Citation
Camp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post Office

Material Information

Title:
Camp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post Office
Series Title:
Camp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post Office
Creator:
Ozment, James L.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Camp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post Office | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/camp-genter-colorado-ghost-town-mail-origins-and-operations-4th-class-post-office[12/8/2015 1:13:35 PM] Home Camp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post OfficeCamp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post OfficeSubmitted by cowestadmin on 9-26-2009 08:04 PMAuthor: John H. Willard and Sergio Lugo Publishing: Denver: Rocky Mountain Philatelic Library, 2008. Color photos, maps, bibliography, index. x + 98 pages. 8-1/2 x 11. $37.50 hardcover; $25.00 paperback. Reviewer: James L. Ozment The Crystal River Valley is one of the most scenic areas of Colorado. Its history is layered with periods of boom and bust and overlaid with the development of railroads and post offices as the various enterprises waxed and waned. Sorting this history accurately is a difficult task and many is the author who gets wrapped around the axle becoming confused over history, railroad construction and operation, and also post office operation. To their credit, Jack Willard and Sergio Lugo, both authors of longstanding interest in railroads (Willard) and postal operations (Willard and Lugo), got it right. The book is well organized, starting out with a good map, then a time line, and ending with description of coal mining in the Crystal River Valley. Illustrating the well-written text are historic black and white photographs, as well as a number of Kodachrome slide photographs made by Jack Willard in the mid1950s, when he worked in the area. Based on research in historic documents and old records Willard and later Lugo weave a fascinating story of the curmudgeonly Edward Genter, who complained to the Carbondale Post Office about their allegedly lousy service. He also took a few swipes at the Crystal River & San Juan Railroad. One can only speculate that the railroad crews tired of this tirade and may have skipped a few pickups and drop off of mails on purpose. Eventually Genter acquired his own post office for the coal mining camp. His mid-1920s post office operated at a time when other post offices in the Crystal River Valley had been closed, leaving only Carbondale and Marble. Edward Genter died on Oct. 3, 1928, and the Camp Genter Post Office closed just fifteen months later. The Crystal River Railroad closed in early 1942, undoubtedly dooming Camp Genter to oblivion. Today only scattered debris and one lonely dynamite shed lie on the banks of the lovely Crystal River, quietly waiting for the train which will not come again in our lifetime, and perhaps not in any other. The appendices broaden the readers understanding of the times and circumstances in which Camp Genter existed. They are a valuable addition to this book. Appendix 1 describes how a postal star route operates. EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanIn 1893, Colorado became the first state in the union to allow women the right to vote through popular election.

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Camp Genter: Colorado Ghost Town Mail, Origins and Operations of a 4th Class Post Office | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/camp-genter-colorado-ghost-town-mail-origins-and-operations-4th-class-post-office[12/8/2015 1:13:35 PM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us Appendix 2 describes the operation of the Railway Mail Service, which in this case was a closed pouch operation during the operation of the erstwhile Crystal River & San Juan Railroad. The letters of Edward Genter are reproduced in color as Appendix 3. The book is well worth the modest price, and a really significant contribution to the existing volumes on Colorado railroad and postal history. Take a journey on the Crystal River railroad to Camp Genter to meet Edward Genter at his post office. All aboard! Reviewer Info: James L. Ozment is a retired construction engineer for the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad. He has spent a lifetime studying railroad history and also almost forty-five years studying Colorado postal history. He has published numerous articles on these subjects and co-authored several books on railroad and postal history. Add new comment