Citation
Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000

Material Information

Title:
Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000
Series Title:
Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000
Creator:
Andrews, Paul
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000 | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/aryan-cowboys-white-supremacists-and-search-new-frontier-1970-2000[12/8/2015 1:15:21 PM] Home Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000Submitted by cowestadmin on 9-26-2009 07:30 PMAuthor: Evelyn A. Schlatter Publishing: Austin: University of Texas Press, 2006. Bibliography, index, photos. xv + 250 pages. 6x 9. $19.95 paperback. Reviewer: Paul Andrews In Aryan Cowboys Evelyn Schlatter argues that various extremist right wing groups are still pursuing the dream of the mythic history of the American West. Schlatter, an independent scholar, based this book on her Ph.D. history dissertation at the University of New Mexico. She maintains that the white supremacists seek their perfect America, which is white, Christian, and ruled over exclusively by men. She begins by surveying the history of the extreme white right in the United States, focusing on the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s and 1930s. With this background, Schlatter discusses how the movement has grown and shrunk, but remains under the surface an expression of dissatisfaction with the federal government. Her argument is centered on the extreme rights belief in the mythic history of the United States that celebrates the ideal of the white male frontiersman, who will go to any length to protect his family, his people, and his property. This vision does give women a role in the movement, both as support for the men of the front lines, and as the mothers of the next generation of Aryan men. This main thesis is very well thought out and Schlatter does a good job of outlining the main points that she hopes to prove. The earlier chapters on the Ku Klux Klan and the Populist Party of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries give the reader a good grounding in the history of white supremacists. Many of the parallels that Schlatter sees are clearly related to modern extremist movements. She spends the last half of the book discussing the recent standoffs between the federal government and various groups through 2000. The problem with Aryan Cowboys is that once the historical background is set, Schlatter seems less inclined to follow through as thoroughly on some of the modern movements. Some get a good hearing, especially the Posse Comitatus and Robert Mathews Order, but others get little or no attention. There is nothing about Tom Metzgers White Aryan Resistance, which had huge media exposure in the 1980s, and Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombing receive only a small mention. Although no author can cover all the fringe groups that make up the extreme right, Schlatter could have made a much stronger argument by paying more attention to the modern groups drawing on the mythic frontier tradition. Overall, however, this work on Aryan Cowboys is solid. The kind of extremism that Schlatter writes about still exists today, and any work that makes it transparent is of value. Reviewer Info: EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanIn 1893, Colorado became the first state in the union to allow women the right to vote through popular election.

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Aryan Cowboys: White Supremacists and the Search for a New Frontier, 1970-2000 | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/aryan-cowboys-white-supremacists-and-search-new-frontier-1970-2000[12/8/2015 1:15:21 PM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us Paul Andrews is a library technician at the University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Library in Aurora, Colorado, and a graduate student in history at the University of Colorado Denver. He is a King Intern at the Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library. Add new comment