ft 2 Loti Trumpets ;#<*** Synth Single* Clear Pectrif -Pe'tuisiet- Br-gnt
ft 3D Dune (Synth Pod) Digital Ensemble r-Oean* Electee Soft
ft ID GloryPad (Synth Pad' Motc Soft
ft 3D lllominatus (Synth Ptcb Analog Ensmble*C!ean-£e ft 3D Krull (Synth Pad! Analog Ensemble *C,ea,*Dc-.t-:s-
ft 3D Lord Of The Rings (Synth Pad! Oi$>U< Ensemtoe Clean Clear.. Soft
1 3D Mission To Mors iSynth Pad: Motion Ensembie-Cieae t'ev.nr Soft
ft3D Neverending Story (Synth Pad! Analog Ln vemb Clean E*e ft 3D North By Northwest (Synth Pad> Digit*: Ensemble *Ciear Etectrrc* Soft
ft 3D OrthoiK (Synth Pads Synth Choir Ensemble t-Oean* Electric-Soft
ft 4 Voices
ft AXlOCallfoenla Bossmoster
..A1!,. ' -'-CW-"., -s |_L
1 Browser Scope
* Tag Editor 3019 File system/locai Harddisks
Score
Cubase features full scoring capabilities and allows you to print guitar chord and
tablature, and even allows you to change to alternate tuning. You can open the score only
when a MIDI part is selected, then by going to the Scores menu and choosing Open
Selection or by pressing [Ctrl]/[Command]+[R].
Open the Cubase project in Projects > Chapter 02> Tango> String Quartet -
Tango, cpr.
An empty project should open, next lets drag and drop from Windows Explorer or the
Mac Finder the MIDI file located in the same folder. Projects > Chapter 02> Tango>
Drag String Quartet Tango Format l.mid.
Tip: Where you drop the file in the Project window is where the start of the MIDI file
will be created.
Highlight all the MIDI parts by pressing [Ctrl]/[Command]+[A]. Now open the score
from Scores menu and choosing Open Selection or by pressing [Ctrl]/[Command]+[R].
53


Cubase also supports importing Music XML which preserves page layout and format
such as stem direction, beaming, grouping of notes, expression marks and page layout.
Dozens of notations applications support the Music XML format such as Finale &
Sibelius.
Undo the import that we just did of the MIDI file by pressing [Ctrl]/[Command]+[Z]
until the MIDI is gone from the project.
Project Audio MIDI Scores i
Undo Import MIDI
Lets import the same file that was exported from Finale as a Music XML file. Go to the
File menu and choose Import and Music XML. Navigate to Projects > Chapter 02>
Tango> Import String Quartet Tango.xml.
54



Cubase JQQj Edit Project Audio MIDI
New Project XN
New Library...
Open... xo
Open Library...
Close xw
Scores Media Transport Devices Window (1) Help

Save XS
Save As... OXS
Save Project to New Folder...
Save as Template...
l:bu
Revert
Sac? Se*.;.
Hr
Export
Replace Audio in Video File...
Cleanup...
Key Commands...
Recent Projects
Audio File...
Audio CD...
Video File...
Audio from Video File...
Cubase Mixmap...
MIDI File...
Track Archive...
Tempo Track
Music XML..
OMF...
Again select all the parts and open the score. Contrast the visual difference between the
same score exported as a MIDI file versus a Music XML file.
[BOO Scores: Mm. -1.01.01.000 -180.01.01.000 j
rc rsaw
snap QMOtm . vnath Q
Ut >>>C*Kk: 12C Quntl7*Lmk
Toei
FunaiOKS t i' ."i! h yr o' tjpt + L
_mEki&mmmmm
II. Tango
55


There are however advantages to using MIDI files over Music XML in that dynamics,
controller data, SysEx messages, note on and off velocities and Cubase specific MIDI
functions are preserved. The score editor is deep and will not be covered beyond this
during this course.
Key Editor
Double click on the Organ Part to open in the Key Editor.
Note; If double clicking didn t open a window that says Key Editor at the top
then your preferences has been changed to open MIDI parts in another editor.
or
Controls
Ml 01
Project A Mixer
Tool Modifiers
Tools
Video
Event Display
Audio
223
Markers
Rulers
Video
Ceneral
MIDI
unit
Preference Presets
HI

in
Event Display-MIOt
Open Key Editor
Open In-Place Editor
Open List Editor
Open Drum Editor
Open Score Editor
Default Edit Action
4ap is assigned
Name Style
( Help )
C Store ^ (~ Rename ) f" Delete ) 1? marked preferences on
(Defaults'*) ( Apply ) ( Cancel ~) OK
56


The Key Editor looks very much like an old time piano roll except playing from bottom
to top it plays from left to right. Click in the ruler near bar 24 to locate your cursor to
play the organ part.
The notes can be individually selected and edited/manipulated in the Key Editor and is
probably one of the most used editors for manipulating MIDI notes even for those that
read music notation. A few of the things that the Key Editor provides is:
1. View of note velocities by color or in the controller lanes at the bottom of the Key
Editor.
2. Exact note start and end position.
3. Part boarders to view events will be triggered upon playback.
4. Step Input.
5. Transposition of part or individual notes.
6. Quantizing notes by various values and much more.
At the bottom left of the Key Editor click the little drop down arrow to the right of the
word Program. You will see a list of many different MIDI controllers to view; choose
Velocity.
57


Citation
Certification course in Steiberg's audio workstation Cubase

Material Information

Title:
Certification course in Steiberg's audio workstation Cubase
Creator:
Olson, Adam Wade
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
119 leaves : ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cubase ( lcsh )
Cubase ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 119).
General Note:
College of Arts and Media
Statement of Responsibility:
by Adam Wade Olson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
|University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
|Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
437393791 ( OCLC )
ocn437393791
Classification:
LD1193.A70 2009m O57 ( lcc )

Full Text
CERTIFICATION COURSE IN STEIBERGS AUDIO WORKSTATION
CUBASE
by
Adam Wade Olson
B.A., Brigham Young University, 2004
A thesis submitted to the
University of Colorado Denver
in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Science in
Recording Arts
Emphasis In Audio Pedagogy
2009


2009 by Adam Olson
All rights reserved.


This thesis for the Masters of Science in Audio Recording
degree by
Adam Olson
3~\3~2oo^
Date


Olson, Adam Wade (M.S., Recording Arts)
Certification Course In Steinbergs Audio Workstation Cubase
Thesis director: Professor Richard Sanders
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is to provide the framework and lay the foundation for
certification courses in the software Cubase made by Steinberg. The course is
intended to be on par with software certification currently in use by the industry. It
is also intended that additional Steinberg courses should follow the guidelines laid
out in this thesis for both image captures and formatting.
The thesis is comprised of work-files, course one out line, with the first two chapters
completed. Recordings have been made, and compositions collected to provide
working examples for the student through out the entire course, to better
understand the concepts demonstrated. This course has been strategically outlined
in the order of topics as book/course one of two or possibly three.
This first certification is intended to take a user with basic computer skills and end
with knowledge of the basic structure of recording in audio, MIDI, and motion
picture in Cubase. The learner will finish the course with a working knowledge of
editing and setting up the workstation with most of the essential settings and
preferences to work efficiently.
This course also provides the learner the key components to recording in most of
today's digital audio workstations by giving key examples how files integrate with
the workstation by means of plug-ins, automation, browsers and audio interfaces.
It is often difficult to discuss one aspect of the software interface without knowing
another and vice versa. The outline of the book has been intensely researched and
thought-out to best provide the average user skills needed to accomplish the above
topics in as linear a fashion as possible in a very nonlinear environment, where
many topics intertwine with each other.
This abstract accurately represents the content of the candidates thesis.
Signed.
Richard Sanders y


DEDICATION PAGE
I dedicate this work to my Heavenly Father, and to my wife Ruthanne who has been
vital in supporting seemingly endless hours of study and recording.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT
I am indebted to all four of my parents, Bruce & Linda Olson and Vem & Christine
Guymon for the love and support they have given me in my life. There is no way this
work would be completed without their ongoing support and love.
I also give many thanks to my brother Clark who believed in me as a musician and
encouraged me to pursue my dreams.
Along the way I have been blessed to work with gifted individuals who have shaped the
way I think about audio and life. I give sincere and deep appreciation to Larry Green,
Mickey Houlihan, Phil McMahon, Gus Skinas, Steve Wiest, Robert Brock, Glen
OHara, John Fishell, Ben Harris, Sam McGuire, Rich Sanders, Leslie Gaston and
Golder ONeill,






Thesis History & Description
History
November of 2004, after a Club Cubase meeting at the Denver Guitar Center I was
taken to dinner and asked to write a course for Steinbergs Cubase. Cubase had no
official training program, nor facilities that meet any sort of standard for teaching
this complex digital audio workstation.
We discussed the needs and deficiencies in the current training methods being
offered, in a few locations in the world, which were Club Cubase, a free user group,
which is usually in the form of "show and tell rather than any kind of hands on
method for the learner. This was how I was introduced to Cubase in Salt Lake City
years earlier.
It was agreed with Steinberg that there were more ways for them to spread the good
news of their program then just their current method. We all felt that if there were
some sort of standard and system in place for certified training centers then more
users would be inspired to study the depth that the program has to offer. With
passionate instructors at the head of these classes they could also engage students
by better showing them the potential of the software.
A drawback for myself and other Cubase instructors was the time and money in
showing others what Cubase was capable of doing. We were promoting a product
we believed in with little to no compensation. If there were certification involved,
there would be more incentive for people to pay an instructor to teach them, and
more incentive for instructors to further learn and teach Cubase.
After discussing this topic with Roy Pritts and Rich Sanders it was agreed that laying
the groundwork for such a book would make a worthy thesis, especially since no
course existed.
One month later Yamaha purchased Steinberg and the company took a new
direction then under its former owner Pinnacle. After attending Winter NAMM
2005 as a Steinberg representative, there were five positions open and the team that
commissioned me to author this course became no longer employed with Steinberg.
Yamaha regrouped Steinberg and delegated much of the work to existing
employees.
As a result of this buyout Yamaha said they would take care of writing such a course.
One year later there was no such course written and again 1 approached
Steinberg/Yamaha about writing such a course and they agreed, on the basis of no
guarantees of publishing.
1


Industry Standards
What has gone into making this thesis has been a lot of work to say the least. First I
had to consult with Yamaha/Steinberg representatives about the content and the
approach of writing a Steinberg certified course. We discussed what competitors
currently offer and how this course compare and/or exceed what they have done.
Our two standards were Digidesigns Pro Tools courseware, and second Apple's
Logic courses. I felt that even though Cubase could take up several volumes of
books in demonstrating techniques and workflow that it was not realistic to offer
such a comprehensive work for Cubase as Digidesign has done in their courseware.
Yet at the same time we want users to feel empowered and that these certifications
actually mean something to the learners. We also want studio owners looking to
hire certified engineers to feel that they can trust what it means when Steinberg
says their user is certified.
The certifications would be broken up into preferably two courses with a possible
third in future years. This would mean a book for each course with a DVD including
content for work files to accompany the chapters. This course is intended to be
three days or twenty-one hours of instructor lead content. Although a student could
read through the books themselves it is not intended to be used in such a way.
Instructor Guide
I have also set the framework for an accompanying guide for Steinberg certified
instructors, to assist them in topics touched upon in this course. An instructor could
give further insight if they so choose.
Depending on the experience and age group of an instructors class, they may
choose to start out in chapter three and begin with recording. The instructor would
need to set-up all the stations to be able to record properly. When finished
recording go back and talk about the settings that made the session work by going
through the first two chapters. This sort of direction would be the reason for the
"Instructor Guide".
The instructor guide is also intended to help the student feel better about the insight
of the instructor teaching the course. Should Steinberg decide to include standards
for the instructor this guide could also be used for that purpose.
Instructional Difficulties
Teaching digital audio workstations is something I feel very passionate about; I
didnt want to just haphazardly throw out ideas and concepts in any order.
Many concepts are difficult to discuss without knowing another, and would need to
be taught in tandem. Since we in one sense verbally learn in a leaner fashion, 1 had
2


to be careful as to what concepts and workflow to give the student first. I also had
to be conscientious and sensitive about concepts I didnt describe in depth.
For example it seems simple enough to just create a session and just say choose this
file-type, sample rate, bit depth etc. and set your buffer size to setting x and then
move on. In reality you may want to briefly mention why you would choose a higher
or lower sample rate and bit depth. As well as why you would choose one file-type
over another; and when you record what buffer you may want to choose versus
mixing.
If you were about to record and the students buffer settings are extremely high that
would be disturbing and might cause the student to blame the software as being no
good. So do you just tell them set it low, then move on? Then when you get to
mixing instruct the student to increase the buffer, and at that point explain your
reasoning for changing it in the first place. By this time it is day three versus day
one when you actually did recording and first touched upon buffer settings?
The point is there are many dilemmas like this, and there of course is no one right
way of teaching it, which is why this is intended to be an instructor lead course for a
live person to field and answer such questions without leaving students frustrated.
So as an author it is extremely important to lay the book out in such a way that
would hopefully not frustrate the instructor as well and give them some liberty to
teach in their own style. By this I mean not laying the book out in a way that would
force the instructor to rigidly go through the book in contiguous order.
Topics Covered
The next several weeks were spent in writing down all the topics to cover in the first
book. It was important that they be sufficient to get a beginner functioning and
working sessions by the time they were done with the course, and not leaving major
gaps in using Cubase. I typed and printed several topics/concepts including sub-
topics/concepts; I cut and laid them all out on a table. My goal was to make this as
linear as possible and minimize discussing topics that would depend on knowledge
of other areas of the interface first.
1 also wanted overarching topics to anchor the student so the course felt focused
[see table below). A few weeks were spent organizing consolidating and adding
new topics that I overlooked, and rereading through everything to make sure that it
was coherent (I was extremely nervous a custodian would come and mess up my
little pieces of paper). After things seemed in logical order 1 then typed it up in an
Excel spreadsheet and looked it over again and again.
3


Getting Around
Recoding
Databases
Production
Setup
Navigating
Recording (part 1) Databases
Tracks Loops
Recording (part 2)
MIDI Editing
Audio Editing
Mixing
Video
Software Used
The next part was my least favorite part of all and took me well over 100 hours of
study, and that was deciding what programs I was going to use to write this course.
I talked and read stories from various authors of books and manuals' about their
software of choice in writing. I did this to reduce my chances of common technical
pitfalls in authoring on such a large scale. It was extremely helpful to hear and read
their horror stories in formatting, layout and overall trouble fighting their authoring
software.
I Googled and read articles about writing manuals (which this is not), books, making
table of contents and what software do people use. I was somewhat aware of the
problems people have had in fighting long MS Word documents. Since this book will
likely be 500+ pages when is complete, 1 wanted to reduce my chances of time
wasted solving what preproduction could have save me.
I talked with a publisher and layout editor, read articles, and watched tutorials on
Quark and Adobes InDesign. 1 studied Quark and InDesigns history and where they
stood in the industry to be sure they would be around for a while and if they were
what I should be using as an author.
After hours of this research and feedback from people whose field of expertise this
is, it was recommended that I use MS Word. I then began the long and arduous trek
of studying this program I had been using for years, in depth, by watching many
different tutorials on MS Word. I also read in-depth articles about indexing in MS
Word versus a professional indexer, creating table of contents, section breaks,
making it so page numbers display the chapter on one side of the page and the
section on the other.
I learned about table formatting and how to make all my titles use the same
referenced format. Should Steinberg, or anyone on my thesis committee, ask me to
change the look, I could do so globally and not individually. I made it so images
would stay grouped with paragraphs and not trail on to another page in cases where
it might make what was being covered more confusing.
Chapters are also setup to always start on odd page numbers. This way if I ended on
an odd page in a chapter there would be a blank page and the chapters would be
4


consistently on the left side of the book. These are a lot of things a layout editor
would do, but I wanted the look and feel to be as close as I could beforehand.
I also spent several hours laying out fonts and number symbols in Adobe's
Fireworks (an image editing software) for numbered examples 1 would show in
images. Taking screenshots was a big deal and I experimented with several
different softwares offering screen captures and read reviews/comparisons, until I
found one that I felt worked the best. Then I set standards for what kind of shadows
and fading would be done on images in the background throughout the book.
Course Guide
I then worked on a guide for myself that I reference constantly while writing. I have
included this as part of my thesis since it is such a major part of the effort that has
gone into writing this book. This is something that is hopefully transparent to the
user that will make the book a better guide.
Terminology from DAW to DAW varies, and so I included references for me to
consistently follow. Again the goal was to be on par and hopefully exceed what is
out there in the industry as DAW certification courses. 1 also read through dozens
of times the Cubase getting started guide to follow a similar layout as was suggested
to me by Yamaha & Steinberg.
Course Flow
As a student and an instructor for Pro Tools and Logic courses I found approaches
that were effective and others that were not so effective in conveying a point."
For example as an instructor teaching from a book that is too wordy and that didnt
give clear and concise images of what was to be executed was difficult. As a learner
I for one did not ever enjoy sitting in classes where the instructor read to me from
the book. I wanted to be engaged in the application, the instructors' experience and
how this application can help me in my workflow. Reading from the text almost
always pulled me away from learning and would make the class feel long.
To overcome this problem as much as possible, for the instructor and student, I have
made it a point to show in the images what has been executed. Rather than an
image of what the screen looks like before execution. For example if you say, "click
on the open button in one of the steps, I needed to make sure the image reflects
what is being done. 1 have done this by circling or having it already highlighted with
the cursor on the button being pressed.
5


Field Test
The first two chapters of this course have been tested with over two dozen students
in three classes. The students were selected as mostly being new to
recording/DAWs. A hand full of the students were chosen that had a lot of
experience in Pro Tools and Logic and other DAWs. A few users were already
power users in Cubase with one student having recording over a hundred sessions
in Cubase prior to the class. I even had a student that went through the material
without an instructor to see how he faired.
Students were given hard copies and electronic copies of the course and went
through with the course in an instructor lead environment. I also tested the book
with no instructor present to check if it was clear enough what the goals and tasks
were.
The systems used were split half and half with Windows and Mac OS. The students
used Cubase Studio while the instructor used Cubase 4 which is the full version.
This was done to check full compatibility with Cubase Studio version and that it was
always noted when a feature is only found in Cubase 4.
I heard many positive things from this and from just two chapters of going through
Cubase. Some students even decided to purchase the software as a result of the
class. I received feedback about grammatical errors I had made.
From one of the advanced users I received comments like switching the order of the
control surfaces and explain the Quick Controls first before control surface mapping
because they are easier to grasp. This was a good idea and one I was debating
myself. I put it in the opposite order because that was the order it was release in the
software. I also got feed back like adding new Cubase 4.5 features that were related
that were not listed like the "Follow" and edit selection function.
The student that was on his own was able to understand and get through the
material alright on his own. More students would really needed to be tested if it
were decided not to have an instructor lead course.
Projects
Spending three days time or one semester on a single software through instruction
can become somewhat tedious. So I have made and prepared work files to help the
student remain engaged in what they are learning.
In the course the students are taken through what is involved in recording on a
computer and in using an audio interface for recording. Several companies were
contacted and permission granted to include their hardware in this course. Audio
and MIDI was recorded and permission granted from the writers and players to
include their work in this book. Joseph Kern wrote a couple MIDI compositions for
6


the course. Permission was granted by David Booker to use his song "Voodoo On
You" which I setup and tracked. Also included, as a work file is a song written and
tracked at UCD with Ben Harris and a couple other master students.
It has been frustration not to have work files when teaching similar courses. As an
instructor I have had to create my own where examples were lacking. On the other
hand having the same work file throughout the entire book has also been frustrating
and monotonous; especially when you do not care for the style of music the author
has chosen. I have experienced this with MIDI dance beat projects used for
demonstrating techniques that could apply to any style, then when mixing you are
still presented with the same project. Obviously it is not possible to please
everyone, but diversity should hopefully make the course easier to go through and
work files easier to teach.
I hope you will find what I have written consistent with my goals and preparation in
writing this thesis.
* Long Documents and Report Writing in MS Word 2003. University of Bradford.
document.pdf>
Mitchell, Daiya So You Want To Write A Book With MS Word. Most Valuable
Professional.
McGhie, John Words Numbering Explained. Most Valuable Professional.

Huggan, Clive Bend Word To Your Will. Most Valuable Professional
< http://word.mvps.org/Mac/Bend/BendWordToYourWill.html >
McGhie, John Things To Avoid!. Most Valuable Professional
< http://word.mvps.org/mac/ThingsToAvoid.html >
11 Digidesign. Pro Tools 101 Official Coursware. Version 7.4. Course Technology, 2007
Nahmani, David. Apple Pro Training Series: Logic Pro 8 and Logic Express 8. Peachpit
Press, 2007
Dvorin, David. Apple Pro Training Series: Logic Pro 8: Beyond The Basics. Peachpit
Press, 2007
7




RULES FOR
CUBASE
COURSE BOOK
CONSISTENCY


Index
Headings and Icons..................................................3
Heading 1 (cmd+pad 2).........................................3
Heading 2 (cmd+pad 2).........................................3
Heading 3 (cmd+pad 3).........................................3
Heading 4-6 (cmd+pad 4-6).....................................3
Cubase Note (cmd+pad 8).....................................3
Cubase Tip (cmd+pad 9)......................................3
Open Project Icon.............................................3
Numbered List.................................................3
Style Notes...................................................4
Fireworks Settings..................................................4
Line Width....................................................4
Typed Text In Images Other Than Numbers.......................4
Numbered Images...............................................5
Emphasizing Selected Items....................................6
Settings for Snapz Pro X............................................7
Object Settings...............................................7
Selection Settings............................................8
Image Captures................................................8
Key Commands Conventions............................................8
Key Command Order.............................................8
Terminology...................................................8
Formatting..........................................................8
Paragraphs....................................................8
Capitalization................................................8
Drop Down Menus...............................................8
Terminology.........................................................9
Course Descriptions...........................................9
Views........................................................10
Cubase Terms.................................................10
Project Window:........................................10
Audio File:............................................10
Audio Clip:............................................10
Audio Event:...........................................10
2


Headings and Icons
Heading 1 (cmd+pad 2)
Only use heading one for the start of the book.
Heading 1
Heading 2 (cmd+pad 2)
Chapter One
Heading 3 (cmd+pad 3)
Sections
Heading 4-6 (cmd+pad 4-6)
Put a space after Heading 4s but 5 and up no space after.
Cubase Caution (cmd+pad 7)
Caution: If you dont save your key commands before you reset them you will have
to reassign all the commands you have assigned (which in our case isnt much).
Cubase Note (cmd+pad 8)
Note: Your key commands are saved as a cross platform xml file that can be
transferred from system to system. The folder icon next to the trashcan in the key
commands window is used for importing older .mac (macros) and .key files from
Cubase 1. The xml file now combines these into one file.
Cubase Tip (cmd+pad 9)
Tip: If you click on the magnifying glass multiple times it will cycle through all the key
commands that have the word Import in them.
Open Project Icon
This icon is used to indicate that there is a file or project to open.
Numbered List
1. List Style
3


This is used for the End Chapter Review.
Style Notes
Heading 2-4 are used in the index so things that should not be included as part of the
index use heading 5. Dont go greater then heading 5.
Fireworks Settings
Line Width
For circles, use straight red and size 4 lines in Fireworks.

Show Macros Reset All j £
/£.
Typed Text In Images Other Than Numbers
Use Times Bold size 24 for picture text.
4


Numbered Images
Always use the numbers made as buttons symbols in Fireworks for things that need
numbers by them. Arial is the font that should be use when displaying text in images.
1*1 Activate/Deactivate Project

}1 Constrain Delay Compensation
2 Performance Meter
3 View Switches
4 Automation Mode
5 Locators
6 Transport Buttons
7 Play Order Controls
8 Time Display
9 Markers
10 Tool Buttons
11 Nudge Palette
12 Autoscroll
13 Snap/Quantize
14 Snap to Zero Crossing
15 Color Menu
Show All
Default
Alternative
Transport & Snap/Quantize
Setup...
|
Touch Fader 100 ms

L 0:00:00:00.00
R 0:00:00:00.00

@ 0
5


Emphasizing Selected Items
Use circles/ovals when showing a single item.
Preferences
Appearance
General
Meters
Work Area
Editing
Audio
Controls
MIDI
Project & Mixer
Tool Modifiers
Tools
Video
Event Display
Audio
MIDI
Markers
Rulers
Video
MIDI
MIDI File
MIDI niter
| Language
M Auto Save
|£j Auto Save Interval
|jU M*ximum Backup Files
M Show Tips
Live Window Resize
1 Usage Profile
( Send Usage Profile to Steinberg )
( Help )
( Store ) ( Rename ) ( Delete ) Store marked pr
( Defaults ) ( Apply ) ( Cancel ) ( OK )
Use squares when showing multiple items.
Preferences
Appearance
General
Meters
Work Area
Editing
Audio
Controls
! MIDI
Project 4 Mixer
Tool Modifiers
Tools
I Video
Event Display
Audio
MIDI
Markers
Rulers
Video
! MIDI
MIDI File
MIDI niter
ra---------------
General
I1- Language
M Auto Save
|4j Auto Save Interval
Maximum Backup Files
in
M Live Window Resize
| i Maximum Undo
|0 On Startup
M Run Setup on Create New Project
[3 Usage Profile
( Send Usage Profile to Steinberg )
Usage Profiling Info
Preference Presets
( Store ) ( Rename ) ( Delete ) Store marked prt
( Help )
( Defaults ) ( Apply ) ( Cancel ) ( OK )
6


If it is already highlighted then do not circle it too.
Preferences
Appearance
Genera!
Meters
Work Area
Editing
Audio
Controls
MIDI
Project & Mixer
Tool Modifiers
Tools
Video
Event Display
Audio
MIDI
Markers
Rulers
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MIDI file
MIDI Filter
111
General
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|>|j Auto Save Interval
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M Show Tips
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jDHT Maximum Undo
nf
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Open Last Project
Open 'Default' Template
Show Open Dialog
Show Template Dialog
Show Open Options Dialog
Preference Presets
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Snapz Pro ...anual.pdf
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There are times when the cursor should be showing to demonstrate a selection that is
being made and other times the cursor can be turned off if you dont want to emphasize a
selection made with the cursor.
Object Settings
0______________________________________Object Settings___________________________________
Color change: j none File type: f -jpg t j Scale: ( 100% t j
Border: [ Drop shadow Quality: [ high - y j CD Cursor Visible
Watermark: f none $ij Watermark opacity: --------=
Thumbnail: [ none Thumbnail size: 256 | 256
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Clipping color:
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7


Selection Settings
0
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j3 Width:
JJ File type: [ .jpg
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Height:
33 Scale: (ioo% : 3
^ Cursor Visible
Watermark: [ none Watermark opacity: Q/
Thumbnail: [ none Thumbnail size: 100 I 100
Image Captures
When taking a picture of windows that you are changing always show a picture of what
you are changing it to and not what it defaults too. This is much easier and saves from
having to read what you are doing.
Key Commands Conventions
Key Command Order
[Windows modifier key]/[Mac modifier key]+[key]
Always capitalize keys, so letters like I and 1 are not confused.
Always use the following spellings: Ctrl, Command, Option, Shift, Alt
Control for Mac isnt used so spelling it out in full is not a problem.
Terminology
Use the name [Pad 1] and [Pad 2] etc. to refer to the numeric pad on the extended
keyboard.
Use [Alpha 1] and [Alpha 2] etc. for the numbers above the QWERTY keys.
Use [1] and [2] etc if it doesnt matter.
Formatting
Paragraphs
Always keep the following paragraph right under the heading that way it always stays
with the heading. Otherwise it will be separated from the heading as text is added
throughout the book. (Logic books do this and it works just fine).
Capitalization
Capitalize File menu, Edit menu, Project menu. This is also the way the Quick Start
guide does it thankfully.
Drop Down Menus
When writing about something selected like in a drop down, or a menu item, then always
put it in quotes so it is known that you are saying something specific to the Cubase
interface.
For example: In Windows XP navigate to Cubase in the start menu, programs and right
click and choose Pin to Start menu if it isnt already. This way we will be able to open
Cubase quickly in the future.
8


Si start
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Terminology
Course Descriptions
Refer to this as a Course and not a book or tutorial (i.e. during this course you will
learn...).
The book is broken up into chapters not sections (i.e. chapter 1 is Setup, chapter 2 is
Navigating etc.).
Sections are found within chapters (i.e. the Key Command section is found in chapter
2).
The book has four main over arching topics (see table below).
Gettina Around 1 Recodina Databases Production
Setup Navigating Recording (part 1) Tracks Recording (part 2) Databases Loops MIDI Editing Audio Editing Mixing Video
9


Views
Refer to selections in the preferences as Views i.e. in the general view. Since the
window is the entire window and the selections on the left or not technically tabs.
Preferences
Appearance
General
Meters
Work Area
Editing
Audio
Controls
MIDI
Project & Mixer
Tool Modifiers
Tools
Video
Event Display
Audio
MIDI
General
English
Auto Save
(El Language
10.0 min
[{IJ Auto Save Interval
|§r] Maximum Backup Files
Ml Show Tips
Ml Live Window Resize
Cubase Terms
Project Window:
The main window is called the Project Window not the project page. There is no need
for quotes capitalization works just fine on its own.
Audio File:
This is what is recorded on the hard disk and found in the Finder or Windows Explorer.
Audio Clip:
This is what is created in Cubase and refers to the Audio File created on the hard disk.
Audio Event:
This is also created when recording and refers to the Audio Clip in Cubase. Audio
Events are also individual MIDI information such as a MIDI note or Continuous
Controller message.
10




< CUBASE4
Music Creation And Production System
Level 1 Certification


Table of Contents


Table of Contents.....................................................2
m
1 ...................................................................IX
Preface............................................................ix
Minimum Computer Requirements:....................................x
Windows.........................................................x
Mac.............................................................x
Minimum Equipment Requirements:...................................x
Minimum Skill Requirements:......................................xi
Computer Skill:................................................xi
Audio Skill:...................................................xi
Miscellaneous Requirements:......................................xi
Character Set..................................................xi
m m m m
II.................................................................XIII
Layout...........................................................xiii
Conventions Used..............................................xiv
Not Covered In This Course....................................xiv
1.....................................................................1
Setup...............................................................1
Hardware Setup....................................................2
Choosing Your Computer..........................................2
Audio Interfaces................................................2
Drivers.........................................................7
Class Compliant Drivers.........................................7
Audio MIDI Setup (Mac)..........................................8
Software Setup....................................................8
VST Audio System (Device Setup).................................9
Inputs/Outputs (VST Connections)...............................11
Project Setup..................................................14
Software Setup Miscellaneous.....................................18
Auto Save (Preferences)........................................18
On Startup "Show Open Options Dialog" (Preferences)............19
Quick Controls (Device Setup)..................................20
MIDI Controller for Fader (Device Setup).......................22
Time Display (Device Setup)....................................24
Saving Templates...............................................25
2 ..................................................................29
Navigating.........................................................29
3


Toolbar............................................................30
View Switches....................................................31
Inspector........................................................31
Event Info Line..................................................33
Overview.........................................................34
Ruler............................................................34
Project Cursor...................................................35
Follow Button....................................................36
Stationary Cursor (Preferences)..................................36
Return to Start Position On Stop (Preferences)...................36
Transport Panel..................................................37
Using Left & Right Locators......................................37
Right Clicking...................................................39
Zoom Functions...................................................41
Track Heights....................................................43
Color Selector...................................................44
Windows & Panels...................................................47
Project Window...................................................47
Mixer............................................................48
Devices Panel....................................................51
Pool.............................................................51
MediaBay.........................................................53
Score............................................................53
Key Editor.......................................................56
Video............................................................59
Preferences........................................................59
Show Tips........................................................59
Select Tool: Show Extra Info.....................................60
Editing Controls (circular, Liner etc.)..........................60
Cycle Follows Range Selection....................................62
Meter Appearance.................................................63
Organizing Windows.................................................64
Tile/Cascade Windows Horizontally or Vertically (Windows Only)...64
Workspaces.......................................................66
Key Commands.......................................................68
3......................................................................75
Recording (Part I)...................................................75
VST Connections....................................................76
Labeling.........................................................76
Consecutive I/O..................................................76
All I/O the same.................................................76
Device Setup.......................................................76
Buffer Size......................................................76
Direct Monitoring (Windows Only).................................76
Using Manufactures Software Mixers.................................76
4


Setting Up a Click................................................76
Recording Audio...................................................76
Renaming a region...............................................76
Recording a Plug-in Input Tracks (Cubase 4 only):...............76
Pre Roll........................................................77
Auto Punch In and Out...........................................77
Manual Punch In and Out.........................................77
4 ...................................................................79
Tracks..............................................................79
Tracks............................................................80
Setting Up Mixer Views..........................................80
Solo, Listen, Mute etc..........................................80
Audio.............................................................80
Notepad.........................................................80
Inspector Views.................................................80
Track Control Settings..........................................80
FX Channel........................................................80
Folder............................................................80
Deep Track Folding..............................................80
Cutting Tracks..................................................80
Instrument........................................................80
MIDI..............................................................80
MIDI Filters....................................................81
Marker............................................................81
Play Order........................................................82
Ruler.............................................................82
Video.............................................................82
Another look at the Mixer.......................................82
5 ...................................................................83
Recording (Part II).................................................83
Control Room Monitor..............................................84
Head Phone Sends................................................84
Sends vs. Studio Sends..........................................84
Talk Back & Listen Back.........................................84
Auto Monitoring Preferences.....................................84
Control Room Overview.............................................84
Comping Takes.....................................................84
Lanes...........................................................84
Cycle Recording Audio...........................................84
Creating Regions & Events (Preferences).........................84
Cycle Recording MIDI............................................84
Overlapping MIDI Regions........................................84
5


6 ..................................................................85
Databases..........................................................85
Pool.............................................................86
Creating Folders...............................................86
Setting the Record Folder......................................86
View/Attributes................................................86
Icons..........................................................86
File Path......................................................86
Auditioning Clips..............................................86
Trash..........................................................86
Missing Files..................................................86
Show Info......................................................86
Browser..........................................................86
Track Data.....................................................86
Sync Selection.................................................86
MediaBay.........................................................86
Browser........................................................86
Viewer.........................................................86
Scope..........................................................86
Tag Editor.....................................................86
Manage Tags....................................................86
Loop Browser.....................................................87
SoundFrame Browser...............................................87
Preset Location(s).............................................87
7 ................................................................. 89
Loops..............................................................89
Opening Multiple Projects........................................90
Creating a Loop..................................................90
Snap Settings..................................................90
Beat Calculator..................................................90
Time Warp........................................................90
Tempo Track......................................................90
Musical & Linear Mode............................................90
Loop Browser.....................................................90
Tag Editor.....................................................90
Manage Tags....................................................90
Time vs. Bars+Beats Linear.......................................90
8 ..................................................................93
MIDI (Editing).....................................................93
Key Editor.......................................................94
Step Entry.....................................................94
Controller Lanes...............................................94
6


Adjusting Region Boundaries....................................94
Score Editor.....................................................94
Display Quantize...............................................94
Tablature......................................................94
Chord Analyzer Insert..........................................94
Drum Editor......................................................94
Drum Maps......................................................94
List Editor......................................................94
In-Place Editor..................................................94
Default Editor (Preferences)...................................94
Time Stretching MIDI Regions.....................................94
Tool Modifiers (Preferences)...................................94
9 ..................................................................95
Audio (Editing)....................................................95
Part Editor......................................................96
Sample Editor....................................................96
Creating Regions...............................................96
Snap Point in Sample Editor....................................96
Snap to Zero Crossing..........................................96
Slicing Audio..................................................96
Time Stretching Audio............................................96
Undo History.....................................................96
Real Time Processing.............................................96
Offline Process History..........................................96
10 .................................................................97
Mixing.............................................................97
Latency Compensation.............................................98
Gain & Fade Handles..............................................98
Signal Flow......................................................98
Hiding Tracks Versus Folders.....................................98
Grouping Tracks..................................................98
Quick Controls...................................................98
Plug-ins.........................................................98
Always On Top..................................................98
EQ Curves......................................................98
Track Presets....................................................99
Automation.......................................................99
Freezing.........................................................99
Audio Mixdown....................................................99
Burning an Audio CD..............................................99
Archiving Your Project...........................................99
Remove Unused Media............................................99
7


101
11.....
Video......................................................101
Divide Track List........................................102
Importing Video Files....................................102
Importing Audio........................................102
File Formats...........................................102
External Playback (Device Setup Mac Only)..............102
Video Settings (Device Setup)............................102
Resizing and Reopening Video View......................102
Frame Rates............................................102
Sizing Moves Contents..................................102
Slip Edits.............................................102
Project Start Time.......................................102
Editing Video..........................................102
Sound To Picture.........................................102
Insert at cursor.......................................102
Insert at origin.......................................102
Snap Point.............................................102
Appendix A...................................................105
DAW Terms Comparison.......................................105
DAW Terms................................................106
Windows In Other DAWs..................................106
Other Terms............................................106
Appendix B...................................................107
Default Key Commands.......................................107
Default Key Commands.....................................109
Appendix C...................................................115
Sample Rate & Bit Depth....................................115
Glossary.....................................................117
8


I
Preface


Minimum Computer
Requirements:
Windows
Pentium / Athlon 1.4 GHz
512 MB RAM
Windows XP Home or XP Professional
Windows DirectX compatible audio hardware; ASIO compatible audio hardware
recommended for low latency performance.
DVD-ROM drive
USB port for protection key
1024 x 768 pixel display (1152 x 864 pixels & dual monitor setup
recommended)*
Full size keyboard
Mac
PowerPC G4 1 GHz or Core Solo 1.5 GHz
512 MB RAM
OS X version 10.4
CoreAudio compatible audio hardware
DVD-ROM drive
USB port for protection key
1024 x 768 pixel display (1152 x 864 pixels & dual monitor setup
recommended)*
Full size keyboard
*Some of the pictures in this course may look different from what you see, depending on
you screen resolution and operating system.
Minimum Equipment
Requirements:
Audio equipment you will need,
1. Microphone.
2. Appropriate cables to connect your equipment.
3. Audio interface (the previous can be substituted for a USB microphone/headphone
headset).
4. MIDI keyboard (with multiple continuous controllers highly recommended)
x


5. Licensed Copy of Cubase 4 with Cubase authorization key.
Minimum Skill Requirements:
It is expected that users be familiar with the following tasks on their given operating
system be it Windows or Mac OS:
Computer Skill:
Navigating in and out of folders
Creating folders
Saving files
Moving and renaming files
Closing and opening files
Using a mouse and keyboard and other such basic computer skills

Audio Skill:
Understanding of mic, line and speaker levels
How to connect a microphone, guitar etc. into audio interface
Level control and other such basic principles
Miscellaneous Requirements:
Character Set
The following nine characters should be avoided when saving Cubase on a Mac to
maintain cross platform compatibility as well as any characters that can be typed using
the option key.
\ /:*?<> |
Colon and forward slash should be avoided on both systems.
xi




Layout


Conventions Used
Many of the key command defaults used with Cubase use modifiers such as the
command, option, control and shift keys on Mac operating systems or control, alt
(alternate) and shift keys on Windows OS. Key commands assigned to the control key
on Mac do not map to Windows systems.
It is relatively simple to switch OS with a little practice on how keys map. For example
if you wanted to undo an operation on Windows, press ctrl+z. The same operation on a
Mac would be cmd+z. The shift key is mapped the same on both systems, so to redo you
would press ctrl+shift+z on Windows or cmd+shift+z for Mac.
When key commands are shown they will always be show with the Windows command
first in the following way:
[Windows modifier key]/[Macintosh modifier key]+[key]
[Ctrl+Shift]/[Cmd+Shift]+[Z]
Cubase can be a very efficient application to get around in when properly set up. We will
frequently refer to right clicking in various areas of the interface. For Macs still using a
one-button mouse this will be done by control clicking in the specified area.
Images shown throughout the book will be from both Mac and Windows systems so
images may look slightly different depending on your OS. In the very few cases where
options are not available on one system or the other they will be noted.
Not Covered In This Course
The following list is only a general outline of things that are not covered in this course,
and is listed in no particular order. Many topics covered in this course could easily be
expounded on and explained in much greater depth.
Macros
Logical Editor
The Score (very briefly covered)
Rewire
Synchronization
Mapping & controlling external equipment
VST System Link
Surround sound
Individual explanation of plug-ins and instruments in depth
xiv






1
Setup


Hardware Setup
Choosing Your Computer
Choosing your computer can be a scary and daunting task, especially if you are
completely new to computers. If you are a complete beginner and you dont know your
central processing unit from your hard drive you would probably benefit by reading over
some brief articles at www.howstuffworks.com. Read about computer CPU, RAM and
hard drives at the very least, and as you read follow some of the links on the pages to
other related material.
One of the wonderful things about Cubase, unlike many audio recording programs, is that
you can run Cubase on both Mac & Windows platforms and the sessions are
interchangeable.
There are several companies that build computers that are quiet and specifically designed
to run audio applications. Any Macintosh computer that you purchase new should run
Cubase just fine. However it is always good to check www.steinberg.net to see if there is
any compatibility issues with your computer of choice.
Audio Interfaces
There are many audio interfaces (a device that allows you to record and play back audio
from your computer) on the market to choose from. You should make your choice based
on three main factors: quality, price point, and the amount/types of inputs and outputs
(i.e. mic, line, optical lightpipe).
If you are mixing in surround (Cubase only) you will want an interface with at least 6
outputs, which usually means you will get 8. The two extra outputs can be used for
alternate speakers or headphones to the talent.
If you are not micing drums or other such things that mandate you have more than one or
two simulations inputs, than go with a smaller interface which will save you space and
more importantly money. Remember you can always overdub (record again adding to
what you previously recorded) and build your song with interface lacking many inputs.
When reading the specs on an audio interface it is important to be aware of what types of
I/O (inputs and outputs) it has. For example you may want to record an acoustic piano
with a microphone and end up with an interface with inputs that have only line level
input. This would be for the output of a mixer or an electronic keyboard and not a piano
being recorded by a microphone.
2


You may have need of 4 simultaneous ins and outs and later find out two of the stated I/O
are digital. In both of these situations more hardware is required for you to get the I/O
you were really after.
In short, check how many analog I/O you need and if you are micing an instrument how
many microphone amplifiers it has on it (otherwise known as a preamp).
RME: Octamic Mic Pre (does not connect directly to a computer)
Allows a user to be able to have mic level signal boosted to line level as well as convert
to AD AT lightpipe allowing a user to connect to a wide array of audio interfaces.
Lynx: Aurora8 Converter (does not connect directly to a computer)
This device is a high quality converter for analog to digital and from digital to analog
through multiple DB-25 connectors. This device converts 8 analog line level signals to
an AES/EBU digital format.
3


RME: Fireface 800 Firewire 400/800
Allows you to have ten line level signals in and out four of which can be mic level. Also
supports two pairs of ADAT lightpipe I/O and one set S/PDIF I/O for 18 additional
digital channels at sample rates of 44.1 & 48kHz. Higher sample rates will reduce the
number of ADAT I/O.
RME: Fireface 400 Firewire 400
The little brother to the Fireface 800 having the same great converters and clock but less
channels and microphone preamps.
4


LynxTwo: PCI
A PCI based solution allowing 8-line level I/O and AES & S/DIF I/O. Comes in three
flavors of 4 in/4 out, 2 in/6 out, or 6 in/2 out.
RME: HDSP 9652 PCIe Cards
Allows you to connect audio hardware that has microphone preamps and converts to 8
channels of three pairs of ADAT I/O. For example you could connect three RME
Octamics to this card.
5


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RME: HDSP RPM Firewire
A small and simple solution to allow for a single microphone to record and connect to
computer via Firewire. Also allows for a total of 4 I/O at line level.
Mackie: ONYX 1200
This interface is well thought out and a pretty complete package. You can record drums
with 8 mics and still have four mic pre amps left for bass, guitar and vocals. It also has
built in talk back so you dont have to use an external mixer or use up one of your
preamps for communication with the talent. It offers in hardware some similar features
you get in Cubase with the Control Room Mixer, allowing you to switch speakers and
have four independent headphone sends. Offers a total of 30 inputs and 34 outputs.
6


Mackie: ONYX Satelite
This is another little innovative and versatile box allowing you to have a base station that
stays with hardware. This would be the case for a little small home studio such as
speakers and two sets of out board gear (dual compressor, reverb etc). You can choose to
connect an electric guitar or bass or two microphones as well. Has built in talkback and
allows you to switch between two sets of speakers. When on the go you can pull the unit
and leave the base allowing two sets of headphones, speaker connection and Mic or
instrument level connection.
Drivers
Drivers allow communication between your audio software and your hardware. Unlike
drivers that come preinstalled on your computer such as mouse, keyboards & printers,
audio and MIDI drivers are very sensitive to latency (unwanted delay). You will want to
make sure that you have the latest driver from your hardwares manufacture, and not just
use the driver that came with the installation disk.
The makers of your hardware often update these drivers as new operating systems are
released, so it is a good idea to periodically check the drivers against your OS version and
the driver version you currently run. These often can be found in the control panel on
Windows and on a Mac at the bottom of system preferences in the category Other,
consult the manual of your hardware if not.
Class Compliant Drivers
These drivers are wonderful and can save a lot of time and frustration, they allow your
hardware to work automatically by following standards of the OS and usually negate the
need of ever having to download drivers. They are often both Mac and Windows
compliant and very efficient or in other words have very little latency. More often you
will find this with USB MIDI keyboards than audio devices.
7


Below are a few images of MIDI keyboards to control virtual instruments known in
Cubase as VSTis.
Audio MIDI Setup (Mac)
Audio MIDI set-up often is helpful in trouble shooting if the Mac recognizes your device
or not. You can open up Audio MIDI Setup by navigating to OS
HD:Application:Utilities:Audio MIDI Setup.app. If your audio and/or MIDI Keyboard
ports are not showing up here than there is a good chance you will need check
compatibility with your current OS version. Try unplugging and reconnecting the
Firewire or USB cable first. If you have speakers or headphones connected to your audio
device unplug them or turn them off before disconnecting, to avoid any pops!
Software Setup
All right we are now ready to dive right into the software application. In Windows XP
navigate to Cubase in the start menu, programs and right click and choose Pin to Start
menu if it isnt already. This way we will be able to open Cubase quickly in the future
All Programs ^
Ss start
Steinberg Cubase 4
3 Steinberg Hatem
<3 Stenberg HAlionOne
<3 Syncrosoft
B Adobe Reader 8
Apple Software Update
Internet Explorer
/*| LogMeln
V MSN
Outlook Express
Pro Tools LE
Remote Assistance
UltraMon
Windows Desktop Search
() Windows Media Player
^ Windows Messenger
% Windows Movie Maker
*3 Documentation
I & ASIO DirectX M Duplex Setup

Cubase 4
Open
j Cubase Application Data F Run as...
Qf Scan for threats...
8


On the Macintosh open up the operating system hard drive and go to the applications
folder and drag Cubase to the dock on your computer.
VST Audio System (Device Setup)
The first thing we need to do at this point is choose the actual drivers that are going to be
in communication with our hardware.
1. We do this by going to the Devices Menu and choosing Device Setup... at the
bottom.
Window (1) Help |
Control Room Mixer 1
f Control Room Overview J
MIDI Device Manager MMC Master Mixer Mixer 2 Mixer 3 F3
Plug-in Information Time Display VST Connections F4
VST Instruments Fll
VST Performance F12
Video F8
Ableton Live ReWire Reason ReWire
Show Panel
Device Setup...
9


Note: Key commands are shown in the menu for various controls and windows.
We will discuss later how to set up your own custom key commands.
2. Next click on VST Audio System on the left.
3. Choose your sound device by clicking on the down arrow to the left of ASIO
Driver.
Dvke Setup
PtVtCM
C3 MID*
j o M £2 Remote Devices
Quick Controls
I £i Transport
Time Display
Video
Video flayer
D-
Fireface *00 (629)
VST System Link
Aggregate Device 16 Sound ...
Aggregate Device ~ 2 Sound F...
Built-in Audio (1)
Built-in Audio (2)
Built-in Audio (3)
Built-in Audio (4)
Built-in Audio (S)
, Digidesign HW (MBox)
Fireface 800 (629)
Soundflower (16ch)
Soundflower (2ch)
iSight
& Adjust for Record Latency
1- ^0^ Shift
kground
( Help )
C Reset } f Apply ^
( Cancel )
r~QK~
Note: The items listed in the drop down list depend on the hardware you are using
and the drivers installed. It is recommended to use something other than the
default one that came with your computer. As you can see from the check mark I
am using an external Fireface 800 by RME as shown earlier.
4. Click OK.
10


Inputs/Outputs (VST Connections)
Next lets set-up the inputs and outputs of your interface.
Inputs
1. Choose the Devices menu and VST Connections (default key command is F4).
Devices
Window (1)
Help
Control Room Mixer
Control Room Overview
MIDI Device Manager
MMC Master
Mixer
Mixer 2
Mixer 3
Plug-in Information
Time Display
F3

VST Instruments m
VST Performance Fi2
Video F8
Ableton Live ReWire
MelodyneEssential ReWire
Show Panel
Device Setup... XD
2. Choose the Inputs tab at the top and if you have anything listed under Bus Name
right click (control click for Mac) and choose Remove Bus until nothing is listed.
Well see later where we can select inputs and outputs on tracks in Cubase.
Always on Top
Add Bus
Set "Stereo In" as Default Input Bus
Remove Bus

3. With no buses showing choose Add Bus, depending on your interface choose
mono and the number of inputs that are possible on your device.
11


onn
VST Connections Inputs
Inputs
Outputs
Group/FX
External FX
External Instruments
Studio
SB All
mamr
Presets I
13 iS
Bus Name
4* kWi.||,l
o Left
~o Right
I Spesters
Stereo
j Audio Device______
Fireface 800 (629)
' Fireface 800 (629) 1
Fireface 800 (629) 3 "
Add Input Bus
Configuration
More...
Note: Choosing stereo or something other than mono allows you to record
multiple inputs simultaneously on your interface on a single track and has nothing
to do with being able to mix in stereo or surround. Also surround is not available
to Cubase Studio or Cubase Essential.
Tip: If you click the drop down arrow you can choose from a list of preset input
configurations. You can also create your own by clicking on the plus icon or remove
them by the minus icon to the right of the drop down box.
12


Outputs
Next select the Outputs tab and again remove all buses, but this time add one stereo bus
or choose from one of the Presets that best fit your hardware setup.
fton
VST Connections Outputs
Inputs
Outputs
Group/FX
External FX
External Instruments
Studio
SB Ail
Add Bus
Presets I
Bus Name
Speakers
i Audio Device
5.1 + 8 mono out
5.1 + 4 stereo out
5.1 + 8 stereo out
12 stereo out
8 stereo out
4 stereo out
4 stereo + 4 mono out
4 stereo + 8 mono out
Stereo out
Stereo + 6 mono out
BE
Note: If there are many outputs already assigned it is often quicker to choose a
Preset of Stereo out, remove it, and then Add Buses from scratch. Often if you
choose a factory preset they will not add your interface or you I/O will be mapped
incorrectly. You may even want to make a Preset with no I/O if you are changing
interfaces regularly.
13


Project Setup
Next lets close the VST Connections window and open the Project Setup... options
windows from the Project menu. Note the ellipsis (three dots) after the word Setup in the
menu indicating that this will not execute a command but rather open another window in
which you can choose options to make changes.
Audio MIDI Score
Add Track
Duplicate Tracks
Remove Selected Tracks
Remove Empty Tracks
Track Folding
Pool 38 P
Markers 38 M
Tempo Track 38T
Browser 38 B
Beat Calculator...
Set Timecode at Cursor
Notepad
Project Setuj.
Auto Fades Settings...
Project Setup
0000000
0:100000
Start
Length
IQ Frame Rate
( Help ) ( Cancel ) ( OK )
It is worth noting that Cubase supports multiple file types, bit depths and sample rates
(different sample rates will play back at the wrong speed if mixed in your session).
However it is advisable to make these settings for your project before you begin
recording. Steinberg has added a preference in version 4 to assist in setting this up when
you create a new project.
Preferences
Preference Presets
( Rename ) f Delete ") C? Store marked j
(Defaults"*) ( Apply ( Cancel ) ^ OK ^
14


Sample Rate
The sample rate affects the frequencies in which you can capture during your recording.
Half the sample rate would be the highest frequency that could be captured. It is
generally accepted that the perceived hearing range of a human with good hearing is from
20 Hertz to 20,000 Hertz often referred to as 20k (short for kiloHertz).
So a sample rate of 44.100 kHz would capture a max frequency of 22,050Hz. Note that
you can only go as high as your sound card or the software permits which ever is less.
Cubase records at a maximum frequency of 96kHz where Steinbergs software Nuendo
designed for postproduction can record up to 192kHz hardware permitting.
Note: For further explanation of this research Nyquist Theorem.
Often professional engineers choose to record at sample rates of 44.1kHz or 48kHz due
to the processing strain put on the computer, as well as audio files needing twice the
storage space at sample rates of 88.2kHz and 96kHz. In other words you could run twice
as many tracks and plug-ins at 48kHz then you could maxed out at 96kHz, and it would
only require half the hard drive space.
Record Format (Bit Depth/Word Length)
The Record Format affects the dynamic range of the project material. Recording at 24
Bit as opposed to 16 Bit gives the ability to record at much quieter levels while still
preserving the range of the program material.
For example if you had a singer that went from very quite to very loud and your input
levels were turned down lower than needed, you could then perform a gain adjustment
via fader or by adding gain to your clip without much of a loss in dynamic range. Keep
in mind that recording at good levels, and being aware of the quality of your microphone
and amplifiers are still important when trying to get the best signal (wanted sound) to
noise (unwanted sound from equipment) ratio.
Most interfaces dont convert at 32 Bit but choosing this option puts less strain on your
CPU (Central Processing Unit) since all files will be stored in the native format that
Cubase will process them at internally when it does its calculations. However the main
reason for this option is when recording with effects on input tracks. Choosing a 32bit
(floating point) format allows you to have less rounding of the files when running
through plug-ins before recording to hard disk. Meaning that the original processing that
happens internally will be preserved in the audio file itself.
Caution: Very few non-professional and professional applications support 32 bit
audio files. Keep this in mind if you plan on handing off your audio files to someone
to use in another application, as they will be incompatible.
15


Record File Type
It is advised that you choose Broadcast Wave file as this is supported by almost every
application. Broadcast wave files store metadata (data about data), of information about
the project location/time it was recorded at your Cubase session right into the wav file
itself. That way applications supporting this format such as Pro Tools, Digital Performer,
Logic, Sonar etc. Can import files from a single Cubase project and have all the audio
files line up with each other in another digital audio workstation.
Note: Your edits will not be retained since this information is stored with the
Cubase project file and not the individual audio file.
Cubase also stores metadata in each recorded audio file containing a description, author
and reference that are helpful for tracking the original author of the files. This is set up in
your Cubase preferences. This is also the setting that will be used by default when
exporting broadcast wave files as a Mixdown (covered in chapter 10).
Preferences
m
MIDI niter
MediaBay
Record
Audio
3
Broadcast Wave
MIDI
Scores
Colors for Additional Meanings
Editing______________________
......... ......................l>
]
Record-Audio-Broadcast Wave
One Hit Wonder
Adam Olson
www.studioprime.com
Description
Author
Reference
*
Preference Presets
( Store ) ( Rename ) ( Delete ) O Slore marked pr
( Help )
(Defaults ~) ( Apply ) ( Cancel ) ( OK )
16


Shown below is an image of a third party application reading the information stored in
recorded audio files with the above settings.
6 BWAVReader LI File Edit Window
oo
Audio 01_01.wav
Chunks
Chunk Location Length
bext 12 802
fmt 822 16
Fake 846 02
data 856 1081122
iXML 1081986 844
Metadata
Chunk SO: bext. Chunk Length: 802. Chunk Position: 12
Description.
One Hit Wonder
Origination Date. 2008.08.08
Origination Time. 11.51.S2
Timecode Start; 00:01:33:20.
Originator: Adam Olson
Originator Ref: www.studioprime.com
Coding History:

File Data
Tout File Length: 1082838
Chunk O: fmt. Chunk Length. 16. Chunk Position. 822
Format. PCM, 44100Hz, 24bit, Stereo
Data Rate: 264 K bytes/sec
Block Align: 6
B Size 24902
Duration: 0:4
Mac Pro
HO:Users^damwolson:Oesktop:Oelete.Aud>
o:Audo 01.01.wav
Play | Stop ] httD^/www.ouesosot.com ( Hide Chunks )
Drop a file on this window or choose Open from the File Menu
VI.1
Raw XML
>2008-08-08 BWF.ORICINATION DATE>
0
( Reveal File)
if you'd like to edit this file please check out BWAV Writer

11:51:52 BWF_ORlCINATION_TIME>
Adam
Olson
NCE>www.studloorime.com *
Note: That when changing your preferences you must close Cubase and reopen it
before recording for these preferences to added to your recorded audio files.
f ....................
Wave 64 File (Cubase only) developed by Sonic Foundry overcomes the two-gigabyte
file size limitation of Wave and AIFF files. This is a concern when recording long
performances without stopping, which creates continuous audio files. This is especially
important when recording surround performances. However keep in mind that few
applications support this format.
Sonically there is no difference between any of the four file formats; they are all
uncompressed audio files. Compatibility is the main concern.
17


Note: When recording to stereo or surround tracks (Cubase only) Cubase always
records interleaved files. Meaning they show up as single files in Windows
Explorer or Mac Finder, although they contain multiple channels. Visually they
look no different than mono recorded files. You can find out more information
about the recorded files on Windows by right clicking and going to properties or
on both Mac and Windows opening in QuickTime and choosing Show Movie
Properties from the menu Windows.
Stereo Pan Law
This lets you set how much your audio will be attenuated or turned down when you pan
center or set your audio to come out both the left and right speakers respectively. A
setting of -3dB or -4.5dB is a good setting if you are not sure what to choose.
Software Setup Miscellaneous
Auto Save (Preferences)
Auto Save can be a real lifesaver when needed, to enable it open the preferences and
navigate to the General view. You can have up to 25 auto saved back-ups at intervals of
your choice. After saving the max back ups the first saved back up or oldest will be over
ridden and then the second etc.
18


On Startup "Show Open Options Dialog"
(Preferences)
Next choose Show Options Dialog.
Preferences
Appearance
General
Meters
Work Area
Editing
Audio
Controls
MIDI
Project & Mixer
Tool Modifiers
Tools
Video
Event Display
Audio
MIDI
Markers
Rulers
Video
MIDI
MIDI Hie
MIDI niter
nr.........
General
English
Language
liU Auto Save Interval
|jj| Maximum Backup Files
M Show Tips
Ml Live Window Resize
90
|i|j Maximum Undo
Do Nothing
On Startup
Do Nothing
Open Last Project
Open 'Default' Template
Show Open Dialog
Show Template Dialog
Show Open Options Dialog
Preference Presets
( Store ) ( Rename ) ( Delete )
Store marked prc
( Help ) ( Defaults ) ( Apply ) ( Cancel ) OK
The following window will be opened next time you start Cubase allowing you to quickly
choose from nine (max) recent projects in the left pane, or from an older project not listed
by Open Other..or start new by choosing from premade templates with the New
Project button.
Cubase 4 Open Document Options
------------.------ .TV..... .-.
Today Far Gone.cpr
j Here Coes The Last One.cpr
! Number One But Too Late.cpr
If Tomorrow Never Comes.cpr
Why Won't You Say.cpr
Say You'll Come 8ack.cpr
The Place In the Void.cpr
If All I Want.cpr
In A Rocky Season.cpr
(Open Selection)
f Open Other...}
( New Project )
( Help )
( Cancel )
19


Quick Controls (Device Setup)
Quick Controls is similar to Generic Remote on selected track with the key difference
that you can assign various controls for the same knob, slider or button on a track-by-
track basis in the Project Window. You may want to delete generic remote if you only
have one controller on your keyboard for the next few steps.
1. First we need to set up our controls like we did for the Generic Remote. Go to
device setup and click on Quick Controls in the view on the left. This does not
need to be added like other controllers.
2. Again click on the control names and repeat the process of first selecting the
Control name and then click learn.
3. If you have a MIDI keyboard that has multiple controller knobs and sliders use
these instead of your Modulation wheel, since this will be more practical. Assign
each know or slider to a 1-8 quick control parameters and press OK.
a. Show the inspector by clicking on the inspector button or press
[alt]/[option]+I.
b. Click Quick Controls in inspector.
c. Make sure it is active which is indicated by the color blue (it is active by
default).
5. On the Vox track click (not double click) in the first blank space under the Active
Quick Controls button and choose volume from the drop down list.
6. Next lets select the second blank Quick Control and open the folder Standard
Panner by clicking the disclosure triangle to the left of the folder then choose Pan
Left-Right.
20


No Parameter
Volume
Mute
Linked Parmer
Standard Partner
ETilffigffliB
Pan Left-Right2
7. Next select the Kick track and assign the first Quick Control to Volume as well.
8. The second slot we will assign to Mute.
Caution: Cubase will allow you to have overlapping MIDI controllers in the Device
Setup so be sure that you havent assigned the same controllers for the Generic
Remote and the Quick Controls. If this is the case both assigned parameters w ill
change together.
Now open up the mixer by going to Windows > Mixer or pressing F3 and select the Vox
track. Move the first controller on your keyboard you set up in Quick Controls and the
volume should change for the Vox track. Move the second knob and you should see and
hear panning from left to right.
In the Mixer press the right arrow key two times to select the Kick track. Now adjust
Quick Control 1 from your keyboard and again volume changes. Now for the key
difference between Generic Remote selected track and Quick Control; adjust the second
Quick Control you assigned and notice that it is controlling mute now since that is what is
assigned for that incoming control on that track. Also note that you must have the knob
or slider at least above or below the halfway point for this to turn toggle switches on or
off.
21


MIDI Controller for Fader (Device Setup)
If you are using a MIDI keyboard that has knobs and sliders, it may be helpful to use
them in your workflow to control various aspects of Cubase. There are hundreds of
things that can be mapped to controllers and you may even want to dedicate a keyboard
as a controller.
6. If your device doesnt follow a particular protocol in the drop down list then choose
Generic Remote.
Device Setup
+ M
Apple Remote Control j__
Time Display
CM Motormix
Generic Remote
jLCooper CS-10
JLCooper MCS-3000
Mackie Baby HUI
Mackie Control
Mackie HUI
Radikal SAC-2k
Roland MCR8
Steinberg Houston
Tascam DM-24 (HUI)
Tascam US-428
Yamaha Olv
Yamaha 01v96v2
Yamaha Olx
Yamaha 02r96v2
Yamaha DM 1000v2
Yamaha DM 2000v2
Yamaha DM2000
VST Audio System
Firefac* 800 (629)
IQ ASIO Driver
Release Driver when Application is in Background
Input Latency: 8.277 ms
Output Latency: 7.982 ms
Advanced Options Set to Defaults
Audio Priority
Q Multi Processing
Disk Preload
Q Adjust for Record Latency
|H Record Shift
0 Samples

( Help ) ( Reset ) r Apply N
( Cancel ) ( OK )
You can dedicate a specific MIDI port as a controller and choose from a myriad of
options of what you want to control. The upper table is your MIDI controls and the
bottom table view 2 is what those controls are assigned to.
22


Device Setup
Generic Remote
£jj MIDI
MIDI Port Setup
Qaj Remote Devices
Quick Controls
Transport
Time Display
£2 Video
vm Video P.ayer
VST Audio System
Hreface 800 (629)
VST System Link
BE

GSBB
I MIDI Input
|0 MIDI Output
Control Name MIDI Status MIDI Channel1 X$fresi Max. Value 1 flags
Facer l Contro er i 14 127 R.T.
Fader 2 Proa. Change 2 7 127 R..R

Fader 4 Poly Pressure 4 7 127 ft..
Fader 5 Note On S 7 127 ft..
Fader 6 Note Off 6 7 127 ft..
Fader 7 Ctfl-NRPN 7 7 127 R..
Facer 8 Ctrl-NRPN 8 7 127 R..
Fader 9 Ctrl-RPN 9 7 127 R..
rader 10 Ctrl-JLCooper 10 7 127 ft..
Fader 11 Ctrl-Houston 11 7 127 R..
Fader 12 Controller 12 7 127 ft..
Fader 13 Controller 13 7 127 ft..
Fader 14 Controller 14 7 127 1.
14 rnnrmller 14
BHTTm
Control Name 1 Device : Owitnai/CateM* [ VaHid/AcTidn ""frigs
Fader 1 Not Assigned
Fader 2 Command p
Fader 3 Mixer Device 4000 .T,
Fader 4 Mixer 3 102S ..N
Fader 6 Transport
Fader 7 Metronome 6 1025
Fader 8 VST Mixer 7 1025
Fader 9 VST Control Room 8 102S
Fader 10 VST Mixer 9 102S
Fader 11 VST Mixer 10 102S
Fader 12 VST Mixer 11 102S
Fader 13 VST Mixer 12 102S
Fader 14 VST Mixer 13 1025
14 inse WsM nr
C Help ) c
E C
Import
( Export........
c
Add
Delete
( Rename )
C
Add
3 ( Apply )
( Cancel ) (OK )
For demonstration purposes lets assign your modulation wheel to control
7. Select control name Fader 1.
8. Move your keyboards modulation wheel.
9. Click the Learn button on the right.
10. Next go to the bottom table and choose Selected under Channel/Category on
Fader 1.
11. Click OK.
12. Now navigate Projects > Chapter 01 > Cubase Control
13. Make sure the mixer is open, press F3 or go to Devices > Mixer
Window (i) Help |
I Control Room Mixer
| Control Room Overview 1
I Generic Remote I MIDI Device Manager | MMC Master
Mixer F3
Mixer 2 Mixer 3 Plug-in Information Time Display VST Connections F4
VST Instruments m
VST Performance ri2
Video F8
Ableton live ReWire Reason ReWire
Show Panel
Device Setup...
23


14. With Vox selected by clicking on the channel strip name move your modulation
wheel. Next move the right and left arrow keys to select different tracks quickly and
move the modulation wheel. As you can see the modulation wheel adjust the volume
of the selected track just like we choose in Generic Remote.
'2x Caution: When jumping between channel strips Cubase jumps to the position of
Y your modulation wheel when moved. This could cause a track that is turned
- J down to JUMP to a louder level if that is where you left off on another channel.
Be careful when controlling Cubase in this way.
Time Display (Device Setup)
Next lets go back to Device Setup and set up a couple different large time displays.
1. Click the plus sign and select Time Display. You should then see Time
Display and Time Display 2 under the transport folder.
t+J-M
Apple Remote Control
Time Display r

24


2. Select Time Display 2 that you just created and changed the settings to the
following:
a. Display Color = Dark Green
b. Background Color = White
c. Time Format = 29.97 fps
+ - M

i Devices
£2 MIDI
MIDI Port Setup
D Remote Devices
Quick Controls
Transport
Time Display
Time Display 2
Device Setup
Time Display 2
| Dark Green [0 Display Color
A
| White [0 Background Color

1 29.97 fps [0 Time Format
3. Select Ok.
4. Under the Devices menu choose Time Display and then Time Display 2 to
have both floating displays visible. Now you can have two floating windows with
colors to indicate what you are looking at.
Note: You cart right click on the floating Time Display and change the counter
type without going back into Device Setup.
Saving Templates
Templates are a really helpful way to have project settings you use often quickly loaded
and ready to go for new projects. Lets say that we were going to use the same track
settings for our current project for another song. Rather than mixing all our audio files
from the new song into the already tracked song lets instead set up to record the new song
now that we know the settings are all good and the talent is happy with their current
levels (we will talk about details of sends and levels in a later chapter).
1. Choose Save As... from the file menu or press
[Ctrl+Shift]/[Command+Shift]+S. This saves only the file that reference to your
audio files and not the audio files themselves. You can save this back to your
chapter one Project folder if you would like.
2. Give it a name of your choice, something like Template Setup.
3. Open the Pool Window from the Media menu or press [Ctrl]/[Command]+P.
4. Select Acoustic Gtr and hold shift and then click on Vox Japanese.
25


5. Drag all files to the trash in the Pool Window.
6.
In the warning choose Remove from Pool.
The selection is in use and can not be moved to the
trash because
it is used in another pool!
Do you want to remove it from the pool and remove
all occurrences from the project?
( Cancel ) ( Remove from Pool

Note: Choosing Remove from Pool will only remove the files referenced in the
current session and not the audio files themselves. This is important to remove
from Pool, otherwise our new template we open would reference to the files
located from this session and open them in our Project Window if it can.
26


7. From the File menu choose Save as Template..
Edit Project Audio MIDI
New Project New Library... XN
Open... Open Library... XO
Close xw
Save xs
Save As... oxs
Save Project to New Folder...
8. In the window that opens save your template as My First Template.
Save as Template
j My Tirst Template ] Name
( Cancel ) f OK
Congratulations you have now saved a template, next lets open and save our new session
to another location.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
From the File menu choose New Project or press [Ctrl]/[Command]+N.
Now choose My First Template from the list and select OK.
New Project
Templates.
Empty
C4 16 MtOt Tracks
C4 4 Stereo 6 Mono Audio Track Recorder
C4 Arranper And Mixed Track Setup
C4 Cubase Synths On Instrument Tracks
C4 Mastering Setup
C4 Music To Picture S.l Surround
C4 Podcasting
( Cancel ) f OK )
Navigate to the Desktop and create a new folder and entitle it Song 2.
Select OK on Windows or Choose on a Mac to save the Project to the new
folder.
Select Activate in the next window that opens. Only one Cubase Project can
have access to your interface and can play at a time, although you can have
several projects open at once.
Go to the File menu and choose Save or press [Ctrl]/[Command]+S.
Caution: It is very important that you realize you have only selected a folder where
your media fdes will be recorded and stored. You have not saved your Cubase
Project until you choose Save. This behaves a little differently the other Audio
Workstations you may be familiar with.
27


You are now ready to record the new song and have the two Project files and folders
independent of each other!
28


2
Navigating


In this chapter we will get a better overview of the windows and areas of the complex
Cubase interface. We will also set up a various aspects of Cubase to speed up our
workflow.
Lets start by opening Projects > Chapter 02> Navigating.
Toolbar
The Toolbar is located at the top of the Cubase Project page and has the option of
selecting what you would like to view by right clicking on any of the tools found in the
toolbar.
a on
30


View Switches
We will not go into detail about what each of the Toolbar views do here however lets
point out that we will be referring to the View Switches throughout this chapter all of
which can be accessed by a default Cubase command. See tool view three below.
1 1 Constrain Delay Compensation
2 Performance Meter
3 View Switches
4 Automation Mode
5 Locators
6 Transport Buttons
7 Play Order Controls
8 Time Display
9 Markers
10 Tool Buttons
11 Nudge Palette
12 Autoscroll
13 Snap/Quantize
14 Snap to Zero Crossing
15 Color Menu
Show All
Default
Alternative
Transport & Snap/Quantize
Setup...
Activate/Deactivate Project
El
m

E


L 0:00:00:00.00
P 00000:00.00
>1 >
Play Order 3
C I
000060000
00006 000
1 £ 3 U S
7 8 310
El
E
0
ttt }#
Inspector
The inspector is complex and had many panels to open to achieve a great amount of
control. For this reason the Inspector only shows the contents of the selected track and
changes depending on what track is selected. You can show/hide the Inspector by
selecting the first View switch in the Toolbar or by pressing [Alt]/[Option]+[I].
To open the panels click on the panel names, i.e. Wood Block, Inserts, Equalizers, Sends
etc.
31



""ni hi 1
If you would like to change what is displayed in each panel based on track type then right
click in the Inspector and choose from the list of options. This list is populated based on
the track type currently selected. To make presets of your own then choose set up from
the list.
32



Audio Inserts
Audio Equalizers
Audio Equalizer Curve
Audio Sends
Audio Studio Sends
Audio Surround Pan
Audio Channel Fader
Audio Notepad
Audio User Panel
Quick Controls
Show All
Default
Setup...
Tip: You can open multiple panels by control or command clicking on the panel name.
Event Info Line
With the Event Info Line you can select parts, and events of both MIDI and Audio to get
various information about the selected part and event such as position, length, file name
key, whether it is locked and what parameters are locked etc.
Audio
Part


MIDI
Event
.iu . t i is
33


Overview
The project overview gives you a birds eye view of all the events and parts in your
current project. The Overview can be seen by activating the Overview button in the
toolbar view switch or by pressing [Alt]/[Option]+[0],
With any tool selected you can go to the upper half of the Overview window and click
and drag left or right to make a selection in your project. Clicking in the bottom half will
either extend your view range or give you a hand to move your view range if clicked
within the blue box showing your current view.
Touch
Current view
in Project window
Overview
Ruler
The Ruler is always displayed above your tracks in the Project window. You can change
what values are displayed by clicking to the far right of the Ruler. The selection here is
what determines you gird value or the point that events will snap to if you are working
with the grid enabled.
Note: You can have multiple time displays at once through the use of Ruler
tracks that will be covered in a later chapter.
34


Project Cursor
When visible the Project cursor always shows where Cubase is currently playing.
4ccGtr FronlO
Project Cursor.
You can even change your cursor width in the Transport view of your preferences.
9 Cursor Width
There are several ways to move your Project cursor, lets try a few.
1. Click in the lower 3/4ths of the Ruler and locate a new place or double click to
begin playing from that location.
2. Jump to memory locations by using your numeric keypad.
3. Type a location in the time display in the toolbar or transport.
4. Set up the preference under the Transport view to Locate when Clicked in Empty
Space. Now when you click in an empty space on your tracks with the object
selection, scissors, glue, eraser, mute, line and color tool your cursor will be
updated to the clicked position without having to move all the way up to the ruler.
locate when Clicked in
5. The plus and minus on the numeric pad will forward and rewind your cursor.
6. Slaving to incoming timecode.
7. Using the Play Order track.
35


Follow Button
The Follow button when active allows your Project Cursor to always be visible, showing
you the current location of playback and record. With the Follow button deactivated you
can continue editing while the Project Cursor continues to scroll out of view while
playing.
The arrow to the right of the follow button allows you to suspend the project cursor from
following while editing.
Stationary Cursor (Preferences)
Some people prefer to have the Project cursor stable and the parts and events move
underneath the Cursor. So set Cubase to behave this way go to your preferences and
under Transport view check Stationary Cursors.
M Stationary Cursors
This will now make all windows that display the Cursor stationary (i.e. Sample editor,
Key editor, Score etc.) Be sure to zoom in to see this in action; to zoom out and in press
the [G] and [H] keys.
Return to Start Position On Stop (Preferences)
Another useful preference is how playback location functions in Cubase. By default
your cursor works like a tape machine picking up where you last stopped. However
when editing and audition audio or using the Follow function you may find it helpful to
always start play back from the last location you navigated to. Do this by going to the
Transport view in Preferences and checking Return to Start Position on Stop.
M Return to Start Position on Stop I
Tip: If you find yourself changing this preference a lot in your workflow then you might
want to assign it a key command. See assigning key commands section.
36


Transport Panel
Below is an image of the full transport panel; to open the Transport panel select it from
the Transport menu and choose Transport Panel or press F2 on both Windows and
Mac.
The full Transport panel can be viewed by right clicking on the panel and choosing
Show All.
Performance
-i. i. l. o:
97. 3. 3. 86* S.
f *1
4. 1. 1. 0
(QB3ES3EQEIOE1D BBQIDES
fcra
it* | SHOW
4/4!
Locatori Jog/Scrub
Main Transport
Arranger


Master+ S> dc
Marker
MID!
Activity
Audio
Activity
Audio
Level
Control
You can also create your own custom presets by choosing Setup... from the contextual
menu.

Transport Buttons
H
Buttons and Time Displays
Dual Time Displays
56. 3. 3.165
Mini Time Displays
*4 O * 'MlD'i-
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Status Fields Only
Jog Scrub and Markers
Performance
Record Mode
Locators
Jog/Scrub
Main Transport
Arranger
Master + Sync
Marker
MIDI Activity
Audio Activity
Audio Level Control
Show All
Default
Transport Buttons
Buttons and Time Displays
Dual Time Displays
Mini Time Display
Status Fields Only
Jog Scrub and Markers
Setup-
Using Left & Right Locators
The left and right locators are very helpful for many things such as setting a punch in and
out point and quickly locating them, setting a range for an Audio Mixdown, setting a skip
range for audio that you would like to not play.
Lets start by opening the Transport and making sure Locators are showing. Then move
your pointer just below the top number next to the L in the locators view. You will see a
little pointer with no stem and a minus sign. Now drag up or down until you see Bar 13
37


showing. The numbers represent Bars|Beats|Sixteenths|Ticks, the tick value resolution is
set in the MIDI view in preferences.
Next move your Right locator on the bottom to about Bar 21.
13. 1.
9
21. 1.
Locator Position
Tip: If you are using a mouse with a wheel you can also hover over the number and
adjust the position with the wheel.
Now enable Cycle in the tool bar or transport by clicking the Cycle button or by pressing
on the number pad. We will work with cycle more when recording in future
chapters.

With Cycle still enabled lets swap the left and right locators and see what happens by
moving our playback cursor to bar 10 and pressing play. You will notice that now the
ruler becomes red between the left and right locator indicating that it will skip that
section upon playback if Cycle is enabled.
1 13 1 1 21 25
1 1 1
13 1 21 25
Solo 2 5o o 3
4 S
Note: A way to understand this function is that when Cycle is enabled you are
telling the Project Cursor to always jump to the left locator when it hits the right
locator.
38


A useful preference is in the Edit view is to check Cycle Follows Range Selection.
fVI Cycle Follows Range Selection
When this is enabled making a selection in all windows that support the Range Selection
tool will now link your left and right locators to your selection. This behaves like you
may be familiar with if coming from another DAW. Now you just need to press pad 1
and 2 to locate to either locator.
If you prefer to work with this off then you can always jump to your selection selecting
Locate Selection from the Transport menu or by pressing [L],
Devices Window (1) Hi
Transport Panel F2
Locators to Selection
Locate Selection
You can also set the left and right locator while playing. To do this hold down the
[Ctrl]/[Command] key while playing and pressing pad [1] to set the left locator, or pad
[2] for the right locator. This is great for setting up a punch in and out point.
With the Object selection tool select a part or event in the Event display and choose
Locators to Selection from the Transport menu or press [P], This is especially helpful
when exact play back is crucial.
Devices Window (1) H
Transport Panel F2

J^LocateSelection^^^^^^^^^Ll
Right Clicking
By right clicking in various parts of the Cubase interface you will get a contextual menu
that gives you options that are useful depending on the area or selected event right
clicked on. Again for Mac if using a one-button mouse this would be a control click in
most cases. An exception to this would be clicking in the Project page even area would
39


pull up the tool pallet with any modifier key based on the preference in the Tools view. If
this is selected holding down any modifier key will open the contextual menu.
There are too many contextual menus to show in detail, below is a collage of just a few of
the contextual menus that are available in the Cubase interface.
Vi coanteoow Outputs
40


Zoom Functions
Lets start off taking a look at our many zoom options near the bottom of our Edit menu
(picture has been edited to reduce Edit menu options). Take a moment to look over the
options listed and particularly make a mental note of the key commands associated with
each on your system.
Project Audio MIDI Scores Media Transport Devices
Zoom In H
Zoom Out G
Zoom Full OF
Zoom to Selection \S
Zoom to Selection (Horiz.)
Zoom to Event OE
Zoom In Vertical
Zoom Out Vertical
Zoom In Tracks
Zoom Out Tracks 3 T
Zoom Selected Tracks
Undo Zoom
Redo Zoom
In your project press [G] & [H] and notice that these zoom in and out keys focus on your
cursor once it comes into view. If your cursor is off screen then zoom will zoom in on
the center of your current view.
Next select Zoom Full this will show all events, parts and automation in your Project
window whatever the size of your window. Very helpful for quickly seeing everything in
your project. Now choose Undo Zoom and you will be taken back to the previous zoom
setting.
Note: Undo and Redo Zoom is independent of your normal edit histoiy undo and
can be selected multiple times to go back through previous zoom states. You can
also assign key commands to these functions.
After you have tried several of the zoom functions lets choose the zoom tool from the
Tool buttons in the Toolbar or press alpha [6]. Now click and drag in the Event display
to zoom in on tracks.
By default Cubase only zooms in horizontally but you can change this in preferences to
zoom in vertically as well in the Tools view by unchecking Zoom Tool Standard Mode:
41


Horizontal Zooming Only if you prefer.
M Zoom Tool Standard Mode: Horizontal Zooming Only
Next lets see another extremely quick way of zooming and that is by clicking in the
bottom half of the Ruler and dragging down and up to zoom in and out respectively.
Notice that you can also drag left and right to change your zoom focus. This function can
be done in most of the edit windows and can quickly speed up workflow.
Next click on the drop down arrow on the bottom right of the Project window and choose
Solo 1 in the list. These are Cycle markers that have previously been created. Notice
that Cubase zooms in to the various sections of the song this way. We will see how to
create cycle markers in chapter 4. Notice the presets at the top and even a custom made
one entitled Dude in the image below.
You can create your own zoom presets by setting up the project page to the zoom size
you prefer and Cubase will use this zoom setting for zooming in to the same level where
you project cursor is.
Note: Track heights and positions are not saved with these customized zoom
settings.
Zoom Full
Zoom to Locators
-6 minutes
~1 minute
~30 seconds
~10 seconds
-3 seconds
~1 second
-200 ms
-30 ms
-10 ms
-5 ms
-1 ms
Dude
Solo 2
Solo 3
Bridge
Outro Solo
Add
42


Track Heights
Lets look at several ways you can adjust the track height in your project. Well start off
by position our pointer just in-between the Marker track at the top and the Wood Block.
When you see the double lines with a double arrow click and drag up and down.
Next lets add pressing the Control or Command key before we click and then drag up or
down. You should now see all the tracks adjust together to the same track width. Now
try the same thing with lower tracks (like the group tracks) and notice that because the
tracks above it are also adjusting the double lines no longer stay in-between the tracks.
Next go to the bottom right comer of the Project window and adjust the vertical slider up
and down.
The drop down arrow above the slider gives a list of preset track heights to choose from.
With Snap Track Heights checked adjusting the slider will snap to the preset values listed
in the drop down menu.
43


Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Tracks 1 Row
Tracks 2 Rows
Tracks 3 Rows
Tracks 4 Rows
Tracks N Rows
Tracks Full
4 Tracks
8 Tracks
N Tracks
Tracks Minimal
Snap Track Heights
1>II-T----A-
If you find your self regularly adjusting track heights you may want to consider assigning
key commands to your favorite track height sizes.
Color Selector
To assist you in quickly locating and navigating in a project are colors that can be
assigned to various aspects of Cubase. First make sure Color Menu is showing in your
Toolbar and then click it.
Default Color
Color 1
Color 2
Color 3
Color 4
Color 5
Color 6
Color 7
Color 8
Color 9
Color 10
Color 11
Color 12
Color 13
Color 14
Color 15
Color 16
Select Colors...
You can choose your own default colors that you prefer to use by adding or subtracting
from the list in the Select Colors... control panel. Spend a little time playing around
44


with some of the color settings and naming colors according to your liking,
( Apply
Event Colors
Vox lead
Brass
Ac. Guitar Lead
Elec, Guitar Lead
Drum Set
Bass Upright
+! -| H a|i*l*[ ,9 9]
( Retet ) ( Cancel ) f OK )
Once colors have been assigned select a region, part or track(s) to and then select the
color of your choice from the Color drop down menu.
45


Note: If no parts or events are selected when a track is selected then all parts and
events on a track will change to the selected color. If an event/part has been
previously assigned a color then the color will remain until selected and changed.
At the top right of the Track list is the option to show the colors of tracks. If you assign
track colors before recording new events will be colored their respective track color.
On the Toolbar, Tool buttons there is a color tool that can be used to quickly assign
colors to events and parts by rubberband selecting (clicking out side an event/part and
dragging a box around muliple events/parts) and then click the any selected event/part
with the color tool.
Tip: To quickly change colors while coloring in Project window hold down Control or
Command to select a new color. This is assignable in the Preferences under Tool
Modifiers view under category Color Tool.
Preferences

Appearance
General
Meters
Work Area
Editing
Audio
Controls
MIDI
Project & Mixer
Tool Modifiers
13
Editing-Tool Modifiers
Audio Warp Tool
MMfcdSS
Controls
Command+Shift

, t Action 1^ fitodTfters
Popup Event Colors_Command p
( Sample Event Color Option
EJ
Press the 'Assign' Button while Holding Down
> Modifier Keys
|g ( Store ) ( Rename ) ( Delete ) C s,ore marked preferences only
( Help ) ( Defaults ) ( Apply ) ( Cancel ) ( OK )
46


Windows & Panels
Project Window
As you know by now the main window of Cubase is the Project Window
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The project window is the main area in which you edit Events in Cubase. Events are
the objects, or what some applications refer to as regions, that are placed automatically on
the timeline when you record. Events are freely movable and audio, MIDI and video
files can be dragged onto Cubases timeline to have Events automatically created.
For both Audio and MIDI events there are other windows to help assist you in fine tuning
your edits which gives you further control then you otherwise would have in the Project
window alone. We will explore these windows in this chapter and throughout the course.
47


Mixer
The Mixer is the second main window in Cubase and is used to have a quick overview of
levels at any given point in the project based on the play position. You can use this to
also see an overview of all the plug-ins that are used on individual channel strips, EQ
settings, studio headphone levels, send levels to effects, submix levels, input and output
level from your hardware, routing to channels, what is parameters are active on a
channel by channel basis and much more!!!
Lets take a closer look at some of the features of the Mixer. First open the mixer by
choosing Mixer from the Devices menu or by pressing [F3], You can also press the
highlighted icon from the top of the Project window.
i
48


5
a

Common Input
Panel Channels
Audio
Channels
FX
Channel
MIDI
Channel
Group
Channel
Rewire Instrument Output
Channel Channel Channel
We will not be working with Rewire channels in the course and you have Cubase Studio
you will not have the option of Input channels.
Common Panel
From here you have access to change what you are seeing in the mixer globally. If you
want to show all inserts, sends, EQs you can. You also have the ability to show/hide
channel types such as Input, Audio, FX, and MIDI etc. By selecting the icons on bottom
right of the Commons Panel.
Input Channels
From here you have the ability to adjust levels after your hardware interface but before
you record. You can also print audio being recorded by adding inserts to Input channels.
Remember that if doing this then it is advisable to record with 32bit audio from the
Project Setup window.
Audio Channels
These will be the primary channels used by most people using Cubase and is what is used
for recording audio from a microphone, guitar or any other outboard gear that you would
like to record as audio in Cubase. Audio channels are used to place audio files stored on
you computer into tracks on the Project window.
FX Channels
These are very useful for allowing the engineer to use sends from various channel types
to output signal and route through various FX via the FX Channel inserts. This gives you
the ability to adjust your FX channel or the Wet channel independent of the original
source material.
49


MIDI Channels
These are used to send MIDI data to Virtual Instruments within Cubase. You can also
send MIDI to outboard MIDI modules or control various MIDI devices outside of Cubase
through MIDI Channels.
Group Channels
These allow you to create a subgroup of multiple channels to have individual control of a
group of channels at once. All channel types in the mixer can be routed to a group
channel except Input, Output and MIDI channels. That means that you can route groups
to groups. Group outputs can be used on Audio Channels to record audio to the hard
drive.
Rewire Channels
Propellerhead developed Rewire in conjunction first with Cubase. These allow you to
route the output of various applications that support the Rewire protocol to be mixed
inside of Cubase. You can send MIDI data from Cubase to have it be triggered by the
external rewire application for sample accurate audio. Rewire applications will show up
in the Devices menu if you have any installed. Popular applications for this are
Propellerheads Reason, Abletons Live and Sonys Acid. See Propellerheads website
for a full listing.
Instrument Channels
These give the added advantage over MIDI tracks in that you have MIDI and the
instrument the MIDI is controlling all accessed from the same channel/track, giving you a
one to one relationship. This eliminates the need to hunt down what device your MIDI is
triggering.
Output Channels
Output channels like input channels are added via your VST Connections accessed
through the Devices menu. Output channels are your over all master fader and the last
step before audio leaves Cubase for adjusting level. These can be mono, stereo or
surround and is selectable as a source when performing an Audio Mixdown of your
project mix.
50


Devices Panel
The Devices panel can be accessed from the Device menu and provides a floating panel
of the various windows you can open from the Device menu.
ft Devices
( Ableton Live ReWire )
( Control Room Mixer )
( Control Room Overview )
( Generic Remote j
f MIDI Device Manager j
c MMC Master J

c Mixer J

c Mixer 2 J

c Mixer 3 J

c Ptug-in Information J

c Reason ReWire N J

c Time Display J

c Time Display 2 J

( VST Connections )

c VST Instruments

c VST Performance J
f Video )
Pool
This window can be accessed from the Media menu and choosing Open Pool Window
or by pressing [Ctrl]/[Command]+[P]. Alternatively you can click the Pool icon on the
Project windows toolbar.
4 tal til
The Pool is very useful to quickly find information about clips and regions in your
project.
51


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We will visit pool throughout the course and in more detail in a later chapter when we
talk about databases. Suffice it to say the pool is where we can quickly find information
about our project media such as how many instances of clips are being used in our project
window, the current record folder, status icons such as offline/missing media, media
outside our project folder, processed clips, auditioning media, file path etc.
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52


MediaBay
MediaBay was introduced in Cubase 4 and can be found in the Media menu under Open
MediaBay. Through MediaBay we can quickly search, locate, tag and audition media
files of all sorts scattered throughout our hard drives and audition them for use in our
project. MediaBay even allows us to audition files in the native project tempo if desired.
Like the Pool we will cover the use of MediaBay in more detail in our chapter about
databases.

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