Citation
The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th Anniversary

Material Information

Title:
The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th Anniversary
Series Title:
The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th Anniversary
Creator:
LaChance, Lauramay
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Center for Colorado and the West
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th Anniversary | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/archdiocese-denver-125th-anniversary[12/8/2015 11:06:22 AM] Home The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th AnniversaryThe Archdiocese of Denver: 125th AnniversarySubmitted by nwharton on 4-23-2012 02:11 PMReviewer: Lauramay LaChance The Archdiocese of Denver is celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2012, and author John Hanley commemorates this milestone with his book The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th Anniversary The pictorial history, with more than 400 rare and historic images, gives a detailed look into the events and people that shaped the Archdiocese of Denver into what it is today. The history of the Catholic Church in Colorado goes farther back than the official establishment of the Denver diocese. Hanley begins his book with Father Domingo de Anza, who is thought to have established the first mission in 1706 at El Quartelejo on the Arkansas River, in what is believed to be eastern Colorado. Hanley emphasizes how the clergy, religious orders, and lay faithful never lost faith as they navigated their way through some of the most difficult times in Colorado history. Monsignor Thomas S. Fryar believes the Holy Spirit was at work in the leadership during those times and the right people were there at the right time(4). Hanley chronicles the lives of the seven bishops and details their contributions. Establishing new parishes with little or no funds, fighting the Ku Klux Klan, establishing the Denver Catholic Register and addressing issues from the economic plight of farmers to Hispanic ministry needs are some of the topics Hanley discusses. The second half of the book focuses on the specific history of the 146 parishes within the Denver Archdiocese. Hanley invited each parish to offer its input on the content and design for its parish page. The concise history and modern images add a personal, local touch. Hanley combines the histories of Colorado and Catholicism to show how much of an impact the Archdiocese of Denver has had on Colorados history, from establishing housing for the elderly and families living at poverty level, to standing behind changes in the Catholic church. An audience interested in how Catholic history fits in with state history will find this book interesting. As Hanley states in The Denver Catholic Register, To me, the book is like a Catholic family tree. Whats great is that it ties together all of the current parishes of the archdiocese to the history. It shows how weve branched out and it connects present Catholics of the Archdiocese of Denver to the first Catholics in Colorado and Denver. The family tree layout that Hanley structures his book around allows the reader to understand the progression of the archdiocese and where different parishes and events fit into that history. Hanley, the former archivist of the Archdiocese of Atlanta, has written histories for the dioceses of Venice (Florida), Phoenix, Atlanta, and Allentown (Pennsylvania). His commemorative book is part of a larger series of books published by Editions du Signe in France about the histories of the archdioceses. These histories were originally written as a means of collecting and preserving the history of the diocese for everyone to enjoy. While this book is great for audiences from all backgrounds, it would not be beneficial EXPLORE BY MEDIABook Reviews Photographs Video Biographies New Publications Resource Guides County Newspaper HistoriesEXPLORE BY TOPICLand & Natural Resources Government & Law Agriculture Mining Commerce & Industry Transportation People & Places Communication Healthcare & Medicine Education & Libraries Cultural Communities Recreation & Entertainment Tourism ReligionEXPLORE BY CULTUREHispanic Native AmericanIn 1893, Colorado became the first state in the union to allow women the right to vote through popular election.

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The Archdiocese of Denver: 125th Anniversary | Center for Colorado & the West at Auraria Library http://coloradowest.staging.auraria.edu/book-review/archdiocese-denver-125th-anniversary[12/8/2015 11:06:22 AM] Auraria Library 303-556-4587 1100 Lawrence Street Denver, Colorado 80204 In the News Partners & Donations About Us Contact Us to use as a research tool for solid facts. Hanley does not include references or citations to his sources but he generally does cite the source of his images. For a more detailed, scholarly history see Thomas J. Noel, Colorado Catholicism and the Archdiocese of Denver, 1857 (Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 1989). Hanley states that an archdiocese is often known for taking on the personality of its parishioners and its bishops, and Denver is no exception(4). How the Archdiocese of Denver has transformed and taken on different personalities over its 125 years is explored by Hanley for anyone interested in discovering this journey. Reviewer Info: Lauramay LaChance completed a masters degree in history at the University of Colorado Denver in 2011, focusing on immigration, ethnicity, and neighborhood oral histories. Her current projects include research on Oakes Ames, the principal financier of the Union Pacific Railroad, who was censured for corruption by Congress in 1873, and a study of how the southern Italians of Denver secured a strong Italian community and presence in North Denver during the 1930s. She is a North Denver resident and member of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish, established in 1894. As a King Intern at the University of Colorado Denver, she wrote two biographical profiles: Dennis Gallagher: Denver Legislator, City Auditor, Council Member and Teacher and Robert Frank Sweeney: A Colorado Giver which was published in the University of Colorado Denvers Historical Studies Journal Add new comment