Citation
Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the Burro

Material Information

Title:
Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the Burro
Series Title:
Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the Burro
Creator:
Culpin, Alan
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the Burro | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/sherwood-stowaway-jockey-rancher-prospector-gambler-saloon-owner-mine-owner-politician[12/7/2015 2:44:07 PM] Home Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the BurroSherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the BurroSubmitted by barlowk on 8-30-2015 09:06 PMAuthor: Sherwood B. Stockwell Publishing: Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the Burro. By Sherwood B. Stockwell .Western Reflections Publishing Company, Lake City, CO, 2014. 244 pages. Bibliography, photographs. Reviewer: Alan Culpin This is an interesting tale of a young boy, Rupert Sherwood, from Wisconsin, orphaned at an early age. He moved to Illinois and came under the wing of a possible uncle, Hank Randall. Or not. Like so much of this book, facts are rare and speculations rampant. Even what is provided is based on a very limited bibliography, relying on newspapers, and maybe heavily on a previous publication. Nevertheless, the story is great semifiction. Sherwood stows away in a box on a wagon when Randall and Old Jim head for California with one hundred horses. On the way, he proves his skills as a jockey and wins four hundred dollars racing, a huge amount for such a youth. They reach Colorado, and on the way Sherwood comes out of hiding. All but one horse are sold there, leaving no need to continue on to California. They return to Illinois by coach, but before long Sherwood returns to engage in mining in South Park and to do all the things in the subtitle of this book. The difficulty is that this does not qualify as history. There are frequent inaccuracies, simple ones like calling General Larimer Latimer and more complex ones that reflect the writers lack of knowledge of Western history, such as the reason for the elimination of the immense buffalo herds. He frequently injects his opinions, heavily politically left, referring to storekeepers as unscrupulous, no exceptions listed. He states that Rupe . was being exposed to the entrepreneurial sophistications of people like Jay Gould, Leland Stanford and Charles Crocker (151), but does not explain just how. There are no footnotes. At least half the book is devoted to mostly unrelated material, such as the history of the Mormons and numerous towns, occupations, mining, and other subjects. Hyperbole reigns supreme, as in statements like the Great migration wiped out EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanWe were most agreeably surprised to find him a polished gentleman. Description of James P. Beckwourth, African American mountain man, fur trader and explorer.

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Sherwood: Stowaway, Jockey, Rancher, Prospector, Gambler, Saloon Owner, Mine Owner, Politician, and Owner of Prunes the Burro | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/sherwood-stowaway-jockey-rancher-prospector-gambler-saloon-owner-mine-owner-politician[12/7/2015 2:44:07 PM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us wildlife, decimated the environment, and laughed at Native Americans sense of common ownership of the land (151), none of which adds to the story of Rupe Sherwood. And finally, despite the title, Stockwell does present a viewpoint that Sherwood did not, in fact, own Prunes the Burro immortalized by the stone memorial in downtown Fairplay. Reviewer Info: Alan Culpin was born in China and educated in a British public school before coming to Colorado to attend the University of Colorado where he earned BA and MA degrees in history with a specialty in Colorado and the West under Robert Athearn. After a short stint at the Colorado Historical Society, he taught Colorado and Western history, the U.S. surveys, and the Civil War at Red Rocks Community College from 1974 to 1985. He went on to found Abracadabra Bookshop, an enterprise that he still runs with his wife Marcy. He is a member of the Colorado and Denver Corrals of the Westerners, and the Texas State Historical Association.