Citation
Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories

Material Information

Title:
Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories
Series Title:
Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories
Creator:
Culpin, Alan
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories. | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/rebels-rockies-confederate-irregulars-western-territories[12/7/2015 3:09:34 PM] Home Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories.Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories.Submitted by barlowk on 6-30-2015 01:39 PMAuthor: Walter Pittman Publishing: Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories By Walter Pittman. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, Inc., 2014. 260 pages. Black-andwhite photographs. Illustrations. 6 x 9. $39.95 paperback. Reviewer: Alan Culpin New Mexico historian Walter Pittman has written a book that will be of great interest to students of both western history and Civil War history. It tells the story of how Confederate sympathizers in Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, and California combined to form groups, companies, and battalions to take on the Union in those areas. Pittman tells the stories of the Brigands and the San Elizario Spy Company from New Mexico, a state that supported the South but not necessarily the Texans emanating from it. Add in the Arizona Rangers, Alderetes Hispanics from New Mexico, and regiments organized under the highly competent Col. John B. Baylor of Texas, and you have a force with depth and competence that constantly outmaneuvered their Union counterparts. They had not only to fight the Federals, but also hostile Indians, most notably the Apache under Mangas Colorado and Cochise. The Union forces under Gen. E. R. S. Canby numbered about 5,500 men in the early days, versus Baylor & Cos 365, yet Baylor managed to keep Canby unsure and unwilling to take him on. With the arrival of Gen. Henry H. Sibley and 3,200 more men, known as the army of New Mexico, the Confederate irregulars were ready to take Canby on head to head. Stupidly, Sibley removed Baylor from command. Other problems affected their effortsa lack of weapons, especially cannon, little food, and poor clothing and shoes. Despite this, they accomplished dominance in New Mexico, Arizona, and, of course, Texas. The account of the attempt to advance into Colorado is well known and the battles of Valverde and Glorieta Pass are well covered here. What is less known is the ongoing spying, attacks, and confrontations that the Southerners engaged in for the remainder of the war, mostly in New Mexico, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. Always outnumbered, always short on supplies, they nevertheless held on until the end, raiding, harassing, and keeping 20,000 federal troops busy in Colorado and New Mexico. The book is full of characters. People like Colorados Charley Harrison, who owned the Criterion Saloon in Denver; Wild Bill Hickman, the Mormon executioner; Capt. George T. Madison, a New Mexico rancher; and many others fill these pages with action and activity. Many of these men were not Southerners Harrison was from New Yorkbut they were all frontiersman, tough and independent, and lacking in military discipline, yet very, very effective. Pittman has written a well-researched, well-documented account of these dramatic days. There are some failings in editing, with incorrect dates and repetitive information, and the organization of material could be EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanWithin Colorado boundaries are lands once claimed by Spanish kings and Mexican governors.

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Rebels in the Rockies: Confederate Irregulars in the Western Territories. | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/rebels-rockies-confederate-irregulars-western-territories[12/7/2015 3:09:34 PM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us better, but those are minor complaints compared to the achievements in covering a subject so little known to most of us. Reviewer Info: Alan Culpin was born in Taipeh, Formosa, in 1939 and educated at Dean Close School in Cheltenham, England. He earned BA and MA degrees in western American history at the University of Colorado. From 1973 to 1985 he taught humanities and Colorado, western, Civil War, and American history at Red Rocks Community College in Golden, Colorado. He then went on to found Abracadabra Bookshop an enterprise that he still runs with his wife Marcy. He is a member of the Colorado and Denver Corrals of the Westerners, and the Texas State Historical Association.