Citation
Dr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the AmericanTuberculosis Movement

Material Information

Title:
Dr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the AmericanTuberculosis Movement
Series Title:
Dr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the AmericanTuberculosis Movement
Creator:
Hunt, Rebecca
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Dr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the American Tuberculosis Movement | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/dr-charles-david-spivak-jewish-immigrant-and-american-tuberculosis-movement[12/8/2015 12:39:10 PM] Home Dr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the American Tuberculosis MovementDr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the American Tuberculosis MovementSubmitted by jainlayconley on 10-5-2010 06:02 PMAuthor: Jeanne E. Abrams Publishing: Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado, 2009. xi + 226 pages. Photos, endnotes, bibliography, index. 6 x 9. $34.95 hardcover. Reviewer: Rebecca Hunt Reviewer Affiliation: University of Colorado Denver Chaim Dovid Spivakofsky fled Russia in 1882 to make a new life in the United States. He began, as so many immigrants did, scratching out a living in New York City. But his destiny was not to be that of an ordinary man but one who worked to obtain a medical education and then went on to become one of the international leaders in treating tuberculosis. His career took him to Philadelphia and eventually to Denver. As part of his journey he became Charles David Spivak. Although he had a thriving medical practice in Philadelphia, Dr. Spivak moved his family to Denver in 1896 hoping to stave off his wifes lung problems. In Denver he found a vibrant Jewish community that was grappling with the ravages of tuberculosis. Unable to find a professional home at the new National Jewish Hospital, he helped create the Jewish Consumptive Relief Society (JCRS) in 1904. His care for the organization, his skill as a physician, and his tireless research and writing earned him a national reputation. Author Jeanne Abrams amply documents Spivaks career. Unlike many biographies that tell of a mans professional career but neglect his family, she explores Spivaks private life, including his 1893 marriage to the talented, radical, and idealistic Jennie Charsky. The marriage produced David, Deena, and Ruthall of whom contributed in both positive and negative ways to Spivaks life. Jennie had her own career teaching at Denver University as well as being a tireless advocate for JCRS and the Denver Jewish community. At the same time, she suffered for years from mental illness, causing her husband considerable anguish and driving him to seek further release in his work. At the time of his 1927 death from cancer, Dr. Spivak had gained a reputation as a tuberculosis specialist, a leader in the American Jewish community, and as co-author of a Yiddish dictionary published in 1911. The eulogies at his funeral came from friends and admirers across the world. He was well loved, well respected, and sorely missed. Jeanne Abrams is one of the leading scholars of both western American Jewish history and of the Jewish contributions to the tuberculosis movement in Denver. She teaches at Denver University and, as director, is the energy and spirit behind the Beck Archives at Penrose Library at DU. She has been instrumental in preserving buildings, artifacts, and archives from the Jewish Consumptive Relief Society. EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanNow, thats wrong! Some of these Japanese are citizens of the United States. Colorado Gov. Ralph Carrs response to Executive Order 9066 forcing Japanese into internment camps during WWII.

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Dr. Charles David Spivak: A Jewish Immigrant and the American Tuberculosis Movement | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/dr-charles-david-spivak-jewish-immigrant-and-american-tuberculosis-movement[12/8/2015 12:39:10 PM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us Abramss biography is solid work. She suffers a bit from the problem of many biographers of getting too close to her subject. At the same time, her book is well grounded in the study and historiography of American ethnic and immigration history. Readers are well served by her knowledge of the local medical establishments battles with tuberculosis. Additionally her grounding in the broader Jewish-American history and her attention to detail make this more than a local history or biography. This book is a significant contribution to the study of Denver history and to Jewish American history. Reviewer Info: Rebecca Hunt holds a PhD degree in social history of the American West from the University of Colorado Boulder. She is a senior instructor in history at the University of Colorado Denver. Her publications include Swedish Medical Center: A Century of Caring (with Sandy Durkin), published in 2005, and Wyoming Medical Center: A Centennial History, due out in December 2010. She also served as consulting historian on The Presbyterian/St. Lukes Experience, published in 2006, and on the documentary A Woman to Match a Mountain released in 2008. Add new comment