Citation
Anne Evans—A Pioneer in Colorado’s Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone

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Title:
Anne Evans—A Pioneer in Colorado’s Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone
Series Title:
Anne Evans—A Pioneer in Colorado’s Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone
Creator:
Contiguglia, Georgianna
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Anne EvansA Pioneer in Colorados Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone. | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/content/anne-evans-pioneer-colorados-cultural-history-things-last-when-gold-gone[12/8/2015 11:13:16 AM] Home Anne EvansA Pioneer in Colorados Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone.Anne EvansA Pioneer in Colorados Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone.Submitted by nwharton on 12-6-2011 10:05 AMAuthor: Barbara Edwards Sternberg with Jennifer Boone and Evelyn Waldron Publishing: Denver, CO: Center for Colorado and the West at Auraria Library and Buffalo Park Press, 2011. Foreword by Dr. Thomas J. Noel, black-and-white photos, color photos, bibliography, index. 556 pages. 6x 9. $29.95 paperback. Reviewer: Georgianna Contiguglia The authors selected the perfect subtitle for this informative book focusing on the life and milieu of Anne Evans, a woman whose lifes work was to nurture the things that last when gold is gone. Family, friends, and community provided the circles of Miss Annies attentions. While historians have devoted their research efforts to the illustrious men of the Evans Family, we are grateful that, at last, an author has dedicated the time to research and tell the story of this intelligent woman who strengthened and supported the perse talents and interests of several generations of her extended family. Her fertile mind also cultivated the community values of historic preservation, appreciation for the art of the Southwests indigenous people, and the importance of education. Unlike the papers of her father, second territorial governor John Evans, his son William, and grandson John Evans Jr., which were preserved and thus have provided a plethora of material for writers, most of Annes papers were, at her request, destroyed upon her death. Thus Sternberg, Boone, and Waldron must be commended for building such a rich and thorough picture of Anne Evans through careful study of the memoirs, correspondence, and oral histories of her extended family and the archives of organizations such as the Denver Fortnightly Club, the material culture of the Byers-Evans House Museum, and the collections that Anne donated and bequeathed to the community. In order to understand Annes life, the authors provide the reader with context and insight into the lives and accomplishments of her family and the circle of friends and professionals that she enlisted in her community endeavors. This book provides interesting capsule biographies of the people whose personalities and actions influenced not only Annes life, but the path of Denvers and Colorados maturation. In usual historical contexts women have been seen in the roles of purveyors of culture and social assistance, a stereotype based often on the facts at hand. Anne Evans has been cast in this role as well, but this biography enhances her picture by emphasizing the business sense, commitment to task, and considerable powers of persuasion demonstrated by this unassuming but determined woman. Annes interests and education led her to study painting in Paris and Germany, and later to study several semesters at the Art Students League in New York City. Very little of her artwork is extant, and what there is does not attest to great talent. Perhaps this is why she gave up painting and concentrated on supporting artists and working so hard to establish a cultural environment and a physical place where their EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanWhile on the Dominguez-Escalante expedition in 1776, Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco drew the first map of Colorado.

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Anne EvansA Pioneer in Colorados Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone. | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/content/anne-evans-pioneer-colorados-cultural-history-things-last-when-gold-gone[12/8/2015 11:13:16 AM] art could be exhibited and appreciated. As a founding member of the Artists Club of Denver, which eventually morphed into the Denver Art Museum, Anne worked tirelessly to establish a permanent gallery that would exhibit work of local artists as well as art of other cultures. Anne herself collected works by artist friends, but her real contribution was to open the eyes of the community to the artistic endeavors of the Hopi potters and Navajo weavers whose work she collected and eventually gave to the Denver Art Museum. Concurrently, Anne established a group to restore mission churches of New Mexico. Politely exerting pressure on friends, family, and professionals, she raised funds and was instrumental in the preservation of several missions and the building of two new ones. Anne immersed herself in the study of the cultures of New Mexico, documenting traditions and rituals and her response to them in papers she presented as a member of the Denver Fortnightly Club. She was no less appreciative of pioneer architecture and worked tirelessly for the preservation and restoration of the Central City Opera House and the adjacent Teller House. As with the mission churches, Anne was not content merely to restore the buildings; she aimed to inject them with renewed life and activity. At Central City, she established an annual summer theatrical and musical season, and helped to establish some financial stability for the building by persuading the University of Denver to assume responsibility for them. While undertaking these and other monumental community tasks, Anne nurtured and enjoyed the company of nieces, cousins, and friends, who visited the Evans Ranch and Annes Cottage in Bear Creek Valley. This beautiful mountain setting was the center for outdoor games and sports, a place where Anne enjoyed the antics of young children and the stimulation of adult conversation. The authors have woven into whole fabric the strands of Anne Evanss life and times. Bringing together the stories of the people in Annes circles of interest, they have provided an engaging and readable book that provides insights into the personality of a woman of conviction, intellect, and charm. Reviewer Info: Georgianna Contiguglia served as president and CEO of History Colorado (formerly the Colorado Historical Society) from 1997 to 2007 when she retired from this position. As president and CEO she oversaw the programs of the Societys twelve museums statewide, the Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, and the State Historical Fund, the states preservation grants program. She also served as Colorados State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), a gubernatorial appointment, from 1998 to 2008. Prior to being appointed president and SHPO, she was curator of decorative and fine arts from 1980 to 1997, during which time she oversaw History Colorados seven house museums and participated in the development of many exhibitions including the annual Artists of America, the award-winning The Real West, and the Twentieth Century Colorado series. Since her retirement from History Colorado, she has been teaching art history in the states community college system and at the Academy for Lifelong Learning. Add new commentComments 2012 IPPY Book Award Permalink Submitted by nwharton on 11-21-2012 08:24 AM

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Anne EvansA Pioneer in Colorados Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold Is Gone. | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/content/anne-evans-pioneer-colorados-cultural-history-things-last-when-gold-gone[12/8/2015 11:13:16 AM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us Anne Evans-A Pioneer in Colorado's Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold is Gone recieved the 2012 IPPY (Independent Publisher Book) Awards Bronze Medal for Best Regional Non-Fiction. The IPPY Regional Awards honor books published with a regional focus, and recognize Best Fiction and Best NonFiction Book in eight U.S. regions, two Canadian regions, and Australia/New Zealand. The Independent Publisher Book Awards were conceived in 1996 as a broad-based, unaffiliated awards program open to all members of the independent publishing industry. The awards are intended to bring increased recognition to the thousands of exemplary independent, university, and self-published titles produced each year, and reward those who exhibit the courage, innovation, and creativity to bring about change in the world of publishing. reply Winner of the 2013 USA Book Award for Best Biography Permalink Submitted by nwharton on 11-15-2013 09:34 AMIt was announced on November 14, 2013 by USABookNews.com the premier online magazine, that Anne Evans-A Pioneer in Colorado's Cultural History: The Things That Last When Gold is Gone recieved the 2013 USA Book Award for Best Biography reply