the College who wish to read and understand the literature of the great cultures of the world, who wish to examine the principles underlying how languages work, and who wish to cultivate their skills in creating writings of fiction and non-fiction. Department faculty have organized and developed the curriculum to respond to student interests in reading and understanding the great works of literature; in acquiring the skill of expressing themselves lucidly, accurately, and with forceful style; and in establishing, developing and refining their analytical and imaginative powers.
Advanced courses, typically in the upper division, permit more detailed attention to subjects for students who are especially interested in one or more of the subdisciplines offered by the department. Among these are Journalism, Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing, Practical Writing, English Education, and Literature.
The English Department is currently effecting changes in requirements for several of its majors and minors. This process includes alterations in and additions to course offerings. Please contact the English Department in August/September 1986 to ascertain the current status of requirements and offerings.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis*
The literature emphasis offers a path of study that produces the skills widely recognized as those of the English major: the ability to work independently, to think with depth and sensitivity, and to write clearly. Literature majors are often valued because they know how to learn and how to apply what they learn. By concentrating their major efforts on reading literature, students receive not only the widest exposure to the best writing of different times and places, but the fullest opportunity to mature their understanding of complex literary stances and language strategies that explore influential ideas about the human condition. The literature major also learns to think carefully and to write clearly on complex subjects for a demanding reader.
39


Division of Humanities
Sophomore level courses provide an introduction to the variety of literary expression in historical context and an initial introduction to techniques and stances used by all writers. Upper-division courses apply these techniques and others to great works, permitting greater depth of study.
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Dickinson ENG 231 English Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare
Semester Hours Required..................................9
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language ENG 202 English Grammar
Semester Hours Required..................................3
III. Two of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre ENG 222 American Literature: Twain to Updike ENG 232 English Literature: Donne to Johnson ENG 233 English Literature: Blake to Beckett
Semester Hours Required.....................................6
IV. One of the following courses:
ENG 351 Advanced Composition**
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction, Poetry, or Drama)**
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing**
Semester Hours Required.....................................3
V. One of the following general courses:
ENG 321 Drama in the United States
ENG 322 American Poetry
ENG 323 American Novel
ENG 324 Afro-American Literature
ENG 331 English Drama: Mysteries to Masques
ENG 332 English Drama: Manners to the Absurd
ENG 333 English Novel: Defoe to Austen
ENG 334 English Novel: Bronte to Conrad
ENG 336 British Poetry
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature
ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature
ENG 343 Classical Mythology
ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences
Semester Hours Required.............................3
VI. Four electives from 300-400 level courses including at least one from the following:
ENG 401 Linguistic Studies (Variable Topics)
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature ENG 413 Major Authors
ENG 414 Modern Continental, English and American Drama
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories and
Sonnets
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Ethical-Problem
Plays
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing
ENG 461 Literary Criticism
Semester Hours Required.............................12
Total Semester Hours Required.......................36
"Students should consult department for recent program adjustments. "Prerequisite: Corresponding lower-division course or pass department examination. Lower-division prerequisite does not count toward major.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts
Secondary School Teaching Area of Emphasis*
The Secondary School Teaching emphasis in conjunction with the state certification program coordinated by the MSC Division of Education prepares future teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse subject matter required for certification. This program equips students with a wide variety of language
principles and skills; practical experience in developing and presenting the process of writing; a sound knowledge of literary genres, periods, and authors with a special focus on literature for adolescents; and an understanding of communication and media as used in English studies. In addition to meeting specified state and departmental requirements, this program offers students the opportunity to develop a further specialization in writing, language, or literature to complement the major.
Semester
Required Courses for Certification Hours
I. ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes ......3
ENG 221 American Literature:
Bradford to Dickinson ......................3
ENG 222 American Literature: Twain to Updike......3
ENG 231 English Literature:
Beowulf to Shakespeare......................3
Lower-Division Literature:
Semester Hours Required............................12
II. ENG 201 Nature of Language........................3
ENG 202 English Grammar...........................3
Lower-Division Language:
Semester Hours Required.............................6
III. ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies............3
ENG 303 Semantics or..............................3
ENG 302 History of the English Language...........3
Upper-Division Language:
Semester Hours Required.............................6
IV. ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition .....................3
ENG 361 Teaching English in
Secondary Schools..........................**
ENG 362 Teaching Composition
in Secondary Schools........................3
ENG 363 Teaching Communications...................3
or
RDG 328 Methods and Techniques of Teaching
Reading: Secondary ......................**
English Education Core Courses:
Semester Hours Required...........................12
V. English Electives:
Three upper-division English courses (including at least one 400-level) selected in consultation with and approved by designated English Department advisors.
Semester hours required.......................9
Total Semester Hours Required.................45
Candidates for certification are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors, and advisor approval must be obtained before the English Department will endorse a candidate for certification.
Students seeking secondary credentials in English must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the English major requirements.
"While ENG 361 and RDG 328 are required to meet State English Certification requirements, these six semester hours are carried under the Student's Professional Education requirements.
English Major for Bachelor of Arts Writing Emphasis
The Writing Emphasis is designed to give the creative writer extensive practice on various genres of literature as well as a good foundation in appreciation of the English language literary heritage. Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer in finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career.
Semester
Writing Component Hours
Entry Course:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing
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Division of Humanities
Semester hours required...................
One of the following writing courses:
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing
ENG 351 Advanced Composition
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing
Semester hours required...................
Three of the following creative writing courses:
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction)
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Science Fiction) ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Poetry)
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Drama)
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television Semester hours required........................................
Exit Course:
ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing
Semester hours required................................
Literature Component
One of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Dickinson ENG 231 English Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare
Semester hours required................................
Each of the following courses:
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre ENG 222 American Literature: Twain to Updike ENG 233 English Literature: Blake to Beckett
Semester hours required................................
One of the following courses:
ENG 321 Drama in the United States
ENG 322 American Poetry
ENG 323 American Novel
ENG 324 Afro-American Literature
ENG 331 English Drama: Mysteries to Masques
ENG 332 English Drama: Manners to the Absurd
ENG 333 English Novel: Defoe to Austen
ENG 334 English Novel: Bronte to Conrad
ENG 336 British Poetry
ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature
ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature
ENG 343 Classical Mythology
ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences
Semester hours required
One of the following courses:
ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature
ENG 412 Selected Themes in Literature
ENG 413 Major Authors
ENG 414 Modern Continental, English, and American Drama
ENG 431 Shakespeare: Comedies, Histories, Sonnets
ENG 432 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Ethical Problem Plays
ENG 461 Literary Criticism
Semester hours required
.3
.3
.9
.3
.3
.9
.3
.3
Total Semester hours required
.36
Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis
Every profession benefits from having among its members persons who write exceptionally well, and rewards, in turn, tend to accrue to such persons. This emphasis is designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop their writing gifts and thereby enhance their career opportunities; for this reason it is expected that the Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis will be a second major for nearly everyone who pursues it.
The program is designed to provide the student with an intensive, coherent sequence of instruction in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing, from the English language literary heritage.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition.....................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language
or
ENG 202 English Grammar .............................3
ENG 303 Semantics....................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.........................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ..............3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
ENG 363 Teaching Communication ......................3
Total..................................................18
Students will take six literature courses of which at least two must be upper division; these courses must be distributed among at least four of the following five areas:
1. World of Continental Literature
2. British Literature: Beginnings to 17th Century
3. British Literature: 17th Century to 19th Century
4. American Literature
5. 20th Century Literature
18
Total Semester Hours Required.................................36
English Minor
I. Two of the following courses:
ENG 211 World Literature: Homer to Cervantes
ENG 212 World Literature: Moliere to Sartre
ENG 221 American Literature: Bradford to Dickinson
ENG 222 American Literature: Twain to Updike
ENG 231 English Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare
ENG 232 English Literature: Donne to Johnson
ENG 233 English Literature: Blake to Beckett
Semester Hours Required...........................................6
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 201 The Nature of Language
ENG 202 English Grammar
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing
Semester Hours Required.....................................3
III. Three electives from 300-400 level courses including at least one from the following:
ENG 321
ENG 322
ENG 323
ENG 324
ENG 331
ENG 332
ENG 333
ENG 334
ENG 336
ENG 341
ENG 342
ENG 343
ENG 345
Drama in the United States American Poetry American Novel Afro-American Literature English Drama: Mysteries to Masques English Drama: Manners to the Absurd English Novel: Defoe to Austen English Novel: Bronte to Conrad British Poetry
Masterpieces of Continental Literature The English Bible as Literature Classical Mythology Literature from Writings in the Sciences
Semester Hours Required..............................9
Total Semester Hours Required.....................18
English Minor
Secondary School Teaching Area of Emphasis*
I. Each of the following courses:
ENG 347 Literature for Adolescents
ENG 351 Advanced Composition
ENG 361 Teaching English in Secondary Schools
ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools
Semester Hours Required...............................12
II. One of the following courses:
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ENG 302 History of the English Language ENG 303 Semantics
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Division of Humanities
Semester Hours Required................................3
III. Three English Electives from 300-400 level courses selected in consultation with and approved by designated English
Department advisors.
Semester Hours Required................................9
Total Semester Hours Required.........................24
'This minor does not satisfy MSC requirements for certification in Secondary English, but does meet minimum requirements for those seeking eligibility to teach English in secondary schools accredited by the North Central Association. Students working toward this minor are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors.
Dramatic Literature Emphasis
The English minor with emphasis in Dramatic Literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading, writing, and thinking about the texts of drama and to turn these skills into marketable assets. The program is designed to meet needs of anyone involved in the history, teaching, writing, production, or performance of drama. The minor will be useful to students of every aspect of theater (design, building, producing, directing, performing, evaluating), in any medium.
I. Introductory Courses
ENG 112 Introduction to Literature: Drama
A second course, introductory in nature, is to be selected by
agreement of the student and the Department advisor. The course
need not be an English course, but if not, it should be an
introductory course related to the students major interest in the
use of drama.
Semester Hours Required
.6
II. Writing Course(s) One of the following courses:
ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Drama
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Script Writing
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing
Semester Hours Required..................................3
III. Literature Electives (9 hours to be chosen in consultation with an advisor)
ENG 131 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENG 321 Drama in the United States
ENG 331 Development of English Drama I
ENG 332 Development of English Drama II
ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop: Drama
ENG 431 Shakespeare I
ENG 432 Shakespeare II
ENG 413 Major Authors (Playwrights)
ENG 414 Modern Continental, English, and American Drama ENG 461 Literary Criticism
Semester Hours Required..................................9
IV. Final Study ENG 480 Workshop
ENG 498 Independent Study
or
ENG 499 Internship or Practicum
NOTE: This phase of the English Minor with an emphasis in Dramatic Literature presents the opportunity for students electing the minor to devote significant attention to one in-depth project for completion of the study. The project should be based on the reading of a dramatic text, but should combine this experience with some other area of design, management, performance or writing. The project should combine the skills of reading drama with those of the associated area of expertise. The project is to be proposed by the student, approved by an advisor in the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor, associated with the other area of expertise fundamental to the study. The study may take the form of a workshop, an independent study, an internship or a practicum.
Semester Hours Required............................3
Total Semester Hours Required......................21
Language and Linguistics Minor
The Language and Linguistics minor offers concepts about, theories of, and analytical techniques in natural language. It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and, simultaneously, serves the interests of future teachers, students of literature and writing, and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language. Taken in an appropriate order made evident by careful advising, the courses in the program educate students both to use and to appreciate their language. The minor requires students to engage in vigorous, progressively more explicit and precise analysis and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 201 The Nature of Language........................3
ENG 202 English Grammar ..............................3
ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ..............3
ENG 302 History of the English Language...............3
or
ENG 303 Semantics.....................................3
ENG 498 Independent Study in Language/Linguistics.....3
15
Two of the Following:
ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools....3
ENG 401 Linguistic Studies (this course will
carry five different title concentrations and may be repeated for credit with a change
in title)........I..............................3
Total for Minor...........................................21
Practical Writing Minor
The Practical Writing Minor is a humanities based, career oriented program enabling students to develop writing skills as an adjunct to any major. Students will be prepared to do the practical writing found in magazines, newspapers, and newsletters. Students completing the program are expected to be versatile writers capable of applying the principles of good writing to different audiences and purposes.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ENG 107 English Usage and Grammar .......................3
ENG 201 The Nature of Language...........................3
ENG 303 Semantics........................................3
ENG 351 Advanced Composition.............................3
ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing ..................3
Semester Hours Required....................................15
Elective Courses (Choose three from the following):
ENG 352 Writing as a Profession
ENG 398 Cooperative Education: English Internship
ENG 498 Independent Study: Writing Project
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and Newswriting
JRN 381 Feature Writing for Newspapers
JRN 481 Feature Writing for Magazines
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion
Semester Hours Required.....................................9
Total Semester Hours Required..............................24
In addition to pursuing the Practical Writing Minor some students may wish to seek certification as qualified practical writers. A student seeking certification must apply to the Practical Writing Review Committee before completing nine hours applicable to the minor, and if approved, must work out with the committee a coordinated sequence of courses, one of which must be English 498, Independent Study. The certification procedure will include development of a portfolio which will be prepared under the guidance of the committee. This portfolio, designed to
demonstrate student proficiency, will include such items as a
letter in which students describe the development of their skills in writing and the extent to which they see these as valuable to their
42


Division of Humanities
careers, and two different demonstrations of their ability to write and edit under pressure. The portfolio materials will be juried by at least two members of the PWRC. Some of the preparation may carry up to three hours credit under English 498.
Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts
The Journalism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and information media, including the press, broadcasting, and public relations. Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism beyond JRN 181. Prospective Journalism students who might be concerned about such proficiency may request and take a test in standard English usage and composition, designed by the Journalism faculty, before registering for any courses beyond Introduction to Journalism. According to the results, the faculty may recommend that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JRN 181.
JRN 181
JRN 182
JRN 282
JRN 286'
JRN 381
JRN 383
JRN 385
JRN 386
JRN 481
JRN 482
JRN 485
JRN 486
JRN 487
Introduction to Journalism Beginning Reporting and News Writing Beginning News Editing and Copyreading Intermediate Reporting and News Writing Feature Article Writing for Newspapers Contemporary Issues Public Affairs Reporting College Newspaper Practicum Feature Article Writing for Magazines Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout
News Media, Propaganda and Public Opinion Advanced Reporting and News Writing Ethical Issues in Journalism
Total Semester Hours Required
36
'Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Journalism Minor
I. Each of the following courses:
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing
Semester Hours Required..................................6
II. Five of the following courses:
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading JRN 286' Intermediate Reporting and News Writing JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues
JRN 385 Public Affairs Reporting
JRN 386 College Newspaper Practicum
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines
JRN 482 Advanced News Editing, Copyreading and Principles of Layout JRN 486 Advanced News Writing
JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism
Semester Hours Required .
Total Semester Hours Required.
.15
.21
'Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282.
Public Relations Minor
The Public Relations Minor prepares students for careers related to institutional and organizational information distribution. Emphasis in the program is on strong news writing skills, problem
solving and planning, and publication production.
Required Courses
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism.......................3
JRN 182 Beginning News Writing and Reporting.............3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copy Reading..........3
JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations..............3
JRN 286 Intermediate News Writing and Reporting.......3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers........3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies.......3
JRN 398 Cooperative Education Public Relations .....3
Total Semester Hours Required.........................24
A suitable basic photography course may, upon approval of the advisor, be substituted for one of the above courses.
In addition, the following courses are strongly recommended as part of the student's general education curriculum.
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing
ENG 303 Semantics
ENG 351 Advanced Composition
MGT 300 Principles of Management
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing
MKT 311 Advertising
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior
ENG 201 The Nature of Language
COM 352 Organizational Communication
Other courses may be recommended by the advisor, depending on the student's particular needs.
With the approval of the Journalism faculty, Journalism majors may substitute courses from the list of recommended electives for required courses they take as a part of their major.
Modern Languages
The Department of Modern Languages offers major programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign Languages, minor programs in French, German and Spanish, and Teacher Education Programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign Languages. Courses in other foreign languages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs. In addition, the Department administers several education programs abroad.
Registration for courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will register for foreign language courses as follows: No previous study, or less than one year in high school 101; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak 101; one semester in college 102; one year in college 211 and/or 231; two years in high school 211 and/or 231; or 102, if needed; three years in high school or one and one-half years in college 212 and/or 232; or 211 and/or 231, if needed; four years in high school or two years in college 300 level courses, or 212 and/or 232, if needed.
The above regulations may not be enforceable if the student has had no professional instruction in his chosen language within the last two years. If the benefit of this exception is not possible but the student feels that he has insufficient preparation for the required level, he should strengthen his background by auditing the course recommended by his foreign language advisor. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements.
Students seeking secondary credentials in Spanish or in Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish) must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the major requirements. They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate Proficiency Test.
Spanish
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II .............3
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Division of Humanities
SPA 231
SPA 232
SPA 311
SPA 312*
SPA 320
or
SPA 321
or
SPA 322
SPA 325
SPA 331
SPA 332
SPA 340
or
SPA 341
SPA 351
MDL 496'
SPA 411
or
SPA 412
Spanish Grammar and Composition I
Spanish Grammar and Composition II...........
Advanced Conversation........................
Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice.......
Culture and Civilization of Spain
Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
Folklore and Culture of the Mexican
Southwest....................................
Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .
Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I ......
Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II .....
Survey of Spanish Literature I
Survey of Spanish Literature II..............
Masterpieces of Latin American Literature ...
Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
Schools......................................
Contemporary Spanish
Latin American Literature ...................
SPA Electives"
.3
.3
.2
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
Required only when seeking a Teacher Certificate.
"Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval.
Minor in Spanish
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I
or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II .........3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition I............3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II...........3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation........................3
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain
or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller...........................3
GER Electives*..................................................3
Must be taken with department approval.
Modern Foreign Languages
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses
The composite Modern Language major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modern languages, at least 12 hours in each. Students are advised into intermediate and advanced classes in each language on the basis of individual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen languages must be taken as follows:
Spanish
SPA 211-212 Spanish Reading and Conversation I, II .....6
SPA 231-232 Spanish Grammar and Composition I, II ......6
French
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation..............3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues...................3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar.......3
FRE 232 French Composition...........................3
German
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation..............3
GER 212 German Civilization..........................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar.......3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing .........3
The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval.
For those seeking a Teacher Certificate in Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish) the remaining hours mentioned above will be taken in at least one of the following areas of emphasis.
Southwest.......................................3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .....3
SPA Electives' ...............................................3
French
Minor in French
Required Courses
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation..............3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues.....................3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar.......3
FRE 232 French Composition...........................3
FRE 311 French Survey I..............................3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization .............3
FRE Electives* ...........................................3
German
Minor in German
French Area of Emphasis
FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation................3
FRE 212 Contemporary French Issues.....................3
FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar.........3
FRE 232 French Composition.............................3
FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I .................3
FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II ................3
FRE 321 French Phonetics: Theory and Practice..........2
FRE 331 Advanced French Composition and Grammar .......3
FRE 332 Advanced Conversation..........................3
FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization ...............3
FRE 352 Modern French Theater
or
FRE 353 The French Novel...............................3
FRE 414 Advanced Textual Analysis
or
FRE 440 Existentialism ................................3
FRE Electives..............................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
School........................................3
Required Courses
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation..............3
GER 212 German Civilization..........................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar.......3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing .........3
GER 321 Survey of German Literature I or
GER 322 Survey of German Literature II........................3
German Area of Emphasis
GER 211 German Reading and Conversation................3
GER 212 German Civilization ...........................3
GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar.........3
GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing ...........3
GER 312 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice..........2
GER 321 Survey of German Literature I..................3
GER 322 Survey of German Literature II.................3
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Division of Humanities
GER 323 Contemporary German Writers .......................3
GER 331 Advanced German Composition and Grammar............3
GER 351 Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller......................3
GER 411 The German Novel of the Nineteenth and Early
Twentieth Centuries...........................3
or
GER 412 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth
Centuries ....................................3
GER 421 Advanced Conversation: Present-day Germany ....3
GER Electives..............................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
School........................................3
Spanish Area of Emphasis SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ...............3
SPA 231 Spanish Grammar and Composition....................3
SPA 232 Spanish Grammar and Composition II.................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation..............................3
SPA 312 Spanish Phonetics: Theory and Practice.............2
SPA 320 Culture and Civilization of Spain or
SPA 321 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization or
SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest ...3
SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish ..3
SPA 331 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I .....3
SPA 332 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar II ....3
SPA 340 Survey of Spanish Literature I
or
SPA 341 Survey of Spanish Literature II...............3
SPA 411 Contemporary Spanish Literature or
SPA 412 Contemporary Latin-American Literature .......3
SPA Electives .............................................3
MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary
School........................................3
Music
Metropolitan State College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Department of Music offers two NASM-accredited degree programs, Music Education and Music Performance, for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in music. Students pursuing these majors are not required to fulfill a minor for graduation. In addition, the Contract Major is available for students seeking a more personalized degree program in music.
The Music Education degree program is designed to prepare students for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at the levels K-12. By taking an additional eighteen semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (EDU 419 and 429), the student becomes eligible for K-12 certification in the State of Colorado. With these additional eighteen hours, this degree program is fully accredited by the Colorado State Department of Education. Students seeking teaching credentials in music must satisfy all requirements of the Teacher Education Program in the Division of Education in addition to all requirements of the Department of Music.
The Music Performance degree program is designed to prepare students for careers in music performance, further graduate specialization or private studio teaching. In order to pursue this course of study, the student must demonstrate, through audition, the capability of developing a high level of musicianship in performance.
Students wishing to gain a broad, general coverage of the field of music may pursue the minor in Music. The department offers a wide range of courses, including some specifically designed for non-music students wishing to enhance their general appreciation and enjoyment of music. Non-music students may also participate in large and small music ensembles, including band, orchestra, choir and chamber music.
All students majoring or minoring in music must participate in the departmental advising program scheduled during the first week of each semester. Transfer students should be prepared to take placement examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition in their primary performance area. For advising, placement, and audition appointments, contact the Department of Music.
Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirement for all Music Education Majors
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111,113,211 Music Theory I, II, III ..................9
MUS 112, 114, 212 Music Theory Lab I, II, III.............3
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II .........................6
MUS 171, 172, 271, 272, 371, 372 Private Instruction l-VI
(Primary Performance Area)...................12
MUS 161, 162 Class Piano I, II .........................2
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging.....................................2
MUS 332 Secondary School Choral Methods and
Materials.....................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School
Choral Methods and Materials..................1
MUS 351 Basic Conducting...............................2
MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition ...............2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music..............................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting............................2
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ..........3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate ....3
or
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas:
Secondary ....................................3
EDU 110 Elementary Education in U.S....................3
EDU 265 Human Relations................................3
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner....................3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom.........3
Total.....................................................63
In addition to the above core requirement, music education majors must select one of the following emphases:
Choral Emphasis
MUS 161 Class Voice I .................................1
MUS 261, 262 Class Piano III, IV....................... 2
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ........14
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All fourteen hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of
the above numbers.
MUS 331 Elementary School Music Methods and
Materials.....................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School
Music Methods and Materials...................1
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials ...............2
MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials.................2
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials............2
MUS 421 Choral Literature .............................2
Total.....................................................28
Instrumental Emphasis
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ............12
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All twelve hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers.
MUS 333 Elementary School Instrumental Music Methods
and Materials....................................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Elementary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials.....................................................1
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Division of Humanities
MUS 334 Secondary School Instrumental Music
Methods and Materials........................2
MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience: Secondary School
Instrumental Music Methods and Materials ....1
MUS 341 String Techniques and Materials ...............2
MUS 343 Woodwind Techniques and Materials..............2
MUS 345 Brass Techniques and Materials.................2
MUS 346 Percussion Techniques and Materials............2
MUS 348 Marching Band Techniques and Materials.........2
Total....................................................28
Music Performance Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirements for all Music Performance Majors
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, III .............9
MUS 112, 114, 212 Music Theory Lab I, II, III..........3
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II ......................6
MUS 171, 172 Private Instruction I, II (Primary
Performance Area)............................4
MUS 273, 274, 373, 374, 473, 474 Performance lll-VIII
(Primary Performance Area)..................24
MUS 161, 162, or 171 Class or Private Instruction
(Secondary Performance Area).................2
Note: Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Piano. Exception: Students electing the Organ Emphasis must take Class Voice I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Voice.
MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ...........12
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All twelve hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers. The ensemble experience throughout the baccalaureate degree program should be varied both in size and nature, and should be chosen from those appropriate
to the area of specialization.
MUS 351 Basic Conducting.................................2
MUS 365 Basic Techniques of Composition ............2
MUS 411 Analysis of Music................................2
MUS 479 Senior Recital...................................1
Music History or Literature Elective............3
Total.......................................................70
In addition to the above core requirement, all music performance
majors must select one of the following emphases:
Voice Emphasis
MUS 141 German Diction and Literature for Singers........2
MUS 142 French Diction and Literature for Singers ,......2
MUS 143 Italian Diction and Literature for Singers.......2
MUS 421 Choral Literature................................2
MUS 442 Vocal Pedagogy ..................................2
Total.......................................................10
Piano Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint.....................................3
MUS 324 Piano Literature.................................3
MUS 441 Piano Pedagogy...................................2
Total........................................................8
Organ Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint.....................................3
MUS 421 Choral Literature ...............................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting..............................2
Total........................................................7
Guitar Emphasis
MUS 310 Counterpoint.....................................3
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging.......i.............................2
Total........................j.............................5
Woodwind, Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis
MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and
Arranging......................................2
MUS 451 Advanced Conducting......................2
Total .....................................................4
Minor in Music
Semester
Required Courses Hours
MUS 111, 113, 211 Music Theory I, II, III ...............9
MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I.......................1
MUS 221, 222 Music History I, II ....................6
MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Private Instruction:
Performance Area...............................4
MUS 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble..................4
Note: These course numbers may be repeated for credit; all four hours may be earned in one course number of in any combination of the above numbers.
Total......................................................24
Philosophy
Philosophy is the oldest of intellectual disciplines. Its questions are of the most enduring interest because they are the most fundamental to our intellectual and practical concerns. As such, it can be taken to be a critical investigation into the assumptions and implications associated with all ideas across all disciplines, and, in this respect, it is interdisciplinary in character. However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods, and, hence, it takes on the character of a specialized discipline. Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought recognizing no preestablished limits in terms of the scope of either its interests or its critical examinations. Therefore, philosophy as a study program enlarges the student's horizons of ideas throughout the various disciplines in the college, while simultaneously providing the critical skills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas. It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical options, to consider alternate points of view, and to penetrate deeply into profound issues. Because of the subject matter, attitudes, and methods employed in philosophy, the student will be much better prepared for leadership in personal life, civic responsibilities, and pursuit of a career.
In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take only one or two courses in philosophy, the Department offers two programs both of which feature flexibility and individualized training:
1. A major for students seeking a solid, general training/background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies in such varied areas as philosophy, the humanities, law, medicine, business, urban planning and development, etc., or as a basis for a career in which the specialized training required is provided by the employer, such as careers in corporate management, government, politics, banking, education.
2. A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their specialized training/background with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase their career options and generally to increase the quality of their lives.
The Philosophy program is now jointly offered by the faculties of MSC and UCD who have been combined into a single department. MSC students who either major or minor in philosophy are encouraged to take appropriate UCD courses whenever such courses contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philosophy experience.
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Division of Humanities
Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHI 144 Logic...............................................3
PHI 300 History of Greek Philosophy ........................3
PHI 302 History of Modern Philosophy........................3
Total.......................................................9
Additional Course Subject Areas Required Lower-Division
Introductory Courses........................................6
Upper-Division
Metaphysics and/or Epistemology ............................3
Ethics and/or Social Philosophy.............................3
One Philosophical Problem or
One Philosopher .........................................3
One Course Relating Philosophy to Religion, Art, Science, or History.........................3
Total......................................................18
Additional Electives at any Level............................
Total Upper-Division Credit Hours required for Major.......18
Total Credit Hours required for Philosophy Major...........36
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology and includes the required courses listed under the Holistic Health and Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Minor in Philosophy Required Courses
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy......................3
PHI 103 Ethics .........................................3
PHI 111 Language, Logic and Persuasion..................3
Total......................................................9
Electives
A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which 7 are upper-division courses in Philosophy selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 20 semester hours.
Speech Communication
Speech communication is one of the most important human qualities. Proficiency in one of the areas of speech opens up many careers to the graduate.
For instance, in mass communication, radio, television and film, a graduate might aspire to careers in On Air operations, mass media ideas, promotion, public affairs, or radio-television sales. He or she might become a consultant in advertising, a specialist in instructional or educational television or in the public broadcasting service. Careers are open as broadcasting specialists in public relations, public information, business, industry and government are also available.
Speech pathology graduates who meet the standards of the American Speech and Hearing Association may find careers in public and private schools, community clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, private practice, colleges and universities, industry, or state and federal government agencies.
Graduates in rhetoric and public address have achieved success at law, industrial and organizational communication, educational administration, public relations, speech writing for political figures, teaching, public relations, and theology.
Professional and educational theatre occupations are open to theatre graduates with specialties in stagecraft, sound, engineering, script writing, directing and acting.
Organizational Communication: Meeting Planning, a new field, presents lucrative and satisfying careers to speech graduates specializing in this area of communication. Job opportunities are available in both associations and industry; some MSC graduates in Organizational Communication are achieving success in all areas of government, industry, business and meeting planning.
Speech Communication
Major for Bachelor of Arts
1. 101-3, Fundamentals of Speech Communication course is required of all speech majors and minors.
2. Independent study, topic courses and experiential education courses such as practicums and internships may be taken in each of the areas.
3. Additional semester hours in Speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
4. Total minimum semester hours for a major in Speech Communication: 36.
5. All Speech majors are required to take a minimum of one class in each of the following six program areas, preferably one of the courses designated by an asterisk.
6. The six subject areas include:
Theatre and
SPE 221*
SPE 222*
SPE 224*
SPE 320*
SPE 322
SPE 325
SPE 328
SPE 420
SPE 426
SPE 427
Mass Comi
SPE 240*
SPE 343*
or
SPE 344*
SPE 347*
SPE 449*
Oral Interpretation
Introduction to Theatre Techniques in Acting I Introduction to Stagecraft Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry Movement for Stage
Introduction to Scenic Design and Theatre
Lighting
Stage Directing
Reader s Theatre
Theatre: Practicum I
Theatre: Practicum: II
Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcasting
Radio-Television Announcing
Radio-Television Production
Evolution of Cinematics as ART
Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary
Life
Communication Disorders and Voice Science
SPE 330* Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction
SPE 350* Speech Pathology I
SPE 351* Speech Pathology II
SPE 355 Speech Pathology: Observation I
SPE 356 Speech Pathology: Observation II
SPE 357 Methods of Speech Pathology-Audiology: Diagnostic Procedures
SPE 358 Methods in Speech Pathology: Articulation and Stuttering
SPE 359* Speech Problems in the Schools
SPE 360* Audiology I
SPE 361 Audiology II
SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology-Audiology
SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology
SPE 457 Medical Aspects of Speech and Hearing Disorders
SPE 463 Practicum in Audiology
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Division of Humanities
Organizational Communication
SPE 310* Business and Professional Speaking SPE 311* Conference Leadership SPE 312* Parliamentary Procedure
Communication Theory
SPE 374* Psychology of Communication
SPE 409 Persuasion in the Greek and Latin Traditions
SPE 410* Techniques of Persuasion
Rhetoric and Public Address
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
SPE
211" Discussion Methods
301 Advanced Public Speaking
305 Intercollegiate Forensics
308* Great American Speakers
309* Argumentation and Advocacy
405 Advanced Intercollegiate Forensics
408* Theories and Criticism of Public Address
412 Freedom of Speech
Speech Education
Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ........3
SPE 211 Discussion Methods...........................3
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre......................3
SPE 222 Techniques of Acting I.......................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft...................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television
Broadcasting .................................3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking.....................3
SPE 309 Argumentation and Advocacy ..................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry........3
SPE 328 Stage Directing..............................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction ..................................3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools...............3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication..................3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.....................3
Electives Hours for the Secondary Teacher Education Program
A minimum of six semester hours in Speech courses recommended in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. These six hours are to be selected from
the following list:
SPE 305 Intercollegiate Forensics.........................1
SPE 308 Great American Speakers ..........................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry.............3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage ...............................2
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I................................3
SPE 360 Audiology I.......................................3
SPE 408 Theories and Criticism of Public Address .........3
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre .................................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I..............................1
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary
Life............................................3
Total minimum hours required for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Communication Arts: 48 hours.
Students seeking secondary credentials in Speech Education must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the major requirements. Recent changes in Colorado Law affecting teacher certification has necessitated changes in advising procedures. All students in the Speech Education Program who are seeking a certificate must, therefore, contact the Speech Department for modifications, changes and advising relative to changes in Colorado Law affecting teachers.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Broadcasting Sponsored by the Department of Speech
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications (Interdisciplinary). In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting
proficiencies (See CCC advisor).
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems...................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.....................3
Total......................................................6
Required Area and Broadcasting Courses
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft...................3
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television
Broadcasting .................................3
TLC 249 Internship in Radio-Television-Film-
Mass Communication .........................1-6
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing..................3
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production..................3
SPE 348 Workshop in Radio/Television Production......3
TLC 349 Advanced Internship in Radio-Television-
Film-Mass Communication ...................1-15
Total.....................................................21
Recommended Electives
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction ..................................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Arts..............3
SPE 448 Seminar-Practicum in Broadcasting............3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life ............................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography .......................3
COM 244 Writing for Radio............................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ....3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies......3
JRN 383 Contemporary Issues..........................3
JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing.......................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.......................3
or other designated electives
Total Electives..............]...........................15
Total........................j..........................42
Communications: Theatre Administration
Sponsored by the Department of Speech
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications (Interdisciplinary). In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting proficiencies (see CCC advisor).
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts
and Systems...................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion........................3
Total.....................................................6
Required Area and Theatre Arts Courses
SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre ........................3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft......................3
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Division of Humanities
SPE 299 Internship....................................3
SPE 320 Oral Interpretation: Prose and Poetry.........3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction ..................3
SPE 499 Advanced Internship...........................3
18
Recommended Electives
COM 244 Writing for Radio.............................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ....3
ENG 414 Modern Continental, English and American
Drama .......................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage ...........................2
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre .............................3
SPE 426 Theatre: Practicum I..........................1
SPE 427 Theatre. Practicum II.........................2
SPE 480 Workshop in Theatre Arts ...................1-3
And/or other designated electives
Total Electives..........................................18
Total....................................................42
Communications Free Electives List
Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected
Communications area of emphasis are acceptable as electives.
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.........3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication .................3
ART 101 Basic Drawing Methods.........................3
ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods ..............3
ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art:
1960-Present Day ............................3
ART 220 Beginning Photography ........................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ..........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II .........................3
ENG 251 Intermediate Composition.......................3
ENG 303 Semantics.....................................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism....................3
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing..........3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading .......3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writing.......3
JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers........3
PHI 144 Logic.........................................3
PSC 322 Public Policy.................................3
PSY 241 Social Psychology..............................3
PSY 342 Issues in Community/Social Psychology.........3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking......................3
SPE 322 Movement for the Stage........................2
SPE 328 Stage Directing...............................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ...........3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction .................................3
SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art................3
SPE 412 Freedom of Speech ............................3
SPE 420 Reader's Theatre .............................3
SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I...........................1
SPE 427 Theatre Practicum II..........................2
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting............3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on
Contemporary Life ...........................3
4. Additional semester hours in Speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech.
5. Total minimum semester hours for a minor in Speech Communication: 18 semester hours.
Speech Pathology-Audiology Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction ..................................3
SPE 350 Speech Pathology I............................3
SPE 351 Speech Pathology II...........................3
SPE 360 Audiology I...................................3
SPE 361 Audiology II..................................3
SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology-
Audiology ..................................1-3
SPE 463 Practicum in Audiology........................1
Electives
A minimum of two additional in courses selected from the following list in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. Approved Psychology courses may be substituted for
electives.
SPE 352 Language Acquisition .........................3
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication...................3
SPE 455 Practicum in Speech Pathology ................1
Total minimum hours required for a minor in Speech Pathology-Audiology: 21 semester hours.
Telecommunications
Telecommunications is one of the most beneficial internship programs for communication students in broadcasting. Under the auspices of the Department of Speech Communication, the student is afforded the opportunity to gain first-hand experience through 67 current internships in radio, television, and film, provided by industry, government, public and commercial telecommunications centers. The student may begin this program upon the completion of six (6) hours in broadcasting-telecommunications courses at MSC. Students should contact the CCC advisor in broadcasting for details relative to eligibility and placement in the telecommunications internships.
The Speech Communication Minor
1. The Speech minor is required to take SPE 101-3.
2. All Speech minors are required to take a minimum of one class in at least three of the subject areas adopted for Speech majors. This requirement does not apply to students interested in Teacher Education.
3. The required courses should be taken from one of the starred courses to be agreed upon by the student and advisor.
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Division of Social Sciences
Division of Social Sciences
The Social Sciences offers baccalaureate degree programs in Anthropology, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Social Work; the interdisciplinary programs in Behavioral Science and Gerontology; and an additional array of areas of emphases and minors designed to develop student understanding of and skills for working with individuals, groups, and large organizations. Courses range from those in the traditional liberal arts core to offerings such as professional internships in social work, topics in popular culture, legislative and government internships, and research practicums. Programs will prepare students for a variety of career objectives, including beginning level practice in helping services and social work agencies, graduate education in law and in the various social and behavioral science disciplines, research in the social and behavioral sciences, work with the elderly, public administration, and secondary school teaching in the social sciences.
History
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.....................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715..................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ........................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 .....................3
Electives
A minimum of 23 additional semester hours in History is required, 18 hours of which must be upper-division.
Grade Average
Students majoring in History must maintain at least a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Advising
History majors should consult with a departmental advisor to select the courses in other disciplines which complement their area of concentration in the major.
Minor in History
There are four different areas of emphasis available to students seeking a History minor. (I) Regular History area of emphasis, (II) American Popular Culture area of emphasis, (III) American West History area of emphasis, (IV) Twentieth Century Studies History area of emphasis.
I. Regular History Area of Emphasis Required Courses
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1715.....................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization since 1715..................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ........................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 .....................3
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional semester hours in History is required. The hours must be upper-division and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor.
II. American Popular Culture Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ...................3
HIS 151 Movies and History ............................3
or
HIS 152 Rock Music and Social History
or
HIS 153 Sports in America .............................3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional History hours is required, of which 9 must be upper-division. Courses must be related to American Popular Culture.
III. American West History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 110 American West....j...........................3
HIS 111 Colorado History I..........................3
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ...................3
HIS 122 American History since 1865 ................3
Electives
A minimum of 9 additional History hours treating the American West is required, all of which must be upper-division.
IV. Twentieth Century Studies History Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
HIS 122 American History since 1865 .................3
HIS 201 Contemporary World History...................3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional hours treating twentieth century history is required, of which 9 must be upper division.
Grade Average
Students minoring in History must maintain a 2.0 average in their history courses.
Secondary School Education Certification in Social Sciences;
Students majoring in History may combine their major with other courses in the Social Sciences and in Education to receive Secondary Education Certification. The requirements of this program are included under the Education Department section of this catalog.
Pre-Law Courses
Several history courses are of particular importance to prelaw students. These include HIS 121, HIS 122, and HIS 368. Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the departmental advisor.
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Division of Social Sciences
Political Science
The study of Political Science is mainly a study of governments: their social and economic environments, how they are organized, how and why they decide upon and carry out policies, and how governments interact with one another. It also includes the study of political ideas and values, past and present, and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging our knowledge of political processes.
The Political Science program provides students with the perspective and background necessary to understand the complex and often confusing reality of politics.
Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSC 101 American National Government ....................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas......................3
PSC 305 Political Theory.................................3
PSC 402 Special Studies .................................3
Total.......................................................12
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours of Political Science must be completed. At least 12 of these 21 hours must be Upper-division courses (300- and 400-level). Total semester hours required for a PSC major: 33.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Minor in Political Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSC 101 American National Government ...................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas......................3
Total........................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours are required in Political Science courses. Total Semester hours required for a PSC Minor: 18.
In addition to the scheduled classes, Political Science students are encouraged to enroll for at least one off campus internship. Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of government service. Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student or by the Political Science Department. Interested students should contact the Political Science Department for details.
Minor in Public Administration
Public Administration is the study of governmental organizations and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The Political Science Department offers a Minor in Public Administration available to students interested in a career in government service, to students presently employed in government who wish to increase their skills and job status, and to students planning to take post-graduate work in Public Administration.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
A. Basic courses required for all PA Minors:
PSC 101 American National Government ...................3
PSC 302 Introduction to Public Administration ..........3
B. Two of the following courses:
PSC 322 Public Policy...................................3
PSC 324 Intergovernmental Relations.....................3
PSC 326 Politics of Budgeting...........................3
PSC 328 Public Personnel Administration ................3
ACC 320 Government Accounting ..........................3
C. One of the following courses:
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ..................3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics..........................4
D. Internship (PSC 299 or 499 Omnibus Courses) or
substitute course ............................(minimum) 3
A governmental internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a minimum of three semester hours. This requirement may be waived for students with at least one calendar year of administrative work experience in a government agency.
Total..................................................19-20
It is recommended that PA Minors also take a course in both public speaking and in technical writing.
Also available to students is a program of courses leading to a Certificate of Completion in Public Administration awarded by the Political Science Department. Students are awarded the Certificate after successfully completing a selection of courses amounting to 26 credit hours. Contact the Political Science Department for details.
Not listed among the regular courses are a variety of omnibus courses and self-paced courses which are offered each semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the semester class schedule for these.
Psychology
The major or minor program is to be planned in consultation with an adviser from the Psychology Department by the beginning of the junior year or upon transfer into the Department.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology........................3
PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for Social
and Behavioral Sciences ........................3
PSY 312 Inferential Statistics.........................3
PSY 331 Research Techniques, Experimental I .........3
PSY 332 Research Techniques, Experimental II ........3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology ............3
18
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology, making a total of 39 hours in Psychology.
A list of optional areas of emphasis is as follows:
Area I Experimental Psychology
Area II Clinical Psychology
Area III Social and Community Psychology
Area IV Industrial Psychology
Area V Developmental Psychology
Area VI Gerontology
Students considering advanced degrees should be aware that most graduate schools require (1) Learning, (2) Sensation and Perception, (3) Physiological Psychology, and often require a mix of courses representing the various subdivisions within the field. Students interested in the Gerontology area of emphasis must select a minimum of 42 hours (see list under Sociology Gerontology area of emphasis), in addition to the 18 hours of required courses of the Psychology Major. This must be done in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology. The Gerontology Emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21
51


Division of Social Sciences
elective hours in the Psychology Major and the minor requirement.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology and includes the required courses listed on Page 26
Minor in Psychology
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.........................3
PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology .............3
Total.......................................................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in Psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology are required, making a total of 21 hours in Psychology.
Sociology
The study of Sociology emphasizes understanding people in groups small groups like the family, the all-pervasive bureaucratic organizations of American society, political parties, football crowds, groups in conflict, society as a whole. It includes the study, from a variety of theoretical models, of past and present societies and social processes, and the analysis, using modern research methods, of contemporary social issues.
The Sociology program offers to its majors and minors, and to students from all academic disciplines, courses that focus on important issues and trends in today's complex societies.
Sociology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology......................3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues......................... 3
SOC 332 Sociological Theory: Past and Present..........3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences................3
SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences ......3
Total.....................................................15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Sociology courses is required, constituting a total of 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in Sociology must be completed at Metropolitan State College by students majoring in the field. Optional Areas of Concentration in Sociology are as follows: Each area of concentration includes a number of courses designed to give the student an in-depth exploration of the knowledge, challenges, issues, and research in a specific subdiscipline of Sociology.
I. BUSINESS AND THE URBAN COMMUNITY
This concentration is particularly recommended for Business, Land Use, Urban Studies, Industrial Communications majors, and all students whose career plans are aimed toward management, planning, or administration in the urban setting.
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living
SOC 316 Industry and Occupations
SOC 318 Labor and Management Organizations
SOC 322 Race, Sex, and Ethnic Groups
SOC 355 Sociology of Law
SOC 373 Mass Media and Social Behavior
SOC 381 Population Issues
II. SOCIAL DEVIANCE
This concentration is particularly recommended for Criminal Justice, Human Services, prelaw, Psychology majors and all students whose career goals involve working in prevention, treatment, and/or rehabilitation programs.
SOC 201 Current Social Issues
SOC 250 Deviant Behavior in Society
SOC 350 Criminology
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency SOC 355 Sociology of Law
SOC 383 Mental Disorders
III. THE FAMILY AND ALTERNATIVE LIFE STYLES
This concentration is particularly recommended for Teacher Education, Human Services, and Psychology majors and all students who plan people-serving careers.
SOC 240 The Chicano Family
SOC 310 Death and Dying
SOC 340 Childhood and Adolescent Socialization
SOC 341 The Family in Transition
SOC 342 Education in a Changing Society
SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles
SOC 344 The Black Family
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency
IV. MEDICINE AND HEALTH
This concentration is particularly recommended for Health Care Management, Nursing, premed, and Psychology majors.
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology SOC 204 Aging in American Society SOC 310 Death and Dying SOC 380 Health and Healers SOC 381 Population Issues SOC 383 Mental Disorders
V. SOCIAL CLASS AND STRATIFICATION
This concentration focuses on the various ways in which societies are divided. It is recommended for all students wishing to gain further understanding of conflict and inequality in groups and societies and to explore possible solutions to these problems.
SOC 201 Current Social Issues SOC 320 Social Classes in America SOC 322 Race, Sex and Ethnic Groups SOC 324 Poverty in America SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles
VI. CHANGING SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS
This concentration offers a broad overview of the dominant institutions in society, those institutions that provide the framework for our work, family life, and general social interaction.
SOC 320 Social Classes in America
SOC 341 The Family in Transition
SOC 342 Education in a Changing Society
SOC 355 Sociology of Law
SOC 371 Politics and Power
SOC 380 Health and Healers
SOC 391 Religious Movements in America
SOC 430 Social Change
Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences (PSY 311) is strongly recommended for Sociology majors who plan to go on for graduate study and/or have career goals involving research. (This course will not be used as a Sociology elective.)
Sociology Majors are also urged to include field experience in their college plans, either through enrolling in SOC 470 or through a Cooperative Education placement.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
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Division of Social Sciences
Gerontology Area of Emphasis
Gerontology deals with the causes and consequences, biological, psychological and social, of aging. Drawing from many fields of academic study, this area of emphasis prepares the student for professional and para-professional careers in human services for the aged population.
To complete the Gerontology Area of Emphasis, a student selects, (in addition to the 15 hours required courses of the Sociology Major, in consultation with and approved by the Department of Sociology/Anthropology/Social Work), a minimum of 45 hours from the following list of courses. The Gerontology area of emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 elective hours in the Sociology Major and the minor requirement.
Semester
Hours
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology..................3
SOC 204 Aging in American Society....................3
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living.....................3
SOC 304 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology...........3
SOC 310 Death and Dying .............................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America...........................3
SOC 341 The Family in Transition ....................3
SOC 380 Health and Healers ..........................3
SOC 381 Population Issues............................3
SOC 383 Mental Disorders.............................3
SOC 470 Advanced Field Internship....................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment...................3
PSY 221 Psychology of Human Development..............3
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues in Psychology:
Death and Dying ..............................3
PSY 327 Adulthood and Senescence.....................3
PSY 493 Seminars in Developmental Psychology:
Senescence....................................3
PSY 499 Field Placement in Gerontology ..............3
HES 105 Dynamics of Health...........................3
HES 204 Nutrition....................................3
Minor in Sociology Required Courses
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology....................3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in Sociology courses, selected in consultation with a department advisor is required, bringing the total to 18 semester hours. At least 6 upper-division semester hours of the minor must be completed at Metropolitan State College.
It is suggested that students consider focusing their elective choices in one of the areas of concentration in Sociology.
Anthropology
Anthropology is the exploration of human diversity. The combination of cultural, archeological, and biological perspectives offers a viewpoint that is unique in studying the problems related to the survival and well-being of the human species. From the living and vanished cultures of Colorado to those of New Guinea or Asia, Anthropology can be applied to assist our understanding of human differences.
Anthropology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory.............3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology............3
ANT 210 Human Evolution..................................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication ....................3
ANT 264 Principles of Archeology.........................3
15
Electives
A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Anthropology is required, bringing the total to 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semester hours in Anthropology must be completed at Metropolitan State College by students majoring in the field.
Students desiring Teacher Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Minor in Anthropology
The minor provides an opportunity for students to bring a unique anthropological perspective to their already chosen area of interest. Anyone having to deal with human or cultural differences would benefit from selecting a focus in cross-cultural contact, archeology, or human diversity.
Required Courses
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory...........3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..........3
6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours in Anthropology is required, bringing the total to 21 semester hours. At least 6 upper-division semester hours must be completed at Metropolitan State College.
Behavioral Science
Major for Bachelor of Arts
This is a distributed major, offering students a structured overview of the social and behavioral sciences, emphasizing breadth of coverage rather than in-depth studies. Particularly applicable for secondary education majors.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.............3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics: Macro....................3
HIS 366 Recent U.S., 1945 to the Present .................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas.......................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology...........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.........................3
18
Electives
A minimum of 18 additional upper-division elective hours in Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology is required, bringing the total to 36 semester hours. No more than 6 upper-division hours may be in any one discipline and must be selected in consultation with, and have the approval of, the advisor. Three hours of field study are recommended in this 18 hours of electives. At least 12 upper-division hours must be completed at Metropolitan State College by students majoring in this field. Each student in this major must have the preliminary approval of an assigned advisor.
Students desiring Teacher Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
No Minor Offered
Social Work
Major for Bachelor of Science
The Social Work program offers preparation for beginning professional practice in helping services, corrections and social work agencies. Students are also encouraged to pursue graduate degrees such as the M.S.W. and the Ph.D. or D.S.W.
53


Division of Social Sciences
The basic objectives of the Social Work degree program are to enable students to achieve effective active participation in community affairs based upon an understanding of complex social welfare programs, to facilitate entry into beginning level practice, and to encourage graduate study.
The curriculum reflects these objectives in its required courses which focus upon field experience, methods of helping individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities; human growth and development; human diversity; social policy analysis and research. Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding and coping with bureaucratic processes and structures.
The field of social work includes: Child Welfare, Family Social Work, Correctional Services, Social Services (public assistance agencies), Medical and Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, Aging, Private Practice, Industrial Social Work and others.
Students who major in Social Work are not required to complete a minor.
Semester
General Studies Hours
ENG 101 Freshman Composition............................3
ENG 102 Freshman Composition............................3
Career ...................................................0-6
Science/Mathematics......................................8-10
Social/Behavioral Science ...............................8-10
Humanities...............................................8-10
Total......................................................36
Required Courses
SWD 101 Social Work: A Helping Profession...............3
SWD 104 Human Behavior and the Social Environment.......4
SWD 105 Family Social Services..........................4
SWD 201 Social Work with Populations at Risk............3
SWD 202 Social Work with Women..........................3
SWD 241 Social Work Practice I; Principles and
Applications...................................6
SWD 378 Policy in Social Welfare: Issues, Analysis and
Planned Change.................................3
SWD 379 Research in Social Work ........................3
SWD 401 Social Work Practice II ........................6
SWD 441 Cross-cultural Social Work......................4
SWD 478 Professional Internship I.......................6
SWD 479 Professional Internship II......................6
Total......................................................51
Electives in Social Work...................................10
Credits to be selected from the following:
SWD 301 Social Work Services for Children and Adolescents .......................................................4
SWD 302 Case Management in Social Work Practice ........4
SWD 303 Social Services for Adults and Aging............4
SWD 480 Workshop (Variable Topics) ...................2-4
SWD 490 Seminar (Variable Topics).....................2-4
SWD 498 Independent Study.............................1-8
Total......................................................61
Case Management Certificate
The Social Work program and Human Services Department have developed a joint program in Case Management and Developmental Disabilities. The purpose of the program is to train individuals interested in performing the functions of a case manager. Required courses are listed under the Department of Human Services. For further information call 556-3167.
Contract Minor Available.
54


Division of Science and Mathematics
Division of Science and Mathematics
The Division of Science and Mathematics includes the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Physics.
The degree programs and course work are structured to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of the urban student. The Division offers interdisciplinary, career-oriented bachelor's degree programs in the traditional areas of science and mathematics as well as those areas oriented toward more specific career objectives such as training for the health related fields, criminalistics, land-use, applied mathematics, computer science, statistics, air pollution monitoring and occupational health and safety.
In cooperation with other institutions, it is possible for a student to receive a B.S. or a B.A. degree from Metropolitan State College and certification in Medical Technology from another approved institution.
Biology
The Department of Biology offers two majors, the Bachelor of Science in Biology and the Bachelor of Arts in Biology. Within these majors, the student may emphasize Botany, Zoology or Microbiology, together with paramedical and general studies. Supportive courses associated with Criminalistics and the Drug and Alcohol Institute, as well as general courses for enrichment of the non-science student's background, are offered by the Department.
Students seeking Secondary Certification in Science should see the Department of Teacher Education.
A Biology minor is offered to students with related majors or a special interest in the field.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses semester
Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ...................4
BIO 210 General Botany Two out
BIO 220 General Zoology of three
BIO 240 General Microbiology courses..........9-10
BIO 360 General Genetics...................................3
BIO 355 Urban Ecology, or BIO 454, Plant
Ecology, or BIO 455, Animal Ecology...........4
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series approved by the Department of Biology must be completed to bring the total of Biology courses approved for the major to 40 credit hours. At least 14 of these credit hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology. It is recommended that, in consultation with his or her advisor, the student select these courses to emphasize Botany, Zoology, or Microbiology.
Total Hours Required in Biology.............................40
Required Non-Biology Courses
One year of college General Chemistry, one semester of upper-division Organic Chemistry, one semester of upper-division Biochemistry, one year of Mathematics starting with MTH 111 are requisites for the Biology Major.
Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses
Semester
Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ....................4
BIO 210 General Botany Two out
BIO 220 General Zoology of three
BIO 240 General Microbiology courses...........9-10
BIO 360 General Genetics....................................3
BIO 355 Urban Ecology, or BIO 454, Plant
Ecology, or BIO 455, Animal Ecology............4
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series approved by the Department of Biology must be completed to bring the total of Biology courses approved for the major to 40 credit hours. At least 14 of these credit hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology. It is recommended that, in consultation with her or his advisor, the student select these courses to emphasize Botany, Zoology, or Microbiology.
Total Hours Required in Biology...........................40
Required Non-Biology Courses
One year of General Chemistry (equivalent to the present courses CHE 110 and CHE 111).
Botany Area of Emphasis
Requirements for either a B.A. or a B.S. degree in Biology must be satisfied, and the 40 hours of Biology courses must include BIO 210, General Botany; BIO 454, Plant Ecology; and 15 semester credit hours from the following Botany electives:'
Semester
Course Hours
BIO 314 Plant Physiology...........................5
BIO 315 Plant Hormones ............................2
BIO 316 Plant Anatomy and Morphology...............4
BIO 317 Evolution of Flowering Plants..............3
BIO 318 Vascular Plant Taxonomy....................4
BIO 412 Algology...................................4
BIO 416 Mycology...................................4
BIO 456 Field Methods in Plant Ecology.............2
Microbiology Area of Emphasis
Students must satisfy requirements for the B.S. Biology degree program, including BIO 240, General Microbiology; and one course from each of the categories of Organismal, Medical, or Advanced Microbiology courses listed below, plus additional courses from these three lists as well as appropriate omnibus
55


Division of Science and Mathematics
courses selected in consultation with the Microbiology faculty to complete 20 semester hours of upper-division electives and a total of 40 semester credit hours in Biology:'
Semester
Organismal Hours
BIO 340 Bacteriology ..................................4
BIO 412 Algology.......................................4
BIO 416 Mycology ......................................4
BIO 422 Protozoology...................................3
BIO 444 Virology.......................................4
Semester
Medical Hours
BIO 327 Parasitology....................................4
BIO 335 Immunology......................................4
BIO 445 Pathogenic Microbiology ........................5
Semester
Advanced Microbiology Hours
BIO 305 Cell and Molecular Biology......................4
BIO 446 Microbial Biochemistry .........................5
BIO 447 Microbial Genetics ............................3
Zoology Area of Emphasis
Students must satisfy the requirements for the B.S. Degree in Biology and must include in the 40 semester hours of Biology courses BIO 220, General Zoology; BIO 455, Animal Ecology; and 15 semester credit hours from the following list of Zoology
electives:'
Semester
Course Hours
BIO 321 Histology.....................................4
BIO 322 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy................4
BIO 325 Arthropod Zoology.............................4
BIO 327 Parasitology..................................4
BIO 331 Introduction to General
Animal Physiology.............................4
BIO 334 Endocrinology..................................3
BIO 422 Protozoology...................................3
BIO 425 Entomology ....................................4
BIO 427 Herpetology....................................3
BIO 428 Ornithology....................................4
BIO 429 Mammalogy......................................3
BIO 436 Introduction to Ecological
Animal Physiology.............................3
BIO 481 Introduction to Vertebrate
Embryology ...................................4
BIO 494 Vertebrate Evolution ..........................3
BIO 301. Microtechnique, and BIO 305, Cell and Molecular Biology, are both applicable to the fields of Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology and are recommended as additional electives for all three areas of emphasis.
Minor in Biology
Semester
Required Courses Hours
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ...................4
BIO 210 General Botany
BIO 220 General Zoology Two out of
BIO 240 General Microbiology these four.......9-13
BIO 231, 232 Human options
Anatomy and Human Physiology BIO 360 General Genetics One out of
BIO 355 Urban Ecology these four........3-4
BIO 454 Plant Ecology options
BIO 455 Animal Ecology
Electives
Biology courses from the 200, 300, and 400 series, approved by the Department of Biology, must be completed to bring the total of Biology courses approved for the minor to 24 credit hours.
Total Hours Required in Biology........................24
Medical Technology Program
See Chairman of Biology Department for details.
Chemistry
The Department of Chemistry offers three majors, and is accredited by the American Chemical Society. These majors are the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (minimum 48 hours), the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry (minimum 37 hours), and the Bachelor of Science in Criminalistics (minimum 97 hours). In addition, a Bachelor of Science degree program in Chemistry with an emphasis in Occupational Health and Safety as well as minors in Chemistry and Criminalistics are available. The Bachelor of Science in Chem^try should be chosen by students who plan a career in Chemistry or plan to attend graduate school in Chemistry. The Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry is designed for students who plan a career in a field related to chemistry but who do not intend to attend graduate school in Chemistry. This option, requiring fewer hours, may be especially attractive to those wishing a second major and to students desiring Secondary Education Certification. Criminalistics is the scientific investigation, identification, and comparison of physical evidence for criminal or civil court proceedings. Criminalists must be trained in an assortment of disciplines including Chemistry, Biology, Law Enforcement, Physics, and Mathematics. The four-year Criminalistics curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and includes a half-time internship in a criminalistics laboratory during the senior year. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in criminalistics and have completed the requirements for graduate school in Chemistry, graduate school in Criminalistics, medical school, dental school, and law school. No minor is required for the Criminalistics major.
Students electing the Chemistry major with the Occupational Health and Safety emphasis will be trained in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazards in the workplace. This area of emphasis includes Chemistry courses equivalent to those required for the Bachelor of Arts major in Chemistry as well as supporting Science and Mathematics courses. In addition, courses in Instrumental Analysis, Toxicology, Safety, and Occupational Health and Safety will be required. An internship during the junior or senior year is required and gives valuable practical experience. Graduates of the program are prepared for immediate emplbyment in the field of occupational health and safety or the field of chemistry. Graduates in this area also meet the admissions requirements for medical school, dental school, veterinary school, and graduate school in Industrial Hygiene or Chemistry. For further information, contact the Chemistry Department.
Students seeking Secondary Education credentials in Science should consult the Teacher Education Program of MSC for requirements.
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry ............................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II .........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis ........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory .............2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ..........................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II .........................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ...............2
CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II ..............2
CHE 325 Physical Chemistry I .........................4
CHE 326 Physical Chemistry II ........................4
CHE 328 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I ..............2
CHE 329 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II .............2
Electives
A minimum of ten semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required. If a degree which meets American Chemical Society
56


Division of Science and Mathematics
approval criteria is sought, CHE 430, Inorganic Chemistry, CHE 410, and CHE 411, Instrumental Analysis and Laboratory must be taken.
Total Hours Required......................................48
Occupational Health and Safety Area of Emphasis
The Occupational Health and Safety area of emphasis may be applied in lieu of the I4 elective hours in the Chemistry Major and the minor requirement.
The required courses do not include CHE 325 and CHE 326, Physical Chemistry I and II, and CHE 328 and CHE 329, Physical Chemistry Laboratory I and II.
Required Courses
CHE 250 Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety ..3
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry...................5
CHE 350 Occupational Safety............................3
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis..........................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory...............2
CHE 415 Instrumentation and Analysis in the Occupational
Environment ...................................4
CHE 420 Evaluation and Control of Air Quality..........3
CHE 425 Principles of Occupational Health and Safety..3
CHE 431 Biochemistry I ................................5
CHE 450 Occupational Toxicology .......................3
CHE 475 Occupational Health and Safety Internship .....8
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ...............4
BIO 232 Human Physiology ..............................4
BIO 240 General Microbiology...........................4
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 320 Biostatistics..................................3
Electives
The following courses are recommended as electives: SPE 101-3, COM 261-3, ECO 201-3, and MGT 357-3.
Total Hours Required (Major and Minor)...................92
Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II .......................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis ...........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ........................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II .......................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I..............2
CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II .............2
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry..................5
Electives
A minimum of six additional semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required.
Total Hours Required........................................37
Criminalistics Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II ..........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis .........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ..............2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ...........................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II ..........................3
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ................2
CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II ...............2
CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry...................5
CHE 370 Criminalistics I...............................3
CHE 371 Criminalistics II..............................3
CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis..........................3
CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory...............2
CHE 431 Biochemistry I ................................5
CHE 470 Criminalistics Internship I ...................7
CHE 471 Criminalistics Internship II ..................7
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
or
PHY 231 General Physics I..............................4
and
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I...................1
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ...............4
BIO 240 General Microbiology...........................4
BIO 360 General Genetics...............................3
CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System....3
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law.......................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law ............................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures..............3
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ....................4
Total Hours Required (Major and Minor)....................97
Minor in Chemistry
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II ..........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis .........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ..............2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ...........................4
CHE 311 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I.................2
Electives
A minimum of five additional semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required.
Total Hours Required.......................................26
Minor in Criminalistics
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry ........................5
CHE 270 Introduction to Criminalistics....................4
CHE 275 Arson and Explosives..............................3
CHE 276 Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs ...1
CHE 370 Criminalistics I .................................3
CHE 371 Criminalistics II ................................3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedures.................3
Total Hours Required.......................................22
Earth Sciences
The Earth Sciences Department is comprised of three basic disciplines: Geography, Geology, and Meteorology. The Department of Earth Sciences offers course work leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Land Use and a Bachelor of Science in Meteorology. The Bachelor of Science degree program is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment.
Minor programs are available in Geology, Geography and Meteorology. Students wishing Teaching Certification in either Science or Social Studies have the opportunity to develop a core of courses in Geology, Geography, or Meteorology. For details on these programs, students should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Land Use
The Land Use program is very broad scoped and can be utilized for a number of career objectives. This is the reason for several areas of emphasis. Career opportunities exist in such areas as planning agencies, cartography, geologic drafting, air photos and
57


Division of Science and Mathematics
satellite imagery interpretation, environmental and resource management organizations, travel and transportation, mining and mineral companies, residential and industrial development, recreational land use, population analysis, and a variety of other interrelated fields. The program also provides a good basis for continued study at the graduate level.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts
MTH 120 Statistics for Land Use I.......................2
GEG 321 Introduction to Cartography ....................3
GEG 361 Principles of Land Use .........................3
GEG 380 Statistics for Land Use II......................2
GEG 495 Internship (or Field Methods) ..................2
Required Area of Emphasis
Each student shall select one of the following areas of emphasis. Within the area of emphasis the student will take 19 hours among the courses listed. Not more than 6 of these 19 hours may be lower-division.
Required Courses Semester
Hours
Urban Land Use
GEG 132 Geography of Social Issues ...................3
GEG 136 Geography of Economic Activities .............3
GEG 204 Geography of Denver ..........................3
GEG 300 Historical Geography of the U.S...............3
GEG 360 Urban Geography (required)....................3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population ......................3
GEG 363 Land Use and Transportation ..................3
GEG 392 Directed Study in Land Use....................2
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning (required)........3
GEG 462 Land Use: Residential.........................3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..........................2
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry.........................1
Land Use Techniques
GEG 112 Orienteering..................................1
GEG 122 Map Use.......................................2
GEG 322 Intermediate Cartography (required)...........3
GEG 392 Directed Study in Land Use....................2
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning...................3
GEG 484 Remote Sensing................................3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..........................2
SUR 251 Surveying I...................................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I .............................3
CMS 441 Management Information Systems ...............3
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry.........................1
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN (required)......4
URS 351 Community Development and Planning............3
Resources and Environment
GEG 140 World Resources ..............................3
GEG 340 Water Resources ..............................3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population ......................3
GEG 392 Directed Study in Land Use....................2
GEG 422 Climate and Land Use .........................3
GEG 461 Urban and Regional Planning...................3
GEG 464 Land Use: Recreation..........................3
GEG 484 Remote Sensing (required).....................3
GEL 342 Soil Resources................................4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources..................4
GEL 400 Environmental Geology (required)..............3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..........................2
BIO 355 Urban Ecology.................................4
ECO 345 Environmental Economics (required) ...........3
Geologic Area of Emphasis
(Note: Students selecting this area of emphasis will be required to minor in Geology.)
GEL 115 Oceanography..................................3
GEL 120 Gemology .....................................2
GEG 124 Landforms ....................................3
GEG 484 Remote Sensing................................3
GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ........................2
GEL 203 Geology of Colorado.........................3
GEL 215 Geomorphology of the U.S....................3
GEL 309 Introduction to Sedimentation (required) ...4
GEL 311 Introduction to Stratigraphy (required).....3
GEL 312 Geomorphology...............................4
GEL 331 Structural Geology (required) ..............5
GEL 342 Soil Resources..............................4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources................4
GEL 400 Environmental Geology.......................3
Structured Electives
Each student must take eleven additional upper-division hours, approved by the Earth Sciences Department, to bring the total in the major to 42 hours. These hours may be taken outside the Earth Sciences Department with prior approval. A list of suggested, related courses in other departments is maintained in the Earth Sciences office.
Electives should be selected to provide an integrated and well-planned pattern of courses. The freedom to select certain courses, both within the areas of emphasis, and the structured electives, allows students the opportunity to somewhat individualize and self-design their programs, in keeping with their vocational goals.
Total Hours Required.......................................42
Required Minor
Except for the Geologic Area of Emphasis, the field of study selected as a minor is at the option of the student.
Land Use Major for Bachelor of Science
To fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Science with a major in Land Use, a student must complete the requirements as listed above under the Bachelor of Arts; however, the student must minor in one of the sciences, or science-oriented fields as approved by the Earth Sciences Department.
Minor in Geology
Required Courses S*n^"
GEL 101 General Geology .............................4
GEG 124 Landforms ...................................3
GEL 103 Historical Geology...........................4
GEL 301 Mineralogy I.................................4
GEL 302 Mineralogy II................................4
GEL 320 Petrology ...................................4
Electives
A minimum of 3 additional semester hours of Earth Science courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Earth Sciences.
Total Hours Required...................................26
Minor in Geography
Required Courses
GEG 112 Orienteering................................1
GEG 122 Map Use ....................................2
GEG 123 Weather and Climate ........................3
or
GEG 124 Landforms ..................................3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography.............3
Structured Electives
A minimum of 13 additional hours of electives must be selected in consultation with a member of the Department of Earth Science faculty. At least one course must be selected from each of the following groups to satisfy this requirement:
Physical Geography and Earth Resources
GEG 140 World Resources .............................3
GEG 340 Water Resources .............................3
58


Division of Science and Mathematics
GEL 342 Soil Resources: Genesis and Morphology ......4
GEL 344 Energy and Mineral Resources.................4
Spatial Analysis and Planning
GEG 360 Urban Geography..............................3
GEG 361 Principles of Land Use ......................3
GEG 362 Land Use and Population .....................3
Regional Geography
GEG 202 Geography of Colorado.....................3
GEG 204 Geography of Denver ......................3
GEG 210 Geography of Latin America ...............2
GEG 220 Geography of the U.S......................3
GEG 300 Historical Geography of the U.S..............3
Total Hours Required..................................22
Meteorology
The Meteorologist represents the liaison between meteorological information and the public. She or he collects, analyzes and, subsequently, translates the information for public use. The public includes such varied groups as large general contractors, public and private utilities, heavy manufacturing, chemical processing plants, agriculture, transportation (including aviation services), government (such as the military and federal agencies), and research organizations. The Meteorologist studies fundamental meteorological theory and analysis practices as well as instrumentation, data processing, and communications concepts. The program is designed to provide the student with the concepts of meteorology while emphasizing one or two chosen areas of public need.
Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Courses
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology ..................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .........................2
MTR 241 Meteorological Instrumentation.................3
MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology..........................3
MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory................4
MTR 343 Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology...........3
MTR 344 Dynamic Meteorology: Atmospheric
Processes....................................3
MTR 345 Dynamic Meteorology: Kinematics and
Dynamics.....................................3
MTR 441 Meteorological Numerical Products..............2
MTR 442 Urban and Industrial Meteorology..............3
MTR 444 Climatology...................................3
MTR 445 Consulting Meteorology........................1
MTR 450 Mesometeorology and Forecasting ..............3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines................3
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics.....................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................4
Subtotal.................................................47
Minor
Must include a minor of not less than (18) semester hours, as
approved by the department...............................30
Subtotal............................................... 77
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101 & 102 English Composition......................6
MTH 111 College Algebra................................4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry .........................3
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II....................................4
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
PHY 202 College Physics II............................5
Humanities...................................8
Social and Behavioral Science................8
Subtotal.................................................47
Total...................................................124
Minor in Meteorology
Required Courses
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology..................3
MTR 242 Use of Radar and Satellites in Meteorology..3
MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology.........................3
MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory..............4
MTR 444 Climatology..................................3
Approved Electives.......................................4
20
Mathematical Sciences
Offerings include Mathematics in the liberal and scientific tradition, Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Statistics and Probability.
The Department of Mathematical Sciences attempts to provide courses relating to all these diverse viewpoints with a wide variety of significant mathematical ideas. Thus, for those primarily interested in the use of mathematics in the study of some aspect of the physical or human world, courses are available emphasizing the classical and current development and applications in analysis, computer science, statistics and probability, business and economics, technical mathematics, and operations research. For the student in Humanities or Social Sciences, courses are offered that survey the development of significant mathematical ideas in human history and that illustrate mathematical methods.
The essentially sequential, spiral nature of mathematics means that prerequisites are required in most courses. Students are thus advised to consult the prerequisites of courses in which they may be interested in subsequent studies. Every effort is made to offer a variety of levels of mathematics courses in order that any student may be able to further her or his mathematical training. The Department is dedicated to meeting the needs of the urban student through various adaptive responses. The student is encouraged to seek the advice of the Department for helping to determine proper placement in any departmental course.
Major in Mathematics for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers course work leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. The student may choose either degree consistent with her or his career objectives.
All majors in Mathematics are required to complete a minimum of 36 hours consisting of the following basic core of courses and electives:
Semester
Basic Core Hours
MTH 141 Calculus I......................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II.....................................4
MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs...............3
Total........................................................11
Electives
The student must complete a coherent program of Mathematics courses, including 19 upper-division hours, to be planned in consultation with the students advisor and approved by the Department. This program must be formulated before the last 10 credit hours of Mathematics are taken. The only courses applicable to the major as electives are MTH 151, 214, 242, and any upper-division course.
The student may choose to complete one of five emphases previously approved by the Department. These emphases are: Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Mathematics,
59


Division of Science and Mathematics
Secondary Education, and Statistics and Probability, as outlined A minimum of 9 hours chosen from MTH 151, MTH 214, or any
below: upper-division mathematics courses.................................9
Applied Mathematics Emphasis
The Emphasis in Applied Mathematics is designed to meet the needs of the scientific, technical, and computer based economy
and to prepare the student for graduate study.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Basic Core...................................................11
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN.....................4
MTH 242 Calculus III.......................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics.........................4
MTH 342 Differential Equations.............................4
MTH 344 Partial Differential Equations.....................3
MTH 448 Numerical Analysis I ..............................3
MTH 449 Numerical Analysis II .............................3
A minimum of three hours chosen from the following courses:
MTH 314 Linear Algebra.....................................3
MTH 322 Statistical Methods ...............................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I .........................4
MTH 347 Applied Combinatorial Mathematics .................3
MTH 421 Probability Theory................................4
MTH 445 Complex Variables.................................3
Total Hours Required.........................................39
Computer Science Emphasis
This Emphasis studies the fundamental concepts of computer science as well as processes of analyzing, designing, implementing, and testing computer software systems. The Computer Science Emphasis is designed to prepare individuals to enter this growing field as well as to prepare them for graduate study in computer science.
The Computer Science offerings have been augmented and reorganized, and are all identified with the CSI prefix. The Computer Science Emphasis is now defined in terms of these new course designations. These changes may necessitate special arrangements to accommodate students already in progress. Students are directed to consult advisors in the Department for
information concerning these changes.
Required Courses
Basic Core (CSI 310 replaces MTH 310) ...................11
CSI 110 Computer Science I ............................3
CSI 120 Computer Science II ...........................3
CSI 210 Computer Organization and Architecture ........3
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra* ...............................2
CSI 311 Data Structures................................3
CSI 312 Computer Systems ..............................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ....................4
CSI 410 Assembler Language Programming.................3
CSI 411 File Structures ...............................3
CSI 421 Software Development and Engineering ..........3
Total Hours Required....................................41
*MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214.
Mathematics Emphasis
The emphasis in Mathematics prepares the student for further specialized study at the graduate level as well as being adaptable for preparation for positions in business, industry, and government.
Required Courses
Basic Core..............................................11
MTH 242 Calculus III..................................4
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ...........................3
MTH 411 Abstract Algebra II ..........................3
MTH 441 Advanced Calculus I ..........................3
MTH 442 Advanced Calculus II .........................3
Total Hours Required...................................36
Secondary Education Emphasis
The emphasis in Secondary Education is for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathematics for secondary schools. Students seeking secondary credentials in Mathematics must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all
of the Mathematics major requirements.
Required Courses
Basic Core...............................................11
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN.................4
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ...........................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ...................4
MTH 360 History of Mathematics........................3
MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics...............3
MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry.......................3
A minimum of 5 hours chosen from MTH 214, MTH 242, or any upper-division mathematics courses; at least 3 hours must be in upper-division courses.....................................5
Total Hours Required.....................................36
Statistics and Probability Emphasis
The Emphasis in Statistics and Probability stresses the application of the principles and methods of statistics and probability in the biological, physical, and social sciences and engineering. This emphasis also prepares the student for
graduate study.
Required Courses
Basic Core..................................................11
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN....................4
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra* ..................................2
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics........................4
MTH 322 Statistical Methods ..............................4
MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I.......................4
MTH 421 Probability Theory................................4
MTH 422 Stochastic Processes .............................4
Total Hours Required........................................37
*MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214.
Minor in Mathematics Basic Core
MTH 141 Calculus I
MTH 241 Calculus II
Electives
A minimum of 12 hours are to be selected from MTH 151, 214, 242, or upper-division courses. At least 4 hours must be taken at
the upper-division level ..................................12
Total Hours Required.......................................20
.4
.4
Physics
The Department of Physics offers course work leading to a Bachelor of Science and to a Bachelor of Arts. A minor in Physics is also offered. Undergraduates preparing for work in industry or for graduate study should take the Bachelor of Science in Physics. Students preparing to teach Secondary School Physics should take the Bachelor of Arts in Physics in addition to satisfying the requirements for certification in Science. See Department of Teacher Education for details.
The Department of Physics also offers a course in astronomy which is primarily designed as a general interest course and satisfies general studies requirements in Science.
60


Division of Science and Mathematics
Physics Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I ............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ...........................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I..................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II.................1
PHY 281 Modern Physics ...............................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics ............................3
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics .........................4
PHY 381 Quantum Mechanics .............................3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours of upper-division Physics courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Physics..................................15
Total Hours Required.......................................38
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 or PHY 125-126 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
The student is urged to take one year of General Chemistry and one year of Electronics. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor in the Department of Physics.
Physics Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PHY 231 General Physics I .............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ............................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I..................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II..................1
PHY 281 Modern Physics ................................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics .............................3
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics ..........................4
PHY 333 Electricity and Magnetism......................4
PHY 341 Thermal Physics................................3
PHY 371 Physics Laboratory I...........................1
PHY 372 Physics Laboratory II..........................1
PHY 381 Quantum Mechanics .............................3
PHY 471 Advanced Physics Laboratory I..................1
PHY 481 Atomic and Molecular Structure.................3
Electives
A minimum of 12 additional semester hours in upper-division Physics courses must be selected and approved by the Department of Physics......................................12
Total Hours Required.......................................48
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 or PHY 125-126 may be substituted for the PH Y 231 -233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
The student is urged to take one year of General Chemistry and one year of Electronics. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor in the Department of Physics.
Minor in Physics
Required Courses
PHY 231 General Physics I.............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ...........................4
PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I..................1
PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II.................1
PHY 281 Modern Physics ..............................3
PHY 282 Classical Physics .............................3
Electives
A minimum of 8 additional semester hours in upper-division Physics courses must be selected and approved by the Department of Physics......................................8
Total Hours Required.....................................24
A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 or PHY 125-126 may be substituted for the PH Y 231 -233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics.
61


Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture and offers a major and a minor in Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies. The Institute provides the student with academic skills leading to better understanding of social interaction and provides services at the local, national and international level. Through the Institute, students can study with faculty from diverse academic backgrounds and can travel and study in Spain, Africa, Mexico, etc.
Afro-American Studies
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services offers a range of courses in Afro-American Studies that present the dimension of the Black Experience in this country. These courses encompass and afford a comprehensive understanding of the African heritage. They present African links and potential; contributions of Black people in the growth and development of the U.S.; Black culture and lifestyles; the Black community; political activity and potential; religious development and importance; community service and resource assistance; and prognosis and potential for social change. The courses may be used in the basic studies requirements and as electives for graduation.
Students are urged to consult with the faculty in Afro-American Studies about new courses now being designed as well as special offerings.
The Major in Afro-American Studies (which leads to a Bachelor of Arts Degree) and the Minor program must be planned in consultation with an Advisor in the AAS Department.
Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education.
Afro-American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies..........3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle: USA
Philosophy, Action (SOC 116) ..............3
One African Heritage Course ..............3
AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice
(PSY 370)......................................3
AAS 485 Black Survival Strategies.....................3
MUS 201 Topics in Ethnic Music: Variable Title
ART 306 African-American Visual Traditions One to be
AAS 324 Afro-American Literature (ENG 324) selected.........3
AAS 499 Field Experience in the Black Community.........3
Total......................................................21
Electives
18 hours. (Related courses may be selected, upon consultation with the advisor, in Chicano Studies and Urban Studies.) Total hours for the major are 39.
Minor in Afro-American Studies Required Courses
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies............3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle: USA
Philosophy, Action (SOC 116)...............3
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours are required in Afro-American courses, 3 hours of which must be an African course, selected in consultation with and approved by the Afro-American Studies advisor assigned the student. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Chicano Studies
The Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Bilingual Chicano Studies. The Chicano and other Hispanic historical experiences are used as points of departure toward expanding awareness of a
multicultural world by using the community and the world as a laboratory and assisting in the preparation of scholars, human science providers, teachers, technologists and persons needing an international experience. Areas of emphasis within three specialties include focus upon research and theory.
Major for Bachelor of Arts in Bilingual Chicano Studies
This program is organized around three areas of emphasis: Intercultural/lntracultural, Community Service, and Bilingual/
Bicultural. The requirements include core courses in the major; specific offerings in at least one of the areas of emphasis and a Spanish language proficiency appropriate to the area of emphasis plus selected and approved electives which can be applied to other degrees. Minimum number of hours to complete the major vary with each area of emphasis:
Intercultural/lntracultural ...................43 Semester Hours
Community Service .............................43 Semester Hours
Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Studies..........47 Semester Hours
Required Core Courses
CHS CHS 100 101 Introduction to Chicano Studies History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (HIS 191) 3 3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexican and U.S. Periods (HIS 192) 3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican and Chicano (ANT 236) 3
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature (ENG 241) 3
Intercultural/lntracultural Area of Emphasis
This area of emphasis will concentrate on the generation of information relative to the conceptual and theoretical foundations which demonstrate the Chicano perspective. Focus is on language, ideology, and culture. The specific intent of the discipline is one which also supports other disciplines, prepares a student for advance study at the graduate level, or develops a candidates skills as a specialist with socio-cultural knowledge.
A minimum of six semester hours from among the following courses are required:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
CHS 202 Chicano Poetry and Drama .......................3
CHS 211 The Chicano in Aztlan...........................3
CHS 351 Aztlan Myth and Reality.........................3
ANT 233 Cross-Cultural Communication ...................3
SOC 322 Race, Sex and Ethnic Groups.....................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America..............................3
Language Proficiency Requirement
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I............................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II...........................5
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and/or SPA 212
Conversation I or il ...........................3
OR proficiency equivalent to the above.
Approved Electives
A minimum of nine semester hours of electives, selected in consultation with the Institute Director, is required.
62


Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services
Community Service Area of Emphasis
This area of emphasis will concentrate on professional development for those wishing to serve in community-based projects and agencies which address community needs. Much of the conceptual, theoretical and applied experiences are designed to better equip the practitioner in professional and paraprofessional programs in the community.
The following courses are required for individuals who are involved in the community service area of emphasis.
CHS 310 The Chicano Community I ....................4
CHS 311 The Chicano Community II ....................4
CHS 312 The Chicano Community III ...................4
In addition a minimum of 3 hours is to be selected from the following:
CHS 221 The Chicano Family ..........................3
CHS 320 Chicano and the Law..........................3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing.........3
BEC 325 Family Law ..................................3
ACC 320 Government Accounting .......................3
HSW 101 Introduction to Human Services and
Community Resources..........................4
Other courses focusing on strategies to assist in the preparation toward service in the Chicano community, designed by departments and approved by the chairperson, may be substituted.
Language Proficiency
This requirement same as that of the Intercultural/lntracultural concentration.
or other courses designed by the above departments and approved by the chairperson as relevant to the intent of the concentration.
No Electives
Minor in Chicano Studies
The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to occupational and educational goals. Students, in consultation with the Department of Chicano Studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors which reflect the best possible elective curricula and which will insure that a relevant emphasis is maintained. Total hours for the minor are 21.
Required Courses
15 Semester Hours
CHS
CHS
100
101
CHS 102
CHS 200
CHS 201 Electives
Introduction to Chicano Studies................3
History of Meso-America: the Pre-Columbian
and Colonial Periods...........................3
History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexican and U.S. Periods.......................3
Living Culture and Language of the Mexican
and Chicano ...................................3
Survey of Chicano Literature...................3
A minimum of 6 semester hours of electives are required to complete the minor. The courses are to be selected in consultation with a Chicano Studies faculty advisor.
Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Area of Emphasis
The area of emphasis concentrates on the preparation of professionals. It is a composite area of emphasis with significant participation of Chicano Studies, the Spanish program, and the Bilingual unit in the Center for Education.
The courses listed below are basic requirements for the Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano area of emphasis. In addition, a course sequence in Spanish to support this area of emphasis is required. For those wishing teaching certificate information, please contact the Bilingual/Bicultural Program Coordinator.
Candidates seeking admission for Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Area of Emphasis should first take a Spanish language proficiency test which sets minimum requirements as a prerequisite to this program, or secure permission of any Department chairperson of those departments listed.
Semester
Hours
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children....................3
or
CHS 341 Chicano Folklore of the Southwest...............3
EDU 351 Perspective in Bilingual/Bicultural Education ..4
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials for
the Bilingual/Bicultural Classroom..............4
Spanish Language Requirement
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I............................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II...........................5
or their equivalent
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II or
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation......................3
SPA 231 Spanish Composition I
or
SPA 232 Spanish Composition II.....................3
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual
Classroom ..................................2
SPA 352 Contemporary Mexican Literature ...........3
63


Institute for Women's Studies and Services
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
Institute for Womens Studies and Services
The Institute for Women's Studies and Services was formed in 1985. It merged the Women's Resource Center and the Department of Women's Studies. The goals of the Institute are:
1. To offer academic course work in Women's Studies, including a minor and a contract major.
2. To provide counseling services for student women, including peer counseling, scholarship assistance, and development experiences, such as workshops and speakers.
3. To promote faculty and administrative mentors for student women.
4. To develop collaborative research.
5. To provide professional development and training for education, business, and government.
Publications
The Institute publishes the Womens Advocate, an informational magazine by and for student women, and the Women's Studies newsletter, Tall Buildings Our Speciality."
Grants
The Western States Project on Women in the Curriculum grant was awarded to the Institute in 1985. The purpose of the grant is to incorporate the new scholarship on women into the college curriculum. In addition, the Colorado State College Consortium awarded monies for a special state-wide edition of the Women's Advocate.
The Future
The Institute anticipates a Working Paper Series which will present recent research about women; it expects to develop a visiting scholar and Research Associate Program, and it will work to build a regional network and to act as a clearinghouse for the work of scholars and consultants.
Minor in Womens Studies
An interdisciplinary program, the Women's Studies minor uses faculty expertise from many different departments. The objectives of the program include: heightening women's awareness of themselves as human beings; review of the cultural patterns which define" women; study of the historical achievements of women in all disciplines; exploration of emerging needs and opportunities for women; emphasis on the methods by which women can achieve success. These objectives are met within the context of women's scholarship.
The courses are appropriate for students in Education, Guidance and Counseling, Law Enforcement, Human Services, Business Management, Advertising, Public Relations, Communication, and the Behavioral and Applied Sciences. Men are welcome and encouraged to study the scholarship which focuses on gender. Women may find such study appropriate in order to understand the historical and cultural background to sexism as a concept; the courses intend to develop the individual, to heighten one's sense of purpose and personhood, and to provide support within the context of scholarship and development.
Men may find such study a needed expansion of view that will enable them to better understand, appreciate, and work with women.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
WMS 101 Introduction: Women in Transition ..................3
WMS 218 Rational Assertiveness Training.................3
WMS 331 Legal Rights of Women ..........................3
WMS 351 Feminist Theories...............................3
WMS 475 New Women in the World Seminar....................3
In addition to the core courses, nine (9) semester hours of electives acceptable to or taught through the Department will be required, bringing the total number of semester hours credit for a Women's Studies minor to 24. These courses, some of which are interdisciplinary, will be selected in consultation with the Women's Studies faculty and approved by the Institute.
Additional Study
Womens Studies courses are supplemented every semester by new offerings from Women's Studies; in addition, students should check the schedule for interdisciplinary offerings relevant to scholarship on women. Interdisciplinary electives are often offered as omnibus courses such as: Technical Communications, Communication Techniques for Women Executives; Psychology, Partnership and Life Style Alternatives, and The Psychology of Women; Sociology, Sociology of Sex Roles; and English, The Eve Image in Literature, Minority Women Writers of the United States," and Women's Poetry.
The Contract Major in Womens Studies
A contract major in Womens Studies may be arranged by consulting with a Women's Studies advisor and the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center. Women's Studies majors are appropriate for students who expect to work with specifically female populations. If the bachelor s degree is to be the terminal degree, faculty recommend strongly a double major in order to create a tailor-made degree.
A Women's Studies degree might be combined effectively with majors in Management, Psychology, Education, Nursing, Human Services, Law Enforcement, Advertising, Public Relations, Marketing, and other fields appropriate to the student's interest. Students will thus be prepared to work with female populations in numerous areas.
Employment opportunities for Womens Studies students may be found in managing Womens Resource Centers and battered womens shelters. Students might also work in community counseling and consulting or develop workshops or special programming for women in business and industry. Students who plan to work in education, law, or medicine may find a Women's Studies degree a useful base for professional studies.
Womens Services
This component of the Institute provides a place and a system of support for college women who seek information or mentoring. Women's Services disseminates information regarding on and off campus educational services and entitlements through financial aid, and admissions procedures. Women's Services houses a resource library, a resource file of news clippings, and information from public agencies. A scholarship file is maintained here, and staff provide peer-counseling and assistance in planning for new career directions in the student's life. Women's Services is considered an "extended family whose objective is to give the individual personalized counseling, referrals, and supportive networks.
64


School of Professional Studies
School of Professional Studies
The School of Professional Studies offers many and varied degree and certification programs.Every program is designed not only to prepare graduates for success in a specific career, but to provide a broad educational background for career and life enhancement.
The major purpose of the school is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and performance competencies needed to successfully enter a chosen profession. The School of Professional Studies includes three divisions, twelve departments, and twelve other administrative units.
The Division of Education consists of three academic departments: Teacher Education; Reading; and Physical Education, Health and Recreation. The Division also includes a Child Development Center, an Educational Resource Center, a Reading Laboratory, the Greenlee Metro Laboratory School, and the Resource Access Program (RAP).
The three academic departments in the Division of Education offer five major and eight minor degree programs. Teacher certification programs are offered in Early Childhood, Elementary Education, Special Education, and fourteen secondary education fields.
The Division of Technology consists of four departments: Aerospace Science, Civil Engineering and Environmental Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, and Technology and Technical Communications. The four academic departments offer ten major and eleven minor degree programs.
The Division of Public Service Professions consists of five departments: Criminal Justice and Criminology, Hospitality, Meeting, and Travel Administration, Human Services, Military Science, and Nursing and Health Care Management; the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behaviors and the Community Service Development Program. The five academic departments offer six majors and eight minor degree programs.
In addition to the many and diverse degree programs offered in the twelve academic departments, four student support programs also are available: the Student Advising Program, the Basic Skills Testing and Remediation Program, the Campus Recreation Program, and the Intercollegiate Athletic Program. Other administrative units within the School include the Office of Clinical Experiences, the Center for School Services and the Mesa/Metro Teacher Education Program located in Grand Junction, Colorado.
The over one hundred-ninety full-time and part-time faculty, seventeen administrators, and twenty-five support personnel of the School are highly committed to assisting each student attain his/her career goals.
Division of Education
The Division of Education is composed of the Department of Teacher Education; the Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health; the Department of Reading; Parenting Education, and a Child Development Center. Other units within the School include the Greenlee/Metro Elementary Laboratory School; The Mesa/Metro Teacher Education Program; and the Education Resource Center.
The Teacher Certification Program at Metropolitan State College is fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Education.
The Department of Teacher Education offers majors in Early Childhood and Elementary Education, as well as minors in Early Childhood and Special Education. Professional courses leading to certification in the areas of Early Childhood Education, Secondary Education, and Special Education are also offered. The major in Elementary Education includes the courses needed for certification.
The Division of Education, with the cooperation of the Modern Languages Department and Chicano Studies (located in the Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services), offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education.
The Department of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health offers a major in Physical Education with two emphasis areas and a major in Recreation with ten emphasis areas with minors in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health and Safety.
The Department of Reading offers one of the few undergraduate Reading minors in the area with numerous courses in the teaching of developmental and remedial reading. The Department also offers reading improvement courses. The well equipped Reading Laboratory offers an opportunity for the individualized work in a variety of materials which include development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. It is open to all students whether or not they are enrolled in a Reading course.
The Office of Clinical Experiences serves to integrate the laboratory experiences in the professional education programs. In addition to the student teaching programs, requests for observations, research projects and studies, and tutoring situations, utilizing off-campus laboratory settings are coordinated through this office.
The Child Development Center is a preschool laboratory which serves as a training facility for students enrolled in early childhood and other educational programs. The Center provides a setting for college students to observe and participate in an on-going educational program for young children.
The Greenlee/Metro Elementary Laboratory School is a cooperative endeavor of Metropolitan State College and the Denver Public School System. The purposes of the Laboratory School are: (1) to provide more effective education for the Greenlee Elementary School pupils and the Division of Education students; (2) to provide professional development and collaborate opportunities for both faculties; and (3) to fully utilize all available resources of the Auraria and Greenlee Campuses and communities.
The Mesa/Metro Teacher Education Certification Program is housed on the Mesa College Campus in Grand Junction, Colorado. This Consortium program provides the opportunity for students on the Western Slope to enroll in and graduate from Metro's teacher education program on the Mesa Campus.
The Education Resource Center is a facility designed to provide materials and resources for teacher education students and faculty members for course work, field experiences and laboratories. The Resource Center presents guest lectures, workshops and seminars. Intercollegiate Athletics sponsors an NCAA-II program, featuring eleven varsity teams. Approximately two hundred full-time student athletes compete annually in men's and womens basketball, soccer, swimming, and tennis; womens volleyball; mens baseball; and womens softball. Excellent indoor and outdoor athletic facilities include a block-long gymnasium, Olympic size swimming pool, weightroom, racquetball/handball court, baseball and softball fields, twelve tennis courts, two soccer fields, and a quarter-mile, competition surface track.
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Division of Education
The Campus Recreation Program is a comprehensive leisure service that provides students the opportunity to participate in a variety of recreational activities. The program consists of five major components: Informal Recreation, Intramural Leagues, Club Sports, Special Events, and an Outdoor Adventure Program. All activities and programs are specifically designed to enhance student life experiences at Metropolitan State College, especially in terms of socialization, health, and fitness.
Campus Recreation is located in the Physical Education Recreation Building and provides ninety hours of programs each week in the swimming pool, weightroom, gymnasium, racquetball courts, dance studio, and atheletic fields. Semester facility schedules are available in the campus recreation office.
Teacher Education Programs
The purpose of the programs in education is to provide systematic and comprehensive preparation for the teaching profession. Students in these programs must meet the general studies minimums and satisfy all other requirements for a bachelor's degree stipulated earlier in this Bulletin.
COLORADO LAW AFFECTING TEACHER CERTIFICATION MAY BE CHANGED IN THE PERIOD DURING WHICH THIS BULLETIN IS IN EFFECT. STUDENTS SHOULD CONTACT THE TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT FOR MODIFICATIONS.
The Department of Teacher Education accepts no course work older than 7 years as substitutes for required courses in the certification sequence and, in certain instances, may not accept more recent coursework if there have been significant changes in content in more recent years.
All students enrolled at Metropolitan State College who wish to prepare for teaching careers and be certified by the Colorado Department of Education are required to pass the California Achievement Test in mathematics, spelling and language usage prior to or during the semester they take the first class in the professional education sequence. A score at or above the 75th percentile must be attained. Students must also pass a public speaking course within a grade of B or better or satisfactorily complete an oral examination. Students should take speech as a part of their General Studies. These tests are in addition to other requirements for admission to the professional training, as listed in this Bulletin.
STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE ADDITIONAL TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES UNTIL THEY PASS THE CALIFORNIA ACHIEVEMENT TEST. THE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAY REQUIRE A DIFFERENT TEST SERIES AS OF JANUARY 1, 1987.
Students who fail one or more of the examinations will be notified so that appropriate remedial instruction can be recommended to them. They will be provided with a list of remedial resources for each area in which remediation is needed. Students are expected to take the initiative to seek out these resources and bring their skills in the identified areas up to an acceptable level. Students may take the examination(s) no more than four times within five years.
In addition, the following requirements must be met for formal admission to the Teacher Education programs:
1. Prior to or during their first course in the professional education sequence, students must present evidence of having met ONE of the following:
a. A rank in the top two quartiles of the candidates high school graduating class.
b. A score at or above 19 on the American College Test (ACT) or a score of 950 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
c. A grade point average of at least 2.50 on a 4.00 scale for at least 30 semester hours of the most recent college or university course work.
Students must also show evidence of having worked successfully with children or young people.
2. Before being admitted to any 300-level course in education, certification students must present evidence that they:
a. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all college work attempted.
b. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all in education courses attempted to date (which may only be one introductory course).
Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees.
3. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours of college work (except elementary).
4. Completion of a Declaration of Intention form, to be filed in the Teacher Education Department office. Normally, students complete this form while enrolled in their first course in education.
5. For students seeking credit for courses taken at this or at another institution that might be equivalent to the required courses described in this section, completion of a formal program plan or evaluation for advanced standing is required in consultation with their advisor, with the results of this evaluation to be filed in the Teacher Education Department office.
6. Completion of 200 clock hours of experience with children or youths by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth groups, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls, Head Start, YMCA, YWCA, church groups, as well as other boys' and girls clubs, camps, recreational programs, teacher aiding, etc.
The following requirements must be met for admission to Student Teaching:
1. Completion of a minimum of 90 semester hours of college work. Students transferring from other institutions, where more than 70 semester hours are being transferred into Metropolitan State College, or those who already hold degrees must complete a minimum of 20 semester hours and two semesters before they can be admitted to student teaching.
2. Students must present evidence that they:
a. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all college work attempted.
b. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area, and
c. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 in all education courses attempted to date.
(Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees. Under-graduate and post-graduate transfer students should check with their Teacher Education Department advisor concerning special GPA requirements.)
3. Completion of all professional courses required for certification.
4. Completion of all subject area courses in the student's teaching area(s) required by North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
5. Completion of all items in the personal student teaching folder, to be obtained in the Department of Teacher Education.
6. Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and/or evaluations from prestudent teaching field experiences.
7. A physical examination report including tuberculosis clearance, on file with the Student Health Services.
8. Approval by the appropriate screening committee when applicable.
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9. Completion of formal application for student teaching, to be submitted to the Department of Teacher Education not later than the following dates:
For Fall Semester
student teaching ....................February 28
For Spring Semester
student teaching ....................September 30
Students who have completed student teaching requirements at another institution may request to take student teaching for six semester hours.
Early Childhood Education
The Department of Teacher Education offers the following programs in Early Childhood Education:
1. A major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
2. A teacher certification program meeting requirements for certification to teach early childhood in the public schools of Colorado (preschool through the second grade).
3. A minor in Early Childhood Education.
4. All the necessary courses to meet the education requirement qualifications set by the State Department of Social Services for day care directors and group leaders.
5. In-home child care and education.
Semester
Required in Education Hours
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural
Education...................................3
EDU 315 Foundations of Urban and
Multicultural Education Lab ................2
EDU 316 Curriculum Development: Pre-
Primary 6.................................3
EDU 317 Curriculum Development:
Pre-Primary 6 Lab.........................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Regular
Classroom...................................3
EDU 439 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Early Childhood ...........................12
Required in Reading
RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read ................3
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary.....................................3
Required Courses in General Studies
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication ...............................3
MTH 261 Mathematics for the
Elementary School Teacher ...................4
BIO 100 Fluman Biology for Non-Majors................3
Early Childhood Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement.........1
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education....................3
EDU 132 Lab in Early Childhood Education ............2
EDU 231 Child Development............................3
EDU 232 Lab in Child Development.....................2
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Young Children................3
EDU 265 Human Relations..............................3
EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in the
Early Childhood Classroom ..................4
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development ..........4
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational
Process.....................................4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood
Classroom...................................3
EDU 436 Cultural Influences on the Socialization
of Children ................................4
EDU 438 Lab in Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom.........................2
Choose one from the following:
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .................3
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for
Teaching Children ..........................3
EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for
Teaching Children ..........................2
EDU 415 Art Methods for the Classroom
Teacher: Pre-Primary 6....................3
MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood............2
Total.................................................40-43
A student majoring in Early Childhood Education must complete the requirements for a minor. Recommended minors include Reading, Bilingual-Bicultural, Parent Education, Special Education, Psychology, and Sociology; other minors must be approved by the Department. Areas of emphasis which are equivalent to a minor are Language Arts, Science and Math, Urban Studies Education, Music and Movement, and Human and Community Resources. Contact your advisor for areas of emphasis requirements.
Requirements for Public School Teacher Certification
In addition to completing a major in Early Childhood Education, students wishing certification must satisfy the following requirements:
Total
.40
Areas of Emphasis: Early Childhood Education (ECE)
Language Arts Area of Emphasis
RDG 312
RDG 360
EDU 410
EDU 411
ENG 346
Total.
Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary.....................................3
Practicum in Reading .......................3
Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children ..............3
LAB-Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children ..............2
Children's Literature.......................3
Electives...................................5
19
Electives
Five hours to be selected from the following list or in consultation
with faculty in ECE.
RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read ..............3
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials ...............2
ENG 202 English Grammar.................................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ....................2
SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools .................3
Human Community Resources Area of Emphasis
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography.................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology..........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.......................3
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education ..............3
EDU 315 Laboratory in Urban and Multicultural
Education......................................2
Electives..................................5
Total........................................................19
Electives
Five hours to be selected from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE:
EDU 410
EDU 411
GEG 360
HIS 111
HIS 301
CHS 102
AAS 101
Language Arts & Social Studies Methods for
Teaching Children .........................3
LAB-Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children..............2
Urban Geography............................3
Colorado History ..........................3
History of Denver .........................3
History of the Chicano in the Southwest ...3
Introduction to Afro-American Studies......3
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Division of Education
HSW 101* Introduction to Human Services & Community
Resources...................................4
PSY 241** Social Psychology .........................3
HSW 202* Small Group Dynamics.........................4
* HSW Human Services and Welfare, Division of Public Service "SWD Social Work, School of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Science and Mathematics Area of Emphasis
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics .......................3
MTH 261 Mathematics for the Elementary School
Teacher.....................................4
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................3
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non Majors..................3
Electives...................................6
Total.....................................................19
Electives
Six hours (with at least one course in physical science) from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE.
GEL 101 General Geology...............................4
GEG 123 Weather and Climate...........................3
GEG 124 Landforms.....................................3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy ....................3
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................3
EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children....................................2
Urban Studies Area of Emphasis
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies.........3
AAS 315 Education of the Black Child .................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest:
Mexico and U.S. Periods ....................3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children ................3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education...................................4
Electives..................................3
Total.....................................................19
Electives
Three hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE.
AAS 330 The Black Community...........................3
CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the
Mexican and Chicano.........................2
CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature..................3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials
for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom......4
PER 465 Recreation Programs and Management
in the Inner City...........................4
SOC 201 Current Social Issues.........................3
Music and Movement Education Specialty
MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music Theory..................3
MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood.............2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation...............2
PER 258 Movement Education ...........................3
PF.R 450 Perceptual Motor Learning ....................3
Electives...................................5
Total.....................................................18
Electives
Five hours chosen from the following list or in consultation with
faculty in ECE.
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Young Children.................3
MUS 161 Folk Guitar I..................................1
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.......................1
PER 150 Modern Dance I.................................1
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child ................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...................2
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children.................................3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education....................3
Minor in Early Childhood Education Required Courses
EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement ........1
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education ...................3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education .....2
EDU 231 Child Development............................3
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development..............2
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Children .....................3
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development...........4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom ........................3
Total..................................................21
Highly Recommended:
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process EDU 335 Assessment & Measurement in the Early Childhood Education Classroom
Child Care Director Qualifications
Early Childhood majors and minors should take:
HES 204 Nutrition
Students seeking only Child Care Director Qualifications should contact the Colorado Department of Social Services. MSC's
suggested program is listed below.
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education .....................3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education .......2
HES 204 Nutrition......................................3
Psychology.....................................3
Sociology......................................3
Elementary Level
Certification and/or a Bachelor of Arts degree at the elementary level requires completion of the following professional course program. Students must complete a minor. Substitutions for any of the requirements must be approved by the chairman of the Department of Teacher Education.
Special certification to teach at the Elementary level in Physical Education, Art and Music is available.
All candidates for the certificate to teach in the elementary schools will declare their intentions at the earliest possible date. They will make arrangements in EDU 110, Elementary Education in the United States, to satisfy the following requirements:
1. Two hundred clock hours of community service by the end of the sophomore year. This service may be with any youth group, including Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church group, teacher aiding, etc.
2. Evidence of proficiency in reading, handwriting, spelling, new math concepts, speech, and grammar.
Elementary Education Major for Bachelor of Arts
THE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION HAS REQUIRED MAJOR CHANGES IN THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR. THESE CHANGES WILL GO INTO EFFECT SEPTEMBER 1, 1986. CHECK WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION FOR A LISTING OF THE NEW
REQUIREMENTS.
Required Courses (in recommended sequence)
EDU 110 Elementary Education in the United States...3
EDU 231 Child Development...........................3
EDU 211 Laboratory in Elementary School.............2
EDU 265 Human Relations.............................3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education...............3
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education...........3
EDU 315 Urban and Multicultural Education
Laboratory..................................2
EDU 316 Curriculum Development: Pre-Primary -
............................................3
EDU 317 Curriculum Development: Pre-Primary -
6 LAB.......................................2
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EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom.......3
EDU 410 Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children................3
EDU 411 LAB-Language Arts and Social Studies
Methods for Teaching Children................2
EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children ................................... 3
EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for Teaching
Children ....................................2
EDU 415 Art Methods for the Classroom Teacher:
Pre-Primary 6..............................3
EDU 419 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6)..................6, 8, 10 or 12
EDU 469 Professional Practicum........................6
Total................................................52-59
(Students lacking proficiency in any area may be required to take additional course work to remedy the lack of proficiency.)
When planning to teach in grades K-3, the following courses are
strongly recommended:
EDU 131 Early Childhood Education .....................3
EDU 132 Laboratory in Early Childhood Education ......2
EDU 232 Laboratory in Child Development...............2
EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development............4
EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early
Childhood Classroom .........................3
Courses Required or Strongly Recommended in the Academic Areas*:
Humanities
SPE 101** Fundamentals of Speech Communications .......3
ENG 346 Children's Literature ........................3
MUS 431** Music Methods for Elementary School
Classroom Teachers...........................2
RDG 312" Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Primary .....................................3
RDG 313** Teaching of Elementary Reading:
Intermediate ................................3
Career
ITS 381 Industrial Arts for the Elementary School......2
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts....................2
PER 250** Activities for the Young Child...............3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child...................2
PER 258 Movement Education ...........................3
PER 300 School Health Programs.......................3
PER 441 Environmental Education........................2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning.....................3
Social Science/Behavioral Science
HIS 121 American History to 1865 ......................3
HIS 122 American History Since 1865 ..................3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology........................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology.........................3
Mathematics/Science
MTH 261 ** Mathematics for the Elementary School
Teacher......................................4
A minimum of one course from each of the following sciences is highly recommended:
Earth or Biological Science
BIO 100 Human Biology for Non Majors..................3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy.....................3
GEG 100 World Regional Geography .....................5
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography...............3
GEL 101 General Geology ...............................4
Physical Science
PHY 108 Physical Science for Teachers.................3
"Courses may count toward basic studies, but not more than six semester hours in any one department will qualify to meet those requirements. "This course required.
Elementary Educational Services and Resources Major
This is an alternative major for those students who decide they do not wish to major in and be certified to teach in elementary
education. This major affords the student the study and the experience in professional fields which are supplementary to Elementary Education; for example, exceptional education, parent education, and educational resources.
The student's major in this field of study is to be designed through consultation with a faculty advisor in Elementary Education.
Secondary Level
Students may be certified at the secondary level, being endorsed to teach in the following areas: Art*, Business Education and Communication, English, Industrial Education, Mathematics, Modern Languages, Music, Physical Education, Science", Social Studies"*, Spanish and Speech.
Students should ask for advisors in the Department of Teacher Education as well as in the departments of their major and minor fields of study.
The student is cautioned to check with his advisor for changes mandated by new Colorado Law.
In addition to a major in the above areas, students must complete the following professional course program:
Semester
Required Courses Hours
Social and Cultural Bases of Secondary Schools
A block of two courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools......................................3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary
Schools.....................................2
Psychological and Physiological Bases of Secondary
Education
A block of three courses to be taken concurrently.
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...................3
RDG 328 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas,
Secondary ....................................3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom........3
In lieu of EDU 360, Physical Education Majors take:
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education ...................3
Processes of Teaching in the Secondary Schools
A block of three courses to be taken concurrently and not earlier than two semesters before student teaching.
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom
Management..................................3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and Materials
Construction................................2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education...............3
Teaching Practice
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary ......................6, 8, 10 or 12
In addition to the field experiences included in the required courses, students must present evidence of having completed at least 200 hours of experience with adolescents in the age bracket that they intend to teach. This may be accomplished through work with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, church groups, volunteer tutor programs, or similar activities.
Students should plan their experience in consultation with their advisor, who will need to sign a form indicating his or her approval.
Students who seek Secondary Certification are cautioned to see also the general certification requirements listed under Teacher Education Program.
Before enrolling for student teaching, students are directed to take a course in methods of teaching their major and minor field of study offered in the respective departments.
Student teaching normally is for sixteen semester hours and involves 16 weeks of full-time work. Students may split the sixteen
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Division of Education
weeks between different subjects, schools, or grade levels upon consultation with their advisor.
'See Art Certification Program requirements listed below.
"See Science Certification Program requirements listed below.
"See Social Studies Certification Program requirements listed below.
Art Certification: K-12
Requirements: Art Major (Available through the Art Department)
Semester
Required Courses Hours
EDU 211 Laboratory in the Elementary School................2
EDU 221 Processes of Education in
Urban Secondary Schools.......................3
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban
Secondary Schools.............................2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner........................3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum
and Classroom Management............................3
EDU 322 Field Experience in Tutoring and
Materials Construction........................2
or
EDU 316 Curriculum Development: Pre-
and Primary 6.....................................6
EDU 317 Curriculum Development: Pre-
Primary 6:Lab...............................2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom.........3
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content
Areas: Secondary..............................3
EDU 401 Art Methods/Materials: K-12 ...................4
EDU 419* Student Teaching and Seminar:
Elementary (K-6).....................6, 8, 10, 12
EDU 429' Student Teaching and Seminar:
Secondary (6-12).....................6, 8, 10, 12
Electives
EDU 402 Arts Institute Workshop: Integrating the
Arts for Gifted & Talented ...................2
EDU 403 Integrating the Arts: Field Experience
for Gifted & Talented ........................1
EDU 404 Fiber/Textile Crafts: Methods K-12.............2
EDU 416 Integrating Art into the
K-6 Curriculum Practicum......................3
'Student Teaching is comprised of daily full-time work during sixteen weeks, split 8 and 8 weeks between elementary and secondary levels.
Strongly Recommended Coursework
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education..................3
EDU 404 Fiber/Textile Crafts: Methods K-12.............2
Science Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sampling from additional areas of science and mathematics. The program satisfies both major and minor requirements, so no further minor is required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College in one of the following areas:
Biology
Chemistry
Earth-Space Science Physics
Please consult with the department involved or with the Teacher Education Department for a list of approved and/or required courses.
Science Support Area
Students must complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis other than that of the major.
Biology
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ..............4
BIO 210 General Botany ...............................5
BIO 220 General Zoology ..............................5
BIO 355 Urban Ecology.................................4
BIO 360 General Genetics..............................3
Chemistry
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...........................5
CHE 121 General Chemistry II ..........................5
CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis .........................3
CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Lab......................2
CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I ...........................4
CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab..........................2
Earth Science
GEL 101 General Geology ...............................4
GEL 103 Historical Geology.............................4
GEG 100 World Regional Geography ......................5
GEG 123 Weather and Climate ...........................3
GEG 124 Landforms .....................................3
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy......................3
Mathematics
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 310 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs............3
MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics................3
10 additional hours to be selected from:
MTH 241 Calculus II....................................4
CSI 110 Computer Science I ............................3
MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ............................3
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ....................4
MTH 360 History of Mathematics.........................3
MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry........................3
Physics
PHY 231 General Physics I..............................4
PHY 233 General Physics II ............................4
PHY 232 General Physics Lab I..........................1
PHY 234 General Physics Lab II.........................1
Plus 8 additional hours in Physics
A support area in Computer Science is being proposed. Check with the Teacher Education Department or Mathematics Department for further information.
General Requirements
These may be fulfilled in the academic major or teaching area of emphasis.
Choose at least one course from each of the following areas:
Biology
BIO 108 General Introduction to Biology ................4
Chemistry
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry ......................5
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ............................5
Earth Science
AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy.......................3
or
GEG 100 World Regional Geography .......................5
or
GEL 101 General Geology ................................4
Physics
PHY 201 College Physics.................................5
or
PHY 231 General Physics I ..............................4
Mathematics
MTH 111 College Algebra.................................4
or
MTH 112 College Trigonometry ...........................3
or
MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics......................4
or
MTH 140 Pre-calculus Mathematics........................4
or
MTH 141 Calculus I......................................4
or
CSI 110 Computer Science I .............................3
or
MTH 320 Biostatistics ..................................3
or
MTH 360 History of Mathematics..........................3
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Division of Education
Science
This course is required:
SCI 395 Methods of Teaching Science.........................3
Notes
Physics majors should choose AST 104 and MTH 151 to meet certification requirements.
Students who elect the Earth Science or Physics teaching areas of emphasis must choose at least one upper-division course in addition to SCI 395.
Permission is being sought for mathematics to be included as an area of emphasis. Check with the Teacher Education Department.
Social Studies Certification Program
The program includes a major in one area of Social Science, an area of emphasis in a second area, and a sampling from every social/behavioral science.
The program meets both major and minor requirements; an additional minor is not required.
Major
Students must complete an academic major at Metropolitan State College in one of the following areas:
Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Behavioral Science
Bilingual Chicano Studies
Economics
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Please consult with the department involved or with the Teacher Education Department for list of approved and/or required courses.
Social Studies Area of Emphasis
Students must complete one of the following teaching areas of emphasis. History must be selected unless the academic major is History.
Geography (12 semester hours)
GEG 123 Weather and Climate ............................3
GEG 130 Introduction to Human Geography.................3
GEG 140 World Resources ................................3
GEG 422 Climate and Land Use ...........................3
Political Science (12 semester hours)
PSC 101 American National Government ...................3
PSC 102 Political Systems and Ideas.....................3
PSC 300 American State and Local Government.............4
PSC 305 Political Theory................................3
Psychology (12 semester hours)
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.........................3
PSY 211 Educational Psychology..........................3
Six (6) additional hours of electives. Suggested: PSY 216, 221, 241, 295.
Sociology (12 semester hours)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.......................3
SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences.................3
Six (6) additional hours of electives, three (3) of which must be upper-division.
General Requirements
(Some may be satisfied in academic major or support area.)
HIS 401 Methods of Teaching Social Science Select one course from each of the following areas: Afro-American Studies*
Anthropology Chicano Studies Economics Geography"
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Afro-American History or other course dealing with Afro-American experience in the United States.
GEG 100-5 World Regional or GEG 140-3 World Resources suggested. These credits are to be taken as part of General Studies.
History (18 semester hours)
HIS 101 Western Civilization I ..........................3
HIS 102 Western Civilization II .........................3
HIS 121 American History I ...............................3
HIS 122 American History II ............................3
Six (6) additional upper-division History hours selected in consultation with the department. Reading courses will not apply. Afro-American Studies (12 semester hours)
AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies.............3
AAS 102 Survey of the Black Struggle....................3
Six (6) additional hours in Afro-American Studies; three (3) must be upper-division. Afro-American History suggested. Students are reminded to take Afro-American Studies and Chicano Studies
courses as listed under general requirements.
Anthropology (12 semester hours)
ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and Prehistory...........3
ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology..........3
Six (6) additional upper-division hours in Anthropology Chicano Studies (12 semester hours)
CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies................3
CHS 101 History of Meso-America........................3
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest........3
Three (3) additional upper-division hours in Chicano Studies. Economics (18 semester hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ..............3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro...............3
Twelve (12) additional upper-division hours in Economics.
Special Education Minor
The minor in Special Education is designed to prepare teachers, physical educators, recreation therapists, counselors, and professionals in human services to work effectively with exceptional children in any educational setting. The courses listed below provide classes totaling nineteen (19) semester hours for completion of the minor. Students who wish to gain endorsement for teaching the educable mentally handicapped (EMH) child must complete the minor and student teaching. The courses listed below are requirements for certification for students in the areas
of Early Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Education:
Core Courses:
EDU 340 Education and Training of the Mentally
Retarded Child ...............................4
EDU 343 Field Testing Remedial Techniques in
Special Education ............................3
EDU 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children....3
EDU 349 Education of the Learning Disabled Child ....3
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom......3
EDU 462 Adaptive Physical Education ...........3
Total.....................................................19
Additional requirements for Early Childhood and Elementary
Education Majors:
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional
Children .....................................3
EDU 342 Curriculum Methods and Methods for Teaching
the Mentally Retarded K-12....................3
Total......................................................6
71


Division of Education
EDU 449 Seminar and Student Teaching:
Special Education: Elementary
(EMH)...............................6, 8. 10 or 12
Total.................................................12 or 18
Additional Requirements for Secondary Education Majors:
EDU 341 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional
Children .......................................3
EDU 342 Curriculum Methods and Methods for Teaching
the Mentally Retarded K-12......................3
Total.........................................................6
EDU 479 Seminar and Student Teaching:
Special Education: Secondary (EMH) .............6
Total........................................................12
Total hours required for Special Education Minor............31
HSW 104 Behavior Modification is highly recommended, but is not a required course for either a minor or certification.
Bilingual-Bicultural Education Minor
The Division of Education offers a minor in Bilingual-Bicultural Education. The minor is an interdisciplinary program sponsored by Chicano Studies, the Teacher Education Department, the Modern Language Department, and the Reading Department. The principal objective of the Bilingual-Bicultural minor is to prepare future teachers who will be able to conduct all phases of classroom instruction in a bilingual and bicultural setting. In the developmental sequence, the minor will provide the potential teacher with a background of the Mexican heritage and with an understanding of present day Hispano/Chicano culture. Proficiency in the Spanish language is required of all students before they complete the minor. This proficiency will prepare the teacher to understand and further develop the native tongue of bilingual-bicultural children, while offering a second language to many other children. In addition, the minor will provide the teacher with sufficient field and academic experiences and resources in order to develop, implement, and evaluate curricular methods, techniques, and materials in the bilingual-bicultural classroom. For students who do not student teach in a bilingual-bicultural program, the Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education will be required.
Required Courses and Recommended Sequence Semester
Hours
CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the American
Southwest: Mexican and U.S. Periods ..........3
EDU 351 Perspectives in Bilingual-Bicultural
Education.......................................4
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers......2
SPA 310 Spanish Terminology for the Bilingual
Classroom ..............................2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom ...3
EDU 451 Development of Methods and Materials
for the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom .........4
CHS* Electives .......................................3
SPA* Electives .......................................3
Total.......................................................24
Must be advanced courses and taken with the approval of the Bilingual advisor.
Courses Strongly Recommended in Chicano Studies and Spanish
CHS 310 Chicano Community Organization..............2
CHS 330 Education of the Chicano Child..............3
CHS 410 Seminar: Mexican and Chicano Art ...........3
SPA 322 Culture and Folklore of the Mexican
Southwest....................................3
SPA 311 Advanced Conversation.......................3
SPA 312 Spanish Phonetics and Diction...............3
Required when student teaching in a bilingual-bicultural program is not completed:
EDU 452 Practicum in Bilingual-Bicultural Education ........3
Preparation Requirements
Language Proficiency: Proficiency in oral and written Spanish will be determined by a committee composed of Spanish-speaking members of the Modern Language Department, Chicano Studies, and the Center for Education. The Four Skills Exam is used as the proficiency measure. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory score on the proficiency examination will be required to take sufficient Spanish classes to enable them to pass the proficiency examination. The following courses are designed to help students meet the proficiency requirements before the completion of the
Bilingual-Bicultural minor:
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I.............................5
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II............................5
SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I ............3
SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ...........3
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Philosophy and includes the required courses listed under the Holistic Health and Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Parenting Education
The purpose of the Parenting Education minor is two-fold. First, the program is designed to provide students entering professions where they will deal with children and families with the information and skills necessary to conduct parenting education programs. Second, the program addresses a need identified in the community for people with specific preparation for the role of parent educator. Many agencies offer or are interested in offering parent education programs, yet no specific preparation for that role has been available. This minor is designed both to make the field of parent education more credible by providing students with education for that role and to give students a set of skills that are increasingly in demand, but rarely found.
This minor is seen as particularly appropriate for students entering family- and child-related fields, including (but not limited to): Education, Health Care Management, Human Services, Law Enforcement (especially juvenile justice), Nursing (and Nurse Practitioner programs), Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, Speech, and Women's Studies. People entering these fields might well be in a position to develop and conduct parent education programs; a minor in Parenting Education should serve them well in the employment market. Other fields, also, might provide opportunities to utilize this background; parent education happens in settings ranging from churches to industry, and is not limited to educational settings in the usual sense.
The Parenting Education minor encompasses three areas of preparation. One set of classes is intended to give students basic information necessary to effective parenting (child development, parenting techniques, family management, health care, etc.). The second facet of the program gives students the skills necessary for developing and conducting parent education programs (group techniques, program development, counseling techniques, etc.). The third component of the program entails actual field experience working in parent education programs; this experience is incorporated into a number of classes and is the central component of the final course in the minor. A field experience is required in the last semester. Placement opportunities include parent education in hospitals, social service agencies, public and private schools, and business and industry. Students work closely with a PAR advisor to ensure an appropriate field placement.
Minor in Parenting Education
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PAR 107 Introduction to Parenting Education...........3
EDU 231 Child Development
or
PSY 325 Child Psychology............................ 3
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Division of Education
PSY 295 Child Rearing.................................3
PSY 295 Principles of Counseling......................3
or
HSW 203 Introduction to Theory and Techniques
in Interviewing and Psychotherapy .............4
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and Experience ...4 or
EDU 265 Human Relations...............................3
PAR 207 Home and Family Management ...................3
HES 307 Parental Health Care Issues...................3
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process ...4
Field Placement: A minimum of 3 hours from the courses listed:
EDU 431 is a prerequisite for any field placement in Parent
Education. The program director works closely with students and
community agencies in setting up appropriate field placements.
PSY 493 Seminar in Developmental Psychology
or
EDU 469 Post Student Teaching
or
HSW 479 Professional Internship
or
NUR 485 Nursing Process: Application
or
PAR 499 Parent Education Field Placement
Minimum hours required for the minor are 27-31 (depending on courses selected). If the PAR minor is combined with a major in any of the following departments (EDU, HSW, NUR, PSY), the combined total semester hours for major and minor must be 60 hours. Such a program must include all courses required for the major and those listed here as required for the PAR minor. Approval by both departments will be necessary for such a combined program.
HSW 104 Behavior Modification
CHS 221 The Chicano Family
SWD 104 Human Behavior and the Social Environment
SWD 105 Family Social Services
SWD 301 Social Work Services for Children and Adoles-
cents
AAS 355 The Black Family
Physical Education
The major in Physical Education is designed to emphasize areas for certification in elementary, secondary, and K-12 physical education levels and in alternative allied physical education fields. The alternatives to certification in Physical Education are emphasis areas in: (1) Non-Teaching area of emphasis, (2) Athletic Training emphasis, and (3) a department sponsored Sports Communication Multi-Major.
Minors in Physical Education include emphasis areas in: Elementary Physical Education, Secondary Physical Education, Non-Teaching, Coaching, Dance, and Athletic Training.
Students seeking teaching credentials in Physical Education must satisfy the Teacher Education Program at MSC in addition to all of the requirements of the Department of Physical Education. Requirements for formal admission to the education programs as listed under the Teacher Education Programs section of this Bulletin must also be met. Colorado law affecting teacher certification may be changed in the period during which this Bulletin is in effect. Students should contact the Teacher Education Department for modifications.
Major for Bachelor of Arts
A. Elementary Area of Emphasis
1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Note: For descriptions of other courses included in the minor, see appropriate department listings: EDU Education; HES Health Education; HSW Human Services; NUR Nursing; PSY Psychology; SOC Sociology; WMS Womens Studies
Parenting Certificate Program
Prerequisites: A degree (B.A., B.S., M.S., M.A.) in a field such as Education, Psychology, Social Work, Human Services, Child Development, or Nursing
Semester
Required Courses Hours
PAR 107 Introduction to Parenting Education...........3
PAR 207 Home and Family Management ...................3
HES 307 Parental Health Care Issues...................3
EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process ...4
PSY 295 Contemporary Issues: Child Rearing............3
HSW 202 Small Group Dynamics: Theory and
Experiences...................................4
or
HSW 465 Group Facilitation and Group Counseling.......4
PAR 499 Field Placement...............................4
or
Approved Electives upon consultation with an advisor
a. Basic Skills (All of the following):
Fundamentals of Movement...............................1
Physical Fitness.......................................2
Tumbling...............................................1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following)
Volleyball.............................................2
Basketball.............................................2
Soccer.................................................2
Football...............................................2
Softball ..............................................2
Field Hockey ..........................................2
c. Miscellaneous (2 of the following)
Square and Folk Dance..................................2
Track and Field .......................................2
Wrestling .............................................2
Lifesaving.............................................1
Racquetball and Handball ..............................2
Total Credits...............................................15
2. Additional Elementary Activity Courses
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child.....................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .......................2
PER 258 Movement Education ................................3
Total Credits................................................8
Total.............................................................24
3. Theory Classes (All of the following):
Suggested Electives PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education 2
PAR 480 Special Topics in Parent Education PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology 3
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence PER 334 Physiology of Exercise 3
HSW 204 Family Functioning, Dysfunction and Therapy PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
SOC 341 The Family in Transition for Children 3
WMS 101 Women in Transition PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
WMS 218 Rational Assertiveness Training Education 2
EDU 344 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning 3
73


Division of Education
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education.............3
Approved electives...........................3
Total Credits..................................................22
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross.
Total Minimum Hours for Major...............................45
To obtain certification by the State of Colorado, all Elementary Physical Education teachers must also complete the following courses:
EDU 110 Elementary Education in the United States .......3
EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education................3
EDU 315 Foundations of Urban and Multicultural Education
Laboratory......................................2
EDU 361 Use of Media in Education .......................3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education .....................3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading
Intermediate ...................................3
Total Credits...............................................17
Highly recommended, but not required:
EDU 231 Child Development................................3
EDU 265 Human Relations..................................3
B. Secondary Area of Emphasis 1. Professional Activity Courses (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Secondary Physical Education majors must present proof of proficiency in fifteen different activities. A total of 23 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by: (1) receiving a passing grade in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
Semester
Hours
a. Basic Skills (All of the following):
Swimming..............................................1
Fundamentals of Movement..............................1
Physical Fitness......................................2
Tumbling..............................................1
b. Team Sports (3 of the following):
Volleyball............................................2
Flag Football ........................................2
Field Hockey .........................................2
Soccer................................................2
Softball .............................................2
Basketball............................................2
c. Sports (5 of the following):
Lifesaving............................................1
Gymnastics............................................2
Track and Field ......................................2
Tennis................................................2
Badminton and Archery.................................2
Golf..................................................2
Racquetball and Handball .............................2
Personal Defense .....................................2
d. Miscellaneous (3 of the following):
Square and Folk Dance.................................2
Ballroom Dance .......................................2
Wrestling ............................................2
Modern Dance (creative movement)......................2
Weight Training.......................................2
2. Theory Courses (All of the following):
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education.............2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.........................3
PER 332 Biomechanics...................................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise ........................3
PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education............................3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education.....................................2
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education.............3
Approved electives............................3
Total Credits............................................22
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross.
Total Minimum Hours for Major............................45
To obtain a certificate from the State of Colorado, all Secondary Physical Education majors must also complete the courses required by the Department of Teacher Education for Secondary Level Certification as listed under Secondary Level in the Education section of the catalog. The only exception to that listing is that Secondary Physical Education majors must substitute PER 462, Adaptive Physical Education, for EDU 360.
C. K-12 Area of Emphasis in Physical Education Major 1. Professional Activities (PER 150)
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)
Students desiring K-12 Certification must be proficient in 16 different activities, selected from the categories below. A maximum of 25 credits will be counted toward completion of the major requirements. Students must present proof of proficiency by: (1) receiving a passing grade in the course; or (2) obtaining the approval of the PER Proficiency Screening Committee for those activities in which they can present adequate verification of proficiency. Proficiency application forms may be obtained at the PER office.
a. Basic Skills (All of the following):
Swimming..............................................1
Fundamentals of Movement..............................1
Physical Fitness......................................2
Tumbling..............................................1
b. Team Sports (4 of the following):
Volleyball ...........................................2
Flag Football ........................................2
Field Hockey .........................................2
Soccer................................................2
Softball .............................................2
Basketball............................................2
c. Individual Sports (5 of the following):
Lifesaving............................................1
Gymnastics............................................2
Track and Field ......................................2
Tennis................................................2
Badminton and Archery.................................2
Golf..................................................2
Racquetball and Handball .............................2
Personal Defense .....................................2
d. Miscellaneous (3 of the following):
Square and Folk Dance.................................2
Ballroom Dance .......................................2
Wrestling ............................................2
Modern Dance (creative movement)......................2
Modern Dance (improvisation, technique,
composition)..........................................2
Weight Training.......................................2
Total Credits
.23 Total Credits
.25
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Division of Education
2. Theory Classes
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education............2
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ..................2
PER 258 Movement Education ...........................3
PER 306 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries......3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology........................3
PER 332 Biomechanics .................................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise .......................3
PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary
Physical Education...........................3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children.................................3
PER 440 Evaluation and Measurement in Physical
Education....................................2
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning.....................3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education ...........3
PER 399' Field Experience (K-12)......................2
38
Total Minimum Hours for Major............................60
This course must be taken during the senior year in a secondary school at the level in which the student does not do student teaching.
Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation Cards from the American Red Cross.
3. The following Teacher Education Classes are required for Certification
EDU 110 Elementary Education in the United States ....3
EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary
Schools......................................3
EDU 222 Field Experience in Urban Secondary Schools...2
EDU 231 Child Development..............................3
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner...................3
PER 462 Adaptive P.E. (In lieu of EDU 360) ...........3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading
Intermediate ................................3
or
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading Content Areas:
Secondary ...................................3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ..........3
Total.................................................23-26
Student teaching must be taken for 18 credits in a combination of elementary and secondary. In that this program enables a person to gain certification to teach physical education in both Secondary and Elementary School Programs, the minor requirements are considered fulfilled.
D. Non-Teaching Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or Methods
of Teaching) (Select any 12).................12
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education............2
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)....................................2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology........................3
PER 332 Biomechanics..................................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise .......................3
PER 362 Trends and Issues in Physical Education.......2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ...3
Approved electives.........................................13
To be Selected in accordance with students intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an advisor in PER Department and approved by the chair.
Total minimum hours for Major ............................43
E. Athletic Training Area of Emphasis
The major emphasis area is designed for those primarily interested in athletic training at the college or professional level and is complimentary to allied fields, e.g., Biology.
PER 150 Physical Fitness (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................2
PER 150 Weight Training (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................2
PER 206 Standard First Aid and CPR ....................2
PER 300 School Health Programs.........................3
PER 306 Care and Prevention of
Athletic Injuries.............................3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.........................3
PER 332 Biomechanics...................................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise ........................3
PER 370 Psychology of Coaching.........................2
PER 462 Adaptive P.E...................................3
PER 489 Advanced Athletic Training
Internship................................10/12
HES 204 Nutrition......................................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.....................3
BIO 231 Human Anatomy...................................4
BIO 232 Human Physiology ..............................4
Total Minimum Hours for Major.............................50
Requirements to enter and complete program:
1. Application to be made between completion of 60 and 90 semester hours (20 semester hours minimum at MSC).
2. 2.75 cumulative GPA minimum requirement upon acceptance and to be maintained through graduation. Junior standing.
3. 1800 additional volunteer hours of work with a certified athletic trainer. Required to obtain National Athletic Training Association (NATA) certification but are not required for graduation.
4. Pass the NATA certification exam and all other requirements of NATA (not required for graduation).
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Sports
Sponsored by the Department of Physical Education, Recreation and Health
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communication. It is imperative that an area of emphasis advisor be consulted. Sports Communication Multi-Majors are expected to engage in practical experiential situations in either Sports Broadcasting or Sports Journalism. At least one three-semester-hour internship in these areas must be considered the minimum. At least 50 percent of all major course work should be completed prior to the internships in Journalism.
Required Core..............................................
COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and
Systems.......................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or ..............3
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.....................3
Total......................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses
SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and TV
Broadcasting .................................3
SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing
(Prerequisite SPE 240)........................3
or
SPE 344 Radio-Television Production..................3
SPE 348 Radio and TV Production Workshop (Prerequisite
SPE 348)......................................3
COM 378 Communications Law ..........................3
JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism...................3
75


Division of Education
JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and
Newswriting..................................3
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.....................1
PER 150 (Select one two-hour PER 150 Course).........2
PER 370 Psychology of Coaching.......................2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American
Society......................................3
PER 498 Independent Study Sports Commmunication
(Must develop and research sports topics related to specific minor sports, for two one-hour courses, e.g.,
Skiing, Hang Gliding, Fencing, Tae Kwon Do, Racquetball, Snowmobiling, Ice Skating,
etc.).........................................2
Total Hours................................................28
Recommended Electives
Student must take electives in 3 different areas; 3 hours must be in PER.
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft....................3
SPE 330 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice
and Diction ...................................3
SPE 347 Evolution and Cinematics and Art..............3
SPE 448 Seminar: Practicum in Broadcasting............3
SPE 449 Effects of Radio and TV on Contemporary
Life...........................................3
JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and
Copyreading....................................3
JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News
Writing .......................................3
JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing........................3
JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magazines ........3
JRN 485 News Media, Propaganda and Public
Opinion .......................................3
PER 210 Officiating ..................................2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology........................3
PER 332 Biomechanics..................................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise .......................3
PER 362 Trends and Issues in Physical Education........2
PER 372 Science and Art of Coaching and
Athletic Administration........................2
COM 244 Writing for Radio...............................3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ....3
JRN 499 Omnibus Courses (Related to Sports
Communication, i.e.. Sports Writing, Photojournalism) Select Three .................3
Category Total..............................................9
Total Minimum Hours for Major..............................43
Physical Education Minor
A. Elementary Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................4
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)...................................2
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child.................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child....................2
PER 258 Movement Education ............................3
PER 350 Methods of Teaching Physical Education
for Children..................................3
PER 460 Organization, Administration and Curriculum
Development in Physical Education.............3
Total Credits.............................................20
B. Secondary Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement.......................1
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................8
PER 206 Standard First Aid and CPR (or valid American
Red Cross cards)...............................2
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise ......................3
PER 340 Methods of Teaching Secondary P.E............3
Approved electives (150 or above) .............3
Total Credits..............................................20
C. Non-Teaching Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Professional Activities (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................6
PER 160 Introduction to Physical Education............2
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (or valid American Red
Cross Card)..................................2
PER 362 Trends and Issues in Physical Education.......2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ...3
Approved electives: Selected in accordance with student's intended career objectives. Must be pre-planned with an advisor in PER Department and approved by the Department chair......7
Total Credits..............................................22
D. Coaching Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................1
PER 150 Weight Training (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................2
PER 150 Physical Fitness (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................2
PER 150 Select from: Volleyball, Soccer, Basketball,
Softball (Skills and/or Methods of
Teaching)......................................2
PER 150 Select from: Gymnastics, Track & Field,
Tennis, Golf, and Aquatics (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................2
PER 306 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries........3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology..........................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise .......................3
PER 370 Psychology of Coaching..........................2
PER 372 Science and Art of Coaching and Athletic
Administration ................................2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society......3
Total Credits..............................................25
Additional Requirement for Coaching Area of Emphasis
3 semesters of involvement in athletic participation or involvement; little league through college coaching.
PER 332-3 is suggested as an additional course for coaching
preparation.
Substitutions for Coaching Area of Emphasis
The following courses would serve as substitutes:
PER 210 Officiating ..................................2-4
PER 316 Water Safety Instructor Certification...........3
PER 371 Administration of Intramural Sports
and Student Recreation.........................2
EDU 265 Human Relations.................................3
EDU 320 Adolescent as a Learner (Elementary
Physical Education Majors only) ...............3
AAS 270 Philosophy of Black Consciousness...............3
AAS 315 Education of the Black Child ...................3
AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Prejudice..............3
CHS 330 Education of Chicano Children...................3
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing & Strategies ..........3
SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking........................3
SPE 382 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication .................................3
All substitutions are subject to approval of minor advisor and Department chair.
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Division of Education
E. Dance Area of Emphasis
PER 150 Ballet (Skills and/or Methods
of Teaching) ..................................2
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)..........................1
PER 150 Modern Dance (Technique, Improvisation,
Composition) (Skills and/or Methods
of Teaching) ..................................2
PER 252* Rhythms for the Young Child
or
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft....................2-3
SPE 322 Movement for Stage .............................3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning.......................3
Select 2 of the following courses:
PER 150 Modern Dance (Creative Movement)(Skills
and/or Methods of Teaching)....................2
PER 150 Square and Folk Dance (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................2
PER 150 Ballroom Dance (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................2
PER 150 Beginning Jazz (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching)...........................2
Select 1 -4 hours of electives as listed below:
PER 150 Dance Activities for the Handicapped
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching)............2
PER 150 Afro-American Ethnic Dance (Skills and/
or Methods of Teaching) .......................2
PER 150 Mexican-American Ethnic Dance (Skills
and/or Methods of Teaching)....................2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation ................2
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child
or
PER 306 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries........3
SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft....................2-3
SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Design
and Theatre Lighting...........................3
MUS 101 Fundamentals of Music Theory....................3
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and
Giftedness in Young Children...................3
Total Credits..............................................20
"Those with teaching interest select PER 252; those with performing interest select SPE 224.
F. Athletic Training Area of Emphasis for P.E. Majors.
The minor emphasis area is designed for the elementary, secondary, and K-12 Physical Education emphasis major. The minor emphasis is basically an extension of the major emphasis designed to provide certification in athletic training and pair with
certification in teacher education.
HES 204 Nutrition .......................................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.......................3
PER 300 School Health Programs...........................3
PER 306 Care and Prevention of
Athletic Injuries...............................3
PER 370 Psychology of Coaching...........................2
PER 462 Adaptive P.E.....................................3
PER 489 Advanced Athletic Training
Internship..................................10/12
Total Credits................................................27
Requirements to enter and complete program:
1. Completion of major in Physical Education Teacher Education Certification Program. Elementary emphasis Physical Education majors must take PER 332 Biomechanics.
2. Application to be made between completion of 60 and 90 semester hours (20 semester hours minimum at MSC).
3. 2.75 cumulative GPA minimum requirement upon acceptance and maintained through graduation.
4. 1800 additional volunteer hours work with a certified athletic trainer. Required to obtain NATA certification but are not necessary for graduation.
5. Pass the NATA certification exam and all other requirements of NATA. Not required for graduation.
Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor
The Multi-Minor may be arranged through the Department of Philosophy and includes the required courses listed under the Holistic Health and Education Multi-Minor in the Degrees and Programs Available at MSC section of this Bulletin.
Recreation
The major in Recreation is intended to prepare students to enter recreation-related jobs that are available at both local and national levels. The major consists of a common core of courses deemed essential for all recreation personnel and emphasizes field work with various types of recreation, parks, conservation, and other social service agencies.
In conjunction with the core course selections, the student will select one area of emphasis. The areas of emphasis provide the student with specialized knowledge and skills related to particular job functions provided by the various recreation-related service agencies. The areas of emphasis from which the student may select are:
1. Therapeutic Recreation Services
2. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities
3. Inner-City Program Specialist
4. Sports and Athletics
5. Performing and Cultural Arts Specialist (Dance)
6. Recreation and Park Administration
7. Camping
8. Outdoor Recreation
9. Gerontology (Activity Specialist)
In summary, Recreation majors have the following degree
requirements or options:
Core Courses .......................................14 hours
Emphasis Area ......................................27 hours
Total...............................................41 hours
Recreation Internship (Required for
State Registration)..................................12 hours
The selection of course work will be approved by the Chair of the Department.
For students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Recreation, the following courses are highly recommended for basic studies:
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics..........................3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology......................3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology.....................3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication...........3
Sciences (Human-Animal-Plant-Earth) to be selected with advisor approval .................................................6-8
Recreation Major for Bachelor of Arts
Required Courses for All Students
A. Core Courses (13 hours)
PER 211 Recreation Leadership and Leisure
Service Systems .............................4
PER 215 Recreation Facility and Equipment
Maintenance..................................2
PER 235 Leisure Education and Recreation for
Special Populations .........................3
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PER 411 Recreation Program Construction and
Control Processes ..............................3
PER 413 Administration and Organization
of Recreation..................................2
Total Credits..............................................14
NOTE: Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation are required. Students may take PER 206 or obtain valid First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation cards from the American Red Cross.
B. Emphasis Area (27 hours)
Students will be required to select one of nine areas of special emphasis courses designed to provide the student with high degree of specialization in a chosen area of interest. These emphasis areas consist of 27 hours of course work offered by the Department and other disciplines within the College.
C. Internship
PER 489 Recreation Internship.....................10/12 hours
This practical learning experience is designed primarily to help students make the transition from the classroom to the practical situation. Opportunity is provided for students to assume normal responsibilities involved in the delivery of services commensurate with degree emphasis. This experience is also required for state registration.
Total hours................................................53
Areas of Emphasis
A. Therapeutic Recreation Services (select 27 hours)
Select six hours from the Skills and/or Methods of Teaching (S/M/T) classes listed below. Students may also substitute PER 480 omnibus (activity related) courses as approved by their advisor and chair of the department.
PER 150 S/M/T Activities for Physically & Mentally Handi-
capped ........................................2
PER 150 S/M/T Activity and Fitness Programs for
the Aged ......................................2
PER 150 S/M/T Camping for Handicapped .................2
PER 150 S/M/T Dance for Special Populations .........2
PER 150 S/M/T Wheelchair Activities ....................2
PER 150 S/M/T Sports Programs for Special Populations ..2
PER 150 S/M/T Fundamentals of Movement .................1
PER 150 S/M/T Camping and Outing Programs for Aged ...2
Total Credit...............................................8
Theory Courses (select 21 hours)
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology.........................3
PER 333 Introduction to Therapeutic
Recreation Services............................2
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise ..........................3
PER 437 Techniques in Therapeutic
Recreation ....................................3
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment.....................3
PER 450 Perceptual Motor Learning......................3
PER 462 Adaptive Physical Education ......................3
PER 463 Recreation Programs for Aged ...................2
Total.....................................................27
NOTE: Areas of study recommended for minor for students with a Therapeutic emphasis of study include: Physical Disabilities: Psychiatric Disorders; Corrections, Drug and Alcohol; Special Education; Early Childhood Development; and Gerontology. Consult with advisor in Recreation.
B. Aquatic and Waterfront Activities (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses
(Skills and/or Methods of Teaching).........11 hours
The following courses are required or selection indicated:
PER 150 Gymnastics
PER 150 Swimming
PER 150 Diving
PER 150 Advanced Lifesaving
Select 2 out of 3.........................................2
PER 150 Canoeing ..........................1
PER 150 Sailing ...........................1
PER 150 Power Boating......................1
Select 3 out of 4.........................................3
PER 150 Water Polo.........................1
PER 150 Synchronized Swimming..............1
PER 150 Competitive Swimming ...........1
PER 150 Scuba Diving ......................1
Total S/M/T Courses........................................11
PER 210 Officiating (Aquatic Activities)................2
PER 316 Water Safety Instructor Certification...........3
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology (required)...............3
PER 332 Biomechanics....................................3
or
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise .........................3
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating
Operations.....................................2
PER 359 Teaching the Handicapped to Swim ...............2
PER 455 Swimming Pool Operation and Management.........4
Total......................................................27
C. Inner City Program Specialist (select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses (Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching):
Select 4 hours.................................4
SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living........................3
PSC 300 American State and Local
Government.....................................4
HSW 345 Crisis Intervention and
Legal Issues....(..............................4
GEG 360 Urban Geography.................................3
SOC 324 Poverty in America..............................3
PER 463 Recreation Program for Aged ....................2
PER 465 Recreation Programs and Management
in the Inner City..............................4
Total Credit..............................................27
D. Sports and Athletics (Select 27 hours) Required Courses
PER 150 Fundamentals of Movement (Skills
and/or Methods of Teaching).....................1
PER 150 Physical Fitness (Skills and/or Methods of
Teaching).......................................2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology...........................3
Additional PER 150 Courses .................................13
Select any eight (8) hours:
PER 210 Officiating (Select Activity Area) ..............2
PER 250 Activities for Young Child ......................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .....................2
PER 332 Biomechanics.....................................3
or
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise ..........................3
PER 371 Administration of Intramural Sports and
Student Recreation .............................2
PER 473 Sociology of Athletics in American Society ......3
Total Credit................................................27
E. Performing and Cultural Arts Dance (select 27 hours) Required Courses
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology...........................3
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise ..........................3
Select 21 additional hours:
PER 150 Professional Activity: Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching
Square & Folk Dance.............................2
Ballroom Dance..................................2
Modern Dance (Technique,
Improvisation, composition).....................2
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Modern Dance (creative movement)..............2
Tap Dance.....................................2
Ballet........................................2
Afro-American Ethnic Dance ...................2
Mexican-American Ethnic Dance ................2
Dance for Special Populations.................2
Beginning Jazz................................1
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation .............2
EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity ...................3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child................2
SPE 322 Movement for Stage ...........................2
Total.....................................................27
NOTE: Students with an interest in the Performing and Cultural Arts may wish to select a catalog minor from the disciplines of: Arts and Crafts (Art or Industrial Technical Studies Departments), Music, or Drama (Speech
Department)
F. Recreation and Park Administration (select 27 hours)
GEG 360 Urban Geography................................3
GEG 464 Land Use Recreation..........................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MKT 330 Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations.........3
MGT 353 Personnel Management...........................3
MGT 461 Employee Training and Supervision .............3
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and
Boating Operations...........................2
PER 383 Urban Park and Recreation Planning ............3
PER 455 Swimming Pool Operation and Management........4
PER 465 Recreation Programs and Management
in the Inner City............................4
PER 481 Federal Grant and Aid Programs ................2
PER 483 Park and Recreation Management ................3
Outdoor Safety and Survival Techniques ......2
Fishing and Waterfowl Management ............2
Western Horsemanship ........................1
White Water Boating..........................1
Canoeing ....................................1
Camping and Outing Programs for
the Elderly .................................2
Hunter Education and Game
Management...................................2
Vehicular Travel Activities..................1
Mountaineering (Rock Climbing) ..............1
PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation .............2
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating Operations..2
PER 441 Environmental Education.....................2
PER 445 Camp Management and Counseling..............4
Total...................................................27
NOTE: Students pursuing employment in State, Regional, or National Park or Conservation services should consider Law Enforcement, Earth Sciences and Industrial Skills (wood, welding and mechanical crafts) for a minor, elective credits, or general studies.
I. Gerontology Activity Specialist. (Select 27 hours)
PER 150 Skills and/or Methods of Teaching Professional Activity Courses. Select six (6) credits from the
classes listed below:
Activity and Fitness Programs
For the Elderly.................................2
Physical Fitness (Required).....................2
Camping and Outing Programs for Elderly......2
Wheelchair Activities...........................2
Sports Programs for Special Populations ........2
Dance for Special Populations...................2
Total...................................................27
G. Camping (Select 27 hours)
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses: Skills and/or
Methods of Teaching.........................12
Swimming.....................................1
Advanced Lifesaving..........................1
Select 2 out of 3:
Canoeing...................................2
Sailing ...................................2
Power Boating .............................2
Basic & Advanced Camp Craft Skills...........2
Outdoor Safety and Survival Techniques ......2
Vehicular Travel Activities..................1
Fishing and Water Fowl Management ...........2
Hunter Education and Game Management ........2
Camping for the Handicapped .................2
English Style Horsemanship...................1
Western Horsemanship I ......................1
White Water Boating..........................1
Camping and Outing Programs for the Elderly .2
Select an additional 15 hours from courses listed below:
Required Courses:
PER 233 Advocacy and Social Action Programs for
the Aged .....................................3
PER 307 Health Problems in Aging......................2
PER 330 Anatomical Kinesiology...................... 3
PER 333 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation
Services......................................2
PER 334 Physiology of Exercise .......................3
PER 436 Movement Problems in Gerontology .............2
PER 463 Recreation Programs for Aged .................2
Select a minimum of five (5) hours from the classes listed below:
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts....................2
PER 219 Music, Drama, Dance in Recreation ............2
PER 437 Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation .........3
Specified Electives: (Basic Studies or General Electives) Students with emphasis in Gerontology must select six (6) credit hours (approved by advisor) from the following courses:
SOC 104 Introduction to Gerontology...................3
SOC 204 Aging in American Society.....................3
HES 204 Nutrition.....................................3
PSY 327 Adulthood and Senescence......................3
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts..................2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation ............2
PER 250 Activities for the Young Child .............3
PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ................2
PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation .............2
PER 353 Waterfront, Marina and Boating Operations....2
PER 441 Environmental Education......................2
PER 445 Camp Management and Counseling...............4
Total....................................................27
H. Outdoor Recreation (Select 27 hours)
PER 150 Skills and/or Methods of Teaching Professional Activity Courses. Select fourteen (14) credits from
the classes listed below:
Swimming.....................................1
Basic and Advanced Camp Craft
Skills ......................................2
Total.................................................................27
NOTE: Areas of gerontological study recommended for a minor include: Therapeutic Recreation, Health Care Management, Sociology, and Psychology Departments.
Recreation Minor
PER 150 Professional Activity Courses................5
Select any five (5) hours from the PER 150 listings of Professional Activity Courses (S/M/T). Contact PER Department for complete listing of course selections available.
PER 211 Recreation Leadership and Leisure Service
Systems.....................................4
PER 217 Recreation Arts and Crafts...................2
PER 219 Music-Drama-Dance in Recreation .............2
PER 235 Recreation for Special Populations...........3
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PER 341 Camping and Outdoor Recreation .....................2
PER 411 Recreation Program Construction and
Control Processes .............................3
PER 413 Administration and Organization of
Recreation ....................................2
Total......................................................23
Health and Safety Education
Minor in Health and Safety
The emphasis in Health Education is intended to prepare students to teach Health Education at either the secondary, elementary, or both levels. This is an excellent area of emphasis for the student who is obtaining a teaching major in another area or for those nurses who are interested in the area of School Health Nurse.
Selection of the emphasis in Driver's Education & Safety will enable the student who obtains Teacher Education Certification to teach at the secondary level in Driver's and/or Motorcycle
Education.
A. Health Education Area of Emphasis
CJC 351 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues
and Treatment.................................3
PER 202 Community Health............................3
HES 204 Nutrition ..................................3
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation................................2
PER 300 School Health Programs......................3
PER 391 Safety Education............................3
PSY 325 Child Psychology or
PSY 326 Psychology of Adolescence ............3
Total....................................................20
B. Driver and Traffic Safety Education Area of Emphasis
CJC 351 Drug Abuse: Legal Issues
and Treatment................................3
PER 206 Standard First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary
Resuscitation................................2
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education................3
PER 391 Safety Education...............................3
PER 392 Driver Education (Basic and Advanced) .......4
PER 394 Simulators, Ranges and Behind-the-Wheel
Techniques...................................3
PER 396 Motorcycle Safety Education...................2
Total....................................................20
In the senior year, students learn to administer a complete reading diagnosis, write a comprehensive case report based on the study of current remedial theory, develop materials for students with reading difficulties, and work in the reading clinic on a one-to-one basis with children who have severe reading problems.
Reading Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Primary ......3
RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read ............3
RDG 313 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Intermediate ....3
RDG 360 Practicum in Teaching Reading.................3
RDG 425 Remedial Reading Theories and Diagnosis.......4
RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials.............2
RDG 460 Practicum in Teaching Remedial Reading .......3
Total....................................................18
Early Childhood Education majors take RDG 310; Elementary Education majors take RDG 313.
Highly Recommended
RDG 328 Reading in the Content Areas....................3
RDG 353 Teaching Reading to Non-English Speakers........2
RDG 358 Reading in the Bilingual-Bicultural Classroom
(competency in Spanish required)............3
Reading
The Reading Department offers reading improvement courses for all students and a reading minor for early childhood, elementary and secondary education majors.
The reading improvement courses emphasize development of vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and rate. A well-equipped Reading Laboratory is used to reinforce classroom instruction. The Reading Laboratory contains materials for use in improving comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills as well as machines for improving reading speed. Any student may use the Laboratory. Students enrolled in the reading improvement courses work on areas identified by a diagnostic reading test administered in each class at the beginning of the semester. Many colleges and universities have used the MSC Laboratory as a model in establishing their reading programs.
The reading minor is designed to produce well-trained classroom teachers. In the sophomore and junior years, students take course work in methods and techniques of teaching reading and receive supervised experience teaching groups of children in a school classroom setting.
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Division of Technology
Division of Technology
The Division of Technology provides technical education to prepare graduates for employment in a wide variety of technical fields. Instruction emphasizes the development of technical competence at a level suitable for success in the various areas offered. The programs include courses in Humanities and Social Sciences to broaden the students' general education. The various fields housed in this Division offer great opportunities for women, due to their demonstrated ability in technical areas and the demands on the part of industry for women with technological skills.
The Division of Technology offers degree programs in Aviation Management and Professional Pilot; Civil Engineering Technology and Surveying; Electrical Engineering Technology, Industrial Marketing and Technical Management; Industrial Technology, Technical and Industrial Administration and Industrial Design; Mechanical Engineering Technology; and Technical Communications.
Department of Aerospace Science
Colorado is one of the nations aerospace centers. Military installations, major aerospace industries, increased interest in private and corporation flying, and the airlines that serve Denver provide employment opportunities. Local Federal Aviation Administration and other government offices offer excellent sources for information. Because of this proximity, students also have the opportunity to visit these facilities and to take courses that are taught by personnel from the various organizations. The baccalaureate degree programs described below have been carefully planned to meet the needs of both the student and of industry. All of the technical courses have been developed in cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration, and prospective employers; students completing them are eligible to take a variety of FAA examinations leading to certification.
The Aviation Management Program prepares the graduate to enter a wide variety of administrative positions within the various segments of the aviation industry.
The Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) courses are not offered by Metropolitan State College. However, students holding a valid FAA Airframe and Powerplant certificate may apply for 30 hours of credit to apply toward a BS degree providing certain validation papers are presented with the application.
All programs in the Department of Aerospace Science have been developed to meet the College Aviation Accreditation Guidelines of the University Aviation Association.
The Airway Science emphasis is an approved FAA Program. Upon completion of the requirements, which include the Systems Management Minor, a student can be registered with the FAA Airway Science Directory in Washington, D.C. As new employees are needed in a variety of FAA related positions, they may be contacted through this directory. Students majoring in any of the Airway Science emphases, must minor in Systems Management.
Bachelor of Science
The Department of Aerospace Science offers baccalaureate degree programs with majors in the following areas:
Aviation Management (AMG)
General Aviation Emphasis
Airway Science Management Emphasis
Aviation Maintenance Emphasis
Airway Science Maintenance Management Emphasis
Professional Pilot (PPT)
General Aviation Emphasis
Flight Engineer Emphasis
Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management
Emphasis
Minors
Aviation Management (AMG)
Professional Pilot (PPT)
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics (APL)
These programs combine a thorough, practical and technical training background with a general college education to prepare a graduate for a wide variety of careers in the aerospace industry. These four-year baccalaureate degree programs have been developed upon the two-plus-two concept (a B.S. degree program built upon a AAS two-year degree). This concept makes it extremely easy for a community/junior college graduate in an aerospace program to transfer to MSC and earn a Bachelor of Science degree in our aviation program. In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree, the student must comply with the College's general requirements for the Bachelor's degree listed in this Bulletin under Requirements for All Degrees
FAA Approved Ground School
MSC Aerospace Science Department is a fully certified and approved Ground School for the Private, Instrument and Commercial FAA Ratings. Approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Veterans Administration flight students should see the Aerospace Science department chair for information on approved flight training program.
Flight Courses
Flight training is contracted for, by the student, with the flight training schools under contract with MSC. In order to enroll in all flight courses and receive credit, the student must fly with MSC's contract flight schools.
The cost of the flight training is in addition to regular tuition and college services fees. This cost will vary depending upon how frequently the student is able to fly during the semester and how much total time the student requires to gain the necessary proficiency. The College instructor helps the student achieve an understanding of the relationship of flight theory to flight practice
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Division of Technology
in order to acquire the knowledge required to meet FAA certification standards. Flights are scheduled by the student with the contract flight training school. All flight training normally must be completed during the appropriate academic semester to receive credit for the course during that period.
Credit-by-Examination Procedures
The basic provision for obtaining credit-by-examination (a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit) is outlined in this Bulletin under Academic Information. The following procedures are established by the Department of Aerospace Science to implement this provision.
1. A student entering MSC for the first time must make application for Credit by Examination during the first three weeks of the first semester. All examinations must be completed within the first semester.
2. A student will not be approved to take a course of a lower number than any course she or he has taken previously.
3. If a student is registered for, but has not completed a higher-numbered course, the examination for the lower numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester.
4. No examinations will be graded during the summer
session.
5. Courses authorized for credit by examination and the appropriate FAA license and/or rating are listed below:
Hours
Course Title FAA Required Credit
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals Private 3
AES 135 Air Navigation I Private 3
AES 150 Private Flight Private 2
AES 236 Instrument Ground Instrument 3
AES 250 Commercial Instrument
Flight I Commercial 2
AES 251 Commercial Instrument
Flight II Commercial 2
AES 352 Commercial Instrument
Flight III Commercial 2
AES 336 Commercial Ground Commercial 3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and
Propulsion Fit. Engineer 3
AES 403 Aerodynamics Fit. Engineer 3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance Fit. Engineer 3
AES 450 Flight Multi-Engine Multi-Engine 1
AES 451 Flight Instructor Fit. Instructor 1
AES 452 Flight Instructor-Instrument Fit. Instructor 1
AES 453 Fit. Instructor-Multi-Engine Fit. Inst. Multi 1
AES 455 Flight Helicopter Helicopter 1
AES 457 Airline Transport Pilot ATP Rating 1
Bachelor of Science Degree in Aerospace Science Programs
A summary of the course program and semester hours which a student must complete for a Bachelor of Science degree is as follows:
Semester
Hours
General Studies ....................................37-39
Major (Select One)....................................49-59
Aviation Management General Aviation
or Airway Science Management....................49
Aviation Maintenance
or Airway Science Maintenance Management*.......59
Professional Pilot
General Aviation*...............................51
Flight Engineer"................................59
or Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management**
Minor (Select One)**...................................18-36
Business Minor/Meteorology
Average Semester Hours of Minor .....................20
Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Minor***..............36
Free Electives..........................................0-16
Total................................................120-124
A recommended sequence for taking all courses in a selected major or minor and a list of required general studies may be obtained from the Department of Aerospace Science.
General Studies
Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in aerospace science programs must complete the following general studies requirements:
Freshman Composition..................................6
(ENG 101 and 102)
Career................................................6
BEC 200-3 Business Communications or
COM 261-3 Introduction to Technical Writing Plus, select a minimum of 3 hours from the following courses: CMS 201-3 Principles of Information Systems ACC 201-3 Principles of Accounting I"**
CJC 201-3 Introduction to Private Security
Humanities................................................8
SPE 101-3 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Select one of the following courses:
SPE 211-3 Discussion Methods SPE 301-3 Advanced Public Speaking SPE 310-3 Business and Professional Speaking SPE 311-3 Conference Leadership
Approved Elective......................................2
Science and/or Mathematics..........................8-10
Mathematics........................................3-5
Select One of the Following Options:
1. MTH 101-2 Beginning Algebra MTH 102-1 Beginning Geometry MTH 103-1 Triangle Trigonometry MTH 104-1 Elementary Mathematics for
Business and Economics
2. MTH 110-4 Intermediate Algebra MTH 103-1 Triangle Trigonometry
3. MTH 111-4 College Algebra MTH 103-1 Triangle Trigonometry
4. MTH 112-3 College Trigonometry
5. MTH 131-4 Finite Mathematics for the
Management and Social Sciences
PHY 125 Physics of Technology I..........................5
Social and/or Behavioral Science............................9
ECO 201-3 Principles of Economics Macro****
ECO 202-3 Principles of Economics Micro****
PSY 101-3 Introduction to Psychology Total...................................................37-39
'All Professional Pilot majors must possess a minimum of the FAA Private, Instrument and Commercial Ratings to receive a Bachelor of Science degree.
"Students choosing a major in any of the Airway Science emphases must minor in Systems Management.' Other majors may minor in any area of the School of Business, A&P, Meteorology or as approved by the Aerospace Science Department.
"'The credit hours awarded are based on the number of clock hours required by the Federal Aviation Administration for the award of the A&P license and the credits normally awarded by junior/community colleges, thus the increased number of hours for the Aviation Maintenance emphasis major or A&P minor.
""Required for all Aerospace Science majors who minor in Business.
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Division of Technology
Aviation Management (AMG)
Major for Bachelor of Science
General Aviation Emphasis or Airway Science
Management Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals .........................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I..............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .........................2
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments
and Navigation ..............................2
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load
Planning.....................................3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and
Propulsion ..................................3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and
Regulations .................................3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk
Management...................................3
AES 323 Commuter Airline
Management...................................3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations..................3
AES 386 Aviation Safety ..............................3
AES 420 Airport Planning .............................3
AES 421 Airport Management.............................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ...................3
AES 424 Air Cargo.....................................3
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems...................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting............................3
Total..................................................49
Suggested Electives
AES 205 Aviation History and Future
Development .................................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ..............3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations.............3
AES 360 Space Flight .................................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology
of Flight....................................3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation...............3
AES 403 Aerodynamics..................................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance..........................3
Aviation Maintenance Area of Emphasis
Students who wish to enroll in the Aviation Management major with the Aviation Maintenance area of emphasis should complete an A&P program prior to or while attending MSC.
Semester
Required Courses Hours
A&P FAA Certificate ....................................30
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation.........2
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations............3
AES 322 Aviation Law and
Risk Management..............................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology ................3
AES 386 Aviation Safety .............................3
AES 420 Airport Planning ............................3
AES 421 Airport Management............................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ..................3
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems..................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting............................3
Total...................................................59
Suggested Electives
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning ..............3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management..................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management .............3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations.............3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations..................3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation..............3
AES 403 Aerodynamics.................................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance.........................3
Professional Pilot (PPT)
Major for Bachelor of Science General Aviation Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals .......................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I..............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology .......................2
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation..........2
AES 236 Instrument Ground.............................3
AES 270 Simulator Cross Country Flight................2
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion...............3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations............3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management...................3
AES 336 Commercial Ground.............................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations.............3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations..................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology
of Flight....................................3
AES 386 Aviation Safety ..............................3
AES 403 Aerodynamics..................................3
AES 404 Aircraft Performance..........................3
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems...................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting............................3
Total....................................................51
Suggested Electives
AES 205 Aviation History and Future
Development .................................3
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning ..............3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management .............3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ..............3
AES 360 Space Flight .................................3
AES 387 Aircraft Accident Investigation...............3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ...................3
AES 424 Air Cargo.....................................3
Flight Engineer or Airway Science Aircraft Systems Management Area of Emphasis
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals ........................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I..............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ........................2
AES 170 Simulator-Instruments and Navigation..........2
AES 236 Instrument Ground.............................3
AES 270 Simulator-Cross Country Flight................2
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion...............3
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations............3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management...................3
AES 336 Commercial Ground.............................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations.............3
AES 362 National Airspace Operations..................3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology
of Flight....................................3
AES 386 Aviation Safety ..............................3
AES 403* Aerodynamics.................................3
AES 404* Aircraft Performance.........................3
AES 413* Flight Engineer Duties and
Responsibilities ............................4
AES 414* B-727 Systems.................................4
AES 437 Advanced Navigation Systems...................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems
and Job Targeting............................3
Total....................................................59
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Division of Technology
*ln order to comply with the requirements for the FAA Flight Engineer's written examination, these courses must be scheduled within a concentrated time period and with a minimum number of clock hours.
The Flight Engineer's program should be taken during the student's senior year.
Suggested Electives
AES 205 Aviation History...........................3
AES 222 Flight Dispatcher/Load Planning ...........3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ..........3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management ...........3
AES 360 Space Flight ..............................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ................3
AES 424 Air Cargo..................................3
Minors
The following aerospace minors are designed primarily to afford majors in other areas within the College with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the aerospace world and sufficient familiarity with aviation skills to use in furtherance of their primary job. Aerospace majors normally may not elect the aviation management or professional pilot minors.
Aviation Management Minor
Semester
Required Courses Hours
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals ........................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I.............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ........................2
AES 321 Aviation Economics and Regulations............3
AES 322 Aviation Law and Risk Management ............3
Total...................................................14
Plus nine hours selected from the following courses:
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion..............3
AES 323 Commuter Airline Management..................3
AES 324 Airline Planning and Management .............3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight.......3
AES 386 Aviation Safety .............................3
AES 420 Airport Planning ............................3
AES 421 Airport Management............................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ..................3
AES 424 Air Cargo ...................................3
AES 491 Aviation Management Problems and
Job Targeting ..............................3
Total....................................................9
Total...................................................23
Professional Pilot Minor
Required Courses
AES 101 Aviation Fundamentals ........................3
AES 135 Air Navigation I.............................3
MTR 141 Aerospace Meteorology ........................2
AES 236 Instrument Ground............................3
AES 300 Aircraft Systems and Propulsion..............3
AES 336 Commercial Ground............................3
MTR 346 Meteorology and Flight Operations............3
AES 385 Human Factors and Physiology of Flight.......3
AES 386 Aviation Safety .............................3
Total...................................................26
In addition, all Professional Pilot minors must possess, as a minimum, FAA Private, Commercial, and Instrument Ratings.
Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics Minor
Students who wish to enroll in the Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Mechanics Minor should complete an A&P program prior to or while attending MSC.
Required Courses
Completion of an FAA approved A&P Program with appropriate
college credit (usual semester hours awarded)...............30
Plus:
AES 386 Aviation Safety .................................3
AES 423 FBO and Aircraft Marketing ......................3
Total.......................................................36
Air Force ROTC Program
Students may register and receive credit at Metropolitan State College for Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The Air Force Department of Aerospace Studies offers two Air Force ROTC programs leading to a commission in the active Air Force upon earning a baccalaureate degree.
Four-Year Program. The four-year program consists of the General Military Course (GMC) and the Professional Officer Course (POC). Emphasis is focused upon basic leadership qualities and preparation for the Air Force while enrolled in a baccalaureate degree program. Upon completion of the GMC, students attend a four-week field training camp at an air force base. Field training is designed to encourage leadership development and to introduce students to the active Air Force environment. The POC taken during the last two years prepares students for active duty through practical experiences as a cadet officer. In this phase, students will concentrate on advanced leadership training in final preparation for an Air Force commission. Four-year programs are available to students with a minimum of 8 semesters remaining at Metropolitan State College. Application for these programs should be made after consultation with the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado.
Two-Year Program. The two-year program consists of the Professional Officer Course (POC) and a six-week field training camp. Students with two years of full-time college remaining at the undergraduate, graduate level, or both, are eligible to apply. Once selected, students must successfully complete the six-week field training which includes 60 hours of academic study in addition to the regular curriculum of the four-week camp. The POC phase is identical to that explained in the four-year program.
Students should contact the Professor of Aerospace Studies, University of Colorado, for specific requirements and options available based on each student's status at the time of program entry. Students who are veterans of military service have participated in Junior ROTC, Civil Air Patrol or similar organizations may have a portion or all of the GMC waived by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. Applications are accepted between November 1 and March 15.
Flight Training: Expense-paid ground school and flight training are open to cadets approved and qualified for future USAF pilot training.
Air Force College Scholarship Program: Students participating in Air Force ROTC may be eligible to compete for Air Force ROTC College Scholarships. Students selected for this program are placed on grants that pay tuition, book costs, nonrefundable education fees, and subsistence of $100 per month, tax free. All cadets enrolled in the Professional Officer Course receive $100 per month during the regular academic year. Students are also eligible to compete for two-, three-, or four-year scholarships open to both men and women.
For further information, contact:
Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies Air Force ROTC Detachment 105 Folsom Stadium, Room 223 University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80309 Telephone: 492-8351
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Division of Technology
Program of Study Four-Year Program
The following courses are required during the first two years:
Semester
Hours
AFR 103 Development of Air Power I .....................1
AFR 104 Development of Air Power II ....................1
AFR 203 U. S. Military Forces I ........................1
AFR 204 U. S. Military Forces II .......................1
The following courses are required during the last two years of the program:
AFR 301 USAF Management and Leadership I................3
AFR 302 USAF Management and Leadership II...............3
AFR 401 National Security Forces I .....................3
AFR 402 National Security Forces II ....................3
Two-Year Program
Veterans of military service, reservists, students with Junior ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, or equivalent experience, may be allowed advanced placement for all or a portion of the first two years. Students who successfully complete the six-week summer camp are allowed to enroll in the program at the 300 course level. ALL students must complete the courses listed under the second paragraph of the four-year program above.
Supplemental Courses and Language Requirements
All AFROTC scholarship students in the General Military Course must successfully complete a course in English composition before they can advance to the Professional Officer Course. All AFROTC scholarship students must also successfully complete a course in an Indo-European or Asian language prior to commissioning. All Professional Officer Course students must successfully complete a course in mathematical reasoning prior to commissioning.
Civil Engineering Technology
The specialized fields within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology include programs in Civil Engineering Technology, Drafting, and Surveying. The Surveying program is a separate, specialized four-year program. The individual curriculum requirements are listed separately.
Civil Engineering Technology graduates apply engineering principles in performing many of the tasks necessary for the planning and construction of highways, buildings, railroads, bridges, reservoirs, dams, irrigation works, water systems, airports, and other structures. In planning for a construction project, they may participate in estimating costs, preparing specifications for materials, and participate in surveying, drafting, and design work. During the construction phase, they work closely with the contractor and the superintendent in scheduling field layout, construction activities and the inspection of the work for conformity to specifications. In recent years, a major work area for Civil and Environmental Engineering Technology relates specifically to environmental problems. This includes design and construction of water supply facilities, design of waste-water collection and treatment facilities, design of air pollution control facilities, and design of solid and toxic waste disposal facilities. The development of environmental impact studies and environmental impact reports are also included in this area.
Following are the curriculum requirements for the various degrees, minors, and areas of emphasis.
Civil Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science
The 4-year Bachelor of Science is awarded upon the completion of the required courses and either a structures, environmental or surveying area of emphasis or an approved minor.
This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) which was formerly the Engineers' Council for
Professional Development (ECPD).
Semester
Required Technical Studies Hours
CEN 110 Civil Technology...............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ..........................3
CEN 210 Structural Drawing ............................3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics..........................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry ..........................2
SUR 151 Surveying I....................................3
SUR 252 Surveying II ..................................3
CEN 310 Construction Methods ..........................3
CEN 312 Engineering Economy............................3
CEN 313 Mechanics of Materials.........................3
CEN 314 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory............1
CEN 316 Mechanics II Dynamics........................3
CEN 317 Introduction to Structural Analysis............3
CEN 318 Fluid Mechanics I .............................3
CEN 319 Fluid Mechanics II ............................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing..............3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I...............................3
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................4
Approved Technical Electives (CEN).........................6
Subtotal..................................................61
Additional Course Requirements
Chemistry..................................................5
ENG 101 & 102 English Composition.......................6
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ...............3
or
ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro
MTH 111 College Algebra................................4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry ..........................3
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II ................................. 4
PHY 231 & 232 General Physics l/General Physics Lab I or
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
PHY 233 & 234 General Physics ll/General Physics Lab II or
PHY 202 College Physics II.............................5
Social/Behavioral Electives................................6
Humanities Electives ......................................9
Subtotal..................................................54
A Minor or Area of Emphasis 18 (minimum)..................18
Total....................................................133
Environmental Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment ..................3
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal.............3
CEN 332 Environmental Impact Statements .............3
CEN 430 Environmental Technology ....................3
CEN 431 Environmental Technology Practices............3
MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology .................3
Total...................................................18
Structures Area of Emphasis Required Technical Studies
CEN 410 Structural Design ...........................3
CEN 411 Steel Design .................................3
CEN 412 Concrete Design I ...........................3
CEN 413 Soils Mechanics..............................3
CEN 414 Concrete Design II ..........................3
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Division of Technology
CEN 330 Water Supply and Treatment ....................3
or
CEN 331 Wastewater Treatment and Disposal..............3
or
CEN 430 Environmental Technology ....................3
or
CEN 431 Environmental Technology Practices...........3
Total.....................................................18
Engineering and Land Surveying Area of Emphasis
Required Technical Studies
SUR 262 Survey Drafting .............................3
SUR 253 Route Surveying..............................3
SUR 354 Boundary Law I ..............................3
SUR 454 Boundary Law II..............................3
SUR 453 Site Planning ...............................3
Surveying Elective ......................................3-4
Total..............................................18 or 19
Control Surveying and Mapping Area of Emphasis
Required Technical Studies
SUR 262 Survey Drafting .............................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I ............................3
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys ........................3
SUR 345 Electronic Instrumentation for Surveying.....3
SUR 474 Geodetic and Special Surveys ................4
SUR 453 Site Planning ...............................3
Total.....................................................19
Minor in Civil Engineering Technology
Required Technical Studies
CEN 110 Civil Technology.............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .........................3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics........................3
SUR 251 Surveying I.............................. 3
CEN 310 Construction Methods ........................3
Approved Lower-Division Technical Elective................3
Approved Upper-Division Technical Elective ................3
Total.....................................................21
Minor in Drafting Engineering Technology
Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I .........................3
CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ........................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry ........................2
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing........................3
CEN 320 Advanced Technical Drawing ..................3
Approved Lower-Division Technical Elective................3
Approved Upper-Division Technical Elective ................3
Total.....................................................20
Surveying
The Bachelor of Science in Surveying is designed to provide basic theoretical training with practical applications for a career in surveying and mapping. The intent of this curriculum is to familiarize the student with modern field, computational mapping and legal procedures used in routine and specialized surveying services. The program is flexible, allowing a course of study that fulfills the objectives of the student, while insuring a sound surveying education.
Surveying Major for Bachelor of Science
Required Technical Studies
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...........................3
SUR 151 Surveying I....................................3
SUR 252 Surveying II ..................................3
SUR 253 Route Surveying...............................3
SUR 262 Survey Drafting ..............................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I .............................3
SUR 271 Astronomy for Surveyors ......................2
SUR 345 Electronic Instrumentation for Surveying......3
SUR 354 Boundary Law I................................3
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys .........................3
SUR 376 Surveying Data Adjustments ...................3
SUR 448 Geodesy ......................................3
SUR 453 Site Planning ................................3
SUR 454 Boundary Law II...............................3
SUR 465 Photogrammetry II ............................3
SUR 474 Geodetic and Special Surveys .................4
GEL 101 General Geology ..............................4
GEG 484 Remote Sensing of the Environment.............3
Subtotal.................................................55
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition .....................6
MTH 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics......................4
PHY 231 & 232 General Physics I/
General Physics Lab I.......................5
PHY 233 & 234 General Physics II/
General Physics Lab II.......................5
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication...........3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing..............3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
Social/Behavioral Electives...............................9
Humanities Electives ..............................6
Subtotal.................................................44
Approved Technical Electives.........................7
Required Math Minor
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................4
MTH 214 Matrix Algebra................................2
MTH 241 Calculus II....................................4
MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ....................4
Approved Math Elective..............................(min.) 2
Subtotal.................................................20
Total...................................................129
Minor in Surveying
Required Technical Studies
SUR 151 Surveying I...................................3
SUR 252 Surveying II .................................3
SUR 262 Survey Drafting ..............................3
SUR 265 Photogrammetry I .............................3
SUR 271 Astronomy for Surveyors .......................2
SUR 362 Cartographic Surveys .........................3
SUR 465 Photogrammetry II ............................3
Total....................................................20
Electronics Engineering Technology
Electronics Engineering Technology graduates possess some of the "know-why" of the engineer and some of the "know-how" of the technician.
Graduates are employed in a variety of positions as technologists working with engineers and scientists in some of the following functional areas:
Research and Development
Technical activities in research and development are primarily directed towards obtaining new information and new knowledge of the field. The engineering technologist is a member of the research team. This specific work may involve the development and construction of prototypes, test and evaluation of equipment, or other activities necessary to render technical support to a research project.
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Division of Technology
and construction of prototypes, test and evaluation of equipment, or other activities necessary to render technical support to a research project.
Electronic Manufacturing
A graduate employed in a manufacturing facility might be involved in actual manufacturing, fabrication, test, prototype development, calibration, quality control, maintenance, or field service. She or he may also in some cases become heavily involved in sales engineering.
Manufacturing Plants
In all other areas of industry, the rapid advancement of sophisticated electronic instrumentation is opening vast fields for the engineering technology graduates. Practically all on-line control processes are electronically directed. In this area, maintenance, calibration, installation, as well as personnel supervisory positions are available to the engineering technologist.
Services
Service engineering has become a field of its own. This area involves extensive activities in the fields of computers, communications, instrumentation, new product development, and numerous other activities involving electrical and electronic systems.
Design
Some technologists design electronic equipment and systems, where the design is application oriented.
The EET curriculum provides a foundation in mathematics and science as well as a thorough treatment of the characteristics of electric circuits and electronic devices. In this four-year program, specialization may be achieved by selection of an area of emphasis included within the scope of the department offerings.
Electronics Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science
Because the technology program emphasizes applications of theory, students are required to take concurrent laboratory courses. In the EET 100 and EET 200 series of courses, students who drop or change to No Credit in the theory/laboratory course must make the same change in the companion laboratory/theory course.
The Bachelor of Science Degree is awarded upon completion of the courses listed below. Students should contact the Department for recent changes to this major.
Semester
Required Technical Courses Hours
EET 110 Circuits I ......................................4
EET 111 Circuits Lab I...................................1
EET 112 Circuits II .....................................4
EET 113 Circuits Lab II .................................2
EET 210 Electronics I....................................4
EET 211 Electronics Lab I ...............................1
EET 212 Electronics II...................................3
EET 213 Electronics Lab II ..............................2
EET 232 Digital Circuits I...............................3
EET 234 Technical Programming Applications...............2
EET 311 Advanced Circuits I..............................4
EET 312 Advanced Circuits II.............................4
EET 333 Digital Circuits II..............................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors..................3
EET 362 Communication I .................................3
EET 371 Automatic Control Systems I...................3
EET 410 Senior Project I ................................1
EET 411 Senior Project II ...............................2
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing
Technology.....................................3
Upper-Division EET Electives ..............................6
Subtotal....................................................58
Additional Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102 English Composition ...........................6
MTH 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics......................4
(MTH 111 and MTH 112 may be substituted)
MTH 141 Calculus I....................................4
MTH 241 Calculus II...................................4
PHY 201 College Physics I.............................5
PHY 202 College Physics II............................5
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ..........................5
COM 261 Introduction to Technical
Writing .......................................3
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communications ........3
Humanities Electives .......................................5
Social/Behavioral Science Electives.........................8
Subtotal...................................................52
Minor or EET Area of Emphasis.......................(min.) 18
(An area of Emphasis is recommended; minor must be approved by EET chairperson).
Subtotal...................................................18
Total...............................................(min.) 128
Communications Area of Emphasis
Semester
Required EET Courses Hours
EET 331 Pulse Circuits .............................3
EET 363 Communication II ...........................4
EET 365 FCC License Preparation ....................3
EET 367 Measurements for Communications.............4
EET 462 Communications III .........................4
Subtotal...............................................18
Power Area of Emphasis
Required Courses
EET 341 Electric Power Generation.....................3
EET 342 Electric Power Distribution .................3
EET 343 Power Generation Using Solar Energy..........3
EET 441 Simulation of Building Energy ................5
MET 311 Thermodynamics................................3
MET 312 Heat Transfer ...............................3
Subtotal...............................................20
Control Systems Area of Emphasis
Required EET courses
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation .4
EET 372 Control Systems Laboratory ..................1
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications ...................3
EET 451 Circuit Analysis with Operational Math.......2
EET 453 Applications of Operational Amplifiers.......3
EET 471 Automatic Control Systems II.................4
Upper-Division EET Elective ...............................2
Subtotal................................................19
Computer Technology Area of Emphasis
Required EET Courses
EET 331 Pulse Circuits .............................3
EET 334 Minicomputer Programming and Operation .....4
EET 432 Digital Filters ............................3
EET 435 Minicomputer Applications ..................3
EET 436 Microprocessor Applications.................3
Upper-Division EET Elective ............................2
Subtotal................................................18
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Division of Technology
Minor in Electronics Engineering Technology
Required EET Courses
EET 110 Circuits I ....................................4
EET 111 Circuits I Lab....................................1
EET 112 Circuits II ....................................4
EET 113 Circuits II Lab....................................2
EET 301 Principles of Electronics and Electrical
Circuits I ......................................4
EET 302 Principles of Electronics and Electrical
Circuits II .....................................4
Upper-Division EET Electives .................................. 4
Total...........................................................23
Technical Management
Technical Management is an interdisciplinary program training students to become technically proficient in order to handle their own jobs effectively and to communicate with and manage technical specialists. Graduates are needed for positions in value engineering, logistics engineering, quality control, maintenance engineering, systems analysis or management, operations research, and field engineering. This program has been coordinated with several industrial management representatives and is administered jointly through the School of Business and Department of Electronics Engineering Technology.
Students completing the Technical Management Program requirements are not required to complete a separate minor.
Technical Management Major for Bachelor of Science
General Course Requirements
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition......................6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ..........3
Humanities Electives..........................6
ECO 201 Principles of Economics- Macro ................3
ECO 202 Principles of Economics- Micro.................3
Soc/Behavioral Science Elective...............3
MTH 141* Calculus I....................................4
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing..............3
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications.....3
Subtotal..................................................39
*MTH 141 requires prerequisite of MTH 112 or MTH 140.
Technology Courses
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Tech ..............3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance ...............3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis ........................3
CEN 110 Civil Technology...............................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...........................3
EET 110, 111 Circuits I and Laboratory ................5
EET 112, 113 Circuits II and Laboratory ...............6
Electives
A minimum of 20 semester hours of technology courses must be selected in consultation with and approved by the Electronics Engineering Technology Department. At least 15 of these hours
must be upper-division......................................20
Subtotal...................................................47
Business Course Studies
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing...........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics............3
CMS 332 Quantitative Decision-Making...................3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ..........................3
MGT 221 Business Law I.................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing........................3
Electives
A minimum of fifteen (15) additional semester hours must be selected from courses offered by the Management or the Computer and Management Science Departments. These electives must be approved by either the Department of Computer and Management Science or the Electronics Engineering Technology Department and at least 7 of these hours must be
upper-division ...............................................15
Subtotal......................................................45
Total........................................................131
Industrial Marketing
The Industrial Marketing program links sales and manufacturing. Specialists are trained to become familiar with designing, manufacturing, branding, packaging, transporting, labeling, pricing, selling, and servicing products. The curriculum develops an awareness of the policies and practices of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and users of technical goods. Graduates may expect to find positions in retail and wholesale industrial sales positions, in the areas of advertising and promotion, and in the field of marketing planning. Administration of the program is handled jointly through the Electronics Engineering Technology and the Marketing departments. Students completing the Industrial Marketing program are not required to complete a separate minor.
Semester
General Course Requirements Hours
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition...........................6
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication..........3
Humanities Electives...........................6
ECO 201 Principles of Economics- Macro ...............3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology.......................3
Soc/Behavioral Science Elective................3
MTH 103 Triangle Trig.................................1
MTH 131 Finite Math for the Management and
Social Sciencies...............................4
PHY 125 Physics of Tech, I ...........................5
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications.....3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.............3
Subtotal...................................................40
Technology Courses
MET 100 Materials and Mfg. Tech.......................3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance ..............3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis .......................4
CEN 110 Civil Tech..........j...............................3
CEN 120 Tech. Drawing I...............................3
EET 110, 111 Circuits I and Laboratory .....................5
EET 112, 113 Circuits II and Laboratory ....................6
Electives
A minimum of 15 additional semester hours of technology courses must be selected in consultation with the Electronics Technology Department; 12 of these hours must be upper-division.......15
Subtotal...................................................42
Business Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing...........3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .............3
CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ...............3
FIN 330 Managerial Finance.............................3
MGT 221 Business Law I.................................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing........................3
MKT 301 Marketing Research.............................3
MKT 311 Advertising....................................3
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Division of Technology
MKT 331 Consumer Behavior..................3
MKT 445 Seminar in Marketing Management............3
Subtotal.............................................39
Total...............................................121
Technology and Technical Communications
The department offers degree programs in Industrial Technology, Technical and Industrial Administration, Industrial Design, Mechanical Engineering Technology and Technical Communications. For specific information see the detailed listings for each major.
Industrial Technology
The Industrial Technology Program offers the following majors:
Bachelor of Science:
Industrial Technology (ITS)
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Rehabilitation Therapy Area of Emphasis Business Area of Emphasis Internship Area of Emphasis Technical and Industrial Administration (TIA)
Bachelor of Arts:
Industrial Design (IND)
Minors:
Industrial Technology Industrial Arts Teaching General Studies
Courses offered in the Program may be applied toward the career category of the general studies requirements of the college and provide students with the opportunity to explore areas of individual interest.
Credit by Examination
Often students selecting the Industrial Technology major have extensive experience in business, industry or the military that parallels the content of some of the courses. To receive credit for such experience the student must contact the department Chair for evaluation.
Industrial Technology Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
In order to be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Technology, the student must meet the College's general specifications for the baccalaureate degree and must complete the courses required for one of the four areas of emphasis (Industrial Arts Teaching, Rehabilitation Therapy, Business, or Internship) as listed below.
No minor required.
General Studies
ENG 101,102 Freshman Composition
Humanities..........................
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication......................3
Electives*......................5-7
Science and/or Mathematics .....................
MTH 100 Survey of Mathematics..............3
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics ...........4
Elective .......................1-3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences Electives* Career .....................................
Semester
Hours
...6
8-10
8-10
8-10
..3-6
COM 261
Total
Introduction to Technical
Writing...............................3
Elective ..........................1-3
..................................................36
"See Rehabilitation Therapy Area of Emphasis and Electricity/Electronics Specialty for Required General Studies Courses for these particular programs.
Industrial Technology Core
The following core courses are required for all Industrial Technology areas of emphasis.
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking .4
ITS 102 Introduction to Industrial and Technical Studies ....1
ITS 103 Finishing Materials and Processes ...2
ITS 110 Introduction to Plastics I ...2
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals: Cold Metals ...2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals: Hot Metals ...2
ITS 141 Industrial Drawing: Sketching ...2
ITS 142 Industrial Drawing: Instruments ....2
ITS 150 Introduction to Graphic Arts 1 ....2
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II ...2
ITS 160 Introduction to Power: Mechanical and Internal Combustion .2
ITS 163 Introduction to Power: Hydraulic and Electrical ....2
ITS 170 Consumer Electricity and Electronics: Residential Systems 2
ITS 171** Consumer Electricity and Electronics: Communication Systems 2
ITS 172" Consumer Electricity and Electronics: Control Systems 2
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production ....4
Total .35
"Electricity/Electronics Specialty students substitute EET 210-4,
Electronics I.
I. Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis
Graduates meet all the state requirements for a secondary teaching credential and are qualified to teach Industrial Arts in both junior and senior high schools. Courses are also offered which are designed for those already in teaching and desire to further their professional growth.
General Studies Industrial Technology Core .36 ...35
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Requirements .. ....14
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Industrial Arts .3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration of Industrial Arts .3
ITS Upper-Division Electives (must be in 2 diffftrfint arnas^ .8
Teaching Certification Requirements ...34
EDU 221 Process of Education in Urban Secondary Schools .3
EDU 222 Field Experiences in Urban Secondary Schools .2
EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner .3
EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management .3
EDU 322 Field Experiences in Tutoring and Materials Construction .2
EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom .3
EDU 361 The Use of Media in Education .3
EDU 429 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary 12
RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in the Content Area: Secondary .3
Electives........................................................1
Electives.......................................................1
Total.........................................................120
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Division of Technology
Industrial Arts Teaching Area of Emphasis Electricity/
Electronics Specialty
General Studies...............................................36
Science and/or Mathematics*
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry................1
MTH 111 College Algebra......................4
PHY 100 Introductions to Physics ............4
Industrial Technology Core....................................35
Electricity/Electronics Specialty Core........................16
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines ......3
EET 211 Electronics Laboratory...............1
EET 232 Digital Circuits I ..................3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II .................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors .....3
EET 436 Microprocessors Applications.........3
Industrial Arts Teaching Emphasis Requirements.................6
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of
Teaching Industrial Arts............3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration
of Industrial Arts..................3
Teacher Certification Requirements...........................-34
Total........................................................127
Required for Specialty
II. Rehabilitation Therapy Area of Emphasis
Students selecting Rehabilitation Therapy must complete requirements for the Industrial Arts teaching credential as well as the requirements for the Manual Arts Therapy Certificate. Completion of the course of study qualifies the student to be certified by the Veterans Administration.
General Studies..............................................36
Where asterisks are indicated in IT General Studies requirements, in addition to the courses required for General Studies, the
following courses must be completed.
Humanities
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy.............................3
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology............3
SOC 201 Current Social Issues................3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology...........3
Industrial Technology Core....................................35
Teaching Certification Requirements (See Industrial Arts
Teaching Emphasis for Courses)............................34
Industrial Arts Teaching Emphasis Requirements................14
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts...............4
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of
Teaching Industrial Arts...........3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration
of Industrial Arts.................3
ITS Upper-Division Elective..............4
Rehabilitation Therapy Certification Requirements ............18
ITS 499 Institutional Internship............6
PSY 216 Personality and Adjustment..........3
PSY 241 Social Psychology....................3
PSY 321 Abnormal Psychology .................3
PSY 400 Theories of Personality.............3
Total.....................................................137
III. Business Area of Emphasis
Selection of the Business Emphasis prepares students to enter business and industry in a variety of capacities. Sales, manufacturing, management and small business operation provide diverse opportunities for graduates. Within this Emphasis, speciality areas are available in:
-Automotive -Graphics
-Drafting -Metals
-Electricity/Electronics -Woods
General Studies..............................................36
Science and/or Mathematics for Electricity/Electronics Specialty
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry.............1
MTH 111 College Algebra...................4
PHY 100 Introduction to Physics ..........4
Industrial Technology.......................................35
Business Core...............................................24
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I........3
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation ..........3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ...3
MGT 221 Business Law I.....................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management...........3
MGT 321 Business Law II....................3
MGT 356 Small Business Management..........3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ...........3
Speciality Areas....................................... 16-24
Automotive
ITS 260 Automotive Maintenance
and Repair........L.................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Ignition,
Carburetor and Emission Systems ...4 ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Electrical
Systems........................... 4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems:
Autobody Fundamentals...............4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Engine
Overhaul ...........................4
ITS 420 Welding Technology.................4
Drafting
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing........4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts..............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies...................5
CEN 210 Structural Drawing ................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry ..............2
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing..............3
Electricity/Electronics
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.....3
EET 211 Electronics Laboratory.............1
EET 232 Digital Circuits I ................3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ...............3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors ....3
EET 436 Microprocessor Applications.........3
Graphics
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography.........3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.........4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts...............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies..................5
TEI 200 Airbrush I (DACC Course)............4
Metals
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II.........2
ITS 231 Art Metal, Silversmith and
Lapidary...........................2
ITS 321 Advanced Metalworking...............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.........4
ITS 420 Welding Technology..................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies..................5
Wood
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II ........2
ITS 301 Advanced Woodworking................4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.........4
ITS 345 Facility Planning ..................3
ITS 401 Furniture Construction .............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies..................5
Electives...................................................1 -9
Total
120
90


Division of Technology
IV. Internship Area of Emphasis
Under this program students receive on-the-job training by working in business and industry in a capacity related to their own speciality area. Employment opportunities are comparable to those in the Business Area of Emphasis. Within this emphasis,
speciality areas are available in:
-Automotive -Graphics
-Drafting -Metals
-Electricity/Electronics -Woods
General Studies..............................................36
Science and/or Mathematics for E/E Specialty
MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry...............1
MTH 111 College Algebra......................4
PHY 100 Introductions to Physics ...........4
Industrial Technology Core...................................35
Business Core ................................................9
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I...........3
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation ............3
MGT 300 Principles of Management............3
Internship...................................................12
Specialty Areas...........................................16-24
Automotive
ITS 260 Automotive Maintenance
and Repair.........................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Ignition,
Carburetor and Emission Systems ...4 ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Electrical
Systems............................4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems:
Autobody Fundamentals..............4
ITS 365 Automotive Systems: Engine
Overhaul ..........................4
ITS 420 Welding Technology..................4
Drafting
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.........4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts...............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies..................5
CEN 210 Structural Drawing .................3
CEN 220 Descriptive Geometry ...............2
CEN 221 Architectural Drawing................3
Electricity/Electronics (E/E)
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines......3
EET 211 Electronics Lab......................1
EET 232 Digital Circuits I..................3
EET 333 Digital Circuits II ................3
EET 336 Introduction to Microprocessors ....3
EET 436 Microprocessors Applications........3
Graphics
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography.........3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.........4
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts..............4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies..................5
TEI 200 Airbrush I ........................6
(DACC Course)
Metals
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II .......2
ITS 231 Art Metal, Silversmith and
Lapidary...........................2
ITS 321 Advanced Metalworking..............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing........4
ITS 420 Welding Technology.................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies..................5
Wood
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II ........2
ITS 301 Advanced Woodworking ..............4
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing............4
ITS 345 Facility Planning .....................3
ITS 401 Furniture Construction.................4
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies.....................5
Total...........................................................120
Industrial Technology Minor
This minor must be approved in writing by the Chairperson of the Department. The Chair must approve the plan of study and will take into account the student's previous experience and future
occupational goal.
Industrial Arts Teaching Minor...............................22
Required Courses
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production.....4
ITS 481 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching
Industrial Arts.....................3
ITS 483 Organization and Administration of
Industrial Arts ....................3
ITS Lower-Division Elective...............8
ITS Upper-Division Elective...............4
Technical and Industrial Administration Major for Bachelor of Science Degree
The Technical and Industrial Administration Major builds on the technical expertise attained through completion of an Associate/ of Applied Science, Associate of Science or Associate of Arts Degree with specialties from within the fields of Trade and Industry (T&l) or Technical Education. This major provides students with an increased opportunity for career mobility and advancement in jobs related to, or associated with, their technical background.
Students who have met MSC's general studies requirements should be able to complete the BS degree in four to five semesters. Technical credits earned in the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree will be accepted and applied toward requirements for a minor. Students entering this program must possess an Associate Degree and complete the following
requirements.
General Studies.............................................36
Technical and Industrial Administration Core ...............20
ITS 370 Industrial Safety ...................3
ITS 371 Development in Industrial and
Technical Processes................3
ITS 372 Characteristics of Industrial and
Technical Personnel Selection,
Supervision and Evaluation ........3
ITS 470 Trade and Technical Enterprises .....5
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I...........3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.............3
Select 1 to 12 semester hours.............................1-12
ITS 487 Special Studies in Industrial and
Technical Studies................1-5
ITS 471 Trade and Technical Practicum........8
ITS 472 Professional Internship.............12
Electives to Complete 30 credit hour major.................0-9
ACC 308 Small Business Taxation .............3
BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal
Communications.....................3
CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ...3
FIN 225 Personal Money Management............3
MGT 342 Principles of Insurance .............3
MGT 356 Small Business Management............3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing .............3
MKT 301 Marketing Research...................3
MKT 310 Retailing............................3
COM Upper-Division Courses ITS Upper-Division Courses
91


Division of Technology
Minor Four (4) upper-division credit hours must be completed in addition to technical credits transferred from Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree. These must be selected in consultation with and approved by an ITS program advisor........4
Associate Degree Credits ................................40-50
Total....................................................120
Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree
No Minor Required
The Industrial Design Major is a joint program offered through the Art Department and Industrial Technology Program.
Semester
Hours
General Studies..............................................36
Required Courses.............................................69
ART 110 Drawing Processes and
Concepts I .........................3
ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ...3
ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II ..3
ART 201 Survey of Modern Art ...............3
ART 240 Beginning Advertising Design........3
ART 245 Beginning Product and Industrial
Design..............................3
ART 300 History of Art Nouveau
or
ART 303 History of Art Between World
Wars................................3
ART 340 Intermediate Advertising
Design..............................3
ART 345 Intermediate Product and
Industrial Design ..................3
ART 445 Advanced Product and Industrial
Design I............................3
ART 446 Advanced Product and Industrial
Design II...........................3
ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking ........4
ITS 103 Finishing Materials & Processes.....2
ITS 110 Introduction to Plastics I .........2
ITS 112 Introduction to Plastics II ........2
ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals:
Cold Metals ........................2
ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals:
Hot Metals .........................2
ITS 141 Industrial Drawing: Sketching.......2
ITS 142 Industrial Drawing: Instruments.....2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography.........3
ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing.........4
ITS 380 Industrial Safety and Production .4
ITS 401 Furniture Construction..............4
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering...........3
Elective Courses (Selected in consultation with advisor, 10 of which must be upper-division).................15
Total.......................................................120
Mechanical Engineering Technology
The program has been developed considering the needs of industry. A group of technical people from various engineering companies, industrial companies, and consulting firms in the greater Denver area serve the Mechanical Engineering Technology program in an advising capacity. This meaningful relationship assures that the four-year graduate is capable of handling a variety of challenging tasks that assist the professional engineer.
Mechanical Engineering Technology program offers the Bachelor of Science Degree in MET. It is structured with three distinct areas of emphasis during the final year of study. The student may select to follow: (1) a series of courses with an emphasis on manufacturing; or (2) a group of design, heat power related
courses under the designated mechanical emphasis: or (3) a series of courses within an emphasis in energy.
The Mechanical Engineering Technologist, as a specialist in applied engineering, takes creative ideas and concepts and translates them into practical applications in new machines, products, or manufacturing processes. A mechanical engineering technologist may choose to apply these concepts in the energy field.
The Mechanical Engineering Technology programs are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
Mechanical Engineering Technology Major for Bachelor of Science Degree General Studies
ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition..........................6
Humanities..............................................8-10
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
Communication.....................3
Electives ......................5-7
Science and/or Mathematics .............................8-10
MTH 111 College Algebra....................4
CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry .........5
or
CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...............5
Social and/or Behavioral Sciences.......................8-10
ECO 201 Principles of Economics -
Macro.............................3
Electives ......................5-7
Career ..................................................3-6
COM 261 Introduction to Technical
Writing...........................3
Total.....................................................36
Mechanical Engineering Technology Core
The following core courses are required for all Mechanical Engineering Technology areas of emphasis:
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology ........3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes........................3
MET 220 Materials of Engineering.......................3
MET 221 Mechanical Drawing.............................3
MET 301 Fluid Flow I...................................3
CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ...........................3
CEN 215 Mechanics I Statics..........................3
CEN 316 Mechanics II Dynamics........................3
EET 200 Electric Circuits and Machines.................3
EET 301 Principles of Electronics/Electronic
Circuits I ...................................4
MTH 112 College Trigonometry ..........................3
MTH 141 Calculus I.....................................4
MTH 151 Computer Programming: FORTRAN..................4
MTH 241 Calculus II....................................4
PHY 201 College Physics I..............................5
PHY 202 College Physics II............................5
Subtotal................................................56
The student then selects one of the following sequences:
I. Manufacturing Area of Emphasis:
MET 240 Welding Processes .............................3
MET 300 Manufacturing Analysis ........................4
MET 310 N/C Computer Programming.......................3
MET 325 Tool Design and Production Tooling.............3
MET 330 Advanced Quality Assurance.....................3
MET 341 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing.........3
MET 404 Plant Layout ................................3
MET 408 Computer Aided Manufacturing ................3
MET 424 Cost Estimating for Manufacturing ...........3
Subtotal................................................28
Total....................................................120
92


Division of Technology
II. Mechanical Area of Emphasis:
MET 302 Fluid Flow II.................................3
MET 307 Machine Design ...............................3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I..............................3
MET 312 Heat Transfer.................................3
MET 331 Thermodynamics II.............................3
MET 332 Instrumentation Laboratory ...................3
MET 407 Computer Aided Design.........................3
MET 428 Advanced Energy Technology....................3
CEN 313 Mechanics of Materials........................3
CEN 314 Mechanics of Materials Lab....................1
Upper-Division Technical Elective .......................3
Subtotal................................................31
Total..................................................123
III. Energy Technology Emphasis:
GEL 101 General Geology ..............................4
MET 103 Introduction to Energy .......................3
MET 302 Fluid Flow II.................................3
MET 311 Thermodynamics I..............................3
MET 313 Combustion Technology.........................3
MET 331 Thermodynamics II.............................3
MET 332 Instrumentation Laboratory ...................3
MET 351 Technical Supervision.........................3
MET 410 Petroleum Technology I........................3
MET 411 Petroleum Technology II.......................3
MET 412 Coal Technology ..............................3
MET 428 Advanced Energy Technology....................3
Subtotal................................................37
Total..................................................129
The Department has structured the following sequence of courses for those wishing to minor in Mechanical Engineering Technology.
Minor/Mechnical Engineering Technology
MET 100 Materials and Manufacturing Technology .....3
MET 101 Manufacturing Processes.....................3
MET 131 Principles of Quality Assurance ............3
MET 220 Materials of Engineering....................3
MET 310 N/C Computer Programming....................3
MET 400 Project Engineering.........................3
Total...................................................18
Technical Communications
The Technical Communications program offers three areas of emphasis under the Communications Multi-Major and an Industrial Communications minor. The three areas of emphasis are Industrial Media, Industrial-Organizational Communications and Technical Communications Specialist. Each area of emphasis offers training in one or more communications areas that are most in demand by industry and government. Industrial Media prepares an individual to write, edit and publish the wide variety of reports, manuals and other technical or lay publications produced by industry and government. Industrial-Organizational Communications is designed for the person who desires to manage the flow of information within a company or government agency or between industries and agencies. The Technical Communications Specialist meets two needs of industry and government: (1) persons prepared to design and implement internal training programs, and (2) persons seeking careers in providing information through the visual media.
The Technical Communications minor provides a general background in communications designed to meet the minimal needs of industry and government with opportunity to emphasize the area of most interest to the individual student. The minor is particularly useful to persons majoring in scientific and technological disciplines as a means of expanding their employment skills.
The program welcomes students from the community and other areas of the College whose professional or academic work will benefit from one or more of the program offerings. Persons enrolling for one of the major areas of emphasis or the minor must confer with a program advisor because all academic programs are tailored to the career goals of the individual student.
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts
Communications: Industrial Media
Sponsored by the Program In Technical Communications
This communication area of emphasis provides the student with both the theory and production practices of technical writing and editing used by industry and government. It includes course work in the writing, editing, design and production of technical reports, proposals, and manuals in addition to professional experience, hands-on practice with computer hardware, and the production of software instructions and manuals.
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems....................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion......................3
Total.......................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses 24 hours from the following:
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media ......3
COM 244 Writing for Radio.............................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.............3
COM 299 Internship.................................arr.
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ....3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction .....3
COM 361 Advanced Technical Writing ...................3
COM 362 Industrial Editing and Production ............3
COM 363 Designing Technical Publications..............3
COM 364 Writing Computer-User Software
Documentation .................................3
COM 366 Topics in Industrial and Technical
Communications.................................3
COM 378 Communications' Law ...........................3
COM 462 Critical Readings in Industrial and Technical
Communications.................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Industrial Communications....3
COM 480 Workshop ...................................arr.
COM 499 Advanced Internship.........................arr.
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II................2
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts..........................4
Total......................................................24
Electives
Twelve hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis
and/or courses approved by the students advisor that would
specifically benefit the student's career goals............12
Total......................................................42
Communications: Industrial-Organizational Sponsored by the Program in Technical Communications
This communication area of emphasis prepares the student for a career in managing the flow of information within and between technical and industrial communications networks and systems. It includes practical experience and theoretical understanding of developing organizational communications theory, the cultures that exist within corporations, conflict management, and various methodologies for the dissemination of information within industrial, governmental, and other large organizations.
93


Division of Technology
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems....................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion......................3
Total.......................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses 24 hours from the following:
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media ......3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing.............3
COM 299 Internship.................................arr.
COM 351 Organizational Communication .................3
COM 352 Communication of Power and Authority..........3
COM 353 Corporate Cultures ...........................3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction .....3
COM 356 Variable Topics in Organizational
Communicating .................................3
COM 378 Communications' Law ..........................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Industrial Communications..3
COM 480 Workshop...................................arr.
COM 499 Advanced Internship .......................arr.
MGT 355 Production Management.........................3
MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations .....................3
PSY 345 Industrial Psychology.........................3
PSY 441 Human Factors Engineering.....................3
SOC 316 Industry and Occupations......................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ...........3
SPE 311 Conference Leadership ........................3
Total......................................................24
Electives
Twelve hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis
and/or courses approved by the students advisor that would
specifically benefit the student s career goals............12
Total.................................................. 42
Communications: Industrial Specialist
Sponsored by the Program in Technical Communications
This communication area of emphasis provides the student with the theoretical understanding and the practical experience required to design, write, and produce multi-image slide and video-tape productions for use in industry, government, and other large organizations. Such productions are frequently used for training, image creation, and information dissemination.
Required Core semester
Hours
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems...................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication
or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion.........................3
Total........................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses 24 hours from the following:
COM 241 Basic Multi-Image Production ....................3
COM 242 Basic Industrial Videotape Production............3
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media .........3
COM 244 Writing for Radio................................3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing................3
COM 299 Internship.......................................3
COM 341 Advanced Multi-Image Production .................3
COM 342 Advanced Industrial Videotape Production.........3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ....3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction ........3
COM 378 Communications' Law .............................3
COM 441 Budgeting and Planning for Audio-Visual
Productions ....................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Industrial Communications.....3
COM 480 Workshop .....................................arr.
COM 499 Advanced Internship...........................arr.
ITS 151 Introduction to Graphic Arts II..................2
ITS 255 Introduction to Photography......................3
ITS 350 Advanced Graphic Arts............................4
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ..............3
SPE 311 Conference Leadership ...........................3
Total.......................................................24
Electives
Twelve hours of electives from any of the areas of emphasis and/or courses approved by the student's advisor that would
specifically benefit the students career goals.............12
Total.......................................................42
Technical Communications Minor
The Technical Communications Minor is designed to provide additional skills for the student majoring in a scientific or technological discipline that will increase his/her employability. In addition to the required core courses, the student selects five courses which may be in one of the specialized areas or may be divided among the areas offered by the Technical
Communications Program to provide an overview of the discipline.
I. Each of the following courses:
COM 243 Introduction to Industrial Visual Media .......3
COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing..............3
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts and
Systems.......................................3
Semester Hours Required....................................9
II. Five of the following courses:
COM 241 Basic Multi-Image Production ..................3
COM 242 Basic Industrial Videotape Production..........3
COM 244 Writing for Radio..............................3
COM 341 Advanced Multi-Image Production ...............3
COM 342 Advanced Industrial Videotape Production.......3
COM 344 Corporate Scriptwriting for Film and Television ....3
COM 351 Organizational Communication ..................3
COM 352 Communication of Power and Authority...........3
COM 353 Corporate Cultures ............................3
COM 354 Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction ......3
COM 356 Variable Topics in Organizational
Communicating ................................3
COM 361 Advanced Technical Writing ....................3
COM 362 Industrial Editing and Production .............3
COM 363 Designing Technical Publications...............3
COM 364 Writing Computer-User Software
Documentation ................................3
COM 366 Variable Topics in Industrial and Technical
Communication ................................3
COM 378 Communications' Law ...........................3
COM 441 Budgeting and Planning for Audio-Visual
Productions ..................................3
COM 462 Critical Readings in Industrial and Technical
Communications................................3
COM 479 Senior Seminar in Industrial Communications....3
Semester Hours Required...................................15
Total Semester Hours Required.............................24
94


Division of Public Service Professions
Division of Public Service Professions
The Division of Public Service Professions is composed of five departments, two programs, and one institute: The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, the Department of Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration, the Department of Human Services, the Department of Military Science, the Department of Nursing and Health Care Management, the Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps Program, the Community Service Development Program, and the Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behaviors.
The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers a Bachelor of Science degree with a choice of five areas of emphasis: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Youth Advocacy, Criminal Justice Administration, and Corporate Security.
The Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration Department provides a flexible and individualized interdisciplinary program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, and Plus I and Plus II Certificates of Completion in Hotel, Restaurant, Meeting and Travel Administration.
The Department of Human Services provides a core service in programs of rehabilitation and training which emphasizes client self-help. Such programs conducted by local, state, and federal institutions and private agencies have created expanded opportunities for a variety of interesting new and existing careers.
The Department of Military Science offers Army ROTC programs leading to a commission in the active Army, Army Reserve or National Guard.
The purposes of the Baccalaureate Registered Nurse Program and the Health Care Management Program are to provide diploma and Associate Degree R.N. graduates and other care professionals with a broadened educational base for improvement of health care practice and preparation for meeting future health care needs of society.
The Air Force ROTC Program allows students to register and receive credit at Metropolitan State College for Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AFROTC) classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
The Community Service Development Program at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide academic and applied learning opportunities for people who wish to pursue professional careers in the administration of a wide variety of nonprofit organizations.
The Institute for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behaviors is designed to provide opportunities for people seeking to become certified addictions counselors to meet those requirements through a degree in Human Services with an Addictions emphasis or a non-degreed certification program through the Institute.
Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology
The present and future needs of American society require substantially greater numbers and more highly educated persons in criminal justice agencies at all levels of government. Increasingly, the demand by potential employers is for applicants who have had professional education. In addition, there is considerable interest at all levels in the criminal justice system to increase professionalization through education. The present curriculum not only provides a solid foundation in police-related areas, but also prepares students who are interested in further study in the areas of probation and parole, corrections, juvenile agency work, criminal justice administration and private/ corporate security. Course offerings within these professional fields are related to the Human Services program, Public Administration, Urban Studies and commercial enterprise.
Criminal Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science
The baccalaureate major is designed to provide professional courses, as well as a broad general education. The curriculum is structured for the student seeking either pre-service or in-service education. Recognizing that many interested in such education are already employed in some form of criminal justice work and that many have completed course work at the college level, the Department has developed a four-year program which provides comprehensive fundamental subjects in the first two years (lower-division) and emphasizes subjects of an advanced, specialized and administrative nature in the second two years
(upper-division). The curriculum is structured to facilitate transfer from two-year police science/criminal justice programs.
A minor in Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, Business Management or Urban Studies is strongly recommended, but others are accepted. A contract minor may also be designed to meet the individual student's area of interest.
Students must meet the colleges requirements for the baccalaureate degree, including general studies and should consult with a faculty advisor regarding general studies courses, the selection of a Criminal Justice area of emphasis and the minor.
Areas of Study
The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers a Bachelor of Science degree with a choice of five areas of emphasis. These areas of emphasis recognize the growing specialization within the criminal justice system and the expanding information base in the fields of Law Enforcement, Corrections, Youth Advocacy, Criminal Justice Administration and Corporate Security. The areas also acknowledge the educational and professional needs of the Criminal Justice and Criminology student by providing to all graduates a commonality of learning experiences through core courses required for all areas of emphasis in Criminal Justice and Criminology.
Criminal Justice and Criminology Major for Bachelor of Science
Semester
Criminal Justice Core Hours
Required Courses for All Areas of Emphasis
CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System...3
CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice 3
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Division of Public Service Professions
CJC 210 Substantive Criminal Law.............................3
CJC 465 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional....3
Total........................................................12
In all areas of emphasis, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper division semester hours.
Area of Emphasis I: Law Enforcement/Public Safety
Designed for those students who seek academic preparation for careers within law enforcement agencies or who may be considering law school or other graduate school programs.
Semester
Required Courses in Addition to Core: Hours
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure.................3
CJC 214 Criminal Procedure ..............................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law ..............................3
Total........................................................9
Students electing this area of emphasis must select I8 hours from the following courses to complete the Law Enforcement/Public Safety area of emphasis:
CJC 215 Municipal Law ...................................3
CJC 220 Law Enforcement Operations.......................3
CJC 291 Critical Issues in Criminal Justice ...........1-2
CJC 314 Juvenile Law.....................................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior ........3
CJC 335 Seminar in Delinquency Causation, Prevention
and Control.....................................3
CJC 340 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers...........3
CJC 341 Criminal Justice and the Social Structure........3
CJC 350 Criminal Investigation...........................3
CJC 370 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration ...3
CJC 440 Criminal Justice Planning, Policy Analysis,
Evaluation and Budgeting Systems ...............3
CJC 441 Special Topics in Law Enforcement................3
Area of Emphasis II: Corrections, Probation and Parole Administration
Designed for those students seeking academic preparation for careers within the adult corrections systems at the community or
institutional level.
Required Courses in Addition to Core:
CJC 214 Criminal Procedure ................................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law ................................3
CJC 328 Classification and Treatment of the Offender ....3
Total...........................................................9
Students electing this area of emphasis must select at least 20 hours from the following courses to complete the Corrections, Probation and Parole Administration area of emphasis:
Administration area of emphasis:
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure................3
CJC 314 Juvenile Law....................................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior .......3
CJC 329 Probation and Parole............................3
CJC 334 Counseling Skills for Corrections Personnel.....3
CJC 340 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers..........3
CJC 430 Penology........................................3
CJC 440 Criminal Justice Planning, Policy Analysis,
Evaluation and Budgeting Systems ...............3
CJC 431 Correctional Law................................3
CJC 442 Practicum in Corrections .......................5
CJC 462 Special Topics in Corrections Administration....3
Area of Emphasis III: Youth Advocacy/Delinquency Control
Designed to prepare and enhance career skills for specialization in Youth Advocacy and Delinquency Control, based upon competencies acquired as a practitioner in this field or students transferring from a two-year program in Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement. Students completing an associate degree in a Criminal Justice program will not be required to complete a minor.
Required Courses in Addition to Core:
CJC 312 Constitutional Law ............................3
CJC 314 Juvenile Law...................................3
CJC 335 Seminar in Delinquency Causation,
Prevention and Control..........................3
CJC 340 Criminal Behavior and Criminal Careers.........3
CJC 345 Behavior Development and Treatment Plans......3
CJC 466 Youth Advocacy Initiatives..................1-15
PSY 325 Child Psychology...............................3
PSY 326 Adolescent Psychology..........................3
Total...................................................22-36
Area of Emphasis IV: Criminal Justice Administration and Management
Designed to enhance the career skills of students preparing for specialization in Criminal Justice Management and Administration, based on competencies acquired as Criminal Justice Practitioners or transferring from a two-year program in Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement. Students completing an associate degree in a Criminal Justice program will not be required to
complete a minor.
Required Courses in Addition to Core:
CJC 312 Constitutional Law ..............................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior ........3
CJC 370 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration ...3
CJC 440 Criminal Justice Planning, Policy Analysis,
Evaluation and Budgeting Systems ................3
CJC 467 Research Seminar in Criminal Justice
Administration ..................................5
Total........................................................17
Students electing this area of emphasis must complete 12 semester hours from the following courses to meet requirements in the Criminal Justice Administration and Management area of
emphasis:
CJC 310 Logic and the Law ............................3
CJC 314 Juvenile Law..................................3
CJC 325 Criminal Justice Delivery of Services and
Decision Making................................3
CJC 410 Advanced Jurisprudence........................3
CJC 443 Comparative Criminal Justice..................3
CJC 461 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
Administration ................................3
Area of Emphasis V: Private Security Administration and Management
Designed for students seeking professional careers in the diverse
areas of private or corporate security.
Required Courses in Addition to Core:
CJC 201 Introduction to Private Security...............3
CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Procedure...............3
CJC 214 Criminal Procedure ............................3
CJC 312 Constitutional Law ............................3
CJC 320 Criminal Justice Administrative Behavior ......3
CJC 341 Criminal Justice and the Social
Structure.......................................3
CJC 370 Civil Law for Criminal Justice Administration .3
CJC 385 Corporate Security Management..................3
CJC 475 Crime Prevention and Loss Reduction ...........3
CMS 201 Introduction to Information Systems............3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
Minor in Criminal Justice and Criminology
CJC 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice System .......3
CJC 110 Evolutionary Legal Concepts in Criminal Justice ..3
CJC 465 Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional...3
CJC Electives selected in consultation with and
approved by the department advisor, at least 4 hours of which must be upper-division...9
Total......................................................18
96


Division of Public Service Professions
Hospitality, Meeting & Travel Administration
Major for Bachelor of Arts
The Hospitality, Meeting and Travel Administration Department provides a flexible and individualized interdisciplinary program leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree, and Plus I and Plus II Certificates of Completion.
A student is offered areas of emphasis in Hotel Administration, Meeting Administration, Restaurant Administration or Travel Administration. Each area of emphasis is designed for the individual student to provide both the theoretical knowledge and practical experiences to prepare him/her for employment in these rapidly expanding industries.
To be awarded a degree, the student must conform to the General Studies requirements as stated by the HMTA Department. These required General Studies meet the specifications of Metropolitan State College.
In addition to meeting course requirements and the General Studies requirements, the HMTA student must:
1. Maintain a Grade Point Average of 2.25.
2. Demonstrate a typing proficiency of 35 wpm.
3. Present CPR and First Aid Certification.
4. Demonstrate a basic competence in a foreign language.*
5. Present certification of 1,200 clock hours of on-the-job experience in the HMTA areas of emphasis. These may be secured through paid job experience, cooperative education, externships, or a combination of the three. No more than 9 semester hours in cooperative education will be accepted, and these hours must contain specific descriptions of the job duties performed.
6. Complete a Graduation Agreement and have it approved by the advisory committee no later than the third semester of enrollment (second semester for transfer students) in the HMTA Program.
7. Select an HMTA advisory committee not later than the third semester of enrollment (second semester for transfer students) in the HMTA Program.
(a) The HMTA Committee will be composed of:
(1) At least two MSC faculty members, plus the Department Chair.
(2) At least one member from the industry represented by the student s area of emphasis. Three industry members is maximum.
(b) The committee works with the student in planning her or his program and meets with the student at least once a year to advise and assist the student in the accomplishment of that program.
Competence to be certified by MSC Modern Language Department as having the equivalence of, or taking MDL 100 and earn a grade of C or better.
General Studies for HMTA Majors
Semester
Hours
I. ENG 101, 102 Freshman Composition.....................6
II. Humanities
SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .............3
MDL 100 Language Conversation (Spanish, French,
German)..........................................3
Electives.................................................2
III. Science and Mathematics
Mathematics Course Approved by HMTA Advisor...............2
Electives Physical, Biological or Earth Science.........6
IV. Social and Behavioral Science
ECO 201 Principles of Economics Macro ....................3
Social or Behavioral Science Course
Approved by HMTA Advisor....................................3
Electives (Psychology Recommended)..........................3
V. Career
Writing Course Approved by HMTA Advisor ....................3
Computer Course Approved by HMTA Advisor....................3
Total......................................................37
HMTA Core (Required of all HMTA Majors)
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant
Administration ................................3
HMT 103 Principles of Meeting/Travel
Administration ................................3
HMT 109 Job Search Strategies*.........................3
ITS 345 Facility Planning .............................3
MGT 300 Principles of Management.......................3
MGT 356 Small Business Management*.....................3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing*.........................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication....................3
Total......................................................24
'Equivalents approved by students advisement committee.
Hotel Administration Emphasis Semester
Required Courses Hours
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II....................3
HMT 300 Research Methods in Hospitality ...............3
HMT 351 Hotel Administration I ........................3
HMT 352 Hotel Administration II .......................3
HMT 360 Beverage Control...............................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I....................3
HMT 456 Hotel/Restaurant Law...........................3
HMT 458 Thesis in Hotel Administration ................2
HMT 459 Seminar in Hotel Administration................2
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development......3
Total......................................................31
Restaurant Administration Emphasis
Required Courses
HES 204 Nutrition .....................................3
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
HMT 161 Kitchen Procedures and Production I ...........3
HMT 162 Kitchen Procedures and Production II ..........3
HMT 300 Research Methods in Hospitality ...............3
HMT 360 Beverage Control...............................3
HMT 361 Enology: The Study of Wine.....................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I....................3
HMT 367 Restaurant Administration II...................3
HMT 456 Hotel/Restaurant Law...........................3
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development......3
HMT 468 Thesis in Restaurant Administration............2
HMT 469 Seminar in Restaurant Administration ..........2
Total......................................................37
Meeting Administration Emphasis
Required Courses
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I.....................3
JRN 284 Fundamentals of Public Relations...............3
HMT 276 Meeting Administration I.......................3
HMT 300 Research Methods in Hospitality ...............3
HMT 375 Promotion Materials: Analysis and Design.......3
HMT 476 Meeting Administration II......................3
HMT 478 Thesis in Meeting Administration...............2
HMT 479 Seminar in Meeting: Variable Topics ...........2
Subtotal...................................................22
97


Division of Public Service Professions
Electives: It is strongly recommended that Meeting Administration students utilize their electives and minor to secure an area of specialization in the Meeting field.
Category I ( Select 3 hours)..............................3
MGT 221-3 Business Law
MKT 300-3 Principles of Marketing
MKT 311-3 Advertising
MKT 312-3 Promotional Strategy
MKT 316-3 Sales Management
MKT 371-3 International Marketing
CMS 300-3 Computer and Society
CMS 305-3 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design
CMS 306-3 File Design Data Base Management
Category II (Select 6 hours)..............................6
HMT 370-3 HMTA Media Workshop HMT 378-3 Leadership by Objectives HMT 472-3 Meeting Law HMT 473-3 Principles of Negotiation
Category III (Select 6 Hours) ............................6
HMT 181-3 Basic Travel Procedures HMT 282-3 Travel Agency Management HMT 351-3 Hotel Administration I HMT 352-3 Hotel Administration II HMT 366-3 Restaurant Administration I HMT 367-3 Restaurant Administration II HMT 382-3 Travel Law
HMT 465-3 Hospitality Employee Resource Development HMT 481-4 Tour Development, Marketing, Management and Evaluation
Total.....................................................37
Travel Administration Emphasis
All Travel emphasis majors and minors must present certification
of 40 clock hours of computer reservation training.
Required Courses
GEG 180 Travel Geography ..............................3
HMT 181 Basic Travel Procedures I .....................3
HMT 182 Basic Travel Procedures II ........................4
HMT 282 Travel Agency Management.......................3
HMT 285 Travel Agency Accounting.......................3
HMT 300 Research Methods in Hospitality ...................3
HMT 375 Promotion Materials: Analysis and Design.......3
HMT 382 Travel Law.....................................3
HMT 385 Travel Agency Budgeting .......................3
HMT 481 Tour Development, Marketing, Management and
Evaluation.....................................4
HMT 488 Thesis in Travel Administration................2
HMT 489 Seminar in Travel: Variable Topics .............2
Total.....................................................36
Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Meeting Planning
Sponsored by the Department of Hospitality, Meeting & Travel Administration
This area of emphasis is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications. In addition to the requirements listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours and supporting proficiencies.
Required Core
COM 272 Introduction to Communications Concepts
and Systems...................................3
SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or
SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion......................3
Total....................................................6
Required Area of Emphasis Courses
HMT 200 Externship I .................................3
SPE 310 Business and Professional Speaking ...........3
SPE 311 Conference Leadership ........................3
SPE 312 Parliamentary Procedure.......................2
HMT 276 Meeting Administration I......................3
HMT 476 Meeting Administration II.....................3
HMT 400 Externship II ................................3
Recommended Electives
JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies.......3
MGT 300 Principles of Management......................3
MKT 300 Principles of Marketing.......................3
MKT 311 Advertising.........j..............................3
HMT 370 HMTA Media Workshop ..........................3
And other designed electives ..............................18
Total......................................................42
HMTA Minors
The Hospitality Meeting and Travel Administration Department offers minors in all four areas of emphasis. Students are expected to know any prerequisites for courses in other departments.
Additional Requirements for all minors:
300 clock hours of on-the-job experience CPR and First Aid Certification Language Competence Certification Typing Proficiency of 35 WPM
Travel students certification of 40 clock hours of computer reservation training.
Minor requirements are listed below.
Hotel Administration Minor
Semester
Hours
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration ..3
HMT 351 Hotel Administration I .........................3
HMT 352 Hotel Administration II ........................3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing ..........................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I.....................3
HMT 456 Hotel/Restaurant Law............................3
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development.......3
HMT Electives..................................3
Total......................................................24
Restaurant Administration Minor
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration ..3
HMT 161 Kitchen Procedures and Production I ............3
HMT 162 Kitchen Procedures and Production II ...........3
HMT 357 Hospitality Marketing ..........................3
HMT 360 Beverage Control................................3
HMT 366 Restaurant Administration I.....................3
HMT 367 Restaurant Administration II....................3
HMT 456 Hotel Restaurant Law............................3
HMT 465 Hospitality Employee Resource Development......3
Total Minor.................J..............................27
Meeting Administration Minor
HMT 102 Principles of Hotel/Restaurant Administration ..3
HMT 181 Basic Travel Procedures ........................3
HMT 276 Meeting Administration I........................3
HMT 370 HMTA Media Workshop ............................3
HMT 375 Promotion Materials: Analysis and Design........3
HMT 378 Leadership by Objectives .......................3
HMT 472 Meeting Law.....................................3
HMT 476 Meeting Administration II.......................3
Total Minor................................................24
Travel Administration Minor
HMT 103 Principles of Meeting/Travel Administration.....3
GEG 180 Travel Geography ...............................3
98


Full Text

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AURARIA LIBRAR Y U18701 9800645

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AU ARY Metropolitan State College Bulletin 1986-87 1 006 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204

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College Calenda r 1986 -87 College Calendar 1986-87 Summer Semester 1986 Autumn Semester 1986 Applications sh oul d b e received by ................ ......... ........ May 21 1st Time College S tudent less than 20 years of age .... August 2 All o t her applic ants .......... .... ............ .............................. August 21 Clas ses be gin ...................... .... ................ .......... .......... ....... June 2 Classes begin ...... ...... .......... .... ....... ...................... August 27 Indep ende n ce Day n o classes ................................ ...... July 4 L abor D ay no c l a sses ............ .......... .......... ........ September 1 Summe r Term ends .................................................. ...... August 8 Tha nksgiving Hol i day no c l asses ................ November 27-28 2 Autumn exams e nd ...................... .............. ...... ....... December 19 Sp r ing Semester 1987 App lications sho uld be recei ved by ............................... January 7 Clas ses begin .................................... .................... ....... Ja nuary 19 S p ring Break-no classes ........................ .... .......... M arch 23-27 Spring exams end ................................................ .. ............. May 15 C ommencement ............. ........ ........ .. .. .. .. .......... .... .......... ..... May 17 'Colleg e offices also closed during this h oliday METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE HOLIDAY CALENDAR All College Offices will be Closed 1986 J uly 4 S eptember 1 November 27, 28 D ecember 25, 26, 29, 30, 31 January 1 May 26 198 7

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Contents Contents Page College Calendar ..... . . ............... .... . ...... .......... ............................ ..... .... .... ..................... 2 Genera l Information .... ..... ........ .... . .... .......... ............. ............................. ...... ........................ 5 Accred itation ....................................... ...... ........ . .............................. ............... ..... ...... ..... 5 Campus ................... ........ ........................................... ........ .................................................. 5 Conso rtium of S tat e Colleges in Colorado ........................................................................ 6 Admiss ions Instructions . ..... .............. .......... .... .... ......... .... .......... ................................. 6 Financial Aid .......... .......... ......... .... ........... .......... .............. .. .............. ................... .... ...... .... 9 Costs ....................... ..... .................................... ....... .......... .... ....... ...................... ............. 11 Student Personnel Services ................ ............ ...... .... ..... ..... ....................... ................... 11 Academic Information ...... ....... ........ ........................................ . ....... ......... ........ ................. 15 Omnibus Courses ...... ........................... .... ..... .... ............... ............ ................ ..... ........... 21 Field Experience/Internship Courses ....... ..... .... ................... .... ...... . ........... ...... ..... 22 Requirements for All Degrees ........................... ................ .......... ..... .......................... ..... 22 Degrees and Programs Available ... ..................... .... ............... .............. ............... ........ 25 School of Business ............... ....................................... ................................................... ....... 28 Institute for Entrepreneurship ................................ ..... ...... .............. ........................ ..... .... 36 School of Letters, Arts and Sciences .......... ........ .............................................................. .... 38 Divis ion of Humanities .... ............ ..... .......... .......................... .... ......... ....................... .... 38 Divis ion of Social Sciences ...................... ........ .................................................... .......... 50 Division of Science and Mathematics ........ ........ .............................................................. 55 Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services .... .................................................... ........ 62 Institute for Women s Studies and Ser vices .... ................................................................ 64 School of Professional Studies ...................... .............. .... .... ........ ..................................... 65 Division of Education .............. ............. .... .... ................................... ........ ......... ....... ..... 65 Division of Technology ....................................... .......... ................... .......... ......... .......... 81 Division of Public Service Professions .................. .................... ....................................... 95 Course Descriptions ........... .................................... .................. ........ ............. ................... 1 05 Trustees ...... ........................................... .... .......................................... ........ .......... ............ 180 Admin istration ............. ................................ ..................... ....................... ............... ............ 180 Academ ic Administrators ............. ............. .................... ..... ............... . ... ... .... .... ....... ......... 182 Faculty .. ....... ................... ......................... ... ....... ......................................... ............... .......... 183 Alphabetica l Index ....................................................... ......... ..... ...... ........ .................. .... .... 192 Campus Map ...... ....................... ..... .......... ......... .... ............ ....... ..... ............ ........... ........... 196 Admiss ions Application ............ ....... ..... .... ............................................................. ....... ..... 197 3

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The Colle g e The C ollege Metropolitan State College is a leader in quality, baccalaureate education. MSC people students faculty, staff and alumni -work to share actively the responsibility of the future Since its creation in 1965 th is exciting, four-year college has contributed to the vitality of downtown Denver And it has changed the face of learning in the metropolitan area with a phenomenal growth to approximately 14, 700 students. Metropolitan State College s success is reflected in the faces of its creative and determined students E i ghteen year olds take the first steps toward establishing a career while young professionals seek caree r advancement. Displaced homemakers learn new skills and all find new opportunities. The aver age student is 27 years old making classes a unique blend of the eagerness of youth and the wisdom that comes with matur ity Because the student population is so d iverse education at MSC is a mutual learning exper ience for stude nts and professors alike There is a give and take between young and old, student and teacher all learning from one another. While MSC s students are committed to learning, the faculty is committed to teaching. Other colleges emphas ize research; MSC s more than 335 full-time faculty members are first, and most importantly teachers. They are available to their students both in the classroom and in their offices for extra hel p and adv ice. Many have extensive p rofessional backgrounds adding an invaluable dimension to their knowledge and over 80 percent have earned the highest level of academic degree attainable in their fields MSC offers Bachelor of A rts and Bachelor of Science degrees in over 55 areas in bus iness human serv ices, education engineering technology, liberal arts, professional studies, science and mathem atics Students can also pursue specific, individualized career choices through a contract major or minor Several academic programs are the only ones of their type offe red in the region and many enjoy national reputations for excellence MSC is not limited to degree-seeking students A class in the latest computer technology may attract a realtor w i th a fascination for high tech." A homemaker with a life-l ong love of Shelley and Keats may find personal growth in a literature class The active businessman or woman may take advantage of an extende d evening class i n management or conver sat ional French at Metro South or Metro North MSC s impact upon the metropol i tan commun it y continues to grow each year as Denver increasingly becomes a national center of commerce and tec hnolog y The College considers itself a partner in Denver s future and seeks ways to share resources to contribute to the quality of urban life MSC students work for local businesses as interns and many classes revolve around community issues. MSC also extends l earn ing opportunities beyond the boundaries of the Aurar ia campus through the Division of Off Campus Programs offering credit classes at locations throughout the metropolitan area including special seminars and workshops for area professionals Addit ionally the College reinforces its partnership with the commun i ty through jointly sponsored events which both entertain and educate MSC students and the metropolitan community Lectures by nationally known figures concerts and plays foreign study programs and community learn in g projects all bring the wealth of MSC s resources into the neighborhoods of metropol itan Denver Metropolitan State College provides equal education and employment opportunities for all, regardless of race, color creed religion, age sex, national origin, or veteran status Accredit a t i on/ Approvals MSC is accredited by the North Central Assoc i at io n of Colleges and Schools, the National League for Nursing, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education the Council for Standards in Human Service Education, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Association of University Programs in Health Administration The Civil Engineerin g Technology Electron i cs Engineering Technology and the Mechanical Engineering Technology programs are accredited by ABET the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology The Department of Human Services has approval from the Council for Standards i n Human Service Education and the baccalaureate program in Chemistry i s accredited by the American Chemical Society Campus Metropolitan State College moved to new facilities on the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) during the 1976-77 academic year The 169-acre campus i s located adjacent to downtown Denver at Speer Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue The Community College of Denver (CCD) and the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) share the facilities with MSC Over one million square feet of space for classrooms laboratories and offices are included in the facility. Some administrative off i ces are in restored Victorian homes i n Denve r s historic Ninth Street Park located within the Aurar i a site The campus features a child care center ; a block-long gymnasium w ith a swimming pool; areas for handball soccer baseball and track ; a student center ; and a library housing more than 595, 000 volumes The Aurar i a Higher Education Center provides a variety of educational opportunit i es that meet the needs of the urba n student. The three Auraria institutions continue to be governed by separate boards and to maintain their dist inc tive roles and missions However, the concept of facility sharing affords the MSC student the flexib ility of taking lower division courses at the community college, and graduate, or specialized professional courses at the university Metropolitan State College's four-year degree programs are coord in ated with those of the other two inst itutions and students may cross register for classes at the three institutions 5

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The College The proximity of the Auraria Higher Education Center to downtown Denver enables students and faculty to use the community as a learning laboratory and to weave classroom theory into the social political cultural and economic practice of the city The Auraria Higher Education Center originated with the need to provide permanent facilities for three rapidly growing urban institutions In 1974, the Auraria Board of Directors was created by the Legislature to plan the campus, construct the buildings, provide a variety of additiona l centralized support services and maintain the facilities In 1972 the Colorado Legislature appropriated nearly $40 million for the construction of the Auraria campus Addit i onal funds were contributed by the City of Denver, the federal government through the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the State of Colorado. The Auraria Higher Educat i on Center constitutes a creative example of cooperation by government at all levels Consortium of State Colleges The member institutions governed by the Tr ustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado are Adams State College Mesa College Metropolitan State College and Western State College The purpose of the consortium is to identify and facilitate cooperative efforts among the institutions Such efforts lead to broader educational opportunities for students than can be offered by any one of the instit utions The register i ng authority of each Consort ium member institution can provide any regularly enrolled student in good standing the materials with which the student can enroll temporarily in any other member institution without i ncurring additiona l matriculation costs Information concerning tuition is available at the host institution The enrollment status of the student at the host insti tut ion will be determined by the student's status at the home institution. Students should ascertain in advance of enrolling at a consortium institution that desired courses will satisfy degree requirements at the home institution The process of enrolling as a consortium student should begin at least one month prior to the beginning of the registration per i od at the host institution Admissions Instructions Applications for Admission are considered in the order in which they are received each semester. To insure guaranteed processing applications for admission must be and credent i als should be, received at the College not later than twelve weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. All credentials which are received by the College become the property of Metropolitan State College and will not be returned to the student. All transcripts should be sent directly from the issuing institut i on to Metropolitan State College, 1006 11th Street Box 16 Denver Colorado 80204 Under no circumstances will hand-carried transcripts be accepted It is the responsibility of the applicant to notify the Office of Admissions and Records of any demographic or academic changes on the application for admission prior to the first day of classes If demographic changes are not reported to the Office of Admissions and Records it could delay the admission process for subsequent enrollment. Failure to report academic changes to the Office of Admissions and Records may result in rejection or dismissal. Admission of Freshmen First-time college students less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment : 6 1 Applicants must request the following information be submitted directly to the Office of Admission and Records from the high school or testing agency : a. ACT or SAT test results b high school class rank c high school grade point average 2 Th i s infor matio n may be submitted at the end of the 6th, 7th or 8th semester of high school. This would const itute an Early Admission Decision program 3 An applicant must meet two of the following three criteria to be eligible for admission : a a composite score of 19 on the ACT or a combined score of 810 on the SAT b 2 5 high school GPA c. upper 21.! high school class rank 4 Appl ic ants who do not meet these requirements as well as appli c ants who have taken the General Equivalency Diploma (GED), will be considered on an individual basis after careful review of all credentials including any letters of recommend at ion persona l letters or interviews which may be requested. First-time college students 20 years of age or older as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment: Applicants who are over 20 years of age who do not meet the above minimum admiss io n requirements should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for Individualized admissions Information To apply for admission : 1 Complete the Application for Admission included in the back of this Bulletin Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records at 1006 11th Street Box 16 Denver Colorado, 80204; 303/556-3058 2 The completed form along with the application fee must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions and Records To insure processing, both the application and all required credentials must be received at least four weeks pnor to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. It is the student s responsibility to request that a transcript or appropriate test scores be sent to the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records directly from the issuing institution or testing agency in time to meet processing dates 3 A $10 application fee, which is nonrefundable and w111 not apply toward tuition must be sent with the application for admission The application fee must either be rece1ved or waived before the application can be considered 4 Upon receipt of the above credentials after a preliminary evaluation has been made the applicant w1ll be informed of her or his admission status. 5 A final official high school transcript with date of graduation is required no later than the fourth week of the term to insure registration for the subsequent term Students w111 not be permitted to register after their initial enrollment unless this final transcript is received 6. All other credentials are required four weeks before the expected term of enrollment. Admission Through ACT/SAT If when the student takes the ACT or SAT she or he indicates Metropolitan State College as one of the colleg.e choices to receive the ACT or SAT Profile Reports the follow1ng adm1ss1on procedures shall apply : 1 A letter of explanation and an application form will be sent to the student. 2 If the student wishes to be cons idered for admission, she or he should complete the form, have the high school counselor sign it and return it to MSC along with the student's high school cumulative grade point average and high school class rank through the last completed semester (6th, 7th, 8th). 3 There is NO application fee

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4 The ACT and SAT Profile Reports and the application form will be used in lieu of a formal application 5, The applica n t will be considered for admission based on the admission criter i a listed prev i ously for first-time college students less than 20 years of age. 6 The applicant must request that a final official transcript (with date of graduation posted) be sent directly to the Office of Admiss io ns and Records from the high school. ACT / SA T Requirement The College will require the ACT or SAT test of all first-time college students who are less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment. High school applicants w ho do not take the ACT or SAT test while in high school may m ake arrangements with the MSC Off ice of Admissions and R ecords to take the ACT examinat ion only after all national test dates have passed Contact the Office of Admissions and Records for additional information (556-3058). G E D appl ica nts less than 20 years of age as of the first day of the expected term of enrollment must a l so adhere to the ACT /S AT req uirement. Fai lur e t o com ply w i t h this ad miss io n s req u irement will result in a hold p laced on f u t ur e registr at i o n High School Student Educat i o n an d E nri c hm ent Progra m The Student Education and Enrichment Prog ram (SEE) is M etropolitan State College s High School Concurrent Enrollment P rogram for collegeready students SEE is designed to supplement a student s ex i sting education through early p articipation in college level classes. This advanced program should no t be i nterpret e d a s a n a l ternative to hi g h sc hoo l comple tion but is, instead a cooperative college/high school e ffort to provide educational enrichment and early college attendance to qualif ied high school students Typically the SEE student meets the following criteria : 1 is currently registered in a Colorado high school 2 is following a GPA of 3 0 or better 3 is preferably in his{her senior year of high school 4 can benefit from specialized or accelerated classes 5 has demonstrated the ability to do college-level work To apply for admission, the student must in consultation with the appropriate high school authority, submit to the Director of H igh School/College Relation s a standard admiss io ns app l ication with th e required $10 .00 application fee accompanied by the following documents : 1 a h igh school counselor/administrator s recommendation stating how the student will benef i t from early college attendance 2 written parental approval 3 an off icial high school transcript. Up on receipt of these documents the student's record is reviewed and the admissions decision is made However if addit i onal or supporting i nformation is requ ire d the student may be requ ired to have an admissions interview with an MSC admissions officer The adm issions dec ision will be based on the student's academic preparat ion, past performance the recommendation of the high school official and the student's personal motivat i on and readiness for a traditional college experience Admi ssion of Transf e r Students Transfer applicants must submit credentials from all colleges and unive rsi t ies previously or currently attending Transfer applicants must be in good standing and eligible to return to the last college attended Failure to report correctly any former or current college or university record may resu lt in loss of credit and/or dismissal. The C olleg e Adm ission to the College for transfer applicants will be based o n a 2.00 grade point average from e a ch institution attended Students who do not meet these admission requirements should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for individu a l consideration. To apply for admission : 1 Complete the Application for Admission that can be found in the back of this Bulletin Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and R ecords. 3 0 3/556-3 058. 2 Comp l ete the application for admission and return it t o t h e Office of Admissions and Records To insure processing the application must be received by the College at lea s t twelve weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which admission i s sought. 3 $10 applicat i on fee which i s nonrefundable and will n ot apply toward tuition must accompany the application for admission The f e e m u st be received or waived before the application can be considered 4 A high school transcript is requested w hen the applica n t has less than 45 quarter hours or 30 semester hours of transferable college credits 5 Students are required to have o f ficia l transcripts sen t directly to the College from the issuing institution. Stude n t s will not be permitted to register beyond their initi a l enrollment unless these credentials are received Altho ugh an applicant s record from several institutions may be summarized on one transcript official transcripts from each institution attended are required. This is true even though no credit may have been earned at an i nst i tution The only except i on is for a non-degree-seeking student who already has an undergraduate degree For these students the only official transcript requ ired is the transcript from the inst i tution granting the undergradua t e degree. Tr a nsfer Cr edit Eva lu at i on Once final official transcripts for degree-seeking students are received by the Office of Admissions and Records the evaluation process begins The student receives a transfer evaluation ca r d which must be signed by the student s major department advis o r The card is then submi tted to the Office o f Admissions a n d Records Within approximately four weeks students receive tw o copies of the transfer cre d it evaluation one of which is taken to the major and minor departments for advice on how credits might apply to their programs Transfer credits will be accepted under the following guidelines: 1. Grades earned must be A B, C or equivalent ; however only the credits will be shown on the MSC academic rec ord Courses with grades of D F or simi l ar grades will not b e accepted in transfer 2 Course content should be similar to those courses offered at Metropolitan State College 3 A maximum of 70 semester hours will be accepted from a two year institution A maximum of 9 0 semester hours o f credit will be given for acceptable work completed a t a four year institution o r combination of two and four-year institutions. 4. Students earning a two-year degree consisting of at lea st 60 semester hours (possibly excluding CLEP) from a n accredited institution with a GPA of 2 0 or better w i ll be guaranteed 60 semester hours of transfer cred i t if they have met the following minimums in the MSC genera l studies areas as part of the two-year degree Freshman English ...... .................. ........ ............. .4 semester hours Humanities ................. ........................................ 8 semester hours Science/Mathematics ....... .... ....... .................... 8 semester hours Social/Behavioral Science ................... .... ...... 8 semester hours plus 2 additional hours in any one of these areas or in the Caree r area .............. ......................... .... ........ 2 semester ho u rs 30 semester ho urs 7

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The College These 60 semester hours of transfer credit may not necessarily fulfill all general studies course requirements for a particula r degree program Students should consult with an advisor in their major department to determine whether additional genera l studies courses w i ll be required Admission of Previously Enrolled Students Former students who have not been in attendance at Metropolitan State College for one or more years: 1. Complete the Application for Admission that can be found in the back of this Bulletin Additional copies are available from the Metropolitan State College Office of Admissions and Records 303/556-3058 2 Complete the Appli c ation for Re-admission and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records To insure processing the application should be received at least twelve weeks prior to the first day of c l asses of t h e semester for which admission i s sought. 3 Are not required to subm i t an application fee 4 Who have artended other collegiate institutions s i nce last attending MSC must follow the admissions requirements for all transfer students and must have an offic ial transcrip t sent dire c tly to the College from the issuing institution St u dents will not be permirted to register beyond their initial enrollment unless these credentials are received (a) An app li cant who was p r eviously admitted as non-degree seeking and wishes to maintain thi s status but i n the i nterim has attended other colleges or univers i ties i s required to have an off i c i a l transcript s ent directly to the College from the issuing i nst i tutio n (b) An applicant who was previously admitted as a non degree student but now wishes to seek a degree at MSC i s required to have one official transcr i pt from all previously attended colleges or univers i ties sen t dire c tly to the College from the issuing i nst i tution 5 Appl i cants who are readm it1ing after nin e years of absence from the college are requ i red to r esubmit all credentials Only non degree seeking MSC graduates do not have to resubmit credentials Admission of Special Students Thi s special student category will permit students to register for classes witho u t hav i ng to submit any official transcripts SPECIAL STUDENTS MUST MEET THE NORMAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS OF ALL STUDENTS and may earn not more than 18 semester hours of credit In order to register for classes subsequent to earni n g 18 semester hours of credit a student is requ ired to have all required transcripts sent directly to the College from the i ssuing i nstitutions Admission of International Students All students who declare a country of citizensh i p other than the Uni ted States on the i r appli c ations for admission must contact the Off ice of Admissions and Records. a 1 Admiss i on of res i dent ali ens (or refugees parolees asylum cases etc ) : (a) Those i ndiv i duals hold ing a res i dent alien c ard or 1 -94 form should bring these forms to the Office of Admi ss i ons and Records to be copied pr i or to being accepted to the institution (b) Official transcripts including secondary level education should be submitted four weeks prior to the beginning of the first day of classes of the semester for which admission is sought. ( c ) Applicants may be required to pass an English proficiency examinat ion. (d) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during the i r first two semesters 2 Adm ission of applicants on student v isas (F1 ) : (a) International students will be admitted to Metropolitan State College for the autumn semester only Exceptions must be approved by the Office of Adm issio ns and Records (b) Applica t ion for Admission and all necessary supporting credentials mus t be received four weeks prior to the first day of walk-in registration for the autumn semes ter (c) Applicants are required to s ub mit the following documents as pa rt of the ir applicatio n to the College : application form, application fee official transcripts from all secondary and pos t-secondary schools attended evidence of English proficiency and financ ial support documents (d) Official academic credentials should be submitted in the original language as well as in officia l English translation Transcripts from American institutions should be sent directly to the College from the issuing ins titution (e) English proficiency may be demonstrated by attain ing a score of at least 500 on the Test of Englis h as a Foreig n Language (TOEFL). Only scores from the Internati ona l o r Special Testing pro grams or from the institu tiona l TOEFL offered t hr ough the Auraria Student Assistance Center will be considered (f) An a dvance deposit of one semester s tuit i on and fees will be required of international students. Scholarship recipients are excluded. (g) Students a r e required to complete a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours with a minimum 2 .00 (C) grade point average each autumn and spring semester (h) Applicants may be required to register for and complete certain courses during their first two semesters. If students are academically admissible and have met the minimum requiremen ts on the English proficiency examination they will be issued the U.S. Immigration Form 20 (1-20). Questions regarding the admission of students from abroad or permanent immigrants should be forwarded to the Off1ce of Adm1ss1ons and Records Admission and Retention of Minority Students Metropolitan State College, through its office of Admissions and Records, strives to enhance the educational opportunities for Denver area minority residents A recruitment netw ork of com mun ity-based agencies and organizations assists the College in meeting this objective In addition, Admissions Officers are available to provide individual counseling regarding general admissions procedures for both new and transfer students Specific counseling and referral services are also provided in the areas of financial aid career planning and academic support Minority residents interested i n attending the College are encouraged to co ntact the Office of Admissions and Records at the earliest possible date Phone 556-3058 for information. Tuition Classification A student is classified as an instate or out-of-state student for tuition purposes at the time of admission. This classification is based upon infor mation supp l ied by the student on the application for admission and is mad e in accordance with ihe Co l orado Tuition Classification Law CRS S23-7-101 et seq. (1973), as amended. Once determined, a student s tuition classification status remains unchanged unless satisfactory evidence that a change should be made is presented. A Petit ion for In-State Tuition Classification and the evidence requested in i t should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records if a student believes she or he is entitled to in-state status

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The tuition classification statute requires that in order to quality tor in-state status a student (or the parents or legal guardian of the student in the case of students under 22 years of age who are not emancipated) must have been domiciled in Colorado tor one year or more immediately preceding the first day of the semester tor which such classification is sought. Domicile for tuition purposes r equires two inseparable elements : (1) a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no i ntent to be domiciled elsewhere Some examples of connections with the state which provide objective evidence of intent are : (1) payment of Colorado state income tax (2) permanent employment in Colorado (3) ownership of residential real property in Colorado (4) compliance with laws imposing a mandatory duty on any domiciliary of the state such as the drivers license law and the vehicle registration law and (5) register ing to vote Other factors peculiar to the individual can also be used to demonstrate the requisite intent. Any quest ions regarding the tuition classif i cation law should be directed to an admissions officer at the College In order to qualify for i n -state status for a particular semester, the student must prove that domicile began not later than one year prior to the first day of classes tor that semester. Pet i tions and all supporting documen tation must be submitted by the last working day prior to the f i rst day of the semester for wh i ch the change in classif ication is sought. The dates tor qualifying and for submitting petitions are published in the class schedule each semest er Education Policy for Persons Over 62 Older area citize ns are encouraged to participate i n Metropolitan State College s programs and activ i ties 1 Persons 62 years or older wishing to enroll for credit should subm it required adm issions and registration materials to the Off ice of Admissio ns and Records Central Classroom Build ing Room 103 1006 11th Street. Every attempt will be made to make financial assistance availa ble. A college record of participation will be maintained 2 P ersons 62 years or older, who do not wish to earn credit, are invite d to attend class on a space-available basis in classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College or at Extended Campus locations There is no cost for these classes. These persons may attend classes beginning the sixth day of each semes ter Interested older persons should obtain a registration form from the Metro-Meritus Program i n the Student Academic Developm ent and Assessment Center. This form must be signed by the instructor granting approval and returned to the Metro-Meritus Office Partici pation on the no-cost no-credit basis should not contr i bute to an increased faculty workload and will not involve required homew ork or examinations No college records of participat ion will be mai ntained Financial Aid Procedure Philosophy The Metropolitan State College f ina nc ial aid program prov i des assist ance and advice to students who would be unable to pursue their education at the college without such help. Scholarships grants l oans and part-t ime employment are available singly or in variou s combinations to meet the d i fference between what the student and the student s family could reason ably be expected to prov ide and the expected cost of attending Metropolitan State College Estimated Expenses For the 1986-1987 academic year pro jecte d expenses are estimated as follows : Tuition and Fees Room and Board Books and Suppl ies Transpo r tation M i scellaneous The College Resident $1110 3690 370 670 760 $6600 Nonresident $3930 3690 370 670 760 $9420 Tui t io n and fees are set by the T rustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado and are subject to change without notice Addit ional allowances are made for students with dependents and day care costs Eligibility and Need To qual if y for financial aid a student must demonstrate financia l need, be a U S citizen or have an immigrant visa and be enrolled as a full-time student. Exceptions exist for part-time st udents who qual ify for the Pell (Basic) Grant the Colorado Scholarship program P resi dentia l Scholarships and Guaran teed Student Loan MSC uses the American College Testing (ACT) Ser v ic e a nat ional nonprofit need analysis orga nizat ion to determine financial need. Application Procedures Returning MSC students may request application forms from the Financial Aid Off ice. Transfer students can obtain application forms from the ir current college or university. Entering c ollege freshmen should obtain application forms from their high schools and/or from the MSC Financial Aid Office ; students should obtain forms as early as possible. All applicants must complete the MSC institutional applicat ion form and submit a Family Financial Statement. Transferring appl icants must supply the MSC F i nancial A i d Office with financial aid transcripts from all schools previously attended Detailed information concerning application procedures is available in the MSC F i nancial Aid Office Financial Aid Resources The aid programs introduced below are available to undergraduates only Students who hold baccalaureate degrees are not eligible for the federal Pell and Supplemental Educational Opportunity grants The amount of funds m ade available depends upon the max imum award allowed by regul at ion of each program the s tudent s established financial need duration of the student's enrollment and funds allocated to the college by the state and federal governme nts. Grants Pell (Basic) Grant : Eligibility is restricted to undergraduates enrolled at least h alf t ime (6 credit hours a term) The maximum award for Colo rado residents is $1770 non residents enrolled full -ti m e may receive up to $21 00. Suppleme ntal Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) : Eligiblity for the SEOG is restricte d to undergraduates enrolled full time in a degree program who demonstrate a high need for financial ass i stan ce The amount of the award var ies year to year accord ing to the availability of funds Colorado State Grant (CSG): Students enrolled full time who are permanent resi d ents of Colorado are eligible for this grant. Awards vary fro m $100 to $1500 per year Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG): Full-t ime students who are permanent residen ts of Colorado are elig ible for this grant. A max i mum award i s $2000 per year Scholarships Sch olarships admi n i stered by the Financia l Aid Office are based on scholast i c ability 9

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The College Presidential Scholarships: The scholarships include four year scholarships for entering high school students and two-year scholarships for transfer students. Scholars receive $450 per semester to pay mandatory tuition and fees. Colorado Scholarships: Grants not exceeding the cost of resident tu i tion and mandatory fees per academic year are available through the academic departments Recipients must be Colorado residents Interested students should contact their departments for applications Athletic Scholarships: MSC has a limited number of athletic scholarships Applications and additional information are available from the MSC Athletic Department. Private Scholarships: The MSC Financial Aid Office does not administer private scholarships Students should contact academic departments for assistance in locating sources of such scholarships. Loans Each of the following is a loan which must be repaid by the student: National Direct Student Loan (NDSL): Undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students enrolled full time in a degree program are eligible for this loan During the freshman and sophomore years a student may borrow up to $3000 ; through the junior and senior years and postbaccalaureate study a student may borrow a total of $6000 The Financial Aid Office provides additional information concerning NDSL loans upon request. Guaranteed Student Loan: This loan is available to undergraduates and postbaccalaureate students officially admitted to MSC Applications are available from the student's home bank or from any college financial aid office Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS Loan): This loan is available to i ndependent undergraduate students officially admitted and enrolled at MSC and to parents of dependent undergraduate students Applications are available from MSC or the few banks which participate in this program. Applications must first be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for preliminary processing Terms of the PLUS loan are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office Additional Loan Programs Raymond R. Uhl Loan: Established in memory of Raymond R. Uhl former MSC student killed in Vietnam this fund is to assist students who need financial help but are not eligible for other types of aid. Maximum loan is $2000 and terms of repayment are arranged according to the individual student's circumstances Student Support Loans : Student support emergency loans are available through the MSC Student Government Loan Fund. Details of these limited emergency loans are available from the MSC Student Affairs Office Emergency Loans: Should there be a delay in the disbursement of funds the Financial Aid Office is able to advance limited funds to students provided that financial aid has been awarded previously College Work-Study : The State of Colorado and federal work-study programs provide part time employment during the summer and academic year Undergraduates and postbaccalaur eate students enrolled full time in a degree-granting program are eligible Students awarded work-study funds must provide the Financial Aid Office with proof of job placement to be eligible to rece ive any other a i d awarded Employment : Many students who do not qualify for wo rk -study find part-time employment to cover a portion of their educational expenses The Aur aria Placement Off ice assists students in finding part-time jobs 10 Other Forms of Assistance Colorado No-Need Work-Study: Students enrolled at least half-time who are permanent residents of Colorado and are not eligible for other forms of financial aid (except scholarships and Guaranteed Student Loans) are eligible for Colorado No-Need Work-Study funds. Applications and information are available in the Financial Aid Office Financial Aid as a Form of Payment: Students who have been awarded financial aid have the option of using that aid as their own form of tuition payment during mail-in registration each semester Once the award has been verified by the Business Office the student will not be required to pay the tuition and fee charges until the aid is disbursed Students receiving any type of financial aid are eligible for this service each semester for which aid has been awarded Related information is provided in mail -in and phone-in registration materials and in class schedules Resource Expectations : Students attending MSC must assume responsibility for the cost of their education Tax-supported aid programs exist to supplement student financial resources, not to replace them Prospective financial aid applicants should refer to the Financial Aid Office for details concerning students resource expectations The Aid Package Once student need is determined an aid package is developed which depends upon the availability of funds and the need of the applicant in relation to that of other students Although it is not always possible to do so, the Financial Aid Office attempts to meet student needs fully To facilitate the work of the Financial Aid Office applicants must obtain all information and forms from designated sources and submit the required mater i als to the appropriate office according to established schedules Receiving a scholarship has no effect on a student's aid if he or she is not receiving funds from NDSL SEOG, CSG, CSIG, or College Work-Study Students receiving aid from any of these programs are limited to a maximum amount of aid A student whose full need has been met prior to receipt of a scholarship will have his or her aid reduced by an amount equal to the scholarship The reduct i on will usually be made from the loan or from work-study. If the student's full need has not been met the scholarship can be allowed to satisfy the unmet need. Each student's situation is treated individually Award Notification When the F i nancial Aid Office has determined the kind and amount of aid for which a student qualifies the student is notif ied of the award by letter The letter also stipulates the conditions of the award Disbursement Procedures: Beginning on the first day of classes each semester students receiving financial aid must come to the Financial Aid Office for their financial aid check release form Students must present proof of appropriate enrollment to obtain a check release. All students receiving aid must sign a Registrat ion Compl i ance form and a Statement of Educational Purpose Repayment Policy Students who withdraw from MSC prior to completion of a term must repay a portion of financ ial aid received th r ough Pell CSG, CSIG, SEOG, NDSL and GSL programs. All required financial aid repayments must be made to MSC before the end of the current academic yea r or before additional Title IV funds may be d i sbursed to the student whichever occurs first. Repayment is made to the MSC Business Office and students must provide the Financial A i d Office with evidence of repayment.

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Student Rights and Responsibilities Academic Progress Requirements Financial Aid recipients are required to maintain satisfactory progress towards their educational objectives in order to continue to receive aid Detailed information outlining the requirements is available in the Financial Aid Office Failure to maintain satisfactory progress may result in cancellation of aid for subsequent terms of school years. Change in Status Students must not i fy the Financial Aid Office of any changes of status of enrollment, family situation, or student resources. The financial aid award may be adjusted to reflect the change in the student s resources and awards may be adjusted during the year by the Financial Aid Office as the result of changes in institutional state, or federal funding. Renewal of Financial Aid Students must apply each year for continued aid. Renewal of financ ial assistance depends on the student's academic performance financial need and the availability of student financial aid funds. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning Metropolitan State College Financial Aid policies and procedures Costs The Board of Trustees of the Consortium of State Colleges in Colorado the governing board of the College, reserves the right to alter any or all tuit ion and fees for any semester without notice Tuition and College Service Fees Tuition and College Service fees are determined by the Legislature and Trustees shortly before the beginning of each academic year and, therefore are not available for inclu sion in this Bullet i n These costs may be found either in an addendum to this Bulletin or in the current semester s Class Schedule. However the cost of tuition and fees for students taking 10 or more hours per semester is projected to be approx i mately $550 per semester for in-state students and $196 0 for out-of-state students The cost of students taking 9 or fewer hours will be approximately $52 per semester hour for in-state stu dents and $190 per semester hour for out-of-state studen ts There is also an additional tuition charge for hours taken in excess of 18 credits per semester For in-state students this charge w ill be approximately $25 per credit hour ; for out-of-state students $100 per credit hour. TUITION AND FEES ARE PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION Standard Fees A n Application Fee is required of all applicants for admission to the College This fee is nonrefundable and will not be applied to tuit ion ............ ............ .... ...................... ... ... ...... ............... $10 .00 Transcript Fee, per transcript ... .... ........... ... ............. ........ ... 1 .00 Special Fees Ret urned Check Penalty .... ........ ....................................... $1 0 .00 Health Insurance : Single coverage is included in the College Serv ice Fee for students taking ten or more semester hours These students may apply for a waiver if they have other The College coverage Optio nal coverage i s available for dependents of students who are enrolled for ten or more semester ho urs Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the first three weeks of each semester Other Cost Information The cost of books and supplies averages from $250 to $300 per academic year with the highest cost during the first semeste r of attendance Othe r costs such as room, board clothing, transportation and other expenses will vary according to ind ividual need. Tuition Adjustments Please see the insertion to this Bulletin or the Class Schedule for the current semester Student Personnel Services The Vice Pres i dent for Student Affairs coordinates a wide range of student assistance programs such as adm issions, record s registration educational and vocational testing, vocational and spec ial counseling financ ial aid, student health services, and student activities Special hel p is provided for students who are hav ing difficulties with their studies or problems of a personal nature Conduct of Students Metropolitan State College policy provides students the largest degree of freedom consistent w ith good work and orderly conduct. The College publishes standards of conduct however, to which students are expected to adhere The Students Rights and Responsib ili ties Handbook including the Student Due Process Pro cedure (the procedural rights prov i ded to students at MSC before disciplinary action is imposed) is available in CN 316 Counseling Center The Center exists for the purpose of providing compet ent professional assistance in three related areas to all students presently enrolled at MSC or MSC alumni. These areas are : (1) Academic Support Programs ; (2) Career Development and Career Decis i on-Making ; and (3) Counseling for Personal Growth and Change These services are provided in a variety of forms and settings that include formal classes workshops semin ars counseling and educational groups as well as the traditio nal one-to-one setting Most group programs begin at the start of each semester and interested students should reg i ster prior to or during the first week of classes Students desiring assistance are encouraged to contact the Center personally to arrange an appointment or to register for one of the programs listed below The Counseling Center is an accredited member of the International Associat ion of Counseling Services Inc Academic Support Programs: College Level Examinat ion Program (CLEP): A program by which students may receive up to 60 hours of college credit by examination There are varied requirements and limitations, and those interested in this program should contact the Center regarding their specific situation Test Anxiety Reduction : Workshop for students whose anxiety about taking tests interferes with studying and test performance Participants will learn skills to change the thinking that leads to anxiety, learn to relax and learn to study and take tests more effectively 11

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The College Career Development and Career Decision-Making: Self-Assessment/Life Planning Workshops: These three session workshops are held at various times throughout the semester and partic i pants will complete exercises and inventories to indicate interests values achievements and personality characteristics. Workshops are free for MSC students and a fee is charged for non -st udents Career Assessment Screening: Students who are initiating the career decision-mak ing process will meet for initial screening Career testing will be carried out and an overview of the process and the services available will be presented Participants will then be referred to an appropriate program. Personal Growth and Change: Emphasis is placed on helping students with any problems that interfere with ach ieving success at the College. The student must ini tiate contact or be referred by a member of the professional staff of the College in order to receive assistance Information disclosed i n counsel ing is held in strictest confidence and is never released without the written consent of the student. Private one-to-one assistance in each of the areas described below is available for those students who do not choose to become a member of a workshop, seminar or group Personal Growth and Development Group: Participat ion in this low-structure group setting is designed to develop skills in communicating honestly directly and comfortabl y with other people and to promote personal growth and change through self-exploration in a supportive atmosphere The group deals with personal problems such as fears, doubts frustrations conflicts about school job family, sex loneliness, and dating Rational Living Workshop: The workshop prov ides an opportunity to become acquainted with the fundamentals of Rational Emotive Training and to apply these principles to problem areas specific to each individual's life The process involves developing an awareness of self and of the emotional self-defeating thought patterns that have been learned This opportunity to learn effective emotional management and positive behavior skills i s provided through d i scuss i ons, lecture role playing and group inter action Anxiety Reduction Workshops: Anxiety is a learned emotional reaction that can be reduced or eliminated entirely by relearning The Counseling Center utilizes the desensitization technique (i.e., relaxation and counter-conditioning) to help eliminate inappropriate anxiety reactions Four two-hour workshops are required to complete the program Compulsive Eating "The Slender Balance": This seven-week educational seminar jointly sponsored by the MSC Counseling Center and the MSC Student Health Clinic provides a descr ipti on and understand ing of compulsive eating. Both campus and outs ide professionals provide relevant information on the psychological and health implications of this pattern. Introduction to Biofeedback Training : This two-session group designed for those people who want more information abo ut b iofeedback training D emonstrates instrumentation and treatment. Participants who desire treatment will be scheduled for continuation in the lab Decision Making/Goal-Setting: Participants complete an assessment inventory that provides information about the man ner of gathering and processing information and making decisions The results are d iscu ssed during the second session and provide a framework for learning additional decision-making and goal-setting techn iques Assertiveness Training: Partic i pants learn techniques to help eliminate difficulties i n asserting themselves. They learn : (1) how to recognize assert ion problems ; (2) simple ways to rid themselves of anxiety ; (3) ways to bu ild assertive skills to deal effect i vely with a wide variety of common problems 12 Stress Reduction/Relaxation Techniques: Students learn and practice a progressive relaxation technique. A theoretical understanding of the benef its and the practica l application of relaxation are emphasized Stress Management Workshop: A variety of techniques for managing fears anxiety and general ized stress are taught. Veterans Upward Bound Veterans Upwa r d Bound at Metropol ita n State College is a federally funded program designed to identify recruit, and motivate Vietnam era Veterans to use their VA benef it s in pursuit of personal career goals through higher education Veterans Upward Bound provides remedial and tutor ial help so that survival in academic or vocational/technical progra ms is maximized This is done during a 12-week trimester Ancillary services such as career counsel ing, financial aid advisement psychological counseling, and job placement are also provided for the participant. High School Upward Bound The program i s designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary to succeed in educat ion beyond high sc hool for youth from low-income families who have academic potential but who have inadequate secondary school preparation The program provides intensive instruct ion in basic academic skills such as reading, writing and mathematics A comprehensive counseling and enrichment program for the purpose of developing creative thinking, effective expression and positive attitudes toward learning, is also part of the support p rogram. The students are recru ited at the beginning of their sophomore year in high school from five target area high schools located in Denver County Special Services Program The purpose of Special Services at Metropolitan State College is to provide educational assistance for selected students who because of financial and/or other circumstances, may otherwise be denied a chance for participat i on in higher education programs Academic assistance is provided for students on the basis of ind ivi dual need Interpersonal communication skills courses for college credit and basic skills courses in English and Reading are offered coupled with tutorial assistance These courses are designed to strengthen and supplement a student's basic educat io nal skills so that she or he may better address the requirements of a college course load Other supportive services available are counseling testing, assistance with financial aid forms, and when possible assistance i n attending social and cultural events to enhance the student's experience at Metropolitan Sta te College Servicemen's Opportunity College Metropolitan State College has received recognition as a Servicemen s Opportun i ty College Further informat io n can be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records Veterans' Services The Office of Veterans Services is designed to prov i de student veterans, and veterans in the community with a variety of outreach, recruitment and retention services These include assistance with problems involving checks, tutor ial and counseling assistance, and many referrals to both on-campus offices and community serv ices. The Office also certifies student veterans and dependents fo r their VA educational benef its Veterans Services coordinates the Colorado Veterans Tuition Assistance program which is a state benef i t offering tuit i on credit for many student veterans who entered the military from

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Colorado Individuals should contact the Office for further information and assistance Student Health Clinic The Student Health Clinic is an accessible outpatient, direc t health care clinic located on the Auraria campus in suite 140 of the Student Center Its primary purpose is to provide patients with quality, economical health care services The Student Health Clinic stresses the concepts of well ness and preventive medicine Health education and counseling sessions are available as well as treatment for medical problems Any MSC student faculty or staff person is entitled to services The staff will provide medical service for departments such as physical exams and injections and are available to speak to classes or groups on health-related topics Many professional services are provided by a highly qualif ied professional staff consisting of physicians nurse practitioners and allied health professionals Evaluation and treatment of illness birth control inf ormat ion and supplies screening for and treatment of venereal diseases pap smears weight counseling health care for illness, blood pressure checks pregnancy testing minor surgery such as wart removals hernia and prostate checks and student health insu rance information are just a few of the available services Evening clinics are available Student Health Insurance The Student Health Insurance i s a group mandatory with waiver policy which is automatic for all full-time MSC students The insurance premium for students taking 10 or more semester hours is included in the student fee assessment each semester The premiums are paid to Southland Life Insurance Company The Student Health Clinic coordinates all insurance claims and forwards them to the insurance company for payment of benef its Optional coverage is available for dependents of ins ured students who are enrolled for ten or more semester hours. Premiums for optional coverage must be paid at the Business Office during the f irst three weeks of each semester The policy is in effect 24 hours a day and covers the period of time from the first day of classes of the semester to the first day of classes of the following semester Insurance brochures list ing other bene fits as well as insurance claim forms and information, are available at the Student Health Clinic Room 140 Student Center The group policy number is G 3392 Student Activities Metropolitan State College s Office of Student Activities offers movies dances leadership development programs, lectures series, art shows and a myriad of other co curricular activities for the students of Metropolitan State College In addition to providing social, cultural and recreational activities the Office of Student Act ivities encourages and supports the development of a wide range of professional, social, academic honorary and special interest student organizations The Office of Student Activ i ties is on the first floor of the three-story Student Activ i ties Center wing of the Auraria Student Center The act i vities wing houses the clubs and organizations the student newspapers and the administrative offices of the Student Activ ities staffs of the three colleges on the Auraria campus Auraria Student Assistance Center Established to provide comprehensive services to students at CCD, MSC and UCD, the Auraria Student Ass istance Cente r functions through off i ces listed below The Center also offers formal internship and practicum opportunities for students Contact the Division D irector of the Center regarding these The College opportu nit i es The Center is located i n Suite 1 08, Central Classroom Building For more information call (303) 556-3474 Career Services The Office of Career Serv i ces offers assistance to students and alumni at CCD, MSC and UCD in planning the i r careers f inding part time jobs while enrolled and seek ing employment upon graduat ion Services offered included workshops career counseling and assessment a Career Resource Center DISCOVER a computer i zed career guidance system on campus interviews with employers job vacancy listings and campus wide career fairs Disabled Student Services The Off ice of Disab led Student Services provides academic support services to disab led students at MSC and UCD. Services i nclude notetaking, interpreting counseling admissions and registration assistance and handicapped parking permits and inf ormat ion The Office also assists in the coordination of the Resource Center for Disabled Per sons located in the Auraria Library Information and Referral Services This Off ice i s a central i nformati on source which provides assistance to prospective students seeking enrollment at CCD, MSC and UCD. Tri-institutional tours of the Auraria Campus are provided to prospective students on a pre -arranged basis. International Student Services The Office of International Student Services assisting students from some 80 countries who attend CCD, MSC, and UCD, provides counseling on immi gration i ssues host family accommodations, support for personal adjustment liaison with consulates missions, embassies and foreign organizations and other pertinent information for foreign students. The Office also provides information on study abroad programs to U S and foreign students Off-Campus Housing Services The Off ice of Off-Campus Housing Services assists Auraria students seekin g information on rental and res i dence hall living opportunities The Office provides listing of rental properties and roommate -wanted situations and refers students to residence halls at local college campuses Vocational Rehabilitation Services The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is a campus branch of the State Department of Social Services Services offered to help disabled students become employable include job seeking skills training vocational testing counseling, tuition assistance prosthetic devices and referral to additional sources of financial aid The Auraria Library The Auraria Library prov ides a wide variety of learning resources for the students and faculty of Metropolitan State College and the other Aurar i a ins titut i ons The library has almost 600 000 volumes of books microforms, and bound periodicals in addition to over 1 900 current period i cal and newspaper subscriptions Collection developmen t efforts are focused on providing a strong base for learning/teaching efforts on campus and on developing in-depth collections in the fields of public administration design and planni ng, urban studies and criminal justice The mai n collection is supplemented by the Design and Planning Branch Library which is located in Brom ley Building Suite 200 and open to all campus personnel. In addition as a member of the Colorado Alli ance of Research Libraries the Auraria Library has access to an additional 6 000 000 volumes through i nter library loan as well as being able to access materials across the country 13

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The College All students are encouraged to take the self-guided audiotape tour of the library which takes about 50 minutes in order to familiarize themselves with the resources and services available to support their academic pursuits Spec ial services offered by the library include an online Public Access Catalog computerized bib lio graphic searches, library orientation and instruc tion for groups and individ uals a depository of U S and Colorado governme nt publ icat ions and media listening and viewing facilities Library rooms are also available for individual study, group conferences and typing The Med ia and Telecommunications Division of the library also has an internship program and a self-service graphics lab which might be of particular interest to students Student Center The Aura ria Student Center serves as the location for out-of class activities and services for all Auraria Campus students and staff. It is the foca l point for many cultural social and recreational a ctivities of the college community The Center contains a bookstore gameroom, cafeteria Mission (3.2% bar) meeting and conference facilities student activities offices Health Center student o rganizations, and a variety of lounges for study and relaxation. The Center's lower corridor contains a housing board ride board and other public transportation information The Student Center is located at 9th and Lawrence Streets Auraria Child Care Center The Aurar ia Child Care Center i s a nonprofit organization which provides a h igh quality child care and preschoo l program for the children of students, faculty and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center Non -Auraria children may attend on a space available basis only The Center operates from 7 a m to 6 p.m and i s fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time It is divided into two toddler three preschool and one kindergartenfaftersc ho ol classroom Children must be 18 months to eight years of age to attend The philosophy of the Cente r is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide a safe nurturing environment. The children s program involves the assessment of indi vidua l needs and establishing goals and appropriate for development. Close parent teacher communication is a key to the responsive individually oriented program provided at the Center Parents may register the ir children on a full-time, part time or hourly basis to accommodate student s varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188 A drop-in center is available for the spec ial child care needs of students faculty and staff during pre finals and finals week of spring and fall semesters. The Center is housed in the Student Center and is fully licensed by State Social Services Parents are encou rage d to make reservations i n advance at the number listed above Auraria Department of Public Safety The Depart ment of Public Safety provides professional law enforcement services for the Auraria H i gher Education Center Sworn peace officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day ; each day of the week trained dispatchers are on duty at all time s to rece ive calls Calls warranting police or emergency services should be directed through the emergency number at 556-3271 The types of services pr ov i ded by Public Safety i nclude : the prevention of crime ; invest igation of offenses and taking crime reports ; responding to first aid and emergency calls for assistance ; monitoring of alarm systems throughout the campus ; monitoring facilities for suspicious activity and unauthor i zed use ; 14 and enforcement of parking and traffic regulations, including accident r eporting The members of the Department of Public Safety are dedicated to the service of th e collegiate community at Auraria and the safety of its users

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Academic Information Academic Information The College operates on the semester system with each semester dur ing the academ i c year consisting of fifteen weeks of instruction followed by a week of examinations Runn ing concurrently w ith the sixteenweek courses are modules. scheduled to begin on the first. sixth and eleventh week of the sixteen -week semester During any sixteenweek semester student s may enroll in sixteen-week courses, five-week courses. or comb i nat i ons of both as long as the limitations outlined under Course Load are not exceeded The College also offers a ten-week summer term during which students may enroll for either ten-week courses, five-week courses. or combinations of both. The course load restrictions are adjusted to be equivalent to those of the regular academic year Classes are scheduled during the day and in the evening in order to accommodate people who are employed Students who are planning to take the majority of the ir classes in the evenings should check with appropr iate department chairpersons about the availability of courses in their major during evening hours Enrollment can be on a full -tim e or part-time basis and can be for the purpose of pursuing a baccalaureate degree, improving vocat i onal or profess ional competence, or learning about particular areas of interest for cultural or intellectual reasons Admission and Registration Students who have not previously attended Metropolitan State College should review the College s admission requirements Students must be accepted for admission in order to be eligible for degree programs All continuing students in good standing at Metropolitan State College are eligible to register each semester Students may maintain the status of continuing student while absent from the College ; however following two full semesters of absence students should review their status with the Office of Admiss ions and Records to determine whether an updated application for re-admission will be required A student may register for classes in one of two ways : (1) by mail approximately eight to ten weeks prior to the beginning of the semester ; or (2) by direct computer registration just prior to the beginning of classes Information on the registration procedure and registration dates are published in the Class Schedule which is mailed to all continuing students Students are responsible for insuring that there is a correct and up-to-date address on file with the College Address changes may be made with the Office of Admissions and Records Registration procedures and dates for five-week modules are described in the Class Schedule For further information regarding regis trat ion please call 556-2987 Academic Standards The Board on Academic Standards Exceptions is composed of three faculty two students and two administrators An Assoc iate Vice President for Student Affairs serves as chair This Board provides a final appeal for students wishing to petition for exceptions to existing academic polic ies Students wishing to appeal should contact the Office of Admiss io ns and Records Academic Advising Academic advising and tutoring programs are available in the schools of Busmess; Letters Arts and Sciences; and Professional Studies Continuing and prospective stu dent s seeking these services should communicate with the coordinator of advising o f the preferred school. Student Academic Development and Assessment Center (SADAC) SADAC s goal is to develop and implement programs responsive to the educational needs of MSC s diverse population The responsibilities of the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center inclu de the following programs : Adult Learning and Assessment Adults entering or returning to college often have questions and problems that are different from those of younger students Adults who would like assistance in planning the i r educational goals or in applying for credit for college-level learning gained through work/life experience may contact the Center Credit for Prior Learning In many academic departments at MSC students may apply for credit for college-level learning gained through experience Such documenting of prior learning is initiated through the Student Aca demic Development and Asse ssment Center Contract Major { Minor Degree Program Students may design an individualized inter d isciplinary maj or or minor program when their educational goals are not met by majors andfor minors listed in the MSC Bulletin. Each con tract major or minor is supervised by a faculty committee chosen by the student. Career Support in Science and Technology This program is designed to help those women and ethnic groups who have been traditionally excluded from careers in science and technology Students are provided w i th support and tutoring, as needed, in order to ensure successful expe rien ces in the scie nces and technology subject areas Metro Meritus Persons 62 or older who do not wish to earn credit are i nvited to attend classes of their choice at either Metropolitan State College or at an Extended Campus location on a space available basis Metro-Meritus i s designed to give special encouragement and assistance to retired citizens to continue their personal educational growth in a stimulating and friendly campus setting. Metro on the Mall Beginning in January of 1986, MSC will open an office on the 16th Street Mall at 16th and Californ i a This office will provide a number of educational services to the urban c i t i zens who work within a short distance of this location Activit ies will include admissions information, i nformation on academic programs academic advising with a particular emphasis on adults financial aid informatio n and short workshops and semi nar s 15

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Academic Information Orientation All new students to Metropolitan State College will be provided with information on college requirements and programs class scheduling registration college services and resources and academic advis ing. Orientation is mandatory for all students new to MSC Freshmen Assessment Testing The College has instituted a plan to help first year college students who have not previously attended a college to be more success ful. All first semester freshmen are required to take a series of short tests These tests measure skills in the basic areas of reading, English and math Test scores will be used to assist i n the advisement of students in selecting college leve l courses. The tests are mandatory and take approximately one and one half hours to complete International Student Advising Special academ ic advising is available for foreign born students; the major emphasis of this advising is on the unique aspects of the foreig n students academic study Assistance is available to assess and place students in English as a Second Language (ESL) classes wh ich are appropriate for their individual needs and which will enhance academic success Probation Re-admit Students who have been away from MSC for more than one year and have had below a 2.00 grade point average when they left are required to re-enter the College on a Probation or Warning Contract. They will be required to have a re-admit interview with a member of the Probation Review Committee and submit a mid-term progress report their first semester after returning to school. Probation Review and Suspension The Probation Suspension Policy at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide each student with the opportunity to maintain high standards and achieve academic success. The Suspension Policy states that students are required to maintain a grade point average of 2.00 (C) in order to qualify for graduation. When a student's grade point average for a semester falls below 2.00, the student will be placed on a warning status. If a student has failed to show satisfactory progress at the end of the warning semester the student will be placed on probation subject to suspension at the end of the probation semester if satisfactory progress is not achieved A probation student may be advised to repeat cou rses enroll in specific courses, or limit the number of hours attempted during this probationary semester A student who is dismissed may petition for re-admission after one year A student's warning or probation status is subject to the student s decreasing a deficiency each semester until a cumulative grade point average of 2 .00 is achieved The College adv ises every student placed on warning or probation status to meet with a member of the Probation Review Committee and the student's major advisor A mid-term progress report may be required before a student is allowed to register for the following semester Students who have been readmitted to the College on probation or warning will have their status changed when they have attempted a minimum of twelve semester hours and maintained a C average or the GPA stipulated at the time of admission for all course work atte mpted at Metropolitan State College. Students re-admitted on probation or warning will be reviewed for possible suspension when failing to show satisfactory progress regardless of the number of hours attempted After removal from probation or warning, the student will be subject to the standard policy outlined above 16 Upon completion of the stipulated suspension period a student may apply for reinstatement through the Probation Revi ew Committee. No student may re-enter after academ ic suspension without the written approval of the Probation Rev iew Committee Women's Services Women s Services housed i n the Institute for Women s Stud i es and Services provides a place and a system of support for women in need of assistance Women s Services dissem inates information regarding on and off -ca mpus educational services entit l e m ents through financial aid and admissions procedures Women s Services houses a resource l ibrary a resource file of news c l i ppings information from public agencies and research papers. Women s Services provides peer counseling and assistance i n planning for new career directions in the student's life Women s Services is considered an extended family whose objec tiv e is to give the individual personalized co unseling referrals and supportive networks. Division of Off Campus Programs The changing nature of society has always created new respo nsibil ities and challenges for educators During the past decade, those changes have come more rapidly and have been more comprehensive. Preparing people for successful and contribut ing roles in the society requires careful coordination with many areas of the community as well as a keen awareness of the educational needs of the nation In order to fulfill its educational responsibility the Division of Off Campus Programs has been designed by Metropolitan State College to meet the diverse higher ed ucation needs of the four-county area The Departments of Spec ial Academic Programs Cooperative Education Extended Campus Programs and Intercultural Services are the core of Off Campus Programs Through these departments educational opportunities for students, faculty and the community have been developed Partnerships have been established between MSC, other institutions and businesses which are creating new models and standards for the development and delivery of innovative high quality education. Cooperative Education Cooperative Education is a program which places students in work experiences related to their academic major The purpose of the program is to integrate academic training with actual work experience This combination allows students to make realistic career decisions, gain valuable work experience, obtain recommendations for graduate school and earn money to help defray college expenses. Students work in large corporations small businesses government and nonprofit agencies throughout the metropolitan area Most co-op students are paid by their employers but in those professional fields where co-op salaries are not available volunteer internship placements are offered to help students gain essential work experience Co-op internship placements are available in most academic majors and minors The Co llege requires that a stude nt must complete 30 semester hours of college course work with a minimum 2 5 GPA and have a declared major to be eligible for reg i stration with co-op No fees are charged to the student or employer for participation in the and each student's interests and job requirements are discussed individually with a professional coordinator Students may choose from three different work schedules based on the academic calendar The alternat ing plan provides full-time periods of work every other semester with intervening semesters spent i n full-time study The parallel schedule places stude nts in

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a job while they simultaneously attend school. These pos i tions are usually part-time The short term/summer plan allows students to elect a work experience which lasts f o r no more than one semester The college awards academic credit for superv ised cooperative education placements Students must complete a credit application available from the Co-op office and this applica tion must be approved by a faculty member from the department i n which credit is to be granted. No more than 15 semester hours of cooperative education credit will be applied toward MSC degree requ i rements. Credit earned for the Co-op Education work exper i ences are not applicable toward general studies requirements Addit i onal departmental restrictio ns may apply to certain majors 298-1 3 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite : Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. An entry level work experience in a private company or an agency of the Federal or State government related to the student's major supervised by professionals on-the-job in conjunction with an MSC f aculty member 398-1-12 (Variable credit) Cooperative Education Prerequisite : Junior standing and permission o f instructor An advanced work experience in a private company or governmental agency rela ted to the student's major and supervised by professionals on-the-job in conjunction with an MSC faculty member For more information on the program and the placement oppo rtunities in your academic major, contact the Cooperative Education Office at 1045 9th Street Park Phone : (303) 556 3290 Special Academic Programs Spe cial Academic P rograms is another facet o f MSC s cont inuing e ffort to provide educational opportunities for the people of metropolitan Denver The office specializes in workshops seminars and confere n ces for professional groups and organi zations with specific educational needs. These programs often have a credit/non-credit option to allow partic i pants to earn academ i c credit from MSC if they desire In some cases Continuing Education Units are offered Each year the Department organizes and offers 30-40 professional development programs for specific groups who wish to update their skills in professi onal areas such as education journalism nurs i n g psychology sociology and holistic health Profess ional organizat i ons are encouraged to contact the office if they have educational needs that can be met through workshops and seminars. Extended Campus Credit Program The Extended Campus Credit Program provides fully accredited MSC courses at convenient locatio ns throughout the Denver metropol i tan area Courses are selected and scheduled to accommodate business professionals pursuing career advanc ement degree seeking students and those interested i n personal enrichment. A majority of these classes are offered at Metro South (West Middle School, 5151 S. Holly St.) and Metro North (Front Range Community College 3645 W 112th Ave.) Other classes are held i n businesses schools, and other community facilities Extended Campus classes are open to regular MSC students and other area residents Tuition rates vary f rom the regular tuition schedule. Students may apply and register on -site during the first week of classes or apply earli er through the Extended Campus off ice to assure seating International Studies Metropol i tan State College prov i des op portun i ties for academ ica lly qual i fied students to participate in study-abroad programs T h ese programs vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester For further i nformation contact the Off ice of Off Campus Prog rams Academic Information Interinstitutional Registration Denver Area Colleges Students enrolled at Metropolitan State College may reg i ster for courses at Arapahoe Community College Community College of Denver, Commun i ty College of Aurora Front Range Community College and Red Rocks Community College Courses taken at these i nstitutions in no way alter existing Metropolitan State College degree requirements, but may apply toward degree requ i rements at MSC subject to specific approval by MSC In the event a conflict exists between the po licies/ p r ocedures of MSC and one of the Colleges listed above the most restrict ive policy prevails Students are well advised to confer w i th department chairs and/or coord inat ors of academic advising before registering interinst i tut i onally Information concerning current procedures for enrolling for courses at these other inst it utions is ava ilable from the Off i ce of Adm i ssions and Records Concurrent Enrollment Concurrent enrollment differs from interinstitution a l enro llm ent in that the student is currently matriculated and enrolled at two different institutions. Students who find it necessary to be registered at Metropo litan State College and another college at the same time m u st obtain a letter of permission from the registering authority of each institution Students concurrently enrolled are affected by the academic policies of both insti tutions MSC students enroll in g concurrently at other inst it utions should check with MSC department chairs concerning the acceptance of credits Semester Hours Credit Course credit is based upon units designed as semester hours One semester hour or one Base Contact Hour equals a minimum of 750 minutes ; this translates to a minimum of fifteen 50-minute hours per semester and normally about tw o hours per week of preparation by the student outside of class Omnibus and laboratory courses give one semester hour of c r edit for each two three or four hours of scheduled work in the laboratory during a week. Internships require a minimum of 2250 minutes for each hour of credit. Course Load The average course load per sixteenweek semester i s fifteen or sixteen semester hours. Students who are academically strong may take up to eightee n semester hours during autumn and spring semesters and up to twelve semester hours during the summer semester Students with cumulative grade po i nt averages of 3 .25 or highe r may take nineteen or twenty semester hours during fall and spr ing semesters and those students with grade point averages of 3 .50 or higher may take twenty -one semester hours Authorization for overloads without these grade point average min imum s must be obtained from the student's major department cha i rperson and appropr i ate dean Author i zation for over lo ads in excess of 21 semester credits is given by the Board on Academic Standa rds Exceptions following a successful formal appeal prior to the beg innin g of the semester. The appeal should beg in by ob t aining a petition from an Academic Advising Coordinator in the appropriate dean s area. For informat i on on the charge per credit hour in excess of 18 refer to the Costs section of this Bullet in Course Numbers, Descriptions, and Offerings Before starting registration students should study Course Descriptio n s for information on the level of instruct ion, cre d it, course sequence content and prerequ i sites 17

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Academic Information The first digit i n a course number designates the l evel of inst ruction. Only courses numbered 100 or above will be i ncluded in cred its toward a degree Courses with numbers up to and inclu ding 199 are primarily for freshmen 200 through 299 primarily for sophomores 300 through 399 prima rily for juniors and 400 through 499 primarily for seniors. Although students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned) they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases students may be permitted to take courses m ore than one level above that designated for their c lass if in addition to meeting the requirements for prerequisites they obtain the permiss ion of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course After eac h course number is a figure spec ifying the semes ter hours of credit. As an example English 101-3 is a three-credit cours e Following the course t itle is a second set of numbers in parentheses i ndicat ing the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The second number in parentheses indicates the number of laboratory shop or field hours. For example i n a sci ence course followed by (3 + 4), the numbers indicate three hours of lecture and fou r hours of labora tory Such a co urse would earn five hours of credit three for lecture and two for laboratory work Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course I f there is a prerequisite that must be met before a student will be permitted to register for the co urse this information is listed above the co urse description. A list of all courses, instruc tors class meeting times, and locations is publ ishe d i n the Class Schedule which is p rinte d well in advance of the begin ning of each semester, and is available to all students. The schedule according to which the courses listed i n this Bulletin are taught during the year is based on predictions of student demand and the amount of funds ava ilabl e Changes in Registration Stud ent s enrolled may adjust schedules by dropping and{or adding classes during the first fif teen percent of each semester (not including weeken ds) See the current Semes ter Class Schedule for complete infor mat ion concerning the tuit ion and fee refund schedule. Students who reduce thei r course load after fifteen percent of the term through the end of the fourth week of classes will receive an NC notation for each course they have adjusted and a twenty-five percent refund if applicab l e An NC{Withdrawal Form must be submitted by the deadline to the Office of Admi ssions and Records Students reducing their course load after the fourth week of classes through the end of the fourteenth week of clas ses may receive an NC notation for each c ourse provided faculty approval is gran t ed. A n NC{Withdrawal Form m ust be submitted by the deadlline to the Office of Adm i ssions and Records See the sections on Grades Notations Course Load and Class Attenda nce in this Section Proportional time frames are applied for module courses and worksho ps Procedures for adding or dropping a five-week co urse after the course has begun are described in the curren t Class Schedu le. Class Attendance Students are expected to attend all s ess io ns of courses for which they are registered. Each instructor determ i nes when a student's absences hav e reached a point at which they jeopardize succe ss in a course. When absences become excessive, the student may receive a failing grade for the course 18 If students antic i pate a prolonged absence because of illness they should contact their ins tructors If they find that they cannot, they should co ntact the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs who will i n form the instructors of the reasons for the antic i pa ted absence Whenever an i nstructor thinks that a student's absences are inte rfer ing with academic progress she/he may submit a letter to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs info rming h i m of the situation Adaptive Self-Paced Learning Adaptive Self-Paced Learning is a phrase used to descri be classes in which students are allowed to proceed at a pace that is suited to t heir personal learning needs and learning style Students may proceed rapidly finishing a course well in advance of the end of a semester or module, with the advantage of being able to begin new studies or to concentrate on other courses. Students may proceed slowly without time limitat io ns that might i nterfere with the mastery of each required skill. This personalized system of learning relies heavily on learning aids and media so that tutors student proctors and faculty are free to devote additional time to individualized instruction and assistance Self -paced courses are identified in the Class Schedule by SP or self-paced Information on the metho d of instructio n and the nature of program is available i n each department Self paced courses are optiona l and are open to all students Students who do not complete the work of a sel f-paced course during a semes ter are given the notation of NC and must re-enroll in and pay for the course in a subsequent semester in order to continue in that course A letter grade is awarded during the semester i n which the work is completed sat isf actorily. Nontraditional Credit Options in Lieu of Course Requirements Successful completion of special examinations and{or completion of a prior lea rning portfolio which assessed for credit, may be substituted for the completion of course requ i rements may permit placement in advanced courses or may be used as the basis for awarding credit. A student may earn up to s ix ty semester hours o f credit toward degree requirements using nontraditional credit options Approved credit of this sort will be posted to the student's record after the completion of 8 semester hours of classroom (r es i dent ) credit. Nontrad itional credit may not be used toward the last twelve credit hours of a degree prog r am, does not substitute for residency requirements, and may not be used to challenge prerequisite c ourses for courses already completed Students are advised that letter grades are not assigned for nontraditional cr e dit and some institutions may not accept transfer credi ts which do not include letter grades Departmental Course Examinations In special cases a department may grant a student credit toward graduat i on for college courses in which she or he requests and passes special college examinations Unde r this provision a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded by the College A fee of $10 per semester hour credit w ill be charged Examinations for credit must be based on work equivalent to a regular course offered by the college (omnibus-numbered courses are excluded) and the credit granted will be for the corresponding course provided the student has no prev ious colleg iat e enrollment for a similar course and the credit is applicable toward the stu dent's graduation requirements Evidence of work justifying an examination for credit must be presented to the department c hairperson no later tha n the th ird week of classes in a semester. Perm issi on for such examination must be secured in advance from the appropriate dean upo n recommendation of the departme n t chair person

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No application for cre d it by examination will be approved for a student who is not currently enrolled in good standing in a degree-seek ing curric ulum in the College Cred it by examination will not be approved for a student who is within 12 classroom cre d i t hours of completing degree requir ements No cred it by examination can be obtained for a course in which a stu dent has been offic ially enrolled at Metropolitan State College or at anothe r i nstitution whether or not the course has been complete d and a grade awa rded Credit by examination cannot be obtained for college courses atte nded as a liste ner visitor or auditor. When stude nts have completed a course in the same discipl ine, higher i n number than the course for which they are seeking examinat ion credit, permission will be granted provide d the two courses are unrelated and approval is granted by the appropriate department chai rper son and dean. In a given discipline no credit by exam ination can be obta ined for a course lower in a n umber in a sequence than the highest-numbered course already completed by th at student. If a student is registered for, but has not compl eted a higher-numbered course in a sequence the examination for the lo wer-numbered course must be completed within the first three weeks of the semester Exceptions mus t be appealed to the Board of Academic Standards Exce pt ion s following endorsement of the department chairpe rson or dean Examinat io ns cannot be taken to raise grades to remove failures or to remove NC or SP notat i ons Credit by examinatio n is not applicable toward aca demic residence requirements Examples of unrelated subject matte r : ART 212, Human Anatom y for Artists ART 103 Basi c Photogr aphy Methods ITS 241, Introduc t io n to Photography ITS 101, Introduction to Wood Exam ination for credi t will be taken at a time specified by the department, but after the special examination fee has been paid. No examinat ion for credit in a college course may be repeated. A grade equivalent to A or B must be attained on the exam inat ion in order to receive credi t but credits so earned for the course w ill be recorded without grade reference on the student's permanent record Credits in c ourses for which credit is earned by examination are not conside red in computing college grade po int averages Credit by examination will be posted after a student has completed 8 semeste r hours of credit at Metropolita n State College and after an evaluation of all possible transfer cre dits has been completed College Level Examination Program (CLEP) The College Board has developed a program of examinations des i gned to evaluate non -tr aditional college-level education specif ica lly inc luding indep endent st udy and corresp ondence work and to award credit for successful demonstration of this knowledge. This program know n as the College-Level Examination Program or CLEP consists of two series of examinat ions the G eneral Examinations and the Subject Examinat i ons The General E xamination series includes five separate examinations covering the areas of English Composit ion, Humanities Natural Sciences Math and Soc ial SciencesHis t ory Based on the results of these examinations the College may award up to a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit in the freshman general stu d ies r equirements areas Thus, the successfu l student may tes t out of most of the traditional courses required dur ing the freshma n year MSC does not allow credit for the English Composition E xamination The Subje ct Examination series consists of more t han 45 examinat ions which apply to specific college courses. MSC allows cred i t for 18 of thes e examinations Thirty semester hours of credit also may be awarded under this series making a total of 60 semeste r hours of cred it obtaina ble under a com b i natio n of the two series of examinations Academic Information Cred i t obtained unde r CLEP at another i ns tit ut ion will be reevalua te d according to MSC credit by-examination standards Interested students should contact the Counsel ing Center for complete i nformation about this progra m before registe ring t o take any of t hese exam s Credit for Prior Learning Stude nts may apply for credit for college-leve l pr ior learnin g gained through experience by submitting a prior learning portfoli o to the Student Acade mic Development and Assessment Center which will toward it to the appropriate acade mic department for evaluat i on and assessment. Credits are awar ded on the bas is of careful evaluation of the prior learning portfolio which should demonstrate that the applicant's prio r learning is equiva l ent to the learn ing objectives des cribed in course syllabi for courses tau ght at Metropolitan State College Students sho uld check with depa rtments for s pec ific departmental guidelines i n addit i on to College gui delines. The award of cred i t will be recommended by the departme nts and must receive final approval from the Prior Learning Assessme nt Committee composed of a facul ty representative from each School of the College. Applicants fo r Cred it f o r Prior Learning will generally be require d to take th e Portfolio Developmen t Workshop. A fee of one-ha lf the part-tim e student tu i t i on rate w ill be assessed for credit awarded Polici es governing nontraditional credit options apply for c redit f or prio r lea rning Contact the Student A cademic Deve l opment and Assessmen t Cente r for assistanc e and further i nformation Attainment Examinati ons Any s tudent may take atta inment examinations in certai n departments for the purpose of waiv ing specific graduation requirements Pass ing such an exam i nation although not reducing the number of credits required for graduation entitl es the student to substitute a subject of her /his own choice for th e required subject. The examination is approx i mately the equ i vale nt of the final exam inatio n in the c ourse Advanced Placement Examinations Stude nt s who have performed sat i sfactorily in special college-level courses while in high school and who have passed appropr i ate Advanced Plac ement Examinat i ons conducted by the College Entrance Exa mination Board, may submit the results to the Office of A dmissions and Records for c ons i derat io n for college credit. This o ffice in c onsultat ion with the appropriat e department chairperson determines the amount and nature of the cred i t andfor advanced placement granted Credit for Military Tra ining and Other Training Programs Mil itary training and other training programs which hav e been assessed for college credit by the American Council on Education will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Records for trans fer credit at Metropolitan State College For formal military tra ining copies of training certificates and a copy of the DD214 should be submitted to the Of fice of Admissions and Records F or other training, off i c ial ACE transcripts should be submitted Pass-Fail Option The pass-fail option encourages the students to venture out of their major and minor fields and thereby broaden their educational exper i ence The pass no_tation has no effect on the grade point average ; the failure g rade is equivalent to the grade of F Students having already complete d at least one MSC course with at least a 2 .00 cumulative grade point average may choose to be evaluated for a certain course on a pass-fail basis rather than by letter grade Courses taken on a pass-fail basis w ill apply to major, minor or teacher certificat ion requirements only with the approval of the appropriate department chairp erson Self-paced courses may not be taken under the pass-fail option Maximum 19

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Academic Information graduation credit for these ungraded courses is eighteen credit hours earned in no more than six courses, limited to one course per semester or mod ule A student must declare interest in the pass-fail option no later than the last day to add classes (during fifteen percent of the term) for a particular semester or module by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records. The instructor will assign and record the pass-fail grade on a final grade list which identifies students electing and eligible for pass -fail grading If the student requests the option and later is declared ineligible, he receives notification from the Office of Admissions and Records during the semester that he will receive a regular letter-grade in the course Once approved the request for the pass-fail option is irrevocable Some institutions do not accept credits for courses in which a pass notation is given. Therefore, students who plan to transfer or take graduate work should determine whether the institution of the i r choice will accept the credit before registering for courses under the pass-fail option Final Examinations It is the general policy of the College to require final examinations of all students in all courses in which they are registered for credit with the possible exception of seminar courses or special projects Grades/Notations Alphabetical grades and status symbols used at Metropolitan State College are as follows : A Superior .... ...... ... ........... ...... 4 quality points per semester hour attempted. B Above Average ......... ..... ... 3 quality points per semester hour attempted C Avera g e ... . ........ ..... ... ... ... 2 quality points per semester hour attempted D Below Average but Passing ... 1 quality point per semester hour attempted F Failure ......... .... ...................... 0 quality points per semester hour attempted NC No Credit Nl No Credit Incomplete S Satisfactory (limited to Student Teaching) P-Pass X Grade ass i gnment pending Student must see faculty for an explanation or assignment of grade. The No Credit (NC) notat ion is not a grade. It may indicate withdrawal from the course a request at registration for no credit course repetition or may be assigned when a student was unable to take the final exami nation andfor did not complete all of her/his out of-class assignments due to unusual circumstances such as hospitalization Incomplete work denoted by Nl must be completed within one calendar year or earlier at the discretion of the facu lty member The notation has no effect on the grade point average The NC notation may also be used in self-paced courses to indicate that the student andfor the faculty have decided to extend the student's exposure to the course in order to increase the student's proficiency In order to earn credit, the student must re-register for and pay for the course in a subsequent term. The Nl notation may not be awarded in a self paced course The following minima l requirements shall be required throughout the College and shall be a part of all school departmental, or individual policies : 1 The NC notation shall be available to students in all instances through the fourth week of classes of each term 2 During the last week of a term requests by students for an NC notation in a given course shall not be granted The NC (incomplete) notation may be used during this period provided the conditions specified above apply 20 3 A written pol i cy statement descr i bing the use of the NC notation shall be given to each student for each class in which she/he enrolls 4 Students are expected to attend all sessions of courses for wh i ch they are reg i stered Each instructor determines when a student's absences have reached a point that they jeopardize her/his success in a course When absences become excess i ve the student may rece ive ? fa i ling grade for the course. Additional requirements for an NC notation may be set by each school department andfor faculty member School policies shall supersede departmental policies ; either school policies or departmental policies sha ll supersede i ndividual policies Repeated Courses (Last Grade Stands) A student may repeat any course taken at MSC regardless of the original grade earned By so doing, only the credit and the grade for the latest attempt at the course will remain on the student's MSC academic record The grade for the prior attempt(s) will be changed to the NC notation The courses must carry the same title, course number and cred i t hours To effect such a change, the student must re-register and pay tuition for the course in question complete the course w i th a letter grade and complete the necessary form in the Office of Admissions and Records indicating that the course has been repeated Otherwise, the grade change will be made administratively at the time of degree evaluation or ear l ier as identified Credit duplication involving transfer interinstitutional or consortium courses may be treated differently from the above procedure This policy cannot be utilized for the purpose of altering grades assigned prior to the receipt of a degree from MSC Quality Points The number of quality points awarded for a course is determined by multiplying the number of credit hours for that course by the quality point value of the grade received The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing the total by the number of credit hours attempted To be eligible for a degree a candidate must in addition to meeting other prescribed requirements have a minimum number of quality points equal to twice the number of credit hours attempted. The notations NC, Nl, S and P have no effect on the grade point average Transcripts of Records A transcript i s a certif ied copy of a student's permanent record and shows the academ i c status of the student at time of issuance Copies are available at $1 each Transcripts will be released by the Office of Admissions and Records upon formal written request by the student. Transcripts will also be issued to firms and employers if written authorization is received from the student. Requests should include the student's full name as recorded while attending MSC student identification number last term of attendance, number of copies desired and to whom and where transcripts are to be sent. Transcripts may be withheld because of indebtedness to the College or for other appropr i ate reasons Certified true copies of transcr i pts from other i nstitutions which are on file in the Office of Admissions and Records will be issued upon signed request by the student. A cha r ge of $1 per copy page i s assessed for this serv ice. Students from other institutions taking MSC courses under the consortium or inter-institutional registration programs must request transcripts from their home institutions. Student Grade Appeal Procedure If students have reason to question the validity of a grade received in a course they must make their request for a change before the end of the second week of th e semeste r following the completion

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of the course the following autumn semester i n the case of the preceding spring semester The Grade Appeal Guidelines may be obtained from the student's respective dean It is the responsibility of the student to i nitiate a grade appeal within the time line, and to follow the procedures specified for grade appeals in the MSC Students Rights and Responsib ili t i es Han dbook The Handbook may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs Student Classification Students are classified accord ing to the number of semester hours of credit earned: Freshmen fewer than 30; sophomores 30 or more but fewer than 60; juniors 60 or more but fewer than 90; seniors 90 or more Honors and Awards Metropolitan State College annually recognizes students who show outstanding leadersh i p and service to the College and community, excellence in scholastic achievement and outstanding personal character and i ntegr i ty Recogn i t ion o f students includes : The Presidents Award (one senior) ; the Vice President for Academic Affa irs Award (one senior) ; the V ice President for Student Affa irs Award (one senior) ; Outstanding Student Awards (juniors and sen i ors from each school) ; Who' s Who Among Students in American Universit i es and Colleges (sophomores juniors and seniors) ; Assoc i at ion of American University Women (AAUW) Award (senior woman) Other awards i nclude Special Service Award for Disabled Students Assoc i ated Students of Metropolitan State College Charles W. Fisher Award and the Colorado Engineering Council Award Information and appl i cat i ons for these awards are ava i lable in CN 316; applications are due each year on the last Fri d a y of February Awards are presented at the annual banquet the night before graduation. In addition to annual awards students with outstanding academic achievements are recognized by being named on Metropolitan State College Honor Lists The President's Honor List carries the names of students who at the t ime of computation have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 3.85 or higher The Vice President's Honor List carries the names of students who at the time of computation have achieved a cumulative grade point average of between 3 .50 and 3.84 inclusively Computation will occur initially when the student has completed between 30 and 60 hours at MSC then again between 60 and 90 hours, and finally after more than 90 hours Graduation honors are awarded to students who have demonstrated superior academic ability in the i r baccalaureate degree while attending Metropolitan State College Honors designations are determined accord ing to the following cr iteria : 1. Summa Cum Laude Top 5 percent graduates within each school with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than 3 .65 Magna Cum Laude-Next 10 percent of graduates within each school with cumulative MSC GPA of no less than 3 .65. 2 To determine each honors category grade point averages for the prev i ous spring semester graduates are arrayed in rank order This rank ordering is then used to determine the honors recipients among the following summer autumn and spring graduates 3. To qualify for graduat i on honors recognition a student must have completed a minimum of 50 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC prior to the term of graduation 4 Courses completed during the term of graduation and transfer credits are not considered when determining honors Omnibus Courses The omnibus courses listed below are designed to provide flexible learning opportunities Experimental topics courses seminars and workshop s deal with novel subjects and current problems Independent study allows students to investigate problems of Academic Information spec ial i nterest. Supervised f i eld study and internships conducted cooperatively with business, industry government and other agencies, provide practical on-the-job learning opportun i t i es Content of these courses should not duplicate that of regular courses listed in the Bulletin Omnibus courses may be offered by all departments in the College A spec i f i c course plan for topic and group workshop courses which cove r s content and credit hours must be submitted by an instructor and approved by the chairperson of the department or disc i pline and dean of the school before such a course can be listed i n the schedule of classes These same approvals are required for plans of study which individual students submit for registration in a workshop course (when individual ized ) or an independent study course No more than 30 semester hours earned in all of the omn i bus courses will be counted toward meeting degree requirements One omnibus course numbered e i ther 190 or 390 of up to three (3) hours credit may be used to satisfy General Studies requirements in each of the areas of Humanities Science and Mathemat i cs and Social and Behavioral Sciences provided the course has a prefix of one of the departments within the respect ive subject matter areas ; e g HIS 190 may be used i n Social and Behavioral Sciences, but not in Science and Mathemat i cs The following course numbers are the same for omnibus courses in all disciplines ; and, when listed in class schedules registration forms and college records the course number will carry the pref i x of the discipline in which the course is offered In addition to prerequis i tes listed under a course and the approvals outlined above other prerequis i tes appropriate to the study and departmental objectives may be added. 190 (Credit Variable) Topics Prerequisite : Permission of instructor An introductory study of selected topics especially appropriate for lowe rdiv i sion students. 299 (Credit Variable) Field Experience/Internship Prerequisite : Sophomore standing and permission of instructor A supervised in-service field or laboratory experience in an area related to the student's major conducted by an affiliated organizat i on in cooperat ion with the department/discipline i n which the student i s majoring 390 (Credit Variable) Advanced Topics Prerequis ite: Permission of i nstructor An indepth i nquiry into selected problems 480 (Credit Variable) Workshop Prerequis ite: Approval of department An advanced program of study often of concentrated nature designed primarily for students majoring in a particular department or discipline Involves in dependent and/or group appraisal and analysis of major problems within a particular area 490 (Credit Variable) Seminar Prerequisite : Permission of instruc tor Presentations, discussions reports and crit i ques of various problems within the discipline in which the seminar is offered 498 (Credit Variable, not to exceed 6 credit hours). Independent Study Prerequisites : Senior standing and permission of the department chair Independent investigation of problems within the student's major discipline The course must be offered in that department/ disc i pline and be supervised by a faculty member of that area 499 (Credit Variable) Advance Field Experience/Internship Prerequisite : Permission of instr uctor 21

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Academic Information An advanced level superv i sed in-service field or labo r atory experience in an area related to the student 's major, conducted by an affiliated organization in cooperation with the department/discipline in which the student is majoring. Field Experience/Internship Courses Field experience or experiential education courses are courses whose major instr uctional activities are conducted outside the regular classroom but whose syllabi are formally approved by the institution and maintained as an integral part of a department's curriculum. These courses incorpor ate actual experience with information assimilation and adhere to policies set forth by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education Certain programs such as Teacher Education, Nursing, etc., require experiential education courses as a part of their major Other departments offer experiential education courses, generally as a part of the student's major or minor for credit applicable to graduation requirements. Five terms iden tify field experience courses offered at Metropolitan State College : External Laboratory Practicum Internship Student Teaching, and Independent Study External Laboratory A controlled environment or organized activity emphasizing experimentation in which gu i ded observations and participation, under the guidance and supervision of the faculty member and the cooperating supervisor enhance the integration of theory and practice (as child in development) The External Laboratory is distinguished from the on-campus laboratory which is devoted to exper imental study in any branch of the natural or applied sciences Practicum A unit of work that involves apprenticeship in the practical application of previously studied theory under the observance and supervision of a skilled practitioner and faculty member (as a pract icum in reading). Internship A work oriented training period of actual service i n an agency, institution or technical/business establishment that provides an in-depth learning experience for the student under the direct supervision of an on-site supervisor as well as the scrutiny and guidance of a faculty member (as in cooperat ive education) Student :reaching Faculty supervised learning experience in which the student applies knowledge gained in the Teacher Education Program to a classroom setting (as in practice teaching). Independent Study A student -ini tiated creative or resea rch project cond ucted under the d irec t guidance and supervision of a faculty member of an academic department or discipline (as a thesis or special upper division project) Guidelines for Field Experience/Internship Courses 1 Credit may vary from one to fifteen hours depending upon the instructio nal act ivity. 2 Students are expected to meet the minimum Base Clock Hours established by CCHE policy which requires two to three times the clock hours established for regular classroom ins tru ction 3 App roved cooperating agencies provide learning opportunities, prepare writte n statements of assignments, monitor students' performance confer with the supervising faculty member and provide a written evaluation 4 An average of one hour a week minimally is spent in seminar and discussion or in conference with the adjunct faculty at the field exper i ence locale andfor in conference with the supervising faculty member 5 The supervising faculty member evaluates students performance and in consultation with the adjunct faculty 22 member, assigns the grade for the course according to grading policies stated in the College Bulletin 6 Omnibus courses (299, 498 499) emphasizing field experiences are subject to guidelines established for regular field-based courses and must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs. Requirements for All Degrees Students are responsible for full knowledge of the information provided in this Bulletin concerning regulations and requirements of the College and their program of study. The instructional program has been organized so that students may work toward one or more of the following objectives : (1) following a curriculum in arts, sciences or applied sciences to meet requirements for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree ; (2) taking programs which may or may not involve being a degree candidate, to prepare for careers in business and public services ; or (3) enrolling for selected courses to improve general education or vocational competency To earn a degree, students must sat isfy the course and other requirements for the curriculum under which they are reg istered and must comp lete a m i nimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative average of 2 00 or higher For degree requ iremen t evaluation purposes students may select any Bulletin in effect while they are enrolled at Met ropolitan State College providing that the Bulletin conta ins their complete program of study A student interrupting continuous enrollment for one calendar year or more may select only those Bullet ins in effect after return to the in st i tution Students must complete the general studies, major minor and all other degree requirements as outlined in the Bullet i n under which they plan to graduate While every effort will be made to provide each student appropriate advice in meeting requirements for graduation and for majors and minors the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. Consequently students are responsible for full knowledge of the provisions and regulations pertaining to their program and should seek advice when in doubt. The student should never assume approval to deviate from the stated requirements without a properly signed statement to that effect. Transfer students should become fam iliar with the requirements of the College the general studies and their major and minor areas Graduation Agreement The official academic evaluation process is initiated when the student complete s the Graduation Agreement. Once the student has received program approval from the major department chairperson and the minor department chairperson the student submits the Agreement to the Office of Admissions and Records for final review. Workshops are held monthly to assist students in beginning their Gradua tion Agreements After the completion of each subsequent semester of academ ic work the student will receive an updated Academ ic Status Report. The deadl ine for subm i tting the Graduation Agreement coincides with the deadline for submitting early (mail) registration for the semester the student plans to graduate. However since the student is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of her/his program of study it is expected that the Agreement will be submitted at least two years prior to the semester of graduation A Graduat i on Agreement submitted after the deadline will be reviewed for the following graduation date After submitting the Graduat i on Agreement a student who feels justified in deviating from College academic requirements may appeal to the Board of Academic Standards Exceptions to request a variance. Val i d reasons for variances must accompany all petitions and must be s ig ned by the appropriate Dean and department chairperson

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Students who have met all requirements for graduation may be granted diplomas at the end of the semester in which the work is completed A formal commencement ceremony is held at the conclusion of the Spring Semester Students who officially graduated during any of the previous three semesters are invited but are not required to partic ip ate in the spring commencement. Requirements for All Bachelor Degrees To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science a student must satisfy the following minimum requirements, plus any others st i pulated for the degree for which a student is a candidate 1 Complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of 2 .00 or higher for all Metropolitan State College course work 2 Complete at least 40 semester hours in upper-division courses (300-and 400-level courses) 3 Complete all general studies requirements listed for the degree and major 4 Complete one subject major consisting of not less than 30 semester hours With certain exceptions (see major department) comp l ete a minor consisting of at least 18 semester hours. If a student completes two majors the second major satisfies the minor requirement ; however, a second emphasis within the first major does not constitute a second major Coursework used toward meeting requirements for one major or minor may not be used toward meeting requirements for another major or minor 5 Complete all special requirements of a department and school. 6 Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2 00 or higher in all MSC courses which satisfy the requirements for the major and for all MSC courses which satisfy requirements for a minor 7 Complete a Graduation Agreement. 8 Academic Residency (class room credit) a Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at Metropolitan State College inclu ding the last 10 semester hours applicable to the degree b Complete at least 8 upper-division (300and 400-level) semester hours of the major and 4 upper-division hours of the minor at Metropol ita n State College (clas sroom credit). c Students should check with the Office of Admissions and Records before attempting to apply interinstitu tional credit to academic residence requiremen ts 9 Cred i t Limitations : a Not more than 30 semester hours of omnibus numbered courses may be applied toward graduation requ i rements b Not more than 4 semester hours in phys i cal education activity courses will be counted toward a Bachelor s Degree for students who are not majoring in Physical Education o r Recreation and only 3 of these may be applied to the career category of general studies c. Not more than 7 semester hours in music ensemble courses will be coun ted toward a Bachelor s Degree for students who are not majoring in Music and only 3 of these may be applied to the humanities category of general studies d Not more than 30 semester hours taken by extension andfor correspondence may be applied toward a Bachelor s Degree General Studies for Bachelor Degrees Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are requ i red to meet the general stud i es distribution requirements l i sted below Each of the category requirements may be sat i sfied by any course within the Academic Information departments listed includin g only one omnibus course numbered either 190 or 390 of up to three (3) hours credit in each of the areas of Humanities Science and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences and then only if the course has a prefix of one of the departments within the respective subject matter areas. No omnibus course may be applied to the Freshman Composition or career catagory Not more than 6 semester hours taken in any one department (as indicated by the three-letter course prefix) will apply toward general studies requirements Each degree candidate must complete English 1 01 and English 1 02. The same course may be used toward meeting requirements in the general studies and the major or minor with the approval of the major or minor department chairperson The credit value of the course may be considered only once, however i n the upper-division and cumulative credit totals The career category is an option within the General Studies A maximum of 6 semester hours of applicable course work may be applied to the career category Students should check for specific general studies requirements stipulated by their major Specific courses are listed in Afro -American Studies Chicano Studies and Women s Studies because the programs are interdisciplinary Credit for cross-listed courses will apply to the General Studies categories according to the course prefix associated with the specific course the student chooses For example although CHS 200 and ANT 236 are cross-listed if a student registers for CHS 200 the course will be applied toward the Humanities category; and if he/she registers for ANT 236 it will be applied toward the Social/Behavioral Science category Credits Freshman Composit ion (ENG 101 and 102) ......... ....... ............... 6 Humanities ............ ....................................... ......................... 8-1 0 Afro-American Studies (AAS 1 03, and 1 08) Art Chicano Studies (CHS 200, 201, 202, 340 341, 351, 352 420) English French German Modern Languages Mus ic Philosophy Reading Spanish Speech Science and Mathematics ......................... ...... ......... ............. 8-10 Astronomy Biology Chemistry Geography Geology Mathematics Meteorology Physics Social and/or Behavioral Sciences ........................................ 8-10 Afro -American Studies (AAS 101, 102, 113 213 220 ,230,270, 315 330 ,340,355, 370 375 ,391, 440 460 470 485) Anthropology Chicano Studies (CHS 100, 101, 102 211, 221, 231, 301, 310,311,312,320 330) Economics History Political Science Psychology Sociology Urban Studies Women's Studies Career (Optional) .............. ............ ..... ................... ....... ............. 0-6 Accounting Aerospace Bus iness Education and Communication 23

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Academic Information Civil Engineering Technology Communications Community Service D evelopme nt Computer Management Science Criminal Justice and Criminology Education Electronics Engineering Tec hnology Finance Health Care Management Health Services Hospitality Meeting Travel Administration Human Services Technical Communications Industrial Technology Journalism Management Marketing Mechanical Engineer ing Technology Military Science Physical Education and Recreation Social Work Surveying Tota/ ............ ......... ... .. ............ ..... ...... .......... ........ ....... ... ......... 36 Requirements for a Second Degree For an additional Bachelor s Degree the student will comply with the following: 1 The first Bachelor's Degree must be recognized by Metropolitan State College. 2. Student must complete all requirements for a new major with a minimum of 8 MSC classroom upper-division semester hours in the major department. 3 Student m ust c omplete a minor if required by the maj or department for the contemplated degree 4 The stude n t must spend at least two additional semesters in residence 5. A minimum of 30 semester hours of classroom credit at MSC is required in addition to the credits completed by the student for the earlier degree. 6 General stud i es will be considered complete unless deficiencies exist according to the major department. 7 Credit limitations for a Bachelor s degree will continue to exist for the second degree. 8 A Graduation Agreement must be completed as outlined in this Bulletin Family Rights and Privacy Act Metropolitan State College gives notice that it has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information as directory i nformat ion under 438(a) (5) (B) of the Family Educational Rights and Pr i vacy Act of 197 4. Directory information concerning students at the College will be released without the prior consent of the student as permitted by law unless within ten (10) days after registration a student has notified the Metropolitan State College Office of Adm is s ions and Records that such informatio n should not be released without his or her consent. Directory information at Metropolitan State College is as follows: 1. name address and phone listing 2 date and place of birth 3 major and minor fields of study 4. participation in officially recognized activities and sports 5 weight and height of members of athletic teams 6 dates of attendance 7 degrees and awards received 8 most recent previous educational agency or institution attended 24

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D e g rees and P r ograms Available at Met r o politan State College Degrees and Program s Available at Metropolitan State College Metropolitan State College is organized into three schools. These are listed below wit h t h e majors and minors offered by each The curriculum requiremen ts for each of the programs are described under special sections of this Bulletin prepared by each school. Programs marked with an asterisk (") do not require completion of a minor Bachelors Degree Bachelors Degree M inor Major Minor Major D ivision of Publi c Serv i c e Profe s s ions School of Business Criminal Justice and Criminology X X Accounting X X Health Care Management (UpperBusiness Communications X D ivision) X X Business Education and Communications"' X Hospitality, Meeting, and Travel Computer and Management Science X Administration X Data Processing X Hotel Administration X Economics ... X X Human Services X X Finance X X Meeting Admini s tration X Human Resource Management X Nursing (Upper-Division for R.N.'s) X Management X X Restaurant Administration X Marketing X x Trave l Administration X Off ice Administration X Sch o ol of Letters, Arts and S ciences Production Management X Real Estate X Divisi o n o f Humanitie s Systems Management X Art* X X Engl ish X X Institute for Entrepreneurship French X Urban Studies German X X X Industrial Design X Journalism X X .. In addition to the B S degree a 3-year specialist degree is offered with Language and Linguistics X opt ions in Adm i nistrative Assistant Admin i strative Office Management and Legal Assistant (paralegal) Modern Languages X Music X ... The Department of Economics offers a B.A. Degree rather than a B S Music Education X Music Performance X School of Professional Studies PhiiOS9 phy X X Division of Education Practical Writing X Public Relations X B ilingual-Bicultural Education X Spanish X X Early Childhood Education X X Speech Communications X X Elementary Education X Speech Pathology-Audiology X Health and Safety X Divisi o n o f S ocia l Science s Parenting Education X Anthropology X X Physical Education X X Behavioral Scie nce X Reading X History X X Recreation X X Political Science X X Secondary Education X Psychology X X Special Education X Public Administration X Teacher Cert ification: Sociology X X Early Childhood Elementary, Social Work X Thirteen Secondary Fields D i v ision of Scie n c e and M at h emat ics and Special Education Biology X X Division of Technology Chemistry X X Criminal is tics X X Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics X Geography X Aviat ion Management X X Geology X Civil Engineer ing Technology X X Land Use X Drafting Engineering Technology X Mathematics X X Electronics Engineering Technology X X Meteorology X X Industrial Design X Physics X X Industrial Marketing X Industrial Technology X X Institute for In tercultu r a l Stud ies a n d S e rvices Mechanical Engineering Technology X X Afro-American Studies X X Professional Pilot X X Bilingual Chicano Studies X Surveying X X Chicano Studies X Technical Communications X Technical and Industrial Admin istration X Insti t ute fo r Women's S tudies and S e rvices Technical Management X Women s Studies X 25

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Degrees and Programs Ava il able at Metropolitan State College Communications Multi-Major The Communications Multi-Major offers nine areas of emphasis for students with varying educational and career needs. Each student s program is planned with an advisor in the selected area of emphasis Students may obtain information concerning the major from the Department sponsoring the particular area of emphasis in which they are interested. Area of Emphasis Communications : Visual Sponsored by Art Communications : Industrial Media Sponsored by Technical Communications Communications : Industrial-Organizational Sponsored by Technical Communications Communications : Industrial-Specialist Sponsored by Technical Communications Communications : Broadcasting Sponsored by Speech Communications : Meeting Planning Sponsored by Hospitality Meeting and Travel Administration Communications : Theater Administration Sponsored by Speech Communications : Business Sponsored by Bus iness Education and Communicat i ons Communicat i ons : Sports Sponsored by Physical Education and Recreat i on All Communicat i ons Multi-Major areas o f emphases comprise 42 semester hours of study inc luding 6 hours of required core courses as outlined below courses in the area of emphasis and a choice of free electives Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Core Courses for All Areas of Emphases Semester Hours COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and Systems ........ ........ ......... ..... ..... ........ .......... .... 3 SPE 37 4 Psychology of Communication or SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ............. .... ...... ....... ....... 3 Opt io n Requ iremen ts ................ .................. .... ................... .... 36 Tota/ .... . ................... ... ................... ........................................ 42 Communications Free Electives List Other courses approved by the advisor in the selected Communicat i ons area of emphasis are acceptable as free electives ANT 131 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ...... .............. 3 ANT 233 Cross -Cultural Communication .......... ........ ............ 3 ART 101 Basic Draw ing Methods .......................................... 3 ART 102 Basic Design and Crafts Methods ......................... 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art : 1960-Present Day ........................ .... ....................... 3 CEN 120 Technical Drawing I ........ ........................................ 3 CEN 121 Technical Drawing II ........................ .... ................... 3 ENG 251 Intermediate Composition ..... ..... ............................. 3 ENG 303 Semantics ................ ..... .............. ........ ......... ....... 3 JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ................ ...... ................ 3 JRN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing ................. 3 JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading ............ 3 JRN 286 Interm ediate Reporting and News Writing .... ......... 3 JRN 381 Feature Article Writing for Newspapers ................. 3 PHI 144 Logic ............. ................. .............. .... ....... .... ....... 3 PSC 322 Public Policy ............... .................. ........... .. ............ 3 PSC 346 Public Opinion ......... ................................ ........ ..... 3 PSY 241 Social Psycho logy .......... ............ .... ......................... 3 PSY 342 Issues in Community/Social Psychology .. .. ........... 3 SPE 301 Advanced Public Speaking .................................... 3 SPE 322 Movement for the Stage ......................................... 2 SPE 328 Stage Direct ing ................................... ........ ........... 3 SPE 310 Bus i ness and Professional Speaking .................... 3 SPE 330 Vo ice Science : Phonetics and Voice and Diction ............... .............................................. 3 26 SPE 347 SPE 412 SPE 420 SPE 426 SPE 427 SPE 448 SPE 449 Evolution of Cinemat ics as Art ............................... 3 Freedom of Speech ................................................ 3 Reader s Theatre ........... ............................. ........... 3 Theatre Practicum I ................................................. 3 Theatre Practicum II .............. .................................. 3 Seminar : Practicum in Broadcasting .... ...... ............ 3 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life ....... ..... .............. ..... ..... ........... 3 Communications Multi-Major Summary Sem Hrs. Sem. Hrs Sem Hrs in Total Areas of In Core In Area o f Communic Sem Hrs Emphasis Courses Emphasis Electives In Major Communications: Visual 6 27 9 42 Communications : Industr ial Media 6 24 12 42 Communications : IndustrialOrganizational 6 24 12 42 Communications: Industr ial Specia list 6 24 12 42 Commun i cations : Broadcasting 6 21 15 42 Communicat i ons : Meeting Planning 6 18 18 42 Communications : Theatre Administration 6 18 18 42 Communicat i ons : Business 6 24 12 42 Commun i cations: Sports 6 27 9 42 Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor The Holistic Health and Well ness Education Multi Minor offers an area of concentration for students who recognize the increased emphasis on wellness in several professional fields and/or for health conscious individuals who wish to establish a self-enhancement program The Multi-Minor is designed to complement a major chosen by a student which is relevant to the student's career goals The student arranges for the minor through one of the following departments : Human Services Nurs ing and Health Care Management Philosophy Psychology, Physical Education and Recreat ion, Sociology, or Teacher Education The Mult iMinor compr i ses 24 hours of study as outlined below : Required Courses Semester Hours HES 105 Dynamics of Health ................................................. 3 HES 204 Nutrition ...................................... ..... ................... ... 3 HSW 375 Holistic Health and High Level Wellness .............. .4 PER 150 Skills and Methods : Teaching Physical Fitness ............. ............. ......................... 2 PHI 322 Personal Knowledge and Professional Growth ..... 3 PSY 275 Introduct ion to Holist ic Health ................................ 3 PSY 303 Research in Health and Wellness ........ .................. 3 Electives .......... ........... ..... ....................................... 3 Tota/ ................... ............................................... ..... ................... 24 Practical experience is an i ntegral part of this minor and contract major Students are urged to enhance their education through field work This can be achieved throug h pract i cums internships and cooperative education offerings in one of the above listed departments or by using these elective hours

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Contract Major/Minor Program Even with the wide diversity of the majors and minors presently offered at Metropolitan State College the need arises occasionally for a major that will not fit the ex i st in g catalog major or minor and which is individual in nature and meets the specific needs of the students The Contract Major/Minor is an organized degree program written by the student in consultation with a Contract Major fMinor Advis ing Committee to enable the student to attain a spec ific, i ndividua l educational objec tive which cannot be satisfied by any existing cata log major and/o r minor programs The degree sought may be either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science For further information contact the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center. Community Service Development Program The Commun ity Service D evelopment Program at Metropolitan State College is designed to provide academic and applied learning opportun ities for people who wish to pursue professional careers in the adm inis trat ion of a wide var iet y of nonprof it organizations A complete description of the program may be found under Human Services and Urban Studies Degre es and Programs Available at Metropolitan State College 27

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School of Business School of Business The curriculum of this School is designed to provide the student with a background of general education, familiarity with basic principles of business and specialized knowledge in a selected field of business The School offers two degrees-the Three-Year Specialist Degree, and the Bachelo r of Science The Department of Economics offers a Bachelor of Arts degree rather than a Bachelor of Science. The Urban Studies Program housed within the Inst itute for Entrepreneurship in the School of Business offers coursework leading to either a Bachelor of Science degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree. Undergraduate programs within the School of Busi ness are designed : 1 To offer the student the opportunity to receiv e the baccalaureate degree This degree program consists of a broad foundation in general education a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and specific competence in one or more significant functional areas of business 2 To offer a diverse undergraduate program to meet the interests of those res i dents of the metropolitan area and others, who desire to study business-oriented subjects without undertaking a degree program and to meet the needs of the Denver business and professional community for continuing education programs 3 To strengthen students powers of imag inat ive and innovative th inking self-reliance creative independent analysis and sensitivity to social and eth ical values. 4. To inst ill in each student a d esire for learning that will continue after he has graduated and taken his place in the community 5. To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering r isk and progress which are essential to the continued development of the Amer ican free enterprise system. The philosophy of the School of Busin ess is to devote its resources to continued growth of high quality, und ergraduate programs As needs arise and resources become avai lable addit ional programs or areas of specialization will be offered. Flexibility of cou rse design a principal requisite of the School of Business, will continue to dominate the planning of all new programs ThreeYear Specialist Degree The Department of Business Educat ion and Communications offers a three-year degre e with a choice from thre e areas of emphasis currently in strong demand The areas of emphasis take into consideration work experience credit, permit additional specialization and include a field of experience requirement for a partial on-the-job training. The student has the opportunity later to obtain a bachelor s degree by completing limited additional requirements for a contract major Students seeking a three-year degree in business for any of the areas of emphasis given below must complete the following general studies re qu irements : Semester Required Courses Hours ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition .... .... ...... .... ................... 6 Human ities: SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ............. 3 Elective ..... .... .... ............ ......................................... 3 Science and Mathematics : MTH 131 Finite Mathemathics for the Management and Social Sciences ........ ....................................... .4 Laboratory Science .................... ... ........................ 3 Social andfor Behavioral Sciences : ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro ............ ........ ... 3 Elective ........ .... .... ....... ...... ............... ....... .............. 3 Career : SEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Commun ications ....... 3 Total ......... .... .... ....... ......... ................... .................................... 28 In addition all three year degree students must complete the following abbreviated bus i ness core : 28 Required Courses ACC 201 Pr inciples of Accounting I ........ .... ........................... 3 ACC 202 Prin ciples of Accounting II ...................................... 3 SEC 301 Business Researc h and Report Writi ng ................. 3 CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems .. ........ .... ........... 3 CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ........................... 3 MGT 221 Business Law I ........................................................ 3 MGT 300 Principles of Management .. ...................... .... .......... 3 Total ......................... .......... .... .... .......... ....... ............................ 21 Three -yea r degree students should choose one of the following areas of emphasis as their major area of interest: Areas of Emphasis Administrative Assistant* Semester Required Courses Hours BEC 102 Int ermediate Typewriting .................................. ...... 3 BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines ........ ................ 3 BEC 112 I ntermed i ate Gregg Shorthand SEC BEC BEC BEC BEC SEC MGT ECO 113 222 323 354 402 499 321 350 (Gregg or Speedwriting) .................... ..................... 3 Advanced Shorthand .................................. .......... 3 Office Pra c tices and Procedures ..................... ...... 3 Listening and Logic .............................. ........ ........... 3 Office Management and Analysis ..... .............. ....... 3 Ethics in Business .................................. ............ ..... 3 Field Experience ............. ............ ............................. 5 Business Law II .............. .......... ....... ........ .......... ...... 3 Managerial Economics ............................................ 3 Up perO ivision Business Electives ......................... 6 T otal ................................................... ................... ...... .............. .41 'Life Experience credit hours for the successful comp letion of the Certified P rofessiona l Sec r etaries E xami nation may be applied to the completion of th1s opt1on.

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Administrat ive Office Management Semester Required Courses Hours ACC 309 Income Tax I ....... ............ .... ........... .............. ....... 3 BEC 105 Operation of Calculating Machines .... ..... ....... .... ... 3 BEC 222 Off ice Pract ices and Procedures ............ ............... 3 BEC 323 Listening and Logic .......... .................. ..................... 3 BEC 354 Office Manageme nt and Analys i s ........ ......... ......... 3 BEC 355 Records Managemen t ............................... .... ...... ... 3 BEC 402 Ethics in Business ...................... ........ .. .. ...... ........... 3 BEC 499 Field Experience .... .... .... .... ...................................... 5 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis or CMS 331 MGT 321 MGT 353 or MGT 453 and Design .......... .... ............ .... .... .... ..... ....... ..... ... 3 Bus iness Fore casting Methods .. ............ ....... ......... 3 Business Law II ...... ................ ........ .. .. ..................... 3 Personnel Management ... ....................................... 3 Organizational Behavior ......................................... 3 Electives .......... ......... ........ ......... .... ....... ... ...... .... 6 Total .................. .... ...... .. ... ... ..... ... ... . ........... .... .... ....... ...... 41 Paralegal ** Seme ster Required Courses Hours ACC 309 Income Tax I ............ .................................. ............. 3 BEC 232 Legal Method Research and Writing ........ ...... ...... 3 BEC 323 Listening and Logic ............ ...... ........................ ....... 3 BEC 324 Litigation ................ ........................................ .... ...... 3 BEC 325 Fami ly Law ................................ .......... .... .......... ...... 3 BEC 326 Probate-Decedents Estates-BEC BEC BEC MGT MGT 327 402 499 321 380 Electives Wills -Trusts ................ ................ .... ........ ............ 3 The Law of Business Organizat ions ...... .. .. ...... ...... 3 Ethics in B usiness .... .......... .............. ....................... 3 Field Exper ience ................ ............. .................... .. 5 Business Law II .................. .. ......................... .......... 3 Pri nciples of Real Estate .............. ........ .. .. .. .. .......... 3 Choose a minimum of 6 credits from the following courses ..... 6 CJC 101 Introduction to the Criminal Just ice System .. ................... ................... 3 CJC 210 Substantive Cr iminal Law .. ........................ ........ .... 3 CJC 212 Evi dence and Courtroom Procedures .......... ... ....... ........ ..... ....................... .... 3 PSC 300 Amer ica n State and Local Government ................. .......... ........ .......... .... ...... .4 MGT 384 Real Estate Law .. ...... ....................... ....................... 3 Total ............. ..... .... ...... .......... ........ ..... .... ........................ .......... .41 A four year paralegal program i s presently being considered Bachelor of Arts Economics Economics is a scientific study which deals with the allocation of scarce or limited resources The study of economics offers an opportunity for the student to acquire a general knowledge of the operation of econom ic systems and i nstitutions This training is extremely valuable to the student regardless of her or his specific career object ive The Bachelor of Art s program has been designed to prov ide the student with a fundamental knowledge of domestic as well as foreign economies and the quantitative to ols necessary for independent analyt i cal research and thought. Spe cialized courses are provided to develop the student's abilit y in the use of the tools of economic theory and analysis Such training is essential for graduates who wish to qualify for positions as prof essional economists Employment opportunities in economics are available in national and international business federal state and local government and i n various non-profit organ i zat ions School of Business General Studies Semester Hours ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition ....................................... 6 Human iti es : ....................................................................... ...... 8-10 Sc ience and Mathematics : MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Sciences ........ ........ .. .. .................... .. .. ... .4 MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences .................... ...... ........................... .. 3 Physical or B i ological Science .................. ............ 3 Social andfor Behavioral Sci ences : ECO 201 Principles of Economics-Macro ........................ 3 ECO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro .......................... 3 Electives ..... ........................ ................... ..... .... .... 3 Career ........... .................. ....... .... ....... ........... ..... : ......... ..... 0-6 Total .. ...... ..... .... ......... .... .... .... ...... .. ....... ................................. 36 Semester Required Courses Hours MTH 121 Introduction to Statistics ........................................ .4 ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomics ................................ 3 ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconom ics ............................... 3 ECO 315 Econometr ics ............ ........ .. ..................................... 3 ECO 460 History of Economic Thought .................. .... ........... 3 Total .. .. ..... ...... . ... ............. ... .... .......... .... ...... ... ... .... ... .... ... ... 16 Approved Electives Fifteen (15) hours of upper-division e conomics electives selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics ............ .. ............... 15 Total .... ....................... ............................................. ................. 31 Minor Eighteen (18 hours must be completed to fulfill the minor requ ir ement) Total .... ..... ....... ......... .............. .... .... .... .... ........ ........... ....... ... ... 18 Free Electives .... .... .......... .............. ....... ... ............ ................... 35 Program Total ........... .............. .............. .............. .. .. ...... ............ 120 Bus iness Emphasis in Economics This emphas i s prepares the student for entry i nto the growing professions of economics and business It provides training that will enable the student to enter the profession and p r ovide assistance to government and business in solving problems and formulating policies General Studies (See General Studies Requirements for Bachelor of Science Degree in School of Business) ................................ 36 Business Core (See Bus i ness Core for Bachelor of Science Degree i n School of Business) .. .............. .. ................................ 33 Semester Required Courses Hours ECO 301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory .............. ........ 3 ECO 302 Intermediate Macroeconom ic Theory .................... 3 ECO 315 Econometrics ........................................................ ... 3 ECO 460 History of Econom i c Thought ................. ................ 3 Total .... .... .................... ....... .......... ...... ....... .... ..... ... .. ... ............... 12 Approved Electives Fifteen (15) hours of upper division economics electives selected i n consultation with and approved by the Departmen t of Economics .... ............. ................ ...... ........................ .. .. ........ .. 15 Total ........................... .... ............................ ......... ... ............ ........ 27 Electives With i n the School of Business .... ............ .......... .. ......... 9 Electives Outside the School of Business .. .. ...................... ...... 15 Program Total ................................................ .......................... 120 29

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School of Business Bachelor of Science Accounting Business Education and Communications Computer and Management Science Finance Management Marketing Urban Studies The School of Business offers majors in accounting business education and communications computer and management science, finance management and marketing The accounting major is designed to prepare students for a career in public, industr ial, tax systems, or governmental accounting. The business education major prepares students to teach business sub jects in public and private junior and senior high schools and community colleges The computer and management science major is designed to prepare students for a career in the rapidly expanding fields of business data processing systems, design, or management science The finance major is designed to prepare students for a career in corporate financial analysis insurance, real estate, investments the extractive industries or banking The major in management provides areas of emphasis in insurance personnel and human resource management production real estate, or small business management. The marketing major prepares students for entry positions in the dynamic areas of distribution/retailing, promotion/advertising sales, marketing research marketing for nonprofit organizations or marketing management. In order to be awarded a degree the student must conform to the College s general spec ificat ions for the bachelor s degree listed under Requ ir ements for all Degrees A summary of the course pr ogram which she or he must complete within the School of Business is as follows except for the Communications Multi-Major Business Opt ion. See the Communications Multi -Major section under Special Programs of this Bull etin. General Studies ....................................... .................................. 36 Business Core ................................ .... ........................................ 33 Major in School of Business ....... ..... ..... ........ ...... ..................... 27 Electives W i thin the School of Business .................... ............... 9 Electives Outside the School of Business ... ..... ..................... 15 Tota/ ............................................ .......................... ....... ...... 120 General Studies Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in accounting, business education and communications computer and management science econom ics (business emphasis) finance, management or marketing must complete the following general studies requirements : Semester Required Courses Hours ENG 101-102 Freshman Composition .......................... ............ 6 Humanities : SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speec h Communication ............. 3 Electives .... .......... ...... .......... ........................... ....... 5 Science and Mathematics : MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for the Management and Social Scien ces ....... ......... ........................ .... .4 MTH 132 Calculus for the Management and Social Sciences ......... ....................... ...................... 3 Physical or Biolog ical Science ............................... 3 Social and/or Behavioral Sciences: EGO 201 Principles of Economics Macro .... ................... 3 ECO 202 Princip les of Economics Micro ...... ...... ...... ..... 3 Elect ive s ....................... ........................ ................. 3 Career : BEG 200 Business and Interpersonal Communication s .... 3 Tota/ ........................................ ..... ............................................... 36 30 Business Core In addition to the general studies requirement students majoring in any area of business administration must complete the following business courses : Semester Required Courses Hours ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I .... .............. .............. ..... 3 ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ................. .................... 3 BEC 301 Business Research and Report Writing ........ ..... .... 3 GMS 201 Principles of Informa tion Systems ................... ... ... 3 GMS 231 Fundamental Business Statistics ...... ........... ........ 3 CMS 332 Quantitative Decision Making .................. ..... .......... 3 FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ........... ..... .......... ...... .... . .... 3 MGT 221 Business Law I ......... ................ ........... .................. 3 MGT 300 Pri nciples of Management .. ... .... ...... ........... ........ 3 MGT 495 Business Policies ........ ..................... ..................... 3 MKT 300 Principles of Market ing ........ ........................ .... .... 3 Tota/ .... ........ ...... ............................................... ....... ............... 33 Accounting Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours ACC 309 Income Tax I ......................................... ... ......... ..... 3 ACC 340 Cost A cco unting ................. ..... ....... ...... ...... ....... 3 AGG 351 Intermediate Accounting I ..... ........ ....... .................. 3 ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II ... ................ ... ........ ...... 3 ACC 420 Auditing .......... ............ .............. ........ ...................... 3 Tota/ ...................... ... .. ... ...... .. ........... .................. .................... 15 Students must select12 hours of accounting elect i ves or one of the follow ing areas of emphasis : Financial Emphasis (CPA)* ACC 310 Income Tax II .......... ...... ........... ........ ............... ..... 3 ACC 320 Governmental Accounting ...................................... 3 ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ........... ....... ............ .... ....... 3 ACG 452 Advanced Accounting II . ................... ...... ......... 3 Tota/ ........................... .......... .... .................................................. 12 'Those planning t o sit for the CPA examination should elect MGT 321. Managerial Emphasis (CMA)** ACC 330 Introduction to Accounting Systems ................. .... 3 ACG 341 Advanced Cost Account ing ............ ... ................... 3 FIN 300 Financial Mark ets and Inst itu tions ......................... 3 FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .......... ...................... ......... .... 3 ... ............................... ..... ............................. ......... .... ....... ... 12 "Those planning to sit lor the CM A examination should elect ECO 350 MGT 357 and MGT 45 3 Tax Emphasis ACC 310 Income Tax II ................................. ........................ 3 ACC 409 Tax Procedure and Research .......... ...................... 3 ACC 410 Tax Planning ..... ... .. .. ............ ........ ...................... 3 ACC 451 Advanced Accounting I ...... ........... .... ........... ......... 3 Total ............... ....... ............... ... ......... ...... ....... ...... .................. ... 12 Systems Emphasis AGC 330 Introduct io n to Accounting Systems ........ ............. 3 AGG 341 Advanced Cost Accounting .............................. ..... 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Sys t ems Analysis and D esign ...... ........ ........... .................. ................ 3 GMS 311 Advanced COBO L ........... ................ ...................... 3 Tota / ..... ... ...... ..................... ....... ..................... ...... ..... .......... ... ... 12

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Governmental Emphasis ACC 330 Introduction to Account i ng Systems .. ............ ........ 3 ACC 320 Governmental Account i ng ........... ...... .... ................ 3 ACC 451 Advanced Acco unting I ...... ..... .... ........................... 3 FIN 331 Managerial Finance II .................... .... ......... ........ 3 Total .............. ... .................. ........................ ........... ................. 12 Oil and Gas Emphasis FIN 320 F i nanc ial Manag e ment i n the ACC 445 .t..CC 455 FIN 331 or Extractive Industr i es ...... ..................................... ... 3 Oil and Gas Account i ng ... ............... ....... ............. 3 Taxation of Natural Resources ........... ..... ... ......... 3 Managerial Finan c e II ......... .... ....... ..... .... ..... ....... 3 FIN 410 Internat i onal F in an ci a l Management ... .... ...................... . ................... ... 3 Total .... ...... .... ................. ...... ..................... .... ... ............ ........ .:!3_ Total hours for Accounting Major ........ .............................. ....... 27 "'Co n s ult w ith depart m e nt f or emphasis stat u s Business Education and Communications Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours BEC 102 Intermediate Typewriting ... .......................... .... ... 3 BEC 354 Office Management and Analys i s ...... ..... ........ ... ... 3 BEC 360 Principles of Business Education ...... ...... .............. 2 BEC 361 Methods of Teaching Typewriting ... ... ................... 3 Total ............................ .... .... ................. .... ................ ................. 11 Students must choose two of the following teach i ng specialties ....... .................. ....... ...................... ..... ... ......... 16-18 Bookkeeping and Accounting ACC 209 Personal Income Taxes ...... ....... ........................... 3 or ACC 309 ACC 340 or ACC 351 BEC 363 Income Tax I ... ... ..... .... .... ...... .. .. ... .... ......... ...... ..... 3 Cost Accounting .......................................... ....... .... 3 Intermediate Accounting I ............... .... .................... 3 Methods of Teaching .................... ....... .......... ..... 3 Bookkeeping Accounting and Basic Business Subjects ............. .... ....................... 3 Consumer Economics and Basic Business BEC 363 Methods of Teach i ng Bookkeeping Accounting and Basic Business Sub j ects ......... 3 BEC 402 Ethics in Business ............. .... .............. ................ 3 FIN 225 Personal Money Management ............................... 3 Data Processing BEC 498 Independent Study Teaching Data Processing ............. ................................. .... .... ..... 2 CMS 211 COBOL ...... ....... ........... ................. .... ...... .... . 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analys i s and Design ... .... .................. ... ... . ...................... 3 'To teach bus i ness courses at the publ i c school l evel i n Colorado a vocational education credential is required. The three courses needed for vocational cert i fication are available thro u gh extens ion c ourses offered by Colorado State Un i vers i ty or the Univer s i ty of Northern C o lorado The speci fic courses are : Foundat ions / Philosophy of V oc at iona l Educ at ion ; Coordinating Techniques ; and Youth Organ i zations Secretarial BEC 112 or BEC 114 BEC 222 BEC 362 Intermediate Shorthand ............. ............................ 3 Beginning Speedwrit i ng .......................................... 3 Office Practices and Procedures .... ... ... .............. 3 Methods of Teaching Stenog r aphy ........ ............. 2 School of Business Semester Required Education Courses Hours EDU 221 Processes of Education in Urban Secondary Schools ..... .......... ....................... 3 EDU 222 Field Exper i ences i n Urban Secondary Schools ................................. ............ ... 2 EDU 320 The Adolescent as a Learner ............... ................ 3 EDU 321 Secondary School Curriculum and Classroom Management School Teachers ... 3 EDU 322 F i eld Exper i ence in Tutoring and Materi als Construction ....... ........................... 2 EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Classroom ........... ...... ... ........... ... .... ........ ............ 3 EDU 361 The Use of Medi a in Educat i on ..... ....... .................. 3 EDU 429 Student Teaching and Sem i nar : Secondary .......................................................... ... 12 RDG 328 Teaching of Reading in Content Areas : Secondary ... ............ ...... ............... . .......... 3 Total ................................. ......... ... ..... ................ .... .................... 34 Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications: Business Sponsored by the Department of Business Education and Communications This communication area of emphas i s g i ves the student a n exposure to basic areas of bus i ness study and pro v ides th e student with the theory and practice most commonly u s ed i n contemporary business commun i cation (See a BEC adv isor) In addition the student must complete the General Studie s for a bachelor s degree and select a suitable minor Required Core COM 272 Introduction to Communicat i o n Co n cep t s and Systems ... ..... ................................................. 3 SPE 374 Psychology of Communicat i on or SPE 410 Techniques of Persuasion ...................................... 3 Tota/ ......... ........ .... ......... ........................................ ... ............ ... 6 Required area of emphasis courses 24 hours from the following ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ........................ .............. 3 ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ........................... ......... 3 BEC 200' Business and Interpersonal Communicat i ons .... . .... .............. ..... ... ....... .... .... 3 BEC 301' Business Research and Report Writing ................. 3 BEC 323' Listening and Logic ......... . .......... ... ... ..... ......... 3 BEC 499 Advanced Field Experience/Internship ...... .... .... arr CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ......................... 3 CMS 231 Fundamental Bus i ness Stat i stics ........ ........... ..... 3 CMS 332 Quantitative Decis i on Maki ng ... .... ................ .......... 3 FIN 330 Managerial Finance I ....... ................. ......... ........... 3 MGT 221 Business Law I ........................................... ............ 3 MGT 300 Principles of Management ...................................... 3 MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ... .... ........ ....... ...... ............. 3 'Th i s c ourse is s pecifically r e qu ire d Electives 24 Twelve hours of electives from any of the areas of e mpha si s and for the free electives list .... ......... ..... .... .......................... .:!3_ Total hrs for multi major ................. ... ................. ..................... .42 Computer and Manag eme nt Science Major for Bachelor of Science Semes ter Required Courses Hou r s CMS 210 FORTRAN ................ ... ..... ............................ .......... 3 CMS 211 COBOL ... ... .............................. ......................... ... 3 31

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School of Business CMS 305 F u n da mentals o f S ys tems Analysis and D e sign ..... ................ . .................. . .... ...... ... 3 T o tal ..................... ....................... .. ... ... ... ......... .......... ... .... 9 One of the following area s of emphasis must be chosen for an additional eighteen (18) l)ours : Information Systems Emphasis CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management .................. ....................... ............... ... 3 CMS 322 Ana ly sis of Computer Hardwa re and Software ..................... ................ .................. 3 CM S 441 Management Informati on Systems ..... ................ 3 Approved CMS electives ................... ...... .... ....... ....................... 9 Total ...................... ................. ................. ... ....... .... .... ...... . 18 Management Science Empha si s CMS 331 Business Forecasting Meth ods ............... .... .......... 3 CMS 431 Management Science Techniques ..... ....... ..... ....... 3 CMS 439 Case Studies in Man agement Sci ence ...................... . ...................... ........... ...... 3 CMS 440 Simulation of Manage men t Processes .... .... ........... .... ......... ......... ..... .... ... .. ... 3 Approved CMS electives .................................. ......... ....... ........... 6 Total ... .. ... . ... .... ... ...... ..... ........... ........... . .... .... .... ... 18 Computer Analyst Emphas i s CMS 214 Funda menta ls of Programming-Assembler ........ ..... ... ..................... .... ....... ....... ........ 3 CMS 306 File Design and Data Base Management .............. 3 CMS 309 Job Control Language and Operating Systems ... .... ...... .............. ......... .......... 3 CMS 314 Advanced Asse mbler Language .... ........... ....... ...... 3 CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Har dwa r e and Software ......... ... .......... ...................... ... ....... .... 3 Approved CMS e l ectives .......... ....... ...... ..... ............................ 3 T otal ... ...... .................. ............. .... ..... . ................... ........ ....... 18 Systems Deve lopment Emphasis Semester Required Courses Hours CMS 306 F ile Desi gn and Data Base Management CMS CMS CMS CMS 311 322 405 407 Systems .............................. ........ ........ ......... ......... 3 Adv anced COBOL ....... ....... ................................... 3 Hardware and Software ....... ........ . ................. 3 Advanced Ana l ys i s and Des i gn ............ ........... ... 3 Systems Development and Impleme ntation .......... 3 Choose six ( 6 ) additional hours fro m the following: CMS 323 Data Communicat i ons ...... ... ...... ...... ........... ..... 3 CMS 324 Computer Control and Auditab i l ity ..... .................... 3 CMS 325 Off ice Aut omat i on ...... ............. .......... ..... ............. 3 CMS 406 Advanced Data Base Management .............. .... ...... 3 CMS 441 Management Information Systems ..................... 6 T otal .... .... ... ... ..... .... .... .... . .............. ......... ......... ..... ....... ......... 18 Total hours for CMS major .. ... ......... ....................... ............... . 27 NOTE: A maximum o f 1 5 semest er hour s of pr ogrammin g c ou r ses i s allowed in the CMS m ajo r Finance Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Requ i red Courses Hour s ACC 309 Income Tax I ..... . ............. ..... ..... ....... ............ 3 ACC 351 I nter med i ate A ccc oun t ing I .... ........... ..... ................. 3 32 FIN 300 F i nanc ial Markets and Inst i tut i ons ......................... 3 FIN 331 Managerial Finance II . .... ....... ................... .... ... 3 FIN 360 Investments .......... . ........ ..................... .... ....... ..... 3 FIN 435 Financia l P rob l ems and Policy ................. . ........ 3 T o tal ........................................................ ........... ................ .... 18 Choose nine (9) additional hours from the following to supplement an area of emphas i s : Insurance MGT 342 MGT 343 MGT 345 Princip les o f Insu ranc e .... .......... ....... ..... ... ............. 3 Prope rty and Liabilit y Insurance ........... ........... ..... . ....................... ........ 3 Governmental Ins urance and Insured Employee Ben ef i ts ... ................................ 3 Total ......... ................................................. ....... ........ ........... 9 Real Estate MGT 380 MGT 382 MGT 384 Pr i ncipl es of Real Estate ..... .... ........... ............. .... 3 Real Estate F i na nce ................... ................ ..... .... 3 Real Estate Law ..... ..... .... ........ . ......................... 3 Total ... ................................ . .... ... ..... ..................................... 9 Financ i al Managemen t ACC 352 Intermediate Acco unt ing II .......... ................ ............ 3 MGT 321 Business Law II ...... ........................... ................. .... 3 MGT 342 Principles of I ns urance ........................................... 3 Tota l ............. ....................... .......... ..................................... ......... 9 Investments ACC 410 FIN 460 MGT 380 Tax P lann ing ..... ......... ................. ..... .................... 3 Secur i t i es Analysis ........ ......................................... 3 Prin c iples of Real Estate ............................. .... ....... 3 Tota l ........ ........... ...... ...... .......................... ..... ....... .... .................... 9 Extractive Industries FIN 320 Finan cia l Management i n the Extractive Ind ustr i es ............................. .... .............. 3 ACC 445 Oil and Gas Accounting ............ .............................. 3 ACC 455 T axat i on of Natural Resour ce s .............................. 3 Total .................. ......................... ............... ................ .................... 9 Thos e selec ting E x tr active Industries a s t heir area of emphasis m us t ele ct Geology to fulf ill Sci ence require ment cons ult w ith dep artment for emp h a sis s t atus Commercial Bank ing ECO 465 Advanced M o netary Theory ................ .................. 3 FIN 370 The Management o f Comm erc ial Banks ......... ...................................... ................... 3 FIN 470 Specia l T o p i cs i n Bank Management ......... .............................. ................... 3 Total .............. ... ....................... ...................................... .............. 9 Personal Financ i al Management MGT 342 Princi ples of I n sura n ce ........................................... 3 MGT 380 Pr i ncipl es of R e a l Est at e ........................................ 3 ACC 410 Tax Plann ing ........................................... ... .. ...... ..... 3 Total ....................................................................... ....................... 9 International Financia l Managem ent FIN 410 Internat ional F i nancial M a n a g ement ...................... 3 MKT 371 Internat io na l Marketing ............................... ........... 3 Appro ved Business E l e ctiv e .... ....................... ....... ................. 3 Total .................. ................ ...... ............. ...................................... 9

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Accounting Emphasis ACC 340 Cost Accounting ............. ........ ........ ....... ....... .. ... ..... 3 ACC 352 Intermediate Accounting II ...... ................................ 3 ACC 310 Income Tax II .............. ...... .... .......... ........... ........ .... 3 Total ............ .......... ............................................. .......... ..... ....... 9 Semester hours for area of emphasis chosen ................ ...... ..... 9 Total hours for major ...................... .......... ...... ........................... 27 Management Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours ECO 350 Managerial Econom i cs ........ .............. ............ .... ...... 3 Students select one of the following areas of emphasis: Insurance MGT MGT MGT MGT 342 343 344 345 Principles of Insurance ........................ ....... ............ 3 Property and Liab ili ty Insurance ............................. 3 Life and Health Insurance ................. ................ ...... 3 Governmental Insurance and Insured Employee Benef i ts ..................................... 3 MGT 346 R i sk Management ...................................... ............. 3 MGT 400 Organizationa l Dec i sion Making ............ .... ............. 3 Approved Managemen t electives ................................ ................ 6 Total ............................................................................................ 24 Management MGT 322 Legal Envir onment of Business ............................. 3 MGT 353 Personnel Management ...... .................................... 3 MGT 355 Production Management ......................................... 3 MGT 400 Organ i zational Deci sion Making ............................. 3 MGT 453 Organ i zational Behav i or ........................... .... .......... 3 MGT 461 Cases in Management .... .... ............................ ........ 3 Approved Management elec tives .......... .... ............ .......... ........ .... 6 Total ............... ...... .............. ......... ........... ............................ ..... 24 Human Resource Management MGT 353 Personnel Manage ment .......................................... 3 MGT 357 Labor/Employee Rel ations ................................. .... 3 MGT 375 Performance Appraisa l ........................................... 3 MGT 400 Organizati ona l Decis ion Making ................... .... ...... 3 MGT 461 Cases i n Management ........................................ .. .. 3 MGT 4 62 Compensation Administration .......................... ...... 3 Approved Management elect i ves ...... .............. .... .............. .......... 6 Total ............... .................. .... ...... ........ ............ .... ... ... .... ......... ... 24 Production Management ACC 340 Cost Accounting ...................................................... 3 MGT 355 P r odu c t i on Management ..................................... .... 3 MGT 400 Organizational Decision Making ............................. 3 MGT 405 Purchasing and Materials Management ................ 3 MGT 455 Systems-Project Management ............................... 3 MGT 461 Cases in Management ............................................ 3 Approved Manage men t electives ................................................ 6 Total ................... .......... ...... ....... ............. ............ .... ... ... ......... 24 Real Estate MGT 380 MGT 382 MGT 384 MGT 400 Principles of Real Estate ........................................ 3 Real Estate Finance ................................................ 3 Real Estate Law ...................................................... 3 Organizational Decis ion Making ............................. 3 S ch ool o f Business MGT 484 Real Estate A ppraisal ............ ................................ 3 MGT 485 Commercia l and Investment Real Estate ............. .. .. .................................. ........... 3 Approved Management electives ................................... .. ........... 6 Total .......... ...... ....... ................ ...... ... ... ........................... ............ 24 Small Bus i ness Management ACC 308 Small B usiness Taxation .. .. .. .................. .... ............ 3 M GT 321 Business Law II ...................................................... 3 MGT 356 Small Business Manage m ent .... .... .............. .... ....... 3 MGT 400 Organizat i onal Decision Making ............................. 3 M GT 457 Adv a n ced Topics in Small Business ...................... 3 MGT 458 Real Cases in Small Busi n ess ........ ....................... 3 Approved Management electives .... .............. ...... ........................ 6 Total .... ....... .......... ............................................... ............... ... 24 Semester hours for area of emphasis chosen .. ....................... 24 Total hours for major ................ .......... ................ ....................... 27 Mar k eting Ma jor for B ach e lor of Scienc e Semester R equir ed C o u rse s Hours MKT 301 Marketing Research .... .. .. .................. ............ .......... 3 MKT 311 A dvertising ............................................................... 3 M K T 316 Sales Management .... ............................................. 3 MKT 331 Co n sumer Behavior .. .. ...... ...................................... 3 MKT 455 Seminar in Marketing M anagement ....................... 3 MKT 456 Advanced Marketing Problems ................ .............. 3 Plus nine (9) hours of Marketing e l ectives ............................... Total hours for major ...... ............ .............................. ............ ..... 27 Mino r s Offered by the Sc hool of Business The m i nors offered by the Schoo l o f B usiness a r e specifically created for n o nbusiness major s Because prerequisite requirements are involved in each set of courses any student min o ring in any of t h e areas below should con t act an advisor. Ac cou n ting M i nor The Accou n ting minor is desig ned to provide students majoring in areas outside of bus i ness the opportunity to develop some knowledge of accounting Semester R e qu ired C ou r ses Hours ACC 201 Prin ciples of A ccou n ting I ............ ........................... 3 ACC 202 P rinciples of Accounting II ........ ................ .... .......... 3 ACC 309 Income Tax I .......... .......... ........................... .. .......... 3 ACC 340 Cos t A ccounting .. .................... ...... ......................... 3 ACC 351 Intermediate Accounting I .... ....... ........................ .... 3 ACC 352 Intermed i ate Accounting II .............. ........................ 3 Accounting Electives ...... .................... ............ ........ 3 Total ........................ ............ ......... ... ........................ .... .... ........... 21 Bus i ness Communications Minor T h e Business Communications minor is designed to give nonbusiness students some o rien tat i on to the business field espec iall y in areas that deal heavily w ith any aspect of communications Semester R eq uired Cours es Hours BEC 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications ...... ........... ......................... ......... 3 BEC 301 Busin e ss Research and Report Writing ....................... ....... ...... .................... .......... 3 33

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School of Business BEG 323 COM 272 Listening and Logic .... ..... .................................. .... 3 Introduction to Communication Concepts and Systems ....... ................ ......... .... ........................... 3 SPE 310 B u siness and Professional Speaking ................... 3 Tota/ .... ......................... ..... .. ... ... .................. ............... .............. 15 Choose six (6) hours of elec tives from the followin g courses : BEG 222 Office Practices and Procedures .. ... ........ ....... ..... 3 BEG 223 Word Processing ... ........... ........... ....... ................... 3 BEG 354 Office Management and Analysis .. ... ............. ....... 3 CMS 201 Pr inc iples of Information Systems .... ..... .................. ..... .................. ......... ...... 3 MGT 300 Principles of Management .................. ........... ........ 3 Semester ho urs of electives chosen ....... .......................... .......... 6 Hours for minor .......... ............. ................................................... 21 Data Processing Minor The Data Processing mino r is designed to give nonbusiness students a career skill in computer programming for business. Semester Required Courses Hours CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ......... ................ 3 CMS 210 FORTRAN .................... ........... ............ .... ............ 3 CMS 211 COBOL .... ................................................. ............. 3 CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming Assembler ........ . ......... ... ... .................. .............. 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design .............. ...... ..................... ........ ...... .... 3 CMS 311 Advanced COBOL ..................................... ..... ..... 3 CMS 314 Advanced Assembler Language .... .............. .... ....... 3 Tota/ ....... ..................... ............. ........... ................ ........ ............... 21 Economics Minor The Economics minor is des i gned for nonbusiness majors and provides them with an opport unity to acqu ire a general knowledge of the operation of economic systems and instituti ons as well as the quantitative tools necessary for analytical resea rch and thought. Semester Required Courses Hours EGO 201 P r inciples of Economics-Macro .......... ....... ......... 3 EGO 202 Principles of Economics-Micro ................. ..... ...... ... 3 Electi'(es A minimum of 12 additiona l semester hours of upper-div ision Economics cou rse s selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Economics Finance Minor The Finance minor is designed to prov ide students majoring in areas outside of business the opportun ity to develop some knowledge of finance Semester Required Courses Hours ACC 201 Principles of Accounting I ............... ................. ....... 3 ACC 202 Principles of Accounting II ............... ..... .................. 3 ACC 309 Income Tax I ...... ................ .................. ................. 3 FIN 300 Financial Markets and Inst itutions . .................... 3 FIN 330 Managerial Finance I .................... ..... ............... 3 FIN 331 Managerial F i nance II ... .... .................... .... ......... .... 3 FIN 360 Investments ... ..... ............................. ........... ........ 3 Tota/ . ......... . ..... .... ....... ................................... .... ......... .... 21 Management Minor The Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and provides them with the opportunity to d evelop an understanding of business and sufficient familiarity with managerial skills to work a business env iro nment. 34 Semester Required Courses Hours MGT 221 Business Law I ........... ....... ....... ..... .... ...... .... ..... .... 3 MGT 300 Principles of Management ............................ ........ 3 MGT 353 Personnel Manage m ent ........... ...... .................. ..... 3 MGT 355 Production Management .................. .... .... ............ 3 MGT 453 Organizational Behavior ...... ...... ....... ............. ........ 3 Approved Management Elective ......... ......... .................. .............. 3 Tota/ ............ ..... ............... ..... ......... ........................ ............ ...... 18 Human Resource Management Minor The Human Resource Management minor is designed for nonbusiness majors and prov ides them with the opportun ity to develop an understanding of personnei/HRM in business and government. Seme ster Required Courses Hours MGT 300 Principles of Management ................ ... .................. 3 MGT 353 Personnel Management ...... .... ................ ....... ........ 3 MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relatio ns ... ... ... ................ .. .. ........ 3 MGT 375 Performance Appraisal ... ... .............. ...................... 3 MGT 462 Compensation Administration .......... ...................... 3 Approved Management Elective . .......... .................................. 3 Tota/ ........ ................ ....... ....... .......... ... .... ...... ..... ................... 18 Marketing Minor The Marketing minor offers the non business major an overview and understanding of the functiona l business area of marketing Semester Required Courses Hours MKT 300 Principles of Marketing ............................. ..... ...... 3 MKT 311 Advertising ....... ................................ .................... 3 MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ...... ......... ..... .......... ........ ..... 3 MKT 455 Semina r in Marketing Management .... ................. 3 Plus six ( 6 ) hours of Marketing elect ives ....... ...... .................... 6 Total .............. ................ ............... ..... .... ...... .... ........ ............. .. 18 Office Administration Minor The Off ice Administration minor attempts to develop a moderate degree of skills while emphasizing promotional possib ilit ies to superv i sory and beginning office management posit ions Semester Required Courses Hours BEG 102 Intermediate Typewriting ............ ...... ............ 3 BEG 105 Operation of Calculating Machines .... .................... 3 BEG 111 Beginning Gregg Shorthand ...... .......... ................... 3 BEG 222 Office Practices and Procedures ........... ..... .... .... 3 BEG 354 Office Management and Analysis ........ ........ ......... 3 Choose one of the following elective courses : ................... . .... 3 BEG 223 Word Processing ..... ............ ........................ .... 3 BEG 323 Listening and Logic ...... ........ .......... ................... 3 BEG 402 Ethics in Business .... ....... ...... ............................ 3 Total .... .... .......... .... ......... ........ ............. .... ....... ........ ..... ...... 18 Product ion Management Minor The Production Management minor is des igned for non-business majors and provides them with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the production process and managerial funct ions as they relate to production and operations Semester Required Courses Hours MGT 300 Principles of Management ..... .... ..... ...... .......... ...... 3 MGT 355 Productio n Management ... .................... ............. 3 MGT 357 Labor/Employee Relations ............. .... ..... ............... 3 MGT 405 Purchasing and Materia l s Management ..... ......... .. 3 MGT 455 Systems Project Managem ent .. ... .............. ....... 3 MGT 461 Cases in Ma nage ment .......... .............. .... ......... ...... 3 Total ..... ............. .................. ..... ....... ............ ............. ... ......... 18

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Real Estate Minor The Rea l Estate minor is designed for non -business majors and provides them with basic course requirements for GRI, prelicensing preparation and required education hours for rec e rtification Semester Required Courses Hours MGT 380 Pri nc i ples of Real Estate ....... ...... .... .......... ... ........ 3 MGT 382 Real Estate Finance ........... ....... .............. ...... .... ..... 3 MGT 384 Real Estate Law ..... ... ................. ....... ......... .. ........... 3 MGT 484 Real Estate App raisal ............................................ 3 MGT 485 Commercial and Investment Real Estate ............... 3 Approved Management Elective .... ..... ..... ..... .... ....... ... .. .. ... ........ 3 Tota/ ................. ....... ...... .. .... .................... ....... .......... ...... .... 18 Systems Management Minor The Systems Management minor is designed to give non-business students a basic understanding of business data processing with particular emphasis on systems analysis and design Semester Required Course s Hours CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ......... ......... ...... 3 CMS 211 COBOL .................................................................... 3 CMS 231 Fundamental Business Statist i cs ...... ... .......... ..... 3 CMS 305 Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design ........................ ......... .......................... 3 CMS 322 Analysis of Computer Hardware and Software ............ ..... ......... ....... ..... .......... ............. 3 CMS 441 Management Information Systems ........................ 3 CMS 451 Data Process ing Management ...... .......... .............. 3 Tota/ ............................ ....... ................ ..... ..... ..... ........................ 21 School of Business 35

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Institute for Entrepreneurship Institute for Entrepreneurship Through the Institute the resources of the School of Business the Urban Studies program and the various segments of the College will be utilized to provide managerial and academic expertise for urban entrepreneurs. Special attention will be addressed to nontraditional entrepreneurs within the urban focus. With in the Institute will be housed the Urban Studies Program an i nterdisciplinary degree which offers the following acade mic programs : Urban Studies MSC/UCD The Institute offers course work le ading to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Urban Studies The Bache lor of Science degree is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in quantitative aspects of Urban Studies Course work is jointly offered by MSC and UCD and there is a common major. The emphasis of this program is an interdisciplinary approach to learning To support this approach six areas of emphasis are offered within the major. 1 Local Government Urban Planning 2 Housing Patterns and Alternatives 3 Cultural Lifestyles 4 Transportat io n and Communication 5 Commun i ty Service Development (CSD) 6 Bus iness Management and Urbanizat ion Urban Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts The requirements total 46 semester hours and inclu de: 1. 25-27 hours of Core Courses 2 9 hours selected from each of four areas of Process 3 12 hours in an area of emphasis to be selected by the student. 4 6 additional hours for a Bachelor of Science 5 Urban Studies Majors who do not wish to pursue a minor in some other d iscipline will be required to take at least 14 semester hours for a total of 60 semester hours. The 14 semester hours must be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor. 6 All courses listed from outside of URS are as of the 1983-84 MSC Bullet in 7. There are different requirements for the CSD and Bus iness Management and Urbanization emphases. Core Courses : URS URS URS URS URS URS 100 200 300 380 489 499' Semester Hours Introduction to Urban Studies ..... . ....... ............ 3 Ins i de Look at Urban Inst itutions ................ ........ 3 World Patterns of Urbanization ....... .... .............. 3 Applied Urban Research Methods ........ .............. 3 Interdisciplinary Seminar ...... ... ...... ..... ............... 4 Internsh ip in Urban Studies ... .............................. 3 Advanced Writing Course which may be taken from Comm unity Service Development English or Communications ........................... ............. '3-4 Statistics which may be taken from Economics Geography Mathematics Psychology or Sociology ........................................................ '3-4 Total .... .... ...................... ..................... ...... ........................... 25-27 cso students may elect to fulfill these requirements within the CSD area of emphasis. A COURSE IS REQUIRED FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF PROCESS FOR A TOTAL OF AT LEAST 9 HOURS CSD STUDENTS WILL TAKE ONE COURSE FROM TWO AREAS FOR A TOTAL OF AT LEAST 6 HOURS SUBSTITUTIONS FOR THESE COURSES SHOULD BE ARRANGED THROUGH THE INSTITUTE S ADVISOR. Urban Spatial Structuring URS 310 Internal St ructure of the City ... ........ .................... 3 URS 351 Community Deve lopmen t and Plann i ng ........ ...... 3 URS 400 Urban Simulat i on/Game ..... ....... ......... ............... .4 GEG 204 Geography of Denver ...................... ..................... 3 36 GEG 360 GEG 461 Urban Geography ....................... ... .. .. ................. 3 Urban and Regional Planning ....... ...................... 3 Urban Political Processes URS 210 An Analys i s of Urban Boundaries ...................... 3 URS 350 Emerging Urban Political Systems ...................... 3 URS 400 Urban Simulation/Game ...................................... .4 PSC 300 American State and Local Government ............. .4 PSC 302 Introduct i on to Public Administration .................. 3 SOC 371 Politics and Power ............ ...... ............ .................. 3 Urban Economic Processes ECO 201 Princip l es of Economics Macro .............. ...... .... 3 ECO 202 Principles of Economics Micro ... ....................... 3 ECO 330 State and Local Finance ................ .... ......... ........ 3 ECO 335 Urban Economic Analys is ........... ......... .... ..... ....... 3 ECO 340 Transportation Economics .................... ... .... ....... 3 ECO 345 Environmental Economics ............. .... .................. 3 SOC 324 Poverty in America .............. .... .... ..... .................... 3 Urban Social Processes GEG 132 Geog raphic Analysis of Current Social Issues ............................................ ........... 3 GEG 362 Land Use and Population .... ................................ 3 GEG 462 Land Use : Residential .......................................... 3 SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Liv ing .......... .... ......... ............... 3 SOC 324 Poverty in America ........................... ................... 3 Areas of Emphasis In each of the first four following areas of emphasis, the student will select a minimum of 12 hours with a minimum of 6 in Urban Stud ies. The student may take any combination of interdisciplinary courses related to the area of emphasis to be selected in consultation with an advisor One of the courses should be a skills course related to the area of emphasis Local Government Urban Planning This area of emphasis concentrates on the basic conceptual and theoret ical planning processes as they relate to and actually appear in urban government occupations and professions. The area of emphasis is designed for studen ts seeking entry i nto government occupations or seeking advanced study in Public Adm inistration or Urban Planning beyond the bachelor s degree. URS 250 URS 389 URS 450 URS 289 URS 400 URS 451 URS 351 URS 410 URS 471 Housing Patterns and Alternatives This area of emphasis w i ll concentrate on the assembly and development of residential land the nature of public and private programs to provide hous i ng and the maintenanc e and rebuilding of neighborhoods A broad range of topics will include the evolution of public intervent i on in housing and residential renewal, the conflict between physical and human criteria in housing decision s and constraints on the public s ability to deal with hou sing issues Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for graduate work andjor employment with a wide range of public and private housing agencies URS 171 URS 289 URS 230 URS 330 URS 250 URS 389 MGT 380 Cultural Lifestyles URS 400 URS 450 MGT 300 This area of emphasis concentrates on the impact s on the urban landscape of the lifestyles of various cultures be they ethnic

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racial, chronological religious, economic or gender. The consequences of these impacts are viewed as among the most significant determinants of urban structure form, function and social interact ion. The student is provided with specialized training and experience for entry into professions with public or private agencies which deal directly with these groups w i thin a pluralistic urban environment. URS 250 URS 389 URS 410 URS 471 URS 371 URS 400 Transportat ion and Communication The Transportation-Communication area of emphasis has three basic academic foci : (1) to aid students in refining their perceptions of the various networks that exist in the urban setting ; (2) to prov ide tools and techniques to analyze these networks; and (3) to increase the students understanding that transportation and communication are interdependent with such factors as land use, politics and demography. Completion of this area of emphasis provides a foundation for a professional career or further graduate training URS 228 URS 328 URS 400 URS 450 URS 289 URS 389 Community Service Development This area of emphasis comb i nes classroom theory and practical experience in a comprehens ive format. Students' formal classroom e xperiences are supplemented by at least twenty hours per week during two semesters in placement experiences All field work will be c arefully supervised and student progress will be measured against learning objectives cooperatively developed for each c o urse by the student agency superv i sor and the College coordinator or faculty member This area o f e mphasis is designed to prov ide an educational program for a very specific administrative level small commun i ty-based non prof i t serv ice agenc ies and organizations The direct ive skills include development and management of volunteer programs fund raising proposal wr i ting program and human resource development. Course Requirements Include : 1. URS Required Core Courses .................... ............ .......... 16 2 Selected Electives ............................ .................... ...... ....... 7 3. CSD Area of Emphasis CSD 200 Introduction to Community Service Development ............. ......... ...................... ............. 1 CSD 201 Principles of Community Serv ice Development .. 4 CSD 300 Applied Development and Sem i nar I ................... 2 CSD 321 Conflict Resolution and Decision-Making .......... 2 CSD 341 Development and Use of Inexpensive Media ..... 3 CSD 401 Ass essmen t and Eval uation of Non-Prof i t Programs .............................................................. 3 CSD 402 Fundra i s ing and Proposal Writ ing for Commun i ty S e rvices .................................... .. .4 CSD 431 Development and Administration of Volunteer Programs ................ .... ...................................... 3 CSD 451 Politics of Agency Survival .................................. 3 Total .................................. .............................. ......................... .47 Business, Management and Urbanization This area of emphas i s will st ress the i nterrelat i onsh i ps between the private business sector and the public pol i cy and urban life designers and dec i s i on-makers. Publ i c sector / private sector { policy makers cooperation or the lack thereof in the future will have a direct effect on urban lifestyle. I ssues to be addressed or focused upon i n this emphasis are : the roles of bus i ness and urban govern m ent i n the overa ll pr o cess of urban i zation ; the functions of manag ing business and managing government; the importan c e of sales tax reve n ues to both bus i ness and government and, with less governmental emp l oyment in the future the cha nges that are i n store for small and med ium size businesses. Thi s area of emphas i s i s e xpressly d i rected toward the student seek ing an undergraduate major in management or Institute for Entrepreneurship admin istration of government organizations at the local state or federal level or in management positions in private industry Course Requirements Include : 1 URS Required Core Courses .... .................. .............. 25-27 2 Business, Management Urbanization Emphasis ............ 21 MGT 1 00 Introduction to Business .......... .................. .......... 3 MGT 300 Principles of Management ................................... 3 MGT 356 Small Bus i ness Management ...... ...... .................. 3 MKT 300 Principles of Marketing FIN 300 Princ iples of Finance ............... .................. .. .. ....... 3 Six Hours to be Selected From: ECO 350 Managerial Economics MGT 454 Organizational Behavior MGT 457 Advanced Topics in Small Business MKT 301 Marketing Research MKT 311 Advertis ing MKT 330 Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ACC 308 Small Business Taxation Major for Bachelor of Science Urban Studies The requirements for the major i n Urban Studies leading to the Bachelo r of Science degree includes six semester hours in addition to the Bachelor of Arts degree The six hours must be taken from the following list of courses CMS 201 Principles of Information Systems ....................... 3 CMS 21 0 FORTRAN ............................................................. 3 CMS 214 Fundamentals of Programming ........... .... ............ 3 CMS 231 Fundamentals of Business Statistics .................. 3 PSY 311 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences ........ ........... ....... .......... .... ............ ..... 3 PSY 312 Inferent ial Statistics .............................................. 3 MTH 131 Finite Mathematics for Management and Social Sciences ....... .......... ....... ..................... .... .4 The Contract Major A contract major for Urban Studies may be arranged by direct consultation with an Urban Studies Facu lty Advisor with i n the Economics Department. This major can be developed to meet specific needs and interests of students that cannot be met through the more conventional structure of the Urban Studies major For example a person might want to emphasize an educational or an occupational interest within his or her major such as airport plann ing and management, water resources management or community health behavior The required core courses as listed for the B A degree will hold for the contract major The other 24 semester hours needed for this major will be agreed upon by a committee of faculty advisors from Urban Studies and other affected departments and the student. Urban Studies Minor Minors for both the Bachelor of Science degree and the Bachelor of Arts degree are available The m inor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to her or his occupational and educational goals Students in consultation with the department offering related courses and the students Urban Studies faculty adv isor will develop individual minors which will reflect the best poss ibl e elective curriculum, and will insure that an urban emphasis is maintained Total for the Minor .... .................................... 21 Semester Hours Required Courses .... ....................................... 9 Semester Hours URS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies .............................. 3 URS 200 An Ins ide Look at Urban Institutions .... .............. 3 COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing ...... ........ .......... 3 Elective Courses ....................... ............ ... .... 12 Semester Hours Twelve additional semester hours are required to complete the minor The elective courses are to be selected in consultation with a URS faculty advisor. 37

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School of Letters Arts and Sciences School of Letters, Arts and Sciences The School of Letters Arts and Sciences offers programs in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Science and Mathematics which are designed to provide a high quality traditional liberal arts education. The programs are structured to provide flex ibility in meeting the needs of the urban student and can be directed toward personal, occupational, and professional goals in a rapidly changing world Each of the departments within the School provides comprehensive academic programs with many options to fulfill the multiple needs of a diverse urba n college population. The Letters Arts and Sciences c u rric ulum amplifies the programs of every other academic area of the College by offering the wide range of courses generally included i n the total educational mission of an accredited institution Letters, Arts and Sciences studies aim toward the development of perspective and intellectual strength for the endeavors of a lifetime. The School of Letters Arts and Sciences is fully engaged in expanding career programs that combine the preparations and broad background elements essential for educational sufficiency in today s urban community In harmony with the bas ic philosophy and goals of Met ropoli tan State College the School of Letters Arts and Sciences assumes a major role in encouraging and preparing students to participate fully in the challenges and opportunities of modern life The School of Letters Arts and Sciences departmental majors and minors lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science deg ree Division of H u m anities The Human ities co mpr ise the offerings of the departments of Art, English, Modern Languages Music Philosophy and Speech. In each of these areas programs are available leading to the Bachelor s degree, and in conjunct io n with programs in Educat ion, students may become certified teachers i n these areas at the secondary level (except Philosophy). Several departments offer more specifically focused emphases within the i r areas such as the Journal ism program and the Preprofessional Wr itin g program in the Department of English and the Performance major in Musi c These areas ot emphasis are identified i n the individual depart mental l i st ings Department of Art The Department of Art offers a full range of studio art courses in the areas of: Fine Arts (drawing painting printmak i ng photography and sculpture) ; Applied Arts (adverti sing design and product and ind ustrial design ) ; Crafts (ceramics metalwork and jewelry making and des ign in wood); and Art History (studies which include an emphasis in contemporary and modern art courses) Art Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree Semester Core Requirements For All Art Majors Hour s ART 110 D rawing Pro cesses and Concepts I .......... ....... 3 ART 111 Draw ing Pro cesses and Concepts II ...... ..... ..... .... 3 ART 120 Design Pro cesse s and Concepts I .... ...... ....... . 3 ART 121 Des ign Pro cesses and Concepts II .... .... . . . 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Imp ressio nism to 1960 ...... 3 ART 202 Survey ot Con tempor ary Art: 1960 to the Pre sen t .................. ........ ............ ....................... ..... 3 Total ................ . .... ............ ........... ............ .................... .... ...... 18 Students may choose one of four areas of emphasis : Art History Fine Arts App lied Arts or Crafts Art History Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Art History (upper d i vis ion) .............. ......... .................. ............. 18 Fine Arts .... ................ .......................... .... ......... ..... ........... .... 6 Applied Arts ......... ....... ............ .... ..... ................. ............... ....... 6 Crafts .... ........... .. ... .... . ..... ............................................ ........ ..... 6 Electives .... ........ ... ................................................................ ..... 6 Total ........................ ........ ................ ................ ........................ .42 38 Fine Arts Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Fine A rts ..... ..... ...................... ............. .... .... ......................... ...... 18 Applied Arts .. ......................... ..... ........................... ...................... 9 Craf ts ...... .... .... ............ .......... ..................... ........... ..... ............. 9 Art History (upper d i vis i on) ......................... ............ ...... ........ .. .. Total ........................... ........... ....... ................. ........................... .42 Applied Arts Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Applied Arts ....... ........................................................ ....... ....... 18 Craft s ................. ... .. .................................... ....... .......................... 9 Fine Ar ts ......... .... ...... ............... .......................... ...... ...... ......... 9 Art History (upper div i s i on) .......................... ........ ..................... Total ........................................................................................... 42 Crafts Area of Emphasis Semester Hours Crafts ... ....... . ...................... ......................... ......................... 18 Applied Arts ......................................... ...... ................................. 9 Fine A rts ............. ........................... ........ .... ..... ...... .... .... ............. 9 Art H is tory (up per divis ion) .......................................................... 6 Total ..... .... .... ... ................................................ ..... ...... ... ....... .42 Total .... ........ ............................ .................... ...... ...... ..... .......... 60 (A min i mum of 27 upper division hours required ) M inor requirements for Art Major s i s optional. Industrial Design Major for Bachelor of Arts Degree N o Minor i s Requ ired Semester Required Courses Hours ART 110 Drawing P r ocesses and Co ncepts I ....................... 3 ART 120 Design Processes and Co n c epts I ......................... 3

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ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II .......... ........ .... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art ...... ........... ............ .............. 3 ART 240 Beginning Advert i sing Design ............................... 3 ART 245 Beginning Product and Industr ial Design ...... ....... 3 ART 300 History of Art Nouveau or ART 303 History of Art Between the Wor l d Wars ... .............. ..... ......... ...................... ...... ..... .... 3 ART 340 Intermediate Advert ising Design ........... ..... ............ 3 ART 345 Intermediate Product and Industrial Design ................. ................ ........ ........... . .......... 3 ART 445 Advanced Product and Industr ial Design I ............... ......... .................. .... ... .............. 3 ART 446 Advanced Product and Indu s tria l Design II ..... .................. .... .... ....... ........................ 3 ITS 101 Introduction to Woodworking ...... ............ ............. .4 ITS 103 F i nish ing Materials & Processes .... ... ... ........ ......... 2 ITS 110 Introduction to Plastics I ................. ..... ........... ....... 2 ITS 112 Introduction to Plast ic s II .... ..................... .............. 2 ITS 120 Introduction to General Metals : Cold Metals .. ............................................ .......... ..... 2 ITS 122 Introduction to General Metals : Hot Metals ............ ................................... .... ............ 2 ITS 141 Industrial Drawing : Sketching ................................. 2 ITS 142 Industrial D r aw i ng : Instruments ............................. 2 ITS 255 Introduction to Photography ................................... 3 ITS 340 Advanced Industrial Drawing ................................. .4 ITS 380 Industr ial Safety and Production ........................... .4 ITS 401 Furniture Const ructio n ........................................... 4 PSY 441 Human Factors Engi neering ................................... 3 Elective Courses ................................................... 15 ( Selected in consultation w i th advisor, at least 10 of which must be upper division) Total .. ... ......... ............. ..................... .... ........................... .... 84 Art Education Teacher certification for art majors is available through the Department of Education Minor in Art ART 110 Drawing Pro cess es and Con c epts I ...................... 3 ART 111 Drawing Proc esses and Concepts II ...................... 3 ART 120 Design Processes and Concepts I ......................... 3 ART 121 Design Processes and Concepts II .. .......... ........ .... 3 ART 201 Survey of Modern Art: Impre ssionism to 1960 ..................................................................... 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art : 1960 to the Present ..................................... ......... ................ 3 Sub Tot al ........................................................................ ........... 18 E l ect ives ....... ..... ......... ........................... .... ......... ....... ............... 9 Minimum One Upper-Division Studio Course Minimum One Upper-Division Art History Course Tota1 .............. ............. . ....... . ...................................... ........... 27 Commun ications Multi Major for Bachelor of Arts Commun ications: Visual Sponsored by the Department of Art The V isual Communications area of co n c ent ration otte r s students a sequence of art courses in graphic communications, including draw ing and de s ign as well as a broad acqua i ntance with the visual art s in con tem porary and historical perspe c tive To become knowledgeable i n the arts as related to present da y communications media, students have the opportunity to pursue graphic co ur ses in the Fine Art s of D rawing, Painting and Printmakin g or i n the A pplied Art fiel ds of Graph ic Commun ica tions and Advert ising Design, Photography and V i deo. Required Core COM 272 Introduction to Communication Concepts and Systems ........... ..... ............................................ 3 Division of Humanities SPE 374 Psychology of Communication or SPE 410 Techniques o f Pers uasion .............. .............. .......... 3 Tot al ................................................. ............................................ 6 Required Lower-Division Courses ART 110 Drawing P roce sses and Concepts I ....................... 3 ART 111 Draw ing Pro ces ses and Con cepts II ...................... 3 ART 120 Design Proce s ses and Con c epts I ................ ......... 3 ART 121 Design Processes and C oncepts II ................. ...... 3 ART 201 Survey o f Modern Art: Imp ressionism to 1960 ...... 3 Required Art History (Select 3 Hours) ART 303 Histo r y of A rt Between the World Wars ................ 3 or ART 401 Modern Ar t History : Theo ry and Criticism ............. 3 Required Studio Courses Fine Arts (select 6 hours) ART 210 Beginning Life Drawing ........................................... 3 ART 215 Beginning Pai nting .................................................. 3 ART 225 Beginn ing Printmaking .............. .............................. 3 ART 220 Beginning Photog r aphy .......................................... 3 Applied Arts (6 hours) ART 240 Beginning Advert ising Design ................................ 3 ART 340 Intermediate Advertising D esign ............ ................ 3 Electives Six hours electe d from Upp er -Division Art Courses ........... ......................... ..... .............. 6 Total ................. ............ ................. ............. ....................... ......... 42 English Department The Department ot Engl i sh offers instruct ion in a variety of areas : English Literature Amer ican Literature and World Literature ; language and linguistics; writing non -fi cti on as well as poetry f i ction, and drama Courses in each area appeal variously to students in every school of the College who wish to read and understand the literature of the great cultures of the world who wish to examine the p rinciple s underlying how languages work and who wish to cultivate the ir skills in creating writings of f i ction and non -fi ction Department faculty have organized and developed the curriculum to res pond to student interests i n readin g and understanding the great works of literature ; in acqu i ring th e skill of express ing themselves luc i dly accurately and with forceful style ; and in establishing developing and refining the i r analytica l and i maginative powers Advanced courses typ ic ally i n the upper division permit more detailed attention to subjects tor students who are especially interested in one or more of the subd i sc i p li nes offered by the department. Among these are Journalism Language and Linguist i cs Creative W riting Practical Writ ing, English Education, and Literatur e The English Department i s currently effecting changes in requirements for several of i ts majors and m i nors This process includes alterations in and additions to cou rse offerings Please contact the English Department in August / September 1986 to ascertain the c urrent status of requ i rements and offerings English Major for Bachelor of Arts Literature Emphasis* The l it erature emphasis offers a path of study that produ ces the skills widely recognized as those of the English major : the ability to work independently to think with depth and sensitivity and to write clearly Literature ma j ors are often valued because they know how to l earn and how to apply what they learn. By co n centratin g their major efforts on reading lit erature students rece ive not only the widest exposure to the best writ i ng of different times and places but the fullest oppo rt unity to mature t heir understanding of complex literary stances and languag e strategies that explore influential i deas about the human condition The literature major also learns t o think carefully and to write clearly on complex subjects for a demanding reader 39

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Division of Humanities Sophomore level courses provide an introduction to the variety of literary expression in h istorical context and an initia l introduction to techniques and stances used by all writers Upper -divisi on co urses apply these techniques and others to great works, permitting greater depth of study I. Each of the following courses : ENG 211 World Literature : Homer to Cervantes ENG 221 American Literature: Brad ford to Dickinson ENG 231 English Literature : Beowulf to Shakespeare Semester Hours Required : II. One of the following courses : ENG 201 The Nature of Language ENG 202 English Grammar Semester Hours Required ...... ................ ........... .... ..................... 3 Ill. Two of the following courses : ENG 212 World Literature : Moliere to Sartre ENG 222 Ame rican Literature: Twain to Updike ENG 232 English Literature : Donne to Johnson ENG 233 English Literature : Blake to Beckett Semester Hours Required .......................................................... 6 IV. One of the following courses : ENG 351 Advanced Composition ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Fiction Poetry or Drama) .. ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing .. Semester Hours Required ..................... .. ................................... 3 V. One of the following general courses : ENG 321 Drama in the United States ENG 322 American P oetry ENG 323 American Novel ENG 324 Afro American Literature ENG 331 Engl ish Drama : Mysteries to Masques ENG 332 English Drama : Manners to the Absurd ENG 333 English Novel : Defoe to Austen ENG 334 English Novel : Bronte to Conrad ENG 336 British Poetry ENG 341 Masterpieces of Contine ntal Literature ENG 342 The English Bible as Literature ENG 343 Classica l Mythology ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences Semeste r Hours Required ... ................................... ..... .............. 3 VI. Four electives from 300 400 leve l courses includ ing at least one from the following : ENG 401 Linguistic Studies (Variable Topics) ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ENG 412 Selected Them es in Literature ENG 413 Major Authors ENG 414 Modern Continental English and American Drama ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comedies, Histories and Sonnets ENG 432 Shakespeare : Tragedies and Ethical-Problem Plays ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing ENG 461 Literary Critic ism Semester Hours Required ................................... ........ .... ......... 12 T otal Semester Hours Required ..................... .. .. ...................... 36 Studen t s should cons ult department for recent program adjustments "Prerequ1s1te: Corresponding lower-divisio n course or pass department examination L ower-d ivision prerequisite does not count toward major English Major for Bachelor of Arts Secondary School Teaching Area of Emphasis* The Secondary Schoo l Teaching emphasis-i n co njunction with the state cer t ificatio n program coo rdinated by the MSC Division of Education prepares future teachers of English to understand and teach the diverse subject matter requ i red for certification This program eq uips students with a wide variety of language 40 princ i ples and skills ; practica l exper i ence in developing and presenting the process of writ ing ; a sound knowledge of literary genres, periods and authors -with a special focus on literature for adolescents; and an understanding of communication and media as used in Engl ish studies. In addition to meet ing specified state and departmental requirements this program offers students the opportunity to develop a further specialization in writing language or literature to complement the major. Semester Required Courses for Certification Hours 1. ENG 211 Wo rld Literature : Homer to Cervantes ............. 3 ENG 221 Amer ican Literat ure: Bra dford to Dick i nson .................... ........ ........... 3 ENG 222 American Literature : Twain to Updike .............. 3 ENG 231 English Literature: Beowulf to Shakespeare ...... ..... .............. .......... 3 Lower-Division Literature : Semester Hours Required ........ ......... ......... ..................... 12 II. ENG 201 Nature of Language ........ .... ........ ...................... 3 ENG 202 English Grammar ............................. .... ...... ........ 3 Lower-Division Language : Semester Hours Required ................................. .... .... ........ 6 Ill. ENG 301 Modern English Langua ge Studies ................... 3 ENG 303 S em antics or ................ ...... ................................ 3 ENG 302 History of the English Language ....................... 3 Upper Division Language: Semester Hours Required ................................................ 6 IV. ENG 347 Literature for Ado l escents ........ ..... .................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition .................................... 3 ENG 361 Teach ing English in Secondary Schools .... ....... ...... ................ .......... ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Seco ndary Schools ........................................ 3 ENG 363 Tea c hing Communications .................... ............ 3 or RDG 328 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Reading : Secondary .... .... ................ ...... ........... English Education Core Courses: Semester Hours Required ............ .. ...... ........................... 12 V English Elect i ves: Three upper-division English courses (including at least one 400-level) selected in consultation with and approved by designated English Department advisors Semester hours required ...... ........ ........................... .......... 9 Total Semester Hours Required .. ........ .... ...................... .45 Candidates for certification are expected to plan and carry out their programs in consultation with designated English Department advisors and advisor approval must be obtained before the English Department will endorse a candidate for certification *Students seeking secondary credentials i n Engl i sh must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in add i tion to all of the English major requ irements. **While ENG 361 and RDG 328 are required to meet State English Certification requirements these six semester hours are carried under the Student's Pr ofessiona l Education requirements English Major for Bachelor of Arts Writing Emphasis The Writing Emphasis is designed to give the creative writer extensive practice on v ar ious genres of literature as well as a good foundation in appreciation of the English language literary heritage Courses are also offered to assist the creative writer in finding markets for literary work and assessing the potential of writing as a career Writing Component Entry Course : ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing Semester Hours

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Semester hours required ...................... .... ................................... 3 One o f t h e followi n g writ ing cours es: ENG 251 Intermedi at e Composi t ion C OM 261 Introduction to Technica l Wr iting E N G 351 Advance d Compositio n ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Wri t ing Semester hours required ................................ ......... ..... ..... ......... 3 T hree of the following creative writing courses : ENG 352 Creative W r i ting Workshop ( F iction) ENG 352 Creative Writing Workshop (Science Fiction) ENG 352 Creative W riting Workshop ( P oetry) ENG 352 Creative W riting Workshop ( D rama) C OM 344 Corporate Scr ipt writing for Film and Television Semester hours required ................................... .......... ......... ....... 9 Exit Course : ENG 452 Advanced Creative Writing Semester hours required .............. ............ ........................ ........... 3 Literature Component One of th e following courses : ENG 211 World Lite r ature : Homer to Cervantes ENG 221 Amer ica n Literature : Bradford to Dickinson ENG 231 English Literature : Beowulf to Shakespeare Semeste r hours required . ........... ............................................. 3 Each of the following courses : ENG 212 World Literature : Moliere to Sartre ENG 222 Amer i can Literature : Twain to Updike ENG 233 English Literature : Blake to Beckett Semester hours required ............................... ........ .... ................ 9 One of the following courses : ENG 321 Drama in the United States ENG 322 American P oetry ENG 323 American Novel ENG 324 Afro-American Literature ENG 331 English Drama : Mysteries to Masques ENG 332 English Drama : Manners to the Absurd ENG 333 English Novel : Defoe to Austen ENG 334 English Novel: Bronte to Conrad ENG 336 British Poetry ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Literature ENG 342 The Englis h Bible as Literature ENG 343 Classical Mythology ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the S ci ences Semester hours required ......................................... .......... ........ 3 One of the following courses : ENG 411 Advanced Studies in Literature ENG 412 Selected Themes i n Literature ENG 413 Major Authors ENG 414 Modern Continental English, and American Drama ENG 431 Shakespeare : Comedies H istories Sonnets ENG 432 Shakespeare : Tragedies and Ethica l Problem Plays ENG 461 Literary Criticism Semester hours required ..... ............. .............. ... ......... ........... ...... 3 Total Semester hours required ...... .... ..... ......................... ...... ... 36 Pre Pro fessi onal Writing Emphasis Every profession benefits from having among its memb er s persons who write exceptionally well, a n d rewards, in turn tend to accrue to such persons. This emphasis is designed to enable talented writers majoring in other fields to develop thei r w riting gifts and thereby enhance the ir career opportunities; f or this reason it i s expected that the Pre-Professional Writing Emphasis w ill be a second major for nearly everyone who p u r sues it. The program i s designed to provide the student with an intensive, coherent sequence of instruction in writing and linguistics interspersed with appropriate study of fine writing f r om the English language literar y her i tage. D i vis i on of H umani ties R e q uire d Cou r s e s Semeste r Hour s ENG 251 Intermediate Composition ... .... .. ......... .... ....... 3 ENG 201 The Nature of Language or ENG 202 ENG 303 ENG 351 ENG 353 SPE 374 English Grammar .................................................... 3 Semantics ............. ............................ .................... 3 Advanced Composition ....... ........... ...... ................ 3 Techniques of Critical Writing ............ ................... 3 Psychology of Communication or ENG 363 Teaching Communication .......... .......................... 3 T otal ........ .................. ................. .. ............................................ -:18 S t udents will take six literature courses of which at least two must be upper divisio n ; these courses must be d i stributed among at least four of the following five areas : 1 World of Cont i nental Literature 2 British Literature : Beg i nnings to 17th Century 3 British Literature : 17th Century to 19th Century 4 Amer ica n Literature 5. 20th Century Literature 18 Total Semester Hours Required ............................................... 36 Eng l ish Minor I. T wo of the following courses : ENG 211 Wo r ld Literature: Homer to Cervantes ENG 212 World Literature : Moliere to Sartre ENG 221 American Literature : Bradford to Dickinson ENG 222 American Literature : Twain to Updike ENG 231 Engl ish Literature : Beowulf to Shakespeare ENG 232 English Literature: Donne to Johnson ENG 233 English Literature: Blake to Beckett Semester Hours Requ i red ....... ................................................... 6 II. One of the following courses : ENG 201 The Nature of Language ENG 202 English Grammar ENG 251 Intermed ia te Composition ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writing COM 261 Introduction to Technical Writing Semester Hours Required ........... .... ............ ............. ................. 3 Ill. Three electives from 300-400 level courses including at least on e from the following : ENG 321 Drama in the United States ENG 322 American Poetry E N G 323 American Novel ENG 324 Afro-American Literature ENG 331 English Drama : Mysteries to Masques ENG 332 English D rama: Manners to the Absurd ENG 333 English Novel : Defoe to Austen ENG 334 English Novel: Bronte to Conrad E N G 336 British Poetry ENG 341 Masterpieces of Continental Lite rature E N G 342 The English B ibl e as Literature ENG 343 Classical Mythology ENG 345 Literature from Writings in the Sciences Semester Hours Requ ired ....................................................... Total Semester Hours Required .............. ..... ...... ... ............... 18 Engl i sh M i nor Sec ondary School T e achin g Ar ea o f Emphasis I. Each of the following courses : ENG 347 Literature for Adoles c ents ENG 351 Advanced Composition E N G 361 Teaching Eng lish in Secondary Schools ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools Semester Hours Requ ired ........ ......... ........................................ 12 II. One of the following courses: ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ENG 302 History of the English Language ENG 303 Semant ics 41

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Division of Humanities Semester Hou rs Required .... ................ ..................................... 3 Ill. Three English Electives from 300 400 level courses selected in consultation with and approved by designated English Department adv i sors Semester Hours Required ........... ........ ............. .. .. .......... ....... Total Semester Hours Required ....... ........................................ 24 This minor does not satisfy MSC requirements for certif ication in Secondary English but does meet minimum requirements for those seeking e l igibility to teach English in secondary schools accredited by the North Central Asso ciation Students working toward this minor are expe c ted to plan and carry out their programs in consultat i on with designated English Department adv isors. Dramatic Literature Emphasis The English minor with emphasis in Drama tic Literature serves students who wish to develop skills in reading, writing and thinking about the texts of drama and to turn these skills into marketable assets The program is designed to meet needs of anyone involved in the history, teaching writing, production or performance of drama. The minor will be useful to students of every aspect of theater (design building producing directing performing evaluating) in any medium I. Introd uctory Courses ENG 112 Introduction to Literature : Drama A second course introductory in nature is to be selected by agreement of the stud ent and the Department advisor The course need not be an English course but if not, i t should be an introductory course related to the students maj or interest in the use of drama Semester Hours Required ............... ...... ...... ........ .............. ....... 6 II. Writing Course(s) One of the following courses : ENG 252 Introduction to Creative Writ ing ENG 352 Creative Writ ing Workshop: Drama ENG 352 Creative Wr iting Workshop : Script Writing ENG 353 Techniques of Critical Writing Semester Hours Required ........... ...... ................... .................... 3 Ill. Literature Elect i ves (9 hours to be chosen in consultation with an advisor) ENG 131 ENG 321 ENG 331 ENG 332 ENG 352 ENG 431 ENG 432 ENG 413 ENG 414 ENG 461 Introduction to Shakespeare Drama in the United States Development of English Drama I Development of English Drama II Creative Writing Workshop : Drama Shakespeare I Shakespeare II Major Authors (Playwrights) Modern Cont inental, English and American Drama Literary Crit icism Semester Hours Required ..................... ..... ....... ...... .......... ....... 9 IV. Final Study ENG 480 Workshop ENG 498 Ind epen dent Study or ENG 499 Internship or Practicum NOTE: This phase of the Englisl1 M inor with an emphasis in Dramati c Literature presents the opportunity for students electing the minor to devote significant attention to one in-depth projec t for completion of the study. The project should be based on the reading of a dramatic text, but should combine this experience w ith some other area of design, management, performance or writing. The project should combine the skills of reading drama with those of the associated area of expertise. The project is to be proposed by the student, approved by an advisor i n the Department of English, and directed in collaboration with a second advisor, associated with the other area of expertise fundamental to the study. The study may take the form of a workshop, an Independent study. an internship or a prac ticum. Semester Hours Required .......... ....... .... .................. ..... .......... .. 3 Total Semester Hours Required .............. ......... ..... ......... .......... 21 42 Language and Linguistics Minor The Language and Linguistics minor offers concepts about, theori es of, and analyt ica l techniques in natural language It represents an intellectual discipline in itself and simultaneously serves the interests of future teachers students of literature and writing and others who have a continuing fascination with language as language Taken in an appropriate order made evident by careful advising, the courses in the program educate students both to use and to appreciate their language The minor requires students to engage in vigorous progressively more explicit and precise analys is and synthesis as they examine facts and fallacies about the miracle of language. Semester Required Courses Hours ENG 201 The Nature of Language ........... ............... ............. 3 ENG 202 English Grammar ...... ......... ...... ........................... 3 ENG 301 Modern English Language Studies ........... ..... ...... 3 ENG 302 History of the English Language ..... ... .... .............. 3 or ENG 303 ENG 498 Semantics ...... ........... ................ .............. .... ............ 3 Independent Study in Language/Linguistics ...... 15 Two of the Following : ENG 362 Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools ... .... 3 ENG 401 Linguistic Studies (this course will carry five different title concentrations and may be repeated for credit with a change in title) .......... ... ... ....... .... ..... ..... ... ....................... Total for Minor ... ........ .......... ....... ....... .......... ....... ....................... 21 Practical Writing Minor The Practical Writing Minor is a human ities based career oriented program enabling students to develop writing skills as an adjunct to any major Students will be prepared to do the practical writing found in magazines newspapers and newsletters Students completing the program are expected to be versatile writers capable of app lying the principles of good writing to different audien ces and purposes Semester Requi red Courses Hours ENG 107 English Usage and Gra mmar ..... ......................... ... 3 ENG 201 The Nature of Language ............. ....... ................... 3 ENG 303 Semantics ............................................................... 3 ENG 351 Advanced Composition ........ ... ... ............................. 3 ENG 353 Techn iques of Critical Wr i t ing ............ ..... ............... 3 Semester Hours Required ......................................................... 15 Elective Courses (Choose three from the following): ENG 352 Writing as a Profession ENG 398 Cooperative Education : English Internship ENG 498 Independent Stud y : Writ ing Project JAN 182 Beginning Reporting and Newswriting JAN 381 Feature Wr i ting for Newspapers JAN 481 Feature Writ ing for Magaz ines COM 261 Introduction to Technical Wr i ting BEC 301 Business Research and Report Wr i t ing SPE 309 Argumentation and Advo cacy SPE 410 Techniques of Persuas ion Semester Hours Required ..................... ............ .... .......... ... ...... 9 Total Semester Hours Required ........ ...................... ...... ......... 24 In addition to purs u ing the Practical Writing M i nor some students may wish to seek certification as qualified practi cal writers A student seeking certificat ion must apply to the Practical Writing Review Committee before completing nine hours applicable to the minor and if approved must work out with the committee a coordinated sequence of courses one of which must be English 498 Independent Study The certification procedure will include development of a portfolio which w i ll be prepared under the guidance of the comm i ttee This portfolio des i gned to demonstrate student proficiency. will inclu de such items as a letter in which students describe the devel o pment of their skills in writ ing and the extent to which they see these as valuable to the ir

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careers and two different demonstrations of their ability to write and edit under pressure The portfolio materials will be juried by at least two members of the PWRC. Some of the preparation may carry up to three hours credit under English 498 Journalism Major for Bachelor of Arts The Journal ism major prepares students for careers dealing with news and informat ion media includi ng the press broadcasting, and public relations. Proficiency in standard written English is a prerequisite for all journalism courses. Students without such proficiency should not register for any journalism beyond JAN 181. P rospective Journalism studen ts who might be concerned about such proficiency may request and take a test in standard English usage and composition designed by the Journalism faculty before registering for any courses beyond Introduction to Journalism Ac cor ding to the results the faculty may recommend that the student take ENG 101 and ENG 102 before taking any journalism course beyond JAN 181. JAN 181 Introduction to Journalism JAN 18 2 Beginning Reporting and News Writing JAN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading JAN 286' Intermediate Reporting and News Writing JAN 381 Feature Artic le Writing for Newspapers JAN 383 Contemporary Issues JAN 385 Public Affairs Reporting JAN 386 College Newspaper Practicum JAN 481 Feature Article Writ i ng for Magazines JAN 482 Advanced News Editing Copyreading and P rincip les of Layout JAN 485 News Media, Propaganda and Public Opinion JAN 486 Advanced Reporting and News Writing JAN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism Total Semester Hours Requ ired ...................... .......................... 36 'Typing proficiency is required for every journalism course beyond JRN 282 Journalism Minor I. Each of the following courses: JAN 181 Introduction to Journalism JAN 182 Beginning Reporting and News Writing Semester Hours Required ........................................ ..... .............. 6 II. Five of the followi ng courses : JAN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copyreading JAN 286' Intermediate Reporting and News Writing JAN 381 Feature Art icle Writing for Newspapers JAN 383 Contemporary Issues JRN 38 5 Public Affairs Reporting JRN 386 College Newspape r Practicum JRN 481 Feature Article Writing for Magaz ines JRN 482 Advanced News Editing Copyreading and Principles of Layout JRN 486 Advanced New s Writing JRN 487 Ethical Issues in Journalism Semester Hours Required ..... .......... ........................ .. ... ........ .... 15 Total Semester Hours Required ................. ............ ................... 21 'Typing profi ci e n cy i s required f or every journalism course beyond JRN 282 Public Relations Minor The Public Relations Minor prepares students for careers related to institut i onal and organizational information distribution Emphasis in the program is on strong news writing skills problem solving and planning and publication production Required Courses JRN 181 Introduction to Journalism ...................................... 3 JRN 182 Beginning News Writing and Reporting .. ............ ... 3 JRN 282 Beginning News Editing and Copy Reading .......... 3 Division of Humanities JAN 284 JRN 286 JRN 381 JR N 382 JRN 398 Fundamentals of Public Relations .......... .... ......... ... 3 Intermed i ate News Writing and Reporting ............. 3 Feature Art icle Writing for Newspapers ............... .. 3 Public Relations Writing and Strategies ................. 3 Cooperative Education Pub lic Relations ............. 3 Total Semester Hours Required ........... ..................................... 24 A sui table basic photography course may upon approval of the advisor be substituted for one of the above cou rses In addition the follow ing courses are strongly recommended as part of the student's general education cu rr ic ulum. BEG 200 Business and Interpersonal Communications BEG 301 Business Research and Report Writing ENG 303 Semantics ENG 351 Advanced Composition MGT 300 Principles of Management MKT 300 Principles of Marketing MKT 311 Advertis ing MKT 331 Consumer Behavior ENG 201 The Nature of Language COM 352 Organi zational Communication Other courses may be recommended by the advisor depending on the student's particular needs With the approval of the Journalism faculty Journalism majors may substitute courses from the list of recommended electives for required courses they take as a part of their major. Modern Languages The Department of Modern Languages offers major programs in Span ish and Modern Foreign Languag es minor programs in French German and Spanish, and Teacher Education Programs in Spanish and Modern Foreign Languages Courses in other foreign l anguages and in occupational or professional fields are offered in order to meet student and community needs In addition the Department administers several education programs abroad. Registration fo r courses is in accordance with previous preparation. Consequently, students will reg1ster for foreign language cou rses as follows: No previous study or less than one year in high school -101; students with one year in high school who feel their background is weak -101; one semester in college -1 02; one year in college -211 and for 231; two yea r s in high school211 andfor 231; or 102, if needed ; three years in high school or one and one half years in college-212 andfor 232; or 211 andfor 231, if needed ; four years in high school or two years in college 300 level courses or 212 andfor 232, if needed Th e above regulations may not be enforceable if the student has had no professional instruction in his chosen language within the last two years If the benefit of this exception is not possible but the student feels that he has insufficient preparation for the required level, he should strengthen h i s background by auditing the course recommended by his foreign language advisor. Elementary courses do not apply toward the major or minor requirements Students seeking secondary credentials in Spanish or in Modern Fore ign Languages (French German Spanish) must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in add ition to all of the majo r requirements They must also demonstrate sufficient mastery of the target language or languages through an appropriate Prof iciency Test. Spanish Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or SPA 212 Spanish Reading and Conversation II ............. ...... 3 43

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Division of Humanities SPA 231 SPA 232 SPA 311 SPA 312" SPA 320 or SPA 321 or SPA 322 SPA 325 SPA 331 SPA 332 SPA 340 or SPA 341 SPA 351 MDL 496" SPA 411 or Span ish Gramma r and Composition I Spanish Grammar and Composition II ... .......... ... ... 3 Advanced Conversation ....... .......... ... ....... .... ......... 3 Spanish Phonetics : Theory and Practice .... ... ...... 2 Culture and Civil iza tion of Spain Spanish-American Culture and Civilization Folklore and Culture of th e Mexic an Southwest .......... ... ................. .... ..... ...... .... .. ...... ..... 3 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .... .... 3 Advanced Spanish Writing and Grammar I ... ...... 3 Advanced Spanish Wri ti ng and Grammar II ........ 3 Survey of Span ish Literature I Survey of Spanish Litera tu re II ..... .... .... .... .... . ..... 3 Masterpieces of Latin American Literature .......... 3 Teach i ng F oreign Languages in the Secondary Schools .......... .... ....... .... .................. ...... ...... .... ... 3 Contemporary Spanis h SPA 412 Latin American Literatu re ... .............................. ... 3 SPA Electives ..... ....... ........ ....... ...... ..... ... .... ................. ...... ...... 2 "Requ ired only when seeking a Teacher Certificate ""Must be advanced courses and taken with department approval. Minor in Spanish Semester Required Courses Hours SPA 211 Spanish Read ing and Conversation I or SPA 212 SPA 231 SPA 232 SPA 311 SPA 320 or SP A 321 or Spanish Reading and Conversation II ........ .......... 3 Spanish Grammar and Compositi on I ... ........ ....... 3 Spanish Grammar and Com position II ... ... .... ... ... 3 Advanced C onversation .... ... ...................... ......... 3 Culture and Civilization of Spain Spanish-American Cultu r e and Civilization SPA 322 Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest ............................................... .... ...... 3 SPA 325 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish ........... 3 SPA Electives ....................... ..... ... ... .... ..................................... 3 French Minor in French Required Courses FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation ........... ...... ....... 3 FRE 212 Contemporary French Is sues ...... ... ...... ...... ..... .... 3 FRE 231 French Vocabu lary Building and Grammar ... ..... 3 FRE 232 French Composition ... ..... .................... ...... ... .... .... 3 FRE 311 French Survey I ........... ... .... ................. .... .... ........ 3 FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization ........ ... .. ...... ....... ... 3 FRE Electives ...................... ....... ..... ... ...... ..... ... ....... ... ........ .... ... 3 German Minor in German Required Courses GER 211 German Reading and Conversat ion ............... ... .... 3 GER 212 German Civilization .... ... ......................... .... ...... 3 GER 231 German Vocabulary Building and Grammar .......... 3 GER 232 German Composi tion and Free Writing ...... .... .... ... 3 GER 321 Survey of German Literature I or GER 322 Survey of Germa n Literature II ... ........................ 3 44 GER 351 Less ing, Goethe and Sch iller ...... ..... ....... ....... ...... 3 GER Electives ........... ........ .............. .......... ......................... ... ... 3 "Must be taken with department approval Modern Foreign Languages Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses The composite Modern Language major involves a minimum of 48 hours in any two modern languages at least 12 hours i n each. Students are advised into in termediate and advanced classes in each language on the bas is of in dividual background and need. The minimum 12 hours in each of the two chosen languages must be taken as follows : Span is h SPA 211212 Spanish Reading and Conversat ion I II .... ....... 6 SPA 231232 Spanish Grammar and Composition I, II .......... 6 French FRE 211 FRE 212 FRE 231 FRE 232 German GER 211 GER 212 GER 231 GER 232 French Reading and Conversation ... ... ... ..... ........ 3 Contemporary French Issues ..... ............ .......... ... 3 French Vocabulary Bu ilding and Grammar ..... ....... 3 French Composition ......... ............................ ......... 3 German Reading and Conversation ....................... 3 German Civilization ........... .... .... ...... ...................... 3 German Vocabular y Bu i ld ing and Grammar .......... 3 German Composition and Free Writing ............... .. 3 The remaining hours to complete the 48 hours required must be taken with department approval. For those seeking a Teacher Certificate in Modern Foreign Languages (French German, Span ish) the remaining hours mentioned above will be taken in at least one of the following areas of emphasis French Area of Emphasis FRE 211 French Reading and Conversation ....................... 3 FRE 212 Contemporary Frenc h Issues ... ........... .... .... ...... ... 3 FRE 231 French Vocabulary Building and Grammar ............ 3 FRE 232 French Composition ... ...... . ....... .................... .... 3 FRE 311 Survey of French Literature I .... .......................... ... 3 FRE 312 Survey of French Literature II ... .................. .... .... 3 FRE 321 French Phonetics : Theory and Practice .............. ... 2 FRE 331 Advanced French Composition and Grammar ... ... 3 FRE 332 Advanced Conversation ......................... . ............ 3 FRE 351 French Culture and Civilization ........... ... .... .... ....... 3 FRE 352 Modern French Theater or FRE 353 FRE 414 or The French Novel .... ..... ... ....... .......... .......... .... .... 3 Advanced Textual Analysis FRE 440 Existentialism ... ....... .... ............ ..... .... ...... ....... ...... 3 FRE Electives .............. ... .................. ............... ....... .................... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Language s in the Secondary School ...... ...... ... ..... ......... ............. ......... ...... ...... ... 3 German Area of Emphasis GER 211 German Reading and Conversation ................ ....... 3 GER 212 German C i vilization ......................... ...... ....... ... ... .... 3 GER 231 German Vocabulary Build i ng and Grammar .......... 3 GER 232 German Composition and Free Writing ......... ....... 3 GER 312 German Phonetics: Theory and Practice ... ...... ...... 2 GER 321 Survey of German Literature I ..... ........................... 3 GER 322 Survey of German Literature II ........ .... .................. 3

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GER 323 GER 331 GER 351 GER 411 or Contemporary German Writers .............................. 3 Advanced G erman Composition and Grammar .... 3 Lessing Goethe and Schiller .. ....................... ...... 3 The G er man Novel of the N ineteenth and Early Twentieth Centur ies ........ ......... ....................... ....... 3 GER 412 German Drama of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries .......................... .................................. .... 3 GER 421 A dvanced Conversation : Present -day Germany .... 3 GER Elect ives .............................. ......................................... ....... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreig n Languages in the Second ary School ....................... .... .... .... ............................ .... 3 Spanish Area of Emphasis SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or SPA 212 SPA 231 SPA 232 SPA 311 SPA 312 SPA 320 or SPA 321 or SPA 322 SPA 325 SPA 331 SPA 332 SPA 340 or SPA 341 SPA 411 or Spanish Reading and Conversation II ................... 3 Spanish Gra mmar and Co mp osition ...................... 3 Spanish Grammar and Composition II ......... ....... .. 3 Advanced Conve rsation ... ............................ .... ..... 3 Spanish Phon etics : Theory and Practice ............... 2 Culture and Civilization of Spain Spanish -American Culture and Civilization Folklore and Culture of the Mexican Southwest ... 3 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish .... ....... 3 Advanced Span ish Writing and Grammar I ........... 3 Advanced Spa nish Writing and Grammar II ......... 3 Survey of Span ish Literature I Survey of Spanish Literature II ......... .................... 3 Contemporary Spanish Literature SPA 412 Contemporary Lat i n-American Literature ... .. ......... 3 SPA Elect ives .... .................................................... ............. ....... 3 MDL 496 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School .... ............................................................ .... 3 Music Metropolita n State College is an accredited ins t itutiona l member of the Nat ional Association of Schools of Music The Department of Music offers two NASM accredited degree programs, Music Education and Music Performance for students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in music Students pursuing these majors are not required to fulfill a minor for graduation In addition, the Contra ct Major is available for students seeking a more perso nalized degree program in mus i c The Musi c Education degree program is designed to prepare students for careers teaching instrumental and/or choral music at the lev e l s K -12. By taking an additional eighteen semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (EDU 419 and 429), the student becomes eligible for K -12 cer t ification in the State of Colorado W ith these addit i onal eighteen hours this degree program is fully accredi ted by the Co l orado State Departm ent of Educat i on Students seeking teaching credentials in music must satisfy all requirements of the Teacher Education Program in the D ivision of Educat ion in add i t io n to all requ i rements of the Department of Music. The Music Performance degree program is designed to prepare students for careers in music performance further graduate specialization or pr ivate stud i o teaching In order to pursue this course of study the student must demonstrate through audit ion, the capability of develop ing a high level of musicianship i n performance. Students wishing to gain a broad general coverage of the field of music may pursue the minor in Music The department offers a w ide range of courses i nclud ing some spec i f i cally designed for nonmusi c students wishing to enhance their general appreciation and enjoyment of music Non mus i c students may also part ici pate in large and small music ensembles including band orchestra choir and chamber music Division of Humanities All students majoring or minoring in music must participate i n th e departmental advising p rogram scheduled during the first week of each seme st er. Tra nsfer students should be prepared to tak e placem ent examinations in the areas of music theory and music history and to perform an audition i n their primary performa nc e area For advising placement and audition appo intments, contact the Department of MuS(. Music Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Core Requirement for all Music Education Majors Seme ste r Required Courses Hours MUS 111, 113 ,211 Mus ic Theory I II, Ill ... ............................... 9 MUS 112, 114,212 Mus ic Theory Lab I, II, Ill ... ....................... 3 MUS 221, 222 Music H istory I II ................. ............................. 6 MUS 171, 172 271, 272 371, 372 Priva te Instruction I -VI (Primary Perfo rma nce Area ) ........ ......... ... .. ......... 12 MUS 161, 162 Class Piano I, II ......... ... ..................................... 2 MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging .......... ....... ........................................... ..... 2 MUS 332 Secondary School Choral Methods and Materials ........................................... .... ....... ........... 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience : Secondary School MUS MUS MUS MUS SPE RDG 351 365 411 451 101 313 or RDG 328 EDU 110 EDU 265 EDU 320 EDU 360 Choral Met hods and Mate rials ............................. 1 Basic Conducting .... ..... ..................... ..... ........ ...... 2 Bas i c Techn i ques of Composition ..... ........ ............ 2 Analysis of Music ................ ........... .... ................. 2 Advanced Conduct ing ..... .................. ...... ... ....... 2 Fundamental s of Speech Commun ic ation ............. 3 Teaching of Elementary Read ing: Intermediate ... 3 Teaching of Reading in the Content A reas : S econdary .................................. ......... ................... 3 Elementary Educat i on in U S .... ..... : .................... ... 3 Human Relat ions .... ............. ..................... ........... 3 The Adolescent as a Learner ................................. 3 The Except i ona l Child in the Classroom ... ........... 3 Tota/ .............. ..... .................... ........ ........................... ........... .... 63 In add i tion to the above core requirement music educa t ion major s must select one of the following emphases : Choral Emphasis MUS 161 Class Voice I ............................................................ 1 MUS 261, 262 Class P iano Ill IV ............................................... 2 MUS 281, 282, 381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble ......... ..... 14 Note : These course numbers may be repeated for cred it. All fo u rteen hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combin at ion of the above numbers MUS 331 Elementary School Music Methods and Materials .......... ............. .... .................... ................. 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience : Elementary School MUS MUS MUS MUS 341 345 346 421 Music Method s and Mater ials ...... .......................... 1 Str ing Techn iques and Mater ials ..... ..................... 2 B rass Tec hniques and M ateria l s .... . ............... .... 2 Percuss ion Techniques and Materials ................... 2 Choral Literature ............................. ..... ................. 2 Tota/ ........... ...... ... ...... ...................... ... ......... ... ... ..................... 28 Instrumental Emphasis MUS 281,282,381, 382 Large or Small Ensemble .......... .... 12 Note: These co urse numbers may be repeated for credit. All twelve hours may be earne d i n any one course number or in any combination of the above numbers. MUS 333 Elementary School Instrumental Music Methods and Mate rials ............................... ................... ........ 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience : Elementar y School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials ............................................................... ... 1 45

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D i vision of Hum a nities MUS 334 Secondary School Instrumental Music Methods and Materials ........................................... 2 MUS 339 Supervised Field Experience : Secondary School Instrumental Mus ic Methods and Materials .. ........ 1 MUS 341 String T echniques a n d M aterials ..... .... ...... ... ..... 2 MUS 343 Woodwind T echniques and Materials ... ................ 2 MUS 345 Brass T echniques and M aterials ..... ........ ..... .... 2 MUS 346 P ercuss i on Techniques and Materia l s ....... . ........ 2 MUS 348 March ing B a n d Techniques and Ma t erials ........ .... 2 Tota/ ....................... ........... ......................... ....... ..... ..... ....... .... 28 Music Performance Ma jor for Bachelo r of Arts Core Requirements for all Mus ic Performan ce Majo r s MUS 111, 113 ,211 M usic Theory I II, Ill .... ....................... .... 9 MUS 112 114 212 Music Theory Lab I II, Ill ... .......... .... .... ..... 3 MUS 221 222 Music H istory I I I .... ......... ............. ........ ............ 6 MUS 1 7 1 172 Private I nstruction I II (Primary Performance Area) .... ... ...... .... .... ....... .................... .4 MUS 273 274 373, 374, 473 474 P erformance Ill -VIII (Prima r y P erformance Area) ....... ....... ... .............. 24 MUS 161, 162 or 171 C lass or P riva t e Instruction (Secondary P erformance Area) .... .................... ...... 2 Note : Must be Class Piano I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction A udition in Piano Exception : Stu d ents electing the Organ Emphasis must take Class Voice I and II unless student is able to pass the Private Instruction Audition in Voice MUS 281, 282, 381, 3 8 2 Large or S mall Ensemble .. ......... ..... 12 Note : These course numbers may be repeated for credit. All twelve hours may be earned in any one course number or in any combinatio n of the above numbers T h e ensemble experience thr oughout the baccalaure ate degree prog ram should be varied both in size and nature, and s h ould be chosen f r om those a p propriate t o the area of spec i alization MUS 351 Bas ic Conducting ... ............. .......... .......................... 2 MUS 365 Bas ic Techniques of Composition .................... ..... 2 MUS 411 Analysis of Mus ic ................................... .... . ........ 2 MUS 479 Senior Recital ........ ............................. ..... . ..... .... 1 Music History or Literature Elective ...... ................. 3 Tota/ ... ... .......... ...... ........ ... ....... .... ................ .... .... ..... ...... ..... 70 In addition to the above core requirement all music performance majors must select o n e of the following emphases: Voi ce Emphas i s M U S 141 German D iction and Lit era t ure for Sin gers ..... .... 2 MUS 142 French D iction and Literature for Singers .... ........ 2 MUS 143 Ital ian Diction and Literature for Singers ... ... ....... 2 MUS 421 Choral Literature ........................... ............... ........ 2 MUS 442 Vo cal Pedagogy ......... ............................................. 2 Tota/ .......................... .... ... ........... ....... ........ . .... ....... ................ 10 P i ano Emph asis MUS 310 Counterpoint ................ ............. ........... .............. ..... 3 MUS 324 P iano Literature .......... ...... ............. ...................... .... 3 MUS 441 P iano Pedagogy ......... ......... ... ...... ......................... 2 Tota/ ............................ .. ... ...... ........ ... ........ ........ .... ....... ............. 8 Organ Emphas is MUS 310 Counterpoint ....... ................................ ............. ........ 3 MUS 421 Choral Literature .......... .......... .... .... ............ ........ 2 MUS 451 Advanced Condu cting ... ............................... ....... 2 Tota/ ....... ................. ...... ......... .............. ... .... ..... ............ .......... 7 Gui tar Emphas is MUS 310 Counterpoint .................. .................. ............ ... ... 3 46 MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging ............ ..... ............. ....... .......... ............. 2 Tota/ ........ .... .... ....... ... .............. .... ...... .............. ..................... 5 Woodwind Brass, String or Percussion Emphasis MUS 315 Instrumental and Choral Scoring and Arranging ............... ................................................ 2 MUS 451 Advanced Conducting ....... ..... ...................... ......... 2 Tota l ....................... ........ ..... ....... ................. ................. ............. 4 Minor in Music Semester Required Courses Hours MUS 111, 113 ,211 Mus ic Theory I II, Ill ........ ..... .......... ........... 9 MUS 112 Music Theory Lab I ................. ... ...... .................... 1 MUS 221, 222 Music History I II .......... ......... ... .. ................... 6 MUS 161, 162 or 171 Class or Priv ate Instruction : Performance Area .......... ........................................ .4 MUS 381, 382 Large or Small Ensembl e ............... ........ ......... ..4 Note : These course numbers may be repeated for credit ; all four hours may be earned in one course numb er of in any combination of the above numbers Total ....... . ................................. ..... ...................... ............. 24 P h ilosophy Philosophy is the oldest of inte llectual disciplines Its questions are of the most endur ing interest because they are the most fundamental to our intellectual and practical concerns As such it can be taken to be a critical invest igation into the assumptions and implicat i ons assoc i ated with all ideas across all disciplines and, in this respect, it is interdiscip l inary in character However, this type of inquiry requires technical concepts and methods and hence, it takes on the character of a specialized discipline Philosophical inquiry is an interaction between speculative and critical thought recognizing no preestablished limits i n terms of the scope of either its inte rests or i ts critical examinations Therefore philosophy as a study program enlarges the student's horizons of ideas throughout the variou s disciplines in the college while simultaneously providing the critical sKills necessary to analyze and synthesize these ideas It encourages students to explore creatively the full range of philosophical options to consider alternate points of view, and to penetrate deeply into profound issues Because of the subject matter attitudes and methods employed in philosophy the student will be much better prepared for leadership in personal life civic responsibilities and pursuit of a career. In addition to offering a variety of courses for students who are planning to take only one or two courses in philosophy the Department offers two programs both of which feature flexibility and ind ividualize d training : 1. A major for students seek ing a solid general training/background which can serve either as a basis for graduate studies in such varied areas as philosophy the humanities law med icine, bus i ness urban planning and development etc., or as a basis for a career in which the spec i alized training required is provided by the employer such as c areer s in corpo rate management government politics bank ing education 2 A minor for students who have already chosen a career and seek to complement their spec iali zed training/background with the opportunities afforded by philosophy to increase the ir career options and generally to i ncrease the quality of their lives. The Philosophy program i s now jointly offered by the facult i es of MSC and UCD who have been combined into a single department MSC students who either major or minor in philosophy are encouraged to take appropriate UCD courses whenever such courses contribute to the requirements or the balance of their philosophy experience

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Philosophy Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours PH I 144 L ogic .................................... ....................... ..... ..... 3 PHI 300 H is t ory of Greek Philosophy ............. ....... ........... 3 PHI 302 H istory o f Modern Phi losophy ............ ..... ............. 3 T o tal ......... ............... ...... ... ..... ....... 9 Additional Course Subject Areas Required lowerD ivision Int ro du c t ory Cou rses ................ ... ...... ....... ..................... .............. 6 Upper Division M e taphysi cs and j or Epistemology ................. .... ........ ..... ........ 3 Ethi c s and /o r S o c ial Philosophy ...................... ........ .... .... ............ 3 One Phi l oso p hic a l Pro blem or One Phil o s o pher .... .... .... ........................ ......... .......... .... ..... 3 One C o urse Relat ing Philosophy to Reli gi o n A r t Scie nc e or H i story ................................... ......... 3 T o t a l ................. ........ ............... .... .... ....... ........ ... ... ...... ........... 18 Additiona l Electives at any level ...................... ................ ... .... T o t a l Upp erD ivi s io n Cred i t Hours required for Major .......... 18 T o t a l Cr edi t H ours required f o r Philosophy Major .............. ..... 36 Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor The Multi-M i nor may be arranged through the Department of Psyc hology and i ncludes the requ i red courses listed under the Hol i stic Hea l t h and Educat i on Multi Minor in the Degrees and Program s Available at MSC sect i on of this Bulletin. Minor in Philosophy Required Courses PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy ........ ..... .... .... .............. 3 PHI 103 Ethics ....... ................... .............. ................... .......... 3 PHI 111 Language Logic and Persuasion .................... ...... 3 Total ..... ... ...... .... ... ... .... ..... ... ..... . ...... . ............. ... ............. 9 Electives A minimum of 11 additional semester hours of which 7 are upper-division courses in Philosophy selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Philosophy to make a total of 20 semester hours Speech Communication Speech communication is one of the most important human qualities Proficiency in one of the areas of speech opens up many careers to the graduate For instance in mass communication radio television and film a graduate might aspire to careers in On Air operations mass media ideas promotion public affairs or radio-television sales He or she m i ght become a consultant in advertising a specialist in instructional o r educat i onal televis i on or in the public broadcasting service Careers are open as broadcasting specialists i n publ i c relat i ons public information business industry and government are also available. Speech pathology graduates who meet the standards of the American Speech and Hear i ng Association may find careers in public and pr i vate schoo l s community clin i cs hospitals r ehabilitation centers private practice colleges and universities i ndustry or state and federal government agencies Graduates i n rhetor i c and public address have achieved success at law industr ial and organizational communication educational administration public relations speech writing for political figures teaching public relations, and theology Professional and e d ucat i onal theatre occupations are open to theatre graduates w ith specialties in stagecraft sound engineer i ng s cri pt wr i t ing, d i rect ing and acting Divisi on of Humanities Organizat iona l Commun ication : Meeting Plan n ing, a new field, presents lucrative and satisfying careers to speech g raduates specializing in this area of commu nicat ion Job opportunities ar e available in both associations and i ndustry ; some MSC graduates in Organizational Communication are achieving s uc cess in all areas of government industry business and meeting plann ing. Speech Communication Major for Bachelor of Arts 1 101-3 Fundamentals of Speech Communicati on course i s required of all speech majors and minors. 2 Independent study topic courses and experiential educat i on courses such as pract i cums and inte rnsh ips may be taken in each of the areas. 3. Additional semester hours in Speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech. 4 Total minimum semester hours for a major in Speech Communication : 36 5 All Speech majors are required to take a minimum of on e class in each of the following six program areas, preferably one of the courses designated by an asterisk. 6 The six subject areas inclu de : Theatre and Oral Interpretation SPE 221 Introduction to Theatre SPE 222 Techniques in Acting I SPE 224 Introduction to Stagecraft SPE 320 Oral Inte rpretation : Prose and Poetry SPE 322 Movement for Stage SPE 325 Introduction to Scenic Des ign and Theatre SPE SPE SPE SPE 328 420 42 6 427 Lighting Stage D irecting Reader s Theatre Theatre : Practicum I Theatre : Practicum : II Mass Communication (Ra d i o -Tele vis i on -Fi lm) SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcast ing SPE 343 Radio-Television Announcing or SPE 344 Radio-Television Production SPE 347" Evolution of Cinematics as ART SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life Communication Disorders and Voice Science SPE 330 Voice Science : Phonetics and Voice and Diction SPE 350 Speech Patho l ogy 1 SPE 351 Speech Pathology II SPE 355 Speech Pathology : Observation I SPE 356 Speech Pathology : Observation II SPE 357 Methods of Speech Pathology Audiology: Diagnostic P rocedures SPE 358 Methods in Speech Pathology : Articulation and Stutter ing SPE 359 Speech Prob l ems i n the Schools SPE 360. Audiology I SPE 361 Audiology II SPE 450 Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology Audiology SPE 455 Practicum i n Speech P athology SPE 457 Medical Aspects of Speech and Hearing Disorders SPE 463 Pract i cum in Audiology 47

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Division of Humanities Organizational Communication SPE 31 o Business and P rofessional Speaking SPE 311' Conference Leadership SPE 312' Parliamentary Procedure Communication The ory SPE 374' Psych ology of Communication SPE 409 Persuasion in the Greek and Latin Traditions SPE 41 o Techniques of P ersuasion Rhetoric and Public Address S P E 2 11' D i scussion Methods SPE 301 Advanced Publ i c Speaking SPE 305 I n tercollegiate Forensics SPE 308 Great American Speakers SPE 309' Argumentation and Advo cacy SPE 405 Advanced I ntercollegiate Forensics SPE 408 Theories and Cr i ticism of Public Address SPE 4 1 2 Freedom of Speech Speech Education Required Courses for the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Speech Commun icati on Arts Semester Required Courses Hours S P E 101 F und amentals of Speech Commun i catio n ............. 3 SPE 211 D isc uss i on Methods .......... ......... ............................. 3 SPE 221 Intr o duc t ion to Theatre ........ ................ .................. 3 S P E 222 Techniques of A ct ing I ............................................ 3 SPE 224 I ntroduc tion to Stagecra ft ...... ................................. 3 SPE 240 I ntroduc tion to Radio and T e l evisio n SPE SPE SPE S P E S P E 301 309 3 2 0 3 2 8 3 3 0 SPE 35 9 S P E 374 SPE 410 Br oadc asting ....... ............................................. ...... 3 Advance d Publ ic Speaking ..................................... 3 Argume ntati on and Advocacy ................................ 3 Oral I nterpretat i o n : Prose and Poetry .................... 3 S tage Directing ............... ......................................... 3 V oic e S c ience : Phonetics and Voice and D ic tion ............................................. ................. 3 Spe e c h P roblems i n the Schools ............ ...... ......... 3 P s ychology of Communication ............................... 3 T echni ques of Per s uasion ...................................... 3 Electives Hours for the Secondary Teacher Education Program A mm1mum o f s ix semester hours in Spe ech courses r ecomme nded i n co nsultat ion with and approved by the D epa rtment of S pee c h These s i x hou r s are to be selected from the fol l owi n g list: S P E 305 Int e r c ollegiate Forensics .......................... ............... 1 SPE 3 08 G reat Amer ican Speakers ..................... .......... ....... 3 SPE 32 0 Ora l I nterpretati o n : Prose and Poetry .................... 3 SPE 3 22 M o v e ment for Stage ................................. ........ ...... 2 SPE 350 Spee c h Pathology I ................................................. 3 SPE 3 6 0 Audio logy I ............................................................... 3 S P E 408 Theories and Cr i t i c ism o f Publ ic Address ............. 3 SPE 4 2 0 Reader's Theatre ........................ ........ .................... 3 SPE 4 2 6 Theatre : Pr act i cum I ................................................ 1 SPE 4 4 9 Effe c ts o f Radio Television on Contemporary L ife... ...................... ............... ....... .......... ... 3 T o t a l minimu m h o urs requ i red for the Secondary Teacher Educa t 1 on Progr a m in Speech Comm uni cation Arts : 48 hours. Stude nt s see k ing secondary c redentia l s i n Speech Educat i on must sat1sfy the T e acher Educat io n Program of MSC in addit i on t o all of the major requirements Recen t changes in Colorado Law affec t1ng t eacher c ert i ficat i on has necess i tated changes i n adv1s1ng proce dures All st u dents in the Speech Educat i on P rogram w h o are seeking a cert i ficate must therefor e contact the Speec h D e partment for mod i ficat i ons changes and adv i s ing rela t ive to chan ge s i n Colorado Law a ff ect ing teachers 48 Communications Multi-Major for Bachelor of Arts Communications : Broadcasting Sponsored by the Department of Speech This area of empha s i s is offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communications ( Interd isciplinary) In addition to the requirem ents listed below, students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hours as well as supporting proficiencies (Se e CCC advisor) Required Core COM 2 7 2 Introductio n to Commun ic at io n Co n cep ts and Syste m s ...... ......... ................................. .......... 3 SPE 374 Psycho l ogy of Commun ic at i on or SPE 410 Techniques of Persuas i on ...................................... 3 Total ......................... ...... ... .................. ......................... ............ 6 Required Area and Broadcasting Courses SPE 224 Int rodu ction to Stagecraft .......... .................. ......... .. 3 SPE 240 Introduction to Radio and Television Broadcast ing ............................... .... ........... ... .... ..... 3 TLC 249 Internship i n Radio-Telev i s i on F i lm-SPE SPE SPE TLC 343 344 348 349 Mass Co mmunicatio n ...... .......................... ......... 1 6 Radio-Telev i sion Announc ing ................................. 3 Radio-Telev i sion Product i on ....................... ............ 3 Workshop in Radio/Televis i on Production ............. 3 Advanced Internship i n Rad i o Telev i s i onFilm-Mass Communication ............................... 1 15 Total ............ ... .... ........ ..... ... ... .................. ............... ............. 21 Recommended Electives SPE 330 Voice Science : Phoneti cs and Voice and Diction .................................. ............................ 3 SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Arts .................... ......... 3 SPE 448 Seminar P ract i cum in Broad c asting ...................... 3 SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Telev i sion on Contemporary Life ......................... .... ................. 3 ART 220 Beginning Photography .................... ...................... 3 COM 244 Writing for Radio ..................................................... 3 COM 344 Corporate Scr i ptwriting fo r F il m and Telev i s i on .... 3 JRN 382 Public Relations Writing and Strategies ................. 3 JAN 383 Contemporary Issues ...... ........... .................... ........ 3 JRN 384 Broadcast News Writing .................................... .... 3 MGT 300 Principles of Management ......... ............................. 3 MKT 300 Principles of Marketing .................. ......................... 3 or other designated e l ectives Total Electives .. .......................................................................... 15 Total .... ....... ....... .......... .... ..... ...................... ... ................... ... . 42 Communications: Theatre Administration Sponsored by the Department of Speech This area of emphasis i s offered through the Cooperative Program for Careers in Communicat i o n s ( Interdisc i plinary) In addition to the require ments l isted below students must complete a minimum of 18 upper-division hour s as well as supporting proficiencies (see CCC advisor) Required Core COM 272 Intro du ction to Commun ica t io n Co n c epts and Systems ...................................................... ..... 3 SPE 374 Psychology of Co mmun ication or SPE 410 Techn i ques of Persuas ion ...................................... 3 Tota1 ................. .... ............... ................................ ...... ... ...... .... 6 Required Area and Theatre Arts Courses SPE 221 Introduct i on to Theatre .. ................. ....................... 3 SPE 224 Introd u ct i on t o Stagecraft ............ ........................... 3

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SPE 299 SPE 320 SPE 330 SPE 499 Internship ........... .................................. ....... ............ 3 Oral Interpretation : Prose and Poetry ........ ............ 3 Voice Science: Phonetics and Voice and Diction ..... ............ ................... ... ...... ...... ......... 3 Advanced I nternship ......................... ..... ....... ......... 3 18 Recom mended Electives COM 244 Writing for Radi o ............ .............. ............ .... .... ...... 3 COM 344 Corporate Scr i ptwriting for F ilm and T e levision .... 3 ENG 414 Modern Continental English and American MGT SPE SPE SPE SPE SPE 300 322 420 426 427 480 Dmma ..... ..................... ..... ........ .................... .... Principles of Man age ment ...... ............. ........ .... ....... 3 Movement for Stage ................ ........... ...... .............. 2 Reader s The atre ........................ ........................... 3 T heatre : Practicum I ................ ................................ 1 Theatre Practicum II ............................... ...... ..... ..... 2 Workshop in Th eatre Arts .................. ....... ......... 1-3 And /or ot h er designated e l ectives T o tal Elect ives ........................................................................... 1 8 T ota1 ..... ............... ............... .................................... ..... ............ 42 Comm unications Free Elective s List Oth er courses approved by the advisor in the selected Commun ications area of emphasis are acceptable as electives ANT 131 Intr od uction to Cultural Anthropology ...... .............. 3 ANT 233 Cross-Cu lt ural Communication ......... ................... 3 ART 101 Basic Dr awing Methods ........................... .............. 3 ART 102 Basic D esign and Crafts Methods .......... .. ............. 3 ART 202 Survey of Contemporary Art: 1960 Present Day ............... ................................. ... 3 ART 220 Beginn ing Phot ograph y . ... ...... ...... .................... 3 CEN 120 Technical Draw ing I ............................. ...... ...... ....... 3 CEN 121 Technical Draw ing II ...... ................ ........................ 3 ENG 251 Intermedia t e Composition .... .... ..... ....... .................. 3 ENG 303 Semantics ........................................... .. ....... ........ .... 3 JRN 181 Introduction to J ournalism ...................................... 3 JRN 182 Beg innin g Reporting and News Wr i ting ................ 3 JRN 282 Beginn ing New s Edi ting and Copyreading ............ 3 JRN 286 Intermediate Reporting and News Writ ing ..... ........ 3 JRN 381 Feature A rticle Writing for Newspapers ...... ........... 3 PHI 144 Logic ........... ....... ....... ....................... ...................... 3 PSC 322 Publ ic P olicy ............................ ............... ................ 3 PSY 241 Social Psychology ..... ...... .............................. ........ 3 PSY 342 Issues in Commun it y/Social Psychology ............... 3 SPE 301 Advanced Pub lic Speaking .............. ....................... 3 SPE 322 Movement for the Stage ......................................... 2 SPE 328 Stage Direct ing ........... ........ ... ... ............................. 3 SPE 310 Bus iness and Profe ssional Speaking .................... 3 SPE 330 Voice Science : P hone t ics and Voice and Diction ............................... ...... .... ...... .... ....... ... 3 SPE 347 Evolution of Cinematics as Art ............... .... .... ........ 3 SPE 412 Freedom of Speech .................................... .. .......... 3 SPE 420 Reader s Th eatre ....... .... .............. . ...................... 3 SPE 426 Theatre Practicum I .............................. ................... 1 SPE 427 Theatre Pra cticum II ........................ ............. ........... 2 SPE 448 Seminar : Practicum i n Broadcasting ..... .......... ....... 3 SPE 449 Effects of Radio-Television on Contemporary Life ......... ................ .... ........ ............. 3 The S peech Communicati on Minor 1 The Speech minor is required to take SPE 101-3 2. All Speech minors are required to take a minimum of one class in at least three of the sub j ect areas adopted for Speech maj ors This requirement does not a pp ly to students i nterested in Teacher Education. 3 The required courses should be taken from o n e of the starred courses to be agreed upon by the st uden t and advisor. D i vis i on of Human i t i es 4 Add i tional semester h o urs in Speech courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Speech 5. Tota l minimum semester hours for a min or in Speec h Communicatio n : 18 semester hours Speech Pathology-Aud i o l ogy Minor Semes t e r Requ i red Courses Hour s SPE 330 V oice S cience: Phone tics and Voice SPE SPE S P E S P E S P E 350 351 360 361 450 and Dict io n .............. ............................................... 3 Speech Path ology I ......................... ....................... 3 Speech Path o l ogy II ................................................ 3 Aud i ology I ........ ................ ....................................... 3 A udiology II ......... .............................. .......... ...... ....... 3 Clinical Pra ctice in Speech PathologyAudiology .............. ............................................. 1-3 SPE 463 Prac t icum i n Aud io logy ... .... .... ................................ 1 Electives A minimum of two additional in courses selected from the f ollowing list in consultation with and approved by the D epartment o f Speech Approved Psy chology courses may be s u bstituted for e l ectives SPE 352 SPE 359 S P E 374 S P E 455 Languag e A cquisitio n .......... .... .............. ................. 3 Speech Prob lems in the Schools ............. ............. 3 Psychology of Communication .. ............. ................ 3 Practicum in Speech Pathology ........ ..................... 1 Total minimum h ours require d for a minor in Speech P athology Audiology : 21 semester hours Telecommun i catio ns T elecommun ica tions is one o f the most beneficial internship p rograms for com municatio n students in broadcasting Under t h e auspices of the Department of Speech Communicat io n the st udent is afforded the opportunity to gain first hand experience t hrough 67 current internships in rad io television and f ilm, prov i ded by industry government pub lic and commercial telecommunicat i ons centers The student may beg i n th i s program u pon the completion of six (6) hours i n broadcasting telecommunicat i ons courses at MSC Students shou ld cont act the CCC advisor in broadcast ing for details relati v e to eligibility and placement in the telecommunications i n terns hips 49

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Division of Social Sciences Division of Social Sciences The Soc ial Sciences offers baccalaureate degree programs in Anthropology History Polit i cal Science Psychology Sociology and Social Work ; the i nterd i sc i plinary programs in Behavioral Science and Gerontology ; and an additional array of areas of emphases and minors designed to develop student understanding of and skills for working with individuals groups, and large organizations Courses range from those i n the traditional liberal arts core to offerings such as professional internships in social work topics in popular culture, legislative and government internships and research practicums Programs will prepare students for a variety of career objectives including beginning level practice in helping services and soc ial work agencies graduate education in law and in the various social and behavioral science disciplines research in the social and behavioral sciences work with the elderly public admin istration and secondary school teaching in the social sci ences History Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours HIS 101 Western Civil iza tion to 1715 ....................... ........... 3 HIS 1 0 2 Western Civil ization since 1715 ........... . ...... . .... 3 HIS 121 A mer i can History to 1865 .... ... .... .... .... ..... ......... 3 HIS 122 American History since 1865 .......... ....... ...... .. .. ... 3 Electives A min imum of 23 add itional semester hours in H i story is required 18 hours of which must be upp er division Grade Average Students maj or ing in H istory must maintain at least a 2 0 average in their history course s Advising History majors should consult with a departmental advisor to select the courses in other d isci plines which complement their area of cor1centration in the major. Minor in History There are four different areas of emphasis available to stuQents seeking a History minor (I) Regular History area of emphasis (II) American Popular Culture area of emphasis (Ill) American West History area of emphasis (IV) Twentieth Century Studies History area of emphas i s I. Regular History Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 101 Western Civilizat io n to 1715 ................................. 3 HIS 102 Western C i vilizat ion since 1715 .............................. 3 HIS 121 A merica n History to 1865 ................ . ..... .......... ... 3 HIS 122 American H istory since 1865 ................ .. ......... .... ... 3 Electives A minimum of 9 additional semester hours in History is required The hours must be upper -divi sion and should be selected in consultation with a departmental advisor II American Popular Culture Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 122 American History since 1865 .................................. 3 HIS 151 Movies and Histo r y ... ....... .................. .............. ...... 3 or HIS 152 Rock Music and Social History or HIS 153 Sports in America ....... ... ....................................... 3 50 Electives A minimum of 15 additional History hours is required of which 9 must be upper division Courses must be related to American Popula r Culture Ill. American West History Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 110 American West .... .............. ......... ......... .................. 3 HIS 111 Colorado History I ....... ................ ... .............. ....... 3 HIS 121 American History to 1865 ........ ........ .... ..... ..... ... 3 HIS 122 American H istory since 1865 ...... ..... ..... ............. ... 3 Electives A minimum of 9 additiona l History hours treating the Amer i can West i s required all of which must be upper-d i vision IV Twentieth Century Studies History Area of Emphasis Required Courses HIS 122 American H i story since 1865 .......... .... .... . .... ..... 3 HIS 201 Contemporary World H i story ... ...... ..... ......... .... ...... 3 Electives A minimum of 15 add i tional hours treating twentieth century history is required, of wh ich 9 must be upper division Grade Average Student s m i noring in H i story mus t maintain a 2 0 average i n their h istory courses Secondary School Education Certification in Social Sciences: Students majoring in History may combine their major with other courses in the Social Sciences and in Education to receive Secondary Education Certification The r e qu irements of this program are inc luded under the E ducat ion Department section of thi s catalog Pre-Law Courses Several history courses are of particular importance to prel aw stude nts These i nclude HIS 121, HIS 122 and HIS 368 Students interested in prelaw courses are urged to contact the departmenta l advisor

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Political Science The study of Politi cal Science is mainly a study of governments : their social and economic e nvironments how they are organized how and why they decide upon and carry out po lic ies and how governments interact with one another. It also includes the study of political ideas and values past and present and recent trends in methods of research and analysis aimed at enlarging our know l edge of pol i tical pr ocesses. The Polit ical Science program provides students with the perspective and background n ecessary to understand the complex and o ften confusing reality of politi cs. Political Science Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours PSC 101 American National Government ............... ............ .. 3 PSC 1 02 Poli tical Systems and Id eas ........... .... ...... ........ .... 3 PSC 305 Politi cal Theory ....... .. ..... .......... ......... .............. ..... 3 PSC 402 Special Studies ......... ................ .. .. .............. .... .... 3 T o ta/ ............................. .............. ... ... .................. .. ........ .......... 12 Electives A minimum of 21 additional semester hours of Political Science must be completed At least 12 of these 21 hours must be Upper-division courses (300and 400-level) Total semester hours required for a PSC major : 33 Students desiring Secondary Certification in Social Studies sho uld see the Department of Teacher Education Minor in Political Science Semester Required Courses Hours PSC 101 American National Government .... ...... ..... ....... .... 3 PSC 1 02 Political Systems and Ideas ................... . .......... 3 Tota/ ....... .......... ....... ....... ........... .... ............ ..... .... ..... .......... .... 6 Electives A minimum of 12 additional semester hours are required in Political Science courses Total Semester hours required for a PSC Minor : 18. In additio n to the scheduled classes, Political Science students are encouraged to enroll for at least one off campus i nternship Students may receive credit for practical work experience in various areas of government service Placement in a governmental position may be initiated by the student or by the Political Science Department. Interested students should contact the P olitical Sci ence Department for deta i ls Minor in Public Admin i stratio n Public Adm i nistration is the study of governmental organizations and how government policies are formulated and carried out. The P olitical Science Department offers a Minor in Public Administrat ion available t o students interested in a career in government service to students presently employed in government who wish to i ncrease their skills and job status and to stu dents planning to take post graduate w ork in Public Administr ation Semester Required Courses Hours A Basic courses required for all PA M i nors : PSC 101 American National Government ...... . . ......... ..... 3 PSC 302 Introduction to Publ ic Adm i nistration ..... .............. 3 B Two of the following courses: PSC 322 Publ ic Policy ...... .... ... ... ........................ ................. 3 PSC 324 Interg o vernmental Relations ........ ........... ........ .. ... ... 3 PSC 326 P oli t ics of Budgeting ................. ...... ................. ..... 3 PSC 328 Publ ic Personnel Administrat io n ......... ........ ......... 3 ACC 320 Government A ccou nting .................................... .... 3 Division of Social Sciences C One of the follow ing courses: CMS 201 P rincip l es of Information Systems ......................... 3 MTH 121 Introduct ion to Statist i cs .............. ............... .......... .4 D Internship (PSC 299 or 499 Omnibus Courses) or substitute course ..... ...... . ........... ......... ......... (minimum) 3 A governmental internship will be required of all students for a minimum of one semester and a minimu m of three sem ester hours. This requireme nt may be waived for students w ith at least one calendar year of adm ini strative work experience in a government agency. Total ....................... ...... ............................ ........... ..... .......... 1920 It is recommended that PA Minors also take a course in both publ ic speaking and in technica l writing. Also available to students is a program of cou r ses lead ing to a Certificate of Completion in Publ ic Administrat i on awa rded by the Pol itical Science Department. Students are awarded the Certificate after successfully completing a selection of courses amount ing to 26 credit hours Contact the Political Science D epartment for details Not listed among the regular courses are a varie ty of omnib us courses and self-paced courses which are offered eac h semester and give the student a greater variety of choice. Please be sure to check the semester class schedu l e for these. Psychology The major or minor program is to be planned in consultation with an adviser from the Psychology Department by the beginning of the junior year or upon transfer into the Department. Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours PSY 101 Introdu ctory Psychology ..... ..... ........ .......... ............ 3 PSY 311 Introduct ion to Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences ..... ......................... .......... 3 PSY PSY PSY PSY 312 331 332 451 Inferential Statistics ...... .... .... .................... ....... . 3 R esearch Techniques, Experimental I .... ...... ........ 3 Research Techniques, Experimental II ......... ...... 3 History and Systems of Psychology ............ ........ 3 18 Electives A minimum of 21 additional semester hours in Psychology courses selected i n consultation with and appro v e d by the Department of Psych ology making a total of 39 hours in Psychology A list of optional areas of emphasis i s as follows: Area I Experimental Psychology Area II Clinical Psychology Area Ill Social and Community Psychology Area IV Industrial Psychology Area V Developmental Psy cho l ogy Area VI Gerontology Students conside ring advanced degrees shoul d be aware that mos t gra duate schools require (1) Learning, (2) Sensation and Perception (3) Physiological Psychology and often require a mix of courses representing the various subdivisions within the field St ude nts interes ted in the Gerontology are a of emphas is mus t select a minimum of 42 hours (see list under Sociology Gerontology area of emphasis) in addition to the 18 hours of required co urses of the Psychology Ma jor This must be done in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology The Gerontology Emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 51

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Division of Social Sci ences elective hours i n the Psychology Major and the minor requirement. Students desiring Seconda ry Certificat ion in Social Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education Holistic Health and Wellness Education Multi-Minor The Multi Minor may be arranged through the Department of Psychology and includes the required courses listed on Page 26. Minor in Psychology Semester Required Courses Hours PSY 1 01 Introductory Psychology ...................... ................... 3 PSY 451 History and Systems of Psychology ............. ......... 3 Tota/ ... ...... ................ .... . ... .... ............... .... ..... ... ... ... ... ........ 6 Electives A mini mum of 15 addit i onal semester hours in Psychology courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Psychology are required making a total of 21 hours in Psycho log y Sociology The study of Sociology emphasizes understanding people in groups small groups like the family the allpervasive bureaucratic organizations of American soc i ety political parties, football crowds groups in conflict society as a whole It i ncludes the study from a variety of theoretical models of past and present societies and social processes and the analysis, using modern research methods, of contemporary social issues. The Sociology program offers to its majors and minors, and to students from all academ i c disciplines courses that focus on important issues and trends in today's complex societies Sociology Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hours SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology ....... ................................. 3 SOC 201 Current Soc ial Issues .. ............................................ 3 SOC 332 Soc i ological Theory : Past and Present ....... ..... .... 3 SOC 360 Research in the Social Sciences ...... ...... ............. 3 SOC 460 Advanced Research in the Social Sciences .......... 3 Tota/ ............ ..... ...... ......... .............. ...... ...... ........... ..... .... ... .... ..... 15 Electives A minimum of 21 addit i onal seme ster hours in Sociology courses is req u ired, consti tuting a total of 36 semester hours. At least 12 upper-division semes ter hours in Sociology must be completed at Metr o polita n State College by st udents majoring in the f ield. Optional Areas of Concentration in Sociology are as follows : Each area of conce ntrat ion i ncludes a number of courses d esigned to give the student an indepth exploration of the knowledge challen ges issues and research in a specific subdiscipline of Sociology I. BUSINESS AND THE URBAN COMMUNITY This concentration is particularly recommended for Business Land Use Urban Studies Industrial Communications majors and all students whose career plans are aimed toward management planning or adm i nistration in the urban sett ing. SOC 216 Patterns of Urban Living SOC 316 Industry and Occupations SOC 318 Labor and Management Organ i zations SOC 322 Race Sex and Ethnic Groups SOC 355 Soc i ology of Law SOC 373 Mas s Media and Social Behav i or SOC 381 Pop ula tion Issues 52 II. SOCIAL DEVIANCE This concentra t ion i s particularly recommended for Crim i nal Justice, Human Services, prelaw, Psychology majors and all students whose career goals involve working in prevention treatment and/or rehabi lit ation programs SOC 201 Current Social Issues SOC 250 Deviant Behavior in Soc i ety SOC 350 Criminology SOC 351 Juven ile Delin quency SOC 355 Soc i ology of Law SOC 383 Mental D i sorders Ill THE FAMILY AND ALTERNATIVE LIFE STYLES This concent ration i s particula rly recommende d for Teacher Education Human Services and Psychology majors and all students who plan peop le-s erving careers SOC 240 The Chicano Family SOC 310 Death and Dying SOC 340 Childhood and Adolescent Socialization SOC 341 The Family i n Transition SOC 342 Education i n a Changing Society SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles SOC 344 The Bla ck Family SOC 351 Juvenile Delin quency IV MEDICINE AND HEALTH This concentration is particularly recommended for Health Care Management Nurs ing, premed and Psychology majors SOC 104 Introduct ion to Gerontology SOC 204 Aging in American Society SOC 310 Death and Dying SOC 380 Health and Healers SOC 381 Population Issues SOC 383 Mental D isorders V. SOCIAL CLASS AND STRATIFICATION This concentration focuses on the various ways in which societies are div i ded It is recom mende d for all students wishing to gain further understanding of c onflict and ineq uality in groups and soc i eties and to explore possible solutions to these problems SOC 201 Current Soc ial Iss ues SOC 320 Social Classes in America SOC 322 Race Sex and Ethnic Groups SOC 324 Poverty in America SOC 343 Sociology of Sex Roles VI. CHANGING SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS This concentration offers a broad overview of the dominant institutions in soc i ety those inst itu t io ns that provide the framework f or our work family life and general social interaction SOC 320 Social Classes i n Amer ica SOC 341 The Family in Transition SOC 342 Educat ion in a Changing Society SOC 355 Sociology of Law SOC 371 Politics and Power SOC 380 Health and Healers SOC 391 Relig i ous Movements in America SOC 430 Social Change Statist ics for Social and Behavioral Sci ences (PSY 311) is strongly recommended for Sociology majors who plan to go on for g r aduate study and/or have career goals involvi ng research. (This course will not be used as a Sociology elective ) Soc iology Majors are also urged to include field experience in their college plans either through enroll in g in SOC 470 or through a Cooperative Education p lac ement Stude nts desiring Secondary Cert i ficat ion in Soc ial Studies should see the Departmen t of Teacher Education

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Gerontology A rea o f E mphas i s Ger o nt o l og y deal s w ith the causes and consequences, biological ps yc hol ogical and s o cial of aging Drawing from many fields of acad emic study this area of emphasis prepares the student for pro f e ssional and para profess i onal caree r s in human serv i ces f or the a ged populat ion. To complete the Gerontology Area of Emphasis a student selec t s (in addition to the 15 hours requ i red courses of the Sociol ogy Major in consultation with and appro ved by the Depa r t ment of Sociology/ A nthropology/Social Work) a minimum of 45 h o urs from the follow ing list of courses The Gerontology area of emphasis may be applied in lieu of the 21 elective hours i n the Soc i ology M ajor and the m i nor requ i rement. Semester Hours soc 104 Introduction to Gerontology ....................... .......... 3 soc 2 0 4 Agi n g i n A merican Society ............... .... ........... ..... 3 soc 216 Patt erns of Urban Living .... ....................... ..... ....... 3 soc 304 Cont e mporary Issues in Gerontology ........... .... ... 3 soc 310 Death and Dying ........ ........................ .... ................ 3 soc 324 Poverty in America ... ....... ....................................... 3 soc 341 The Family i n Transi t ion ......................... .............. 3 soc 380 Hea l th and Hea l ers .......................................... .... ... 3 soc 3 8 1 Population Issues ...... .... ......... .... ....... ......... 3 soc 383 Ment a l D isorders ...... .... ..... .................. .......... ...... 3 soc 470 Advanced Field Internship .... ............ .................. 3 P S Y 216 Personal i ty and Adjustment ................. ............ ..... 3 PSY 221 Psychology of Human D evelopment .............. ....... 3 PSY 295 Contemporary Issues in Psychology : D eath and Dying ............................ ................. ..... 3 PSY 327 Adulthood and Senescence ... ......... ....... ..... ......... 3 PSY 493 Seminars in Developmental Psycho l ogy : Senescence ........ ........... ........ ...... .......... ............ .... 3 PSY 4 9 9 Field Placement in Gerontology ....... .............. ....... 3 HES 105 Dynamics of Health ........................ ........................ 3 HES 204 Nut rit ion .... ....................................... ................... ... 3 Minor in Sociology Required Cour s es SOC 101 Intro duction to Socio l ogy ....... ............. ................... 3 Electives A min imum of 15 addit i onal semester hours i n Sociology courses selected i n consultat ion w i th a department advi s or i s requ i red br inging the total to 18 semester hours At least 6 upper-d i vision semest er hours of the m i no r must be comp l eted at Metropolitan Sta te C ollege It i s s ug geste d that students c o nsi d er focusing their elective choi c e s in one o f the areas of concentrat i on in Sociology Ant hropology Anth r op ology is the exploratio n of human dive r s i ty The comb ina t ion of cul tural, archeological and b i o logical pe r sp ec t i ves o f fers a viewpoint that i s un i que i n studying the p r ob lems related to the surv ival and well -being of the human spec ies From the living and vanished cultures of Colorado to those of New Guinea or Asi a Anthropology can be applied to assist our understand ing of human d i fferences Anth ro p ology Major f or Bachelor of Arts S emester R eq u ired Cours e s Hours ANT 101 Phys ical A n t h ropology and Preh i story ................... 3 ANT 131 Int rodu c t i on to Cul t ural Anthropology .................... 3 ANT 2 1 0 Human Evolut ion ..... ..................................... ..... ..... 3 ANT 233 Cross -Cultural Communicatio n .............................. 3 ANT 2 6 4 Princi p les of Arche o logy .......... ........ ....... .... ...... 3 15 D ivisi o n of Social Sciences Ele ctive s A minimum of 21 add i t i onal semester hours in Anthrop o logy is requ i red bringing the total to 36 semester hou r s At l e a s t 12 uppe rd i v i s i on semester hours i n Anth r opology m ust be comp l eted at Metropol i tan State Colleg e by stud e n ts majorin g in the f i e l d S t ude n ts des i ring Teacher Certificatio n i n Soc ial Stud i e s s h ould see the Department of Teacher Education. Mino r i n Anthropology The minor provides an opportunity for students to br ing a unique anthropological perspective to \heir already chosen area of interest. Any o n e having to deal w i th human or cultura l d i fferences would benefit from sel e ctin g a focus in cross-cultural co n tact archeology, o r human diversit y Requ i red Courses ANT 101 Physical Anthropology and P r ehis t ory ................... 3 ANT 131 Introduct ion to Cultural Anthropology .................... 3 6 E lec tiv e s A minimum of 15 addit i onal semester hours in Anthropology is requ i red b r inging the total to 21 semester h ours A t least 6 upper-d i vision semester hours must be comp leted at Metropolitan State College Behavioral Science Ma j o r f or Bachelor of Arts Thi s i s a d i str i buted major offering students a st r u c tured overv i ew of the social and behav i oral sciences e m ph asizing breadth of coverage rather than i n-depth studies Part icu larly applicab l e for secondary education maj ors. Semester Req uire d C ourse s Ho u rs ANT 131 I ntroduction to Cult u ral Anthropology ......... .......... 3 EGO 201 Princ i ples of Economics : Macro ............................. 3 HIS 366 Recent U S., 1945 to the Present .......................... 3 PSG 102 Pol i t i cal Systems and Ideas ......... ........................... 3 PSY 101 Introductory Psychology ..... ............. ....................... 3 SOC 1 01 Introduct ion to Socio l ogy .................................... .... 3 1 8 Elec t iv e s A m i nimum of 18 add i tional upper-d i v i sion e l e c t i v e h o urs i n Anthropology Econom i cs History Polit i cal Scienc e P s y c h o logy and Soc i ology i s requ i red bringing the total to 36 s emester ho u rs No mo r e than 6 upper-d i v i s ion hours may be in any one d i sc i pline and must be selected in co n s u ltation with a n d have the approval of the advisor Three ho urs of field study are recommended in this 18 hours of electives At l east 12 upper division hours mus t be completed at Metropol i tan State College by students maj oring i n t hi s field Each student in this major must have the pre li minary appro val of an assigned advisor Students des i ring Teacher Certification i n Social Stud i e s should see the Department of Teac h er Educat i on No Mi nor Offered Social Work Ma j or for Bachelor of Science The Social Wor k program offers preparation for beginning profess i onal prac tice in helping services co r rections and social work agencies Students are als o encourage d to pursue graduate degrees such as the M S W and the Ph. D or D .S.W. 53

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Division of Social Sciences The basic objectives of the Social Work degree prog ram are to enable students to achieve effective active participation in community affairs based upon an understanding of complex social welfare programs to facilitate entry into beginn i ng level practice and to encourage graduate study The curriculum reflects these objectives in its required courses which focus upon field experience, methods of helping individuals, families small groups organizations and communities ; human growth and development ; human diversity; soc ial policy analysis and research Particula r emphasis is placed upon understanding and coping with bureaucratic processes and structures The field of soc ial work includes: Child Welfare Family Social Work Correctional Services Social Serv i ces (public assistance agencies) Med ical and Mental Health Developmental Disabilities Aging Private Practice Industrial Social Work and others Students who major in Soc ial Work are not required to comple te a minor Semester General Studies Hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition .... .................. ................. 3 ENG 102 Freshman Composition ........................................... 3 Career ........ .... ............. ........ ............. ................................... .... 0-6 Science/Mathematics ............. ...... .......................................... 8 10 Social/Behavioral Science ..................................................... 8-10 Humanities .............................. ........ ....... .................. .. .. ........ 8-10 Tota/ ....................................... ..... ..... ... .... .......... .... ...... ...... ..... 36 Required Courses SWD 101 Social Work : A Helping Profession .................... .... 3 SWD 104 Human Behav i or and the Social Environment ...... .4 SWD 105 Fami ly Social Services .......................................... .4 SWD 201 Social Work with Populat ions at Risk .................... 3 SWD 202 Social Work with Women ........................................ 3 SWD 241 Social Work Practice 1 : Principles and Applications ............................ ................... ............ 6 SWD 378 Policy in Social Welfare : Issues Analysis and SWD SWD SWD SWD SWD 379 401 441 478 479 P lanned Change .......... ......................................... 3 Research in Social Work ....................................... 3 Social Work Practice II ........ .... .......... ................ .. ... 6 Cros s-cultura l Social Work .................................. ..4 Professional Internship I ......................................... 6 Professional Internship II ........ ....................... .. ....... 6 Total ................................................... ... ...... ......... .................. 51 Electives in Social Work ...... ...... .............. .......... .... ..................... 1 0 Credits to be selected from the follow i ng : SWD 301 Socia l Work Serv i ces for Children and AdolesSWD SWD SWD SWD SWD 302 303 480 490 498 cents ......... ... ................... ......................... ....... ...... .4 Case Management in Social Work Pract ice ........ .4 Socia l Services for Adults and Aging ........ ........ .... .4 Workshop (Variable Topics) .................. ............ 2-4 Sem i nar (Variable Top ics) ............ ...... ................ 2 4 Independent Study .............................................. 1-8 Tota/ ... ........................... ...... .... .... .... ..... ............. ........... ..... ....... 61 Case Management Certificate The Social Work program and Human Services Department have developed a joint program in Case Management and Developmental Disabilities The purpose of the program is to train individuals interested in performing the functions of a case manager. Required courses are listed under the Department of Human Services For further information call 556 3167 Contract Minor Available. 54

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Division of Science and Mathematics Division of Science and Mathematics The Division of Science and Mathematics includes the Departments of Biology Chemistry Earth Sciences Mathematical Sciences and Physics The degree pr o gram s and course work are structured to provide flexibility in meeting the needs of the urban student. The Division offers interdiscipl i nary career-or i ented bachelor's degree programs in the traditional areas of science and mathematics as well as those areas or i ented toward more specific career objectives such as training for the health related fields, crim i nalist i cs, land-use applied mathemat i cs computer sci ence statistics air pollu tion monitoring and oc cupatio nal health and safety. In cooperation with other inst i tutions it is possible for a student to receive a B S or a B A degree from Metropolitan State College and certification i n Medical Technology from another approved institution. Biology The Depa rtment of Biology offers two majors the Bachelor of Science in Biology and the Bachelor of Arts in Biology Within these majors the student may emphasize Botany Zoology or Microbiology together with paramedical and general studies Supportive courses associated with Criminalistics and the Drug and Alcohol Institute as well as general courses for enrichment of the non science student's background are offered by the Departme nt. Students seeking Secondary Certification in Science should see the Department of Teacher Education A Biology minor is offered to students with related majors or a special interest in the field Biology Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses Semester BIO 108 BIO 210 BIO 220 BIO 240 BIO 360 BIO 355 Electives Hours General Introduction to Biology ............... ....... ... .4 General Botany Two out General Zoology of three General Microbiology courses ...... ..... ... 9-10 General Genet ics ........... ...... ..... ...... .. ... ......... ....... 3 Urban Ecology or BIO 454, Plant Ecology or BIO 455 Animal Ecology ................... .4 B i o l ogy c ourses from the 200 300 and 400 series approved by the D epartment of Biology must be co mpleted to bring the total of Biology c ourses approved for the major to 40 credit hours At least 14 of thes e credit hours mus t be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Department of Biology It is recommended that in consultat i on w i t h his or her advisor the student select these courses to emphasize Botany Zoology or Microbiology Total Hours Requ i red i n Biology .................................. .... ..... .40 Required Non-Biology Courses One year of college General Chemistry one semester of upper-division Organic Chemistry one semester of upper division Biochemistry. one year of Mathematics starting with MTH 111 are requis i tes for the Biology Major Biology Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses BIO 108 BIO 210 BIO 220 BIO 240 BIO 360 BIO 355 Electives Semester Hours General Introduction to Biology ............................ .4 General Botany Two out General Zoology of three General M i crobiology courses ... .......... 9-10 General Genetics ..................................................... 3 Urban Ecology or BIO 454 Plant Ecology or BIO 455 Animal Ecology ................... .4 Biology courses from the 200 300 and 400 series approved by the Department of Bio logy must be completed to bring the total of B iology courses approved for the ma j or to 40 credit hours At least 14 of these credit hours must be from the 300 and 400 courses of the Departme nt of Biology It is recommended that in consultation with her or his advisor the student select these courses to emphasize Botany Zoology or Microbiology Total Hours Requ ired in Biology ...... ......... .... ................... .... .40 Required Non-Biology Courses One year of General Chemistry (equivalent to the present courses CHE 110 and CHE 111) Botany Area of Emphasis Requirements for either a B.A or a B S degree in Biology must be satisfied and the 40 hours of Biology courses must inclu de BIO 210 General Botany ; BIO 454 Plant Ecology ; and 15 semester credit hours from the follow ing Botany electives : Course BIO 314 BIO 315 BIO 316 BIO 317 BIO 318 BIO 412 BIO 416 BIO 456 Semester Hours Plant Physiology ................. ... ................................. 5 Plant Hormones ......... ... ....... .......... ...... ........... .... 2 Plant Anatomy and Morphology .... ................... .4 Evolution of Flower i ng P lants ......... ..... ....... ........... 3 Vascular Plant Taxonomy .................. : ............ .... .4 Algology ....... .............. ... ........................................ .4 Mycology ........ ....................................................... .4 Field Methods in Plant Ecology .............................. 2 Microbiology Area of Emphasis Students must satisfy requirements for the B S Biology degree program including BIO 240 General Microbiology ; and one course from each of the categories of Organismal, Medical, or Advanced Microbiology courses listed below plus additional courses from these three li sts as well as appropriate omnibus 55

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Division of Science and Mathematics courses selected in consultat i on with the M icr ob i ology faculty to complete 20 semes ter hours of upper-division electives and a total of 40 semester cred it hours in Biology : Organismal BIO 340 BIO 412 BIO 416 BIO 422 BIO 444 Medical BIO 327 BIO 335 BIO 445 Semester Hours Bacteriology ........ ........ ........... ...................... ..... ..... .4 Algology .............. ........... ........ ....... ..... ............... .4 Mycology ...................... ............... .... ..................... .4 P rotozo ology ...... ...... .... ............... ............... ...... ..... 3 Virology ................ .... ................................. .......... .4 Semester Hours Parasitology ........ ......... ......... ...... ....... .......... .... ...... 4 Immuno logy ......................... ........ ........................... 4 P athoge n ic Microbiology ........ ............. .................. 5 Semester Advanced Microbiology Hours BIO 305 Cell and Molecular B i ology ....... .... .... .................... .4 BIO 446 Microbial B iochemistr y ........ .... ............................... 5 BIO 447 Microbial Genet ics ........ ............... ...... .................... 3 Zoology Area of Emphasis Students must satisfy th e require ment s for the B S Degree in Biology and must inc lude in the 40 semeste r hours of B io logy courses BIO 220 General Zoology ; BIO 455 Animal Ecology ; and 15 semester credit hours from the following list of Zoology ele c tiv es : Semester Course Hours BIO 321 H istol ogy ........ .... .... .................. ....... ....... .............. .4 BIO 322 Compa r ative Vertebrate Ana tomy .... .... ............... .4 BIO 325 Arthropod Zoology ........ ....... ............ ..... ..... ......... .4 BIO 327 Parasito l ogy ....... ..... ............ .... ............. .... ....... .... .... 4 BIO 331 Intr oduc tion to General Animal Phys iology .................. ..................... .......... 4 BIO 334 Endocrino l ogy ...................... . ..................... .... .... 3 BIO 422 Protozoo logy ....... ........ ......... .............................. ..... 3 BIO 425 Entomology .......... . ..... ...... ..... .... .................. .4 BIO 427 Herpeto l ogy ............ ............. .... ............ ..... ............. 3 BIO 428 Orn i thology .... .......................... ..... ............ ... .. .. .. ... 4 BfO 429 Mammalogy ....... .............. .... ............ .................. 3 BIO 436 Introduction to Ecological Ani mal Physiology .................................... .... .......... 3 BIO 481 Introduction to Vertebrate Embryology ............ ............ ....... ........... ............. ... .4 BIO 494 Vertebrate Evolution .............. .................. ............... 3 'BIO 301. Mc rotechnique and BIO 305, Cell and Molecular Biology are b oth applicable to the fields of B otany. M icrobiology and Zoology and are reco mmended as additional elect i ves for all tHree areas of emphasis Minor in Biology Required Courses Semester Hours BIO 108 General Introduct ion to B iology ......... ................... .4 BIO 210 General B otany BIO 220 General Zoology BIO 240 General Microbiology BIO 231, 232 Human Anatomy and Huma n Phy siology BIO 360 Genera l Gen etics BIO 355 U rban Ecolo gy BIO 4 54 Plant Eco logy BIO 455 Anima l Ecology Electives Two out of these fo ur ...... .... 9-13 options One out of these four ....... .... 3 4 options Bio logy courses from the 200 300 and 400 series, approved by the Depa rtment of B iology must be completed to bring the total of Biology courses approved for the minor to 24 credit hours Total Hours Required i n B iology .......... ............ ............. .... .... .... 24 56 Medical Technology Program See Chairman of B i ology Department for details Chemistry The D epartme nt of Chemistry offers three majors and is accredited by the Ame rican Chemical Society Th ese majors are the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (minimum 4 8 hours) the Ba che lor of Arts in Chem ist ry (minimum 37 hours), and the B achelor of Science in Criminalistics (minimum 97 hours) In addition a Bachelor of Sc ience degree program in Chemistry with an emphasis in Occupat ional H ealth and Safety as well as minors i n Chemistry and Criminalistics are available. The Bachelor of Science in should be c h osen by stu d ents who plan a career in Chemistry or plan t o attend graduate school in Chem istry The Bachelor of Ar ts in Chemistry is des i gned for students who plan a career i n a field related to chemistry but who do not intend to attend graduate school in Chemis try This option, requiring fewer hours may be especially at tra ctive to those wishing a second major and t o students desiring Secondary Education Certification Criminalistics is the scientific investigation identification, and comparison of physical ev id ence fo r criminal or civi l court proceedings. Criminalists must be trained in an assortment of disciplines including Chemistry Biology Law Enforcement Phys ics and M athematics The four year Criminalistics cu rr iculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and includes a half-time interns h ip in a criminalistics laboratory during the senior year Graduates of the program are prepared for employment i n criminalistics and have completed the requirements for graduate school in Chemistry, graduate school i n Crim inalistics, med i cal school dental school and law school. No minor is required for the Criminalistics major. Students electing the Chemistry major with the Occupational Health and Safety emphasis will be trained in the recognition evaluation and control of hazards in the workpl ace This area of emphasis i ncludes Chemistry courses equi valent to those required for the Bachelor of Arts major in Chemistry as well as supporting Science and Mathematics courses In addition, courses in Instrumenta l Analysis, Toxicology Safety and O cc upational Health and Safety will be required An internship dur ing the junior or senior year is required and gives valuable pract ical experience Graduates of the program are prepared for immediate empl6yment in the field of occupatio nal health and safety or the field of chemistry Graduates in this area also meet the admissions requirements for medical school dental school veterinary school, and graduate school in Industrial Hyg iene or C hemistry. For further informa tion con tact the Chem istry D epartment. Students seeking Secondary Edu cation credentia l s in Science should consult the Teacher Education Program of MSC for requirements Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Science Sem ester Required Courses Hours CHE 120 General Chemistry ........... ...................... ...... ........... 5 CHE 121 General Chemistry II .......................... ............. ........ 5 CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis ..................... .......... ............... 3 CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ......... .. ................ 2 CHE 310 Organic Chemist ry I ............................................... .4 CHE 311 Organi c Chemistry II ...................... ..... .......... .... ...... 3 CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Lab oratory I ............................. 2 CHE 313 Organic Chemistry L aboratory II ..... ...................... 2 CHE 325 Phy sical Chem istr y I ...... ................ ...... ................. .4 CHE 326 Physical Chem istr y II ............... ........ ...................... .4 CHE 328 Phys ical Chemistry Lab oratory I ............................ 2 CHE 329 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II ................ ........... 2 Electives A min i mum of ten semester hours in Chem i stry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required If a degree which meets American Chemical Society

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approval criteria is sought, CHE 430, Inorganic Chemistry CHE 410, and CHE 411, Instrumental Analys i s and Labor atory must be taken Total Hours Required ................ ................................................. 48 Occupational Health and Safety Area of Emphasis The Occupat ional Health and Safety area of emphasis may be appl ied in lieu of the 14 elective hours in the Chemistry Major and the minor requ ire ment. The required courses do not include CHE 325 and CHE 326 Physical Chemistry I and II, and CHE 328 and CHE 329 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I and II. Required Courses CHE 250 CHE 319 CHE 350 CHE 410 CHE 411 CHE 415 CHE 420 CHE 425 CHE 431 CHE 450 CHE 475 BIO 108 BIO 232 BIO 240 PHY 201 MTH 141 MTH 320 Electives Introduct io n to Occupational Health and Safety .... 3 Survey of Phys ical Chemistry ................................. 5 Occupational Safety ......... ..... ........................... ...... 3 Instrumental A nalysis .... ............... ........................... 3 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory ........................... 2 Instrumentation and Analysis in the Occupational Environment .................. ........................... ..... ........ 4 Evaluation and Control of Air Quality ................ ..... 3 Principles of Occupational Health and Safety ....... 3 B iochemistry I ..................... ..................... ..... ........ 5 Occupational Toxicology ...... ... .... .................... ...... 3 Occupational Health and Safety Internship ........... 8 General Introduction to Biology ............ ................ .4 Human Physiology ..... ............................................ .4 General Microb i ology ....... ......... ............................ 4 College Physics I ........ ........... ........................ ......... 5 Calculus I ............. ............. ...................................... 4 B i ostatistics .... ................. ................................. ...... 3 The following courses are recommended as electives: SPE 101-3 COM 2613 ECO 201-3 and MGT 357 3 Total Hours Required (Major and Minor) .................... ............. 92 Chemistry Major for Bachelor of Arts Required Courses CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...................... ..... .......... ...... ..... 5 CHE 121 General Chemistry II .................. ...................... ...... 5 CHE 300 Quant i tative Analysis ........... ................................... 3 CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ........................... 2 CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I .................................... .......... .4 CHE 311 Organic Chem i stry II ...... ........................................ 3 CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ............................. 2 CHE 313 Organic Chem i stry Laboratory II ................ ............ 2 CHE 319 Survey of Physical Chemistry ................................. 5 Electives A minimum of six additional semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required. Total Hours Required ........... .............. ................. ................... .... 37 Criminalistics Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses CHE 120 General Chemistry I ............................ ................... 5 CHE 121 General Chemistry II ... .................................... ........ 5 CHE 300 Quantitative Analys i s ....... ........ ............................... 3 CHE 301 Quantitative Analys is Laboratory ................... ........ 2 CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I .......................... ... .............. .. .. .4 CHE 311 Organic Chemistry II .... ............................ ........... .... 3 CHE 312 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ............................. 2 CHE 313 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II ........ ............... ..... 2 CHE 319 Survey of Physi cal Chemistry ............. ............... ..... 5 CHE 370 Criminalistics I .... ..................................................... 3 CHE 371 Cri minalistics II .......... ................... ........ ............ ...... 3 CHE 410 Instrumental Analys i s ....... .... ................. .................. 3 CHE 411 CHE 431 CHE 470 CHE 471 PHY 201 or Division of Science and Mathematics Instrumental Analysis Laboratory ....... ........... ......... 2 Biochem i stry I .... ....... ..... ......... ...... .......................... 5 Criminalist ics Internship I .... .............................. ..... 7 Criminalistics Internship II ........................... ........... 7 College Physics I ............. .......................... ............. 5 PHY 231 General Physics I ..... ........ .. ... ................. ........ ........ .4 and PHY 232 BIO 108 BIO 240 BIO 360 CJC 101 CJC 210 CJC 312 CJC 212 MTH 141 MTH 321 General Physics Laboratory I .. .. .. ........................... 1 General Introduction to Biology ............. ............... .4 General Microb iology .............. ................. ............... 4 General Genetics .................................... ..... ....... .... 3 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System .......... 3 Substantive Cr iminal Law ....................................... 3 Constitutional Law ................................. ................ 3 Evidence and Courtroom Pro cedures .................... 3 Calculus I ............ .. ............... ................................... .4 Probability and Statistics .......... ............................. .4 Total Hours Required (Major and Minor) ...................... ........... 97 Minor in Chemistry Semester Required Courses Hours CHE 120 General Chemistry I ...... ....................................... .. 5 CHE 121 General Chem istry II ............................................... 5 CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis ...... ........................................ 3 CHE 301 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ........................... 2 CHE 310 Organic Chem istry I .... ............. .... ......................... .4 CHE 311 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ............................. 2 Electives A minimum of five addit i onal semester hours in Chemistry courses selected in consultation with and approved by the Department of Chemistry are required Total Hours Required ............................... ................... ..... .......... 26 Minor in Criminalistics Semester Required Courses Hours CHE 110 Introduction to Chemistry ....................................... 5 CHE 270 Introduction to Criminalistics ................................. .4 CHE 275 Arson and Explosives ............................................. 3 CHE 276 Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs ... 1 CHE 370 Criminalistics I .......... ............................................... 3 CHE 371 Crim i nalistics II ........................................................ 3 CJC 212 Evidence and Courtroom Pro cedures .......... .......... 3 Total Hours Required ................................................................. 22 Earth Sciences The Earth Sciences Department is comprised of three basic disciplines : Geography Geology, and Meteorology The Department of Earth Sciences offers course work leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Land Use and a Bachelor of Science in Meteorology The Bachelor of Science degree program is recommended for those students desiring a stronger background in the physical and quantitative aspects of the environment. Minor programs are ava ilable in Geology, Geography and Meteorology Students wishing Teaching Cert i fication in either Science or Social Studies have the opportunity to develop a core of courses in Geology, Geography or Meteorology For details on these programs, students should see the Department of Teacher Education. Land Use The Land Use program is very broad scoped and can be utilized for a number of career ob j ect i ves Thi s is the reason for several areas of emphasis Career opportunities exist in such areas as planning agencies cartography geologic drafting, air photos and 57

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Division of Science and Mathematics satell ite imagery interp retati on env ironme ntal and resource management orga n izations travel and transportation mining and mineral companies residential and in dustrial deve l opment recre ational land use population analys i s and a variety of other interrelated fields. The pro gram also provides a good basis for con t inued study at the graduate level. Land Use Major for Bachelor of Arts MTH 120 Stat i stics for Land Use I ............................ ..... ...... 2 GEG 321 Introduc t ion to Cartography .......... .... ................. 3 GEG 361 Princi p les of Land Use ... ....... .... ...... ..... .... ........ 3 GEG 380 Statistics for Land Use II ... .... ... .............. .......... 2 GEG 495 Intern ship (or Field Methods ) .... ..................... ...... 2 Required Area of Emphasis Each student shall select one of the follow ing areas of emphasis Within the a rea of emphas is th e student will take 19 hours among the courses listed Not more than 6 of these 19 hours may be lower-division Required Courses Semeller Hours Urban Land Use GEG 132 Geography o f Social Issues ............. ... ... .............. 3 GEG 136 Geography o f Economic Ac ti v iti es ...... ..... .... .... .... 3 GEG 204 Geography o f Denver ........ ...... ....... ............... ... 3 GEG 300 Historical Geography of the U S ............. ............ 3 GEG 360 Urban Geography (required) .......................... ......... 3 GEG 362 Land Use and Population .... .... ....... . .............. .... 3 GEG 363 Land Use and Transportation ..... ........ ..... ... .... .... 3 GEG 392 Directed S tu dy in Land Use ... ......... ....... ..... ........ 2 GEG 461 Urban and Regi onal Planning (required) ...... ..... .... 3 GEG 462 Land Use : Residential ..... .......... ........ ................. ... 3 GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ....... ........ ......... ............... 2 MTH 103 Tria ngle Trigonometry ..................... ............. .... ...... 1 Land Use Techniques GEG 112 Or i enteer ing ............. .... ................... .... ........ ........ ..... 1 GEG 122 Map Use ..... .......... .... ................. ......... ......... ..... ... 2 GEG 322 Intermediate Cartography (required) ...................... 3 GEG 392 D irec ted Study in Land Use ................................ ... 2 GEG 461 Urban and Regional Plann in g ................................. 3 GEG 484 Remote Sensin g ......................................... .. ...... ..... 3 GEG 490 Seminar in Land Use ..................... ..... . ............... 2 SUR 251 Surveying I ............ ......... ........... .............. ............... 3 SUR 265 Photogrammetry I ............ ... .... ..... ...... ... ................. 3 CMS 441 Management Information Systems .. ...................... 3 MTH 103 Triangle Trigonometry ............................................ 1 MTH 151 Computer Programming : FORTRAN (required) ..... 4 URS 351 Community Dev elopment and Planning ................. 3 Resources and Environment GEG 140 GEG 340 GEG 362 GEG 392 GEG 422 GEG 461 GEG 464 GEG 484 GEL 342 GEL 344 GEL 400 GEG 490 BIO 355 ECO 345 World Resour ces ......................... ..... .......... ...... ... 3 Water Resour ces .................................. ................. 3 L and Use and Population ................. .......... ............ 3 D i rected Study i n Land Use ........... ...... .............. ..... 2 Climate and Land Use ................. ................. ....... ... 3 U r ban and Regi onal Planning ........... .... .................. 3 Lan d Use : Recr eation ...... .... .... .............................. 3 Remote Sensing (required) ............. ..... ....... .. ......... 3 Soil Resources .... ......................................... ......... 4 Energy and Mineral Resources .......... .... .......... ..... .4 Environmenta l Geology (required) ............. ............. 3 Semi nar in Land Use ......................................... ..... 2 Urban Ecol ogy ........... ....... ............. .... ............ ........ 4 Environmental Economics (requ ired) ..................... 3 Geologic Area of Emphasis ( Note : Students selecting this area of emphasis will be required to minor in Geology.) GEL 115 Oceanography ......................................................... 3 GEL 120 Gemology ................ ............................ ........... ....... 2 GEG 124 Landforms ....... .... .............................. ........ .............. 3 GEG 484 Remote Sens ing ............................. ................. ........ 3 58 GEG 490 GEL 203 GEL 215 GEL 309 GEL 311 GEL 312 GEL 331 GEL 342 GEL 344 GEL 400 Seminar in Land Use ............................... .............. 2 Geology of Colorado ........ .............. ... ........ .............. 3 Geomorphology of the U S ................... ........ .......... 3 Introduct ion to Sedimen tation (required) ....... ....... .4 Introduct i on to Stratigraphy (required ) ................... 3 Geomorphology ............... .... ............ ................. ...... 4 Structura l Geology (req uired) ................... ............. 5 Soil Resources ............ ................................... ........ 4 Energy and Mineral Resources ......... .......... ..... ..... .4 Environmental Geolog y ........ ........................... ...... 3 Structured Electives Each student must take eleven addi tional upper-divis io n hours approved by the Earth Sc i ences Department to b rin g the total in the major to 42 hours These hours may be taken outside the Earth Sciences Department with prior approval. A list of suggested related courses in other departments is maintained in the Earth Sciences office Electives should be selected to provide an integrated and well planned pattern of courses The freedom to select certain courses both within the areas of emphasis and the structured electives allows students the opportunity to somewhat individua liz e and self-design their programs in keep ing w ith the i r vocat i onal goals Total Hours Required ........ ..... ...... ............. ...... ............. ........ ...... 42 Required Minor Except for the Geologic Area of Emphasis the field of study selected as a minor is at the opt ion of the student. Land Use Major for Bachelor of Science To fulfill the requirements for a Bach elor of Science w ith a major in Land Use a student must complete the requirements as listed above under the Bac helor of Arts ; however the student must minor in one of the sciences or science -oriented fields as app rove d by the Earth Sciences Depa rt ment. Minor in Geology Semester Required Courses Hours GEL 101 Genera l Geology ............................ ............ ............ .4 GEG 124 Landforms ........................ ........ ............................... 3 GEL 103 Histor ical Geology ...................... ............................ .4 GEL 301 Mineralogy I ...... .. ........................ ........... .......... ...... .4 GEL 302 Mineralogy II .. ..................... ...................... .............. .4 GEL 320 Petrology ................................... .......... ........ ........ ..4 Electives A minimum of 3 add itional semester hours of Earth Science courses selected i n consult atio n w ith and approved by the Depa rtment of Earth Sci ences Total Hours Requ i red ... ........................... .... ........................ ...... 26 Minor in Geography Required Courses GEG 112 Orienteer ing ............................................................. 1 GEG 122 Map Use ........ ............................... .. ............ ............. 2 GEG 123 Weathe r and Climat e ....... ........ ............ ................... 3 or GEG 124 GEG 130 Landform s ..... . ........ ................... ....................... 3 Introdu ction to Human Geogr aphy .... ............... ...... 3 Structured Electives A min imu m of 13 add iti onal hours of electives must be selecte d in consultat ion with a member of the Department of Earth Science faculty At l east one course must be selected from each of the following groups to satisfy this requ irem ent : Phys i cal Geography and Earth Resources GEG 140 World Resources .. .................................................. 3 GEG 340 Water Resources .................................................... 3

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GEL 342 GEL 3 44 S oil Resources : Genesis and Morphology ........... .4 Energy and Mineral Resources .................... ....... .4 Spatial Analysis and Planning G E G 360 U r ban Geography ........ ........ .... . ....... ........... ..... 3 GEG 361 P ri nciples of Land Use ... ................... .............. .... 3 GEG 362 Land Use and Population ..................... . ...... ... ..... 3 Regional Geography GEG 202 G eo graphy of Colorado ....... ...... ..... ............... ....... 3 GEG 204 G eo graphy of Denver ................................. ....... ... 3 GEG 210 Geography of Lat i n Amer i ca ........... ..... ..... .......... 2 GEG 2 20 G e ography of the U S ............................... ......... ... 3 GEG 300 H is torical Geog r aphy of the U S .................... ... .... 3 T o t a l Hour s R e qu i red ............... ........ ........ ..... ........................... 22 Meteorology The Meteorolog i st represents the liaison betwee n meteorological inf o rmation and the public She or he collects analyzes and s ubsequently t r anslates the information for public use The public in c lude s such var i ed gro up s as large general contrac tors publ ic and private util i t i es heavy manufacturing chemical processing plants agriculture transportation (inclu ding aviation services) government (su c h as the military and federal agencies), and res e arch organ iz ations The Meteorologist studies fundamental meteorological theory and analysis practices as well as ins t rum e ntat i on data processing, and communications concepts The program is designed to prov i de the st udent with the concepts of meteorology while emphasizing one or two chosen areas of publi c need Meteorology Major for Bachelor of Science Required Courses MTR 140 Introduct i on to Meteorology ........... .... ....... ...... .... 3 MTR 141 Aer ospace Meteorology .......... ............. ......... ...... 2 MTR 241 Meteorological Instrumentation ........... ........... . .... 3 MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology ... ................ .... ... .. .. .............. 3 MTR 341 Synopt i c Meteorology Laboratory .... .... ....... ....... .4 MTR 343 Introdu c tion to Dynam i c Meteorology .... .......... ... 3 MTR 344 Dynamic Meteorology : Atmospheric Pro c esses ..... ..................... ........................... ........ 3 MTR 345 Dynamic Meteorology : Kinematics and MTR MTR MTR MTR MTR EET MTH MTH 441 442 444 445 450 200 121 151 Dynamics .... ....... ............................... ......... ..... ...... 3 Meteorological Numerical Products ....................... 2 Urban and Indu strial Meteorology .......................... 3 Climato l ogy .............. ..... ..... ..... ..... ..................... ..... 3 Consu l t i ng Meteorology ........ ................ ........... ..... 1 Mesometeoro logy and Forecasting ....... ............... 3 E l ectr ic C i rcuits and Machines ............... ............. 3 Int ro du c t i on to Stat i stics .............. ........... ...... .. .. ... .4 Computer Programming : FORTRAN ............. ....... .4 S ubto tal ........ .... .... ....... ............... ......................... ..... ...... ... ..... .47 Minor Must incl u de a minor of not less than (18) semester hours as appro ved by the department .......... ........ ......... .......... ...... . .... 30 Subtotal ....................... ... .. ... .................. ......... ............ ..... : ........ 77 Additional Course Requirements ENG 101 & 102 English Composit i on ....... .... ............... .... ..... 6 MTH 111 College Algebra ................ ....... . ..... ...... ........... .4 MTH 112 College Trigonometry . .... . ........... ....... .. ...... ... 3 MTH 141 Cal c ulus I .................. .... .................... ........ .... . ..4 MTH 241 Calculus II ... ........ ..... .... ......... ...... ...... ......... ..... .4 PHY 201 C olle ge Physics I ................................ .. .. ........ ......... 5 PHY 202 C o llege Physics II .... ......... ....... ...................... ..... 5 Humani ties ....... ..... ....... ....... .... . .............. ......... 8 S ocial and Behavioral Science .... .......... ...... ...... .. 8 Subtotal .... .............. ....... ........ .... .... .... ....... ...... ....................... .47 Total ..... ....... .. ......... ... ................................ ..... ..... ....... ....... 124 Division of Science and Mathematics Minor in Meteorology Required Courses MTR 140 Introduction to Meteorology ....... .................... ..... 3 MTR 242 Use o f Radar a nd Satellites i n Meteorology ........ 3 MTR 340 Synoptic Meteorology .................... ........................ 3 MTR 341 Synoptic Meteorology Laboratory .... .................... .4 MTR 444 Climatology ................... ..... .............. ........ .............. 3 Approved Electives ........................... .......... ............ ................... .4 20 Mathematical Sciences Offering s include Mathematics in the l iberal and scientific tradition Applied Mathematics. Computer Science Statistics and Probab ility The Department of Mathematical Sciences attempts to provide courses relating to all these d i verse viewpo i nts with a wide variety of significant mathematical ideas Thus for those primarily interested in the use of mathematics in the study of some aspect of the physical or human world courses are available emphasizing the class i cal and current development and applications in analys i s computer sc i ence statistics and probability business and economics technical mathematics and operations research For the student in Humanities or Social Sciences courses are offered that survey the development of significant mathematical ideas in human history and that illustrate mathematical methods The essentially sequent i al spiral nature of mathematics means that prerequisites are required in most courses Students are thus advised to consult the prerequ i s i tes of courses in which they may be intere sted in subsequent studies Every effort is made to offer a variety of levels of mathemat i cs courses i n order tha t any student may be able to further her or his mathematical training The Department is dedicated to meeting the needs of the urban student through various adapt i ve responses The student is encouraged to seek the advice of the Department for helping to determine proper placement in any departmental course Major in Mathematics for Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers course wor k leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. The student may choose either degree cons i stent with her or h i s career objectives All majors in Mathematics are required to complete a minimum of 36 hours consisting of the follow i ng basic core of courses and electives : Basic Core MTH 141 MTH 241 MTH 310 Semester Hours Calculus I ..... ..... ........... .... ................................. .4 Calculus II .............. ................... .... ............ ..... ........ .4 Introd uctio n to Mathematical Proofs ...................... 3 Total .......................... ......... .... ........ ............. ...... .... ......... ...... 11 Electives The student must complete a coherent program of Mathematics courses including 19 upper-division hours to be planned in consultation with the student s advisor and approved by the Departme nt. This program must be formulated before the last 10 credit hours of Mathematics are taken The only courses applicable to the major as electives are MTH 151, 214 242 and any upper division course The student may choose to complete on e of five e mphases previously approved by the Department. Th es e emphases are : Applied Mathematics C om puter Scie nce Mathemati cs, 59

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Division of Science and Mathematics S e co ndary Education, and Statistics and Probability as outlined b e low : Applied Mathematics Emphasis The Emphas i s in Appl ied Mathematics is designed to meet the needs of the scie ntific technical and computer based economy and to prepare the student for graduate study Required Courses Semester Hours Basic Core ........................................................... ... ........ ....... 11 MTH 151 Computer Programming : FORTRAN ...... ..... ........ .4 MTH 242 Calculus Ill ...... ......... ......... . ....... .......... .... ......... .4 MTH 3 2 1 Probability and Statistics ................ ..................... .4 MTH 342 D i fferential Equat i ons .... ..... ............................ ....... .4 MTH 344 Partial Different ial Equations .................................. 3 MTH 448 Numerical Anal ysis I ........ .... .... ...... ..... .... ..... .... 3 MTH 449 Numerical Analysis II .......................... .................. 3 A minimum of three hours chosen from the following courses : MTH 314 Linear Algebra ......... ..... ..... ...... ............................... 3 MTH 322 Stat i stical Methods ... .. ... ............. ........ ........... .4 MTH 325 Opt i mizat ion Techniques I ..................................... .4 MTH 347 Applied Combinatorial Mathemat ics ..... ........ ........ 3 MTH 421 Pro bability Theory .... ......... ..... ....... . . ............. .4 MTH 4 4 5 Complex Variables ...... ....... ......... ............. .......... 3 T o tal Hours Required ... ............... ....... .......... ......... ....... ........... 39 Computer Science Emphasis This Emphasis studies the fundame ntal concepts of computer science as well as processes of analyzing, designing implement ing, and testing computer software systems The Computer Science Emphasis i s designed to prepare ind ividuals to enter this growing field as well as to prepare them for graduate study in computer science The Computer Science offerings have been augmented and reorgan i zed and are all identifie d with the CSI prefix The Computer Science Emphas is is now defined i n terms of these new course designations. These changes may necessitate spec ial arrangements to accommodate students already in progress. Students are directed to consult advisors i n the Departme nt for i nformation concerning these changes. Required Courses Basic Core (CSI 310 replaces MTH 31 0) ...... .......................... 11 CSI 11 0 Computer Science I ..... ........ ..... ........ .................... 3 CSI 120 Computer Science II .......................... ...... ..... ..... ... 3 CSI 21 0 Computer Organization and Architecture ..... ....... 3 MTH 214 Matrix Algebra .......... .................... ...... .... ....... ..... 2 CSI 311 Data Structu res ......... . ..... . ........... ...... .... .... ...... 3 CSI 312 Computer Systems ................. ........... .... ...... ........ 3 MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ...... ... ..... ..... ....... ..... ..... .4 CSI 410 Assembler Language Programming ..... ............. .... 3 CSI 411 File Structures ...... ............ ........ ..... ........................ 3 CSI 421 Software Deve lopme nt and Engineering ............ Total Hours Required ......................... ....... .......... ....... . .... ...... .41 MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214. Mathematics Emphasis The emphasis in Mathemat ics prepares the student for further specialized study at the graduate level as well as being adaptable for preparation for posit i ons in bus i ness industry and government. Required Courses Basic Core .... .... .... .... .... ... ..... ... ......... ...................... .............. 11 MTH 242 Calc ulus Ill .... ....... . .............. ..... ...................... ... .4 MTH 311 Abs t r act Algebra I .... ........ ...................... ........... 3 MTH 411 Abstract A l gebra II ...... .... .......... ...... ......... ... ... 3 MTH 4 4 1 Advanced Calcu lus I ......... ............................ ......... 3 MTH 4 4 2 Advanced Calcu l us II .............................................. 3 60 A min i mum of 9 hours c hosen from MTH 151, MTH 214, or any upper-div i sion mathemat i cs co urses ................... ......... .... ........ 9 Total Hours Required ............ .... .................. ....... .... ........ ... ......... 36 Secondary Education Emphasis The emphasis in Secondary Educat io n is for the preparation of classroom teachers of mathematics for secondary schools Students seeking secondary credent ials in Mathematics must satisfy the Teacher Education Program of MSC in addition to all of the Mathematics ma j or requirements Required Courses Basic Core .................... ..... ................ ................................. ........ 11 MTH 151 Computer Programming : FORTRAN ......... .... .... ... .4 MTH 311 Abstract Algebra I ............... ......... ..... ......... ..... 3 MTH 321 Probab ility and Statistics .... ................. ... ....... ... .4 MTH 360 History of Mathematics ................ ........ ..... ............. 3 MTH 361 Methods of Teaching Mathematics ..... ... .............. 3 MTH 365 Foundations of Geometry ......... .... ..... ....... .......... ... 3 A minimum of 5 hours chosen from MTH 214 MTH 242, or any upper-d i vision mathemat ics courses ; at lea st 3 hours must be in upper-d i vision courses .............. ................ .... ............ ........ ....... Total Hours Required ... .... ....... . ...................... .... ....... .... ... 36 Statistics and Probability Emphasis The Emphasis in Statistics and Probability stresses the application of the principles and methods of statistics and probability in the biological, physical and social sciences and engineering This emphasis also prepares the student for graduate study. Required Courses Basic Core .............................. ... ......... ....................................... 11 MTH 151 Computer Programming : FORTRAN .................. ..4 MTH 214 Matrix Algebra .................................... .... .......... 2 MTH 321 Probability and Statistics ..... .... .... .... ................... .4 MTH 322 Stat istical Methods ... .... ...... ... ...... .... ... ............ .4 MTH 325 Optimization Techniques I ........ .......... ................. .4 MTH 421 Probabil ity Theory .... ..... .... ... ... ... ............... ... .. .4 MTH 422 Stochast ic Processes ... ........... ...................... ...... .4 Total Hours Required .......... .... ....... ......... ......... ... .... ..... ......... 37 MTH 314 may be substituted for MTH 214 Minor in Mathematics Basic Core MTH 141 MTH 241 Electives Calculus I ...... ..................... ......... ............. ..... ...... .4 Calculus II ........ ........ ..... .... ..... .............. . . ...... .4 A minimum of 12 hours are to be sel ected from MTH 151, 214 242, or upper-division courses At l east 4 hours must be taken at the upper-division level ...... ....... .... ....... ..... ................ .... . Total Hou r s Required .................................... ....... ................ .... 20 Physics The Department of Physics offers course work leading to a Bachelor of Science and to a Bachelor of Arts A minor i n Physics is also offered Undergraduates preparing for work in i ndustry or for gradua t e study should take the Bachelor of Science in Phys i cs Students prepar ing to teach Secondary School Physics should take the Bachelor of Arts in Physics i n addition to sat i s f y i ng the requirements for cert i f i cation in Science See Department of Teacher Education for details. The Depa rt ment of Physics also offers a course in astronomy which i s pr i marily designed as a gene ral interest course and satisfies general stud ies r equirement s i n Science

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Physics Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Hou rs PHY 231 General Physics I ............................ . .................. .4 PHY 233 General Physics II ............................... .... ....... ........ .4 PHY 232 General Physics Laboratory I ............. .... ...... ......... 1 PHY 234 General Physics Laboratory II ...... ...... .................. 1 PHY 281 Mod ern Physics ........... .......... ............................... 3 PHY 282 Classical Physics ....................... ............................ 3 PHY 321 Analytical Mech anics ............................ ..... ........... .4 PHY 381 Quantum M echan i cs ..... ...... ....... ........ ....... .......... ... 3 Electives A minimum of 15 additional semester hou r s of upper division Physics courses selected in con s ultat ion with and approved by the Departme nt of Physics ..................... ........ ...... .................. 15 Total Hours Required ......... ...... ...... ...... ............. ...... ................. 38 A one-year sequence of PHY 201202 or PHY 125 126 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physic s The student is urged to take one year of Gene ral Chemistry and one year of Electronics These courses should be chosen in consultat ion with the student s advisor i n the Department of Physi cs Physics Major for Bachelor of Science Semester Required Courses Hours PHY 231 General Physics I ....... .......... ............. .... ................ .4 PHY 233 General Physics II .... ............................................ .4 PHY 232 General Phys i cs Laboratory I ... ..... ............. .......... 1 PHY 234 General Phys ics Laboratory II ................ ........... .... 1 PHY 281 Modern Phys i cs ...................... ............. ....... ........... 3 PHY 282 Classical Phys i cs ..... ......................... ..................... 3 PHY 321 Analyt ical Me chanics ... .............. ....... ........ .... ..... .4 PHY 333 Electricity and Magnet ism ....................... ...... ....... .4 PHY 341 Thermal Phys ics ................ ............... ........... ..... .... 3 PHY 371 Physics Laborat ory I ........................... .................. 1 PHY 372 Phys ics Laboratory II ........................ ...................... 1 PHY 381 Quantum Mechan i cs ............................................... 3 PHY 471 Advanced Phys ics Laboratory I .............. .............. 1 PHY 481 Atomic and Mo l ecular Structu r e .... ..... ....... .......... ... 3 Electives A minimum of 12 additiona l semester hours i n upper-d i v i sion Physics courses must be selected and approved by the Departm ent of Phys ics .............. .... ......... .... ......... ................... 12 Total Hours Required ........... ............. .... .......................... ..... .... 48 A one year sequence of PHY 201202 or PHY 125 126 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233 r e quirements w it h the consent of the Depa rtment of Physic s The student is urged to take one year of General Chemistry and one year of Electronics These c ourses should be chosen in consultation with the student's adviso r i n the Department of Physics Minor in Physics Requ ired Courses PHY 231 General Phys i cs I ..... ............... ............ ............... .4 PHY 233 General Phy s i cs II ............................ .... .................. .4 PHY 232 General Physics Labo ratory I ................................. 1 PHY 234 General Physics Labo r atory II ........ ................... . 1 PHY 281 Modern Physics ................. .................. .................. 3 PHY 282 Classical Physics .................................................... 3 Electives A minimum of 8 addit i ona l s eme s t e r h o ur s in u pp e r-div i s ion Physics courses must be sele c ted a n d app ro ved by the Department of Phys i cs ... ............................... .................. .... ....... 8 Total Hours Required . ..... ..... ......... ....................... . ....... ...... 24 Division of Sc ie nce and Mathemat ics A one-year sequence of PHY 201-202 o r PHY 125 -126 may be substituted for the PHY 231-233 requirements with the consent of the Department of Physics 61

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Institute for Intercultural S tudies and Services Institute for Intercultural Studi es and Services The I n stitute for Inte r cultural Studies and Services is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture and offers a major and a minor in A f ro Amer ican Studies and Chicano Studies The Institute provides the student wit h academic skills leading to better understanding of social i nter action and p rovides services at the local nat i onal and international level. Through the Institute, students can study with faculty from diverse academic backgrounds and can travel and study in Spain, Africa Mex ico, etc Afro-American Studies The Institute for Inte r cultural Studies and Services offers a range of courses in Afro-American Studies that present the d imensi on of the Black Experience in this country These courses encompass and afford a comprehensive understanding of the A fri can heritage. They present African links and potential ; contri buti ons of Black people i n the growt h and development of the U .S.; Black culture and lifesty les ; the Black community ; pol itical activity and potential ; r eligious deve lop ment and importance ; communit y service and resource assistance; and prognosis and pot ential for social change The courses may be used in the basic studies requirements and as electives for graduation Students are urged to consu lt wit h the faculty in Afro -American Studies about new co urses now being designed as well as special of f erings The Major in Afro-American Studies (which leads to a Bachelor of Arts D egree) and the Minor program must be planned in consultation with an Advisor in the AAS Department. Students desiring Secon dary Certification in Soc ial Studies should see the Department of Teacher Education. Afro-American Studies Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Courses Ho u rs AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies .......... ..... .... 3 AAS 102 Survey of th e Black Struggle : USA -Philosophy Action (SOC 116 ) ......... ... .... .......... .... 3 One African Her itag e Course ......... ....................... 3 AAS 370 Psychology of Racism and Group Prejudice AAS MUS ART AAS AAS 485 201 306 324 499 (PSY 370) ........................... ...... ........................ ....... 3 Black Surv ival Strategies ................. ................. 3 Topics in Ethnic Music : V ariable Title Afr i can-Amer ican Visual Traditions One to be Afro-American Literat ure (ENG 324) selected ..... 3 Field Experienc e i n the Black Community ...... ....... 3 Total .... ......... .......... .... ..... ...................... ....... ....... ....................... 21 Electives 18 hours (Related co ur ses may be selected upo n consultatio n with the advisor in Chicano Studies and Urban Studies.) Total hours for the major are 39. Minor in Afro-Amer i can Studies Required Courses AAS 101 Introduction to Afro -Am erican Stud ies .... ......... ... 3 AAS 1 02 Survey of the Black Struggle : USA Phi losophy A ctio n (SOC 116) ......... .... ...... .... ..... 3 Electives A m inimum of 15 additional semester hours are required in Afro American courses 3 hour s of which must be an African course sele cted in consultation with and approved by the Afro -American Studies advisor ass i g ned the student. Total hours for th e minor are 21. Chicano Studies The Institute for Intercultural Stu d ies and Services offers a Bache lor of Arts degree in B ilingual Chica no Studies The Chicano and other H i spanic historical experiences are used as points of departure toward expanding awareness of a 62 mult icultural world by using the community and the world as a laboratory and assisting in the preparation of scholars human science providers, teachers technologists and persons need ing an i nterna tional experience Areas of emphasis within three specialties incl ude focus upon research and theory. Major for Bachelor of Arts in Bilingual Chicano Studies This p rogram is organized around three areas of emphasis : lntercu l tural flntracult ura l Corpmunity Service, and Bilingual/ Bicu l tural. The requirements include core co urses in the major ; specific offeri ngs in at least one of the areas of emphasis and a Spanish language prof i ciency appropriate to the area of emphas is plus selected and approved electives which can be appl ied to other degrees Minimu m number of hours to complete the major vary with each area of emphasis : lnterculturalflntracultural .... ........ ..... .............. 43 Semester Hours Community Service .... .............................. .... 43 Semester Hours Bil ingual/Bicultura l Chicano Studies ............. 47 Semester Hours Required Core Courses CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Studies ... ............... ... ....... 3 CHS 101 History of Meso-America : Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (HIS 191) .............. .... .... .... 3 CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexican and U S Periods (HIS 192) ... ...... ............ 3 CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mex i can and Chicano (ANT 236) ................ .... ......... .... .... 3 CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature (ENG 241) ............ ........ .......... ........... .... ........... .... 3 lntercultural/lntracultural Area of Emphasis This area of emphasis will co n centrate on the generation of information relative to the conce ptual and theoretical foundations which demonstrate the Chicano perspective Focus is on language, ideology and culture. The specific intent of the discipline is one which also supports other disciplines, prepares a student for advance study at the graduate level or develo p s a candidate's skills as a specialist with soc io -cult ural knowledge A minimum of six semester hours from among the following courses are required : Semester Required Courses Hours CHS 202 Chicano Po try and Drama ........... .................. .... 3 CHS 211 The Chicano in A ztla n ........................ ................. ... 3 CHS 351 Aztlan Myth and Reality ........ ............... .... ... ... ......... 3 ANT 233 Cross-Cultura l Communication ..... .............. .......... 3 SOC 322 Race Sex and Ethnic Groups ........... ..... .... ... ... ... 3 SOC 324 Pover ty in America .... ..... . .... ...................... .... .... 3 Language Proficiency Requirement SPA 1 0 1 Elementary Spanish I ...... ..... .................. . ........ 5 SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II ..... ......... ............. .... .......... 5 SPA 211 Spanish Reading and/or SPA 212 Conversation I or II ..... ................. ..................... 3 OR proficiency equivalent to the above. Approved Electives A minimum of nine semester hours of elect i ves sel ected in consultation w ith the Inst itut e Director is requi red

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Community Service Area of Emphasis This area of emphasis will concentrate on professional development for those wishing to serve in community-based projects and agencies which address community needs Much of the conceptual theoretical and applied experiences are designed to better equip the practitioner in profess ional and paraprofessional programs in the community The following courses are required for individuals who are involved in the community service area of emphas is CHS 310 The Chi cano Community I ...... ....... ................... ... .4 CHS 311 The Chicano Community II ..... ......................... ..... .4 CHS 312 The Chicano Community Ill ... ..... ...... ...... ....... ... .4 In addition a minimum of 3 hours is to be selected from the following : CHS 221 CHS 320 BEG 301 BEG 325 ACC 320 HSW 101 The Chicano Family .............. ............ ......... ........... 3 Chicano and the Law ......... ...................... .............. 3 Bus iness Research and Report Writing .............. 3 Family Law .............. ..... ......... ........................ ....... 3 Government Accounting ..... ..... ...... ...... ...... ........... 3 Introduction to Human Services and Community Resources ........................ ............... ..... 4 Other courses focusing on strategies to assist in the preparation toward service in the Chicano community designed by departments and approved by the chairperson may be substituted Language Proficiency This requirement same as that of the lnter c ultural/lntracultural concentrat ion. Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano Area of Emphasis The area of emphasis concentrates on the preparation of professionals It is a compos ite area of emphas is with significant participation of Chicano Studies the Spanish program and the Bilingual unit in the Cente r for Education. The courses listed below are basic requirements for the Bilingual/Bicultural Chicano area of emphasis. In addition a course sequence in Spanish to support this area of emphasis is required For those wishing teaching cert ificate inf ormation please contact the Bilingual/Bicultural Program Coordinator Candidates seeking admission for Bilingua l/Bicul tural Chicano Area of Emphasis should first take a Spanish language proficiency test which sets minimum requ iremen ts as a prerequisite to this program or secure permission of any Department chairperson of those departments listed CHS 330 or CHS 341 EDU 351 EDU 451 Semester Hours Education of Chicano Children ............................... 3 Chi cano Folklore of the Southwest ......... .......... ..... 3 Perspective in Bilingual/Bicultural Education ........ 4 Development of Methods and Materials for the Bilingual/B icul tura l Classroom ................... ..... .4 Spanish Language Requireme nt SPA 101 Elementary Span ish I ......... ... ... ....... ............. ........ 5 SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II ............ ................................. 5 or their equivalent SPA 211 Spanish Reading and Conversation I or SPA 212 or SPA 311 SPA 231 or SPA 232 SPA 310 SPA 352 Spanish Reading and Conversat ion II Advanced Conve rsation ... ................................ ... .... 3 Spanish Compos ition I Spanish Compos ition II ............. ..... ...... .. ... ... .......... 3 Spanish Termino logy for the B ilingual Classroom ..... ..... .................................................... 2 Contemporary Mexican Literature ...... ...... ..... .... 3 Institute for Intercultural Studies and Services or other courses designed by the above departments and approved by the chairperson as relevant to the intent of the concentration No Electives Minor in Chicano Studies The minor can be designed to provide the student with course experiences which are most relevant to occupational and educational goals Students in consultation with the Department of Chicano Studies faculty advisor, will develop individual minors which reflect the best poss i ble elective curr i cula and which will insure that a relevant emphasis is maintained Total hours for the minor are 21. Required Courses 15 Semester Hours CHS 100 Introduction to Chicano Stud ies ..... ............... ......... 3 CHS 101 History of Meso-America : the Pre-Columbian and Colon ial Periods ..... .......................................... 3 CHS 102 History of the Chicano in the Southwest: Mexican and U S Periods .................................... 3 CHS 200 Living Culture and Language of the Mexican and Chicano ............... .............. .......... ......... ........... 3 CHS 201 Survey of Chicano Literature ....... ........................... 3 Electives A minimum of 6 semester hours of electives are required to complete the minor The courses are to be selected i n consultation with a Chicano Studies faculty advisor 63

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Institute for Women's Studies and Services Institute for Women's Studies and Services Institute for Women's Studies and Services The Institu te for Women's Studies and Services was formed in 1985 It merged the Women s R esource Center and the Departme nt of Women s Studies The goals of the Institute are: 1. To offer aca d emic course work in Women s Studies including a minor and a contract major 2 To provide counseling services for stude nt women, including peer counseling scholarship assistance and dev elopment experiences, such as works hops and speakers 3. To promote faculty and administrative mentors for stu dent women 4 To develop collaborat ive research 5 To provide profess ional development and training for education business and government. Publications The Institute publishes the Women s Advocate an informational magazine by and for student women and the Women s Studies newslett er, Tall Buildings Our Speciality." Grants The West ern States Project on Women in the Curriculum grant was awarded to the Institute in 1985. The purpose of the grant is to incorporate the new scholarship on women into the college curriculum In addition the Colorado State College Consortium awarded monies for a spec ial state wide edition of the Women s Advocate The Future The Inst itute anticipates a Working Paper Series which will present recent research about women ; it expects to develop a visiting scholar and Research Associate Program and it will work to build a regional network and to act as a clearinghouse for the work of scho lar s and consultants Minor in Women's Studies An interdiscipl i nary program the Women s Studies minor uses faculty expertise from many different departments The objectives of the program include : heightening women s awareness of themselves as human beings ; review of the cultural patterns which define women; study of the historical achievements of women in all disciplines ; explora tion of emerging needs and opportun ities for women ; emphasis on the methods by which women can achieve success These objectives are met within the contex t of women s scholarship The courses are appropriate for stu de nts in Education, Guidance and Counse ling Law Enforcement Human Services Bus iness Management Advertising Public Relations Communication, and the Behav ioral and Applie d Sciences. Men are welcome and encouraged to study the scholarship which focuse s on gender Women may find such study appro pr iate in order to understand tile histor ical and c u ltural background to sexism as a concept ; the courses intend to develop the individual to heighten one s sense of purpose and personhood and to prov ide sup port w i thin the context of scholarship and development Men may find such study a needed expansion of view that will enable them to better understand appreciate and work with women 64 Semester Required Courses Hours WMS 101 Introduc tion : Women in Trans i tion ... ......... .... ...... 3 WMS 218 Rational Assertiveness Training . .................. ...... 3 WMS 331 Legal Rights of Wome n ............ ..... ... .... ....... ..... 3 WMS 351 Feminist Theories .................. . .... ..... .. ................ 3 WMS 475 New Women in the World Seminar ........ ........ 3 15 Electives In addition to the core cou rses nine (9) semester hours of electives acceptable to or taught through the Department w ill be required bringing the total number of semester hours credit for a Women s Studies minor to 24. These courses some of which are interdiscip l inary will be selected i n consultation with the Women s Studies faculty and approved by the Institute Additional Study Women s Studies courses are supplemented every semester by new offeri ngs from Women s Studies ; in addition students should check the schedule for interdiscipl i nary of f erings relevant to scholar ship on women. Inte rdisc iplinary electives are often offered as omnibus courses such as : Technical Communicat ions Commu nica tion Techn1ques for Women Executives"; Psycholo gy, Partnership and Life Style Alternat ives," and The Psychology of Women"; Sociology Socio l ogy of Sex Roles"; and English, "The Eve Image in Literature," Min ority Women Wr i ters of the United States and "Women s Poetry." The Contract Major in Women's Studies A contract major in Women s Stud ies may be arranged by consulting with a Women s Studies advisor and the Student Academic Development and Assessment Center Women s Studies majors are app ropriat e for students who expect to work with specifically female populations If the bachelor s degree is to be the terminal degree faculty recommend strongly a double major in order to create a tailor-made degree A Women s Studies degree might be combined effectively with majors in Management Psychology Education Nursing Human Services Law Enforcement Advertising P ubli c Relations Market in g and other fields appropriate to student s i nterest. Students will thus be prepared to work with female populations in numerous areas Employment opportunit ies for Women s Studies students may be found in managing Women 's Resource Centers and battered women s shelters Students might also work in community counseling and consulting or develop workst']ops or special programming for women in business and industry Students who plan to work in education law, or medicine may find a Women s Studies degree a useful base for professional stud ies. Women's Services This compo nent of the Institute prov i des a place and a system of support for col leg e women who seek information or mentoring Wome n s Ser vices disseminates info r mat io n regard ing on and off campus educational services and entitlements through financial aid, and admissions procedures Women s Services houses a resource library a resource file of new s cli ppings and informa tion from public agencies A scholarship file is maintained here and staff provide peer -counseling and assistance i n planning for new career d irec tions in the s tudent s life Women s Services is considered an extended family whose objective is to g ive the i ndiv idual per sonalized co unsel ing, refer rals and support ive network s

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School of Professional Studies School of Professional Studies The School of Professional Studies offers many and varied degree and certificat i on programs.Every program is designed not only to prepare graduates for success in a specific career but to provide a broad educational background for career and life enhancement. The major purpose of the school is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and performance comp etenc ies needed to successfully enter a chosen profession. The Schoo l of Profess ional Stud ies includes three divisions twelve departments and twelve other adm inistrativ e units. The D ivision of Education consists of th ree academic departments : Teacher Education; Reading; and Physical Education Health and Recreat ion. The Division also includes a Child Development Center, an Educat ional Resource Center a Reading Laboratory the Greenlee Metro Labo ratory School and the Resou rce Access P rogram (RAP) The thre e academic depa rtments in the Divisi on of Education offer five major and eight minor degree programs Teacher certification programs are offered i n Early Childhood, Elementary Educat ion Special Education and fourteen seconda r y education fields. The Division of Techn ology consists of fou r departments : Aer ospace Science Civil Engineering and Environmental Technology Electronics Engineering Technology, and Technology and Technical Commun i cations The four academic depa rtm ents offer ten major and eleven minor degree programs The Division of Public Service Professions consists of five departments : Criminal Justice and Cr iminology, Hospita lity, Meet ing, and Travel Administration Human Ser vices, Military Science and Nurs ing and Health Care Management ; the Institute for the Study of Drugs Alcohol and Add ictive Behaviors and the Community Service Development P rogram. The five academic departments offer s ix majors and eight minor degree programs In addit ion to the many and d i verse degre e programs offered in the twelve academic departments four student support programs also ar e available : the Student Adv ising Program the Basic Skills Testing and R emediation Program the Campus Recreat ion Prog ram, and the Inter c oll egiate Athletic Program. Other administrative units within the School inclu de the Office of Clinical Experiences the Center for School Service s and the MesajMetro Teacher Education Program located in Grand Junction Colorado. The over one hundre d -ninety full -t ime and part -time faculty seventeen administrators and twenty-five supp o rt personnel of the School are highly comm itted to assisting each student attain hisjher caree r goals Division of Education The D ivision of Education is composed of the Department of Teacher Education ; the Department of Physical Educat ion, Recreat ion, and Health ; the Department of Reading ; Parenting Education and a Child Development Center Other units with in the School include the GreenleejMetro Elementary Laboratory School ; The MesajMetro Teacher Education Program ; and the Education Resource Center The Teacher Cert ifica tion Program at Metropo litan State College i s fully accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Colorado Department of Educat ion The Depa rtment of Teacher Education offers majors in Early Childhood and Elementary Educat i on, as well as m i nors i n Early Childhood and Spec i a l Education Professional courses leading to certification in the areas of Early Childhood Education Secondary Education and Spec ial Education are also offered The major in Eleme ntar y Education i ncludes the courses needed for certification The Divis ion of Education w ith the cooperation of the Modern Languages Department and Chicano Studies (located in the Inst itute for Intercultural Studies and Services) offers a minor i n B ilingual-Bicultural Education The Department of Physical Education Recreation and Health offers a major in Physical Education with two emphasis areas and a major in Recreation with ten emphasis areas w ith minors i n Physical Education, Recreation and Health and Safety The Department of Reading offers one of the few undergraduate Reading m inors in the area with numerous courses in the teaching of deve lopmental and remedial reading The Department also offers reading improvement courses The well equipped Reading Laboratory offe rs an opportunity for the individu alized work in a variety of materials which include development of vocabulary comprehension study skills, and rate. It i s open to all students whether or not they are enrolled in a Reading course The Office of Clinica l Experiences serves to integrate the laboratory exper i ences in the professional education programs In addition to the student teach ing programs requests for observat ions, research projects and studies, and tutoring situations util i zing off-campus laboratory settings are coordinated through this office The Child Development Center is a preschool laboratory which serves as a train in g facility for students enrolled in early childhood and other educational programs The Center provides a setting for college students to observe and participate in an on-going educational program for young children The G reenleejMetro Elementary Laboratory School is a cooperative endeavor of Metropol i tan State College and the Denver Public School System The purposes of the Laboratory School are: (1) to provide more effective education for the Greenlee Elementary School pupils and the D ivis io n of Education students ; (2) to provide professiona l development and collaborate opportunities for both fac ulties ; and (3) to fully utilize all available resources of the Auraria and Greenlee Campuses and communities The Mes ajMetro Teacher Education Certification P rogr a m is housed on the Mesa College Campus in Grand Junction Colorado This Consortium program provides the opportunity for student s on the West ern Slope to enroll in and graduate from Metro s teacher education program on the Mesa Campus The Educat ion Resource Center is a facility designed to provide materials and resources for teacher education students and facult y members for course work field experiences and laboratories The Resource Center presents guest lectures workshops and seminars I ntercoll egiate Athletics sponsors an NCAA-II program featuring eleven varsity teams Appr oximately two hundred full-time student athletes compete annually i n men s and women s basketball soccer, sw imming, and tennis; women s volleyball ; men s baseball ; and women s softball. Excellent indoor and outdoor athletic facilities i nclude a block-long gymnasium olympic size swimming pool, weightroom racquetba ll/handball co urt baseball and softball fields twelve tennis courts two soccer fields, and a quarter-mile competition surface track. 65

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Division of Education The Campus Recreation Program is a comprehensive leisure service that provides students the opportunity to participate i n a variety of recreational activities The program consists of five major compon ents : Informal Recreation Intramural Leagues Club Sports Spec ial Events and an Outdoor Adventure Program All activities and programs are spec i fically des i gned to enhance student life experiences at Metropo litan State College especially in terms of social izati on healt h and fitness Campus Recrea tio n is located i n the Phy sical Education Recreation Building and provides ninety hours of programs each week in the swimming pool weightroom gymnasium racquetball courts dance studio anfl atheletic fields Semester facility schedules are available in the campus recreation office Teacher Education Programs The purpose of the programs in educat i on is to provide systemat ic and comprehens ive preparation for the teaching profession Students in these programs must meet the general studies minimums and satisfy all other req uiremen ts for a bachelor s degree stip ulated earlier in this Bulletin COLORADO LAW AFFECTING TEACHER CERTIFICATION MAY BE CHANGED IN THE PERIOD DURING WHICH THIS BULLETIN IS IN EFFECT STUDENTS SHOULD CONTACT THE TEACHE R EDUCATION DEPARTMEN T FOR MODIFICATIONS The Department of Teacher Education accepts no course work older than 7 years as substitutes for required courses in the certification sequence and i n certai n instances may not accept more recent coursework if there have been significant changes in content in more recent years All students enrolled at Metropolitan State College who wish to prepare for teaching careers and be certified by the Colorado Department of Education are required to pass the Californi a Achieveme nt Test i n mathemat ics spelling and language usage prior to or dur ing the semester they take the first class in the professional education sequence A score at or above the 75th percentile must be atta ined Students must also pass a public speaking course within a grade of B or better or satisfactorily complete an oral examinat ion Students should take speech as a part of their General Stud ies These tests are in addition to other requirements for adm i ss ion to the profess ional training, as listed in this Bullet in STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE ADDITIONAL TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES UNTIL THEY PASS THE CALIFORNIA ACHIEVEMENT TEST THE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAY REQUIRE A DIFFERENT TEST SERIES AS OF JANUARY 1 1987 Students who fail one or more of the exam i nations will be notified so that appropr iate remedial in struction can be recommended to them They will be provided with a lis t of remedial resources for each area in which remed iation is needed Students are expected to take the initiative to seek out these resources and bring their sk i lls in the identifie d areas up to an acceptable level. Students may take the examination(s ) no more than four times within five years In addit ion the following requirements must be met for formal admission to the Teacher Educ ation programs : 1 Pr ior to or during their firs t course in the professional education sequence students mus t present evidence of ha ving met ONE of the following : a A rank in the top two quartiles of the candidate s high school graduat ing class b A score at or above 19 on the American College Test (ACT) or a score of 950 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) c A grade point average of at least 2 50 on a 4.00 scale for at least 30 semester hours of the most recent college or unive rsity course work Students must also show evidence of having worked successfully with children or young people 66 2 Before being admitted to any 300 level course in education cert ifi cat io n studen ts must prese nt evidence that they : a Have a minimum GPA of 2 75 over all college work attempted b Have a minimum GPA of 2 .75 over all course work i n their major (or teaching) area and c Have a m inimum GPA of 2 .75 over all in education courses attempted to date (which may only be one introductory course) Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and action by the respective area committees 3 Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours of college work (except elementary). 4 Completion of a Declaration of Intention form to be filed in the Teacher Education Departme nt office Normally students comp lete this form while enrolled in the i r first course in educat ion 5 For students seeking credit for courses taken at this or at another institut ion that might be equivalent to the required courses descri bed in this sect ion completion of a formal program plan or evaluation for advanced standing is require d i n cons ultati on with the ir advisor, w i th the results of this evaluat ion to be filed in the Teacher Education Department office 6. Complet ion of 200 clock hours of experience with children or youths by the end of the sophomore year This service may be with any youth groups including Boy Scouts Girl Scouts, Campf ire Girls, Head Start YMCA YWCA church groups, as well as other boys and girls clubs camps recr eational programs, teacher aiding etc The following requirements must be met for admission to Student Teach ing: 1 Completion of a minimum of 90 semester hours of college work Students transferring from other institu tions where more than 70 semester hours are being transferred i nto Metropo litan S t ate College or those who already hold degrees must complet e a min imu m of 20 semester hours and two semesters before they can be admitted to student teaching 2 Students must present evidence that they : a Have a m inimu m GPA of 2 75 over all college work attempted b. Have a minimum GPA of 2.75 over all course work in their major (or teaching) area and c Have a min imum GPA of 2 75 i n all education courses attempted to date. (Individual exceptions to the above requirements may be made through petition to and act i on by the respective area committees. Under-graduate and post-graduate transfer students should check with their Teacher Education Department advisor concerning special GPA requirements ) 3 Completion of all profess ional courses required for certification 4. Completion of all subject area courses in the student's teaching area(s) required by North Central Assoc i ation of Colleges and Secondary Schools 5 Completion of all items in the personal student teaching folder to be obtained in the Department of Teacher Education. 6 Recommendations from two Metropolitan State College faculty members and/or evaluations from prestudent teaching field experiences 7 A physical examination report including tuberculosis clearance, on file with the Student Health Services 8 Approval by the appropriate screening committee when applicable.

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9. Completion of formal application for student teaching to be submitted to the Department of Teacher Education not later than the following dates : For Fall Semester student teaching ....................... ............... February 28 For Spring Semester student teaching .... ... ............ ........... Septe mber 30 Students who have com pleted student teaching requirements at another institution may request to take student teaching for six semester hours Early Childhood Education The Department of Teacher Education offers the following programs in Early Childhood Education : 1 A major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 2 A teacher certification program meeting requirements for certification to teach early childhood in the public schools of Colorado (preschool through the second grade). 3 A minor in Early Childhood Education 4 All the necessary courses to meet the education re qu irement qualifications set by the State Department of Social Services for day care directors and group leaders 5 In-home child care and education Early Childhood Education Major for Bachelor of Arts Semester Required Cour ses Hours EDU 100 Entry Level Assessment and Placement ........... .. 1 EDU 131 Early Childhood Education ..... ............. . ........... 3 EDU 132 Lab in Early Childhood Education ....................... 2 EDU 231 Child Development .... ............... .... ... .. ........... .... 3 EDU 232 Lab in Child Development ...... ................ .............. 2 EDU 233 Facilitation of Creativity and Giftedness in Young Children .............................. 3 EDU 265 Human Relations .................................................. 3 EDU 335 Assessment and Measurement in the Early Childhood Classroom ...... ........................ .4 EDU 337 Language and Cognitive Development .............. .4 EDU 431 Parents as Partners in the Educational Process ........ ......... .. .................. ..................... ....... 4 EDU 435 Planning and Organizing the Early Childhood Classroom .... ... .. ... ............ ... ....... .............. .... .... 3 EDU 436 Cultural Influences on the Socialization of Children .......... ... ..................... .................... ...... 4 EDU 438 Lab in Planning and Organ i zing the Early Childhood Classroom ........................................... 2 Choose one from the following : PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child .......................... .... 3 EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching Children ................................. ............... 3 EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for Teaching Children .................. ..... ......................... 2 EDU 415 Art Methods for the Classroom Teacher: Pre-Primary 6 .................................. .... 3 MUS 432 Music Methods for Early Childhood ............ ........ 2 Total ..... ........ ............................. ......... . ... .... ..... ............. 40-43 A student majoring in Early Childhood Education must complete the requirements for a minor. Recommended minors include Reading, Bilingual-Bicultural Parent Education Special Education, Psychology and Sociology ; other minors must be approved by the Department. Areas of emphasis which are equi v alent to a minor are Language Arts Science and Math Urban Studies Education Music and Movement, and Human and Community Resources Contact your advisor for areas of emphasis req uirements Requirements for Public School Teacher Certification In addition to completing a major i n Early Childhood Education students w ishing certification must satisfy the following requirements : Division of Education Semes ter Requ ired in Education Hours EDU 314 Urban and Multicultural Education .............................................................. 3 EDU 315 Foundat ions of Urban and Multicultural Education Lab ........................ ..... .... 2 EDU 316 Curriculum Development: Pre Primary 6 .............................. .............................. 3 EDU 317 Curriculum Development: Pre-Pr imary 6 Lab ........ ...................................... 2 EDU 360 The Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom .............. ........ ............... ........ ......... ...... 3 EDU 439 Student Teaching and Seminar : Early Childhood ................................ ........ .......... 12 Required in Reading RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read .................... 3 RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading: Primary .... .......................... .............. ............. .... .... 3 Required Courses in General Studies SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication .... ........ ............... ............... ..... ...... 3 MTH 261 Mathematics for the Elementary School Teacher ............ ...................... .4 BIO 100 Human Biology for Non-Majors ............ ............. .... 3 Total ............... ......... .......... ..... .......... ........ ........ .... ....... ........... 40 Areas of Emphasis: Early Childhood Education (ECE) Language Arts Area of Emphasis RDG 312 Teaching of Elementary Reading : Primary ................. ........... ..................... ................. 3 RDG 360 Practicum i n Reading .......................................... 3 EDU 410 Language Arts and Social Studies Methods for Teaching Children ........................... 3 EDU 411 LAB-Language Arts and Social Studi es Methods for Teaching Children ........................... 2 ENG 346 Children s Literature ... ................................ .......... 3 Electives .............. ...... .......................................... 5 Total ................................... ...... ......................................... .. ....... 19 Electives Five hours to be selected from the following list or i n consultation with faculty in ECE. RDG 310 Preparing the Young Child to Read ......... ..... ...... 3 RDG 434 Development of Reading Materials ......... ............ 2 ENG 202 English Grammar ......................... ................. .... .... 3 PER 252 Rhythms for the Young Child ...... ........................ 2 SPE 359 Speech Problems in the Schools ............... ........ 3 Human Community Resources Area of Emphasis GEG 130 PSY 211 soc 101 EDU 314 EDU 315 Introduction to Human Geography ........ .............. 3 Educational Psychology .................... ............ ....... 3 Introduction to Sociology ........... .......................... 3 Urban and Multicultural Education ...... ......... ....... 3 Laboratory in Urban and Multicultural Education .... ......... ....................... ..... .......... ........ 2 Electives .................. ..................... ...... ........... Total ................ ....................................... .............. ..... ............... 19 Electives Five hours to be selected from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE: EDU 41 0 Language Arts & Social Studies Methods for Teaching Children ................... ............................. 3 EDU 411 LAB Language Arts and Social Studies GEG HIS HIS CHS AAS 360 111 301 102 101 Methods for Teaching Children ............. ............. 2 Urban Geography .. ........................... ................ .... 3 Colorado History .. ............................... ................. 3 History of Denver ......... .................................. ...... 3 H is tory of the Chicano in the Southwest ...... ..... 3 Introduction to Afro-American Studies ...... .......... 3 67

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Division of Education HSW 1 01' Introduction to Human Services & Community Resources ......... ................................................... 4 PSY 241" Social Psychology .... ........................ . ...... ..... ... 3 HSW 202' Small Group Dynamics ............ ............ ...... .... ...... .4 HSW Human Serv i ces and Welfare Division of Publi c Service swo Social Work School of Letters Arts and Sciences Sc ie nce and Mathematics Area of Emphasis MTH 1 00 Survey of Mathemat i cs ........................ ............ .... 3 MTH 261 Mathematics for the Elementary School Teacher .............................. ................. ............ 4 EDU 412 Math and Sc ience Methods for Teaching Children .............................. ............. ....... .... ......... 3 BIO 100 Human Biology for Non Majors .......................... 3 Electives ................ ........................... .... .... ......... .. 6 Total ... ...................................... ..... .................... ....................... 19 Electives Six hours (with at least one course in physical scie nce ) from the following list or in consultation with faculty in ECE GEL 101 General Geology .................................................. .4 GEG 123 Weather and Climate ........................................... 3 GEG 124 Landforms ............................................................. 3 AST 104 Introduction to Astronomy .............. ...... ............... 3 EDU 412 Math and Science Methods for Teaching Children .. .... ................................... ................... .... 3 EDU 413 LAB-Math and Science Methods for Teaching Children ................ ....... ..... ..... .......... .... .............. 2 Urban Studies Area of Emphasis AAS 101 Introduction to Afro-American Studies ......