Citation
Shinin’ Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado Restaurant

Material Information

Title:
Shinin’ Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado Restaurant
Series Title:
Shinin’ Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado Restaurant
Creator:
Starr, Ruth M.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Shinin Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado Restaurant | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/shinin-times-fort-stories-recipes-and-celebrations-landmark-colorado-restaurant[12/8/2015 12:26:22 PM] Home Shinin Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado RestaurantShinin Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado RestaurantSubmitted by jainlayconley on 3-2-2011 11:37 AMAuthor: Holly Arnold Kinney Publishing: Morrison, CO: Fur Trade Press, 2010. Reviewer: Ruth M. Starr Shinin Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado Restaurant includes 150 mouth-watering recipes for the many fans of The Fort restaurant, and anyone interested in cooking authentic western food. Holly Arnold Kinney dedicates her first cookbook to her guardian angel, father Saml Paul Arnoldthe famed restaurateurand her husband, Jeremy Kinney. She also acknowledges other members of her biological family, her Fort family, and the many people who inspired the recipes. Beautifully written and illustrated, with photographs by Lois Ellen Frank, the cookbook reads like a history lesson of Colorado, the West, Native Americans, and the history of western foods. Kinneys introduction beautifully describes her childhood memories, beginning with her father Sam Arnold and mother Bay and their inspiration to build what later became a landmark Colorado restaurant. She fondly recalls how she and her brother Keith studied the Colorado landscape, the animals, and western traditionssuch as making their first rattlesnake skin hatband from a snake whose meat was offered to a patron. We read of her pet Sissy, the Canadian black bear, who drank soda from a bottle, along with Lobo, a faithful German shepherd. Her father, who was an excellent cook, exposed Holly and Keith to recipes and meals of wild game, snake, elk, and buffalo. Choosing one or two recipes to try is easy. However, once you try one, you will want to cook another one tomorrow. The books organization is perfect: Beginners, or appetizers, vary from the simply prepared to the complex, but all are well worth the effort. I highly recommend Hollys posole the best posole I have eaten (89). The recipe was easy to follow, and I didnt have a difficult time finding all the ingredients. Everyone in my family truly enjoyed the classic stew, which will become a favorite in our house now. I baked the Indian horno bread (134) to go with the posole instead of serving it with traditional tortillas. The bread tasted like my grandfathers, a nice surprise. Kinneys recipe brought back memories. My grandfather used to bake bread in an adobe oven outside his farmhouse. All of my cousins and I loved his cooking. My grandfather would have enjoyed eating the roasted buffalo bone marrow (32). I have vivid memories of watching him eat marrow from deer and elk. In this case, some of the recipes ingredients were hard to find. Fortunately, Kinney provides a list of sources for some of the items she usesspices, seeds, berries, and meats (240). The names, addresses, phone numbers, and websites of suppliers and ranches will prove helpful. And The Forts coffee was delicious as a dessert on its own (64). Attention to detail is in every aspect of her bookfrom the organization, the history, easily-to-follow recipes, and the index, which conveniently lists recipes both by name as well as main ingredient. EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanIn 1893, Colorado became the first state in the union to allow women the right to vote through popular election.

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Shinin Times at The Fort: Stories, Recipes, and Celebrations from the Landmark Colorado Restaurant | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/shinin-times-fort-stories-recipes-and-celebrations-landmark-colorado-restaurant[12/8/2015 12:26:22 PM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us Kinney includes a thoughtful section on easy and fun-to-make family recipes (242). These are family recipes that she recalls making with her mother. She encourages readers to cook with their children and provides words of wisdom to children on kitchen safety and the importance of hygiene. Young people in my family successfully made the Three Sacred Sisters tamale pie recipe, a tasty vegetarian dish (193). By including a section for families, Kinney lovingly shows the amount of care dedicated to her first cookbook. Kinney begins her cookbook with a Navajo blessingand a tone of reverence for her parents and the adobe restaurant they built near a red rock outcropping that provides inspiration to all who travel to partake of the restaurants extraordinary hospitality, excellent food, and Colorado history. Now sole owner of The Fort, Kinney continues the restaurants traditions while making some improvements. The adobe building is continuously maintained to keep its traditional look, and with this practice, we are always taking care of Mother Earth (xiii). She has, however, gone farther and made a commitment to sustainability, which includes serving organic and Colorado home-grown produce whenever possible. There is now a garden in the courtyard, which produces fresh vegetables and herbs. Huzzah to Holly Arnold Kinney for a job well done, and for writing an excellent authentic western cookbook. I wholeheartedly recommend this cookbook to everyone. Reviewer Info: Ruth M. Starr is a Colorado native whose family is Navajo. A registered nurse, she graduated from George Washington High School and Presbyterian School of Nursing (both in Denver), and is currently a sophomore at the Womens College of the University of Denver. Starr serves on the Denver American Indian Commission and volunteers for the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. She enjoys walking, cooking, home gardening, and caring for Elders. She lives in the Denver metro area. Add new comment