Citation
Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oñate

Material Information

Title:
Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oñate
Series Title:
Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oñate
Creator:
Wilson, Luther
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oate | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/came-men-horses-conquistador-expeditions-francisco-vasquez-de-coronado-and-don-juan-de[12/8/2015 9:24:43 AM] Home Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de OateCame Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de OateSubmitted by nwharton on 5-5-2013 08:49 PMAuthor: Stan Hoig Publishing: Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado, 2013. 344 pages. Illustrations, maps, tables, appendices, index, bibliography, notes. 6 x 9. $34.95 paperback. Reviewer: Luther Wilson Some writers have published so many books they qualify to be their own publishing enterprise. Duane Smith at Fort Lewis College has published more than fifty books. Thomas J. Noel (aka Dr. Colorado) has published more than forty. Stan Hoig comes close with somewhere around twenty-five books, many of them still in print today. Hoigs first book, The Sand Creek Massacre (University of Oklahoma Press, 1961), covered a controversial subject that is still of great importance to Colorado history. Hoig went on to write many more books on the Plains Indians, particularly the Cheyennes, and their wars and treaties with the United States. He also wrote and published several titles on regional Oklahoma and Kansas history. Most of Hoigs writings have dealt with the peoples of the western plains of Oklahoma, Kansas, eastern Colorado, and Nebraska. As a university press executive, I had the pleasure of working with Stan Hoig on many of those books, beginning with The Peace Chiefs of the Cheyennes (University of Oklahoma Press, 1980); Jesse Chisholm: Ambassador of the Plains (University Press of Colorado, 1991); and finally, The Chouteaus: First Family of the Fur Trade (University of New Mexico Press, 2008). I read early versions of the manuscript that became Came Men on Horses but we never reached an agreement to publish it before Stan died in December 2009. Fortunately, Stans widow, Pat, pursued publication by the University Press of Colorado. The subject of Came Men on Horses seems at first glance to be a little far afield for Hoig. However, all of the present Southwest was part of Spains empire in the mid to late sixteenth, all of the seventeenth, and most of the eighteenth centuries. The Spaniards came north from Mexico into the present-day United States long before the English, French, or Dutch had ever set foot on the Atlantic Coast of North America. The first official expedition of Spain into the Southwest was led by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado beginning in 1540 and ending in 1542. The viceroy of the Indies and the king of Spain sanctioned this mission with the primary goals of claiming the new lands and peoples for the kingdom of Spain and to bring Christianity to its inhabitants. Fueled by stories told by Nuez Cabeza de Baca and Fray Marcos de Niza, expectations were high that new, rich cities like those of the Aztecs and the Incas would be found, greatly enriching the members of the expedition as well as the viceroy and the king. Vasquez de Coronados expedition left from the Pacific coastal town of Compostela and eventually reached as far as EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanWithin Colorado boundaries are lands once claimed by Spanish kings and Mexican governors.

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Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oate | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/came-men-horses-conquistador-expeditions-francisco-vasquez-de-coronado-and-don-juan-de[12/8/2015 9:24:43 AM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us present-day Hutchinson, Kansas. With the exception of leaving a couple of priests to live among the Pueblos of the Southwest, it was a near catastrophic failure. The second officially sanctioned expedition into the Southwest was led by Juan de Oate. It began at the great mining town of Zacatecas from which Oate had garnered most of his immense wealth. The Oate expedition had much different goals than that of Vasquez de Coronado: to establish a permanent Spanish settlement among the Pueblo Indians of present-day New Mexico along the Rio Colorado (now the Rio Grande); to establish a permanent presence of Christianity among the natives; and to pursue further the quest for riches among the natives. This incursion was more of a qualified failure than the abject failure of the Vasquez de Coronado expedition. A presence of Catholic priests among the natives was established, albeit shakily; and the rudiments of permanent settlements were established, first at present-day San Juan Pueblo (now known by its native name, Ohkay Owingeh), then at San Gabriel, and finally at present-day Santa Fe. Oate lasted until 1607 when he resigned his position as adelantado of the provinces of New Mexico to which the king had appointed him in 1600. Like Coronado before him, he returned to Mexico City bereft of the riches with which he had begun, and facing myriad criminal charges for his actions against both the natives of the north and his own soldiers and settlers. Hoig, a good writer and a good scholar, produced an engaging narrative that ends with some fifty pages of appendixes and a good bibliography. Many have written about either Vasquez de Coronado or Oate, but to my knowledge this is the first to treat both expeditions in one volume. This is a fitting capstone to the lifes work of a fine scholar and storyteller. Reviewer Info: Luther Wilson retired in June 2010 as director of the University of New Mexico Press, having served twice as its director, from 1980 to 1985, and from 2000 to 2010. He was director of the University Press of Colorado from 1988 until 2000, and the Syracuse University Press from 1985 to 1988. He also served as general manager of the College and Trade divisions of Nelson-ITP, Australia, editor-in-chief of the University of Oklahoma Press, and acquisitions editor for the Cambridge University Press and for Harper and Row. He worked in commercial and academic publishing for forty four years, publishing textbooks, general and scholarly nonfiction, fiction, and poetry.