Citation
Training mental health professionals

Material Information

Title:
Training mental health professionals a grounded theory study of the supervisory relationship
Creator:
Goalstone, Janet Claire Dahlinger
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
x, 212 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Psychotherapists -- Education (Graduate) ( lcsh )
Psychotherapists -- Supervision of ( lcsh )
Supervisors ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 206-212).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Doctor of Philosophy, Educational Leadership and Innovation.
General Note:
School of Education and Human Development
Statement of Responsibility:
by Janet Claire Dahlinger Goalstone.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
37818436 ( OCLC )
ocm37818436
Classification:
LD1190.E3 1997d .G63 ( lcc )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
TRAINING MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS: A GROUNDED
THEORY STUDY OF THE SUPERVISORY RELATIONSHIP
by
Janet Claire Dahlinger Goafstone
B.A., Metropolitan State College of Denver, 1992
M.A., University of Colorado at Denver, 1994
A thesis submitted to the
University of Colorado at Denver
in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy
Educational Leadership and Innovation
1997


This thesis for the Doctor of Philosophy
degree by
Janet Claire Dahlinger Goalstone
has been approved by
Alan Davis
L .

Robert Smith

Ellen Stevens


Goalstone, Janet Claire Dahlinger(Ph.D.t Educational Leadership and
Innovation
Training Mental Health Professionals: A Grounded Theory Study of the
Supervisory Relationship
Thesis directed by Associate Professor Patricia Stevens-Smith
ABSTRACT
This investigation consisted of a grounded theory study of the supervisory
relationship as a component of the training of mental health professionals.
The study focused on master's level programs at two universities. The
results of the study indicate that students are active in orchestrating their
supervisory experience. Students supervisory needs do not change as a
result of development, as reported in previous studies. Rather, trainees
needs for supervision style and focus may be related to the supervision
modality. The students in this study desired succinct and specific direction
during live supervision and collaborative case conceptualization during
one-on-one supervision. Students were able to define their supervisory
needs based on their personal knowledge of their own learning styles.
Additionally, this study identified that supervisors violations of trust
resulted in a supervisory relationship rupture which was difficult to mend
during the course of the training semester. Finally, it appeared that the
live, interactive supervision expedited trainee skill acquisition and
facilitated a sense of comfort in session. Implications for further research
are related to discovery of the effectiveness of specific interventions in live
and consultative supervision modalities.
This abstract accurately represents the content of the candidates thesis. I
recommend its publication.
Signed \f4fIJJUPz ,
( Patricia Stevens-Smith
nt


DEDICATION
The process of writing the dissertation impacted the lives of the people
most important in my life. As such, it is fitting that the finished document
be dedicated to my loves:
To my life mate and best friend, Marc. You broke trail on this
endeavor. You were always able to encourage me when I could no longer
see the reason for this task. You gently pushed me back into focus when
there seemed to be none. I will always love you.
To my phenomenal daughters.
Sarah, you have become a strong, caring, sensitive young woman.
Your intuitive nature is evident in the beautiful photos which are your
talent. You have all the qualities I admire. You have filled my life with joy
and peace.
Hannah, you fill our home and lives with music and laughter. Your
leadership demonstrates an inner drive and dedication that will always
amaze me. You bring flavor to my life with your dynamic energy and
charm.
To my siblings:
Jane, in a very real sense, you have been my mother. From you I
have learned to be solid and strong. Dick, you have brought joy and family
to my sister, and for that, I love you dearly.
Jim, you have always shown me the care and consideration that
every woman needs from an older brother.
Jack, you are missed.
Mother and Dad, I hope you are watching. I see you dancing
together again in Heavens ballroom, and I am happy for you.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
My words cannot adequately express the gratitude and admiration I
feel for Dr. Patricia Stevens-Smith who directed this dissertation.
Patricia, in the course of this project you have provided support,
challenge, encouragement, and insight in precise measurement and at the
exact time when each was needed. Under your guidance I have been able
to do things I never believed I could do. The trust you shared with me
has been a motivating force for me at times of struggle. Your wisdom has
inspired me, your respect has driven me, and your humor has supported
me. Your contributions to this project and to my life are beyond measure.
Thank you.
I have appreciated the steadfast efforts of my other committee
members as we hammered out the proposal, enacted the plan, and edited
the drafts. Dr. Ellen Stevens, Dr. Alan Davis, Dr. Robert Smith, and Dr.
Candan Duran-Aydintug have each added unique perspectives which
combined to create this final document. Thank you all.
This project could not have been completed without the assistance
of ten students and nine supervisors who took the time to meet with me for
interviews. I appreciate each of the people who shared their stories with
me.


CONTENTS
CHAPTER
1. INTRODUCTION...........................................1
History of Supervision and Current Trends.....3
History of Psychotherapy Supervision.....3
Current Supervision Activities...........5
Requirements for Licensure...............7
Supervisor Training......................9
Overview of Supervision Research.............10
Characteristics of Supervision..........10
Models of Supervision...................11
Application of Supervision Research.....12
Rationale for this Study.....................13
Rationale for the Methodology of this Study..16
Conclusion...................................22
2. LITERATURE RELATED TO SUPERVISION..................23
Therapeutic Models of Supervision............25
Psychodynamic Supervision...............27
Person-Centered Supervision.............28
VI


Solution-Focused Supervision..............29
The Developmental Models of Supervision.........30
Developmental Focus.......................33
Stage Theory..............................35
Systemic View of Supervision..............41
Studies on Developmental Models...........43
Supervision Process Literature..................46
Components of Supervision.................47
Characteristics of Supervision..................57
Dimensions of Supervisory Behavior........58
Supervisory Style.........................60
Power.....................................61
The Supervisory Relationship....................64
Conclusions and Direction for this Study........71
3. METHODOLOGY AND PROCEDURES..............................74
Methodological Assumptions......................74
Grounded Theory.................................77
Participants....................................78
Facilities................................78
Participant Selection Process.............83
vii


Data Collection
87
Student Interviews........................88
Supervisor Interviews.....................92
Instruments...............................94
Data Analysis....................................97
Transcription.............................98
Data Reduction............................99
Data Display.............................102
Data Corroboration.......................103
Data Description.........................104
Summary.........................................104
4. RESULTS..................................................106
Student Therapists..............................111
School A Students........................111
School B Students........................112
Student Self-Presentation................113
Facilities......................................117
School A.................................117
School B.................................120
Findings and Analysis...........................123
viii


Control and Responsibility...............123
Supervisory Style and
Personal Characteristics..............130
Students Perceived Needs................135
Significant Events..............................138
Enhancers................................138
Ruptures.................................142
Supervisor Interviews...........................151
Corroborating Evidence..........................154
Toward a Grounded Theory
of Supervision................................162
Summary.........................................169
5. DISCUSSION...............................................171
Comparison with Previous Studies................173
Application.....................................181
Implications for Further Research...............183
Limitations of the Study........................186
Conclusions.....................................187
APPENDIX
A. SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW PROTOCOL............190
B. SUPERVISOR WORKING ALLIANCE INVENTORY....194
IX


C. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY.
198
D. CODING CHARTS..........................201
REFERENCES.....................................206
x


CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION
Supervision is a key component in the training of mental health
professionals. In counseling psychology, clinical psychology, marriage and
family therapy, and social work, master's level students are required to
have supervised client contact both pre-graduation and post-graduation in
order to be eligible for licensure in most states. Doctoral level students
receive additional supervision as part of their clinical training. Standards
for accreditation of academic programs also require supervised practice
within the facility during both master's and doctoral level training.
The importance of supervision in mental health training transcends
its requirement for licensure and accreditation. Supervisors are in a
position to impact the caliber of professionals entering the field and thereby
impact clients. Through supervision, academically prepared individuals
acquire the skills for doing therapy and take on the characteristics of a
professional. Supervisors act as trainers, mentors, models, and
gatekeepers for the mental health profession.
The supervisory relationship is a dynamic interpersonal process
whereby an experienced professional monitors and evaluates the growth
1


of a less experienced person. Within this relationship, the foundation of
ethical and skillful practice is transmitted through conversation, direct
observation, and clinical discourse. Because of the importance of this
relationship, considerable research has been conducted to identify the
characteristics of effective supervision.
This study examined pre-graduate supervision in marriage and
family therapy and in counseling psychology. Because supervision is seen
as an important component in the training of mental health workers in all of
the discipline areas, the information from this study will be useful to all
supervisors as well as in the two disciplines studied.
In training programs, supervisors are matched with student
counselors in order to direct the experiential component of their training
process. The didactic portion of the students training includes theory
courses, techniques courses, and research courses. Some of the
students entering supervised practica have had experience in counseling,
but the majority of students enter this phase having had no actual client
contact as a therapist. For example, one person who participated in this
study had been an academic advisor at a community college. Two of the
students had worked at juvenile residential facilities as staff, and they
perceived that role as similar to counseling.
2


This study focused on the relationships between the supervisors
and beginning students throughout one semester. The purpose of this
study is to expand on existing theories about the process of supervision.
Knowledge of the process of supervision will inform efforts to develop
training programs designed to prepare supervisors.
This chapter will present introductory information necessary to
understand supervision as it is conducted in training programs at this time.
The chapter includes four sections. The first section is a history of
psychotherapy supervision and a discussion of current trends in training
facilities. The second section is an overview of current supervision
research. Sections three and four discuss the rationale for this study and
a rationale for the chosen methodology for this study.
History of Supervision and Current Trends
History of Psychotherapy Supervision
The actual beginning of supervision is difficult to define. Haley
(1996) indicates supervision may have its roots in the training of clinical
hypnosis techniques in the 19th century which was taught by having a
trainee observe a teacher at work with a client, followed by the teacher
observing the trainee at work (p. 133). The teacher would guide the
3


trainees actions during the activity. In psychoanalytic training, the student
analyst undergoes personal psychoanalytic therapy in which the focus is
on transference and countertransference with the patient (Bradley, 1989).
Prior to the advent of the one-way mirror in training facilities,
supervision was conducted in supervision meetings, and the student would
report to professors using anecdotal information. The occasional use of
audio-taped sessions began because supervisors realized that student
reports may not accurately reflect the content of the session. Sometimes,
because reel to reel taping was cumbersome, supervisors actually sat in
the therapy room and silently observed the session.
In the 1950s the use of the one-way mirror or video monitors
became the standard supervision method. With the use of these two
tools, supervisors were able to watch the process of the session and the
counselor's skill development without being in the room. At first
supervisors would not interrupt the flow of the session for any reason
because of the concern for violating the alliance between the therapist and
client. At some point in the development of the use of the one-way mirror,
supervisors began to knock on the door and ask the therapist to step out
for a consultation. Haley reports (1996):
It was discovered not only that the therapy improved
with suggestions made during the interview, but that
4


the therapist grasped ideas better when the
supervisor's suggestions were made (p. 133-134).
With this discovery, new tools were developed to make the process even
easier. For example, the bug-in-the-ear" was a small ear piece worn by
the student therapist. The supervisor had a voice transmitter and was able
to talk to the student at any time, often without the client's awareness.
Some facilities installed a phone line between the observation room and
the therapy room, and supervisors would make suggestions over the
phone. With these tools, the therapist could receive instructions without
leaving the room.
Current Supervision Activities
Live supervision is increasingly being used in training facilities. The
use of the one-way mirror has enhanced the process of supervision and is
now an integral tool for live supervision. Some facilities have a supervisor
monitoring every session. Other facilities monitor only selected sessions,
but these facilities usually tape all unmonitored sessions for supervisors to
view at a later time.
Procedures in live supervision vary according to the policies of the
facility, the supervisor and student preferences, and the available
equipment at the site. Most training programs accredited by the Council
5


for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
(CACREP) and the Commission on Accreditation of Marriage and Family
Therapy Education (COAMFTE) have one way mirrors through which the
supervisor can view a session. Many facilities have a phone line on which
the supervisor can talk to the student therapist during the session. (This is
called the call-in technique.) Facilities without such a phone system may
still use a bug-in-the-ear". Consultation breaks often occur at mid-session
and offer the supervisor the opportunity to give the student feedback in
more detail than he/she can over the phone. Supervision from behind the
mirror may be conducted by the students designated supervisor or by
another supervisor on faculty at the facility. Sometimes, more than one
supervisor and other practicum students are present during a session, and
feedback to the student during or after the session may be coordinated by
the supervisor with input from others present.
Video tapes are also commonly used in training facilities. Often,
students will tape a session for review with their supervisor at a later time.
The use of video tapes to review sessions is helpful even if the supervisor
monitored the session as it occurred because the tape can be replayed
and discussed in depth during a supervisory meeting. In the absence of
video equipment, audio tapes are sometimes used for the same purpose.
6


The supervisory meetings entail a one-to-one discussion between
the supervisor and the student. During these meetings, the student may
review a case, discuss concerns or issues that have arisen with a client, or
process paperwork. The supervisor reviews the students case notes,
discusses with the student any concerns, and gives the student feedback
on her or his progress. The activities and direction of the supervisory
meetings are usually negotiated by the supervisor and student at the
beginning of their relationship.
In addition to meeting alone regularly with the supervisor, the
student will attend weekly meetings with a group of practicum students and
a supervisor. These sessions are usually called group supervision, but
some facilities refer to the meetings as staffings. During the group
meetings, students review cases with their peers, give feedback to one
another, and ask for suggestions with particular cases.
Requirements for Licensure
Program requirements for accreditation of the program and
licensure of the graduates of the program outline the number of contact
hours a student must complete in each of the supervision components.
CACREP and COAMFTE specify that supervision meetings occur a
minimum of one hour each week. This requirement can be met through a
7


supervisory meeting or through the supervisors live observation of a
session. Students are required to have fifteen hours of group supervision
or staffing each semester. Both practicum (within the facility) and
internship (outside of the facility) fall under these time requirements. In the
case of internship, the student will have an on-site supervisor who is
employed at the internship site and is responsible for monitoring the
students cases. The internship student will also meet weekly for group
supervision with a faculty member from the training facility.
Following graduation, the student is not eligible for licensure until
the completion of a required number of hours of post master's supervised
practice. The specific number of hours varies by state statute because
licenses are governed by the state.
For licensure in the state of Colorado, students who have a
masters degree from an accredited program in counseling or counseling
psychology are eligible to apply for the Licensed Professional Counselor
(LPC) credential. They must have a minimum of 45 semester hour credits
and they must pass a standardized test which was developed by the
National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC). In addition, they must
complete a minimum of two years of supervised practice with a minimum
of 2,000 hours of client contact and 100 hours of supervision during that
8


time. Students who have obtained their masters degree in marriage and
family therapy (including the marriage and family therapy strand of some
counseling psychology programs) can apply for the LPC, but they will more
frequently pursue the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)
credential. The LMFT requires a minimum of 45 semester credit hours
from an approved program. The students must pass a standardized test
and complete 1,500 hours of client contact and 100 hours of supervision
during a two year time period. Students who have graduated from
masters level programs which are not accredited by CACREP or
COAMFTE can apply for licensure when they have met educational
guidelines established by the licensing board. These students often must
take some additional courses to meet the boards requirements.
Supervisor Training
COAMFTE and CACREP accredited doctoral programs include
classes in supervision and have practica with supervised practice of
supervision (Baird, 1996). There are guidelines for the training of
supervisors, but there are no national standards and there are no national
credentials for supervision. However, some states, for example Alabama
and Florida, are beginning to license supervisors. Currently, the
Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), a division of
9


the American Counseling Association (ACA), and NBCC are coordinating
efforts for a national supervisor specialty certification.
Overview of Supervision Research
An extensive review of the literature on supervision is presented in
Chapter Two. The purpose of this section is to establish an understanding
of the important aspects necessary for effective supervision as well as the
type of research on supervision that currently exists in order to clarify the
need for the study at hand.
Characteristics of Supervision
Many researchers have addressed the issues of identifying
characteristics of effective supervision (Baum & Gray, 1992; Heath &
Storm, 1985; Watson, 1993; White & Russell, 1995).
Several suggest that client outcome is important data for determining
supervisory effectiveness (Friedlander, Siegal, & Brenock, 1989; Holloway
& Neufeldt, 1995; Shanfield, Mathews, & Hetheriy, 1993). Researchers
have also been involved with studies that identify trainee traits, supervisor
traits, and client factors which interact to impact client outcome and
therefore represent effective training (Bradley, 1989; Holloway, 1996;
10


Stoltenberg & Delworth, 1988; Sumerel & Borders, 1996; Tracey,
Ellickson, & Sherry, 1989; White & Russell, 1995).
Models of Supervision
Some theoretical literature has been written which describes models
of supervision as it is related to therapy. Supervision is not therapy. Yet,
there are many commonalties. Both are oriented toward growth and
change, and both adhere to an understanding and acknowledgment of
personal responsibility. Therefore, some researchers have found that
therapeutic models are a good basis for understanding supervision
(Deveaux & Lubell, 1994; Friedlander, Siegal, & Brenock, 1989; Heath &
Storm, 1985).
A common factor described in the literature as essential to positive
therapeutic outcome is the relationship between client and therapist.
Gelso and Carter (1994) describe the therapeutic relationship as having
three parts: transference, the real relationship, and working alliance.
Bachelor (1995) described the therapeutic relationship as a common,
pantheoretical factor that could account for positive therapy outcome,
regardless of treatment approach (p. 323).
Because of the similarities between supervision and therapy, the
concept of the relationship appears to be an appropriate focus for studying
11


the effectiveness of supervision (Gaston, 1990; Gelso & Carter, 1994;
Ladany & Friedlander, 1995). The study of the relationship is also useful
in examining the components of effective training of supervisors (Bradley
1989; Kaiser, 1992).
Another approach has been to study training from a developmental
perspective, and models of trainee development and/or supervisor
development have been addressed (Berger & Dammann, 1982; Cagnon &
Russell, 1995; McNeil, Stoltenberg, & Romans, 1992; Stoltenberg &
Delworth, 1987). These theorists have incorporated principles of social
learning theory and cognitive development to explain the conditions in
which optimal personal and professional growth can be facilitated during
training.
Application of Supervision Research
A recent topic of research has been the development of supervisor
training programs and the need to identify the necessary components of an
effective supervisor training program (Deveaux & Lubell, 1994; Ronnestad
& Skovholt, 1993). Research that combines the supervision process and
the supervisory relationship will inform the attempts to develop training
programs for supervisors as well as criteria for credentials. Because this
study is designed to examine the process of the supervisory relationship,
12


the information gathered will make a contribution to the task of training
supervisors by adding to our knowledge about the process from the
perspective of the supervisees.
Rationale for This Study
Supervisors play multiple roles because they are teaching therapy
skills to the trainee and evaluating the trainees performance while
simultaneously protecting the clients interests. The complexity of this
multilevel role is not to be underestimated. Students are in a new role and
need to adjust, experiment with how to perform the role, and overcome
anxiety. The client expects and deserves compassion, respect, and
appropriate therapy. Balancing the responsibilities to the student and the
client is a supervisory task which needs to be taken into consideration at
ail times.
Despite their classroom success, some students are not well suited
for counseling and may not readily move from the role of student to the
role of therapist. The supervisor acts as a type of gate keeper for the
profession by ensuring that students with serious barriers to becoming an
effective therapist do not go into the field without those barriers being
13


resolved. Yet, there are few guidelines for supervisors to differentiate
between serious problems and problems that simply reflect inexperience.
The act of evaluation impacts what students say to supervisors,
what they share, and how they interpret what the supervisor says to them.
Their perception of the supervisors feedback impacts how they follow the
supervisor's suggestions, and ultimately how they deal with the client.
The students responses impact the supervisor's interaction in the same
way. This circular interaction can facilitate or impede student growth and
supervisory effectiveness.
The presence of live supervision for all sessions is advantageous,
but little is known about the impact live supervision has on the counseling
session and the supervisory relationship. When supervision was less
constant or was conducted after the session using anecdotal self-report,
the immediacy of the impact was not as significant. However, it seems
reasonable to assume that the presence of the supervisor behind the
mirror, often interjecting into the session via phone or other means, will
have a significant impact on the dynamics of the ongoing session.
Because we have little research as to the extent of this impact, the
consideration of live supervision as a technique must be included in a
study about the supervisory relationship.
14


In the 1980s some foundational process research was conducted
which forms a framework identifying the components that fit together to
create effective supervision. However, those studies did little to identify
individual characteristics that contributed to process or how the variables
identified contributed to effectiveness.
Allen, Szollos, and Williams (1986) found that students preferred
more weekly contact time and more frequent contacts per week. The
authors did not discover what happens in those contacts that make them
desirable. Heppener and Roehlke (1984) note that beginning trainees
prefer warmth, acceptance, respect, understanding, and trust. Yet, we do
not know if these characteristics mean the same thing to all students, and
we do not have an understanding of what these characteristics do that
improves supervision. It could be that those characteristics simply make
the supervisory sessions more pleasant, but not necessarily more
productive. Research that delves into supervisee meaning-making in the
process of supervision may answer some of these questions and
simultaneously test the findings of the classical studies.
15


Rationale for the Methodology of this Study
The supervisory relationship is essentially an interpersonal
relationship designed so that one individual (the supervisor) promotes and
facilitates growth in the other individual (the supervisee). The relationship
goes beyond other student/teacher relationships because of the one-on-
one contact and the focus on personal and professional growth.
Because of the interpersonal relationship quality, I have chosen
qualitative research methods as a means to study the process.
Descriptive research opens the possibility of discovery. Discovery may be
impaired by a study which sets out to prove a predetermined theory. While
quantitative research geared toward hypothesis testing has great value, l
believe that descriptive research is the appropriate initial step for looking at
the supervisory relationship and its impact on the trainees acquisition of
skills because it examines the perspectives of the trainees. Moon, Dillon,
and Sprenkle (1990) contend that qualitative research is congruent with
systems theory because it is isomorphic with the cybernetic
underpinnings (p. 363) of systems theory. They remark, Discovery
oriented research can be used to answer questions about training and
supervision (p. 366).
16


Discovery oriented investigations must go beyond descriptive
studies. While descriptions are interesting and useful in personal
reflection, additional insight is needed into the process of supervision. It is
useful to look at research and subjective phenomena in tangent with one
another. By using grounded theory methods of data collection and
analysis, this study will examine theories and identified components of
supervision through a different lens.
Grounded theory is a general methodology for developing theory
that is grounded in data which has been systematically gathered and
analyzed. Grounded theory uses methods such as interviews and
observations which are common to qualitative researchers. The goal of
theory generation and the systematic procedures guiding the analysis and
interpretation make grounded theory distinctive (Strauss & Corbin, 1994).
Grounded theories require multiple perspectives because one
perspective would limit the resulting theory. According to Strauss and
Corbin (1994):
Grounded theories connect the multiplicity of
perspectives with patterns and processes of
action/interaction that in turn are linked with
carefully specified conditions and consequences
(p. 280).
17


The nature of interpersonal relationships is phenomenological. It is
based on the personal meanings of the participants. It cannot easily be
reduced to distinct variables. Rather, solid research in this area must first
address those personal meanings and the transactions between people.
One overarching goal of this study is to inform supervision theory in
a way that will contribute to the development of training foci for
supervisors. This study will serve as preliminary information toward the
global goal by identifying student perspectives about conditions within the
supervisory experience which are facilitative and those which are not
facilitative to their growth.
This study explored the supervisor/supervisee relationship within
the context of the experience for students in two different training
programs. The policies and procedures for the two facilities vary greatly.
The students and the supervisors at each facility also present considerable
variation between and within the sites. Therefore, an examination of the
perceptions of the participants in this study will give valuable insight into
conditions across individual factors. A common criticism of qualitative
research is its lack of generalizabilty. In response, Neuman (1991) notes:
The ideas and generalizations are wedded to their
context. The theory and evidence are interwoven to
create a unified whole. Generalizations emerge out
of specific details (p. 53).
18


The value lies not in generaiizability to all trainees or supervisors,
but in giving voice to varied descriptions of the experience and thereby
recognizing the uniqueness of each. In doing so, preliminary information is
gathered which will begin to answer the question: What type of
supervision works well with what type of trainee under what conditions?
Previous supervision studies have rarely examined the perceptions
of students or supervisors. Instead they have focused on general
dependent measures of satisfaction with supervision determined on an a
priori basis" (Worthen & McNeill, 1996, p. 26). A phenomenological
investigation can take those predetermined variables and expand on them,
taking into account the existence of differences and similarities among
students in order to determine the saliency of the variables in relation to
experience. Thus, grounded theory is an ideal method for expanding our
existing beliefs about supervision by exploring those theories within the
supervisees belief system.
In quantitative research, the researcher begins with a theory,
develops a hypothesis, and creates measures of variables (Neuman,
1991, p. 328). Grounded theory is a qualitative method. In grounded
theory, the researcher begins with a research question. Theory is built
from the data. This occurs through systematic analysis of the data and
19


sometimes changing the direction or the focus of the research question.
The motivation for this study began with the question: What needs to
occur during the training of supervisors to ensure that the process of
supervision is effective?
Preliminary literature review indicated that there are many concepts
about the components of supervision which account for growth and
therefore should be taken into consideration in order to train supervisors.
One of the strongest positions taken by theorists is that the supervisory
relationship is a key facilitative condition which has an impact on all the
components of supervision. Therefore, it is important to account for the
relationship in designing supervisor training programs. Thus, the broad
research question was narrowed to What are the facilitative conditions of
the supervisor/supervisee relationship?
According to Neuman (1991):
A qualitative researcher interprets data by giving
them meaning, translating them, or making them
understandable. She begins with the point of view
of the people being studied (p. 329).
The interview format was designed following a careful review of
literature about supervision which identified various approaches to
understanding supervision and/or the supervisory relationship. Theories
about supervision included theoretical models and process models which
20


have been developed without the perceptions of the students involved in
the process. This study was directed toward expanding theory by adding
the perceptions of the participants. Using the literature review of existing
theories of supervision process and counselor development as a guide, a
number of more narrow research questions were used to design the
interview format. Those questions were:
What is the perception of the student about what
happens in supervision?
How do these events facilitate growth as perceived
by that individual?
What are students preferences for supervisor style
and supervisor role?
What are their preferences for student role?
How does power contribute to the relationship?
Under what conditions does the supervisory
relationship grow?
What types of events cause the supervisory
relationship to fail?
The analysis of the interview transcripts began with the first
interview. As is common in grounded theory studies, the data analysis
was recursive. The research direction and research questions change as
more information is gathered. Themes and patterns emerge from the data.
21


Information gathered early in the study was used to frame subsequent
interviews. The perceptions of the participants are the basic foundation for
the interpretation of how supervision is perceived by the participants. The
value of this type of data collection and analysis is that meaning develops
within a set of other meanings, not in a vacuum (Neuman, 1991, p. 329).
When studying people, meaning can never be disqualified. It is not
only an important consideration, it is the primary consideration if we are to
answer questions related to what goes on when two people interact. If we
have not listened to the voices of the students and the supervisors who
are in the process, we have not learned anything about the process of
supervision.
Conclusion
In this chapter, I have outlined the history and types of supervision.
I have discussed the rationale for studying the supervisory relationship in
order to contribute to the task of designing supervision training programs.
I have offered a rationale for the methodology to be used in the study. As
part of that rationale and description, I have made reference to existing
theories about supervision. In the next chapter, the literature on
supervision theory and process is reviewed in greater detail.
22


CHAPTER TWO
LITERATURE RELATED TO SUPERVISION
The complexity of supervision is mirrored in the complexity of the
literature that attempts to define and describe supervision. Attempting to
isolate supervision theory is no less a task than that of identifying a single,
comprehensive strand for thinking about psychotherapy. There exists no
unifying body of information. Theories, models, and empirical research
have been scattered and diverse. Thus, the challenge of creating models
for training supervisors or for establishing criteria for credentialing
supervisors is daunting.
Supervision, according to Holloway (1996), was not thought of as a
distinct profession until the early 1980s. Educators have often assumed
that the act of teaching counseling is not much different than the act of
doing counseling that counselors become supervisors because they are
counselors (p. 9). In the 1980s, however, a shift in thinking occurred.
Beginning at about that time, the idea that supervision required a distinct
set of knowledge and skills is represented in the literature.
Early writing about supervision was primarily theoretical and
attempted to present models of supervision. As empirical research
23


became more accepted in the counseling profession, empirical research of
supervision became common. More recent literature on supervision
combines theory and process. It is important to review both the theoretical
origins and the process studies because each contributes to the more
recent studies.
Another trend emerging in the study of supervision is the
examination of the supervisory relationship. Studies of the relationship
integrate theory and process studies. The focus of these studies is to
identify the impact of the relationship on the process of supervision across
theoretical approaches.
There is tremendous overlap in these categories so that the
categorization of studies as theoretical, process-oriented, or relationship-
focused is artificial. Still, such categorization makes a more systematic
method of summarizing the concepts. Therefore, the categories will be
utilized for the purposes of this review.
The organization of this chapter will be temporally linked. The
sections will begin with the oldest approaches to understanding
supervision and move toward more recent approaches. It is important to
note that the new approaches did not replace the previous approaches.
Instead, different researchers studied in different areas. While the first
24


formal studies employed a therapeutic model to understand supervision,
the advent of developmental studies did not minimize the attention to
theoretical supervision, and process studies did not cause theory or
developmental approaches to be discontinued. All three approaches are
considered in the study of the supervisory relationship.
The balance of this chapter is divided into four sections. Section
one will describe therapeutic models of supervision, and section two will
describe developmental models of supervision. The third section
discusses the process of supervision, and the fourth section presents
literature about the supervisory relationship. A final section will summarize
the four areas of supervision research and the interaction of the
approaches to conclude this chapter.
Therapeutic Models of Supervision
Supervision, as a distinct profession, was not recognized by
researchers or theoreticians until the 1980s (Holloway, 1996). Instead,
supervision was seen as an extension of counseling. Supervisors were
merely counselors who were teaching counseling to others. Thus, it is not
surprising that the first trend of supervision research focused on
counseling theories as their base. Counselors conducted supervision in
25


much the same way they did therapy. This is understandable since
individuals choose clinical orientations based on their own view of the
world and how they believe change occurs.
It is important to recognize that these processes were not defined
as models of supervision. Rather, ascribing the term model to them was
a result of studies developed to determine what activities supervisors
perform when they supervise. What researchers discovered was that
even though supervisors were not doing therapy with their supervisees,
what they were doing modeled their therapeutic approach. The description
of the process of supervision in terms of these models came as a result of
the discovery.
Because supervision activity followed clinical orientation, a
discussion of theoretical supervision models could be conducted for each
clinical orientation. Three are relevant to this study and will be discussed
in this chapter. The first, psychodynamic, is relevant to this study because
it was the first approach to supervision (Bradley, 1989) and continues to be
a component of supervision with some practitioners. Components of this
model are used as part of the process studies in supervision. The other
two models described, solution focused and person-centered, are those
used most frequently by the supervisors who took part in this study.
26


Psvchodvnamic Supervision
Freud may not have considered himself a supervisor. Rather, he
prescribed psychoanalysis for students because he believed that the
therapeutic process required the use of self in therapy. Thus, he believed
that students must undergo psychoanalysis which focused on the
relationships with patients in order to uncover the dynamics of the
relationship with that patient so that the psychoanalysis would be effective
(Haley, 1987).
Classic psychoanalytic studies of supervision were conducted by
Hora (1957) and showed that the purpose of supervision was to enable a
less experienced therapist to become effective" (p. 773). Eckstein (1964)
described the role of supervisor as an equilateral triangle composed of
therapist, administrator, and didactic teacher (p. 138).
Psychodynamic supervision focuses on interpersonal dynamics
between the therapist and client (Bradley, 1989, p. 68). The supervisor
guides the therapists exploration of her or his responses (verbal,
emotional, and physical) to the client. Bradley summarizes:
Focusing on intrapersonal and interpersonal
dynamics is a way for the counselor to unlock
others problems, and in parallel fashion, the
same approach can be applied to unlocking a
27


counselors difficulties in helping his/her
relationships with others (p. 75).
The supervisor uses confrontation and interpretation as basic
supervisory techniques (Bradley, 1989, p. 89). For example, he or she
may draw the trainee's attention to an emotional reaction to something that
happened in the therapy session or to discrepancies between what the
trainee says and what she or he does. The supervisor may offer the
trainee an explanation of the dynamic patterns occurring in the therapy
session or to the reenactment of the emotional dynamic of the therapy into
the supervisory relationship (Holloway, 1996, p. 25).
Person-Centered Supervision
The basic philosophy of person-centered therapy is that the client
has the inclination to become fully functioning and the capacity for self-
direction. The client centered therapist has qualities of warmth,
genuineness, and empathy. The client has the responsibility for
therapeutic direction, and the relationship between the therapist and client
facilitates the clients positive growth (Corey, 1991).
When applied as a model of supervision, a client centered approach
will include these assumptions. The supervisor's personal characteristics
facilitate the supervisees growth as a counselor. The supervisee is
28


responsible for the direction of the supervision and for therapy. When the
supervisor exhibits the facilitative conditions of empathic understanding,
positive regard, concreteness, genuineness and self disclosure" the
trainee moves toward growth (Bradley, 1989, p. 192). At a higher level,
Bradley adds, immediacy and confrontation (additional client-centered
activities) can be used to spur action toward further growth (p. 193).
Solution-Focused Supervision
The key to solution-focused therapy is to define goals and move
toward those goals. Thomas (1994) identified the solution-focused
assumptions as they relate to solution-focused supervision. The
supervisee knows what is best for her/him, so the supervisor acts as a
supporter. The supervisors job is to identify and amplify change" (p. 14).
Because there is no one right way to do things, the supervisor does not
tell the trainee what to do. When a trainee becomes stuck, the supervisor
may empower the trainee with alternative, viable choices (p. 15).
Supervisors using the solution-focused approach would rarely give a
student one option. Rather they would suggest several choices and ask
the student to choose the one that best fits the situation.
To summarize, psychodynamic supervision involves the exploration
of the trainees interpersonal and intrapersonal dynamics in order to help
29


the trainee understand human processes that impact human function.
Client-centered supervisors offer to the trainee the facilitative conditions in
which professional growth can occur. Solution focused supervision entails
guiding the trainee toward goals. Few supervisors, including the ones in
this study, are exclusively focused on one orientation. Many will use one
approach preferentially, but they are open to techniques from other
theoretical orientations as well.
The Developmental Models of Supervision
Rather than applying theories of counseling to supervision,
developmental models apply developmental stage theory (Loganbill,
Hardy, & Delworth, 1982). Based on Erik Erikson's stage theory (1958),
the application to supervision is that the trainee will experience turning
points. Growth within and between developmental stages assumes a
careful sequence of experience and reflection which is grounded in the
careful assessment of present functioning (Loganbill, et al., p. 15).
The path to this area of supervision theory is the opposite of the
path of theoretical models. The theoretical models assert, this is what
supervisors are doing". Developmental theory started with a theory from
30


another field, educational psychology, and was applied as a prescriptive
model for what supervisors should do.
Developmental approaches imply change over time. Supervision
theorists have applied this theory in three ways. Stoltenberg and Delworth
(1988) consider development along temporal lines. Students have
different needs at different levels, and the level is directly related to the
amount of experience they have. Holloway (1987) argued defiantly that
the process of supervision was not developmental, but rather systemic.
That is, the connection between the trainee and the supervisor was related
to the characteristics of each person, the client, and the facility. Holloway
contended that researchers must view supervision contextually, and not in
terms of stages. Holloway (1996) and Usher and Borders (1993) present
developmentally appropriate guidelines for supervision tasks, but the
development itself was related to the access of skills. That is, when
students exhibited competency in a specific skill, the supervisors tasks
changed.
Ellis and Dell (1986) consider development along stages as
dependent upon the quality and not the quantity of experience in
supervision (p. 283). Although this group declined to consider supervision
as developmental, their stage theory is similar to the stages described by
31


Stoltenberg (1993) and will be included in the discussion of developmental
models. In each, the stages are defined by describing the supervisors
role at each stage. The difference between Stoltenberg and Ellis and Dell,
is that Ellis and Dell suggest movement from one stage to the next occurs
as a result of completion of one stage, whereas Stoltenberg indicates
specific time points at which the changes occur.
These three perspectives are important to contrast because the
concepts impact how supervision is conducted and so impacts the way
supervision training needs to occur. The theorists are not large groups of
researchers. Rather they are individuals or small teams of theorists who
operate from one of the perspectives. They are, however, distinguished
theorists in the area of supervision, and their contributions to supervision
theory is noteworthy. I will discuss each perspective separately.
For the purpose of this review, Stoltenberg and Delworths focus
will be categorized as developmental theory. Ellis and Dells focus will be
called stage theory, and Holloways focus will be categorized as systemic
theory. These terms are not the theorists terms, but terms that I have
applied to facilitate the conceptualization of the differences. In each area,
relevant empirical research studies, conducted to test if the theorists
concepts are occurring in supervision, are presented.
32


Developmental Focus
Stoltenberg, McNeil, and Crethar (1995) defined the stages of
supervision as related to control and responsibility. In their model, control
and responsibility begin with the supervisor and move to the trainee as the
trainee gains experience. They identified stages and corresponding
supervisor roles. The following list is a summary of their description:
1. Stage one is the establishment of the supervisory
relationship. The supervisor role is to facilitate goal
setting and define the relationship.
2. Stage two is teach and counsel. The supervisor role is
to provide structure and manage supervision sessions.
3. Stage three is trainee self-evaluation. The supervisor role
is to act as consultant.
4. Stage four is self-supervision. At this stage, the trainee
acts independently (p. 633-648).
Note that the control and responsibility for supervision move from
the supervisor to the student, as the authors intended. They do not,
however, define the corresponding student role at each stage. For
example, they do not describe the role of the student in stage one when
33


the supervisor is establishing the relationship. Nor does this stage model
define the role of the supervisor when the trainee role is dominant in
stages three and four.
Empirical research aimed at testing stage theory has been
conducted with four foci. Several researchers discovered that supervisors
do modify supervision to match the developmental level of the trainee (Ellis
& Dell, 1986; Heppener & Roehlke, 1984; Krause & Allen, 1988).
Supervisors changed their style as the student gained experience.
As a second view, some researchers found that it was not
supervisory style that the supervisor modified, but actually content (Wiley
& Ray, 1986; Worthington & Stem, 1985). For example, supervisors
taught counseling behaviors and techniques to novice counselors but
focused on personal growth and the supervisory relationship with
advanced counselor trainees.
A third approach has been to view supervision from the
developmental stage of the supervisor and not the stage of the student.
Holloway and Wolleat (1994) reported that supervisors acted from their
own states of development regardless of the students stage. They found
that novice supervisors were direct and task oriented and experienced
supervisors were more flexible (p. 39).
34


The fourth research track focused on how trainee developmental
level impacted the students' expectations of supervision. Heppener and
Roehlke (1984) and Worthington (1987) both concluded from their studies
that entry level counselors were unaware of their feelings and resisted
discussion of their feelings with their supervisor. This position was
supported by Allen, Szollos, & Williams (1986) whose study found that
entry level counselors wanted structure, support, and help with skills while
advanced counselors wanted to examine personal issues that affected
their relationship with their clients. Despite a full decade between their
studies, Sumeral and Borders (1996) support Allen, et al.'s findings,
concluding advanced counselors are concerned with process rather than
skills (p. 269). Hunter and Pinsky (1994), who studied psychiatric
residents, noted, A resident wants or requires various kinds of supervision
or knowledge at different stages of training (p. 90).
Stage Theory
Some researchers conceptualized supervision process along
stages that were unrelated to the quantity of experience. Rather, the
determining factor was the quantity of the student's prior experience in
supervision.
35


Wiley and Ray (1986) found that supervised experience contributed
to counselor development, but that unsupervised experience did not.
Therefore, students with considerable time spent in a counseling role
without a supervisor had the same needs from a supervisor that students
did when they had no client contact prior to supervision in practicum.
Students who had more supervised experience had needs related to the
advanced stages of counselor development.
Usher and Borders (1993) found the distinction to be in the
students personal characteristics. They noted, There are conceptual and
empirical indications that developmental level is more complex than are
composites of experience indexes (p. 78). For example, Usher and
Borders believe that an individuals cognitive and theoretical orientation
are more of an indication of their developmental level than is experience
with clients, whether or not that experience was with supervision.
Usher and Borders (1993) defined what they called
developmentally appropriate preferences for style, focus, and approach.
They defined styles of supervision about which students seem to have
common preferences at different stages of their learning. Trainees at the
early stage of supervision preferred a supervisor-teacher (p. 75) style in
which the focus was on specific counseling skills and techniques. At the
36


intermediate stage of supervision, the trainees wanted a supervisor-
counselor (p. 75) style in which the emphasis was on self-awareness and
relationship dynamics. The advanced counselors wanted a supervisor to
be more collegial and to have a peer-like relationship with them. They
called this style supervisor-consultant (p. 76).
Hunter and Pinsky (1994) identified similar trends among psychiatric
residents. In their review, they found that beginning students ask highly
pragmatic questions such as How do you arrange the chairs? and What
do you say when...? Later, the students moved from requiring information
to requiring ideas about how to work with particular clients (p. 91-92).
Baird (1996) attributes the students needs for pragmatism to the
academic role they have been in as a student. He contends that interns
can easily stay in the student role and may even ask for more didactic
instruction:
Interns tend to bring expectations from academic
settings into supervision. They want to be told the
right answers. Supervisors need to use questions
designed to stimulate thought and understanding (p. 60).
Ronnestad & Skovholt (1993) found that at the beginning of
internship, students preferred didactic information because they felt a need
for practical, concrete information to help cope with anxiety and ambiguity.
However, the authors warn that supervisors may contribute to the situation
37


because supervisors can get stuck in the didactic mode because lecturing
is familiar" (p. 401). Failure to push the student to deal with ambiguity and
make her or his own decisions is not growth promoting, and the authors
contend that supervisors need to be aware of their own tendency to
lecture.
Haley (1996) voiced similar concerns about live supervision when
he discussed the supervisors involvement in the session. Haley favors
live supervision and considers the phone-in technique a valuable tool for
supervisors. However, he reminds supervisors that they are to monitor the
students progress and teach therapy, but that they should not do co-
therapy. When he discussed this issue, he was speaking specifically
about the use of the phone or bug-in-the-ear in live supervision. He
argued that when the supervisor is too active in the session, it interferes
with the therapists autonomy: When there are continual suggestions to
the therapist, he or she becomes like a robot carrying out the supervisors
ideas (p. 134). Haley described guidelines for the use of the phone in
supervision which include discussing the protocol at the beginning of the
supervisory relationship which would establish an understanding of when
the therapist would be allowed to use discretion with the instruction and
when the instruction was to be followed explicitly.
38


Adult learning theory, as discussed by Perry (1985) describes
students progression from thinking dualistically to thinking relativistically.
As dualistic thinkers, students believe that an absolute truth exists and that
it is the teachers responsibility to tell them the answers. Students become
frustrated with teachers who refuse to do so. Those students believe the
teacher either is not knowledgeable or is tricking them. In their progress,
students begin to see that there may be areas in which truth is not yet
known. In this phase, everyone is entitled to an opinion because the
right opinion has not yet been decided upon. Students feel entitled to
their opinion without need to justify it, and they resent being asked to
support their ideas. As students become relative thinkers, they view the
world differently. In this complicated phase, they see that the lack of an
absolute truth requires reflective thought and that concepts do need to be
supported by logic and rationale.
Perrys theory may explain Ronnestad and Skovholts (1993)
discovery that beginning students wanted practical, concrete, didactic
information. Students may come into the counseling experience believing
that there exists a correct way to do therapy, and that the supervisors role
is to tell them what to do.
39


Hess (1987) described the shift from thinking as a student to
thinking as a counselor. He defined the three stages as:
1. Beginning: trainee is characterized as self-conscious.
2. Exploration: trainee is involved in self-analysis.
3. Confirmation: trainee has counselor identity and is
capable of self-supervision (p. 255-256).
Hesss stages show a movement from dependence to independence
similar to Stoltenberg, McNeil, and Crethar (1995) described in the section
on developmental models. However, Hess contends that these stages
occur not as a result of time but as a result of having the needs at each
level satisfied through supervision (p. 258). By applying Perry's stages of
how students look at the world, we can examine not only the satisfaction of
needs but also a progression from dualistic to relativistic thinking. In the
first stage, the trainee is self-conscious, wanting to perform in the correct
way and concerned about the supervisors evaluation. In a dualistic
viewpoint, the student is concerned with the right answers because the
wrong answers will result in failure. In the middle phase of Hesss model,
the student is trying to find him/herself in relation to a plethora a
approaches to supervision. At this level in Perrys theory, the student may
will feel entitled to his/her opinion. In supervision at this stage a student
40


may resist input from the supervisor. At the most advanced level of both
Hesss model and Perrys model, the student is ready to make her or his
own decisions, recognizing that the decisions require reflection.
Systemic View of Supervision
Holloway (1987) was one of the first to question the developmental
model. She said supervision process was not a developmental process
but rather an interactional process with the key variable being the
supervisory relationship itself that creates a trainees initial vulnerability
and final independence (p. 215). For Holloway, the students changes
occurred as a result of becoming accustomed to their role as supervisee.
The relationship with the supervisor facilitated the role adaptation by
allowing the student the opportunity to explore the role in safety.
Relationships in which trust was low and vulnerability was high did not
result in role adaptation but rather in behavior which mimicked the
supervisor and minimized risk-taking.
A key factor in this model is that a students movement from one
stage to another is contingent upon the relationship with the supervisor.
Aspects within that relationship such as trust and the use of power greatly
impact how the student performs. More importantly, the manner in which
41


students perform in the field is affected by the relationship. If the student
has never conceptualized a case or selected specific interventions, but has
always been led by the supervisor, the student will be less prepared for
independent thought as a practitioner. This could result in less effective
therapy for clients.
Holloways (1988) model is the only one of the three which
addresses the future behavior of the student as a result of the supervisory
activities. That is, others look at the purpose of supervision as it relates to
acquisition of necessary skills and knowledge, but Holloways model
addressed what can occur when supervisors perform those functions in an
exclusive role, such as teacher as opposed to consultant. Holloway
contends (1996) that a balance of the roles of teacher, counselor, and
consultant, performed in a relationship of high trust and low use of power,
is essential for students who will eventually perform independently.
In summary, the three models of trainee development attempt to
define how student growth occurs during supervision. The models are not
divergent in the belief that students go through stages of development of
which the supervisor needs to be aware. The concept of what contributes
to the growth is the area of contention between the three. Development
purists believe that experience itself is the contributing factor. Regulations
42


contribute to this view by prescribing specific numbers of hours which need
to be accumulated rather than specific skills which need to be acquired.
Stage theorists believe that only supervised activities contribute to growth,
but they do little to define how supervision functions to promote growth.
Systemic theory of development contributes growth to the context and
addresses specific conditions involving the student, the supervisor, the
client and the facility which affect the outcome. However, Holloway's
focus is primarily on the relationship between the student and the
supervisor.
Some research has been conducted which attempts to determine if
supervision is actually performed with stages and development in mind.
The following subsection includes a review of literature related to the
research on developmental models. The studies are presented
separately, because they did not focus on a specific model of
development.
Studies on Developmental Models
Throughout the literature on development, the general sense is that
trainee growth moves along in a prescribed manner, with the trainee
needing different supervisor input at different levels and the supervisor
43


responding to those changes by altering his/her style and focus. Prest,
Schindler-Zimmerman, and Sporakowski (1992) reported that research
indicated trainee growth and supervision adjustments to that growth did
not always occur in the prescribed manner theorists claimed. In their study
of supervision literature, they found It does not always evolve in mutually
desirable ways (p. 122). Prest, etal., reviewed several empirical studies
aimed at defining differences in supervision style as called for in
developmental theory. Specifically, they reviewed three major studies
which indicated that supervisors were not altering their supervision as the
student advanced. Moy and Goodman (1984) found that supervisors
became more directive and controlling when supervisees felt the need for
increased affirmation and support. Frankel and Piercy (1990) and Carifio
and Hess (1987) found that consistently, across all variables, there were
no significant differences between supervision with beginning trainees and
with advanced students (Prest, et. al., p. 122). To summarize their
findings, Prest et al. stated:
It seemed as if supervisors in these studies were
unadaptable in their patterns of supervision and did
not take into consideration the individual needs or
developmental level of the trainee (p. 122).
Several supervision theorists (e.g., Liddle, Stoltenberg, Delworth)
continue to defend development as a way to understand supervision. Few
44


empirical studies, however, have found that supervisors actually change
what they do with students as the student develops. Yet, some studies
have found that students needs do change (e.g., Baird, 1996; Ronnestad
& Skovholt, 1993; Usher & Borders, 1993). This arena may be an area
which needs further study that could significantly impact the development
of components for supervisor training programs. For example, do
students needs actually change or is there another explanation for the
researchers findings? If students' needs do change, and supervisor style
and focus do not change, how is student growth impacted? Further, what
are the perceptions which guide the supervisors' choice not to change?
Can training supervisors effect responsiveness to students needs?
Stoltenberg and Delworth (1988) defended their developmental
theory and insisted that the theory was correct but not being correctly
applied. They indicated it is time to quit debating theory and start applying
theory to empirical investigations of effectiveness:
Ultimately, the utility of developmental models of
supervision and training will be determined not by
how dutifully we reiterate what theorists in other
areas have said but rather by how faithfully we
describe and investigate that process by which
one becomes an effective psychotherapist (p. 135).
45


Holloway (1987) rejoins by stating that it is dangerous to
automatically accept models that are intuitively attractive (p. 215). She
addresses the issue of lack of research into supervision models again in
1988:
We have begun the process of investigating our
models, and this process must be continued with
systematic and conceptually relevant approaches
for it is in the laboratories and the field, not in the
clever defenses of our own thinking that the relevance
of our models are determined (p. 138).
Supervision Process Literature
This section will review theory and research related to variables
within the supervision process. Various theorists have presented concepts
about what happens in supervision that can be tested to determine
efficacy. The study of process enhances our knowledge about what needs
to occur so that we can determine some of the areas which need to be
developed in designing training programs for supervision. The section is
divided into three categories of process variables. The first section will
describe the components of supervision. The components define the
purpose of supervision, the activities of supervision, and the roles of the
supervisor and trainee. Characteristics of supervision are presented in the
second category and include supervisor style and power. The third
46


category in this section is a brief review of empirical studies to
demonstrate how some of these variables are utilized.
Components of Supervision.
The components of supervision have been classified by researchers
in a confusing pattern. The most significant categories are functions,
roles, and tasks. Yet, theorists often use these words differently. Bernard
(1979) for example, defined roles and functions of supervision as separate
concepts and created a matrix for describing how roles change depending
on the function at hand. Holloway (1996) defines functions as roles in
which a supervisor engages. However confusing and overlapping, the
components of supervision are described in order to answer the question
What is supervision for and how does it work? Some confusion can be
resolved by defining for this study functions as the purpose of
supervisions, roles as the characterization of how the supervisor performs
supervision, and tasks as the activities of supervision.
Empirical studies attempt to identify how the components of
supervision come together. Studies have been designed to see how the
functions, roles, and tasks are related to development and/or theoretical
orientation. Other studies look at supervisor and supervisee traits and
characteristics. Still others try to find ways to test the outcome of
47


supervision. For each of the categories in this section, relevant research
whether theoretical, correlational, descriptive, or outcome will be
addressed in the appropriate area. In some studies there may be overlap.
For such studies, they will be discussed in the section to which their study
most closely applies.
Functions of Supervision Most commonly, function refers to the
purpose of the phenomena being described. The function of supervision,
then, would define the major purposes of the supervision process.
Bradley (1989) defined three purposes of supervision. They are
personal and professional development, competency development, and
promotion of accountability. Bradleys description entails what trainee
skills are to be developed through supervision. To summarize Bradley,
counseling skills include communication patterns, counseling techniques,
empathy, confrontation, and decision making skills (p. 8-10). The
professional role development function prepares the student to apply
principles of ethical practice, knowledge of the appropriate use of external
resources for the client, the tasks of record keeping and procedures, and
the appropriate use of interprofessional relationships (p. 10-13). A
students skill in self-evaluation is defined as the ability to recognize his or
her limits of competence and effectiveness (p. 13-14).
48


Holloway (1996) uses the word tasks to mean the transmission of
professional knowledge requisite of the counselor role (p. 12). Thus,
Holloways tasks fall under the definition of function used in this study.
The inference is that the supervisor is responsible to transmit to the
supervisee the requisite knowledge. She defines the core knowledge
areas as consisting of counseling skill, case conceptualization,
professional role, emotional awareness, and self-evaluation (p. 16.)
Bernard (1979) identified the functions of supervision as facilitating
counselor development in the process skills (the execution of counseling
techniques), conceptualization skills (the ability to organize and synthesize
information about the client), and personalization skills (awareness and
acceptance of ones own feelings, values, and beliefs) (p. 62).
Loganbill, Hardy and Delworth (1982) describe the four functions of
supervision as: (a) monitoring client welfare, (b) enhancement of
supervisees growth, (c) promote transitions of trainee from stage to stage,
and (d) evaluation. They call their model a master-apprentice" model
(p. 4). The student learns how to do therapy by following in the footsteps
of the supervisor. In their view, the supervisor is ultimately responsible for
the clients welfare, and attention to this area should take precedence over
all the other functions.
49


Ellis and Dell (1986) identified three supervisor functions. The
supervisor is responsible for facilitating counselor improvement in three
areas: process (the execution of counseling techniques), conceptualization
(the ability to organize and synthesize information regarding the client),
and personalization (an awareness and acceptance of ones own feelings,
values, and beliefs) (p.285 ).
Usher and Borders (1993) described four areas of supervisory
emphasis. These emphasis areas are consistent with the definition of
function in this study. They define key areas of trainee skills on which the
supervisor chooses to focus. The supervisors choice is based on the
supervisors belief about the function of supervision. With these four
areas, as with roles, supervisors may choose a consistent presentation
while others may move from one to another based on the situation. Usher
and Borders found that the majority of supervisors in their study chose a
primary emphasis area (p. 78).
The four emphasis areas that Usher and Borders (1993) defined are
summarized as follows:
1. Standards and principles of the counseling
profession: these behaviors are transmitted through
supervisor modeling and instructing.
2. Process skills: the counselor behaviors of attending,
questioning, immediacy, and self-disclosure.
50


3. Personalization skills: the inner attitudes and feeling of
the trainee toward the client.
4. Conceptualization skills: cognitive abilities, choice of
appropriate interventions, and identification of client
themes (p. 68 74).
Roles in Supervision For this study, roles are defined as a
characterization of the supervisor and/or the student in relation to the
function at hand. For example, a supervisor performing the function of
instructing is in the role of teacher.
Bernard (1979), Bradley (1989), and Ellis and Dell (1986)
use the same terms to define three roles in which supervisors engage:
teacher, counselor, and consultant. Bradley describes the roles as
interactions between the supervisor role, the student role, and the function
being performed. For example, when the supervisee is learning about how
to work with a particular client, the student is in the counselor role, and the
supervisor is in the consultant role (p. 304). When the supervisor is
instructing the supervisee about paper work and protocol in the facility, the
supervisor is in the teacher role, and the supervisee is in the student role
(p. 303). When the function at hand is the supervisees professional or
personal development, the supervisor role is counselor and the student
role is, in Bradleys terms, person" (p. 303). Thus, the role of the
i
51


supervisor is dependent on the role of the supervisee at the time of the
interaction.
Ellis and Dell (1986) use Bradleys (1989) terms, but describe the
roles differently. For them, the supervisor in the teacher role teaches
counseling skills. In the counseling role, he or she promotes trainee
growth. The assumption for this role is that as the student becomes more
self-aware, he or she will become more effective. Ellis and Dell describe
the consultant supervisor as creating an egalitarian relationship in which
the trainee is responsible for the content of the supervision sessions.
Stoltenberg, McNeil, and Crethar (1995), in their developmental
theory, addressed changing roles as the trainee gained experience.
According to Ellis and Dell (1986) some supervisors move from one role to
another as Bradley (1989) suggests, but many use one role as the basis
for their interactions throughout the process (p. 284). Ellis and Dell do not
describe the conditions under which a supervisor performs the different
roles or what happens in supervision when the supervisor chooses a
stable role across time.
This summary illustrates differences between developmental and
theoretical supervision as well as personal characteristics of the
supervisors involved. That is, are they intentionally choosing a role
52


because they believe consistency is necessary, or is this their personal
role and they remain in it, as suggested by Bradley with regard to students
being stuck in the academic role and supervisors being stuck in the lecture
role.
The trainees role complexity is even greater than that of the
supervisor, according to Oik and Friedlander (1992) who reported trainees
engage in multiple roles simultaneously: therapist, student, client,
supervisee, and colleague (p. 389). Holloway (1996) uses the same role
titles and very similar descriptions of the roles. The following summary is a
synthesis of Oik and Friedanders and Holloways descriptions about
trainee roles.
As therapist, the trainee must apply therapeutic skills with clients
and develop a therapeutic relationship. As student, the trainee continues
to learn diagnostic and case management skills and to apply theories,
strategies and techniques at the appropriate time. As client, the trainee
experiences personal development as it affects and is affected by her/his
work with clients and with the supervisor. As supervisee, the student must
allow the cases to be monitored by the supervisor, accept responsibility to
outline the goals and direction of supervision, and discuss issues related to
personal growth. As colleague, the trainee participates in responsible,
53


ethical, peer relationships with the supervisor, other staff, collateral
helpers, and the profession as a whole. All the while, the trainee is aware
that in the student and supervisee roles, s/he is being evaluated, and that
evaluation can have serious consequences for degree completion and
employment. In relation to professional development, the trainee is a
consultant with peers, the supervisor, and collateral helpers.
Ladany and Friedlander (1995) also studied the multiple roles of
trainees and supervisors and their relationship to the supervisory working
relationship. They found that multiple roles created conflict between the
supervisor and the trainee, but that the conflict was reduced in situations
of a positive working alliance. This study is discussed in more detail in the
section on the supervisory relationship.
Tasks of Supervision Again the definitions of supervisory tasks are
confusing to separate from functions. Although Holloway (1996) uses the
word function, for the purpose of this study her description applies to
tasks as defined herein. She outlines five functions of supervision. They
are: (a) monitoring and evaluating, (b) instructing and advising, (c)
modeling, (d) consulting, and (e) supporting (p. 33). These functions are
all related to interactions with the supervisee, and do not prescribe a
function that addresses the supervisors responsibility toward the client.
54


Holloways model assumes that the client is served by the supervisee, and
the successful completion of the supervisor's functions will serve the client.
Bradley (1989) uses the word activities (p. 16) instead of tasks.
She defines the activities as consultation (p. 16), counseling (p. 18),
training and instruction (p. 20), and evaluation (p. 25). The difference
between Bradleys activities and Holloways tasks is evidence of the
confusion that exists about the components of supervision. Bradleys
terms sound like functions, but her descriptions of each include the
behaviors of a supervisor in pursuing the purposes of supervision.
Because theorists use the terms functions, tasks, and roles
differently, comparison between the theorists can be confusing. Table 2.1
is designed to clarify some of the overlap.
55


Table 2.1
Summary of Supervisor Functions. Tasks, and Roles
Functions The Why of Supervision
Component Theorist
Personal and Professional Development Bradley; Holloway; Loganbill, Hardy & Delworth; Usher & Borders
Competency Development (process skills, conceptualization skills, personalization skills, self-evaluation skills) Bradley; Holloway, Loganbill, Hardy, & Delworth; Ellis & Dell
Promotion of Accountability Bradley
Monitoring Client Welfare Loganbill, Hardy, & Delworth
Promote Transition from One Stage to Another. Ellis & Dell
Tasks the What of SuDervision
Components Theorists
Monitoring and Evaluating Instructing and Advising Modeling Consulting Supporting Training Holloway; Bradley Holloway Holloway Holloway; Bradley Holloway Bradley
Roles the "How of Supervision
Supervisor Roles
Teacher
Counselor
Consultant
Consultant
Theorists
Bradley; Holloway
Oik & Friedlander
Student Roles
Therapist
Student
Client
Supervisee
Colleague
Theorists
Holloway;
Oik &
Friedlander
56


To summarize, supervision is an interaction in which the
supervisor's role impacts the way the function at hand is transmitted to the
supervisee, and the function is impacted by the task or goal the supervisor
has defined. For example, if the task is to transmit knowledge of case
conceptualization, the supervisor in the role of teacher would instruct
(function) the supervisee (student role) on methods of case
conceptualization. For the same task, a supervisor may advise (function)
in the role of consultant.
Because there is no clear model of tasks, roles, and functions, it is
difficult to operationalize the components of supervision. The interactions
just described incorporate components from each of the theorists. This
may create inaccurate interpretations due to the interplay of the definitions
and lack of consistency therein. Additionally, the theorists disagree about
whether roles should be flexible or stable. In other words, some theorists
see supervisors as teachers at all times. Others see them as collaborators
at all times. The alternative view is the supervisors play many roles during
the course of training, and the role is matched with the task at hand.
Characteristics of Supervision
This section will introduce three areas in which supervision research
has been conducted using specific variables of supervisor and trainee
57


traits or issues. The review serves as an introduction to the concepts.
The majority of outcome research in supervision has utilized many of these
variables, and the conclusions are very similar to the studies reviewed
here. Also, the variables are not defined in terms of student or supervisor
perceptions. Instead, they are conceptualizations of the authors which are
included in research instruments to which the participants respond.
In contrast, this study will address the personal meaning
participants have for these variables, an area that has not been addressed
in previous research. Therefore, an introduction to the types of
characteristics of supervision that have been studied provides an
adequate background for this study. This section will briefly review three
areas: the dimensions of supervisor behavior, supervisor style, and power.
Dimensions of Supervisor Behavior
Tracey, Ellickson, and Sherry (1989) defined twelve dimensions of
supervisory behavior. These constructs can be used in studies which
examine interactions between the two people. The supervisory
dimensions they defined are: supervisor skill, supportive, directive,
realistic, warm, sincere, collaborative, likable, structure, teaching, focus on
trainees affect, and focus on counselors behavior (p. 340). The
counselor behavior dimensions are cooperative, likable, counseling skill,
58


and self-awareness (p. 340). Clearly, the dimensions listed by these are a
mixture of traits and styles. They are presented here because these
researchers and several others utilized the dimensions as the independent
variables in their studies.
Sumerel and Borders (1996) found that when students experienced
their supervisors as warm, likable, sincere, and trustworthy, they were
more likely to disclose issues of personal discomfort with the supervisor
(p. 281). This occurred at all levels of development, in contrast to studies
which indicated that only advanced students chose to discuss feelings and
personal issues (e.g. Stoltenberg & Delworth, 1988; Loganbill, Hardy, &
Delworth, 1982). Disclosure of personal discomfort in the therapy session
may facilitate conversations with the supervisor in which the trainee can
resolve the issues and move toward becoming a better therapist (Sumerel
& Borders, 1996, p.281).
White and Russell (1995) found that supervisees desired a
supervisor who displayed trust, respect, and an open and supportive
manner, and that supervisees desired these dimensions regardless of their
developmental level development (p. 50). When such dimensions were
present, supervisees reported their experience in supervision was more
productive.
59


Supervisory Style
Usher and Borders (1993) define three types of supervisory style.
They are collegial, relationship oriented, and content focused (p. 70).
According to these authors, style was related to the supervisors
theoretical orientation and not related to the supervisors amount of
supervisory experience. A collegial style was defined as attractive, and
key characteristics were listed as warm, open, supportive, and friendly
(p.70). The relationship orientated style was seen as interpersonally
sensitive, invested, committed, therapeutic, and perceptive (p. 71). A
content-focused supervisor was task-oriented, goal directed, thorough,
focused, practical, and structured (p. 71).
Some of these characteristics are similar to the roles that Bradley
(1989) and Ellis and Dell (1986) defined (teacher, counselor, consultant).
A supervisor could act in any role, depending on the circumstances. For
Usher and Borders (1993), these characteristics represented an overall
approach to doing supervision. This is not to say that a supervisor would
never display characteristics beyond one style, but that style was a fairly
stable personality quality and varied only in unusual circumstances.
60


Several studies have been conducted which examine trainees
preferences for style (Allen, Szollos, & Williams, 1986; Carifio & Hess,
1987; Usher & Borders, 1993). These studies tend to identify the style
through the researchers point of view and ask the students to choose
based on those definitions. No studies have elicited the students
perspectives or definitions.
Power
Power is a component of all relationships, in the supervisory
relationship, it is important to understand power in terms of the position of
the individuals involved and the purpose of supervision. Since supervision
is an interaction, power can impact effectiveness depending upon how it is
perceived and how it is used.
Using the terms originally presented by French and Raven (1959),
Holloway (1996) outlines five types of power relative to supervision;
Reward Power The perception that the other person has
the ability and resources to mediate reward.
Coercive Power The perception that the other person has
the ability and resources to mediate punishment.
Legitimate Power A persons perceived trustworthiness as
a professional, socially sanctioned provider of
services.
Expert Power Attributed to a person because of his or her
mastery of knowledge and skills.
Referent Power Derived from a persons interpersonal
attraction (p. 33).
61


Power in supervision is multi-dimensional. Clearly, the supervisor is
in a more powerful position than the student because of the supervisor's
role and responsibility. However, the student also has power in the
therapeutic relationship. The client may perceive the student to have any
or all of the types of power listed above. The trainee may not perceive
herself or himself to be in a position of power. It is important to address
individuals perspective of power in the relationship. The topic of power
was a common theme in the interview process for this study.
Bradley (1989) discusses power games in which supervisors
sometimes use power inappropriately within the supervisory relationship.
The games she describes can be compared to Holloways (1996)
distinctions on types of power. The first game, Remember whos boss
reflects legitimate power by implying that the supervisor is in a designated
position of power. Parent knows best is the supervisors inappropriate
use of expert power. Ill tell on you is coercive power used
inappropriately (p. 53). Bradley contends that power games keep the
relationship closed while fostering helplessness in the relationship (p. 52).
The use of power in the relationship is an important consideration in
counselor training because it impacts the trainees reaction to the
62


supervisor. Additionally, power in the supervisory relationship may be
modeled in the therapeutic relationship. That is, if the
supervisor/supervisee relationship models inappropriate use of power, the
student may use power inappropriately with clients. Similarly, appropriate
use of power in the supervisory relationship may affect the supervisees
appropriate use of power in the therapeutic relationship. The concept of
applied power was used in the interview questions for this study using
Holloways (1996) description of the types of power. The respondents
were asked to describe the type of power they personally ascribe to their
supervisor. The results of those queries are presented in Chapter Four.
In summary, evaluating supervisory effectiveness is a complex
problem because there are so many variables to consider. A research
question about effectiveness must define which participants perception of
effectiveness is most viable the supervisor, the supervisee, or the client.
Second, the conditions under which supervision is deemed effective must
be taken into account. For example, was effectiveness considered in
terms of client success, students successful acquisition of key
characteristics of a beginning therapist, or by the supervisors evaluation of
the students competencies in the therapy session.
63


As researchers studied these variables it became clear that the
interaction between the supervisor and supervisee and the variable which
impacted the outcome. Consequently, considerable research has been
focused on the supervisory relationship which is the subject of the next
section.
The Supervisory Relationship
Gaston (1990) reviewed studies of counseling outcome and
concluded that researchers continued to agree that the quality of the
working alliance between therapist and client may be a significant factor in
the successful outcome of psychotherapy (p. 143). This was not a new
statement by any means, since Rogers (1957) had outlined conditions of
client centered therapy, many researchers had agreed that the therapeutic
relationship was significant in producing change regardless of the
theoretical orientation or the types of interventions.
Following the concepts of therapeutic studies, researchers looking
at effective training and supervision have come to analyze the
supervisor/trainee relationship in the same way others have examined the
therapist/client relationship. Some have focused strictly on the relationship
as it impacts trainee skill acquisition (Berger & Damnann, 1982; Haley,
64


1996; Ladany & Friedlander, 1995). Others have looked at the dynamics
of the relationship and their impact on therapy (Frankel & Piercy, 1990;
Friedlander, Siegal, & Brenock, 1989). Kaiser (1992) and Frankel and
Piercy (1990) discussed the concept of isomorphism, the concept that
what happens in supervision is reflected in therapy (Kaiser, p. 284), so
that the study of the relationship between the supervisor and student was
an essential topic for study. Hess (1987) stated that the relationship
between the supervisor and supervisee is a focus, if not the focus of
psychotherapy and supervision (p. 255, emphasis in original). Moskowitz
and Ruppert (1983) stated that a positive relationship between supervisor
and supervisee is a prerequisite to successful supervision (p. 632).
Studies of the supervisory relationship have utilized the research on
theories (both therapeutic and developmental) and research regarding
process and components. One common denominator in the findings of the
studies seems to be that those key factors contribute to the supervisory
experience through the interaction of the supervisor and the supervisee.
Additional factors that must be considered are the client and the facility
(Holloway, 1996). There may be some developmental changes that occur
across time, but those changes may be mediated by the relationship so
that they do not consistently appear in empirical findings. Similarly,
65


developmental studies may not recognize individual differences sufficiently
to theorize what is happening between people.
Friedlander, Siegal, and Brenock (1989) conducted a single case
study design with the intent of studying parallel process. They video-taped
all supervision sessions and asked the supervisor and trainee to evaluate
several dimensions of the interaction using the Working Alliance Inventory
(WAI) and the Session Evaluation Questionnaire (SEQ). They found that
the supervision dyad clearly favored an attractive and interpersonal^
sensitive approach over a task oriented one throughout the semester
(p. 155). This is in contrast to developmental theories (e.g. Stoltenberg),
which suggest reserving the consultative, collegial approach for relatively
advanced trainees. Stoltenberg (1993) indicated that a beginning trainee
would be anxious, naive, self-focused, structured, and dependent
(p. 132). Friedlander, et al.s study describes a consistency throughout the
semester, in contrast with Ellis and Dells (1986) stage theory which
recommend that the supervisor gradually diminish her/his role and the
trainee increase her/his responsibility and control.
Clearly, a single case study design is not a foundation upon which
to reject any of the developmental theories. However, in this case certain
interesting dimensions are worthy of note. For example, the supervisor,
66


even when defining herself as consultative, acted in a nurturant,
supportive, positive style, according to the researchers. These traits were
consistent at all times when she was giving either praise or constructive
feedback. Still, at all times she assumed a one-up stance, with the
trainee one down (p. 155). The roles did not change as the semester
progressed, and the trainee continued to develop confidence and ability as
defined by the trainee, the supervisor and the clients (p. 155). So,
Stoltenbergs (1993) description of the naive, dependent, floundering
novice did not hold true for this case. This finding leads to the question of
whether the style of delivery may be a key factor in the interactions.
Returning to studies on supervisee preferences conducted by Usher and
Borders (1993) and Allen, Szollos, and Williams (1986), it is important to
recognize that students preferences for style may have been impacted by
their perceptions of their own experience, their definitions of the style
categories, and the meaning they made of interactions with their
supervisor.
Ladany and Friedlander (1995) studied the multiple roles of trainees
and supervisors. Their research goal was to determine if role conflict, role
difficulty, and role ambiguity in counselor trainees were related to
supervisory working alliance. The authors described role ambiguity as
67


occurring because of the trainees confusion on how to present themselves
to the supervisor (p. 221). That is, because the supervisor role was both
as trainer and evaluator, trainees experienced discomfort sharing areas of
weakness or personal concern while simultaneously being evaluated by
the supervisor. Role conflict occurred when trainees were in disagreement
with the supervisor either ethically or theoretically. Role difficulty resulted
because the trainee did not know how to develop personal ideas without
damaging the teacher/student dyad and endangering the evaluation
process. The authors found that such conflicts naturally occurred in most
supervisor/trainee relationships, but that a working alliance mitigated the
negative impact (p. 225). Further, the working alliance not only impacted
the dyads ability to resolve the conflict, but also enhanced the learning
process for the trainee.
Ladany and Friedlander (1995) identified three dimensions of the
supervisory working alliance: the emotional bond, goals, and tasks. They
described the emotional bond as a mutual trust and caring. Goals were
described as the goals for supervision as well as the goals for the therapy
sessions. The task dimension is an agreement on how to proceed in order
to reach the established goals. It can be seen that the authors' definitions
of the dimensions are similar to the roles, task, and functions described in
68


the supervision process section of this chapter. The distinction is that
Ladany and Friedlander describe these as interpersonal alignment. That
is, these three dimensions are manifested between the supervisor and the
supervisee. Thus, the outcome is impacted by the conditions under which
the dimensions are achieved.
White and Russell (1995) studied variables which were important to
outcome in supervision. They found that the supervisor, the supervisee,
and the client were variables which interacted to impact outcome. The
authors emphasized that future research must examine the interactions
between and the relationship between the supervisor and the trainee
(p. 42). They added that a systemic focus must include systems
research (p. 43).
Kaiser (1992) identified accountability, personal awareness, trust,
dependency/autonomy, and power as primary elements (p. 283) in the
supervisory relationship. Because these aspects change the relationship,
they must be considered as variables to the outcome of supervision.
For Kaiser (1992), accountability refers to the supervisors ultimate
responsibility for the client. This ensures the trainees safety and facilitates
her/his ability to explore in the relationship (p. 291). Safety includes the
ability to acquire the role of therapist through experimenting with different
69


styles while the supervisor monitors the clients needs so that the student
does not inadvertently do harm to the client. Student safety also implies
that the student can make the mistakes inherent in learning a new skill
without losing the opportunity to continue to formulate that role. Personal
awareness on the part of both the supervisor and supervisee impact the
direction the relationship will take (p. 284). Trust and respect are both
related to the way in which the supervisor uses power and authority. They
are also related to student safety and to the development of personal
awareness. Dependency or autonomy exist as a result of the supervisors
perception of his/her role (e.g. teacher, mentor, colleague, etc.).
According to Liddle (1986), the supervisor can foster dependency by
taking over the therapy. With too much dependency, the trainee does not
develop a personal perception of competence (p. 122).
Two researchers have clarified the necessity of examining the
supervisory relationship. Bradley (1989) stated:
Within the supervisory relationship, the focus is not
only on the activities of counseling and supervision
but on the feelings which emerge within the counseling
and supervisor relationship (p. 36).
Loganbill, Hardy and Delworth stated in 1982 that the experiencing
of the relationship itself can be the significant learning experience (p. 4).
So, the power of the relationship is twofold. First, the relationship
70


mediates the other components. That is, the relationship impacts how the
roles, tasks, and functions actually work. Second, it is a model for
interacting with one another. The supervisory relationship can actually
increase the trainees knowledge about how to be in a relationship in which
one person guides and facilitates change in another. This knowledge is
important for the student to use in developing relationships with clients.
Conclusions and Direction for this Study
Examining supervision appears to have changed very little since the
early 1980s. Studies continue to focus on whether or not the
developmental model is appropriate to replace theoretical models and vice
versa (Borders, 1989; Holloway, 1996; Stoltenberg & Delworth, 1988).
Process studies attempt to identify the characteristics and components of
effective supervision.
There is a trend toward examining the supervisory relationship.
Several recent studies agree that the relationship and interactions between
a supervisor and trainee are the most important consideration and that the
relationship is mediated by the theoretical approaches, development, and
the components of supervision (Cagnon & Russell, 1995; Clairbom,
Etringer, & Hillerbrand, 1995; Holloway, 1996; Kaiser, 1992; Usher &
71


Borders, 1993). Still, there is little consensus or empirical data to support
the models and approaches to training and supervision.
Clearly, the study of supervision can follow a plethora of tangents.
When one accounts for supervision theories, process components, and
identification of elements in the relationship, it is understandable that a
unifying body of information is difficult to isolate. The literature described
in this chapter presented the issues that will be addressed in interviews
with the students and supervisors who participated in this study.
Information described here has shown that there exist disagreements as
well as agreement on all of these areas. By adding the voices of the
participants in the relationship, we may identify areas in the research
where more investigation is necessary.
Other changes in supervision research need to occur because, thus
far, the results of considerable research have led to few solid conclusions.
No comprehensive model exists (Borders, 1989; Frankel & Piercy, 1990;
Holloway, 1996; Liddle, Breunlin, & Schwartz, 1988). Supervisors
continue to conduct supervision within an implicit model of therapy often
without the conscious intent of doing so (Borders, 1989; Nichols, Nichols,
& Hardy, 1990).
72


Supervision is an area of counseling in which new regulations are
being developed. Other states are likely to follow Alabama and Florida in
licensing supervisors. A national credential is being established by the
ACA and the NBCC. As a result of part of these changes, it is essential
that curriculum be developed for training supervisors as well as evaluation
strategies for measuring the outcome of such training. Because of the
complexity of this task, continued research into the process of supervision
is needed. Specifically, research which examines the supervisory
relationship is critical because the relationship has been shown to mediate
all other variables.
73


CHAPTER THREE
METHODOLOGY AND PROCEDURES
Qualitative research has its origins in anthropology and sociology.
For each, the goal was to understand a culture through the careful
observation of that culture. In other words, it was a contextual analysis of
the culture through an exploration of the meanings for that group.
Educational researchers have frequently made use of the principles of
qualitative research because of its value in describing the subjective
phenomena intrinsic to situations. Although research in the psychological
realm has often attempted to follow the guidelines of the natural sciences,
much of our understanding of human nature has come from case studies
which are inherently qualitative. For example, the use of case studies,
originated by Freud, has been useful in understanding the meanings
ascribed to living (Moon, Dillon, & Sprenkle, 1990).
Methodological Assumptions
Both quantitative and qualitative inquiries are vital to the endeavors
of researchers because each offers possibilities for discovery that do not
exist in the other. The appropriate choice for research depends on the
f
74


goal of the study, the types of questions the researcher is attempting to
answer, and the philosophical underpinnings of the study itself. This study
will be qualitative in design because qualitative inquiry is the better of the
two types of inquiry for this study.
Qualitative inquiry will enhance the study of the supervisory
relationship because the relationship itself is subjectively interpreted. Only
by gaining access to the participants view of the relationship can one
achieve a deeper understanding of the meanings ascribed to the
interaction by the individuals who are in the relationship. Interpretive
research is concerned with the participants explanations and meaning
given to phenomena (LeCompte & Preissle, 1993). Therefore, qualitative
research is the appropriate approach for examining the supervisors and
trainees experience of the relationship and its impact on how they perform
their roles during the practicum semester.
This investigation is designed to explore the students perceptions
of the interactions they have with their primary supervisor or with other
supervisors with whom they have contact during training. Ten students
from two facilities were interviewed four times during the course of the
semester. Additionally, nine supervisors were interviewed about their
75


perceptions of their own training and supervision experiences and how
their current supervision style is related to those experiences.
Interactions have to do with how meanings and perceptions and
events come together with respect to one another" (Strauss & Corbin,
1990). In qualitative research, the supervisees understandings of these
supervisory interactions can be described in more depth than they could
be in quantitative studies. It is not the variables correlated with the
interaction that will be studied, but rather the participants interpretations of
those interactions.
A basic assumption of qualitative research is that reality is not a
fixed phenomenon but varies as a result of interpreted meaning.
Qualitative research honors varied voices as part of this assumption.
Especially in the field of mental health, the importance of hearing those
alternate voices is imperative. I believe this approach increases rather
than decreases validity because it allows for diversity, accounts for
variance, and expands the information gathered by including variables
which might be ignored in quantitative research. The measure of validity
for qualitative inquiries, then, is the degree to which the researchers
analysis fits the situation, follows a logical course, and is credible to the
76


reader (LeCompte & Preissle, 1993; Neuman, 1991; Strauss & Corbin,
1990).
Grounded Theory
Grounded theory is a specific method for qualitative research. In
grounded theory, the researcher uses systematic data collection and
analysis to arrive at inductively based theory which can be used not only
to explain reality but to provide a framework for action (Strauss & Corbin,
1990, p. 22). In fact, Glaser and Strauss (1967) developed grounded
theory as an approach to building theory which can be applied in settings
beyond the particular setting in which the study was conducted. The
authors developed a systematic process of data collection and analysis
which provided the rigor and precision that basic science research
required. Strauss and Corbin (1990) define grounded theory as
(Theory) that is inductively derived from the study
of the phenomenon it represents. That is, it is
discovered, developed, and provisionally verified
through systematic data collection and analysis of
data pertaining to that phenomenon. Therefore, data
collection, analysis, and theory stand in reciprocal
relationship with each other. One does not begin with
a theory, then prove it. Rather, one begins with an
area of study and what is relevant to that area is
allowed to emerge (p. 22).
77


This study follows Strauss and Corbins (1990) suggestions for data
collection and analysis procedures. The components of the process
described in the following sections are based on their model.
Participants
A total of 10 students from two different training programs were
interviewed four times over the course of one semester in a supervised
practicum experience. Nine supervisors from the same programs were
also interviewed in order to gain their perspectives of the impact of their
own supervision on their supervisory style at this time. However, the
students' perspectives were the primary data for this study.
Facilities
Two masters level training programs were invited to participate in
this study. Both agreed to allow me to speak to the practicum class and
enlist volunteers who were willing to be interviewed. One training program
is accredited by Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs (CACREP), and the other is accredited by
Commission on the Accreditation of Marriage and Family Therapy
Education (COAMFTE). Both programs are required to provide
supervised clinical experience as a criterion of accreditation.
78


School A offers a masters degree in counseling psychology and
counselor education. The program is a division in the School of Education
and is accredited by CACREP. Students choose a specific focus area
which is called a track". Five tracks are available: college student
counseling, community counseling, school counseling, human resource
development, and marriage and family counseling/therapy (MFC/T). The
course requirements vary for each track. Students in any of the first four
tracks complete 42 credits in theory and techniques prior to entering
practicum. Students in the marriage and family track complete 45 credits
of theory and techniques courses prior to practicum. Practicum,
internship, and research courses constitute the balance of 60 (63 for
MFC/T) credits required for graduation. All practicum students, regardless
of track, must complete 150 hours of practicum experience. Of the 150
hours, 40 hours are spent in client contact (10 of which must be as a group
facilitator). For the marriage and family track students, a minimum of 20
hours of client contact must be with couples or families. Students
complete an internship in a school or agency outside the facility following
practicum. Of the 600 hours, 240 are direct client contact. For marriage
and family track students, a minimum of 180 hours must be with couples or
families.
79


The training facility at School A operates on a sliding fee scale, and
services are available to anyone in the community or university except
students in the master's program for counseling psychology. The center
has six treatment rooms, and each is equipped with a video camera, an
intercom system, and a one way mirror. Supervisors and students in an
observation room can view the therapy sessions occurring in any of the six
rooms. Phone systems connect the observation room to each treatment
room, and supervisors can give instructions at any time during the session.
At least one supervisor is on duty in the observation room at all times
when the clinic is open. Students do have a primary supervisor, which will
be discussed in the next section. The supervisor in the observation room
at the time a student is in session with a client may or may not be that
students primary supervisor.
Before each session, the student posts a session plan in the
observation room which gives the on-duty supervisor pertinent information
about the clients presenting problem, the students theoretical orientation,
and the students plan for the session. Supervisors and students typically
meet for five to ten minutes before the session. The student is required to
take a mid-session break in which the supervisor and the student can
80


discuss the session. Frequently a supervisor will give the student
feedback after the session.
School A is an urban university. The master's degree at this
university is usually a two year program (two-and-one-half years for MFT)
if completed as a full time student. Often, however, students who are
working take more than two years to complete the masters degree.
At School A, students complete all of their counseling course work
prior to practicum. Some students do not take their research courses until
during or after practicum and internship. So, practicum and internship
occur at the end of the students tenure in the masters program. Students
apply to enter practicum during the semester prior to the one in which they
plan to enroll. Occasionally a student will be asked to delay practicum if
the faculty concurs that the student is not ready for the experience. During
the fall and spring semesters, no more than 30 students are allowed into
practicum. This ensures that a sufficient number of clients will be available
to the students as well as appropriate supervision time. During Summer
semester, only 20 students are admitted to practicum for the same
reasons.
The second site which participated in this study is School B. The
program offers a masters degree in marriage and family therapy and is
81


accredited by COAMFTE. Students complete 63 semester credit hours of
course work including theory and techniques courses and research
courses, a thesis, and an internship. As part of the requirement, they
complete 500 hours of client contact at the facility and 250 hours at an
outside facility in an internship experience.
The training clinic at School B consists of six therapy rooms. Four
have one-way mirrors and phone systems. Students have access to
cameras which can be placed in any room for video-taping sessions.
Observation of a session is scheduled between the student and their
primary supervisor as they see fit. When the session is observed it is
called a live". When a session is not observed, it is typically video-taped
for later review with the students direct supervisor. The students at
School B call a taped session canned". It is rare for a supervisor other
than the students primary supervisor to view that students sessions.
School B is a residential campus. The masters degree in marriage
and family therapy is designed to be completed in two-and-one-half years,
and students must attend full time. The program admits six students per
year. Those six students are considered a cohort. They follow a
prescribed course of study throughout their program. The prescribed
course means that they take the same classes each semester, begin to
82


see clients at the same time, and leave for their internship at the same
time. They attend group supervision (call staffings) together. So, at any
given time, the program consists of two cohorts, the first years and the
second years. In early November of their first semester, a first year
student is paired with a second year student and the two conduct
co-therapy with clients with whom the second year student has been
working. In January, the second year student leaves for his/her internship
and the first year student retains the client. The process is called
transitioning. Thus, students in this program are working with clients for
nearly the full two years of their program.
Participant Selection Process
Supervisors School A has nine supervisors. During the Fall of
1996, three of those supervisors were the primary supervisor for five
students each; the other six supervisors worked with only one or two
students. Two supervisors agreed to be interviewed for the study. School
B has three supervisors who usually supervise two students each.
However, during the Fall of 1996, one supervisor was not supervising at
all, so only one supervisor had two students and the third supervisor had
four. Neither of the two active supervisors consented to participate in this
study citing lack of available time as the reason.
83


I began conducting interviews at both facilities in late August. As
the semester and the study progressed, I determined that more
supervisory input would be helpful for different reasons at each facility.
The lack of supervisory input at School B was the concern regarding that
site. I contacted the program director who was the non-active supervisor
during the fall semester. She agreed to be interviewed for the study.
At School A, it was apparent that the live observation policy resulted
in the students contact with several supervisors in addition to their primary
supervisor, so that their supervisory relationship experience was not with
only one supervisor. I contacted the other supervisors at School A with
the exception of two who were on my committee and one who had
previously stated that she was not interested in participating. All six
available supervisors agreed to be interviewed. Thus a total of nine
supervisors were interviewed, six female and three male.
Students One of the key conditions that the clinic directors of each
facility agreed to was that the participation of the students must be
completely voluntary. Only six students were required to meet the
minimum my committee had established. I presented my study to the
students and took volunteers. I approached the students of the two
School A supervisors who had agreed to participate so that I would be able
t
84


to have participation from both parties of the supervisory relationship. One
of first two supervisors at School A who agreed to participate in my study
was directly supervising five students. The other was supervising two. In
late August, I attended the first group supervision classes for those seven
students.
Since neither of the active School B supervisors had agreed to be
interviewed it was not possible to get participation from both sides of the
dyad, so I invited all six School B students to participate regardless of
whom they were receiving supervision from during the Fall of 1996. In
mid-August, I attended the first staffing of Fall semester at School B. All
six of the second year students were in attendance.
At the staffing meeting at School B and at the two practicum
meetings at School A, I described my research project and the amount of
time commitment it would require from them if they chose to participate.
The students asked questions about how the information was to be used
and the degree of confidentiality that I could assure. Because I had
addressed the issue of confidentiality in meetings with each of the clinic
directors, I was able to assure the students that the supervisors would
never have access to the transcripts of the interviews. They were told that
the dissertation would not contain their names, but that they might be
85


identifiable through the content. This fact did not concern any of the
students since the dissertation would not be written until after their
practicum experience and thus could not effect their completion of
practicum. The permission form that each participating student and
supervisor signed reiterated the same information.
I did not ask the students to make decisions at the meetings
because I wanted them to carefully consider before committing. I thought
that such consideration would help to insure their continued participation
throughout the project, and that a hasty decision or one prompted by my
presence might not. I distributed prepared summaries of my discussion
and my phone number and asked the students to call me if they wanted to
participate. Within one week, I had been contacted by ten students, six
from School A and four from School B. Thus, I had participation from 66%
of the School B students and 28% of the School A students.
We scheduled the first interview for the last week of August, a date
that was prior to any client contact for the School A students. School B
students were beginning their third semester of seeing clients, as
mentioned previously, but they each had a new supervisor for the fall
semester, so they were starting a new supervisory relationship during this
time.
86


The ratio of male to female students in both programs is heavily
female. At School B, four of the six students are female. Of the four who
agreed to participate, one was male. At School A, 4 of the 21 students
were male. The six students who chose to be interviewed were all female.
My student sample was nine females and one male. Given this
configuration I would not be able examine gender differences between
students with any degree of confidence. Nevertheless, because of the
large number of female students in each program, it was not surprising
that my ratios were also very unbalanced.
Data Collection
Four semi-structured interviews were conducted with each of the
ten students. The student interviews averaged 50 minutes each. Nine
supervisors were interviewed for an average of 60 minutes each. In some
cases, the supervisors schedule required that we meet twice in order to
cover all of the information. Other data collected included two instruments:
the Supervisory Working Alliance Inventory (SWAI) and the Confirmatory
Survey. The instruments were completed by the 10 participating students
and by 12 School A practicum students who had not been interviewees for
this study.
I
87


Student Interviews
The student interviews were designed to elicit information about the
supervision process from each student. Based on the preliminary review
of the literature, the interviews were scheduled at several points in time in
order to examine student change over time and significant events or
turning points as perceived by the students. To examine change overtime
one line of questioning was consistent in all four interviews. At the
beginning of each interview, I asked the students about their progress
toward their requirement for the semester (i.e. number of client contact
hours). I also asked them to rate their skills and their comfort level on a
scale of 1 to 10. All four interviews asked the students to discuss specific
events that had occurred since the previous interview. From these stories,
the students perceptions of the process of supervision became known.
The interviews were scheduled at four week intervals. The first
interview was scheduled during the first week of the semester, before
client contact had been initiated. The second interview occurred during
the second week of October, when the semester was approximately one-
third completed. The third interview took place during the third week of
November, two-thirds into the semester. The final interview took place the
88


week of December 9, 1996, which was the final week of the semester for
both facilities.
During the planning phase of the project, I had outlined certain topic
areas for the interviews. These topic areas were based on the literature
but were broad. The topic areas included role transactions, the use of
theory in supervision, and the interactions within the supervisory
relationship.
In grounded theory research, the data analysis and data collection
interplay. Therefore, each interview was coded prior to the subsequent
interview. Open coding allows the researcher to identify patterns and
themes which are emerging from the data. As themes emerged, I returned
to the literature to determine if the themes were related to any previous
findings. For example, the concept of trust was a theme in the first
interview. Trust was discussed in the literature, but I had not done an
extensive review until it emerged as a theme. I returned to the literature
and explored trust in more detail. The research findings and the
statements made during the first interview were used to format the
questions for the next interview.
On the other hand, some topics which were addressed repeatedly
in the literature did not appear to be important to these students, and even
89


direct questions about those concepts yielded only perfunctory responses.
An example is the concept of evaluation which is discussed in the chapter
on results. In addition, some unexpected themes began to emerge from
the data. These themes were unexpected because they were not
discussed in the literature to any extent, and yet they recurred as foci of
discussion in the majority of the interviews.
When planning the next interview, an outline of the previous themes
was made so that each could be discussed. Consequently, the interview
format was adjusted in order to follow the emerging themes. Table 3.1
outlines the interview format.
90


Full Text

PAGE 1

!" #!$%$ &''(!$)$ $#$*+!(,--. ''( +!% $*$$!/$+!(,--0 "% %%12 /$" +!% $*$$!/$+! )! *1* 2 $*"!31 !2%*$!"/#!$* $4$!$*" $%$)" /14 $/!%" )/$+ $ ,--5

PAGE 2

" %"% %*$!"$4$!$*" $%$)" /#! !" #!$%$ "%))!$+/ 4 +%62 + % 6/ 1# /1!6/ 1# $!2 +%

PAGE 3

$%$( !" #!7"''(/14 $/!%" )/ $+ $ #"!$*%% $%!$1//"$!1/$*" 1)!+ %$! $%" ) "% %/ !4/%%$4 !$*%%$!! 4 +%62 " % +% # $4$% %/$*#!$1//"$!%1/$*"%1)!+ %$! $%" )%4$2)$$*"! #$*2"")!$*%% $%' "%1/*$41%/$2%!8%+)!$#!2%9$1 +!% %'" !%1%$*"%1/ / 4"%1/%!4 + $!4"%! #" %1)!+ %$!:)! 4'1/%;%1)!+ %$!/%/$$4"#% !%1$*/+$)2(%!)$!/ )!+ $1%%1/ %'"!(! %; /%*$!%1)!+ % $%/*$41%2!/$"%1)!+ % $ 2$/ '"%1/% %%1//% !/%144 4/%)4 4/ !4 $ /1! # +%1)!+ % $/4$$! +4%4$4)1 < $/1! # $6$6$%1)!+ % $'1/%9!$/* !%1)!+ %$! /%%/$" !)!%$=$9/#$*" !$9! #%%' // $(" %%1/ / /"%1)!+ %$!%;+ $ $%$*!1% !%1/ %1)!+ %$!! $%" )!1)1!9" 4"9%/ ** 41$2/ /1! #"4$1!%$*"! #%2%!' ( ))!/"" +( !4 +%1)!+ % $:)/ /! %= 431 % $/ *4 /%%$*4$2*$! %%% $'2) 4 $%*$!*1!"!!%!4" !!/$/ %4$+!$*"**4 +%%$*%)4 4 !+ $% + /4$%1 +%1)!+ % $2$/ %' %%!4441!!)!%%"4$$*"4/ /;%"% %' !4$22/ %)1 4 $' & #/ 4 +%62

PAGE 4

")!$4%%$*9! #"/ %%! $ 2)4/" +%$*")$) 2$% 2)$! 2 *'%%14"( %* #""* %"//$412 // 4/$2$+% $2 *2/%*! /(!4'$1!$=! $" % /+$!'$19!9%$4$1!#29"4$1/$$#! %"!%$*$!" %%='$1#)1%"/24= $*$41%9" "!%2/$$'9 9%$+$1' $2)"$2/1#"!%' !"($1"+4$2%!$#(4! #(%% +$1#9$2' $1! 1 +1! %+ / "1 *1)"$$%9" 4"!$1! '$1"+"31 %/2 !'$1"+* /2 *9 ">$ /)4' "($1* $1!"$2/ +%9 "21% 4/1#"!'$1! /!%" )/2$%!% !/! +/// 4 $"9 9% 2<2'$1! #*+$!$2 *9 "$1!/2 4!#/ 4"!2' $2% #% ( +!!%%($1"+22$"!'!$2$1 "+!/$%$ //%!$#' 4=($1"+!$1#">$/*2 $2% %!(/*$!"($+$1/!' 2($1"+9%%"$92"4!/4$% /! $" +!9$2/%*!$2$/!!$"!' 4=($1!2 %%/' $"!//("$)$1!94" #'%$1/4 # $#"!# +;%!$$2(/2"))*$!$1'

PAGE 5

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

PAGE 6

,'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''', %$!$*1)!+ % $/1!!!/%''''''''''''''''C %$!$*%4"$"!)1)!+ % $'''''''''''''C 1!!1)!+ % $4 + %''''''''''''''''''''''''''D 31 !2%*$! 4%1!'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''5 1)!+ %$!! #'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''+!+ 9$*1)!+ % $%!4"''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',E "!4! % 4%$*1)!+ % $'''''''''''''''''''''''',E $/%$*1)!+ % $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',, )) 4 $$*1)!+ % $%!4"'''''''''''''',. $*$!" %1/''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',C $*$!""$/$$#$*" %1/''''''''''''',F $41% $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''.. .''''''''''''''''''''''.C "!)1 4$/%$*1)!+ % $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''.D %4"$/2 41)!+ % $'''''''''''''''''''''''''''.5 !%$6!/1)!+ % $'''''''''''''''''''''''''.G 9

PAGE 7

$1 $6$41%/1)!+ % $''''''''''''''''''''''''."+$)2$/%$*1)!+ % $''''''''''''''CE +$)2$41%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''CC H#"$!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''CD %2 4 9$*1)!+ % $'''''''''''''''''''''''''0, 1/ %$+$)2$/%'''''''''''''''''0C 1)!+ % $!$4%% !1!'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''0F $2)$%$*1)!+ % $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''05 "!4! % 4%$*1)!+ % $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''D5 2% $%$*1)!+ %$!&"+ $!'''''''''''''DG 1)!+ %$!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''FE $9!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''F, "1)!+ %$! $%" )''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''F0 $41% $%/ !4 $*$!" %1/''''''''''''''''''5, C''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''50 "$/$$# 4%%12) $%'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''50 !$1//"$!'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''55 4 )%'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''5G 4 %'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''5G 4 )4 $!$4%%'''''''''''''''''''''''''GC

PAGE 8

$4 $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''G5 1/!+ 9%'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''GG 1)!+ %$!!+ 9%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''-. %!12%'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''-0 % %''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''-5 !%4! ) $'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''-G /14 $'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''-%)''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',E. $!!$$! $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',EC %4! ) $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',E0 122!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',E0 0''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',EF 1/"!) %%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',,, 4"$$1/%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',,, 4"$$&1/%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',,. 1/*6!% $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',,C 4 %'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',,5 4"$$''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',,5 4"$$&''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',.E / #%/% %'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',.C

PAGE 9

$!$/%)$% '''''''''''''''''''''''''''',.C 1)!+ %$!/ !%$"!4! % 4%'''''''''''''''''''''''',CE 1/%;!4 +//%'''''''''''''''''''''''''',CD # 4+%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',CG "4!%'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',CG 1)1!%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',0. 1)!+ %$!!+ 9%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',D, $!!$$! #+ /4''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',D0 $9!/!$1//"$! $*1)!+ % $'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',F. 122!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',FD'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',5, $2)! %$9 "!+ $1%1/ %'''''''''''''''''''''''''',5C )) 4 $''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',G, 2) 4 $%*$!1!"!%!4"'''''''''''''''''''''''''''',GC 2 $%$*"1/'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',GF $41% $%''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',G5 I '@'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',-E &'@?''''''''''''',-0 I

PAGE 10

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''',-G ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''.E, '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''.EF

PAGE 11

1)!+ % $ %=4$2)$ "! #$*2"" )!$*%% $%'4$1% #)%4"$$#(4 4)%4"$$#(2!! #/ *2 "!)(/%$4 9$!=(2%!8%+%1/%!!31 !/$ "+%1)!+ %/4 4$4$")!6#!/1 $/)$%6#!/1 $ $!/!$ # *$! 4%1! 2$%%%'$4$!+%1/% !4 +// $%1)!+ % $%)!$*" !4 4! #'/!/% *$!44!/ $$*4/2 4)!$#!2%%$!31 !%1)!+ %/)!4 4 9 "*4 /1! #$"2%!8%//$4$!+! #' 2)$!4$*%1)!+ % $ 2""! #!%4/% %!31 !2*$! 4%1!/44!/ $'1)!+ %$!%! )$% $$ 2)4"4 !$*)!$*%% $%! #"* //"! 2)44 %'"!$1#"%1)!+ % $(4/2 4)!)!/ / + /1% 431 !"%= %*$!/$ #"!)/=$"4"!4! % 4%$* )!$*%% $'1)!+ %$!%4%! !%(2$!%(2$/%(/ #=)!%*$!"2"")!$*%% $' "%1)!+ %$!! $%" ) %/2 4 !)!%$)!$4%% 9"!:)! 4/)!$*%% $2$ $!%/+1%"#!$9"

PAGE 12

$*%%:)! 4/)!%$'@ " %! $%" )("*$1/ $$* 4/%= *1)!4 4 %!%2 /"!$1#"4$+!% $(/ !4 $%!+ $(/4 4/ %4$1!%'&41%$*" 2)$!4$*" % $%" )(4$% /!!%!4""%4$/14/$ / *" 4"!4! % 4%$***4 +%1)!+ % $' %%1/:2 /)!6#!/1%1)!+ % $ 2!! #/ *2 "!)/ 4$1% #)%4"$$#'&41%%1)!+ % $ %% % 2)$!4$2)$ "! #$*2""9$!=!% $* "/ %4 ) !%(" *$!2 $*!$2" %%1/9 1%*1$ %1)!+ %$!%%9% "9$/ %4 ) %%1/ /' #)!$#!2%(%1)!+ %$!%!24"/9 "%1/ 4$1%$!% $!/!$/ !4":)! 4$2)$$*" !! # )!$4%%'"/ /4 4)$! $$*"%1/%;! # 41/%"$! 4$1!%%(4" 31%4$1!%%(/!%!4"4$1!%%'$2$*" %1/%! #%1)!+ %/)!4 4"+"/:)! 4 4$1% #( 1"2>$! $*%1/%!" %)"%"+ #"/$414 4$4%"!) %'$!:2)($)!%$9"$)! 4 )/ % %1/"/4/2 4/+ %$!4$221 4$#'9$$*" %1/%"/9$!=/>1+ !% / *4 %%%**(/" )!4 +/"!$%% 2 !$4$1% #'

PAGE 13

" %%1/*$41%/$"! $%" )%9"%1)!+ %$!% /# #%1/%"!$1#"$1$%2%!'")1!)$%$*" % %1/ %$:)/$: % #"$! %$1")!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $' ?$9/#$*")!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $9 *$!2**$!%$/+$) #)!$#!2%/% #/$)!)!%1)!+ %$!%' %4")!9 )!% !$/14$! *$!2 $4%%!$ 1/!%/%1)!+ % $% %4$/14/ #)!$#!2%" % 2' "4")! 41/%*$1!%4 $%'"* !%%4 $ %" %$!$* )%4"$"!)%1)!+ % $// %41%% $$*41!!!/% # *4 %'"%4$/%4 $ %$+!+ 9$*41!!%1)!+ % $ !%!4"'4 $%"!/*$1!/ %41%%"! $*$!" %%1// $*$!"4"$%2"$/$$#*$!" %%1/' %$!$*1)!+ % $/1!!!/% %$!$*%4"$"!)1)!+ % $ "41# #$*%1)!+ % $ %/ ** 41$/* 7,--FJ / 4%%1)!+ % $2"+ %!$$% "! #$*4 4 ")$% %4" 31% ",-"41!9" 4"9%1#"A"+ # $%!+4"!9$!=9 "4 (*$$9/"4"! $%!+ #"! 9$!=B7)',CCJ'"4"!9$1/#1 /" C

PAGE 14

! ;%4 $%/1! #"4 + ')%4"$ 4! #("%1/ %1/!#$%)!%$)%4"$ 4"!) 9" 4""*$41% % $!%*!4/4$1!!%*!49 "") 7&!/(,-G-J' $!$"/+$*"$692 !!$! #*4 %( %1)!+ % $9%4$/14/ %1)!+ % $2 #%(/"%1/9$1/ !)$!$)!$*%%$!%1% #4/$ *$!2 $'"$44% $1%$* 1/ $6)/%%% $%#41%%1)!+ %$!%!
PAGE 15

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

PAGE 16

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

PAGE 17

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

PAGE 18

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
PAGE 19

2'1/%9"$"+$ /" !2%!;%/#! 2!! #/ *2 "!)7 41/ #"2!! #/*2 "!)%!/$*%$2 4$1% #)%4"$$#)!$#!2%J4))*$!"(1"9 2$! *!31)1!%1" 4%/!! #/2 "!) %7J 4!/ '"!31 !%2 212$*0D%2%!4!/ "$1!% *!$2))!$+/)!$#!2'"%1/%21%)%%%/!/
PAGE 20

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

PAGE 21

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

PAGE 22

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

PAGE 23

" *$!2 $#"!/9 2=4$! 1 $$"%=$*! # %1)!+ %$!%// #$$1!=$9/#$1")!$4%%*!$2" )!%)4 +$*"%1)!+ %%' $*$!" %1/ 1)!+ %$!%)21 )!$%41%"!4" #"!) %= %$"! /+1 #"! ;%)!*$!249" % 21$1%)!$4 #"4 ;% !%%'"4$2): $*" % 21 +!$ %$$1/!% 2/'1/%! 9!$/ /$/>1%(:)! 29 ""$9$)!*$!2"!$(/$+!4$2 : '"4 :)4%//%!+%4$2)%% $(!%)4(/ ))!$)! "!)'&4 #"!%)$% %$"%1//" 4 %%1)!+ %$!%=9" 4"/%$= $4$% /! $ 2%' %) !4%%!$$2%144%%(%$2%1/%!$9%1 / *$!4$1% #/2$!/ 2$+*!$2"!$$*%1/$" !$$*"!) %'"%1)!+ %$!4%%)$*#=)!*$!" )!$*%% $%1! #"%1/%9 "%! $1%!! !%$4$2 # **4 +"!) %/$$#$ $"* /9 "$1"$%!! !% # ,C

PAGE 24

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

PAGE 25

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

PAGE 26

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

PAGE 27

%4$+!$! / +% # $%21%#$$//%4! ) + %1/ %'@" /%4! ) $%! !% #/1%*1 )!%$ !*4 $(// $ % #" %// $")!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $' % 1%*1$$$=!%!4"/%1>4 +)"$2 #9 "$ $"!'&1% ##!$1//"$!2"$/%$*/4$4 $/ % %(" %%1/9 :2 "$! %/ / /4$2)$%$* %1)!+ % $"!$1#"/ **!%' !$1//"$! %#!2"$/$$#*$!/+$) #"$! %#!$1// /9" 4""%%%2 4#"!//
PAGE 28

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

PAGE 29

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

PAGE 30

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

PAGE 31

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

PAGE 32

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

PAGE 33

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

PAGE 34

422$!44)/ "4$1% #)!$*%% $(2) 4!%!4"$* %1)!+ % $424$22$'$!!4 !1!$%1)!+ % $ 4$2 %"$!/)!$4%%' % 2)$!$!+ 9$"""$! 4 $! # %/")!$4%%%1/ %41%4"4$! 1%$"2$! !4%1/ %' $"!!/2!# # "%1/$*%1)!+ % $ %" :2 $$*"%1)!+ %$!! $%" )'1/ %$*"! $%" ) #!"$!/)!$4%%%1/ %'"*$41%$*"%%1/ % %$ / *" 2)4$*"! $%" )$")!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $4!$%% "$! 4))!$4"%' "! %!2/$1%$+!) "%4#$! %%$"" 4#$! < $$*%1/ %%"$! 4()!$4%%6$! /($!! $%" )6 *$41%/ %! 4 (%14"4#$! < $2=%2$!%%2 4 2"$/$*%122! < #"4$4)%'"!*$!("4#$! %9 1
PAGE 35

*$!2%1/ %2)$/"!)1 42$/$1/!%/%1)!+ % $( "/+$*/+$)2%1/ %/ /$2 2 <" $$ "$! 4%1)!+ % $(/)!$4%%%1/ %/ /$41%"$!$! /+$)2))!$4"%$/ %4$ 1/'"!))!$4"%! 4$% /!/ "%1/$*"%1)!+ %$!! $%" )' "4$*" %4")! %/ + // $*$1!%4 $%'4 $ $9 /%4! "!)1 42$/%$*%1)!+ % $(/%4 $9$9 /%4! /+$)22$/%$*%1)!+ % $'"" !/%4 $ / %41%%%")!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $(/"*$1!"%4 $)!%% !1!$1"%1)!+ %$!! $%" )'* %4 $9 %122! < "*$1!!%$*%1)!+ % $!%!4"/" !4 $$*" ))!$4"%$4$41/" %4")!' "!)1 4$/%$*1)!+ % $ 1)!+ % $(%/ % 4)!$*%% $(9%$!4$#
PAGE 36

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

PAGE 37

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

PAGE 38

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

PAGE 39

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

PAGE 40

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

PAGE 41

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

PAGE 42

$!#7,--CJ/9 41// "/ %41%% $$*/+$)2 2$/%'4"("%#%!/* //%4! #"%1)!+ %$!;% !$4"%#'"/ **!49$!#/ %/( %" %/%1##%2$+2*!$2$%#$":$441!% %!%1$*4$2) $$*$%#(9"!%$!# / 4% %)4 4 2)$ %9" 4""4"#%$441!' "%"!)!%)4 +%! 2)$!$4$!%41%" 4$4)% 2)4"$9%1)!+ % $ %4$/14//%$ 2)4%"9 %1)!+ % $! #/%$$441!'""$! %%!$!##!$1)%$* !%!4"!%'"!"! / + /1%$!%22%$*"$! %%9"$ $)!*!$2$$*")!%)4 +%'"!("$9+!(/ % #1 %"/ "$! %% "!$*%1)!+ % $(/" !4$! 1 $%$%1)!+ % $ "$! %$9$!"'9 / %41%%4")!%)4 +%)!' $!")1!)$%$*" %!+ 9($!#/9$!";%*$41% 9 4#$!
PAGE 43

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

PAGE 44

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

PAGE 45

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
PAGE 46

@ /7,-GFJ*$1/"%1)!+ %/:)! 44$! 1/ $4$1%$!/+$)2(1"1%1)!+ %/:)! 4/ /$' "!*$!(%1/%9 "4$% /! 2%) 4$1% #!$ 9 "$1%1)!+ %$!"/"%2/%*!$2%1)!+ %$!"%1/% / /9"""/$4 4$4)! $!$%1)!+ % $ )!4 412' 1/%9"$"/2$!%1)!+ %/:)! 4"//%!/$" /+4/%#%$*4$1%$!/+$)2' %"!/&$!/!%7,--CJ*$1/"/ % 4 $$ %1/;%)!%$4"!4! % 4%'"$/(A"!!4$4)1/ 2) 4 / 4 $%"/+$)2+ %2$!4$2):"! 4$2)$% %$*:)! 4 /:%B7)'5GJ'$!:2)(%"!/ &$!/!% +" / + /1;%4$# +/"$! 4$! $ !2$!$* / 4 $$*" !/+$)2+" %:)! 4 9 "4 %(9""!$!$":)! 49%9 "%1)!+ % $' %"!/&$!/!%7,--CJ/* /9""4/ A/+$)2))!$)! B)!*!4%*$!%(*$41%(/))!$4"' "/* /%%$*%1)!+ % $$19" 4"%1/%%2$"+ 4$22$)!*!4%/ **!%#%$*" !! #'! %" !%#$*%1)!+ % $)!*!!/A%1)!+ %$!64"!B7)'5DJ% 9" 4""*$41%9%$%)4 44$1% #%= %/4" 31%'" CF

PAGE 47

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

PAGE 48

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

PAGE 49

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

PAGE 50

H%%7,-G5J/%4! /"%" **!$2" = #%%1/$ = #%4$1%$!'/* /""!%#%% ,'&# #! %4"!4!
PAGE 51

2!% % )1*!$2"%1)!+ %$!'"2$%/+4/+$*$" %%;%2$//!!;%2$/("%1/ %!/$2="!$!" % $9/4 % $%(!4$# < #""/4 % $%!31 !!*4 $' %2 4 9$*1)!+ % $ $$97,-G5J9%$$*"* !%$31% $"/+$)2 O2$/'"% /%1)!+ % $)!$4%%9%$/+$)2)!$4%% 1!"! !4 $)!$4%%9 ""=+! #" A%1)!+ %$!! $%" ) %*"4!%! ;% +1! O/* /)/4B7)'.,DJ'$!$$9("%1/;%4"#% H$441!!/%!%1$*4$2 #441%$2/$" !!$%%1)!+ %' "! $%" )9 ""%1)!+ %$!*4 /"!$/) $ $9 #"%1/"$))$!1 $:)$!"!$ %*' $%" )% 9" 4"!1%9%$9/+1! 9%" #"/ /$ H!%1 !$/) $1!"! "+ $!9" 4"2 2 4=/" %1)!+ %$!/2 2
PAGE 52

%1/%)!*$!2 "* / %**4/"! $%" )'*"%1/ "%+!4$4)1
PAGE 53

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

PAGE 54

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

PAGE 55

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

PAGE 56

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

PAGE 57

4#$! %%4 $ %! *!+ 9$*2) 4%1/ %$ /2$%!"$9%$2$*"%+! %!1
PAGE 58

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

PAGE 59

$$97,--FJ1%%"9$!/A%=%B$2"!%2 %% $$* A)!$*%% $=$9/#!31 % $*"4$1%$!!$B7)',.J'"1%( $$9;%%=%*1/!"/* $$**14 $1%/ %%1/' *!4 %""%1)!+ %$! %!%)$% $!%2 $" %1)!+ %"!31 % =$9/#'"/* %"4$!=$9/# !%%4$% % #$*4$1% #%= (4%4$4)1 < $( )!$*%% $!$(2$ $9!%%(/%*6+1 $7)',F'J &!!/7,-5-J / /"*14 $%$*%1)!+ % $%*4 # 4$1%$!/+$)2 ")!$4%%%= %7":41 $$*4$1% # 4" 31%J(4$4)1 < $%= %7" $$!#
PAGE 60

%/7,-GFJ / /"!%1)!+ %$!*14 $%'" %1)!+ %$! %!%)$% *$!*4 #4$1%$! 2)!$+2 "! !%)!$4%%7":41 $$*4$1% #4" 31%J(4$4)1 < $ 7" $$!# $! $*%1)!+ %$!% !%1/4"$% )! 2!2)"% %!7)'5GJ' "*$1!2)"% %!%"%"!/&$!/!%7,--CJ/* /! %122!
PAGE 61

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

PAGE 62

%1)!+ %$! %/)/$"!$$*"%1)!+ %" 2$*" !4 $' %/7,-GFJ1%&!/;%7,-G-J!2%(1/%4! !$%/ **!'$!"2("%1)!+ %$! "4"!!$4"% 4$1% #%= %'"4$1% #!$("$!%")!$2$%! #!$9"'"%%12) $*$!" %!$ %"%"%1/4$2%2$! %*69!("$!%"9 4$22$!**4 +' %//%4! "4$%1%1)!+ %$!%4! ## ! $%" ) 9" 4" "! %!%)$% *$!"4$$*"%1)!+ % $%%% $%' $!#(4 (/!"!7,--DJ( !/+$)2 "$!(//!%%/4"# #!$%%"! # /:)! 4' 44$!/ #$ %/7,-GFJ%$2%1)!+ %$!%2$+*!$2$!$$ $"!%&!/7,-G-J%1##%%(121%$!$%"% % *$!" !4 $%"!$1#"$1")!$4%%7)'.G0J' %//$$ /%4! "4$/ $%1/!9" 4"%1)!+ %$!)!*$!2%"/ **! !$%$!9""))% %1)!+ % $9""%1)!+ %$!4"$$%% %!$4!$%% 2' %%122! 1%!%/ **!4%9/+$)2/ "$! 4%1)!+ % $%9%)!%$4"!4! % 4%$*" %1)!+ %$!% +$+/'" %(!" $4"$$% #!$ D.

PAGE 63

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

PAGE 64

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

PAGE 65

$$9;%2$/%%12%""4 %%!+/"%1)!+ %(/ 4$2) $$*"%1)!+ %$!8%*14 $%9 %!+"4 &!/7,-G-J1%%"9$!/A4 + %B7)',FJ %/$*%=%' "/* %"4 + %%4$%1 $7)',FJ(4$1% #7)',GJ( #/ %!14 $7)'.EJ(/+1 $7)'.DJ'"/ **!4 9&!/;%4 + %/$$9;%%=% %+ /4$*" 4$*1% $": %%$1"4$2)$%$*%1)!+ % $'&!/;% !2%%$1/ =*14 $%(1"!/%4! ) $%$*4" 41/" "+ $!%$*%1)!+ %$! )1!%1 #")1!)$%%$*%1)!+ % $' &41%"$! %%1%"!2% / / **!(4$2)! %$9""$! %%44$*1% #'.', %/% #/$4! *%$2$*"$+!)' DD

PAGE 66

.', 122!$*1)!+ %$!14 $%'%=%(/$% 14 $%6"A@"B$*1)!+ % $ $2$ "$! % !%$/!$*%% $+$)2 &!/N$$9N $# (!/M 9$!"N %"!M&$!/!% $2)4+$)2 &!/N$$9( 7)!$4%%%= %(4$4)1 < $ $# (!/(M %= %()!%$ < $%= %( 9$!"N %*6+1 $%= %J %M !$2$ $$*44$1 &!/ $ $! # @*! $# (!/(M 9$!" !$2$!% $*!$2 %M #$$"!' %=%6"A@"B$*1!+ % $ $2$% "$! %% $ $! #/+1 # %!14 #//+ % # $/ # $%1 # 1))$! # # $$9N&!/ $$9 $$9 $$9N&!/ $$9 &!/ 1)!+ %$!$% 4"! $1%$! $%1 $%1 $%6"K$9B$*1)!+ % $ "$! %% &!/N$$9 =M! //! 1/$% "!) % 1/ 1)!+ % $#1 "$! %% $$9N =M //! DF

PAGE 67

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

PAGE 68

! %$! %%1%'"!+ 9%!+%% !$/14 $$"4$4)%' "2>$! $*$14$2!%!4" %1)!+ % $"%1
PAGE 69

/%*69!%%7)'C0EJ'!("/ 2% $% %/"%! 2 :1!$*! %/%%'"!)!%/"!41%"% !%!4"!%/%+!$"!%1 )!%(%1)!+ %%!)$!/" !:)! 4 %1)!+ % $9%2$! )!$/14 +' D

PAGE 70

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

PAGE 71

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

PAGE 72

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

PAGE 73

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

PAGE 74

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

PAGE 75

,--FN/M! //!(,--DJ'"!%"+$$=/"/2 4% $*"! $%" )/" 2)4$"!)7!=M !4(,--EN //!( #(M&!$4=(,-G-J'? %!7,--.J/!=/ !47,--EJ/ %41%%/"4$4)$* %$2$!)" %2("4$4)" A9""))% %1)!+ % $ %!*4/ "!)B7? %!()'.G0J(%$ ""%1/$*"! $%" )9"%1)!+ %$!/%1/9% %% $) 4*$!%1/'%%7,-G5J%/""! $%" ) 9"%1)!+ %$!/%1)!+ % %A*$41%( *$"*$41%$* )%4"$"!)/%1)!+ % $B7)'.DD(2)"% % $! # J'$%=$9 < /1))!7,-GCJ%/"A)$% +! $%" )9%1)!+ %$! /%1)!+ % %)!!31 % $%144%%*1%1)!+ % $B7)'FC.J' 1/ %$*"%1)!+ %$!! $%" )"+1
PAGE 76

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

PAGE 77

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

PAGE 78

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

PAGE 79

"%1)!+ % $)!$4%%%4 $$*" %4")!'"/ % 4 $ %" //! //!/%4! "%% !)!%$ #2'" %("%"!/ 2% $%!2 *%/9"%1)!+ %$!/" %1)!+ %'"1%("$14$2 % 2)4/"4$/ $%1/!9" 4" "/ 2% $%!4" +/' @" /1%%7,--DJ%1/ /+! %9" 4"9! 2)$!$ $14$2 %1)!+ % $'"*$1/""%1)!+ %$!("%1)!+ %( /"4 9!+! %9" 4" !4/$ 2)4$14$2'" 1"$!%2)"%
PAGE 80

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

PAGE 81

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

PAGE 82

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

PAGE 83

1)!+ % $ %!$*4$1% # 9" 4"9!#1 $%! #/+$)/'"!%%! =$*$$92/$! / 4% #%1)!+ %$!%' $4!/ % #% %"/" /"&'%!%1$*)!$*"%4"#%( %%% "41!! 4112/+$)/*$!! #%1)!+ %$!%%9%+1 $ %!# %*$!2%1! #"$14$2$*%14"! #'&41%$*" 4$2): $*" %%=(4$ 1/!%!4" $")!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $ %//')4 4(!%!4"9" 4":2 %"%1)!+ %$! $%" ) %4! 441%"! $%" )"%%"$9$2/ $"!+! %' 5C

PAGE 84

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

PAGE 85

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

PAGE 86

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

PAGE 87

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

PAGE 88

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

PAGE 89

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

PAGE 90

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

PAGE 91

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

PAGE 92

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

PAGE 93

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

PAGE 94

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

PAGE 95

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

PAGE 96

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

PAGE 97

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

PAGE 98

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

PAGE 99

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

PAGE 100

/ !431% $%$1"$%4$4)% //$)!*14$!!%)$%%' :2) %"4$4)$*+1 $9" 4" %/ %41%%/ "4")! $!%1%'// $(%$21:)4/"2%#$2!#*!$2 "/'"%"2%9!1:)4/41%"9!$ / %41%%/ !1!$:(/"!41!!/%*$4 $* / %41%% $ "2>$! $*" !+ 9%' @") #": !+ 9($1 $*")!+ $1%"2% 9%2/%$"4"4$1// %41%%/'$%31(" !+ 9 *$!29%/>1%/ $!/!$*$$9"2!# #"2%'C', $1 %" !+ 9*$!2' -E

PAGE 101

C', !+ 9$!2 *$1! !+ 9% J)!$#!%%$9!/4$2) $/$9!/)!%$#$% J)!%$+1 $$*%= %/4$2*$!+ 4J/%4! ) $$*+%"9!2 #*1% 4)!+ $1% !+ 9 /J)!4 +/4"#% !4 $%9 ""%1)!+ %$! !+ 9 J%1/;%4=#!$1//!%$*$!4"$$% #" / %4 ) J:)4 $%*!$2%1)!+ % $ 4J)! $!:)! 49 #%1)!+ %/ /J#$*%*$!" %%2%! !+ 99$ J%1)!+ %$!;%!1%9$!" %% J*/4=*!$2%1)!+ %$! 4J%1)!+ %$!%"+ $! +%1)!+ % $ /J)!$4/1!% "*4 !+ 9"! J)$9! J4 % 4J)!$4%% "*4 !+ 9$1! J!2 $9 "4 %/"%1)!+ %$! J$+! 2)!%% $$*%1)!+ % $ 4J)!%$/%9" 4"9!2$!$2 -,

PAGE 102

")!$1!$*" %/ %%! $(%122!$*" !+ 9% 1%!%"$9""2%9" 4"2!#/9!1%/$*$!21" !+ 9%$9!/" %* /% #' 1)!+ %$!!+ 9% ")! 2 !/% #*$!" %%1/ 41//%1)!+ %$!%9"$9! / !4%1)!+ % #%1/%9"$9! # !+ 9/'" %$! # )(9$1/"+44%%$$")! 4 )% "! $%" )/ 9$1/$+ 9"9$)!%)4 +%$*"%2)!$4%%/ +%'9%$$*$$9"/% #41%$*!% %4*!$2" %1)!+ %$!%4$4/'!9!"% $)! 4 ) *"9! $%=/$/ %41%% / /%1/'"9$%1)!+ %$!%*!$2 4"$$&9"$/4 /$)! 4 )%/"" !4"$ 49%%/$ 4=$* 2'$9+!( "4$+!% $%"/9 ""2(" 4$4!%*$41%/$4$* / /"!$$*"%1)!+ %$!' 4"$$("* !%9$%1)!+ %$!%9"$9! !+ 9/#!/$/ %41%% %1/% / '$9+!(/1! #"* !% !+ 99 "4"$*"2 9%$$/ !4" !4$+!% $%$/%1/% #!' @"24$22 //!2 /"2$!%1)!+ %$! )1 9$1/1%*1$"%1/(!/% #/" !+ 9*$!2%$" 9$1/4$2)9 ""4$2*$!/%$*"%1)!+ %$!%/% )!$+ / -.

PAGE 103

> 1%*1 *$!2 $'1!"!("9/% #2""%1)!+ %$!% O9"$9! # !+ 9/9!$/ !4%1)!+ % #$*" %1/%9% !+ 9 #(%$"9!%%1!/""9$1/$ >%=/31% $%/ !4!/$$$*" !%1)!+ %%'/% # # "9%1)!+ %$! !+ 9*$!2(1%/"* !% !+ 9%9 ""9$ %1)!+ %$!%4"$$%#1 /' / /!% 9" 4"%1)!+ %$!% 9!9 #$)'!$2"$%!%(/* /$) 4%9" 4"9$1/ !$ *$!2 $"9%2!# # "%1/ !+ 9%/9" 4" 9%4$22$ !1!' / /9$%!/%$* *$!2 $9" 4" N!%1/ *$!2"22/%/"/%$*"%1)!+ %$!%' "%1)!+ %$!%9!9 #$/ %41%%" !)!%$ :)! 4%%%1)!+ %'"9!%$4$2*$!/ %41%% #" )!%$%1)!+ % $%/" !)!4) $%$*"$9" !% % > !/$" !$9! #'@"4$4/%1)!+ %$!%//%4! / "9*$!2($*")$)9"$9! + /#!/$)! 4 )' / /$%="9$4"$$&%1)!+ %$!%9"$"/$! # /4 /' %$4$/14/"%4$/ !+ 99 "4"$*"$! # 4"$$ %1)!+ %$!%44$!/ #$"9*$!2' "%1)!+ % $ !+ 9%9!%!141!/ !+ 9%'/+$)/ %)4 4$1 $*4" !+ 9/4$+!/"%2 *$!2 $9 -C

PAGE 104

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

PAGE 105

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

PAGE 106

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

PAGE 107

% % % % %"=4$2)$ #!$1//"$!' %" 2$% 24$%12 #)"%'%%/)!+ $1%(/% %# % 22/ *$$9 #"* !% !+ 9/4$ 1%$%")"*$41% $*" +% # $"!$1#"$1")!$4%%'")!$4%%$*% % % %1/1
PAGE 108

9!1%/%2%$* O O!)!% +%%$*" !+ 9/'"* %#$*% %(" %122!/%4! ) $%(%122! <"* / #%*$!)!% $ O*$1!"4")!$*" %/ %%! $' O"*$$9 #%4 $%/%4! ")!$4%% 4"$*"4 + % / %41%%/$+ !%4! ) $ >)!%$!%4! /4" !+ 9'!%4! ) $4!% )! /+! 2!/ $%$*" !+ 9%'"$1#"!%!4"!% 4$22$1%!%4! ) $%!+ 4(*$1/"4$1/*$!2" !%4! )% 9%"9!2 #*1$2/9$1/"4" 4$/ #)!$4/1!%'$!:2)(1%/4! %2$%$ / 4$+!% $ 9" 4""!%)$/9%31$ #$"!)!%$$! !) #:4%2"$!%"2/' 41//$ $%$* 1#"!$!$"!2$ $9" 4"$9/"!%4! )%$!*4"2$$/ $*" !+ 9")$ 2'"%$ $%422 #*1 O/1! #"% %)!$4%%' $! !+ 9%9!4$/14/9 "%1/%'+ !+ 9 %%% $%9!4$/14/9 "%1)!+ %$!%'*!4" !+ 99% H)/(+! /"441!4 % #$")9 "")! / -G

PAGE 109

H/$412*$!2'$!!4 $%9!2//* 4$) %$*4" !%4! )9!)! /'"/$412%$/$+!,(.EE% #%)4/ )#%' O/14 $ !/14 $9%4$/14/1% #* !%$)4$/ #/" H%4 +4$/ #%/%4! /!1%%/$! 7,--EJ')4$/ # %A")!$4%%$*!= #/$9(:2 #(4$2)! #(4$4)1 < #( H/4#$! < #/B7)'F,J'*($)4$/ #$441!%*$!" !%!4"!"%/* /4#$! %'$9+!(*$!" %%1/(%$2 H4#$! %9!/* / $!/!$%!141!" !+ 9)!$$4$' "!*$!(")!$4%%$*$)4$/ # +$+/ / #%2% 9" 4"//!%%/"$%4#$! %/ / #4#$! %$ )!+ $1% / /' >%)!$*1/!%/ #"2 #%)! 4 )%! 1/$" H4#$! %()!$)! %// 2% $%9! / //1! #$)4$/ #' O!$)! %!"4"!4! % 4%$*4#$!// 2% $%!" H$4 $$*")!$)! %$#4$ 1127)'F-J'!1%%/$! 7,--EJ1%4$$!% 1%! $$*"$94#$! %()!$)! %(/ O/ 2% $41/!%$$/'$$! %"4#$!'%)!$)! %! O%"/("1( % (4'$!4")!$)!"!: %%/ 2% $$ -

PAGE 110

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

PAGE 111

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

PAGE 112

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

PAGE 113

$")"$2$1/!%1/B7)',DGJ'"2! :*$!2 %1%*1 !)! #/41% %+ %16/ %)"%"$9% !! $%" )% 2$#+! %/4$%!14%7?!"9$"(,--CJ'" %9($4 # $#!")$"%%$44$1*$!")!%'"2! : *1!"!$9%*$!A1/ "$"!%4*$$9$!4$%!14"$9 % %/+$)/($4"4="!% $* / $*4$%!14%(/$ /!2 "$# 4+ / $*"4$41% $%K7?!"9$"()'C0.J' $!!$$! $ 1! #"* !+ 9(%1/%4$2)/"1)!+ %$! @$!= # 4+$!7@J'"12! 4!%)$%$" +$!9%4$2)!/$"+!/ !+ 9%$+! *" "%1/!%)$%%$%/!/
PAGE 114

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

PAGE 115

"* +4 + %$*% %$*" !+ 9%)!$+ //" *$!2 $4%%!$ !)!":)! 4%$*")! 4 )%'" )!$4%%31% $%1%/$#1 / !)! $$*"/ 41// $9/ /4"#$441!P $9/ /")! 4 )%;:)! 4%!$)!+ $1% !%!4"!%;"$! %$*%1)!+ % $/"%1)!+ %$! $%" )P @"2 #%/ /"%1/%4! $4! +%P $9/ /"$%2 #% 2)4"4$%314%$* "+%P 9$// $)!$4%%31% $%#1 //"/ %41%% $ +$+ # "!+4$*" %%1/ $%" %%1/)!%9+ /4$1" )!$4%%$*%1)!+ % $P @"= /%$**1!"!!%!4"$) 4%! / 4/ "%!%1%P ")!%$1!/ +$*" %/ %%! $9 / %41%%"!%1% $*"/% %*$!"%1/' ,ED

PAGE 116

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

PAGE 117

,--EJ %%$%% "!)$! #$*"* / #% $!/!"" !/!4+1"!%!4"!;%4$41% $%'"/4$4/*$! %%1/ 41/ *$!2 $9" 4"4$1/1
PAGE 118

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

PAGE 119

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

PAGE 120

!431$%*!$2" !+ 9%!1%/$//$"/)"$* 1/!%/ #"44" +/ 31 + 31 !'"31$ $% !=/ !4*!$2"!%4! ) $%'9$)%$*31$ $%! 1
PAGE 121

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

PAGE 122

*$41%'$$*"%1/%9"$)! 4 )/9!!$/9! %4"$$4$1% #!4='!$ (+(/!4 %!!$/ 4$221 4$1% #!4=' 4"%4$2 /4$221 4$1% # /"12!%$1!4/+$)2' %2!! #/*2 "!) %1/'$$*"%1/%)$)1!%1"''% :%1/%) $9$!= #4 %$!1% %%%'" 2$*"* !% !+ 9( +"/."$1!%$*4 4$4( 4"/$"$1!(/"$"!0 "/$%4 %'1! #"4$1!%$*"%2%!(F %1/%4$2)/"CE"$1!%$*4 4$4/"/!!#/*$! !%" )%$# 1!'1! #" !%" ))"%(%1/% 9$1/!31 !/$4$2)$"!.0E"$1!%$*4 4$4'F 4"$$%1/%9!)! 2%1/%/9!%$9$!= # +!#$*CE"$1!%)!9=/1! #)!4 412'"F%1/%"/ "2%!;%)!$#!2*$!+!#$*0!%(/"/9$!=/*1 2"!$1#"$1" !%4"$$ #' O4"$$&1/% $1!4"$$&%1/%)! 4 )/ %%1/("!*2%/ $2'"!$*"%1/%9!.0!%$//$9%.F!% $/" 2$*"%1/'%1/%9!%1/ #*$!2%!;% /#! 2!! #/*2 "!)(/9!*16 2%1/%' ,,.

PAGE 123

" 2$*"%1/(*$1!%1/%9! !*$1!"%2%!$*" )!$#!2' !9 #!/1 (/"$"!"!9 #!/1 1#1%' !/$)$431 !"''/#!% 22/ *$$9 #" %)!$#!2'$! /+)$#$ $#49$!=$! )! +)!4 4'"*$1!%1/%"/431 !/+!#$*CEE"$1!% $*4 4$4"# #$*)2!9"* !%29 ""2' *$1!9!1/!"%1)!+ % $$*1/1! #"%2%! 9" 4" !+ 9%$$=)4' 1/*6!% $ 1! #"* !%%$* !+ 9%("!9%/ % 4/ **!4 "+$*: 9"%1/%4"$$/"%1/% 4"$$&'"4"$$&%1/%9!+!42$1"))!$4" # %2%!'"4"$$%1/%9!+!%' "/ **!4 ": +%9%4!!/$" %1/%;:)! 4'1/%4"$$&9!4$ 1 #)!$4%% ""/ +$+/9 "*$!9$%2%!%'"9!! #" %24 %'"$/ **!4*$!"2/1! #"*$*,--F9%$ "9%1)!+ %$!(1'%1/"/1%%1)!+ %$!/1! # "!* !%%2%!(1"$"!C"/=$9" 2$%")!$*%%$!$* %$2$*" !4$1!%%'"!9%+! : 2$#"4"$$& ,,C

PAGE 124

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

PAGE 125

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

PAGE 126

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

PAGE 127

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

PAGE 128

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

PAGE 129

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

PAGE 130

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
PAGE 131

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

PAGE 132

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

PAGE 133

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

PAGE 134

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

PAGE 135

)!%$%/"*4 %8)$ 4 %!#!/ #!%)$% /4$!$ 9 "! #+ !$2'"!$1#"$1" !+ 9%*$!" %%1/( 9%4!" 2)$!4$% /! $*$!$*"%1/%9%" %%1$*9"$9% 4"!#$*9""/ / %%% $'9%%$4! "*$!4"*4 ("!9%%)4 4)$ 49" 4"//!%%/ %%1%$* 4$!$/)$9!' "*4 %9!)$!
PAGE 136

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

PAGE 137

2>1%*! /"9 %$!+$1%9 *$!# 9""%1)!+ %$!% //9$;# #"'=$9 9"+$%:49""$/1%(>1%"$)" !%"!$2= %"$!7,0CC5J' %"%2%!)!$#!%%/( ;%*!%/ 2 %"/9"%"
PAGE 138

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

PAGE 139

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

PAGE 140

%1)!+ %$!7 !)!%$!4 +%%J'0', %%4$2)$% $* "%1/%;/%4! ) $%' ,CE

PAGE 141

0', 1/%;%4! ) $%$*1)!+ %$!"!4! % 4% !)!%$!4 +%% @!2 / + # %%%$*"12$! ?$9/#(1/$%$)!%%*%A":)!B $9%%1/%$2=2 %=% =%4$1% #/%1)!+ % $%! $1% 1 + (4! # %!14 $% $! # /($)$*: )$%1##% $ "!%+1! $$! + %% 2 !+1%(" 4%/2$!% :)! % !%$*:)! 4 #! )1 $ %!4" %41%%%9=$9)$)9 "9"$2"L%""%9$!=/ 1 (! 2$%!% % 4%/! / % #"% $/ %41%%"$! %$"!"" %L"!$9$! $ !1%9$!" %% 4! )1 $*$! #!1%9$!" $%9 "%1/$1%= %/!%9"!#!$9" %// @!2 @ #$%*6/ %4 $% 9" 4""L%"1%%)$9! ,C,

PAGE 142

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

PAGE 143

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

PAGE 144

%1/4"$$&!)$!/"%"*"A%1)!+ %$!% %"$1/"$%!%)$% *$!"4 /"%"$1/ #1% 9"$/$B7.&,.C0J'" %%1/;%/%9!+!/312' 42!$*,--F("+ #!0EE"$1!%$*4 4$4 :)! 4(%"9%% 1%1!$*"!!$%"!) %/4$ 1/$ )!%"!%* 31 (%"2!'!+ 9 #24$+!% $%9 "!( 9%%$/!2 "$! ;%"!)1 4=$9/#9% 4! 4'!!)$!%$*%144%% / 4/"%"9%/$ #9 9 "4 %'!)!%%)$=" #"$*"!'"1%("!))!"% $9% $!/$/* 4 % "!'"9%>1%31 (2$/% )!%$9"$ %%$+!#/= /'!#$$*9$!= #9 "4" /! *!$21%/*2 %%1 %"!)!%$ 9'""%"%$*/ )!$4 +1!"+ 4 2
PAGE 145

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

PAGE 146

%1)!+ % $(/" !/%9!/%4! / "4$:$* "!#!$1) %1)!+ % $7%** #%J$!$6$6$4$4' "* !% !+ 9(+9%4!9!"%"9/ / **!% +%1)!+ % $"%"9/ "!%1)!+ %$! 2 #%9 "2'"%$!4$#
PAGE 147

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
PAGE 148

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

PAGE 149

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

PAGE 150

$#!1/!%/ #$*9"$"!(9"" 9$4"#(/2$14%$2 /%$"$9 $14")"24"#"';%>1%#$! #$$/9$*:) #"(/))!4 "' 7,...EJ' !;%/%4! ) $$*A9 /!($/)!B%!+/"!*14 $%' +/&!!$*%$2 : $1"!$9%= % !+ 9 # $9 #"!$*$41%$"4 ;%)!% $!"!""4$ $*"!31% $%'4$/( /2$%!/4" 31*$!4 64!/ "!)/9$4$4)1 <"1%$*4 64!/))!$4" 9 ""!)!$$2'" !/(" % !4 $4!/4$# +%" **$! &!!41%%"4$1/1/!%/"%"!/)$%%%%/%$2 $*"%= %"%"9$1//'%/$** #"%"9% 1)!)!/*$!*4 #4 %(%"!
PAGE 151

&!!;%)!4) $$*"!%*%"!) %/+$)/(%"! 1/ %$2$*"!4$2*$!+$!;%1%*1)"!%%' $% +4$22%*!$2%1)!+ %$!%9!*!312 $/ "%1/%'%1/%4$22/$ 2%9"%1)!+ %$!2/ 31 4=4$229" 4"$$%/" !%*6%2/4/% "4!'"%4$22%9!)! 41!1%*1*$!"%1/%9" "%1)!+ %$!2 $/%)4 4"+ $!%'$!:2)($! !)$!/ "1% /(A%9$1!)" %2$! #(! 4>$'9% 2)!%%/9 ""$9#$19!9"%"9%4! #B7C&,0DGJ' 4!)$!/!%)$%*!$29$%1)!+ %$!%9"$"/$%!+/ "!%%% $ 7/J9!>1%4" #(/"! 9%$$4= "$%!+ $!$$2/ )" 424= /% /$(A%; 4#!P$%;%"/$ 4>$PB/ % /A%B'9%>1%!31 4=1 4$1/")" !2 7C,.F.J' "4!%/ /$9%# %)$% + !4 $'$ %4(+"/# +:)! 49 "!/1! #%%% $' "*""/4$*1% #$")"$(/%"9%$$ *$$9" %/ !4 $% (%$%"42$1$*"!$$2/4! /" %!14 $'*!"%%% $(+/!/ %41%%/"%%% $ % /"9%4$4!/"" %%9% $"! #"%*$!2(/"%=/2 ,0,

PAGE 152

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

PAGE 153

* *!$2%2)$% ++'"1%(%2)$% ++%*4 / #!$9"(/%2# ++%/ /$ 2)/#!$9"' "!%1/%:)! 4/!1)1!%9" 4" "!!/" %1)!+ %$!! $%" )(" !%*64$4)($!" !)!$#!%%$9!/%*6 / %"!) %'"/$*"%2%!($$*"$%!1)1!% "/"/'$9+!(9$$*"%1/%"/$9$!=9 "*4 %;)!$$4$$4$ 1$"+)$% +! $%" )%9 "$"! %1)!+ %$!%' 9$4"$$&%1/%:)! 4/!1)1!%9 "1/1! #" 4$1!%$*"%2%!'$! !("!1)1!**4/$"! !4 $9 "1'$!$("!1)1!% # 4 2)4/"! 4$2*$!+ ")!$#!2'*(%"4$% /!/+ #"%$ 4$2)"! !%" )%9"!'&$"!1)1!%"/$/$9 4$!/ 4 $91;%%/)$% $$)$9!/" %"+ $!' &$" !;%%$!/$;%%$!21%)!*4/9 %122!$*9"1;%%/)$% $$*)$9!"/1)1 !1)1!%$441!!/'/ /$ !+ 91(%$"%122!)!%/ % =*!$2" !+ 9%9 ""0%1/%'1"/)!%/" 2%* $"%1/%%*2 %'9%)1!)$%*1$6/ !4 +'%$/ )!+ $1%("1%/" %%1$*)$9!%"! $*$!$ # ,0C

PAGE 154

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

PAGE 155

%4"4$2%$2 / %"9"/ %1)!+ % $" %)%$/'@"/41!" 9=*$!$1 #$ 241%)$) 9!9= # "*"$1!'/":%** # 4$2%!$1//19%$12 1%' $($$*"%1/%2/"4$22A$1;! !1 #PB(>1%= /$*>$= #'/1% /(+! #!1**(A&%/$294"(2$(/2 94" %"$"2!%'B@9!=4= '" =$144")$9!/2 4%1 *$1 4;9="9=( /$%;7)1%J'''$1"+$ $)1 $+!/ + #7C&..EFJ' $! !("%" "!4$2*$!+9 "142%!%1 $*% #" %"+ $!%4$!/ 4 #" %%*6)!% $'!%1/ 4=$*!1%*$!9" 4"%"4$2)%/9 "/!9 #'!!31 !/ 12!$* / + /1"$1!%$*%1)!+ % $"/2(%$%"/ /$ %4"/12 #%*$!"4$*"%2%!' $;%!1)1!9 "19%%$$1)$9!(1 "/!$/! 4$%314%*$!$'19%$"!"% %/+ %$!'$9+!( "/$*4$!%""/$$%4"/12 #9 "" 2 41%$*" % #"%4"/1'"9%9$!= #$$"!)!$>49 "!$(/"!$%1##%/"$/$"!"% %$" !)!$>4' /9%+!)!4 441%$"//$:% + !1! !+ 9//4$4 $*$!")!$>4/4$1/9!)1)""% % % '"!$%1##%/"12! +/$!2$+/*!$2 "%=$*4" #$;%4$22 '$9+!(*!$ *$!2/1 ,0D

PAGE 156

$*"4"#("9%#!'4"% %/$*$!$A% 4= #9 "" $! # )!$>4B'1%31("!*1%/$4$2)!%$* !4$22/ $%*$!/$4$!)!$#!2%%)!$2 %/(/"$) 4! 4
PAGE 157

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

PAGE 158

H%""/)4/ !'!/ %!%%9%%)4 %/9 %$))/" !+ 9/%4"/1/$2# "*$$9 #/'" 9%42!/2$! 4$!$$*"!2$ $%(1%"9%$2$! 9 #$%"!9 "29"%""/%=/$%$"!4 O$$9 # %)$! $$*"%4$/ !+ 9 N@% %$2" #"9%$! #"*$!$1($! > $! #"*$!"4 P $!$"$*1%' @"/ /$1/$P H !% %/'/""4/4=# / % /A 'B$(/ /(% /)!$* '/"" 4/4=/% /A"9"$" #'B$(/ /' > *! / 41$1%' > $(!9%9!"$1/ /;9$% %'%' %"" %%($)1%"*$!%$2" #"9% $1$/$P $";++!$ 4/*$!' @"/$$1" = 9% 2)$!$" 2P ="9%! #)! !!1) $'&1 >1%/ /$* 99 "2' *!"%%% $(/ /$1=9 "!P >1%% /"*!14$2*$!% # %$2" # ="'9%$1" 4/ ;% 2)$! ,0G

PAGE 159

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

PAGE 160

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
PAGE 161

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

PAGE 162

"%1)!+ %$! !+ 9%9!%!141!/'+!%1)!+ %$!9% %=/"%231% $%'$%31("% %$*"% !+ 9% 9%4$/14// **!"" !+ 9%$*"%1/%'1)!+ %$! !%)$%%9! 2
PAGE 163

9%+!$6>1/#2'"/:!2 #":)4 $%'4$221 4/"4$1/ /$"9$!='9%2/2/$2$!" 9""$1#"4$1//$'9%+!!9!/ #( +!4$1!# #/%1))$! #'9$1/4! 31 1$4! 4 <'9$1/4!2=$99" "/%4!9/1)(1$2=2* =$$%! 70,CEJ' 4$;%44$1 # %2 !!$!/ $"!%1)!+ %$!;%4$22%' "!4$# 1%"%1)!+ %$!%1$"!)!$*%%$!% 2* / 7.F,J' "%1)!+ %$! !+ 9%////)"$"4 2"%1)!+ %$! $%" )%/$ 2)4")!$*%% $/+$)2$*"%1/%' 2$!/ /% %$*"%1)!+ %$! !+ 9%9$1/$ / *$!2 $"9$1/:/" *$!2 $#"!/ %%1/ 41%"/ /$/ %41%%"$9"2=%)4 4/4 % $%%/$ / + /1%1/%'$9+!("%1)!+ %$! !+ 9!%4! )%!! 4" ,DC

PAGE 164

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

PAGE 165

0'. 1/%%)$%%#!/ #1)!+ %$!;%$2 /!*!!/$ S ,. & ,. ,. 3 3 E 4 , F F E . 4 4 4 4 & . ,E 5 5 $'"412!% / 4"12!$*%1/%*!$24"*4 9"$!=/"%1)!+ %$!!$%* !%' 4"$$&%1/%9!/ + // !!%)$%%$31% $$' @"/* #"!$" !)! 2!%1)!+ %$!9% (.%/"!$$* 4$%19%" !/ % 4 $*$!4"$ 4$'4"!/4$$!$! 4"!4 +/$+$'$$4"$$&4"$%2$!%"12! $)$% $"*" !%1)!+ %$!4"$%*$!" 2%*'$9+!(9" %9! #31% $9$(C$*"0%1/%2/2$!" !* !% )!*!4'" / 4 $ %""%1/%*")! 2!%1)!+ %$!;% ,DD

PAGE 166

)! 4 )!$9%/ **!"9""%1/%)!*!!/%" )! 4 )%1)!+ %$!!$' 4"$$"%9!%$31% $%$/9$9! / 4( / 4 #""%1/%)!4 +/""%1)!+ %$!$$="!$" ")!*!!/%L"='$!$"")! 4 ) #%1/%/" !$W )! 4 ) #)!%("* !%4"$ 49%2$!75$*,G+$%J$!4"! 7F$*,G+$%J'"$"!D+$%*$!* !%4"$ 49!/ + //9 4$%17C+$%J/4$$!$!7.+$%J' "" !/31% $/9 ")$9!'1/%9!%=/$ 4"$$%"%$1!4$*)$9!9" 4"%/%4! /" !%1)!+ %$!' $$98%7,--FJ)$9!/% # $%9!)!$+ //'"$%/% # $% 9!7J:)!(7J# 2(74J!*!(/7/J4$!4 +'$" *4 %("%1/%!=/:)!)$9!%"" #"%'$!4 + )$9!9%"*$1!"4"$ 4*$!"%1/%'0'C 1%!%" %1/!%)$%%' ,DF

PAGE 167

0'C 1/%8= #$*1)!+ %$!$9!% # $ ? 4"$$ ,. C 0 4"$$& ,. C 0 I ,. 0 E E , ,... E E D ,C CE E ,. E E C ,. E ,, $'"12!% 4"4$12 / 4"12!$*%1/% 4"*4 9"$)4/"%1)!+ %$!;%)$9!%$1!4 "!=' "*$1!"31% $)!$+ // !% #!%1%'"%1/%9! %=/$/* "%1)!+ %$!8%* !%(%4$/(/" !/+%$*4" !%)$% *!$2"4"$ 4%7J"4 (7J"*4 (/74J" %1/'"%1/%9!+/ + //9 ""*)4 #"4 !% /"*)4 #"%1/* !%'+!%1/)4/"*4 !/' # ("!9!$!+/ **!4%9"% %' ,D5

PAGE 168

>0'0 1/%;= #$*"1)!+ %$!%)$% % & C ,. C ,E G E.. E G ,E E.. E E E ,G EE 0 "* *"31% $%=/"%1/%$ / *" !4 $*!$2 9" 4""!/"2$% ")!4/ #%2%!'" !4"$ 4% 9!7J / + /12 #%9 ""%1)!+ %$!(7J#!$1)%1)!+ % $( 74J +%1)!+ % $(/7/J$"!%1/%'4"$$&%1/%)4/ + %1)!+ % $%/4"$$%1/%)4/ +%1)!+ % $* !%'$! %4$/)44"$$&%1/%9!/ + //+9#!$1)/ / + /1%1)!+ % $'$1!$*")! 4 ) #4"$$%1/%/.$* !)!%)4/#!$1)%1)!+ % $%4$/'"$"!,.4"$$ %1/%9!/ + //$" !%4$/4"$ 4'4"$$($. %1/% / 4/"!/"2$%*!$2" !$6$6$2 #% 9 "" !%1)!+ %$!'%0'D/0'F 1%!"!%)$%%$ 31% $12!* +' ,DG

PAGE 169

0'F 4"$$1/%;= #$*$! 1 $%$!4 412 ? C0 '' 0 50 E ,E C G ,0 ,C E E 0 DF 0'D 4"$$&1/%8= #$*"$! 1 $%$!4 412 ? ,. C0 '' E . E ., E EEE 0 .E ,E ,D

PAGE 170

" / 4 $%*!$2" %%1!+!"$/ % 4/ **!4% : %/9"%1/%9 "!#!/$" *%$1)$9!/ "%1)!+ %$!%;)! 2!!%)$% '"!9!4!/ **!4%$1 "!$" !%1)!+ %$!"%=/"!$"%1/%)!*!!/' 4"$$%1/%9!2$!% %* /9 ""!$" !%1)!+ %$!$$=' "!9!%$/ **!4% ")! 2!! #4 + '4"$$ %1/%%9 +$%!+ $%"2$%* 4 (/4"$$& %1/%*#!$1)%1)!+ % $9%"2$%* 4 '$9+!(" 2:) /"2 22$1$* +%1)!+ % $4"$$& %1/%!4 +/' %%1!+ %$$! **$!#!
PAGE 171

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

PAGE 172

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

PAGE 173

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

PAGE 174

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

PAGE 175

)1!)$%$*" %%1/("+4%% /"4"$$)$ 4A 2)$%/ :!4$!$B(2 #""%1/%/ /$4$!$"%%% $$! !+ $%1
PAGE 176

!% #(4"$$%1/%))!/$4$2*$!*4 # !%" ) 9" 4" +%1)!+ % $)!$4/1!%9$1/2 2' ))!("*" !%= /+$)29%/31*$! /)/4$/14 #"!)' 4"$$&)$ 4)4/!%)$% /4$!$$"%1/%' 1)!+ %$!%9!$6/ !4 +(/%) 9"%1/%%=/*$!*!$2 "2'" !+ 99 ""4"$$&%1)!+ %$!/:4!)%*!$2" %1/%;%2% / 4""*4 ;%)$ 49%%/$ /% !$$ 2)$%" !!4" 4%!141!41%$*)$9!'1!"!( +/""%1/%9$1/!! /%"!) %% *" *$1/" !$99 $"!$' ""$! 4/ **!4%9"9$% %!)!%%$2$* "4$* 4 "%1)!+ % $ !1!'" %("$9/$%1/%2$+ $"!$$*"!) %P4"$$))!%$%1))$!:)! )!$4%% 9" 4""%1/ <%%144%%/1! #"%%% $( 1 /%!)!$ !$* !+ $%/))!$4"%(/!%%" :)! 4 $**4 +( /)/)!4 4'4"$$&%1))$!% :)! )!$4%%"!$1#"9" 4""%1/;%:)! 2 $9 +! /%%/))!$4"%!%1% )!%$%"22$! !/
PAGE 177

"/$*"!%!4"%2%!(/" %9$1/! %" %%1$* ** 4 4'*"%1/%9 "%!141!/ )1/+4/ %% 2( 2% # 4* / #$1")!$4%%'"%1/%42 $ "% 1 $9 ")!%$! #%/9$!/+ 9//>1%/ 9 ")!$4/1!%$*"*4 $4!)$% +:)! 4'* %1/%4 +$!4"%!" !! #()!")%"4"$ 4$*"2$! ** 4 !$1 %"$# 44"$ 4*$!*4 )!$4/1!%' 4"$$&(%1/%9 ")!%$%$*= #!%)$% /4$!$*14 $/9 %%% $744$!/ #$" !)!4) $J 41%"9!$:)! 29 "/ **!"!)1 4%%/ "$! %%"!/"2'$%31(9""!/ 4%% 9%
PAGE 178

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

PAGE 179

> $9+!( % 2)$!$4$% /!" %%1$*)!4) $$*%= %% $))$%/$)$%%%% $$*%= %'$!:2)(" %%1/4$4$41/ ""%1/%4"% 9!31%= /($"" >)!4) $%$*%= +9!% 2 !'$!/!$%4! 2$! *$!2 $$1"$99"%1/%)!*$!2/(4 /%1)!+ %$! +1 $%9$1/4%%!' ("%1/%;)!4) $%$*" 4$2*$!+/%= +! 2)$!41%" !%*64$* /4 2)4%" !)!*$!24' > 122! "/% %4$/14/*$!" %%1/ / /*$1!=*4$!% 9" 4" 2)4! #/9" 4"! 2)$!$!4$# <9" % %" #! #% 1 $%*$!2""9$!=!%'"=*4$!% !%*$$9%1/% / *" !%1)!+ %$!/%! ! #%/$" !)!%$9!%%$*" !$9! #%N 8%1/%!$4%% *%1)!+ %$!%%"!$1#"4!*1$%!+ $ $*"%1)!+ %$!%8 !4 $%9 "$"!%N")$ 4 %/)!$4/1!%$* "*4 **4"2"$/%1/%1%$#" !/2N% # 4 ,F

PAGE 180

+%4"4$!/ %!1)"%1)!+ %$!! $%" )/ 2)/ *1!"!* *!$2"! $%" )' % 2)$!$$"!1)1!/$%$4%%! / 4 ""%1/;%! #9% /31$! **4 +'""! %1/% %%1/9"$!)$!/% # 4!1)1!% !%1)!+ %$! $%" )/ /$)!4 +"" !$+!)!)! $*$!"2 ""* /9% 2) !/'"!"/44)/$ !%" )% %( /"!*96)!)!/*$!":)"%$*" !! #' 1/!%/ #$*"4"#%/%4! /"! 9 *$!2 %1)!+ % $"$!/2!%1 9!%$*2)"% %*$! %1)!+ % $! #'"* 4")!$*" %/$412(9 / %41%% "$9" %%1/4$2)!%$)!+ $1%!%!4"(//!%%%$2$*" )$ 2)4"%* / #%2"+(/%1##% 2) 4 $%*$! *1!"!!%!4"' ,5E

PAGE 181

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

PAGE 182

2"$%/%'"2! 9" 4"%1/%2//>1%2%9% !%1$* !4 $9" !)!%$%$*!%)$% / 4$!$/ 2)$%/4$!$$! # #9 ")$ 4 %$*" )!$#!2 9" 4""9!!$/' # 4+%"4/$! 2) !/")!$4%%$*! #*$! "%1/%'$% ++%9!!/$ 4!%/4$2*$!+/ 4!%/%= 431 % $'# ++%/ %!1)/"%1)!+ %$! $%" )/41%/%" "%1/;%# 4$" %L"! )! 2!%1)!+ %$!' "!1)1! 4"4%9%! 1/$$%%$*!1%' %1/*+ $/(/%"4$1/$$#!!1%""%1)!+ %$!8% / !4 $%/1! # +%1)!+ % $9$1/%1##% $%%"9%$ *$$9'"$"!9$%1/%%$*!1)1!"+$*!1%9" 4" 9%%%$4 /9 ""%1)!+ %$!%;!+!%$*" %%/)$% $ !#!/ #)$9!'&$"%1/% !)!/"!+!%% / 4 $$* 4=$*#1 %% )!+ $1% !4 $%'"%:)! 4%2 / 4"!1% %"=*4$! %1)!+ %$!! $%" )%'+ $ $ $*!1% + //$"!%1)!+ %$!"+ $!%' 4!"$! 4%2" %%1##%/"* / #% % "%1/%4 +)! 4 ) "%1)!+ %$!)!$4%%9$!= # ,5.

PAGE 183

9 "4$%! %$*)$ 4/)!$4/1!%$2=4! !/% !2'$!"%%1/%(4 + %""1%/$#" !/% 2 41//44%% #%1)!+ % $*!$2%1)!+ %$!9 "9"$2 )$% +4$4 $4$1/% %"/'1/%9!4)$* 1/!%/ #")%$*)!$4%%%9" 4"4/ 4$4!9 "" / + /1
PAGE 184

# #7%1)!+ %$! 4"!!$J/2$+$/$:)$! )!%$ %%1%%"$% %%1% 2)4" !4 4$47%1)!+ %$! !$$*4$1%$!$!4$%1J' $!"%1/% %%1/("/ **!%%9!$ /+$)21!"! +$+/)!*!4%*$!9""9/ + %1)!+ % $/9""9/*!$2%1)!+ % $ #!'"/ / 94$4!/ /4 4 *$!2 $(1$/1! # +%1)!+ % $'@" "9! %1)!+ %$!2 #%("9/$/ %41%%4% 4$4)1 < $'1/%4"$$&"/+! +%1)!+ % $/ 4$ 1/$"+/% !*$!/ /4 4 *$!2 $/%) +!# 44121 $$*0EE"$1!%$*4 4$4"/$*" %%1/'" / /!)$!"" !4$$! +9$!=9 "" !)! 2!%1)!+ %$!9% 2 #" !/%*$!/+$)2$*4$4)1 < $%= %' ")!$4/1!%"9$*4 %9!)$!
PAGE 185

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

PAGE 186

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

PAGE 187

4$4#$!
PAGE 188

1/% %%1/ / /%/ **!"/ /)!+ $1% %1/ %'")!+ $1%%1/ %1%/%/!/
PAGE 189

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

PAGE 190

)!$4/1!%$*"*4 %9! 2)$!*4$!%$4$% /!' )$" 4($"4"$$&%1/%/4"$$%1/%9$1/ !%)$/$%/!/
PAGE 191

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

PAGE 192

// $(%1)!+ %$!2 #%%"$1/"+*$41% 2 /'" %(4"2 #%"$1/)/$//$"2$+2$9!/" %1)!+ %%;#$%'"%1)!+ %$!% %%1// /"+)$% + $%1$$*" !4 + %9! $' 4$% /! $*$!%1)!+ %$!! #2/ **! 4" 31%*$! +%1)!+ % $/%1)!+ %$!2 #%'$!:2)( %1)!+ %$!! %!/ !4/$ / *" $*%)4 4 !4 $% 9 "%1/%("2$/ % #1 %""$%%1)!+ %$! 4" 31%"!))!$)! *$!/ **!2$/ %'!")% )9$1/$*$41%$)!$4%%/:41 +%= % #!$1) %1)!+ % $()!%$/)!$*%% $#!$9" $6$6$%1)!+ % $( /"$! 41%$*4" 31%/%= /+$)2/1! # +( !4 +%1)!+ % $' %%1$* +( !4 +%1)!+ % $!31 !%%1)!+ % $ %!14 $!#!/ #"2$%**4 +2"$/$*$**! # 6%%% $ %1##% $'$!:2)(%1)!+ %$!%2/)!4 4 % #" )"$6 !+ $%$2"%1/%;/%'1)!+ %$!%2 /$4$% /!" $$*4" !+ $'9%4!*!$2" % %1/"%1)!+ %$!%1%")"$/ **!(1 9%$4! *" ,G.

PAGE 193

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

PAGE 194

"%%2 44$/ $%9 "*4 '" !/(" 2)4$*! #/ %1)!+ %$!)!$4/1!%$"4 /$1/!%$$/' ( !%!4"9" 4":2 %" $ $*%1)!+ %$!"+ $!%4 1%/$/>1%! #)!$#!2%*$!%1)!+ %$!%'4 %9" 4"! 2""9$!=!%! /%1 /$/% #/ 2)2$* "%!%!4"/+$!%' %%1/)!$+ /%+ /4"%1/1/!%/ #%$*" 4$/ $%$*"%1)!+ %$!! $%" )2/ **!*!$2 *$!2 $ #"!/1 < #%/!/
PAGE 195

%/!/
PAGE 196

S1 +!%!4"//!%%%"4$4)$*21 ))!%)4 +% %=4$2)$$1/!%/ #)"$2$'" %4$4)%$ /%$)) /$"!%!4")!$4%%'S1 +%1/ %9" 4" 1
PAGE 197

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

PAGE 198

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

PAGE 199

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

PAGE 200

I ,-E

PAGE 201

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

PAGE 202

,.'@"9%"!$$*"! #*4 $1!:)! 4P@%" %1)!+ %$! 4"!#$*$1P@%"!%$2$%1)!+ % #" %1)!+ %$!P@%"!+!)!$2P ,C'@"$2/"))$ 2P@"$%"#/P@" *$1"/ )!$2(4$1/$14"%1)!+ %$!P ,0'@"9%$1!%1)!+ %$!;%"$! 4$! $P /$1!%#!P / "+$#!P ,-.

PAGE 203

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

PAGE 204

I& ,-0

PAGE 205

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

PAGE 206

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

PAGE 207

CE'"%1)!+ %$!/4$$! % ##$%*$!2 %1)!+ % $' C,', 2*!1%!/9"2/$ # %1)!+ % $' C.'@"+% %"/#$$/1/!%/ #91%$*"= / $*4"#%"9$1/#$$/*$!2' CC'"" #%"%1)!+ %$! %%= #2$/$/$82=214" %%$2' C0', /$8=$99"$:)4%"!%1$*%1)!+ % $' CD', +"99!9$!= #9 2)!$+2 %4$!!4' CF', *"%1)!+ %$!4!%$12+9"/$" #%" "L%"/$%$))!$+$*' ,-5

PAGE 208

I ,-G

PAGE 209

$* !2$!1!+ "*$$9 #31% $%!*!$%1)!+ %$!;%!$/)$9! %1)!+ %$!! $%" )'4"2$!2$))'%!= $!/!" 2)$!4$*4"/%4! ) +!2 $1!! $%" )9 "$1! )! 2!%1)!+ %$!)4 #12!4"!2'*!2/$%$ ))*$!$1()4
PAGE 210

D'1! #" %%2%!("+!/*!$2 / + /12 #%9 "2%1)!+ %$! &')!4 4124%%7#!$1)%1)!+ % $J +%1)!+ % $*!$2" /"2 !!$! '"!%1/%

PAGE 211

H I .E,

PAGE 212

!+ 9X, !+ 9X. X$*4$4"$1!% %*! #$*%= % %*! #$*4$2*$!+ :)4 $%*!$2%1)!+ %$! 2 $!)$% + 4 / 2 $!# + 4 / .E.

PAGE 213

!+ 9XC !+ 9X0 X$*4$4"$1!% %*! #$*%= % %*! #$*4$2*$!+ :)4 $%*!$2%1)!+ %$! 2>$!)$% + 4 / 2>$!# + 4 /

PAGE 214

9$! 4"#%$+! 2'! 4 )4$/ !+ 9 !+ 99$ !+ 9"! !+ 9$1! /% *!$2 %1)!+ %$! !%$ +1 $

PAGE 215

&4=#!$1/ :)! 4%%1)!+ %/#% 1)!+ %$!X, 1)!+ %$!X. 1)!+ %$!XC 1)!+ %$!X0 1)!+ %$!XD .ED

PAGE 216

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

PAGE 217

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

PAGE 218

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

PAGE 219

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

PAGE 220

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

PAGE 221

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

PAGE 222

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