Citation
The Revolution

Material Information

Title:
The Revolution
Uniform Title:
Revolution (New York, N.Y.)
Creator:
Anthony, Susan B ( Susan Brownell ), 1820-1906
Place of Publication:
New York, N. Y.
Publisher:
[S. B. Anthony, etc.]
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
8 v. : ; 32 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Women -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Women ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
v. 1-8; Jan. 8, 1868-Feb. 17, 1872.

Record Information

Source Institution:
|Auraria Library
Holding Location:
|Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
233066290 ( OCLC )
sc 81003298 ( LCCN )
ocn233066290
Classification:
HN51 .R5 ( lcc )

Full Text
principle, not policy: justice, not favors.men, their rights and nothing more: women, their rights and nothing less.
VOL. I.NO. 21.
NEW YOBK, THUBSDAY, MAY 28, 1868. sinsle$cop#T6ekts.
C|t Itnuilntiun.
4 _____
ELIZABETH CADY STANTON.) ^ __
PARKER PIBLSBURY, ) ^ailols*
SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Proprietor.
OFFICE 37 PARK ROW (ROOM 20.)
THE LABORING MAN A SLAVE.
The history of the human race in every age
and under every form of government has been
a condition of slavery for the mass of the peo-
ple ; btit a repetition from generation to genera^
tion of cunning devices on the part of the few
to subordinate the many to their own selfish
purposes. As we are the most easily movedby
wrongs not perpetrated by ourselves, from
which we reap no personal advantages or disad-
vantages, whose evil results are seen by the out"
ward eye, the grossest and most remote forms
of slavery have been the first to be attacked.
Though England emancipated the slaves of the
West India Islands a quarter of a century ago,
she holds millions of her own people in abject
and hopeless slavery to-day. While the North
struck the chains from 4,000,000 African' slaves
on the Southern, plantations, by our national
debt, heavy taxation and suicidal financial policy
new chains were fastened on thirty millions of
people.
While the grossest forms of slavery are thus
passing away, the more hidden and insidious
forms, whose causes and effects are not so easily
traced, through the ignorance and indifference
of the many, and the cunning and craftiness of
the few, have been protected* and perpetuated
from generation to generation. The aristocra-
cies of nations, races, families, blood, color,
sex, are all being considered and condemned,
and in our country, in theory at least, all alike
are repudiated. But a monied aristocracy has
stood firm and immoveable, through all the
changing scenes of the past, and is as powerful
in our country to-day as in any nation on the
face of the globe.
To say that the mass of the. people in all'
countries are slaves, might seem a startling pro-
position to, many, but if you accept the defini-
tion that a slave is a person whose bodily toil
and the fruits thereof are the property of
another, are not the laboring men, who toil
from early dawn to eve, their lives all through,
and then lie down to die, with nothing gained
for themselves but the coarsest food and clothes,
and for their children a heritage of woe and
poverty, the slaves of capital? Bond slaves
are they to those who make them stepping
stones to luxury and elegance and ease, to the
higher realms of thought and happiness where
those who are chained to earth in degradation,
gnorance and want, can never rise.
But with advancing civilization and increasing
volutions they are beginning to make special
demands. Rulers no longer dare to wrest the
results of a man's labor from him by force, it is
now done by cunning legislation. It is not to be
supposed that the ruling classes are necessarily
destitute of all human feelings, because in all
ages they have ground the masses to powder.
It is not because they hate man but love money.
Believing that might makes right, that self-
preservation is the first law of nature, not
choosing to labor themselves, it became ne-
cessary to grind out of others the results of
their toils.
Rich men feel no spite or prejudice against
the poor, the black man or the woman, but it is
the law of animal life for the strong to prey on
the weak, and until we pass altogether from this
dynasty of force into that of moral power, until,
by education, elevation, and enfranchisement,
we make all citizens equal and strong, this will
he the law of life. Until capital and labor are
linked together by the higher law of affection,
which is woman, craft and cunning will subor-
dinate strength and activity, and the few will
monopolize the wealth of the world. When we
remember that the finances of a nation are the
basis of its existenoe, its progress, its religion,
education, art, science, literature, and that
the cardinal virtues rest on an equal distribu-
tion of money and intelligence, it becomes a
serious question how we shall undermine the
monied aristocracy, the proud monopolies in
this country that are now absorbing into them-
selves our inexhaustable mines of gold, silver,
copper and coal; the wealth of our majestic
forests and rolling prairies, making the rich
richer and the poor poorer, blocking the car
of progress by exhausting one half the race
with excessive toil and hardship, and enervat-
ing the rest with excessive luxury and ease ; on
the one side paralyzing the mind in the con-
stant struggle for bread, and on the other side
from lack of necessity to struggle at all. The
inequalities in life work fearful wrongs in ajl
directions, and end in the demoralization and
death of all. e. o. s.
V. SOROSIS
The World tells us that t£e Sorosis has held,
its fourth regular meeting, and passed seven
resolutions. If it were not for the columns of
the World the public would be left in ignorance
of much that the daughters of Eve are now
doing on both continents.
It is a lfttle singular that with all the preten-
sions' of republicans to interest in the elevation
of woman, that it is left for democratic papers
to chronicle the steps of progress. But what
are these 'seven resolutions? We, of The
Revolution, confess to our full share of the
curiosity that is said to characterize our sex,
and it is with the greatest impatience we wait
to hear what the Sorosis proposes to do. As
these seven resolutions, no doubt, contain
work, we trust
the same enterprising attache of the World
that found out all the secrets of the business
meeting of the late Woman's Rights conven-
tion, which was held with closed doors, wil
give us the pith and point of these seven re-
solutions. Nothing has occurred for a long time
in elite circles that has roused so much inter-
est and cariosity as the formation of the So-
losis Club, and we hear the question asked on
all sides, What dp they intend to do.
A good work for some women is set forth in
an abl; letter by Daniel Croly, in the May num-
ber of the new monthly, Public Spirit.
Not as discussion leads to action, we would
sugget to the Sorosis to hold conversational
once a week in the houses of those who have
large parlors to throw open, and discuss in
turn 11 the leading questions of the day. Let
them be free, like receptions for ladies and gen-
tlemen, no refreshments, no elaborate toilets,
taxing the lady of the house in no way but to
light her gas. To particularize, you decide at
your next meeting to have a conversational at
Mrs.-------, to discuss the question of green-
back education, fashion, or labor, for example.
Having decided which one, read, think, write,
talk, get all the information you can on the
point. The evening arrives ; at seven or half-
past, the company assemble ; a presiding officer
is chosen for the evening merely. Each person
then gives in turn the result of his or her
thought, or reading, allowing each one five
minutes. It a pleasant discussion ensues after
all have spoken, that would add to the interest.
At nine, o'clock have music, dancing until ten
o'clock, and then go home.
This would not only c ultivate pleasant social
relations between ladies and gentlemen of all
sects and parties, but would educate women as
well as men into a knowledge of all the grave
questions of national life. Young ladies and
gentlemen admitted to such circles would
soon acquire much general information,. and
a taste for thoughtful conversation. We were
once, a member of such a conversational for
three years, and shall never forget the pleasure*
and profit we derived from it. As the Sorosis
increases in wealth and numbers it can have
some spacious club-room of its own, where,
with beautiful pictures, flowers, music and bril-
liant conversation, it can do more to refine and
exalt society, and save young men and women
from the degradations of vice than oan ever be
done by repressive legislation. e. c. s.
What a Cauthagenian Wqman Pro.*-At
the fall- of Charthage, Hasdrubal, the Carthage-
nian commander, begged his life of the Roman
general, as all Carthage was burning to the
ground. His noble wife standing near, re-
proached him for his want of bravery ; and
determined not also to adorn the triumph of the
victor at Rome, cast herself, holding her chil-
dren to her bosom, into tbe raging flames, and
perished with her beloved city.
Was Hasdrubal the divinely constituted
head of that family ?
knowledge and intelligence, the people have be- their platform, faith and future
gun to feel their power, and instead of blind re-


322
WJJAT THE PRESS SAYS OF US.
Traaslatod from Lg Siecle, Paris, April 16, 1868.
The Revolution is the title of a journal born in
New York with the present year, 1868, and which certainly
merits its title. It is nothing loss than a Revolution
which this sheet attempts, and what a Revolution I The
motto ol tho paper announces boldly : Man, his rights,
and nothing more ; woman, her rights, *nd nothing
less.
One sees at a plan cc the end which The Revolu-
tion has in view. In its first.number it thus defines
its principles: In politics, intelligent universal suf-
frage, without distinction of sox or color ; 'equal remu-
neration for equal work ; eight hours of work for both
sexes ; abolition of standing armies ; no more political
despotism ; all for the people and by the people. In re-
ligion, science instead of superstition ; God less high
and man less low; love uniting heaven and earib, and
all inankiDd. IiYsocial life, practical, not theoretical edu-
cation ; facts, notfictious ; virtues, not vices ; water de-
throning alcohol; a healthy mind in a healthy body.
Let us add, The Revolution declares that, de-
voted to the reformation and moral improvement of
mankind, it will never insert scandals, nor quack adver-
tisements, those things which find their way into the
family circle under cover of even religious journals 1.
Up to the present time, The Revolution has kept
its promise faithfully. We congratulate it.
What seems above all Revolutionary in this new paper
is, that its founder, publisher and editor are three wo-
menMiss Parker Pillsbury, Miss Susan B. Anthony and
Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and these three female
pens accomplish fittingly, every week, their self-imposed
task. Wo observed, particularly in the number of 26th
February, an article entitled: Is voting a natural
right? The author, Miss Parker Pillsburj, replies en-
ergetically in the affirmative.
Now, continues the writer, all natural right de-
mands forcibly the conditions necessary to itsenjoy-
ment and preservation. Without this it could not exist, ;
The right of suffrage is as clear, as sacred as the right to
live, to seek happiness and liberty. It is the comple-
ment of these last, and their only safeguard. The right
of.existence would be nothing without the right to ac-
quire and possess the means necessary to existence.
Moreover, it is derision to speak to a nation of liberty
if every Individual who goes to compose it does nothold
in his or her hand the vote which insures and consecrates
this liberty. The right of the slave to live, is no right at
all, if the possessor of this slave can deprive him of all
the means of preserving and beautifying'the life which
he is willing to allow Mm. He can live, but it is through
the tolerance of another individual. It is the same with
liberty: a nation is not really free but on condition of
being able to affirm the right of all its citizens exactly
where, wlienandhowitplcasesthem. If otherwise, their
liberty is, indeed, but a servitude mere or less disguised.
Their fetters exist none tho less from being Mdden under
flowers or gold!
Behold, an American woman who, indeed, does not
reason badly I
In the third number of The Revolution one finds
many striking statements which clearly announce the
spirit and object of this new sheet. We read there, that
in the workiug classes of New York there is a majority
of 88,000 women, and that, among teachers in the United
States, more than 100,000 are women I Behold!.'
cries 4 The Revolution to its readers an d u ubscribers,
in exchange for ten cents for a single number, or two
dollars for an annual subscription, we will make known
to you your rights, and lead you on to conquest.
We believe it our duty to add that the appearance of
this new journal, which has now reached its fourteenth
or fifteenth number, is regarded as a phenomenon by
other journals which all, with the exception of the Times
of New York, occupy themselves, some-with raillery like
the World, others with blame like^the Sunday Times, and
a certain number, like the Sunday News, in open praise.
The Revolution registers all with calmnessde-
fends itself with talentgoes on successfully.
We must confess, we regret deeply that this journal,
assuming to be the organ of Young America, seems
willing to bind itself to things as old as the poetical
lucubrations of Mr. G. F. Train, and to men so com-
promised as President Andrew Johnson. It is true that
it was one of the first numbers of The Revolution
which was not favorable to the Republican party ; it was
an error of that journal, an error which it will soon re-
cognize. But here is something which is perhaps still
more serious. The Revolution wishes America to
free herself from Eurcpe. We are quite willing that
there should be in 'America a system of American
r

finance, that is just; that they establish in the. United
States or multiply the national discounting banks,
Credit Fonder and Mobilier Societies, etc. We wish in
that, the New World may he happier than the bid. But
what we cannot understand is, that The Revolution, '
which demands full liberty for labor and American pro-
ductions, should demand prohibition of labor and Euro-
pean productions! Here is a contradiction which should
not exist. A paper which desires to see its country sur-
rouud herself with a wall like that of China, raay still
perhaps call itself the The Revolution, but it will be
a retrograde Revolution. And what will then become of
the national cry : Go ahead ? We are convinced that
our young fellcw-laborer will not be slow in correcting
this error, and that, true to its motto (granting it its full
meaning), it will soon inscribe upon its banner : America,
its rights, and nothing more; Europe, its rights, and
notbing less! B. Sainte-Anne.
We are very sorry that Parker Pillsbury is not
a woman, that we might disprove the common
assertion that women are creatures of intuition,
not reason. We have, however, this consola-
tion, that if we cannot reason ourselves, we like
those men best who do, especially when they
use their reasomto prove our claims just. You
do not understand us, Mr. Editor, if you sup-
pose The Revolution was started to advo-
cate the views of any party or man. As to Mr.
Johnson, we neither approve of the man, his
policy or party, though it may be truly said he
has no party to-day, for the republicans and de?
mocrats alike repudiate him and his plan of re-
construction.
We are not favorable to the republican party
because it tried to insert the word male in
the Federal Constitution where it never had
been, and because one of its leaders, Charles
Sumner, apologized in the-Senate when he pre-
sented a protest from the women of the nation
against thus amending the Constitution. He
said it was not the time for women to press
their demands, as this was the negros hour.
Again the republicans reported against Wo-
mans Suffrage in the New York Constitutional
Convention, and defeated it in Kansas where it
was submitted to a vote of the people. These
are a few of the many adverse positions this
party has held against Womans Suffrage during
the last four years, showing that we have good
reasons for our want of faith in the integrity of
republican leaders. .As Mr. Train writes over
his own name, we are in no way responsible for
what he says. Observe our Prospectus says,
we will discuss the various subjects to which
you refer, not advocate. Our editors even differ
on some points. Mr. Pillsbury believes that we
should have an educational qualification for suf-
frage iu every State, to take effect in 72, giving
the freedmen time to learn to read. Mrs. Stanton
has always believed in universal suffrage, and.
advocated it without any qualification.
In regard to industry and productions* Miss
Anthony is an earnest advocate of protection of
home manufactures, while Mr. Pillsbury and
Mrs. Stanton believe in Free Trade.
We believe that all men and women have the
right to the fruits of their labor, to make, in-
vent, discover what they Gan, and sell in any
market in the world where they can get the best
price, .without, any interference on |he part of
governments. The best government is that
which secures the greatest freedom to its sub-
jects, in locomotion, speech, trade And the press.
With nations, as individuals, the interest of one
is the interest of all, and the highest good of
one is the highest good of all. It must be as
suicidal for a nation to build a Chinese wall
round itself and Jive independent of all the world
beside, as for an individual to shut himaalf up
in- his own house and make for himself every
implement he uses in daily life.
From the N. Y. Daily Tribune.
'The last number of The Revolution is unusually
spicy.
We thank the noble Tribune for its elaborate
and oft-repeated notices of us. We feel, how-
ever, that many such notices will hardly repay
the debt of gratitude due us from its editor for
all our frankness and faithfulness iu endeavor-
ing to educate him into the idea of a republican
government. We have talked to Horace like a
mother, to bring him to repentance for his
wickedness in trying to build up on this conti-
tinent (in the face of the Monroe doctrine) on 2 of
the most hateful andunnatural forms of aristoe-
racy* a mans government:a government
which degrades the mother of the race below the
most ignoranttypes of manhood, andmakes her
the subject aod victim of her own sons. If the
virtuous, wealthy, educated women of this coun-
try are to be governed by men, we say the
fewer the better, and let them be of the most
exalted character. While we have clearly
pointed out to Horace the error of his ways,
with tears in our eyes, he shows no signs of
contrition ; on the contrary, with lofty' com-
placency, he pours out the vials of his wrath on
the devoted heads of the degenerate democracy
whose platform is a white mans govern-
ment.
Now, will the Tribune tell us the difference
between a mans government and a white
mans government? Do they not alike violate
the republican idea ?
From the Albany (N. Y.) Morning Express.
" The Revolution, under the business management
of Miss Anthony, and the editorial direction of Mrs.
Stanton and Parker Pillsbury, is a sprightly, saucy, vi-
vacious, intrepid sheet, extravagant on the woman ques-
tion, abomioable in its Train-inspired financial crotchets,
but always foil of entertaining matter and frequently
distinguished by good- thought; It is not as much a
Revolution in fact as the original rostrum efforts of its
organizers, but it is the attainment of a new degree of
sagacity, because it recognizes that the press is' the
moulder of public opinion. We wish it tho most abun-
dant success. \
Here we sit in.our sanctum a staid, thought-
ful, solemn person on the shady side of fifty,
with our white hairs like a crown of glory on
our brow, and are filled with surprise at such
adjectives as saucy and extravagant as ap-
plied to us. How these editors, when they get
their pens sharpened, do throw the English lan-
guage into pi,* and use adjectives in the most
incongruous way. We occupy ourselves study-
ing the constitutions and laws of our country,
endeavoring to persuade men to do justice and
women to ask it, simply claiming that a woman
has the same right to do what she can that a
man has, and a right to equal pay for the same
work. What is extravagant in that? Bobbed
of all those rights most sacred to citizens of a
republic, we call on the white male to make
immediate and unconditional restitution, is
there anything saucy in that ? If a man should
pick your pocket on the sidewalk and you
should seize him by the throat and compel him
to return your property, he would no douht
think you saucy and extravagant. Yet, what
is his crime compared with that of rulers who
govern subjects without their consent, tax them
without representation, and try them in their
courts without a jury of their own peers ? The
men who, in their constitutions, rank their
mothers with idiots, criminals, rebels, and those
who bet on elections, are the saucy ones, and
those who use not only their own rights but all
those that belong to women and black men are
the extravagant ones. We pray you, Mr. Ex-
press, help us to mould public sentiment aright



aftrSn-olMtinC0-*
323
on this question, and then you will not" have
lived in vain.
From the Michigan (Ann Arbor) Argus.
We have read of "The Revolution, and extracts
from it have occasionally attracted our notice. Bub now
'a eopy of that spicy sheet has found its way to our
table.
How do you like it ? RJease tell the women
of Michigan, especially, if you think well of us,
if not, keep silence. We want 100,000 sub-
scribers and we hope the women will help us
roll them up. .Let those women in Michigan
who do not believe in Womans Suffrage, send
their Objections to The Revolution, our
columns are open to both sidesi
From the Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle.
The Revolution. This independent, stirring
paper, with Susan B. Anthony as proprietress, sets an ex-
ample for its cotemporaries worthy of imitation, in the
elements of activity, firmness and unwavering prin-
ciples, which so vividly pervade' every article within its
columns. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Parker Salisbury
are the editors. They ask- their numerous readers to
help roll up the list of subscribers to 100,000, to ensure
complete success.
We hope every young man in Harvard will
buy a copy of The Revolution and give it
a thoughtful reading. As they are to be our fu-
' ture Presidents, Senators and Congressmen, we
want them to get ready for the new order, when
at least half the desks in our Capitol will be oc-
cupied by feminine legislators. -
From the Machias (Me.) Republican.
The Revolution.We have received this sprightly
and ably conducted advocate for Womans Rights, etc.,
ever siuce it was published, and have perused it with a
good deal of interest. In many parts of the country
the Woman' Question is rapidly becoming popular,
and has enlisted in its cause some of the ablest and
most popular men of the country. Away down East the
women do not have such a hankering for politics and the
turmoil of elections, as seem to predominate in the fair
sex of the middle and Western states. We say, go
aheadw ith your Revolution, and venture to predict,
that whenever (he elective franchise is extended to the
ladies, they will not mane a bad use of it.
We would here state that The Revolution is
handsomely printed on fine white paper, and if any of
our lady readers want to know what'is being said and
done for the welfare of their sex at large, they should
enclose t^o dollars to The Revolution.
We are sorry to hear that the women down
East are in such a torpid state. If you will
send us their names we will scatter The
Revolution like a fire brand among them,
and rouse them to vigilance. They need warm-
ing up, those East winds are too chilling. Let
the daughters of Hancock and Adams awake.
From the Tama County (Iowa) Republican.
T?te Revolution.It is a live, spicy paper, full of
interesting and instructive reading, and should he read
and taken in every household in the country, for it is
really the friend of women, and worth a dozen of the
namby-pamby papers that are flooding our land, to the
injury of the rising generation. Away with this light
literature and send for The Revolution.
This comes from Senator Grimes's state. A
private letter tells us the people are very in-
dignant at his late vote for acquitting the Presi-
dent. Let the people break up the present sys-
tem of nominating available men by party
caucuses, and select their representatives for
themselves. We are not making a fair experi-
ment of self-government when the people leave
all their interests to the management of a few
wily politicians.
From the American Journal of Mining, New York.
The Revolution.The Revolutions which usually
engross us are somewhat different from the one now
claiming our attention, and we therefore turn over the
pages of the neat hebdomadal bearing the above title,
with feelings of a novel nature, hut with a docile spirit.
The present is not the first, but the lOth number, how-
ever, and our tardy notice can only be accounted for by
the confession that it has taken some time to realize that
it ie a Revolution of facts, not of wheels, now patiently
awaiting consideration. Being at length fully cognizant
of what is required, we willingly extend a kindly greet-
ing to our new visitor. The subjects treated both in
this and past numbers have been pleasantly varied, and
handled with vivaoity. A questionable sense of wrong
underlies all the articles, which is not confined to any
limits, but forcibly bursts iorlh on every page. In
perusing its columns we see with painful distinctness
the figure of woman In all the grandeur of offended dig-
nity claiming her rights and nothing less, and close
our eyes to the disturbing vision from the conviction
that its presence would fatally unnerve us in the dis-
charge of the stern duties daily exacted of us. With
the hope that right may triumph, we turn again to our
own revolutions, which we have- for a few moments
luckily forgotten, trusting that the Revolution will be
effected without the loss of blood.
Ratheropen your eyes to the awful guilt of
your position, Every man that does not speak
and write to secure justice to womau is against
us; there is no neutral ground on this question
to-day. As your journal treats of mining we ex-
pect you to go to the foundation principles of
every question.
From the Coach-Makers International Journal, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
The Revolution.In conning the columns of
The Revolution we find but a little to condemn
and much to admire. In Woman's Suffrage we can-
not see anything so terribly shocking as many, to whom
the mere mention of such a thing has been a great bug-
bear, would have us believe. In truth, we cannot see
how either of our present political parties can consist-
ently oppose the movement in its favor. Believing that
no taxation without representation is necessarily a
fundamental principle of a government strictly repub-
lican in form, the honest radical advances the claims of
the negro to the right of the ballot, and upon this self-
same principle the democrat bases his demand that the
right of suffrage should be restored to the repentant
rebel. And is not our own great Army of Progress
battling for a greater equality before the law?
Do not we cry lustily against oppression, and in op-
position to the conferring of privileges and immunities
upon one class that are not enjoyed by another? If
there is one attribute that ennobles a cause more than
another -it is that of consistency. These are but a lew
rambling thoughts suggested by the perusal of The
Revolution. We do not commit ourselves to the sup-
port of the principle of suffrage without regard to race,
color or sex ; neither do we oppose it, but we- do claim
it an impossibility to refute this assertion that all man-
kind view a reform only through a lens constructed of
their own wrongs, and that charity and consistency
enter but little into the canvass.
"Well said for the coach-makers. We wish they
were our law-makers also. We look to the la-
boring men for the triumphs of our question,
because they will see .how the intierests of labor
are affected in the degradation of the laborer.
Because woman is disfranchised she gets half
pay for her work.
From the Vineyard Gazette, Edgartown, Mass.
The Revolution is just as sprightly as at first, and
the proprietress, Susan B. Anthony, is bound that it
shall be a power in the land. She wants 100,000 sub-
scribers, and will send specimen copies to all who ap-
preciate its demands for women.
And whatever Susan is bound to do she ac-
complishes,, and she will no doubt have her 100,-
000 subscribers at the end of the year, then
The Revolution will be a daily, and in 72
we shall choose our President, a sober, honest,
noble man, if we have to go to the Rocky Moun-
tains to find him ; if we cannot find such a man
we will take a woman.
From the Wapello (Iowa) Republican.
The Revolution.It is full of vim and spirit, and
if it does not make its mark the fault will not be in lack
of pluck and determination. Its motto is, Principles,
not Policy ; Justice, not Favors.Men, their Rights and
nothing more ; Women, their Rights and nothing less.
The ladies should subscribe for it largely.
Iowa speaks right out every tune, We trav
elled all through the Western states last sum-
mer and were rejoiced with the vim, spirit and
pluck of those Western people. We do not in-
tend to deprive men of their rights, as a man
in Iowa thought we should if we took the word
male out of the constitution. I am op-
posed,, said he, to striking out the word male
because then the men could not vote.
From the Boone County (Iowa) Advocate.
The Revolution, an-out-and-out, plain spoken ad
vocate of Womans Rights.
From the Pittsburg (Pa.) Daily Gazette.
The Revolution is, of course, a journal without a
peer in its special department of social and political agi-
tation. The Revolution has undertaken a very
large contract, and we shall make it a point to observe its
weekly progress, pledging in advance our admiration if
not our convictions.
Pray, do more .than take observations, help us
with your able pen to fulfill the large contract
we have undertaken. Back up your admiration
by stirring up the women of Pennsylvania to
send us hundreds of subscribers. Men are
equally interested with us in ushering'iu a bet-
ter day for all.
WHAT THE PEOPLE SAT TO US.
Volusia, Fla., April, 1868.
Mas. StantonDear Madam: Can you credit the as-
sertion that we ore still so overshadowed by the dark
ages as to have remained up to date in total igno-
rance of The Revolution? It comes to mo, this
seventh number, like a gleam of blessed sunshine at the
close of one of our fierce autumnal gales, and of course
I like it. It bears no resemblance to the staff of life *
as manufactured in this region, which usually prerents
an undone appearance in every part except the covering.
I feel a lively interest in this work of advocating the
claims of women and negroes to a recognized place in
the councils of'the state and nation. Just now the
negro seems to have the lead, not that be is considered
the better man, but just at this time the more avail-
able for party purposes. Now, because we demand full
recognition as citizens and-individuals!, it does not fol-
low that we all desire to hold office, mid I think if we
oould only impress this idea on the minds of our lead-'
ing men, many of them would withdraw their opposi-
tion to this movement, for isnt it more a dislike to "ad-
mit a ajew class of competitors after the loaves and
fishes than any idea of incompetency on the part o
woman lo understand, or to be able to carry out consis-
tent views of political economy. It is usually urged by
superficial thinkers, and most men, and women too, are
superficial on the subject of womans wider sphere of
activity, that she already has alarger scope for her powers
and a wider field of action than she can fillthat there
is no bar to hinder any woman from doing or being any-
thing for whioh.she Will fit herself or has the courage to at-
tempt. But I do not understand the complaint o) woman
to be a dearth of labor, but rather that, by her depend-
ent position, she is obliged to labor beyond ber physi-
cal strength, in assocations not congenial, simply because
having no voice in the making of the laws by which she
must be governed, ber work is so poorly paid that a
liberal education which, alone, would enable her to
compete with her brother, is beyond her reach I How
different will be ber position when holding in her hand
the pow:er to determine her own destiny! Not that
many would make haste to exercise the right of suf-
frage, but the knowledge that her hands' held that au-
thority would be sufficient to command the respect of
each toward the other when struggling in the same
paths of honor or of duty!
It is useless to talk of a liberal education for woman,
so long as matrimony is ber total extinguisher; and
this must be, so long as husband and wife are but one
before the law and that one the man. Of what object,
in such a wilderness as this, would be a knowledge of
the sciences or the fine arts ? and yet the few practical
women of this country, with a voice in its management,
would make a revolution in some of its practices l
Imagine a whole country, almost equal in area to the
State of Rhode Island, and not a church or school-house
within its borders, and hardly a native inhabitant wbo
can read or write 1
Did you never hear men say, in derision, when at-
tempting to argue the question of the practicability of
womans yotingthat there was no law to preyent


324
Sttue lUvaintiati.
women from chopping wood or doing other out-of-door
labor if they wished, as he knew of ? I should like to have
such men take a tramp through this section of the country
and try their hand at just such work with some of these
brawny-armed women who certainly show far greater
dexterity in wielding axe and hoe than with mop and
broom Necessity makes many compromises with law
and fashion, qnd the war has shown ns that womanly
delicacy and refinement was not out of placereceived
no rudo shock from actual contact with out-of-door la-
bor ; and many a true woman, who, perhaps, might have
been slaked at the thought of casting a vote, carried
on the farm or kept her husbands business in good
order while he did battle for his rights. The most
liberal of men setm to find it hard to relinquish the
idea of a sort c ownership in woman; and however
earnest the o^iay he for her enfranchisement, it is still
hard for them to accord Equal Righls to their wives,
So strlko hard blows, true to the mark, that such and all
other mon may he relieved from the grave responsibility
of representing any one but themselves. e. h. h.
The fact that the white male is begin-
ning to concede the vote, while he turns up the
whites of his eyes at the idea of women holding
office shows us that it is good policy to demand
everything, and then we shall be sure and get
something. Henry Ward Beecher, talking to
some abolitionists who feared to advocate Suf-
frage for Women because it might block the
black mans chance, said, bait your hook
with a woman, and perhaps you will catch a
negro. But the republicans and abolitionists
tljrew the woman overboard in the last election,
and lost the black man also. We were in Ire-
land at the time OConnell was holding his re-
peal meetings. Meeting him one day, we said,
Do you hope to secure a repeal of the union ?u
No, said he, but it is always good policy
to claim the uttermost, and you will be sure to
g:t something. But we do claim our share of
the offices, and a place in all the profitable and
honorable employments. Of course, those of
us who have brains do not propose to chop
wood or dig ditches, but to be lawyers, judges,
physicians, ministers, postmistresses, senators
or president. Victoria, with her large family,
supported by the nation, is better off than she
would be running a sewing machine in a Lon-
don garret. So would an educated wom^n be
better off as President on $25,000 a year than
teaching school at $500. Bread and the ballot
go together.
As to m atri m otiy' be ing a total extinguisher!
under the new regime it is to be an equal part-
nership. When women can support themselves
they will soon end the old idea that the husband
and wife are one, and that one the husband.
Dignity, virtue and independence go hand in
hand. It gives us great pleasure to receive so
many excellent letters from Southern women,
believing as wedo that through the moral power
and the West are soon to sit down in sweet
counsel together. We should be glad if we
could receive a cordial invitation to lecture to
Southern women on this question.
Office of the Doogb County Republican,)
EassoN, Minu., May 2d, 1868. 1
Publisher Revolution "Dear Sister : Will you
have the kindness to place the Republican on your ex-
change list. Will reciprocate by saying good words ;
for your Revolution deserves an extensive circu-
lation. I have always advocated the principle of equal
rights between the sexes and that to improve and elevate
woman, is but to improve and elevate man ; that by na-
ture our interests and privileges are equal, and for
cither to assume the supremacy, in a religious, political,
or auy other point of view, would be hut to degrade the
other.
Wishing you abundant success iu your very laudable
enterprise, I have the honor to subscribe myself,
Yours, truly, U. B. Shaves.
That is the true idea. There can be in the
nature of things no real antagonism between
man and woman. Whatever exalts woman
exalts man, and whatever degrades one sex de-
grades the other. Ours is not a movement for
Womans Bights, but human rights. We shall
thank you for all the good words you can truth-
fully say in our behalf.
Huso, Nevada.
Dear Revolution : What a noble field you are la-
boring IB. How you must appreciate the nobleness of
your work, when you see what is to be realized from the
success of woman gaining those rights which will make
her thesocial and political equal ofman. I praynotonly
for an early harvest in the cause, but au abundant yield.
I have read The Revolution with profit and plea-
sure, and feel so sensibly the justice of its cause that I
wish to be marshalled with its coming hosts of sub-
scribers.
Yours truly, w. o.
699 W. 5th st., Cincinnati, O.)
May 4th, 1868. J
Dear Miss Anthony : I see you have not taken our
sturdy little chick, the Spelling Reform, under your ma-
ternal wings, or if you have it has not yet been suffered
to peep. But, dear me, when 1 think of all the re-
forms you are hovering, it is evident, as Mi*. Train says
about Old Speck, you will have to spread yourself
considerably to guard all from the hawks.
I assure you, I draw one long breath of gratitude on
every Saturday morning, when the carrier brings my
- Revolution. 1 enjoy the whole contents. The edi-
torials which speak so earnestly and straight out the
convictions' of those who write them; the comments
and orilicisms of your brothers of the editorial ira-
ternity; the strictures made by many of your corres-
pondents on certain things they dont like ; and your
apt replies to their.carping, or frank admissions of error.
I welcome the letters of George Francis Train, who I
verily believe is the least understood and most under-
rated man before the public. Why, to have given street
railways and The Revolution to benefit the world,
should alone secure him immoitality ; not to speak of a
moral xecord that puts nearly all Washington to the
blush.
I read even the financial reports and Wall street chat,
though much of it. is Greek to me; but then 1 know
The Revolution circulates where such shot is un*
derstood and appreciated, and also hits ; certainly you,
at the very centre of monied evil, know best how to
wake people up to a sense of it. So God speed The
Revolution in its mighty work. - .
Yoo told us, wimens rite agitators, hwen we had a
favor tu ask, tu go tu the demokratik papers. I sent
the enklozd leter tu the Sensinati Enkwirer, and yoo
se thee publisht it. Rev. N. P. Gadis is speking brav'
wurds for wuman, and dr06 krouded houzes everi Sunda
nit. He givs the men plan wurds, as Miui Wortli duz in
her artikl.
Yoors tu help as oportuniti ofers,
Eliza V. Burns.
We are very glad to know that a woman h as
invented a new phonetic alphabet. It is a
grand step in progress when the English lan-
guage is spelled according to sound instead of
some arbitrary rule that bothers the best of us,.
aud disheartens many a child and ignorant
foreigner from- ever trying to read or write.'
Mary Wortles letter may be found in another
column.
Havre, France, April 21,1868.
Mrs. StantonMadame; In addressing to you the
publications of the Peace Union, I call your high and
enlightened attention to this work, which is an energetic
profcestagainstthe oppression of brute force.
' Wo address ourselves to mothers, to sisters, as to our
most sympathizing allies in this universal campaign
which opens under the sacred flag of The RightPro-
tector of the Oppressed.
' May our earnest voice touch your heart and thus se-
cure to us an eminent ally.
Accept, Madame, the homage of our sentiments of
profound esteem for your character, and of admiration
for your talent. J. Fantallier,
Secretary.of the Peace Union.
We hail all these movements towards peace,
and regard the education of woman as one of
the most poweiful means to this end. Man re-
presents justice and force, woman mercy and
love, and it is because we have the male ele-
ment alone in government, that we fee on all
sides violence and war. Woman knows the
cost of life better than man does, and when he*
thought is felt in the nation, onr whole criminal
code will be essentially modified.
Boston, May 14,1868.
Dear Mrs. Revolution : Each week the tamo
seems longer as I look for you. There comes always
with you a vitalizing power that sends the blood through
me like wine and a sound like the hum of bees, busy,
earnest, harmonious ; and I hold my breath while I try
to keep pace with your lightning thought. And I turn
you over and over to see if there is not still more, after
I have devoured your contents, for-while you feed wo-
mans hungry soul, you make her more hungry, you
revolutionize her. It she listens to you once, she cannot
again sink into indifference.
Lizzie LaPierr Daniels.
These earnest words give us new resolution
to make our paper all it should be, to those who
watch and wait. May the good and true wo-
men from all parts of the country send us their
thoughts that we may know how they feel as
to the enfranchisement of their sex.
, Nyaok, May 15, 1868.
Miss Anthony : The Young Mens Christian Union of
Nyack is, I think, the only .Christian Union or association
in the land, that can rightly he called liberal or pro-
gressive. In its reading-room is always to be found the
last number of The Revolution, the Banner of
Light, and the Circular.
The second section of the second article of the Young
Mens Christian Union reads thus : Any man who is a
member, in good standing, of an Evangelical church,
may become an active member. Active members only
may bold office.
An amendment has already been presented, which
strikes out the word man substituting the word persou,
and which cuts out-the word Evangelical.
Most respectfully yours, Frederic R. Marvin.
We hope some of the bright girls of Nyack
will now study up all the questions of the day,
join the association and take part in the dis-
cussions. Let it not be said that women are
not ready to enter the doors as fast as man opens
them. In behalf of the women of Nyack, we
thank the young men and rejoice over their
liberality and progress.
Naples, Ontario Co., N. Y.,)
May 14, 1868. j
Dear Miss Anthony : There seems to me hot a shadow
of a doubt, but tbat God meant woman should exercise
the elective franchise or power of choice equally with
man. Choose, ye this day whom ye will serve, was not
spoken to the male alone, but to mankind, both male and
female.
In Gods government of sentient beings, He requires
all irrespective of sex, race, or color, to chocse for them-
selves, If God be your choice, serve Him, if Baal, serve
him. Mans injustice and deception taught women in
a very-early day how tulile the attempt to trust him as a
protector, for his first act after his disobedience to God
was, to show his ingratitude Jor Gods first and best
gift to him, viz., woman, by shirking responsibility.
Had he refused to disobey and advised the woman not
to, then he would have been blameless. But I suspect
he desired to taste the forbidden fruit, so practiced the
art of magnetism {as has so often since been done) to
draw her into making the first move, thereby to screen
himself, hence his answer, The woman thou gavest to
be with me, she did it. Again, God said it was not
good for man to be alone, that was His reason for pre-
senting him with a fit help or help meet. Nor did He
limit that help to the kitchen and nursery, nor even to
teaching school, provided that she will teach cheap
(as Lucy Stone remarked at Seneca Falls in her address
before the Womans Rights Convention), so we may safely
infer that God designed she should help wherever and
whenever the best interests of both require her to do so,
not only for utility but to develop her God-given powers
and be a praise to her Maker.
The governmental economy of the great ruler of the
universe is democratic. Equal Rights and privileges
extended to all, being the motto. Each individual is held
responsible before the law. No one disputes womans
right on equal terms with inan (aside from trial by a jury
of. her own peers) to the jail, the gallows and the tax
list. It is only when she attempts the elevation of her
sex, as well as the other, that the cry is raised, out of
her sphere. But her sphere is only limited by her


ability. When husband goes to Syracuse, or Saratoga,
or any other place and leaves her in charge, she may
then even saw and draw wood, groom the horses, attend
to the herd, sheep, pigs, work in the vir eyard, corn, hay,
or harvest field, no tear? of her becoming masculine,
unless she goes into business upon her own response
bility.
We have no adequate means to iathom all the insult,
abuse, and degradation that is and has been practiced
upon women, simply because the power is not in her
hands to obtain redress.
Men deem even the protection which the ballot affords
insufficient, and have eqsconed themselves behind walls
of Masonry, excluded women, and christened it
free." e. m. a.
Please accept the above crude thoughts from a back-
woods country woman, and do with them as you choose.
My business this summer is housework, out-door
chores, and tying up grapevines to the wires when the
woathcr will permit. Ten thousand thanks for The
Revolution." God speed the right.
Yours, etc., Elizabeth M. Atwell.
These women all write as if they understood
the situation, and were fully ready for the
Revolution we are inaugurating. The men will
begin to think, after reading some of these let-
ters, that the women have not been so effectu-
ally hoodwinked as they supposed. Are you not
out of your sphere, Mrs. Atwell, raising grapes ?
Send us some when they are ripe and let us
see if the feminine element improves them.
WASHINGTON LETTER.
Washington, May 16, 1868.
Mbs. E. C. Stanton : The logic of to-day, as it comes
to the responsible, loyal portion of our country is,
What shall we do to be saved.
When the sad and terrible truth of the defection of
Senators in whom we had trusted to carry out a mea-'
sure fraught with the life and liberties of American citi-
zens was burned into our souls, it was a relief to leave
the capital, and .attend the anniversaries that meet once
a year in-New York, to compare notes and report pro-
gress.
Not being iu time for the anti-slavery meeting, which
we regretted, our first inquiry in regard to it showed
that the usual uncompromising demand for the rights of
the black man Was the order of the day, and that his
only security to citizenship in this republic was through
the ballot, which they demanded for him, in every State
of the Union j to all of which, had I been presont, I
would have given hearty assent,
Next came the Equal Rights Associationa grand as-
semblage of common sense men and women from all
parts of the Northern and Eastern Stateswho made
their usual protests against the usurpation of the gov-
ernment in enforcing on woman taxation without re-
presentation," thus obstructing their legitimate and re-
sponsible influence in the republic, and claiming that
through the ballot alone can v oman And a field of use-
fulness commensurate with her ability and aspirations,
and that to withhold, it from her is to delay peace and
prosperity, if not hasten the final ruin of tho govern-
ment and the country ; that it is a crime against
humanity, and a sin against God 1 Following the utter-
ance of this protest and demand, which was earnestly
and harmoniously sustained by the meeting, came an
appeal to practical effort, by agitation of the subject,
in the usual forms of educating public sentiment, and
by seizing the present favorable opportunity to petition
Congress so to amend the charter of the District of
Columbia, while under revision, as to remove the dis-
ability to Woman Suffrage.
Then came the Universal Peace Association, where wo
found many of the leading minds of the above-named
meetings, and among theni some of the oldest standard -
. bearers of freedom who have aqted during the last quar-
ter of a century. It Was good to see their faces, and
hear their ripened conviction of human duty, in rela-
tion to war, and the conditions necessary to peace.
The latter brought rich contributions of thought and
eloquence from the several speakers interested in the
overthrow of popular evils, and the former, by reciting
facts concerning the war of the rebellion, intimated that
from a Christian standpoint this nation was no nearer
the Kingdom of Heaven now than before the war. That
the sacrifice of five thousand millions of dollars and the
loss of five hundred thousand lives (that the violation of
the principles of kindness and affection implanted by
God* find at!ytiofipA by the motto*? df the race)/ that the
Iff fUvtftuUtftt.
325
check Upon legitima.te industry and education must im-
pose burdens ot economy and untold evils upon the fu-
ture generations as great as those we have aimed to de-
stroy.
In this opinion Mrs. Cora Y. Daniels could not agree,
and said that the loyalists of the South would welcome a
military despotism sooner than a peace that leaves them
in the hands of the present rebels ; and her presents-
tation of land monopolies in Louisiana, and the terrible
condition of labor and capital generally, and the utter
want of credit, even to prevent starvation of the labor-
ing classes, which she claimed to be results of slavery,
and which were, in her opinion, greater evils than death
by the swordbrought a reply from our old friend,
Charles Burleigh, in a clearly-defined argument, based
on the Divine humanity, showing that self-government
is the highest form of human attainment, and asks no
bayonet for its defence. The editor of the Anti-Slavery
Standard thought the discussions of the Society showed
that its platform was very properly the omnibus that
carried all the reforms.
Mr. Powell took occasion to express his delight at a
discovery .made at the Equal Rights meeting on the day
before, which he claimed was a good sign, because it
proved that women, like men, were human. They, also,
conld leave principles for parties. That he observed that
Mrs. Stanton and Susan B. Anthony had gone over to the
copperheads, and Lucy Stone and Mrs. Rose stood with
the Republicans. He admitted that they might be un-
conscious of this, which qeemed a somewhat question-
able compliment to their intelligence. We wondered if
it was not in his memory when the same easy charge
was made against himself and the school of abolitionists
to which he belongs; wben their criticisms seemed to
give aid and comfort to the enemy ? Time has settled
all doubts of the position of himself and his co-workers
for freedom, and it will, we have no doubt, turn out as
well for Mrs. Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in the
good time coming." At'least the good and true repub-
c|ps need take no alarm at present. So it seems to me.
Observes.
Washington, May 18th.
On Saturday, the third meeting for free discussion of
Female Suffrage in the District took place at Harmonial
Hall. It was well attended and highly interesting.
To-day, Mr. E. C. Ingersoll, of Illinois, presented in
the House a memorial from the Franchise Association,
eignedby a Committee of twenty-two prominent citizens
(.equal numbers of men and women, including two colored
men and one colored woman), supporting the bill and
petition presented by Mr. Washburn, of Indiana, last
Monday. It was erferred, like the former documen ts, to
the Committee on the District, of which Mr. Ingersoll
is chairman. Observed,
SUFFRAGE IN MISSOURI.
i Kingston, Mo., April, 1863.
Dear Miss Anthonv ; Though we have not written,
we have not beon idle.
Yesterday, in this place, about twenty-five persons
men and women, met in the Court-room, for the pur-
pose'of organizing a Womans Suffrage Association"
to co-operate with the State Association organized at St.
Louis last fall.
We were called upon to state the object of the meet-
ing, after which lawyer Chapman read a communication
Jrom the Secretary of the State Association, soliciting
the aid and influence of every Mend of the cause in
forwarding its work. As a report of the proceedings
of the meeting is going to be sent to the The Revolu-
tion, we will leave it with its members. But wo can-
not forbear sayiug that in Kingston we have met with
more encouragement than in any other town we have
visited in the State. More women came out to the first
call fora meeting to organize than came outfbe6rst
time in Lawrence, Kansas for that purpose.
Judging from what they have done there, and are still
doing, what will they do here after hearing as much iu
favor and against the question as the women of Law-
rence have heard ?
We go from here to Kidder and Breckinridge (have
spoken-twice in each place), two small but enterprising
towns on the railroad, expecting to form an organization
in each place.
In Kidder we had a brief discussion with a Presbyte-
rian clergyman. Ho opposed the question, and took the
Bible to sustain his position. He thought that Paul and
the advocates ofWomans Suffrage would certainly quar-
rel should they meet each other face to face ) fov Paul
said> allow1 h'ot vdman to teach or usurp SWhotily
ove* man. But fee was tuskbie to teR tte w #5*$ capa-
city Phebe iabored, who was servant of the church at
Cenchrea. or whether Priscilla or Aquilla, who were
Pauls helpers in Christ," were longae-ticd. He
quoted the twenty-third verse of the fifth chapter of
Ephesians, which reads, For the husband is bead of
the wife even as Christ is head of the church, and he is
savior of the body." In reply to this, we reminded him
that that mado no provisions for unmarried women, and
asked him what the seven thousand surplus women iu
Massachusetts would do for beads, unless they should
emigrate West, or an equal number of young men be
transported to that State. We also asked him to make
some provisions for the sixteen hundred women in that
State who have lost their heads during the past year by
obtaining divorces.
Theoretically he proved himself asunequal to the ta* k
as Dr. Todd has done, and we hope, for his own sake, he
will never be induced to put his thoughts on paper and
give them to the public, while Gail Hamilton is reading
and criticizing.
We asked him 'how Christ was head of the church
was he a tyrant or usurper ? Did he ever demand any-
thing of the church (hat he did not strictly adhere to
himself ? Wejisked him what he understood by (hat
command in which is comprehended Christs whole
moral law : Do unto unto others as,ye would that
others should do unto you? We asked him if the
father and husband who daily returned to his home in-
toxicated could be the head of the wife in the sense
that Christ is the head of the church. We told him
when every husband, by his life, proved himself as fit
to be the head of his wife as Christ, by bis life and
teachings, proved himself fit to be the head of tbe
church, we should need no legislation. That the statutes
of every state would be abandoned, and the Golden
; Rule substituted in their place. This, to him, was a
new interpretation of the text in question. Still he in-
sisted that the Bible did not teach Suffrage for Woman.
We asked him to reler us to some chapter that taught
suffrage for man. He did not do it at that time, but it
may be be will have found it by the time we visit his
town again. If he has, we will inform The Revolu-
lution where it may be found, and we trust it will be
generous enough to enlighten Dr. Todd and Senator
Mullins.
However, before closing his remarks, he came to tho
conclusion that if there was nothing more involved in
this question than simply allowing women to vote it
would, not seem 60 absurd ; but he doubted womans
ability to plead law, sit on juries, on the judges bench,
be Congress-women, and President of the United States.
At this point, a lady in the audience remarked that she
wished we bad a woman for President now, which
brought the house down so, that the Rev. wisely dropped
the subject. At the close of our meeting in Plattsburg,
a gentleman objected to the question for tbe reason that
it would destroy womans dependence upon man, in
which he considered consisted her chief beauty and
glory. The next day we learned that his wile was teaching
school, and not only supported herself but her husband
and family also. We were not surprised that he thought
it impolitic to give woman the ballot.
In another meeting we discussed the question with
two gentlemen, a lawyer and a general. They both talked
long and loud, but said nothing more than we have
heard for the last twenty years. After quoting from
dry parchments and dusty records for some time to
determine what womans true sphere is, the lawyer
thought he had settled the question by proving beyond
a doubt that wemon were incapable of judging what
men were fit to fill positions of trust, for, said he,
if Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony have
so little knowledge of human nature as to choose for a
travelling companion that idiot, Goorge Francis Train,
what will the masses of women do when they have
equal power with men in selecting men to office ? We
told him that, though wo were not personally acquainted
with Mr, Train, having read several articles from his
pen, w& had long since como to the conclusion, that if
the majority of meu who are ridiculing him would de-
vote the same amount of time to solf-cullurc, they and
their country would be the better for it. They, vith
Mr. Train, would show, themselves raoro manly, for he
seldom stoops to retaliate. And as to Mrs. Stanton and
Miss Anthony, their virtue was not protected by their
associates.
In all the discussions we have had upon this question,
the most weight is put upaii this objectiona fear that
the enfranchisement of women will disturb the liarmony
and destroy the sanctity of the home. From the nuni-
ber of family broils that have come under our observa-
vation, the number of divorces granted in the different
f States every year, we are forced to believe that yen now,
tor pome meon (ignorance?;> Wfahnofty of the hoar


326
is greatly disturbed ; and when the St. Louis Democrat
says that it knows that a certain prominent man in that
city, a husband and father (and this is only one case in
a thous:nd) visited a house of infamy sixty-one times
in one week, is not the home already robbed of its sanc-
tity?
As long as youug women are so falsely educated, and
young men, by a corrupt public opinion, are taught to
believe that high-toned moral virtue is not a requisite of
manhood, our homes can never be sanctified. We must
have personal purity in man as well as woman before the
ideal homes pictured to us by the opposers of this ques-
tion can become real ones.
Yesterday, through the kindness of the editor of the
Sentinel, we wore favored with number fifteen of The
Revolution. As we peruse its pages, filled with plain
truths, we silently thank the good Father there is at
last a journal that dares to expose incompetency, degra-
dation and fraud wherever, and in whomsoever, it may
be found.
Its personalities are needed to rebuke'men in
high places, for their iniquity. Write onwork onun-
til our government, church and homes arc so com-
pletely revolutionized that principle, not policy, shall
actuate our rulers, the laws of life and health be taught
from our pulpits, understood and practiced in our
homes. More anon. M. H. Biunkehhoff.
SUFFRAGE A MEANS NOT AN END.

Editors of the Revolution:
If it is allowable for a man to address a few words to
his sisters through the medium of The Revolution,
there is something I should like to say.
There is no doubt but that the independence of wo-
man is one of tho most important questions now in the
world ; but let those women who are interested in it, re-
member that with tho obtaining of the right of suffrage,
tho end will not be gained. In fact it is hardly a ques-
tion but wnat tne condition of women will be made even
worse than it is at present, if they gain only the right of
political freedom, while the present disorganization of
labor continues, since they will then only be advancing
to tho consciousness of tlio presont system of slavery
prevailing in the system of wages.
Ii women should obtain their political freedom, while
the domination of capital still continues, they would
only be entering iuto the present uneasy position in
which the productive labor of the country finds itself.
Here with tho realization of the democratic idea, with
the extension of male suffrage, male labor is commenc-
ing to find that its freedom in this single respect serves
only to make it conscious of its slavery to the social
sy stem, which robs it on the one hand and on the other,
and by which those who produce all wealth retain in
their possession the smallest portion of it, so that it is
a fact (bat a life of labor leads rather to the poor house
than to plenty and security in age.
It was a motto in olden times that to labor was to
pray, but iu the process of specialization of function
which characterises the present subversive period of de-
velopment, these two duties have become divided, and
oue class finds itself devotod to labor while the other
livo by preying, spelling it as I have written it.
What then would I advisethat women should cease at-
tempting to secure their political rights? By no means.
But do not limit your endeavors to this single purpose.
Society must be organized upon the principle of justice.
Productive industry, as it is the source and only source
of all wealth, all refinement, all culture, all art, must re-
tain in its own possession all the wealth it creates. And
as in productive industry women have always held the
chief place, they will when labor is organized, and as-
sumes its proper position, obtain that which is tbeir
duo.
The right of suffrage should be aimed at only as a
means to a far better and nobler end, to the organization
of industry ; for until that is accomplished, life must
romain tho mean and ignoble struggle it now is for ob-
taining nothing but the moans ot living, and the suc-
cessful in the squabble will, as now, bo those who have
most effectually repressed their better feelings and de-
veloped thoir worst qualities.
There is a basis ot truth in the objection to the wo-
mans movement towards taking her partin the practical
duties oi life, that these duties are snob as cannot have
anything but a debasing effect upon her. The thing to
be done then is to make life as noble as it should be, so
that to live au active life, fosters and employs all our
nobler energies, and this will be when productive indus-
try, which is the destiny of man, is made the basis of
our sooial system. In all attempts to secure these ends,
and in the woman movement as an aid towards securing
c Wxt ghtlutitu,'
tbem, I cannot but be deeply interested, and have found
time, even in what I am doing to secure them, to write
you this, wishing you every success. F. h.
A FEW THOUGHTS FOE CHRISTIAN
BONDHOLDERS
---------------------------
Dear. Friends: The working-men and working-wo-
men of this country, are about to ask of you the same
favor for themselves.and their children which you
demanded for the Southern slaves. They ask their
liberty. You could not recognize a slaveholder as a
Christian. How can you, in view of the United States
bonds, which you hold, call yourselves Christians?
You have mortgaged us and our children, our flesh and
blood, our labor, for the payment of the interest on your
bonds. Shylock only wanted a pound of flesh. 1 You
have taken the whole body. But we trust you have
done this thougtlessly. It was very noble in you to ask
the Southerners to release tbeir slaves. In the same
magnanimous spirit, we call on you to set the working-
men free from their bonds. Release your slaves.
The oppressive taxes, and consequent high prices of
shelter, food and clothing, deprive us of the comforts
and decencies oi life. Our wretched abodes, poor fare,
and hard toil prevent us from acquiring knowledge,
cultivating our reasoning powers, and thus fitting our-
selves to exercise with ability.the right of Suffrage. We
are compelled to blindly follow the leading of partisan
journalists, instead of studying for ourselves the work-
ings of the machinery of our government. Our ragged
and famishing children are unable to enter the public
schools and are thus as effectually deprived oi education
as were the Southern negroes. Set us free from our bonds,
and prosperity will soon smile upon us, mid twenty-five
years hence, with increased facilities for gaining know-
ledge, every voter will be a statesman, and corrupt legisla-
tion will be impossible. Can we ask of you a nobler wcjpk
than in this manner to advance the coming of Christs
kingdom?
Do you desire to rea'ly follow your Divine Master,
who took upon h*m the form of a servant (lit, slave) that
He might make many free ? Then give np your claim
on our flesh and blood, and make yourselves poor, that
we who are at present your chattels, may be freed from
servitude. This glorious deed will prove your piety
and your patriotism. Furthermore, you are at present
endangering the stability of our government, by making
two antagonistic parties. Now, Rich against Poor, and
soon Poor against the Rich. In this country the history
of foreign tyrannies is hastening to a repetition. The
silence of our suffering people will not last always.
They do not understand writing and speech making as
well as the bondholders, but it is a very easy matter for
them to vote their oppressors out of office. In order to
unite these ever conflicting parties, the rich and the
poor, bum your bonds. Thus you will strengthen your
government, promote peace, and secure your personal
safety from the horrors of civil war.
You say that you are laying up wealth in these
securities to lavish on your children. Christian bond-
holder, does not your Masjter say that it is bard for
those that are rich to enter the kingdom. Are you not
'leading your children into temptation by giving your sons
the means of dissipation, and malting your daughters
the silly followers of fashion ? Give up your bonds,, that
by being thrown upon tbeir own resources, your chil-
dren may be developed into noble men and women.
The bracing air ot self-dependence will enlarge and
strengthen their souls.
You say, Christian bondholder, that you have laid up
a support for your widow and orphans, in bank stock,
insurance policies, and United States Bonds. Did it
ever occur to you, that the widows and orphans of poor
workingmen, are the slaves who will have to earn the
income which you bequeath ? Is your family made of
any better clay than theirs ? Does the just and holy law
of God permit you to live on the sweat of your neighbors
brow ? Would you be willing for your widow and orphans
lo labor for other peoples support? You may devour
poor widows earnings and for a pretence make long
prayer^, but you cannot deceive the Judge of all the
earth. You have bound heavy burdens and grievous
to be borne and laid them on the shoulders of the poor
white men ot the North, and you yourselves will not
touch them with on of your fingers. Depend upon it
your covetousness will draw down upon you the wrath
ot God.
Allow me, Christian bondholder, to make one more
suggestion. How can you, with Our Bonds in your
hands, look up to God and ask him for his blessing ?
Sou call him Our Father and you treat His poor not
as brethren, but as slaves. You say Hallowed be
thy Name, and you are employing all the powers of
your mind, and the strength of your body, in endeavor-
ing to bring dishonor on that Name by making it a cloak
for your covetousness. In the name of love for the poor
negro, you have put up for sale the northern poor man
and his children, and you, yourselves, have bid them
in. Such hypocrisy as that disgraces your Christian
profession before men, and is abhorred in the sight of
God. You pray, Thy kingdom come, and by lend-
ing upon increase you arc sustaining tbe kingdom of
Prince Mammon, and disobeying the Ring yoli preiess
to serve. You say Let thy wiljbe done, and you are
busy doing the will of the Father of deceivers, by swin-
dling, the poo* of their bard earnings. You modestly
say Give us this day our daily bread, but you live in
tbe barbarous splendor of an oriental despot, on the
taxes wrung from the toil, and sweat, and privations cf
workingmen, and workingwomen, and (let Americans
blush) from pale-faced, half famished working children.
Can you offer up the next petition? Forgive U3 our
debts, as we forgiVe our debtors. Surely, you must
release those bonds, Christian, or, that prayer will send
you to perdition. You say Lead us not into temptation,
atd the vast wealth which yen usurers acoumulate only
serves (o lead your own children to moral ruin, through
idleness, and presses the laboring classes to crime through
ignorance and want. You say, Deliver us from all
evil, and hold on to that money which is the root of all
evil. Truly it is of you, Christian bondholders, that
God says, This people honoreth me with their lips but
their heart is far from me. '
The Southern slaveholders united their wisdom and
power to defend the venerable and respectable institu-
tion of slavery. God has judged tbem, and tbeir vassals
are free.
Now, the bondholders may edit papers and write
books to prove that Money is King, and unito all their
power to control the coming election. But their judg-
ment hastens and cannot bo stayed. The Lord is at
hand. He will drive the money changers and those that
sell doves out of His Templo. The nations shall know
that the earth is the Lords and the fullness thereof.
The thrones of pride and selfishness shall be cast down,
and through tbe outpouring of His Spiritthe Royal Law
of Christian love shall be maintained in the hearts of
this people, and this shall be Immanuels Laud.
A Working Woman.
CHARLES FO UR1ER.
Probably no great thinker is so little known by those
who assume to speak of him as Charles Fourier.
In a recent article in tbe Atlantic Monthly on Our
Catholic Brethren, Mr. Parton alludes to the fatal de-
fect of Fouriers system, as if he and Air. J. T. Hecker
had found it all out, but I think it would puzzle tho
author of that article to state what the principles he con-
demns are. So,, too, he speaks of the unpeaceful
abode of Brook Farm, which, considering that the his-
tory of the world up to the present time and especially
of Christendom, is the record of a long succession of
w-ars, and that we are now suffering tbe consequences of
a bloody civil war, and that murders are of daily occur-
rence in our streets, comes with a very ill grace, savoring
more of flippancy than iairness. I know not how it was
while Mr. Hecker was there, but this writer found a
residence at Brook Fkrm, very, peaceful and delightful,
and both by the successes and the failures of that at-
tempt, his faith in the essential truth of Fouriers lead-
ing ideas was confirmed. Certainly with regard to un-
peacefulness it would be difficult to imagine anything
worse than the isolated households, and whatever may
have been the errors of Fouriers positive philosophy,
his criticisms of present society are unanswerably true.
Tbe church has had some eighteen centuries of trial,
during a large portion of which it has wielded almost
unlimited power, with the results that we see. Poverty,
prostitution, fraud, theft, war, muTdcr, cholera, syphilis,
scrofula, chattel and wages-slavery, oppression, atheism,
superstition. And all that the church does is to try to
reconcile the sufferers to their fate and to burn at the
stake those who would do away the evils that afflict hu-
manity, by leading mankind to learn and obey the will
of God. Fouriers great thought was to find out the will
of God or the law which governs the.universe, and he
sought it in the "soul of man, created in the image of
God. To this study he consecrated his life and was re-
warded by discovering what he believed to be the un-
derlying principles of a harmonic or divine society.
Some of these he formulated and I think no one who
desires to do something to elevate his race can afford to
beignorantof them.. The subject is too vast to be more
than alluded to in a short article, but there are book s


which ought to be studied, setting forth the views of
that great Master in Social Science! Ideas do finally
govern, and if society is to be harmonized and man re*
generated, correct thinking or positive philosophy must
take the place of the superstitions which now govern so
ill. By their fruits ye shall knew them. The fearful
fruits that we see around us certainly come from no
good tree. Is there not somewhere a Tree of Life ?
f. s. c.
WHAT WILL BECOME OF THE BABIES.
Fbom every quarter is wafted this cryand where-
fore ? Only because womeu are waking up to a seuse of
their position as wives, mothers, and members of so-
ciety, and insist on their right to have a hand in the
management of all public affairs appertaining, however
remotely, to their interest, socially and financially. Why
is it that a great many cultivated, intelligent men and
women, too (thats where the rub comes), persist in ig-
noring the fact that female equality and suffrage mean
more love, more tenderness, an accession of respect and
thoughtfulness for our companions, and better sense in
moulding the characters of our children. Said a lady to
me, yesterday :
Why should I lift up my voico for this Revolution in
social affairs you so stroDgly advocate?" Religiously and
politically my husband and myself are one ; and our
love for each other is of such a character that his wish
is my law, and vice versa.
Now, just that little sentence caused every nerve in
my body to quiver painfully. No true woman can shut
herself up in a little Paradise of hor own, and never'
look out into the great thoroughfare of life. Why,
woman alive, or wornau asleep, where there is oue
wife happy and contented in the love of a noble man,
there are thousands of wretched ones; where thero is
one woman shielded and protected, there are thousands
who are driven to feebleness, moral destruction and the
grave. Think a moment. Suppose death, inexorable
and strangely exacting, should claim his own; what
then? Tour husbands salary, which now nicely sup-
ports you, you would receive no longer. Your three
babies, fatherless, and you a widow, -educated, re-
fined, and fitted by numberless graces to adorn a little
niche in society, undisturbed by want or the necessity
of labor ; our opinion is, that you would be glad to
take into consultation even Revolutionists under such
circumstances, and be very happy to welcome any
educational or philanthropic movement whereby you
could walk out into the world, and demand as an equiva-
lent for your work a comfortable living for yourself and
babies. Then, at the conclusion of that heartless
speech, to have her look so sweetly and wisely into our
face, and remark :
Rut Frank and I have been thinking should women
turn to politics and literature entirely, what will become
of the babies ?
"VYhat will become of your, babies, madam, should you
be suddenly deprived of the means of their support?
Have you the courage, stamina, ay, ability, to fight the
world single-handed ? A fellow-feeling makes us won-
drous kind. We have been there, thank you, and
know all about it. Every heart-throb, every blush of
indignation, every dastardly attempt to change the
wages of labor for the wages of sin, we are familiar with ;
and it makes us side when we see an intelligent female
looking at so great a subject through so small a glass, and
dirty at that. What wiE become of the babies ? Why
dont somebody askwhat has become of the babies?
Ask ResteEe and thousands of physicians, male and
female, who have been engaged in their wotkof destruc-
tion for years. Physicians who have graduated from
our first medical coHeges, physicians with high sound-
ing diplomas, whose elegant equipages stand in front of
Fifth avenue mansions, who pocket a big fee aqd a little
bundle of flesh _at the same time, and nobodys the wiser!
not even the husband in hosts of instances. What wiH
become of the babies^did you askand you ? Can you
not ase that the idea is to educate womeu that they may
be self-reliant, self sustaining, self-respeeted ? The
wheel is a big one, and needs a strong push, and a push
all together, giving to it an impulse that wiE keep it con-
stantly revolving, and the first revolution must be Fe-
male Suffrage. After this,*the ponderous affair wiE
move regularly, and perhaps slowly; but education,
mbral, physical, and intellectuaEy practical, will as
surely foEow as dawn foEows the darkness of night.
Then marriages of convenience wiE not he neces-
sary ; men and women wiE come together, attracted
by mutual respect; namby-pamby, doE-faced, wishy-
washy, milk-and-water feminine bundles wiE be un-
marketable. God speed the time, for the sake of the
babies. Little ones wiE thfen be welcome, and mothers

327
wiE know enough to instruct them sensibly, with a view
to the practical side of life. Men, if you desire healthy,
intelEgent, economical wives, do not oppose this new
movement; for in this way only can you and yours, and
subsequent generations, be saved from degeneracy.
WiE somebody tell us why women who pay taxes (we
wiE leave out the rest just at present) should not be al-
lowed a voice in the management of the laws decree-
ing taxation ? Dont be afraid to speak ; come out
squarely. This is the tfme for free, earnest discussion on
aE points of general interest; but please do not take for
your final syEogistic premises the foolish idea that
women who are self-reliant must necessarily be Unlove-
able. It is no such thing, we assure you, and we know.
My dear fellows, this is quite as much for your benefit
as ours. What we propose to do. is so to arrange things
that should you ever become sick or poor, we can put
our hands to the plough and run the machine, nursing,
. sympathizing, attending to the finances, and loving you
to distraction at the same time. How do you Eke the
picture? ' Eleanor Kirk.
EDUCATED SUFFRAGE THE SOLUTION OF OUR DIFFI-
CULTIES;
What is Educated Suffrage? Let all vote,
male and female, black and white, when they
axe educated to know what a vote is. That is
educated Suffrage. But the voter who waits
outside the poll for a mule, under the impression
that the paper he dropped into the box was an
order for said article, ought not to be allowed
to impeach a President! The fact is, man is a
cowardwoman is not. Man fears the moral
influence ol woman. Her votes will expose his
midnight haunts, his infidelities, his debauch-
eries. But fate ordains it. Man must be ele-
vated and made nobler by the moial power of
woman at the ballot-box.
HOW DOE* MAN PROTECT WOMANAGAINST WHOM
AND WHAT AND WHERE?
LETTER FROM GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN
WHY SHOULDNT WOMAN HAVE A BED AND BOARD
AS WELL AS MAN ?MANS PROTECTION OF WO-
MAN fS AGAINST SOME OTHER MANNOT WOMAN.
MANS INCONSISTENCY COMES FROM THE FORCE
\ .OF HABIT.
A ~
' / Men sneer at the * strong-minded and cheer
/at the weak-minded. Why ? It is the force
of habit. Man sits for hours in the concert
room to hear a low-necked, bosom-exposed
opera singer, but has a holy horror to see on
the same stage a high-necked dressed lady lec-
turer. Why is it ? Simply the force of habit.
Men are ignorant brutes. Their habits and
tastes are beastly. The sensual predominates
over the intellectual. They look on woman as
a playthinga dolla mistress or a wife-sel-
dom as a companiona frienda colleague.
Mans ignorance comes from habit, education,
custcm. How long is it since woman attended
lectures, political meetings, conventions? Only
the other day. Are not such meetings now
more orderly, more decorous, more dignified ?
How is it that man luxuriates in listening to a
Siddons, a Rachel, a Bis tori as an actress, yet
has an infernal sneer on his lip when Elizabeth
Cady Stanton, or Susan B. Anthony speaks on
the same stage lor human rights and Universal
Liberty. It is the force of habit. The Bevo-
lution is inaugurating a new era. Europe
delights to quote from The Bevolution.-
Womans Suffrage agitates the Old World since
that Kansas campaign. And Fawcett and
Hughes compete with Mill to see who will outrun
a Stanton, a Pillsbury, an Anthony. Drunken-
ness, Bestell sm, prostitution, bestiality will
be less respeotable when women vote. God
help TheBevolution.
Must woman always suffer for mans sins?
The marriage ceremony makes woman a slave.
She must obey. Why not make him swear to
obey. Mans inhumanity to woman is infamous.
When woman is mans equal as voter she will
get mans pay for keeping school. Woman has
to bear all mans vices. He sneaks off like
Adam and the woman braves all danger. The
responsibility is hers, and man bears up under
the load woman has to carry. There is a skele-
ton in every house. Phillips Greeley, Garri-
son, Smith ought to be ashamed of themselves
to insult thtir mothers, sisters, wives and
daughters by enfranchising the negroes and
thereby disfranchising women; for the negroes,
in Kansas all opposed our campaigu for Edu-
cated Suffrage. (P. P. must not think I am
waging war against a man and a brother. I
am only looking out for a woman and a sister
for change.)
Mans protection is simply ridiculous. Pro-
tection against whom ? Some other roan Man
protect woman! Where? There are eighty
thousand brothels in London. How does fhan
protect them ? There are thousands of needle
women who sing the song of the shirt at
starvation prices. How does man protect them ?
There are one hundred thousand women school
teachers in the United States who get half the
wages of men teachers. How does man protect
them ?
Society allows man to swear, gamble, riot and
get drunk. Of course, gallantry permits it
chivalry awards itsex guarantees ithe is the
protector of woman. Let woman do the least
of these, and down comes the whip of public
opinion and she is damned by her natural pro-
tector.
ALL THE LAW DOCUMENTS USE THE WORDS BED,
BOARD AND OBEY.
Let woman forsake the one, interfere with
the other, or refuse to obey, and mans gallan-
try, chivalry and protection make her a prosti-
tute and a devil. Do you remember Washing-
ton Irvings picture of woman the Tree and
the Vine? How absurd those similes. Wo-
man is often the tree and man the vine. Do we
not often see women support their children and
husbands too ? Ivy is poison. So is the Upas
tree. Had Irving said the Upas tree was man
and the Ivy was woman, the analogy, even then,
would not be fair. Man is activewoman pas-
sive. Man attacks, woman repels. It is about
time that woman had a 5 bed and board of her
own.
TWO CODES OF MORALS FOR MAN AND WOMAN.
How singular that while man fears woman
will be contaminated by ballot-boxes and the
busy whirl of active voting, that he never makes
objection to her appealing as a witness or
a criminal in court. A young girl, for instance,
up lor infanticide. The judge or the lawyer
prosecuting, perhaps, the father of the child.
She can pay taxes toobut voting will unsex
her. Why should there be two codes of morals
for tbe sexes? There is how. But later it
shall not beor my hour of labor is the forfeit.
That Kansas campaign of mine for the eman-
cipation of woman is the noblest act of my
busy life ; and when have I ever attempted a
point, that I did not succeed in the end. By
and by I will force the world to believe in me
as a Reformer, a Moralist, and a Statesman,
Meanwhile, am contented to be called a Luna,
tic, a Charaltan and a Mountebank^ It pleases
them, and does not injure me. For do we not
; live, and move, and have our being in tbe
i stirring times of The Bevolution?
I George Francis Train.
i


328
tu l tt ti 0
Clii- leuolution.
ELIZABETH CADY STANTON,)
PARKER PILLSBVltY, ( n. SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Proprietor.
NEW YORK, MAY 28, 1868.
TBACTS.
We have now a complete series of all our
tracts, republished, and will meet the numer-
ous orders we have from the South and West
as rapidly as possible. We have been moving
our office to another room, which has caused
some delay in filling orders as promptly as we
should otherwise have done.
TEE CHICAGO PLATFORM UNDER THE
INK.
When Henry Olay was running for the Presi-
dency in 184! ho was told that to carry New
York, he must secure the Catholic vote. To
this end it was proposed that he should write a
letter advocating separate schools lor Catholic
childrena measure then under consideration
to be read to Bishop Hughes, and thus secure
his influence in that direction. Accordingly
one of Clays most polite letters was written,
and a gentleman called one day to make the
good Bishop a friendly visit, letter in pocket.
In the course of conversation, which he skill-
fully directed towards Clay and the presidential
election, he incidentally drew out the letter and
handed it to the Bishop, to prove to him that
Clay was sound on that question. The Bishop
read it carefully, but without changing the ex-.
pression of his face, or making any comment,
he handed it back to his visitor, who had
watched him closely to see what impression it
made. Surprised at the Bishops indifference,
. he said, What do you think of that letter?
Oh! said tne Bishop, coolly, my misfor-
tune is, I read it under the ink.
In reading the Chicago Platfoim we discover
that it, like Henry Clays letter, has more
meaning under the ink than appears on the
surface, and for the benefit of our readers we
give a libwal translation.
A branch of the republican party of the
United States assembled in convention in the
city of Chicago on the 21st day of May, 1868,
and made the following declaration of policies:
1. Let us congratulate ourselves on our suc-
cessful reconstruction policy ; ^ajhjcb, although
maintained by a military despotism that de-
grades one half the people and loads all with
taxes, is nevertheless necessary in our present
emergency. Although a standing army to sup-
press a discontent, that a wise legislation could
easily turn into peace and prosperity, is opposed
to the genius of our institutions, yet it is not
our province to establish principles for national
safety, but to bridge, .over present difficulties
with a transient policy that will secure party
success.
2. Although it is said to be the duty of Con-
gress to secure a republican form of government
in every state of the Union, yet we do not be-
lieve in negro suffrage as a principle at the
North. Vide our state constitutions and our
* late elections. We know there' is a seeming
contradiction, in withholding the baUot from
the intelligent black men of the North, who
fought bravely under the Union flag in the late
war, while we givo it to every ignorant planta-
tion hand in the South, but as we need the
black vote of the South which is a very large
one, while in the North it is a mere trifle, to
perpetuate our republican dynasty, a wise states-
manship can easily reconcile these seeming con-
tradictions.
3. The national honor requires the payment
of the public debt, but as it never can be done
while we continue to pay bondholders six per
cent, in gold, and legislate the enormous profits
we now do into National Banks, amounting in
sixty-five years to $2,500,000,000, we must in
some way shirk the responsibility of our own
policy. Seeing that our financial policy leads
inevitably to Revolution and Repudiation, we
must set the dogs of war on the wrong scent,
by showing that greenbacks for bondholders is
the straight road in that direction. Though we
will say as little as possible on this point, lest
the great West should perceive that this is a
Wall street platform.
4 We see that the working men are waking
up to the fact that the policy of McCulloch and
Jay Cooke is national suicide, and that the taxes
fall mainly on the laboring classes, hence the
necessity of a reference at least in our platform
to equalized and reduced taxation. As the
masses are easily wheedled with such high
sounding phrases as nationalhonor, and the
great principles laid down in the immortal
Declaration, it is better to give them these
glittering generalities than promises of any
specific redress of their wrongs that, we could
never fulfill without splitting our party.
5. The national debt is too big a problem for
us to solve. \Ye dare not repudiate, and we
cannot pay. So do not let us bother our heads
about it, but go on with the show, leaving the
burthen of our sins on the shoulders of our
children, that they may fight this financial
scheme with the bondholders just as our Fathers
left us by their wicked compact to fight the
battles of slavery for a century.
6. Though this debt was made by inflation it
will not do to pay it by inflation. Though we
are growing poorer every day for the lack of a
currency to develop our resources, and are
grinding Labor to powder by building up a
Monied Aristocracy, yet we must keep up ap-
pearances, so that foreigners will lend us money
at a lower percentage than our own pet bond-
holders do to-day. We know it is the duty of
Congress to relieve the present rate of interest,
but so long as the bondholders own Congress
there is a serious difficulty in the way of its
accomplishment;
7. This has been the most corrupt adminis-
tration since the foundation of the government.
Both at our National and State capitals we have
witnessed such wholesale demoralization, that
we have no faith left in the leading men of our
own party. We doubt the honesty of William
Pitt Fessenden, and the honor of Chief-Justice
Chase, in fact the Mephistophiles, Andrew
Johnson, has deceived the very elect. We have
been so shamefully nursed and fostered in
our own corruptions that we now call the gods
to grant us some new power and pabulum for
our speedy redemption.
8. We mourn the fact that Andrew Johnson
has so fully carried out the policy for which we
elected him. We chose him from all the promi-
nent candidates, in order to conciliate the
South, but he has rather overdone the matter
in that direction. True, we rejected a good
New England republican to make way fo£ hia?>
but in Andrew we got moretham we contracted
for. We tried to impeach him, but we found
that he was so intertwined and intertwisted
with all our party interests that it was like cru-
cifying-our own flesh and blood; to prove him
gailty proved too much against ourselves, and
so we ended the force, and his fate, like that of
Jeff Davis, is indefinitely postpdned.
9. Though 300 naturalized American citizens
have been rotting in English prisons for the
last three years, sentenced for life, on the mere
suspicion of sympathy with Fenians, and one
of our distinguished citizens, George Francis
Train, has been imprisoned for words spoken
,on this side of the water. As we had no sto-
mach for a fight with England, we thought best
to be still in reference to this whole matter.
But now, on the eve of a Presidential cam-
paign, with 1,000,000 Irish votes in this coun-
try, some word of sympathy must be extended
to the sufferers, and some calm suggestion made
to Great Britain to the effect, that the doc-
trine if a man is once a subject he is always so,
is a relic of Feudal times, not authorized by the
laws of nations.. When England reads this
ninth article of the Chicago platform, let her
beware! And let the Irish in this country take
courage, and all vote for Grant and Colfax.
10. Of all who were faithful in the late war,
let us not forget out brave seamen and soldiers
who imperilled their lives in the service of
their country. Wc should regard them, as
well as the wives and children of our gallant
d*id, as the wards of the nation. While the
bondholder who rolls in his gilded carriage,
clothed in purple and fine linen, demands in-
terest all in gold, do not the boys in blue,
maimed, halt and blind, beggars in our streets,
appeal as loudly that their bounties and pen-
sions be paid in the same currency? Do not
our sick and dying soldiers, their starving
wives and children need bread as well as honor?
Now is the time to remember all elasses, for we
shall need their votes in the coming election.
11. We must not forget to congratulate our-
selves on the immense flow of immigration to
our shores. And we would remind the peoples
of the earth that this is the asylum of the op-
pressed from all nations, and the republican
party i£ the Moses to lead them through the
wilderness of ignorance and poverty to the
promised land of specie payments, high tariffs,
National banks and manhood suffrage.
12. Being the party of freedom, we extend
our sympathy to all oppressed peoples, black
and white, struggling for their rights ; except
women. An£ amelioration in their condition
would involve such fundamental changes in the
functions of the sexes, in the reorganization of
society, would necessarily be so new and revo-
lutionary that we are not prepared to entertain
any propositions fer their emancipation or en-
franchisement.
On this remarkable .document the noble
Jribune makes no comment for want of
space, with forty-eight columns! at his dis-
posal. Hence we have tried to explain to the
people the hidden wisdom of the Chicago plat-
form. For wantof space we shall reserve
our comments until next week. e. c. s.
Correction.Our types last week'got astray
on the letter from Miss Dr. Phelps of Boston.
Rev. I. Kalloch, not Hallock, was the Tremont
Temple Baptist minister now fighting inglori-
ously against womans right of suffrage in Kan-
sas, while his successor of the Temple (one
Fulton) is doing the same unhallowed work
there, and wherever etee anybody will hear him^


Zkt fttMlitU**.
329
THE S1ANDARD OF MORALITY.
Human nature everywhere recognises some
standard of right and 'wrong. The saint no
more than the savage illustrates this truth.
Bishop Butler says truly that whatever the
disputes among nations on the question, where-
in virtue consists, there is in reality a universal
standard of it., ,iIt is that, he says, which
all ages and all countries have made profession
of in public. It is that which every man you
meet puts on the show of. It is that which the
primary and fundamental laws of all civil con-
stitutions over the face of the earth make it
their business and their endeavor to enforce
the practice of on mankind; namely, Justice,
Veracity and regard to Common Good.
This definition of virtue is more than a hun-
dred years old, and in our country appears to
have become nearly obsolete, both as to politics
and religion. A very large part of the Commu-
nity do not seem to recognise any standard of
morality whatever. A good citizen must
be male, must have a white skin, morality
enough to keep out of state prison and soul
Sufficient to preserve the body from putrefac-
tion. More is superfluous. Mrs. Stowe some-
where-says in substance that young women pre-
fer a streak of the fast, the rough, in
young men. Probably she is correct. And
young men are made to honor villany, druuken-
ness, debauchery, if combined with talent and
success, no matter in what calling not absolutely
odious. No wonder they imitate what they
honor and elevate to office. No wonder, if
yourijg women are willing they should. The
pulpit is chargeable with this state of things, no
less than the press. Were virtue and righteous-
ness only exalted by professedly virtuous and
righteous men, vice could never mount into the
high places of honor and power. There are
about three million baptized Protestant church-
members in the nation. At the polls their vote
would be irresistible if always cast only in the
direction of justice and righteousness.
The Temperance advocates, in all their va-
rious departments, number myriads. What
drunkard could ever reel into the presidency
over their stem protest. Were they but faith-
ful to their professions, the Church and the
Temperance cause would be omnipotence itself
against elevating vice or villany, crime or cru-
elty, injustice or unrighteousness, to any of the
seats of power in the government or the church.
Sometimes the friends of temperance have pro-
posed to vote for no man to any office who is
not pledged openly and as far as known to their
principles. But the whip of party leadership,
on or before election, catechises them back to
* the regular nominations. Robert C. Winthrop
said iu the Mexican Massacre about Texas,
our country, right or wrong, and the same
. gospel governs in political partisanship. The
. political abolitionists at one time elevated their
standard so high as that they would not and did
not vote for a known apologist for slavery to any
civil office whatever. But that scrupulousness,
did not last long. The Garrisonians predicted
that it would notfor when they called on those
* Conscience Whigs and Independent Demo-
crats to be consistent and withhold sacramen-
tal as well as ballot-box fellowship from the
accomplices of man-stealers, they refused indig-
nantly and branded the more faithful and con-
sistent as infidel#. And so the world had before
it the strange spectacle on Sunday of whig eat-
ing sacramental Jnread with democrat; the
democrat drinking communion- wine with whig;
and political abolitionists swallowing both whig
and democrat with all their slaveholding sins in
the, holy supper, when on the next day at the
ballot-box, each was to both the others an ab-
horrence and an abomination, and not to be
voted for for any political position, sooner than
the prince of darkness himself! Thirty years
ago this was the virtue of the American church
in every important denomination. The Metho-
dists illustrated it in another manner. In seve-
ral Northern States, the black laws, as they
were termed, prohibited colored testimony in
all the courts against white persons charged
with any crime or offence, even indecent attacks
on colored female chastity, by no means an un-
usual occurrence. In 1840, the Methodist
Gflneral'Conference resolved:
That it is inexpedient and unjustifiable for any
preacher to permit colored persons to give testimony
against white persons in any state whore they are denied
that privilege by law.
More than eighty thousand Methodist church-
members were thus shamelessly prescribed by
their own brethren in deference to the ungodly
prejudice of the State. They were thus declared
unfit to testify even in the church, though pre-
sumed to be worthy to sing and shine forever
in the courts above.
But it may be said all this belongs to the past.
How is it, then, to-day? What higher standard
of morality and virtue can the church, or the
temperance cause (to say nothing of the outside
world) boast? The momentous issue of a next
president has been pending for months. The
republican party, foiled in its hypocritical im-
peachment attempt against one drunken presi-:
dent, are determined to put another in his!
place of similar or worse moral disqualifications,
and those unredeemed by even the mediocre
intellectual ability of the Great Impeached.
The Philadelphia Daily Hews only echoes the\
voice of multitudes (of both political parties),
residents and visitors at the capital, when it
that makes it coward. There is with it a
fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indig-
nation. And with good reason.
And now availability again selects the candi-
date. He was, like Gen. Taylor, twenty odd
years ago, ready and willing to be taken up by
either party. The republicans seized him first
and called him their own, lavishing on him gifts
of fabulous value, as on a coquetting mistress.
He had.avowed no principles, had none to
avow. Principles were not necessary. Can he
be elected? was the question. It was believed
that he could be, because both parties thought
so. Both parties wanted him, and the republi-
cans snatched him from the hands of the demo-
crats ; knowing that unless they nominated
him, the democrats surely would. Jeffersons
questions, is he honest? is he capable? would
have been impertinent. That he was not honest
was certain, or lie could not have coquetted
with both parties. That he was not capable was
at least probable, for he had never expressed an
opinion, at a time and in a state of affairs when
silence itself was crime, where men like him,
highest in popular favor and among the very
highest in office and authority, had counsel to
give.
And now, blindly and basely, the young men
and the old men of the country axe expected to
elect him not on trust 6ven, but with full know-
ledge of his utter moral and mental unfitness
and unworthiness. Such is the present stand-
ard of moral and political sentiment? Senator
Wilson says he never saw him drunk. So
once in an ancient court where a criminal was
on trial for stealing an axe, two good men swore
they saw him take the axe, put it on his shoul-
der and carry it away ; but the other side
brought twelve witnesses who swore positively,
like Senator Wilson, that they didnt see him
do' any such thing. The court decided that
the oath of only two could Dot be taken against
twelve, and discharged the defendant.
says
We do not hesitate to assert that at the present time
there may be found in Washington a greater amount of
depravity and gross villany than coold be fonnd by rak-
ing out all the penitentiaries in the country. We are
ready to substantiate this assertion whenever any of our
Radical cotemporaries will seriously undertake to controvert
what we assert; and we shall provo it by such evidence
as will leave no doubt upon the mind of any candid per-
son. It is amongst those who ostensibly represent the
people and States of our Union, and the officials acting
under their direction, that the most unblushing repro-
bates in America may be found. Men so debased in
mind and morals that they are not ashamed to let the
world know that they are guilty of theft, lying, slander-
ing their opponents, resorting to most despicable arts to
deceive the people, and taking the most solemn oaths,
which are broken almost as soon as uttered.
* * *
Is it not an act of gross injustice to punish pcor and
friendless persons for small crimes, while those who are
guilty of the most enormous outrages upon justice and
decency are placed in positions of honor and power ?
Suppose Andrew Johnson guilty of all the
crimes in the calendar. He cannot be punished
for the one sole reason, that.there is not moral
rectitude in the government to deal with a great
criminal. The great crime of all, and most de-
serving impeachment, was making him vice-
president. When the whole foundation of the
government had given way under rebellion and
revolution, the party in power selected him, a
poor while a slaveholding democrat, to he
the second officer in the government. A good
republican was sacrificed for him, all on the
ground of base, blind expediency and availabil-
ity. And the party that elected him of course
cannot punish him; has no right to punish
him j dftxe notr punish him/ It i# conscience
The republicans taunt tbe democrats with
entire want of a candidate ; a most ungracious
flmg truly when the parties had but one avail-
able candidate between them, and only by a
happy accident did he fall into their hands;
and will undoubtedly yet prove to them a
traitor. Should he be suddenly taken irom
them, where would they be, even now ?
Jf the democracy, the true democracy, will
only have the grace, or even good sense, to
accept the situation, build a platform of modem
principles, making educated but impartial suf-
frage its corner-stone, and then nominate Chief-
Justice Chase as theia candidate, bruise, kill
all copperheadism, never speak opprobriously
of the colored race again, nor odiously and
cruelly proscribe them any more on account of
their color, the very stars in their courses would
fight for them, and the days of republican mis
rule would be ended. r. p.
WOMEN FARMERS.
A western widow, handsome and learned, manages a
large farm, and sbe raised, last year, 1,000 bushels of
wheat and 1,200 of com; has alargestock of hogs, sends
fat cattle to tho New York market, has abundance of
flowers, apples, peas, strawberries, and currants Keeps
up with current literature. Does not want to get mar-
ried. b. F. c.
Travelling through Kansas, last autumn, we
found many women who had carried on their
forms and other business in the absence of
their husbands during the war, and in many
cases paying up debts, and managing far better
than the white had before them/


330
3lb* HUvtfltttifltt.
IMPORTANT IF TRUE.
And heaven send that ifc may be true what is
written in Wilkes's Spirit of the Times, as fol-
lows :
We know of what we speak, and we say authoritatively
that the democratic platform will be so amended as to
recognise the national progress of the last seven years,
and to suit the progressive temper of the time. On the
Fourth ot July next that programme will beaenunciated
in Tammany Hall, in the city of New York. Its main
planks will be a denunciation of the principle of human
slavery, and an acceptance of all the legislation oi the
period on that subject; the repudiation and extinction
ol the Coniederate debt; the equality of all men before
the law ; and impariioJ-suffragc It is shrewdly calcu-
lated that in view of such a programme, the alienated
democratic element, which now constitutes the republi-
can majority, having become disgusted with a party
which is iucapable of government, or even of defending
its own life, and perceiving, moreover, in other and vig-
orous hands, a platform covering their old principles,
will at once flock to the- new standard, and leave the
republican party to sink to ruin.
It is as true as it is remarkable that almost
all progress is by paradox. The last shall be
first and the first last. He that would save his
life shall lose it. The publicans and harlots
shall go into the kingdom before you. The
wisdom of this world is foolishness with Him
who chooscth the weak things to confound the
wise. These are but fewametag the many New
Testament declarations to that purport. In all
the workings of nature the same law holds. In
the divine economy the simplest means ever
produce the sublimest results. Somebody says,
could a finite being be shown all the means and
machinery by which the material universe
was made and is kept in motion, only its sim-
plicity would surprise him ; and he would ex-
claim, Is this all ?
The .republican party had it in its power to
abolish slavery at the filing on Sumter, and so
to end the war before it was really begun, but
did not, dared not. It could only write the
proclamation of freedom on half a million un-
timely graves. It could have reconstructed the
government three years ago on the basis of
Impartial Suffrage, but would not. Andrew
Johnson was ready to lead, offered to lead in
that movement. But republicanism was not
ready, or not willing, and it is not done yet.
So salvation was sent to the Jews first, but re-
jected by them, it turned aside to the Gentiles,
the heathen ; and the Jews wander in darkness
even to this day, and must wait long yet before
their hour shall come.
Now let the people, including both republi-
cans and democrats, abandon Chicago and
Grant and the old party leaders who have so
lqng ruled and so nearly ruined them, and let
them, as the Spirit of the limes suggests, only
recognise the progress of the last seven
years, repudiate the confederate debt and
grant impartial suffrage and equality of all
men (and women) before the law, and with
Chief-Justice Chase on such a platform, they
would soon see both the old democratic party
and the not less wicked republican sinking
indeed to ruin. Nor would a gladder, or
much abler man be found in the new associa-
tion than Mr. Wilkes himself. p. p.
Females are gradually working their way into the
watch-making business.
We are glad to hear this, for we like to see
the sphere ot woman widening, notwith-
standing the many obstacles put in her way by
the oponents of womans Bights. What
sane man or woman can deny that it is better
for women to be working in the large and
pleasant rooms of a watch factory, than
tucked away in.a garret sewing for a living.
ORANGE MARMALADE.
Two weeks ago, we introduced Mfss---------
the daughter of a millionaire, to our readers as
an enterprising manufacturer of orange marma-
lade. We described Miss --------, radiant with
smiles and hopes, in the full tide of a successful
business. Yesterday she entered our sanctum
again, her lovely face veiled in sadness. Our
imagination suggested at once all kinds of catas-
trophes that might have occurred to Miss-----
in her new business. Perhaps she had left her
large china kettle with the precious orange
juice and sugar to the care of some ignorant
Hibernian, and it had boiled over, deluging
range, hearth and her new kitchen oil-cloth, or
worse, perhaps, in taking it hurriedly from the
range, she let the whole thing fall, scalding
Miss-------s pretty little feet, and scattering
the marmalade and china kettle in all direc-
tions. But these flights were soon contradicted
by Miss--------pointing us to the following ad-
vertisement in Every Saturday:
Confectioners.To be sold, cheap, several cwt. of
Orange Peel, in good condition ; the Advertiser, having
the contract for the Sweepings of all the Metropolitan
Theatres and places of amusement, is in a position to
treat for it on unusually advantageous terms. Address
On the strength of this advertisement the
writer goes on to comment on all the stages o'f de-
gradation through which this orange peel must
have gone, from being sold and sucked in the
hands of the great unwashed, to being trampled
underfoot by cow boys and tobacco spitters. As
Miss ------read the whole article tons with
burning, cheek and flashing eye, she literally
tremble cl with disgust, vexation and disappoint-
ment. Never again, said Miss------, shalll
listen with, any patience, to arguments infavor of
the freedom of the press. This thoughtless edi-
tor has dashed all my hopes to the ground. No
one will buy or eat marmalade after this. The
public will suppose that mine is made in the
same way. We consoled Miss-------with many
practical suggestions, such as, that few people
had seen this article in Every Saturday, and
fewer would believe it. We promised her,
moreover, to tell our readers that her manna
lade was made out of the purest ^ugar and the
best of oranges. If, reader, you could see Miss
------ at work, as we have, with her clean
calico dress, white apron, cuffs and collar, and'
her hair neatly arranged in a compact braid
round a few of her own curls, with her clean
towels, plates and knives, her luscious oranges
and clarified sugar, we know yon would not
only enjoy the marmalade, but the earnestness
and common sense of Miss------*, .also.
We shall send a jar to- Evet'y Saturday, and
give that gentleman an opportunity to write
another article on Orange Marmalade. We
have already received several orders from a dis-
tance at the office of The Revolution, and
we hope, in order to encourage Miss--------&
Co., we shall have many more. e. a s.
Religious' Dodging.The church as well as
the State can shirk an unpopular idea. The
Medodist Conference votes colored churches
il Missions. Some of them sent delegates to
the General Conference in session at Chicago.
Conference had doubts about their admission.
Finally it was discovered that they were only
delegates from Missions, not from churches,
and so were not entitled to seats! A rose by
any other name would smell as sweet. Why
not a negro or a colored church ?
WOMEN VOTING AGAIN.
WATER WORKS FOR SCHENECTADYVOTE BY THE
TAXPAYERS, MALE AND FEMALE.
Schenectady, May 19. 1868.
The taxpapers of this cil y voted, to-day on a plan lor
the introduction of water works in this city. Out of
746 votes cast 622 were against the plan. Women voted.
This is the third time within a month that
women have votedin Sturgis, Mich., Passaic,
N. J., and Schenectady, N. Y. Will Horace
Greeley still insist in the face of this that wo-
men do not want to vote ? Let the women who
are large property holders in this city, who pay
half the taxes, now insist on their right to vote
on all school questions at least. The wholesale
murder of the innocents in our crowded schools
calls loudly for womans attention.
Passaic is no longer alone. Schenectady also has ad-
mitted the votes of women into the affairs of the burgh.
Passaic bears the name of rather a torpid town, but it is
a scene of lestless activity compared with Schenectady,
which is the most thoroughly Dutch, and consequently
conservative, of any place iii the country. Neverthe-
less, on the question whether public water-works should
or should not be erected at the municipal expense, nearly
one-sixth of the seven hundred odd votes cast were de-
posited by women. The conservative tendencies of the
sex were made proudly manifest in the lact that of their
quota ot votes nearly all were cast against the proposed
innovation. So Schnectady is to get on for at leadt soin e
years to come with its private water works, such as they
are, as best it may.World.
BRUTALITY OF THE ABYSSINIAN CAM-
PAIGN.
The London Pall-Mall Gazette gives the fol-
lowing illustration of the stupid brutality exer-
cised by the British officers in the Abyssinian
campaign:
One day about one hundred and fifty of the Turkish
and Egyptian mule drivers came up jabbering to an offi-
cer who could not understand then), and reported it as
a case of mutiny. Forthwith two companies of infantry
were sent down, and sixty of die Turks were tied up to
the triangles and got fifty lashes each; It then leaked
out that the poor wretches had been three days without
rations and were only complaining.
On this Punch thus comments :
The truth is, that tor all the pluck and practical good
sense over which he is so ready to hug himself, John
Bull is too ^often the most offensive cf snobsbrutal,
pig-headed'1'and blunderingas odious a creature,
altogether, as any ihat lives ; a being to blush over,
and to repent in sackcloth and ashes for. Here
assuming this story to be truethe nigger-driving
element, which is one of the odious ingredients in John
Bulls character, is in the ascendant; and the worst
of the thing is, that nobody hesitates about believing
such a story. It is in fact only a reproduction, on a large
scale, of the blundering cruelty and overbearing stupid-
ity which mark the dealing ol your English snob with
niggers, wherever he has authority over them. Only
of your Englsh snob, however. Happily, there is your
English gentleman to trim the scales. But then your
snob is so frightfully frequent in this blessed
country. Is there any other country under the sun so
overrun with snobsany other where the snob is to
be found, rampant, in all ranks, classes, callings, and in
such force that he often determines their tone and
establishes their laws. We doubt it.
The Boston Traveller says the Massachusetts
Legislature has voted down Female Suffrage
three times. It would vote down colored male
suffrage, were the question before it, for the sake
of a parly triumph,


fmtfftffltt* 331
An old lady announced in court that she had no
counsel, that God was her.lawyer. My dear
madam, replied the judge, He does not practice in
this court.
That is one of the Revolutions we propose to
bring about, to teach our lawyers and judges
that the all-seeing eye of God is watching the
scales of justice in our courts. And they who
do not love mercy, and do justice, will find
some sharp practice in the higher courts, when
they f^jand face to face with him who can read
their inmost thoughts, who knows how the poor
are cheated .and wronged and buried alive in
our jails and prisons, with none to plead their
cause, nor pity them in their solitude and
misery.
Wilkess Spirit says the beautiful trotting mare, Fear-
less, was burnt by her keepers lighting his pipe just
before be locked the $16,000 beauty in her straw-covered
box! Thus does'tobacco stultify alt the sensesand its
devotees care neither how nasty nor how dangerous
their foolish practice is.
Fearless is not the only piece of beauti-
ful femininity whose life and happiness have
been destroyed by tobacco.' We hope none of
these vandals will ever enter our sanctum, to
burn up our valuables, or spit on our carpets,
or breathe their pestilential breath in our faces.
The disciples of Kuskowski all with one consent
repudiate these tobacco-chswers and smokers
with loathing and disgust. Let all men who
use tobacco choose a life of siugle blessedness.
It is unjust to any pure, sweet woman to ask
her to share a home'fumigated with tobacco
smoke and slimed with its juice.1
TEE SITUATION*
A sadder commentary on American politics do where
can be found than in tfce Tribune of the 13th inst, under
the head of The Feeling in the City. By consulting
.Ibe article we find that the political thermometers of
public opinion arc the rum shops. The men who re-
present the great democracy are found at the Pewter
Mug, while only a grade higher come the republicans
with their cut-glass decanters at Jerry Thomass. All
day loug the representatives drink and bet over the
prospective triumphs of their brothers in 'Washington.
Ho sane person will expect much from sympathizers
with traitors and assassins. But the eyes of the civil-
ized world are fixed on the movements of the republi-
can party. While mothers mourn for their dead and.
sisters weep by the graves of their brothers, the men
who, through their sacrifices, have become rich, spend
their time and money in disgracing the country.
1 have attended the most respectable republican meet-
ings where eloquent orators exalted virtue, and called
on angels to witness their deeds, yet as soon as the as-
sembly dispersed these very men met in pplendidly
furnished rooms, and spent hours in drunken de-
bauchery, Tbese are facts which I challenge any one to
deny. I am not speaking of democrats for every child
kbows what they are.
It matters not whether the republicans meet in East
Broadway or in Fifth Avenue, or whether they drink
whiskey or sherry. The difference between Ibe refined
sensuality of the St. Nicholas parlors, and the coarse
vulgarity oi Terrace Garden, is not very great. Drunken-
ness and obscene stories are some of the requisites for a
seat in the legislature. -They who plan presidential"
campaigns over brandy and water need not wonder if
their candidate proves a traitor. The uninitiated can
have only a faint idea of the condition of our political
machinery.
The majority of republican leaders are scarcely more
than cyphers, aDd were it not for the virtuous few, the
whole party would fester with corruption. While the
subject of Bestellism is being agitated, we might as well
uncover the. lountain head, and show to our children,
the kind of men their fathers are. God only knows what
the wives of these monsters have undergone, and how
much pain and sorrow is bequeathed to their innocent
children. Shall the women of America waste further
time in idle excuses, or will they come forward and
claim their birthright, securing what God has given
them,
Now is the time for women to show their philan-
thropy. Unless they come to the rescue with the gos-
pel m their hearts, and the ballot in their hands, and
sweep away intemperance, more homes will continue to
be filled with despair. While philosophers laugh and
aristocrats deride, let the laborer still toil, lor the suc-
cess of Universal Suffrage is only a question of time.
Help us, noble mothers. Nations await the result of
.your efforts. Raise up your Anna Dickinson's, and a
country smiling with virtue, temperance, and religion
will be your reward. n. m.
John Stuart Mild has astonished a great many
persons by publicly advocating the retention of capital
punishment. His chief argument is, that to hang a man
outright is much more merciful than to imprison him
for life. Dickens differs.
Suppose-Mr. Mill should permit the man to
choose for himself. But as our whole system
of punishment is cruel and unphilosopbical,
everything proposed is but a choice of evils.
The morally weak should be objects for our
love, pity and protection. Our jails and prisons
should be moral seminaries, where the criminal
should be educated and enlightened, and fitted
for society. Remember the greatest rogues are
outside the prison walls while the unwary are
caught.
The wort of The Revolution is not ac-
complished until women have every right that
men have. We have, therefore, a great work
before us. Let every reader of this paper help
us to speed the joyful day, by putting The
Revolution into the hands of every one of
your friends; or if you have not the time to do
it, send us names and we will. Remember we
want 100,000 subscribers! can you not aid
s?
Idolaters, ob Idiots ?Bonfanti, the
danseuse, upon the occasion of her last appear-
ance in New York city, was called before the
curtain ten times, was presented with jewelry
to the value of over $1,500, and bouquets in-
numerable covered the stage. The audience
rose en masse and cheered her. Over five thou-
sand people were in attendance at a serenade
given her at her residence after the performance.
The elder Dr. Beecher said the divinity of
Fanny Elsler was in her heels. He would say
the same of Bonfanti. But where is the
divinity of her admirers and worshippers,
as reported above?
Child Murder.This crime is so increasing
in Liverpool that the attention of the govern-
ment has been directed to the subject and the
Home Secretary has authorised the borough
coronor to offer rewards for the detection of the
guilty persons. Notwithstanding this state of
things, the virtuous British public continue to
oppose foundling hospitals lest they should en-
courage vice!
A woman who says she does not want her
rights, is like a child who does not want an
education; neither know their value.
Financial and Commercial.America versus
EuropeGold, like our Cotton, FOB SALE.
Greenbacks for Money. An American System
of Finance. American Products and Labor
Free. Fbreign Manufactures Prohibited. Open
doors to Artisans and Immigrants. Atlantic
and Pacific Oceans for AMEB1CAN Steam-
ships and Shipping. New York the Financial
Centre of the World. WaU Street emancipated
from Bank of England, or American Cashfor
American Bills. The Ch'edit Foncier and Credit
Mobilier System, or Capital Mobilized to Re-
suscitate the South and our Mining Interests,
and to People the Country from Ocean to Ocean,
from Omahato San Francisco. More organized
Labor, more Cotton, more Gold and Silver
Bullion to sell foreigners at the highest prices.
Ten millions of Naturalized Citizens DEMAND
A PENNY OCEAN POSTAGE, to Strength-
en the Brotherhood of Labor. If Congress Vote
One Hundred and Twenty-five Millions for a
Standing Army and Fieedmaris Bureau for the
Blades, Cannot they spare One Million for the
Whites ?
THE REVOLUTION.
NO. XXI.
To our Servants at Washington from the
People.at Home*
. THE RUSSIAN ALASKA SWINDLE.
Congress will be called upon this week to
vote on the appropriation to pay Russia for the
purchase of Alaska. It is the duty of Congress
to see where this money goes. The hulk is to
be divided up between parties in Washington
through the machinery of trumped up claims
on the Russian .government, which are held
mainly it is said by Thurlow Weed and an emi-
nent banking firm, and that Secretary Seward
and Robert J. Walker have been the chief in-
struments used to arrange this matter.
THE SWINDLE OF THE BRITISH CREDIT SYSTEM.
The value of cash or ready money in business
transactions is sufficiently acknowledged by all
civilized communities, to require no argument
on our part to demonstrate it. The holder of
cash is the holder of a power. The great bank-
ers of Europe are the arbiters of peace and war,
and the rulers of commerce and labor. British
gold conquered the great Napoleon, mid hum-
bled to the dust Fiance, the most powerful and
warlike nation of Europe. The power of Great
Britain consists in having a greater command
of ready money than any other nation on the
face of the globe. Great Britain controls not
only its cash capital, hut also a very large por-
tion of that in every country with which it
trades. The British Credit System is the engine
of power by which the cash and money markets
of foreign nations that trade with Great Britain
are placed under the direct control of the Bank
of England. This British Credit System has
initiated and fostered the exchange or sale of
the bills or acceptances of British films, for the
ready money of foreign nations. The British
Credit System is naturalized all over the world,
with London as the focus of its financial peri-
phery.
HOW THE BRITISH CREDIT SYSTEM SWINDLES
AMERICA. '
The British Credit System is more firmly es-
tablished, and works with greater power in the
United States, and more to the benefit of Great
Britain, than in any other countiy on the face
of the globe. American cash becomes the
property of Europe in exchange for its sixty-
days sight hills, to the full amount of our trade
with that continent. The mode by which this
is effected is as follows : A foreign firm estab-
lishes itself say in New Orleans, Mobile, Savan-
nah, Richmond, Baltimore, or any other point
from which exports of produce are made, and
with a branch firm to accept bills in New York,
Liverpool, or London. The firm in New-
Orleans draws on the branch in New York a


332

thirty or sixty-days sight bill, which is sold iu
New Orleans tor American cash. The American
cash realized from this foreign firm's bill is need
in New Orleans to make cash advances on cotton,
to the extent of 75 per cent, of its market value.
This cotton is shipped to the branch firm of the
foreign house in New York or Liverpool, to be
sold there. When the New Orleans bill matures
iu New York, it is paid by the American cash real-
ized from the sale of another bill drawn by the
New York firm at sixty-days sight, on the Lon-
don or Liverpool firm, thus giving the uncon-
trolled possession of the American cash for four
months to the foreign firm. When the bill on
the London or Liverpool firm matures, it is in
turn paid by the American cash realized from
the sale of the American cotton, consigned
from the New Orleans film to the Liverpool
firm. Not one cent of European money is used
in the whole4 affair. As this American cotton,
shipped direct from New Orleans to Liverpool,
is sold on the average within about two to three
months from date of shipment, it is apparent
that the Liverpool firm enjoys the use of the
American cash realized from the sale of both
the bills and the cotton for one to two clear
months. The result of this system is to give
Europe, chiefly Great Britain, the absolute con-
trol of American cash to so great an extent as
to enable Europe to buy all American produce
for ready money at the low prices which ready
money always commands ; while at the same
time Europe is enabled to sell its manufactured
products on credit to Americans at the enhanced
profits which the granting of credit always com-
mands above sales for ready money. Thus
Europe, chiefly Great Britain, buying for cash
and selling on time, in its dealings with the
TJnited States, makes a clear gain of at least
ten per cent, on the whole import and export
trade with the United States, or say, $50,000,-
000 per annum above what would be possible,
if America kept the control of its own cash.
MORE OP THE BRITISH SWINDLE.
In order to make this matter more plain, we
will assume, for the sake of illustration, that
the average exports of the United States to
Europe are, say $250,000,000 per. annum, and
the imports $300,000,000, requiring exports of
specie or bonds to the extent of $50,000,000 to
balance the account. With this amount of
foreign trade, as the foreign exchange or bill-
drawing business is almost entirely iu the hands
of foreign firms, it follows that nearly the whole
of the American cash used in this foreign busi-
ness is constantly under the control of Europe,
which keeps this cash balance, either in New
York, London, Paris, or Frankfort, as may best
suit European interests or convenience. Natu-
rally, this American cash given iu exchange
for foreign bills is used to benefit, not the
United States, but Europe. The minimum es-
timate cf the amount oi his American cash
used by Europe under the British Credit Sys-
tem is, say one-sixth of the amount of imports,
or a permanent $50,000,000 given in exchange
for one set of the European sixty dayss sight
bills. Furthermore, the cash proceeds of all
American produce sales will average at least
another two months, in the hands of European
firms, say $40,000,000, representing the mini-
mum total $90,000,000 in gold of United States
cash capital, constantly in the possession of
Europe, owing to the British Credit System, by
which our foreign trade is conducted. Besides
his sum, there are the $50,000,000 clear annual
profit in cash from Europe, buying for cash
a-nd selling oft Credit 0 the United States/
THE LOSS OF AMERICAN CASH FROM ABSENTEE-ISM
The curse of Ireland is its absentee-ism, or
Irish landlords spending their rents out of Ire-
land. The drain of very hard cash from
Ireland, owing to this absentee-ism, builds up
English bankers and merchants while it keeps
down Ireland.
The United States arc cursed with a greater
drain of very hard cash to Europe, than
Ireland ever staggered under.
It is estimated that there are at least fifty
thousand Americans travelling or resident in
Europe whose [average annual expenses are
probably more than $4,0'00 in gold. This sum
would give a total of $200,GOO,000 in gold of
American very hard cash spent in Europe
by Absentees every year.
EUROPEAN DRAIN OF VERT HARD CASH FOR
BONDS.
A former article in The Revolution
showed that Europe owns $600,000,000 of
United States bonds, interest and principal
payable in gold, which cost only $360,0u0,000
in gold; that, so far, three years interest or
$108,000,000 in gold had been paid, and that if
these bonds were held in Europe till they ma-
tured, seventeen years hence, and that if they
were then paid in gold, Europe would realize a
clear profit of $1,052,000,000 by having lent
the United States $360,000,000 in golda nice
little' profit of about two hundred per cent,
cleared in twenty years, over and above com-
pound interest.
AMERICA THE SLAVE OF EUROPE FOR VERT HARD
CASH.
These statements are placed before our read-
ers in order to arouse the people to the ruinous
financial system under which the incompeteney
of their Washington officials has placed them.
With this perpetual foreign cash drain eating
like a cancer into the National prosperity, how
is it possible for our industrial interests to pro-
gress as they ought to do ? Under this con-
dition of affairs, American citizens are reduced
practically into a bondage to Europe analagous
to that of the serfs in the Middle Ages. Freedom
exists only in name. Our bodily toil and its
fruits are made perpetually the property of Eu-
rope. We are, in fact, the slaves of Europe.
THE UNITED STATES BECOMING A COUNTERPART OF
THE SPANISH-AMERICAN REPUBLICS.
The Spanish-American Republics are cursed
by the same European influence, and their en-
tire commerce, and their internal trade, down to
the smallest tienda, are in the hands of Euro-
peans. The number of native Spanish-Ameri-
cans in trade is so small, that, as an element in
their commerce, it is not to be seen or felt.
This extraordinary fact illustrates, in a remark-
able manner, the absorbing power of this
British Credit System. The United States are
only saved from the same ruinous results by the
superior energy and talent of the people, but
we suffer, nevertheless, to a terrible extent. It
is the cause of much of that commercial de-
pression and impoverishment of the masses
from which the whole country is suffering.
Rock Island ami Wall Street Stockjobbers.
The Wall Street clique stockjobbers have
followed the example of the simple idiot, who
killed the goose that laid his golden egg.
They have killed investment and speculation
in every stock they have touched. The un-
precedented stagnancy on the New York
Stock Exchange is evidence of this fact- Tne
eUqffes and everybody they can borrow or beg
money from are staggering under a load of non-
dividend paying and watered railway shares
which have been run up to such high figures
that not even the most reckless of gamblers
dare to hold them even for twenty-four hours.
Milking the street, watering the capital
of these non-dividend paying companies with
stock dividends when they have scarcely money
enough to pay running expenses an I the last
new stockjobbing trick of legal injunctions,
played with the blind stupidity of brainless
blockheads, have given the. coup de grace to the
last slender*hope of salvation for the stockjob-
bing cliques. The outside public have long
since ceased to touch the clique stocks, and
prudent brokers have refused to buy them on
any margin, since the disgraceful litigation in
Erie and the absconding of its President and
Treasurer, Mr. Daniel Drew, with some of the
directors. The clique slocks are dead on the Slock
Exchange. Hudson River, Harlem, and Prairie
du Cbien are buried and out of sight. Chicago
and North Western Common and Preferred and
Michigan Southern watered to death with
stock dividends, are flickering with washed
sales on the Stock Exchange, and are all in the
hands of one clique. Milwaukee and St. Paul
Common and Preferred are kept alive also by
washing. Pittsburg is in the hands of those
who have swindled the street so often that they
can swindle it no more. New York Central and
Erie are staggering on their last legs, even as
speculative footballs, and their bubble is liable
to burst on any day. Erie hopelessly bankrupt.
New York Central paying but not earning an an-
nual dividend of 6 per cent, in currency and
held at 129, while Government 6 per cent, gold
bonds equal to about per cent, in currency
are selling at 109 and 10:40s paying 5 par cent,
gold equal to 7 per cent, in currency are selling
at 105 are facts which account satisfactorily for
the stagnation in New York Central. Rock Is-
land has been watered about 40 per per
cent., and now when its managers are propos-
ing to make it more valuable by building it
through the Companys lands to connect with
the Union Pacific at Omaha, a gang of reckless
* stockjobbers invoke the legal injunction dodge
for the purpose of sacrificing the road to their
own selfish interests.
Mr. Henry Keep wants to stop the Rock Is-
land road at Des Moines, for the purpose of
absorbing it in the Chicago and North Western,
and to prevent an opposition to that road in
which he holds a controlling interest. Mr. David
Crawford wants to stop the Rock Island road
at Des Moines, because he and his brother own
a large amount of property there, which they
expect to sell to the Company at exorbitant
prices, if they can cany out their scheme and
obtain the control of the Rock Island. In that
case Mr. Crawford and his confederates will
also carry out their plan fpr watering the
stock, which will enable them to divide about
$3,000,000 among the members of the clique.
This stock-jobbing clique consist of Mr. Henry
Keep, David Crawford, Uriel Murdock, Presi-
dent of the Continental Bank, D. P. Morgan,
of Dabney, Morgan & Co., W. H. Appleton, the
book publisher G. J. Forrest, H. Blood, and
others, with the usual routine of brokers to
use as tools, among which are Rufus Hatch
& Co., and Fisk & Belden.
This ring of specul ators, who have been seek-
ing for some time to get control of the Chicago,
Rock Island, and Pacific railroad, and subject
it to the interests of a rival road, still persist in
their schemes, 'they are calling'* stockholders'


\
I
333
meeting for the election of directors, when they
well know that such meeting is forbidden by
statute and by injunction, and if it were held
its acts would, have no effect, except to involve
all the actors in ignominious punishment..
The design obviously is to get some appeaamce
of authority by holding an illegal election. With
the same view they attempted to get possession
of the Companys office in New York ; and it is
to be hoped, ior the good of the road, they will
fail in the present plan as they did in that.
The following correspondence tells its own
story :
New York, Apnl 4tb, 1868.
To Mr. F. H. Tows, op the Rook island Company :
Sir : I am directed by a majority of the stockholders
of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Com-
pany to say that they wish to hold a stockholders meet-
ing in the office of the Corporation for consultation, on
some day next week, say Tuesday ,or Wednesday.
Is there any objection to their using the office for that
purpose ?
Yours, James Grant,
88 Wall Street.
Chioago, Rook Island & Pacific Railroad)
Company, Secretary's Office, 13 William \
street, New York, April 4th, 1868. )
James' Grant, Esq., New York Sir : Your note of
this date stating that you are directed by a majority of
the stockholders of this Company to say that they wish
to hold a stockholders meeting in the office of this Cor-
poration, for consultation, on some day next week, say
Tuesday or Wednesday, and asking if there is any objec-
tion to their using the office for that purpose, is re-
ceived ; and in reply, I beg to say that as no stockhold-
ers'meeting has been called and no notice of such meet-
ing has been given, it would he irregular to hold it as
proposed, and you cannot expect an officer of the Com-
pany to aid suoh illegal-assembly by admitting it to the
Company's offices. If any of the stockholders actually
wish to consult together, there are rooms in abundance
without this building, and of ample dimensions to con-
tain all who would meet for that purpose.
Under the By Laws of this Company all stockholders
meetings, except the annual meetings, must be called by
a majority of the directors, and at such times and places
as they may appoint, of which notice must be published
in Illinois and Iowa, at least thirty days previous to the
time of meeting. A meeting not so authorized by due
call and notice cannot represent the Company, and it
would be injustice to the numerous permanent holders
of shares if the meeting you propose, without any call
or notice, should he held in the office of the Company,
and its unauthorized doings should thus falsely gain a
oolor of regularity which might deceive the public.
As you are in the service of parties who have pursued
.this Company for the last three months with suits, in-
junctions and attempts to procure receiverships, and to
pnnish for illegal contempt, aiming thereby to delay and
defeat the extension of the road to the Missouri River,
and to deprive the Company of its cash means, for such
extension; who have denied the essential corporate
powers of the Company, assailed the wise policy of its
management, disputed the safety of its funds, denied
the right of tl^e corporation to nold meetings in New
York, and defamed its directors, and still persist in so
doing after public and complete refutation ; and* as you
have aided those parties as attorney in court, as lobby
member before the Legislature of Iowa, and as maker of
affidavits, I cannot assume that you intend anything for
the good of the corporation by an irregular gathering of
a few stock speculators which you style a stockholders
meeting.
Yours, etc., Francis H. Tows.
Talk among the Brokers in Wall Street.
RICH AND RACY GOSSIP IN WALL STREET.
HOW RAILROADS ARE MANAGED BY RESPECTA-
BLE INDIVIDUALS OP KNOWN STANDING.
THE CHICAGO AND NORTH WESTERN DIRECTORS ON
A * GRAND SWIZZLE.
THEY INVITE ONLY A PEW OP THEIR BOSOM
FRIENDS AND PIGEONS TO PLUCK.
HENRY KEEP, UNCLE DAN. DREW, GEN. BAXTER,
BEN. NATHAN, GEO. DENISON, RUFUS HATCH,
ALPHABET HUGHES, AND OTHER EMINENT
INDIVIDUALS TO LITE WELL FOR TEN DAYS
rmi ^
AT THE EXPENSE OP THE NORTH WESTERN STOCK-
HOLDERS.
THE MICHIGAN SOUTHERN SPECULATION, Alp HOW
RUFUS^ HATCH AND DAVE CRAWFORD EXPECT TO
STICK THE PUBLIC.
WALL STREET UAT> ^BETTER LOOK OUT FOR THIS
WORTHY COUPLE.
TTTTC ROCK ISLAND CONTROVERSYSOME PACTS' FOR
THE REAL STOCKHOLDERS.
THE PRESENT MANAGEMENT TO COMPLETE THE
ROAD TO THE MISSOURI RIVER AT ALL HAZARDS
ANOTHER ISSUE OF STOCK PROBABLE.
HATCH, CRAWFORD, CIRCUS FISK AND OTHER PA-
TRIOTS TRYING TO GET POSSESSION OF ROCK
ISLAND TO STOP THE BUILDING OF THE ROAD
AND TURN IT OVER TO KEEP AND THE NORTH-
WEST.
THE GREAT SPECULATION IN GOVERNMENT SECURI-
TIES,
THE SOUTH WEST AND ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC
LITTLE GAME. WARD ts CO. AND THE FRAU-
DULENT BONDS.
OAKES AMES AND THE CREDIT MOBELIER DIRECTORS
AND THE UNION PACIFIC.
BELMONT AND GENERAL DIX. IS IT A SWINDLE OR
BLACKMAILING ?
D. P. MORGAN AND PERUVIAN BONDS.
W. H. APPLETON PATENT GAS, PETROLEUM AND
GOLD COMPANIES AND ROOK ISLAND.
RUSSELL SAGE & F. P. JAMESS LITTLE GAME.
The talk among the brokers is the
AWFUL STAGNATION IN THE STOCK MARKET AND THE
WONDERFUL ACTIVITY IN GOVERNMENT BONDS,
and the question asked by everybody is, what is going to
become of the cliques and the stocks they hold? The
talk is about the Chioago Republican platform being
DEAD AGAINST GREENBACKS AND INFLATION,
and that if the democratic convention in July goes in for
the same thing, then the game is all up lor high prices
and the
RICHES OF THE RAILWAY MILLIONAIRES
with their five, ten, and twenty million dollars, will
BE WIPED OUT OF EXISTENCE
in much less fame than it took to make them. The talk
is that the riches of these railway millionaires consist of
railway stocks with which they are loaded, and lor which
there
IS NO MARKET AT ANY PRICE,
that it .will make all the difference in the world to them
if
CHICAGO AND NORTH WESTERN
common instead of selling at 67 dropped down to 30
and the preferred from 77 to 46 and
MICHIGAN SOUTHERN FROM 88
ex-dividend, equal to 97, down to 60 and so on, that the
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION IN THE FALL
and the financial platforms of both political parties have
already
FRIGHTENED SOME OF THE SHREWD BANKERS
and money lenders, who want the cliques to sell their
9tocks at the best price they can get and dose up their
loans this summer, as they expect a
SERIOUS COLLAPSE IN THE FALL
in all the shares of the non-dividend paying railway
stocks. The talk is that the £
EXPENSES OF WASHING STOCKS,
buying and selling to make the market active, and in-
terest account for carrying have wiped out so much of
the marginof the cliques that some of the weaker
Members have very ltttt.f left.
The capital stock of
CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN,
common and preferred, is $26,000,000, and
MICHIGAN SOUTHERN $11,000,000,
making a total of $37,000,000 and a tumble to the prices |
of last year would wipe out $15,000,000 with great ease.
That last year Chicago and North Western Common
WAS SOLD AT 29§ AND IN 1866 25 £
and the preferred at 56% to 52% and
MICHIGAN SOUTHERN WAS SOLD
at 64% last year, and in 1865, when the earnings were
larger than they are now and the capital stock several
millions less,
THE PRICE WAS 49|, OR ABOUT HALF .
its present market quotation. The talk is that the pub*
lie and the street understand perfectly
TBE CONDITION OF THE CLIQUES,
and that it is impossible to make money either by buy*
ing any of the clique stocks long, or selling them short,
for they milk them either way. The talk is that the
LEADERS OF THE CLIQUES
have had some serious meetings with the banks and
MONEY LENDERS THAT ARE CARRYING THEM,
arid theybave been told that they
MUST SELL BEFORE AUGUST.
The talk is that the cliques, in consequence of being
PRESSED AND URGED BY THE MONEY.
lenders, are going in for a
GRAND JAMBOREE THIS SUMMER,
and will make desperate efforts to sell their stocks, and if
they cant sell them, then they will borrow on them all
they can from new parties whom
THEY WILL FINALLY STICK
with the property at higher prices than they could real*
ize if they attempted to force sales. The cliques intend
to
PLAY UPON BROKERS AND MONEY LENDERS
the littlegame of the
; CUMBERLAND COAL SWINDLE,
of which full particulars can be obtained from the highly
respectable members of the old board, the ;
ASTUTE BAYLtS, THE VOLUBLE CUTTING, AND THE
FASCINATING L. T. HOYT.
That the banks and others, when they take
CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN, ERIE, PITTSBURG,
ROCK ISLAND,
and other non-dividend paying and watered stocks
involved in litigation, will do well to get one of
THOMAS DENNY & CO.S ANNUAL CIRCULARS
to showjihem the prices of the last few years, so that they
MAY ESCAPE BEING VICTIMIZED,
like the highly respectable and experienced brokers who
were stuck by
LENDING ON CUMBERLAND COAL.
The talk is that the cliques have resolved to
GET UP MONSTER EXCURSIONS
over their roads in the West, in order to popularize their
stocks amoiig -the
VICTIMS WHOM THEY INTEND TO PLUCK, THAT
HENRY KEEP, BEN. NATHAN, AND THE NORTH
WESTERN CROWD
are going to lead off next week with a grand excursion
over the
MICHIGAN SOUTHERN AND CHICAGO & NORTH
WESTERN
railways with
OCEANS OF CHAMPAGNE, WHISKEY COCKTAILS, AND
OTHER FIXINS
to match, that the days of
KEEP, LOCKWOOD, AND CO. MAY
be long upon the face of the earth, that
HENRY KEEP HAS ROPED
in Uncle Daniel Drew, General Baxter, and that
RUPUS HATCH IS TO ATTTEND AS CHAPLAIN
to the company and
ALPHABET HUGHES AS THE BEAU
Brummel of the party. The talk fe that the party will b o
a grand success, and that they mean to
STICK SOME WESTERN CAPITALISTS
if they can, and to have a high time generally at the
r


334:
EXPENSE OP THE INNOCENT STOCKHOLDERS
of the Chicago & North Western'and Michigan Southern
companies to whom the items will be charged in con*
struction Account. * The Revolution will have two
special reporters on the occasion, one to do the heavy
business with the whiskey cocktail men and a spe
cial personal
FRIEND OF DENISON AND BEN. NATHAN,
and the other to do the deportment and respectability
department who is a warm personal friend of
CHAPLAIN RUFUS HATCH AND ALPHABET HUGHES,
so between the cocktail and deportment re*
porters of The Revolution its readers will he
thoroughly posted as to the glorious events, spark-
ling wit, dashing eloquence and heavy drinking of
THIS MOST GLORIOUS EXPEDITION
of the glorious idea, that the glorious cliques
have hit upon 11 start their
VICTIMS ON THE ROAD TO GLORY.
The talk is that
HERNY KEEP IS SO DELIGHTED
at the prospect, that he has been seen to
SMILE ON THREE SEVERAL OCCASIONS
during the past week, and it is commonly reported that
he also uttered at one time
THREE CONSECUTIVE BUT INCOHERENT SENTENCES,
that bis friends rather doubt the latter and the sheet is
inclined to think it is a joke, that
CHAPLAIN RUFUS HATCH EXPANDS
all over, that be wants to shake hands and talk confiden-
tially iu a whisper with everybody he meets, that
ALPHABET HUGHES IS SO EAGER
to shine in the West that his tailor swears he will have
tn give him up and the a'ccouut for hisjivbims aud altera-
tions will drive him mad. The talk is that
DENISON AND HIS FRIEND, SWEET WILLIAM,
promise their 'bosom friends delicious times in their
old
CAMPING GROUNDS IN THE WEST,
that Uncle Daniel says he must have the
CIRCUS DANCER, FISK, AND BEN. NATHAN
to talk about Aaron and the Golden Calf and his
SYNAGOGUE ON MURRAY HILL.
The talk is about the little game that
RUFUS HATCH AND DAVE CRAWFORD
are getting up for
HENRY KEEP IN MICHIGAN SOUTHERN
to stick the public, that they and
HENRY KEEP, LOCKWOOD & CO.,
aud others of the clique, hold all the capital of Michigan
Southern, that it they can only get short interest enough
they will keep advancing the price, that they will
CORNER THE SHORTS,
that when the shorts settle thoy will then drop the price
and keep it there until they get more shorts, that then it
will be advanced agaiu, so as to bleed tho street by this
patent sale game process, that
RUFUS HATCH AND DAVE CRAWFORD
say if they can only get people to either
BUY OR SELL MICHIGAN SOUTHERN
that they will work their money ont of them either on
the long or short tack. The talk is that Rufus Hatch,
DAVE CRAWFORD, AND CIRCUS DANCING FISK,
aud other patriots, are trying.to get
POSSESSION OF THE ROCK ISLAND
road to stop its building and completion to Omaha, and
that they intend to
SELL IT OUT TO HENRY KEEP
and tho North West Road, to tho great injury of the real
stockholders of tho Rock Islaud Comany. That in order
to cover up their stookjobbiug designs to ruin the road
they have roped iu
WILLIAM H. APPLETON OF PATENT GAS,
pet: oleum and gold companies notoriety. _
D. P. MORGAN, WHO SOLD PERUVIAN BONDS
and then repudiated his*contracts, and other highly re-
spectable names, that do not
Sg MIND PICKING UP THE CHIPS EX-CATHEDRA
in a quiet way. The talk is about *

ALLAN MLANE, PRESIDENT OF PACIFIC MAIL,
and his nice little game to get up a short interest in
the stock by publishing officially his letter saying that
the company had postponed dividends indefinitely and
would run at a loss as
LONG AS WEBBS OPPOSITION LASTED.
The talk is that
STOUT AND DICKINSON ARE THE BROKERS
he uses, and they do not get shorts enough to pay. The
talk is that the new directors of the
SOUTH PACIFIC RAILROAD
company are going in for a big thing for themselves per-
sonally by an
INFAMOUS SHARP THING THEY INTEND
to perpetrate by an arrangement with the
ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD
company, that tho bonds of the Atlantic and Pacific Rail-
road Company sold by the highly
THE MONEY MARKET IS EASY
at 4 to 5 per cent, with exceptions at $ per cent. Prime
short paper is discounted at to 7% per cent, and longer
dates at 7 per cent The weekly bank statement shows
an increase of $4,619,967 in legal-tenders while the loans
are decreased $343,564, showing the impossibility of the
banks using their surplus in loans. This condition of
tho money market is forcing the banks to buy govern-
ment bonds in order to make interest
The following table shows the changes in the New
York city banks compared with the preceding week :
May 16th May 23d Differences. '
Loans,
Specie,
Circulation,
Deposits,
Legal tenders.
$267,724,783
20,839,142
34,193,249
201,313,305
. ^T, 613,095
267,381,279 Dec.
20,476,947 Dec.
34,183,038 Dec.
202,507,550 Inc.
62,233,002 Inc.
$343,564
462,195
10,211
1,194,245
4,619,967
THE GOLD MARKET
is film but quiet. The continued large ex]5orfc3 of specie
control its price independent of political movements at
Washington.
RESPECTABLE FIRM OF WARD AND CO.
are all fraudulent, that they were issued without color of
law, that tile
ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC COMPANY IS NOT RESPON-
SIBLE
for one dollar of
THESE BONDS SOLD BY WARD & CO.,
that the proceeds of these bonds sold by
WARD U CO. WERE SQUANDERED
illegitimately outside of the companys business by the
former managers, that
" OAKES AMES, OF BOSTON,
and other heavy Boston men, are trying to cloak up these
frauds and make a big thing for themselves, that all in-
terested had better see into this matter and look after
their interests for
OAKES AMES EXPERIENCE IN THE UNION PACIFIC
RAILROAD COMPANY AND THE CREDIT MO-
BILIER OF AMERICA
has made him an expert in all
FIRST-CLASS SHARP PRACTICES,
that Oakes Ames and the Credit Mobilier folks
DO NOT ALWAYS KEEP WITHIN
the law as their settlements with
BELMONT, GEN. BIX,
and others recently in their nice little game with the
UNION PACIFIC AND CREDIT MOBILIER
affairs plainly show. The talk is if highly respectable
gentlemen like
OAKES AMES, BUSHNELL, LUMBABD,
and ihe collective respectability of the
*
CREDIT MOBILIER OF AMERICA AND THE UNION
PACIFIC
railroad company will pick up the chips alter the
fashion of the
The following table shows the course oi the gold market
during the past week :
Opening. Highest. Lowest. Closing.
Saturday, 16, 139% 139% 139% 139%
Monday, 18, 339% 189% 139% 139%
Tuesday, 19, 139% 139% 139% - 139%
Wednesday, 20, 139% 139% 139% 139%
Thursday, 21, 139% 139% 139% 139%
Friday, 22, 139% 140 139% 139%
Saturday, 23, 139% 139% 139% 139%
Monday, 25, 139% 140 139% 140
TEE FOREIGN EXCHANGE MARKET '
is firm. Prime bankers 60 days sterling bills are quoted
110% toll OX and sight 110% to 110%. Bankers francs
on Paris 60 days 5-13% to 5*12% and sight 5.-11% to 5-10%.
THE RAILWAY SHARE MARKET
is dull hut higher £nd firm at the advance. The chief
legitimate movements are in Fort Wayne and Toledo
and Wabash, and the cliques are moving Michigan
Southern, Pittsburg and Reading. Pacific Mall is worked
by a clique in order to get shorts. The robbery of
Adams & Co. has hurt the Express Companies shares.
Canton is strong and Quicksilver is steady. The general
market closed strong under clique manipulations.
Mnsgrave & Co., 19 Broad street, report the following
quotations:
Canton, 50X Wells, Fargo & Co., 24% to 24%; Adams
Express, 67% to 57%} United States Express, 57% to
58 ; Merchants Union Express, 29 to 29%; Quick-
silver, 30 to 30%; Mariposa, 8% ; Pacific Mail,
94% to 95; W. U. Tel., 38% to 38 % ; New York
Central, 130% to 180%; Erie, 69% to 69%; preferred,
74 to 76; Hudson River, 138% ; Beading, 94% to.
94% ; Tol. W. & W., 48% to 50 ; Mil. & St. P., 65% ;
preferred, 77% to 77%.Ohio & M. C. 30% to 30%;
Mich. Cen., 118% ; Mich. South, 88% to 88% ; 111.
Central 147%'; Cleveland & Pittsburg, 88% tb 88% ;
Cleveland & Toledo, 109% to 109%; Rock Island, 96 to
96% ; North .Western, 67% to 68; Wayne, 110% to
li0% ; Bankers & Bro. 11% to 11%.
UNITED STATES SECURITIES
FORTY THIEVES IN THE NEW YORK .
Common Council, where shall the great American people
look for high-tonod honor and integrity ? The talk is
about
ALASKA, AND THAT CONGRESS
are active and strong, and the amount of transactions is
greater than at any other period since the rebellion.
The bonds of the Central Pacific Railroad Company are
selling in advance of their receipts and there is a fair de-
mand for the Union Pacific bonds.
will vote the money to the Russian Government this
week, and that
THURLOW WEED, SEWARD, AND AN EMINENT
BANKING
firm held claims against the Russian Government which
will take a large slice of the money.
WHAT ABE THOSE CLAIMS?
The talk^l about the
ENORMOUS BUSINESS DOING IN GOVERNMENT
4
bonds, and that the street is boginning to speculate in
them as tho only safe thing to touch. The talk is about
the suits to be commenced against the
MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL COMPANY
by the holders of the third mortgage bonds of the old
La Crosse & Milwaukee Company, when
RUSSELL, SAGE, F. P. JAMES,
and others, will be shown up in their tricks to pick up the
chips.
Fisk & Hatch, 5 Nassau street, report the following
quotations
Registered, 1881, 115 to 115%; Coupon, 1881, 115%
to 115%; 5-20 Registered, 1862, 107 to 107%; 5-20
Coupon, 1862, 110% to 110% ; 5-20 Coupon, 1864, 108%
to 108% ; 5-20 Coupon, 1865, 1C8% to 109; 5-20 Cou-
pon, Jan. and July, 1865, 110% to 110%; 5-20 Coupon,-
1867, 100% to 110% ; 10-40 Registered, 105% to 105% ;
10-40 Coupon, 105% to 105% ; June, 7*30, 108% to
108%; July, 7-30, 108% to 108% ; May Compounds, 1865,
; August Compounds, 118% ; September Com-
pounds, 117%; October Compounds, 117%.
THE CUSTOMS DUTIES
for the week were $2,184,880 in gold against $2,404,0t7
last week, $2,293,625, and $2,136,368 for the preceding
weeks. The imports of merchandise for the week were
$3,470,371 in gold against $5,778,251, $4,216,906 aud $5,-
395;815 for the preceding weeks. The exports, exclusiveof
specie, were $4,035,781, iu currency, against $3,434,535,
$3,188,021 and $4,170,473, for the preceding weeks/

. j


<
ilu iUvflttttifltt.
335
The exports of specie were $3,947,038, against $3,150,-
457, $3,686,394, $1,431,891 and $1,867,291 for the pre-
ceding weeks.
WOMAN SUFFRAGE TRACTS
for sale at the office of THE REVOLUTION.
Enfranchisement of Women, by Mrs. John Stuart
Mill.
Suffrage for Women, by John Stuart Mill, M.P.
Freedom for Women, by Wendell Phillips.
Public Function of Woman, by Theodore Parker.
Woman and her Wishes, by Col. T. W. Higginson.
Responsibilities of Women, by Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols.
Womans Duty to Vote, by Henry Ward Beeoheb.
Universal Suffrage, by Eltzabth Cady Stanton.
The Mortality of Nations, by Parker Pillsbury.
Impartial Suffrage, by an Illinois Lawyer.
Suffrage a Right, not a Privilege, by J. H. K. Wilcox.
Equal Rights for Women, by George William Curtis.
Should Women Vote? Affirmative Testimonials of
Sundry Persons.
Price per Single Copy 10 cts.; per Hundred Copies;$5 ;
per Thousand Copies $4U.
Orders should be. addressed to Susan B. Anthony,
Proprietor of THE REVOLUTION, 37 Park Row,
(Room 20), New York.
BEAT NATIONAL PAINTING.
THE NEW REPUBLIC,
OR,
EMANCIPATION.
A splendid Allegorical picture by the celebrated artist,
Ferdinand Pauwls, Professor of the Academy at Weimar
On exhibition at the ART GALLERY, 845 Broadway,
N. Y., from 9 A. M. tj 10 P. M. - 21-24
LADIES, think and aot for yourselves. 18
carrat gold jewelry for $2 per dwt. to wit : Ladies
chains solid 18 carrat gold 10 dwt. $20,15 dwt. $30. Rings,
Pins, Sleeve Buttons, Childrens Jewelry, both useful and
ornamental. Ladies, get solid gold jewelry, it is the cheap-
est in the end. Get it for your childrens sake, get it for
your own sake, get it for your husbands sake. Ladies,
act ior yourselves, see that your silverware is coin $3.50
per ounce, made up. Ladies get watches that will keep
time, dont be put off with cheap French -watches.
Finest watches and jewelry at .Benedict Brothers, up
town (new store), 691 Broadway, near 4thstreet. Ladies,
you have been fooled long enough, let there be a Revo-
lution in buying your jewelry.
FRANKLIN CLARKS
LAND OFEICE,
No. 1 Park Place New York.
Dealer in U. S. Land Script, Government Lands, Farms
and other Real Estate.
fJlHE DORCAS SEWING MACHINE.
PRICE, INCLUDING TABLE, ONLY $30.
. LATfcST, SIMPLEST, CHEAPEST, AND BEST,
for the price, ever offered; combining the utmost sim-
plicity and reliability with tbe inside minimum cost.
The first good, simple, reliable Seeing Maohine ever
offered at a low price.
Agents, wanted everywhere, local and travelling.
Great inducements offered.
Address, THE DORCAS SEWING MACHINE CO.,
No, 1 Centro st., New York.
JjTARMS FOR SALE,
IN SULLIVAN AND DELAWARE COUNTIES
AT GREAT BARGAINS.
Only 150 miles from New York City, near the Erie
railroad.
D. D. MoKOON, Agent, Long Eddy, Sullivan Co., N. Y.
19-6m.
"ppjNM B. STANTON,
AND
HENRY STANTON,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
/
62 CEDAR STREET,
Notary Public, New Yob?.
fj\HE FREEBOOTERS.
A STORY OF THE TEXAN WAR,'
BY
GUSTAVE ATMAUD.
Author of The Prairie Flower, Tbe Trapper's
Daughter, The~Piriatos of the Prairies, The In-
dian Chief, Etc.
PRICE 50 CENTS.
The Freebooters, by Gustave Aimard.The writer
of this volume is a Frenchman, who in his youth was
adopted by a tribe of Indians, with whom he lived for
years, studying their habits and characteristics, and ac-
quiring a fund of knowledge concerning them, which,
since his return to civilized life, he has industriously
turned to account in the manufacture of Indian stories,
of which he has written quite a large library, the list on
the cover before, us extending to thirteen. They are all
intensely interesting, and their number and popularity
prove that they have a great deal of merit.
T. B. PETERSON & BROTHERS, Publishers,
306 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa.
J^EMORESTS YOUNG AMERICA,
THE BEST JUVENILE MAGAZINE.
EVERY BOY AND GIRL THAT SEES IT SAYS SO J ALL THE
PRESS SAY SO ; AND PARENTS AND TEACHERS CONFIRM IT.
DONT FAIL TO SECURE A COPY!
A good Microscope, with a Glass Cylinder to confine
living objects, or a good two-bladed pearl Pocket-Knife,
and other desirable objects, given as a Premium to each
Subscriber. Yearly, $1 50. Published by
W. JENNINGS DEMOREST,
473 Broadway, N. Y.
Try it, Boys and Girls. Single Copies, 15 cents, mailed
free.
"QEMORESrS MONTHLY MAGAZINE,
UNIVERSALLY ACKNOWLEDGED
*
The Model parlor Magazine of America ; devoted to
Original Stories, Poems, Sketches, Model Cottages,
Household Matters, Gems of Thought, Personal and
Literary Gossip, Fashions* Instructions on Health,
Music, Amusements, etc. ? all by the best aiithors, and
profusely and artistically illustrated with costly En-
gravings ; lull-size, useful, and reliable Patterns, Em-
broideries, and a constant succession of artistics nov-
elties.
No person of refinement, or economical housewife,
can afford to do without the Model Monthly. Single, 30
cents; back numbers as specimens, 10 centseither
mailed free. Yearly, $3, with a valuable premium ; two
copies, $5 ; three copies, $7.50 ; five copies, $12, and
splendid premiums for Clubs at $8 each, with the first
premiums. Address W. JENNINGS DEMOREST,
473 Broadway, N. Y.
LOTHING! CLOTHING! CLOTHING!
Our stockfor the present season is of unparalleled
extent and variety in both MENS AND BOYS CLOTH-
ING. Persons at a distance can obtain perfect fitting
garments from us, with certainty and dispatch, by the
aid of OUR NEW RULES FOR SELF-MEASUREMENT,
Rules and Price-List sent by mail on application. FREE
MAN & BURR, Clothing Warehouse, 124 Fulton and
90.Nassau Sts., N. Y.
PICTURES JUST READY. .
Marriage of Washington, Size to Frame 22 in. by 28.
Hour of Prayer,
View on Hudson near West Point,
Life in the Wood,
The Cavalry Camp.
Also a full set of
u R100 EAcy peofound-
READ THE NEW ILLUSTRATED ANNUAL OF
PERENOLGY AND PHYSIOGNOMY
for 1868. Contains : Marriage of Cousins ; its effects.
Whom and when to marry. Right age. Jealousy in all
its phases, with causes and ouxe. Distinguished char-
acters, with portraits. Bismarck, Disraeli, Victor
Hugo, the Hon. Henry Wilson, Miss Braddon, Kings
and Queens. Two Paths to Womanhood, illustrated'.
How to Read Character, 30 pagls, hansomely printed,
25 cents. Newsmen have it. Sent first post by
S. R. WELLS,
No. 389 Broadway, N. Y.
JJOW TO PURCHASE A HOUSE
FOR*$15.80 PER MONTH!
WITH
IMMEDIATE POSSESSION AND NO RENT TO PAY! !
APPLY TO CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING BANK,
202 Bboadway.
HOW TO BUY A LOT FOR $2.00 PER WEEK!
With Immediate Possession for BuildiDg or Gardening
purpose. Apply at the Offices of the
CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING BANK, 202 BROADWAY.
HOW TO INVEST YOUR MONEY SAFELY
At 7 per cent, interest,
APPLY TO CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING BANK,
202 Broadway.
Interest invariably reckoned from date of deposit to date
of withdrawal. Open from 10 a. m., to 4 p. m. Mon-
days and Fridays till 8 p. m.
Circulars giving full particulars, .mailed free, on appli-
cation. J. ANDREW, Secretary.
19.-4t.
JNDISPENSABLE HAND-BOOK.
HOW TO WRITE, HOW TO BEHAVE, HOW TO TALK,
HOWTO DO BUSINESS.
In one handsome volume oi 600 pages, 12mo. Sent by
first post for $2.25. Agents wanted. Please address
S. R. WELLS,
No. 389 Broadway, N. Y.
JJOME INSURANCE COMPANY.
CAPITAL, $100,000.00.
OFFICERS.
D. R. ANTHONY, President,
F. E. HUNT, Vice-President,
A. D. NIEMANN,, Secretary.
OFFICE49 MAIN STREET,
Leavenworth, Kansas,
. CHROMO LITHOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS
of George Washington, Martha Washington, Lincoln ,
Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, Stonewall Jackson and Gen.
Lee, all framed in fine gilt ovals 14 inches by 11,
Address LYON & CO., 494 Broome street, N. Y.
rpHE BEST BOOK TO SELL.
Agents will find a ready sale for
HOW TO WRITE, HOW TO TALK, HOW TO BEHAVE
AND HOW TO DO BUSINESS.
Complete in one gilt volume. Sent first post for $2.25
Agents wanted. 'S. R. WELLS,
No. 389 Broadway. N. Y.
JpRINTING AND STEREOTYPING,
BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND JOB WORK
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
EVERY FACILITY FOR QUALITY AND DESPATCH.
EDWARD O. JENKINS,
20 North William street,
18-ly New York, ,
HE EXCITEMENT CONTINUES.
That Dipper and The Little WonderThe Dia-
per weighs, without springs or weights, from a half
ounce to two pounds, and measures Irom a gill to three
pints. The Little Wonder combines House-funnel
Apple Coror, Cake Cutter, Pie Crimper, Radish grater,
and Green Com Sheller. Samples of each' (4 pieces),
boxed and shipped on receipt of $1.30. Agents wanted.
MARSH & CO., 33 Maiden Lane, New York.
gPLENDlD PREMIUMS FOR CLUBS
TO DEMORESTS MONTHLY MAGAZINE. .
To each Subscriber either a Package of Initialed Sta-
tionery, Diamond Needles, Fonr Pieces of Music, a Box
of S*eel Pens, or Visiting Cards. Club of Two: Album,
Cook.Book, Reticule, Butter-Knives, Plated Butter
Knives, or Young America for one year, or Childrens
Bulletin of Fashions. Club of Three : Album, Writing-
Desk, Reiicule, or LadiesBulletin of Fashions. Club
of Four : dozen Plated Spoons, splendid Album.
Club of Five : Best Carving Knif^and Fork. Club of
Six : Yi doz best Ivory-handled Knives, large Album.
Club of Eight : Clothes Wringer, yz doz. Plated Forks.
Club of Ten : Websters Dictionary, or a Music Box.
Club of Twenty : Wheeler & Wilson's Sewing Machine.
Club of Thirty :.A Melodeon. Club of Two Hundred : A
hew Piano. Besides al) the subscriber g tithe first
premium. 473 BROAD WA N. Y,


336

The Revolution;
#
THE ORGAN OF THE
NATIONAL PARTY OP NEW AMERICA.
PRINCIPLE, NOT POLICYINDIVIDUAL RIGHTS AND
RESPONSIBILITIES.
550 MILES
OF THE
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD
RUNNING "WEST PROM OMAHA
ACROSS THE CONTINENT
ARE NOW FINISHED,
WHOLE GRAND LINE TO THE PACIFIC
WILL BE COMPLETED EN 1870.
The means provided for construction have proved am-
ple, and there Is no lack of funds for the most vigorous
prosecution of the enterprise. The Companys FIR&T
MORTGAGE BONDS, payable, PRINCIPAL AND IN-
TEREST, IN GOLD, are now offered at par. They pay
J^ECTURES AND SPEECHES
OF
GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN.
CHAMPIONSHIP OP WOMEN.
The Great Epigram Campaign of Kansas of 1867. Price
25 cento.
SIX WEEKS IN THE WEST.
Protection to American Industry, versus British Free
Trade. Irish Nationality and the Fenian Brotherhood.
The Pacific Railroad. Chicago to Omaha. 125 pages.
I860. Price 25 cents.
THE REVOLUTION WILL DISCUSS :
1. In PoliticsEducated Suffrage, Irrespective, of
Sex or Color; Equal Pay to Women for Equal Work;
Eight Hours Labor; Abolition of Standing Armies and
Party Despotisms. Down with PoliticiansUp with the
People!
2. In ReligionDeeper Thought; Broader Ideas ;
Science not Superstition; Personal ^Purity; Love to Man
as well as God.
3. In Social Life.Practical Education, Dot Theo-
retical; Fact, not Fiction; Virtue, not Vice; Cold Water,
not Alcoholic Drinks or Medicines. Devoted to Moral-
ty and Reform, The Revolution will not insert Gross
Personalities and Quack Advertisements, which even
Religious Newspapers introduce to every family.
4. In Finance. A new Commercial and Financial
Policy. America no longer led by Europe. Gold,
like our Cotton and Corn, for sale. Greenbacks for
money. An American System of Finance. American
Products and Labor Free. Foreign Manufactures Pro-
hibited. Open doors to Artisans and Immigrants.
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans for American Steamships
and Shipping; or American goods in American bottoms.
New York the Financial Centro, of the World. Wall
Street emancipated from Bank of England, or American
Cash for -American Bills. The Credit Foneier and
Credit Mobilier System, or Capital Mobilized to Re-
suscitate tbe South and our Mining Interests, and to
People the Country from Ocean to Ocean, from Omaha
to San Francisco. More organized Labor, more Cotton,
more Gold and Silver Bullion to sell foreigners at the
highest prices. Ten millions of Naturalized Citizens
Dehand a Penny Ocean Postage, to Strengthen the
Brotherhood of Labor. If Congress Vote One Hun-
dred and Twenty-five Millions for a Standing Army and
Freedmans Bureau for the Blacks, cannot they spare
Ooe Million for the Whites, to keep bright tbe chain of
friendship between them and their Fatherland?
Send in your Subscription. The Revolution, pub-
lished weekly, will bo the Great Organ of the Age.
Teems.Two dollars a year, in advance. Five names
($10) entitle U)e sender to one copy free.
ELIZABETH CADY STANTON, ) E
PARKER PILLSBURY, J
SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Proprietor.
37 Park Row (Room 20), New York City
To whom address all business letters.
BATES OF ADVERTISING S
Single insertion, per line......................20 cents.
One Months insertion, per line.................18 cents.
Three Months insertion, per line...............16 cents.
Orders addressed to
SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Proprietor,
* . 37 Pork Row, New York,
THE REVOLUTION
may be had of the American News Company, New
York ; Western News Company, Chicago; Missouri Book
and News Company, St. Louis, Mo., and of the large
Dealers throughout the country,
SIX PER CENT., IN GOLD,
and have thirty years to run before maturing, Sub-
scriptions Will be received in New York, at the COM-
PANY'S OFFICE, No. 20 Nassau street, and by JOHN
J. CISCO & SON, Bankers, No. 59 Wall street, and by
tbe Companys advertised Agents throughout the United
States.
A PAMPHLET AND MAP for 1868, showing the Pro-
gress of the Work, Resources for Construction, and
Value of Bonds, may be obtained at the Companys Offi-
ces or of its advertised Agents, or will be sent free on
application.
JOHN J, CISCO, Treasurer,
April 10, 1868. - New York.
JJLANK BOOKS, STATIONERY, &c.
FRANCIS & LOUTREL,
\ , 45 Maiden Lane.
All kinds of first-class Account Books, Paper and Sta-
tionery for business, professional and private use. at
moderate prices. Job Printing, Engraving, Litho-
graphic Work and Book Binding of every style.
Please call or send your orders.
Let every woman be her own
ADVISER.
The best way she can attain this position is by pos-
sessing a copy of Wellss Every Man His Own Lawyer
and Business Form Book. It is a complete guide in all
matters of law and business for every State in the Union.
No one who has or expects to have any property, rights,
or privileges which require protection, can afford to be
without a copy. The entire leaaing press of the coun-
try iudorse tbe work. The book to published 12mo,
660 pages, and sent post-paid, full library binding, on
receipt of $2 50. Address,
? B. W. HITCHCOCK,
98 Spring street, New York.
~|^ASTERN HYGEIAN HOME.
FLORENCE HIGHTS, N. 3.
R. T. TRALL, M.D., ) phvsicians
ELLEN BEARD HARMAN, M.D., J ^ysicians.
This institution is beautifully situated on the Delaware
River, midway between Bordentown and Burlington.
All classes of invalids are treated on strictly Hygienic
principles. In the College Department patients and
guests have the privilege of hearing most of the lectures
ofProfessors Trail and Harman to tbe medical class.
City office No. 97 Sixth avenue, New York. Send stamp
for circulars.
Office, 361 West 34th street, )
N. Y. Feb. 11, 18G8. j-
RS. C. S. LOZIER, M.D., DEAN OF THE
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for Women
and Children, desires in this way to ask assistance from
any of our citizens, men or women, to purchase a desir-
able building and grounds in the tapper part of this city,
offered to tbe Board of Trustees for $31,000. They have
about $15,000 of tbe amount. Any one able to belp them
to secure this property either by donation or loan, with-
out interest, will forward a noble cause. Apply or write
to MRS. C. F. WELLS, Secretary of tbe Board of Trus-
tees, No. 389 Broadway, firm of FOWLER & WELLS.
^NTI-DRUG CURE
AND
HYGIENIC INSTITUTE,
BINGHAMPTON, N. Y.
E. S. JENKINS, M. D., or
L. A. JENKINS, M. D.,
PHYSICIANS and proprietors,
. BINGHAMPTON, N, Y.
FENIANISM.
Speech on Irish Independence and English Neu-
trality, delivered before the Fenian Congress and
Fenian Chiefs, at the Philadelphia Academy of Music,
October 18, 1865. Price 25 cents.
Speeches in England on Slavery and Emancipation,
delivered in 1862. Also great speech on the Pardoning
of Traitors. Price 10 cents.
UNION SPEECHES.
Delivered in Efig.'and during the American War, By
George FraDcis Train. Price 25 cents.
TRAINS UNION SPEECHES.
Second Series. Delivered in England during the
American War. Price 25- cents.
SPEECH ON THE DOWNFALL OF ENGLAND.
And a Sermon on the Civil War in America. De-
livered-August 17, 1862, by Archbishop Hughes, on his
return to America from Europe. Complete in one vol-
ume. Pries 30 cents.
YOUNG AMERICA ON SLAVERY.
The Facts; or, At whose Door does the' Sin (?)
Lie?
Who Profits by Slave Labor ?
Who Initiated the Slave Trade ?
What have the Philanthropists Done ?
The Questions Answered.
150 pages. I860. Price 25 cents.
Copies of the above-named pamphlets sent by mail, at
prices named.
For sale at the office of
THE REVOLUTION,
37 Park Row. (Room 17),
New York.
jyj'MK. DEMORESTS
COMBINATION SUSPENDER
AND
' SHOULDER-BRACE.
These useful and comfortable articles relieve the hips
and suspends the weight of the skirts on the shoulders,
and, at the same time, they are so arranged that they in-
cline (be shoulders back and the chest forward, giving a
very graceful and dignified position to the bodycon-
ducing to comfort and health, besides being very con-
venient and durable.
Every lady should wear, and no children should be
without them.
Ladies $1.00; Childrens, 75 cento. Mailed free on
receipt of price.
No. 473 BROADWAY, N. Y.
gEXOLOGY
AS THE
PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE,
v IMPLYING
SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNMENT, .
BY
MRS. ELIZABETH O. G. WILLARD.
The most important work on the true nature and
position of Woman yet published, by the testimony of
many eminent critics.
1 Vol. large 12mo. Nearly 500 pages, bound in doth.
Publishedand for sale by J. R. Walsh, of tbe Western
News Company, Chicago, 111., and sold at retail by the
trade generally. Pi ice $27 or 2,25 when sent by mail,
- eow tf,


Full Text
AtizMessage
header
from
library
station
to
date
content
meta
title
subtitle
author
firstName
middleName
lastName
displayName
languageCode format ISO639-2
yearPublished
file
contentNum
type
size
name
originalName
creationDate
digitizer
username
capturedBy


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
ListFile Path Z:\DIGITIZATION\Miscellaneous\2 Scan\AA00003578_00020\ LastIndex 9 CropLeft CropRight
Pages
Left Crop False Resize
Right 00002.JPG
00003.JPG
00004.JPG
00005.JPG
00006.JPG
00007.JPG
00008.JPG
00009.JPG
00010.JPG
00011.JPG
00012.JPG
00013.JPG
00014.JPG
00015.JPG
00016.JPG
00017.JPG