Citation
The Cambridge book of poetry and song

Material Information

Title:
The Cambridge book of poetry and song
Creator:
Bates, Charlotte Fiske, 1838-1916 ( editor )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
T.Y. Crowell & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
ix, 882, [2] pages : frontispiece (portrait) plates ; 24 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
English poetry ( lcsh )
American poetry ( lcsh )
Poésie anglaise -- Anthologies ( rvm )
Poésie américaine -- Anthologies ( rvm )
American poetry ( fast )
English poetry ( fast )
Genre:
Dummies (Publishing) ( rbpub )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Dummies (Publishing) ( rbpub )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Selected from English and American authors, by Charlotte Fiske Bates ... Illustrated by Fredericks, Church, Dielman ... and other eminent artists. With indexes of authors, titles, and first lines.

Record Information

Source Institution:
|Auraria Library
Holding Location:
|Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
00351236 ( OCLC )
16025491 ( LCCN )
ocm00351236
Classification:
PR1175 .C355 1882 ( lcc )
821.08 ( ddc )

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library
Literature Collections

Full Text






CAMBRIDGE BOOK
OF
POETRY AND SONG.
SELECTED FROM
ENGLISH AND AMERICAN AUTHORS,
BY
CHARLOTTE FISKE BATES,
AUTHOR OF u RISK, AND OTHER POEMS.
COMPILER OF THE LONGFELLOW BIRTHDAY BOOK, SEVEN
VOICES OF SYMPATHY.
ILLUSTRATED
BY FREDERICKS, CHURCH, DIELMAN, TAYLOR, HARRY FENN, GIFFORD
AND OTHER EMINENT ARTISTS.
Entieieg of ^ittfjarg, titles, anti JHrst ILtnes.
NEW YORK:
THOMAS Y. CROWELL & CO.,
No. 13 Astor Place.


/


PREFACE.
Though text-books of every variety abound, and many per-
sons assert the old to be better than the new, yet every year
sees'no inconsiderable number added to their list. It is folly
to suppose that any one prepares a work merely for the sake of
doing it, and careful examination proves that every successor in
a given field has some superiority of plan, comprehensiveness,
detail, or material to recommend it. Something it may lack
that others havebut it also has something that others lack. So
it is with compilations of poetry. Every one is found faulty
somewhere, by somebody, nor can it be imagined possible, with
the varied tastes of men, that the work of one should be so all-
embracing as to leave no intelligent reader disappointed. The
compiler of this volume has not pretended to make what she
has never found,a perfect compilation,and will be gratified,
if this prove so well done as to save it from the charge of
being a supernumerary. Whatever its defects, it still carries
out, in the main, her aim in undertaking it, which was,
First. To represent the genius of woman as fairly as that
of man.
Second. To the extent of the compilers power, to give
those poets their just dues who have hitherto not had them.
Third. To quote largely, though in brief passages, from
those authors whose works, through their uninviting looks,
length, or subject, or the undue bias imparted- by ridicule and
one-sided criticism, are generally seldom read, and but imper-
fectly represented.


PREFACE.
Fourth. To bring together not only copious extracts
from the standard and popular writers of Great Britain and
America, but also a goodly number of poems from the very
latest volumes of both countries, and a representation, through
one poem, at least, of those whose writings are as yet un-
collected, and whose names have not appeared in other com-
pilations.
The alphabetic arrangement of the work prepared virtu-
ally in £ortions ; not offered complete to the printers de-
manded unusual readiness in the choice and supply of material,
and the temporary omissions of chance or necessity placed
authors and poems desired for the body of the work in its
supplement. A glance at the latter will quickly discover, from
its value, that, though coming after, it is no afterthought.
A number of names on the compilers list were, through
accident, wholly omitted, while others were left out through
want of space on account of the length of poems, or because
extracts could not be seasonably obtained. Positive knowl-
edge of insufficient space excluded translations from the work,
and though ballads and anonymous poems were in the plan,
there was found to be very meagre room for even these.
In comparing the extent of representation, it will be remem-
bered that the space occupied by poems, no less than their
number, must be considered. Other things being equal, the
compiler welcomes brevity, and the more this element prevails
in an author, or the more his works admit of short and striking
quotation, the more variously can he be represented. It often
happens that one long lyric claims as much room as five or six
short ones, while a mere glance at the index would seem to
indicate injustice.
To the editors sincere regret, and through circumstances
over which she had no control, Joaquin Miller, John White
Chadwick, and Walt Whitman are unrepresented in this
volume; while the poems from Helen Jackson, Dr. Joyce,
and Edgar Fawcett are, from a like necessity, not those at
first selected from their works.


The publishers acknowledge the generous courtesy of the
following houses in granting the use of their publications:
Messrs. Houghton, Mifflin & Co.; J. R. Osgood & Co.; Harper
& Brothers; Charles Scribners Sons; J. B. Lippincott & Co.;
G. P. Putnams Sons; Lee & Shepard; D. Appleton & Co.;
The Century Company; E. P. Dutton & Co.; and R. Worth-
ington.
The editor also recognizes the private courtesy of many,
among whom are Edmund Clarence Stedman, Richard
Watson Gilder, John Boyle OReilly, John Townsend
Trowbridge, William Winter, Edgar Fawcett, Edna
Dean Proctor, Mary Mapes Dodge, Louise Chandler
Moulton, Harriet Prescott Spofford, Julia C. R. Dorr,
and Louisa Parsons Hopkins.
Justice requires the statement that this compilation has
occupied the leisure intervals of a busy life for but fifteen
months; also that it has been prepared entirely without aid;
and that a thorough examination of the authors works, where
accessible as in the majority of cases they were made the
selections, as largely as possible, independent of those prepared
by others, though of necessity, choice has often proved
coincident.
C. F. B.




ioS
v.^i.


a
SSPl
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Engraved and Printed under the Supervision of
George T. Andrew.
Steel Portrait of Henry W. Longfellow................................Frontispiece
SUBJECT AKTIST
Marian Erle..............................F. E. Wright . .
(Mrs. Browning).
The Isles of Greece ......... J. D. Woodward .
(Lord Byron).
Our Homestead............................F. B. Schell . . .
(Phoebe Cary).
Plighted....................................W. L. Taylor . . .
(Dinah Unlock Craik).
Concord Bridge...........................E. H. Garrett . . .
(Ralph Waldo Emerson).
Cleopatra embarking on the Cydnus . Alfred Fredericks
(Thomas Kibble Hervey).
As I CAME ROUND THE HARBOR BUOY W. F. HALSALL . . .
(Jean Ingelow).
Maiden and Weathercock...................F. Dielman ....
(Henry W. Longfellow).
Auf Wiedersehen..........................W. L. Taylor . . .
(James Russell Lowell).
The Ride of Collins Graves...............A. R. Waud ....
(John Boyle O'Reilly).
Seneca Lake..............................J. Francis Murphy 413
(James Gates Percival).
PAGE
67
98
127
171
215
267
307
343
351
399


ILLUSTRATIONS.
A Scene in the Highlands.................E. H. Garrett .
(Sir Walter Scott).
Una and the Lion.........................F. S. Church .
(Edmund Spenser).
Come into the Garden, Maud .... Harry Fenn .
(.Alfred Tennyson).
The Pines were dark on Ramoth Hill R. Swain Gifford
(John G. Whittier).
The Old Oaken Bucket ........ James D. Smillie
(Samuel Woodworth),
477
524
580
646
666


CONTENTS.
A.
Abide with Me, ....................................Lute
Abou Ben Adhem,.....................................Hunt
About Husbands,.....................................Saxe\
Abraham Lincoln,....................................Stoddard,
Absence,............................................Kemble,
A Character,........................................R. B. Browning,
A Character,........................................Dryden} .
A Character,........................................J. T, Fields, .
A Character,........................................R. B. Lytton,.
A Common Thought,...................................Timrod, .
A Day in Sussex,...................................Blunt.
A Day of Sunshine,.................................H. W'. Longfellow,
Address to a Mummy,................................H. Smith.t
Address to Certain Goldfishes, ....................H. Coleridge,.
A Death-Bed,.......................................J. Aldrich,
A Desire,..........................................Spalding,
A Dirge,...........................................Winter,
A Dream, . .......................................A, Cary, . .
A Dreams Awakening,................................S. M. B. Piatt,
A Drop of Dew, ..................................Marvell,
Advice on Church Behavior,.........................Herbert,
Advice to One of Simple Life,......................Crabbe,
A Face in the Street,..............................G. P, Lathrop,
A Faithful Picture of Ordinary Society,............Coivper, . .
... Holmes,.................732
Kingsley,
A Familiar Letter to Several Correspondents,
A Farewell,.................................
Afar in the Desert,...................................Pringle~ '...........437
Affliction,...........................................A. T. De Vere, . . . 185
A Forsaken Garden,....................................Swinburne, .... 553
A Forest Walk,........................................Street..................548
A Four oClock,.......................................Spofford,............531
After All, . ......................................Winter,...............659
After a Mothers Death,...............................E. Cook.................150
After Death in Arabia,...............................E. Arnold.............21
ALter the Ball,.......................................Peiry,...............414
After the Burial,.....................................Lowell, ...... 350
After the Kain,.......................................T. B. Aldrich, ... 11
A Funeral Thought,....................................B. Taylor...............565
Against Bash Opinions,................................Crabbe,..............165
Against Skeptical Philosophy,.........................Campbell,............117
Age,.................................................Rogers,...............463
Aged Sophocles Addressing the Athenians,..............^4. Fields,..........224
A Happy Life,........................................Wotton,...............676
A Hospital,...............-.......................... Spencer, .... 527
- " 417
370
161
199
469
636
48
A Letter,...............................................Phetps
Alexander at Persepolis
Alexander Selkirk, . .
Alexanders Feast, . .
A Life on the Ocean Wave,
A Little before Death, .
A Little While,..........
All Change; no Death, .
Michell, . . .
Cowper, ....
Dryden, . .
Sargent, . . .
H. k. White, .
Bonar, ....
E, Young,............683


xii
CONTENTS.
o his
Lov
All Earthly Joy Returns in Pain,
All in a Lifetime,............
All the Rivers,............
All Things Once are Things Forever
All Things Sweet when Prized,
All Together, .
Alone, ....
A Lost Chord, .
A Lovers Prayer,
A Love Song, .
A March Violet,
A Match, .
Ambition, .
Ambition, .
Amends, .
America, . .
A Mussel-Shell,
A Name in the Sand,
An Authors Complaint,
And Thou hast Stolen a Jewel,
And Were That Best ?
An Evening Reverie,.
An Epitaph, ....
Angelic Care, . .
An Idle Poet, . .
Annabel Lee, . .
An October Picture, .
An Old Song Reversed,
An Open Secret, .
Answered, ....
Antony to Cleopatra,.
An Unthrift, ....
An Untimely Thought,
A Passionate Shepherd t
A Petition to Time, .
A Picture, ....
A Picture of Ellen, .
Apollo Belvedere, .
A Portrait, ....
Apostrophe to Ada, .
Apostrophe to Hope,
Apostrophe to Liberty,
Apostrophe to Light,
Apostrophe to Popular Appla
Apostrophe to the Ocean, .
Apostrophe to the Poets Sister
Apostrophe to the Sun, .
Apostrophe to the Whimsical
A Prayer in Sickness,
April, .
A Protest,
A Question Answered
Archie. .
A Request,
Argument,
A Scene in the Highlands,
Ashes of Roses,
Asking for Tears, .
Ask Me no More, .
Ask Me no More, .
A Sleep, ....
A Snow-Drop, .
A Snow-Storm, .
A Song of Content,
A Song of Doubt, .
A Song of Faith, .
Aspirations after the Infinite,
Aspirations of Youth, . .
A Spring Day, . . -
Dunbar,..............
Stedman, .....
Phelps,..............
Lord Houghton, . .
A. T. De Vere, . .
H. H. Brownell, . .
H. H. Brownell, . .
A. A. Procter, . .
Wyatt,..............
M. A. De Vere, . .
Lazarus,.............
Sioinbnrne, ....
G. Houghton,....
E. Young, .....
Richardson, ....
Dobell,..............
Tliaxter,............
Gould,...............
Pope.................
Massey,..............
Gilder...............
Bryant,.............
Prior,...............
E. Spencer, ....
Robertson............
Poe..................
Collier,............
Stoddard,............
Mason, ..............
P. Cary, .....
Lytle,...............
Bradaock,............
T. B. Aldrich, . . .
Marlowe,.............
B. W. Proctor, . .
Street,..............
Scott,...............
W. W. Gay, ....
E. B. Broioning, .
Byron,...............
Campbell,...........
Addison..............
Milton,..............
Cowper,..............
Byron,...............
Wordsworth, ....
Percival.............
Crabbe,..............
B. W. Procter, . .
W. Morns. ....
J. 'P. Fields, ....
Mackay,..............
P. Cary..............
Landor,..............
Tupper,.............
Scott,...............
E. Goodale, ....
,S. M. B. Piatt, . .
Carew,..............
Tennyson,...........
Prescott.............
Spofford,............
Eastman,.............
J. J. Piatt, ....
Holland,.............
Holland,.............
Akenside,............
Montgomery, . .
Bloomfield,..........
208
539
416
289
186
57
58
441
677
317
337
555
285
683
458
189
587
238
765
368
233
80
773
528
851
423
143
540
844
127
353
805
10
842
444
549
477
820
63
105
117
3
381
157
100
667
411
165
445
390
226
365
125
328
617
477
237


CONTENTS.
xui
&
1
As Slow our Ship,....
Assurance,.............
A States Need of Virtue, .
A Strip of Blue, ....
A Summer Mooa? ....
A Summer Morning,. .
A Summer Noon at Sea, .
A Sunset Picture, ....
At a Club Dinner, . .
At Divine Disposal, . .
At Dawn,...............
A Tempest,.............
At Home,...............
A Thought,.............
A Thought of the Past,
A Thrush in a Gilded Cage,
At Last, ....
At the Church-gate,
At the Forge, .
At the Last, .
At Sea, ....
At Sea, ....
At Sea? ....
Auf Wiedersehen,
Auld Robin Gray,
Austerity of Poetry,
Autobiography,
Autumn, . . .
Autumnal Sonnet,
Autumn Song, .
Avarice, . .
A Voice from Afar,
Awaking of the Poetical Fa<
A Welcome to Alexandra,
A Wet Sheet and a Flowing
A Wife,................
A Womams Love, ....
A Womans Question, .
A Womans Way, ....
culty,
Sea,
B
Ballad,.....................
Barbara,......................
Barbara Frietchie,............
Battle Hymn of the Republic,
Battle of the Baltic, ...
Bay Billy, ...................
Beati Illi,...................
Beatitude,....................
Beauties of Morning, ....
Beautiful Death,..............
Beautys Immortality, ....
Becalmed at Eve,..............
Beethoven,....................
Before Dawn,..................
Before the Bridal,............
Before the Prime,............
Behind the Mask,..............
Belinda,...............
Bell and Brook,...............
Bending between Me and the Taper
Benevolence,..................
Be Quiet, Do,.................
Betrayal,.....................
Beyond Recall,................
Bingen on the Rhine, ....
Moore,
E. B, Browning,
Thomson,
Larcom,
Bayne, .
McKay,
Sargent,
Falconer,
Mackay,
Burbidge,
J. C. R. Dorr
Bloomfield,
C. G. Rossetti,
Gilder,
Sargent,
Crdnch,
Stoddard,
Thackeray,
A. Fields,
J. C. R. Doi'r,
H. H, Brownell,
Jennison,
Moulton,
Lowell,
Barnard, .
M. Arnold,
Havergal, .
Hopkins,
Allingham,
Hutchinson,
E. Spenser,
Nexoman,
Baker,
Tennyson,
Cunningham,
Dryden,
Hay, . .
A. A. Procter,
Bunner.
Hood,
A. Smith,
J. G. Whittier,
Howe,
Campbell,
Gassaway,
Symonds,
A. T. De Vere
Beattie, .
Dryden,
Keats, .
Clough, .
Thaxter,
Thompson,
B. Taylor,
Osgood, .
Whitney,
Pope,
S. T. Coleridge,
A. T. De Vere,
Sigourney, .
Mackay, .
Lanier, . .
Bradley, .
Norton,
388
64
594
332
255
842
471
218
756
808
196
40
466
233
470
173
540
585
224
193
59
833
845
351
30
25
823
829
18
830
525
396
45
582
180
206
254
442
808
284
504
642
289
114
229
558
186
34
206
312
131
590
854
566
403
637
767
136
185
500
757
329 i
52
397



XIV
CONTENTS.
Birds and their Loves,...........................
Blessed are They that Mourn,.....................
Books,...........................................
Bosom Sin,.......................................
Boyhood,..................'......................
Break, Break, Break,.............................
Breathes there the Man,..........................
Breathings of Spring,............................
Broken Friendships...............................
Bugle Song,......................................
Burial of Sir John Moore,........................
Burns,...........................................
But Heaven, O Lord, I cannot Lose,...............
Byrons Remarkable Prophecy,.....................
By the Autumn Sea, ..............................
By the Dead, ....................................
Thomson, ... .
Bryant,..............
Crabbe,..............
Herbert,.............
Allston..............
Tennyson,............
Scott,...............
Henians,.............
S. T. Coleridge, . .
Tennyson,............
Wolfe,...............
Halleck, . . .
E. D. Proctor, . .
Byron,...............
Hayne,...............
Laighton,............
603
72
170
265
19
584
478
260
136
577
665
249
446
103
256
324
c.
Vere,
Calling the Dead,..................................S. M. B. Piatt,
Calm and Tempest at Night on Lake Leman............Byron, . . .
Calm on the Bosom of our God,......................Hemans, . .
Caradoc, the Bard of the Cymrians, ................E. B. Lytton, .
Careless Content,.................................. Byrom, . .
Catos Soliloquy,..................................Addison, . .
Cayuga Lake,.......................................Street, . . .
Changes,...........................................if. B. Lytton, .
Charge of the Light Brigade,.......................Tennyson, . .
Charity............................................Dryden, . .
Charity,...........................................G. Houghton,
Charity,...........................................E. H. Whittier,
Charity Gradually Pervasive,.......................Pope, . . .
Charles XII.,......................................S. Johnson,
Cheerfulness in Misfortune.........................E. Young, . .
Circumstance,......................................Tennyson, . .
City Experience....................................Leland, . . .
Cleansing Fires,...................................A. A. Procter,
Clear the Way,................................ Mackay, . .
Cleon and I,.......................................Mackay, . .
Cleopatra Embarking on the Cydnus,.................Hervey, . . .
Cold Comfort,......................................Blunt, . . .
Columbus,..........................................Sir A. He
Come, Let us Anew,.................................Wesley,.
Come not when I am Dead,...........................Tennyson, . .
Come, ye Disconsolate,.............................Moore, ....
Compensation,......................................Cranch, ....
Complaint and Reproof,.............................S. T. Coleridge, .
Complete, .........................................Collier, ....
Conclusions,.......................................P. Cary, . . .
Concord Fight,.....................................Emerson, . . .
Condition of Spiritual Communion,..................Tennyson, . . .
Conscience, . .'.................................E. Young, . . .
Consecration.......................................C. F. Bates, . .
Consolation, ......................................E. B. Bromiing,
Constancy, ........................................Suckling, . .
Constant Effort Necessary to Support Fame, .... Shakespeare, .
Content and Rich,..................................Southwell, . .
Contentation,......................................Cotton, ....
Contentment,.......................................Thomson, . .
Contoocook Kiver,............................. . E. D. Proctor
Controversialists..................................Crabbe
Convention,........................................Howelis,' .
Coquette, .........................................Bobertson, . .
Counsel, ....................................A. Cary, . .
Couplets from Locksley Hall,.......................Tennyson, . .
Courage,......................................... G, Houghton,
Courage, ..........................................Thaxter, . .
421
101
263
839
705
4
547
840
584
206
286
639
431
308
684
585
744
442
362
362
267
803
184
633
585
387
174
141
143
126
215
575
678
31
63
550
486
525
154
597
447
168
292
851
121
573
285
589


Courtesy, .
Cradle .Song,
Cradle Song,
Critics,
Critics,
Cruelty,
Cuba,
Cui Bono,
Cui Bono,
Cupid Grown Careful,
Daily Dying.
Daisy, . .
Day Dreaming,
Dead Love,
Death,
Death,
Death amid the Snows,
Death and Resurrection.
Death in Life, ....
Death of the Day, .
Death the Leveller, .
December,
December,
Decoration,
Decoration Ode
Delay,
Delay,
Departure of the Swallow,
Dependence, ....
Descanting on Illness,
Description of the One he would Lore
Deserted Nests,
Despite All,
Destiny, . .........
Die down, 0 Dismal Day,
Different Sources of Funeral Tears
Dirge for a Soldier,............
Discontent,
Disdain Returned,
Distance no Barrier to the Soul,
Divorced,.............
Doctor Drollheads Cure,
Dolcino to Margaret,
V Domestic Happiness,
Door and Window,
Dorothy Q., . .
Dows Flat,
Dreams,
Drifting,.............
Driving Home the Cows,
Dullness,
Dying,
Early Death and Fame,
Early Rising,
Early Summer,.
Easter-day, .
Easter Morning,
East London,
Effect of Contact with the Wofld
gras.-aa




Egg
CONTENTS.
Effort the Gauge of Greatness,
Egyptian Serenade, ....
Elegy in a Country Churchyard,..................
End of all Earthly Glory........................
Endurance,......................................
Entered into Rest,..............................
Enviable Age,...................................
Epistle to Augusta,.............................
Epigram, .......................................
Epitaph,........................................
Epitaph,........................................
Epithalamium,...................................
Equinoctial,....................................
Equipoise, .....................................
Estrangement through Trifles,...................
Evelyn Hope,.............................
Evening,........................................
Evening,........................................
Evening Prayer at a Girls School,..............
Evening Song,...................................
Eventide,.......................................
Every Day,......................................
Excessive Praise or Blame,......................
Excess to be Avoided,...........................
Exhortation to Marriage, ..................
Exile of Erin,..................................
External Impressions Dependent on the Souls Moods,
Extract from A Reverie in the Grass,.........
Extracts from Miss Biddys Letters, ......
E. Young,..............680
Curtis,................181
T. Gray,...............240
Shakespeare, .... 487
Allen,..................14
Bolton,................805
S. Johnson, .... 308
Byron,..................95
S. T, Coleridge, . 711
Hervey, 268
B. J'onson, .... 310
Brainard,...............52
Whitney,.............' 636
Preston,...............434
Moore,.................385
P. Browning, ... 69
Croly,.................178
Wordsworth, .... 675
Hetmans,...............262
Lanier,................328
Burhidge,..............809
Allen,..................17
Pope,..................432
Thomson,...............596
Rogers>................461
Campbell,..............112
Cra&fte,...............167
Mackay,................365
Moore,.................760
F.
Eaciebat, . ....................................Abbey, .
Fair and Fifteen,...................................Redden,
Fair and Unworthy,..................................Ayton, ,
Faith,..............................................Kemble,
Faith in Doubt,.....................................Tennyson,
Faith in Unfaith,...................................£co#,
Faithless Nellie Gray,..............................Hood,
Faithless Sally Brown,..............................Hood,
Falling Stars,......................................Trench, .
False Appearances,..................................Shakespeare,
False Terrors in View of Death,.....................E. Young,
Fame,...............................................P. P. Lytton,
Fancy,..............................................Keats, .
Fantasia,...........................................Spofford,
Fare Thee Well,.....................................Byron, .
Farewell,...........................................Symonds,
Farewell,...........................................Thaxter,
Farewell, Life,.....................................Hood,
Farewell of the Soul to the Body, ..................Sigourney,
Farewell, Renown,...................................Dobson, .
Farewell to Nancy,..................................Burns, .
Fatherland and Mother Tongue,.......................Lover, .
Father Molloy, ................................ . Lover, .
Fear no More, ......................................Shakespeare,
Fear of Death,..................................... Shakespeare,
February,...........................................Morris, . .
Few in Many,........................................R. B, Lytton,
Field Flowers,......................................Campbell, .
Fingers, ...........................................Kay, . .
First Appearance at the Odeon,......................J. T, Fields,
Five, ..............................................J. C. R. Dorr,
Florence Nightingale, ............................E. Arnold,
Florence Vane, .....................................P, P. Cooke,
Flower and Fruit,...................................Thomas,
Flowers without Fruit,..............................Newman, .
2
848
798
318
575
479
739
740
606
485
682
753
311
530
92
559
586
283
499
190
84
748
748
488
487
389
752
111
836
227
195
22
151
853
396


CONTENTS.
Folly of Litigation,.........
For a Servant,.................
For a That and a5 That, . ,
For a Widower or Widow, . .
Forbearance,...................
Forget Me Not,.................
Foreknowledge Undesirable, .
Forever,.......................
Forever Unconfessed, .....
Forever with the Lord, ....
For his Childs Sake, .....
For my own Monument, ...
France,........................
Friend after Friend Departs, .
Friendship,.....................
Friendship in Age and Sorrow,. .
Fritz and I,....................
From Absalom ................
From An Ode to the Rain, .
From A Preacher,.............
From a Vision of Spring in Winter
From a Window in Chamouni, .
From Childhood,..............
From Christmas Antiphones, .
From <( Dejection,.............
From Eloisa to Abelard, . .
From Far,.......................
From Friend to Friend, ....
From Intimations of Immortality
From Lines composed in a Concert Room,
From Lines to a Louse, ...
From MakingPoetry, ....
From Mire to Blossom, ....
From No Age is Content, . .
From Nothing to Wear, . .
From Poverty,................
From Rules and Lessons, . .
From St. Mary Magdalen, .
From The Christian Politician,
From The Cock and the Fox, .
From the Elixir,.............
From the Exequy on his Wife,
From the Flats,.................
From the Lay of Horatius, .
From The Ode on Shakespeare,
From The Sensitive Plant, .
From The Thief and the Cordelier,
From To a Lady with a Guitar,> .
G.
Ganging to and Ganging frae,
Garden Song, .
Genius,..........
George Eliot, .
Glasgow, ....
Gleaners Song,. ,
Gods Patience,. .
God, the only Just Judge,
Goethe (Memorial Verses),
Go, Forget me,..........
Go not, Happy Day, . .
Good Counsel, .....
Good Life, Long Life, .
Good Counsel of Polonius to
Good Morrow,............
Goodness,...............
Laertes
Crabbe, .
Wither, .
Burns, .
Wither, .
Emerson,
Sargent,
Tupper, .
O Reilly,
Lord Houghton,
Montgomery,
Tennyson, .
Prior, . .
Goldsmith,
Montgomery,
Simms, .
Crabbe, .
C. E. Adams,
Willis, .
S. T. Coleridge,
Webster,
Swinburne,.
Moulton,
Vaughan, .
Sioinburne,
S. T. Coleridge,
Pope,. .
Marston, .
Symonds, .
Wordsioorth
S. T. Coleridge,
Burns, .
Havergal, .
S. Longfellow,
Earl of Surrey
W- A. Butler,
Wither, .
Vaughan,
Vaughan,
Vaughan,
Dryaen, .
Herbert, .
King .
Lanier, .
Macaulay,
Sprague,
Shelley, .
Prior,
Shelley, .
Tennyson, .
Byron, .
Phelps, .
Smith, .
Bloomfield,.
Preston,
Burns, .
ilf. Arnold,
WWe, .
Tennyson, .
CUaucer,
Johnson,
Shakespeare,
Heywood, .
R. Browning,
XVU
164
663
82
662
215
469
620
400
288
385
577
772
236
384
503
168
686
654
710
629
552
846
622
556
136
429
843
560
670
710
698
826
346
551
701
662
624
622
623
722
827
836
328
354
534
493
774
495
150
580
99
416
505
43
435
85
25
665
581
811
310
485
268
688
S#f


I
SSJ1

XVlll
CONTENTS.
Good News,...................
Good Night,..................
Gray,........................
Greece,......................
Green Things Growing, . . .
Grief for the Loss of the Dead,
Guardian Spirits.............
Gulf-weed,....................
H.
Hallowed Ground, . .
Hand in Hand with Angels,
Hannah Binding Shoes,
Happiness...............
Happiness in Little Things of the Present,
Happy are They,..............
Hark to the Shouting Wind, .
Harmosan,....................
Harsh Judgments,.............
Harvesting,..................
Harvest Time.................
Health Necessary to Happy Life,
Heart Essential to Genius, .
Heart-glow,..................
Heart Oracles................
Heart Superior to Head, . .
Heaven near the Virtuous, .
Heliotrope, . .
Helvellyn,
Her Conquest, .
Hereafter, .
Heroes,. . ,
Her Roses, .
Hester, ...
Hie Jacet, ,
Hidden Joys,
Hidden Sins, .
Highland Mary,
Hints of Pre-existence,
History of a Life, .
Hohenlinden, .
Homage, ....
Home and Heaven,
Home, Wounded, .
Hope,............
Hope for All, .
Hope in Adversity,
How are Songs Begot and Bred ? .
How Cyrus laid the Cable, . .
How Delicious is the Winning, .
How the Hearts Ease first Came,
How they Brought the Good News from Ghen
How to Deal with Common Natures,
Hudson River,..................
Humanity,......................
Husband to Wife,...............
Hymn before Sunrise in the Valley of Cha
Hymn for Anniversary Marriage Days,
Hymn from Motherhood,'
Hymn to Trust, ....
Hymn to Contentment,
Hymn to Cynthia, ....
Hymn to the Elowers, .
to Aix,
Kimball................319
Shelley, ..............495
Ticknor,...............854
Byron,.................105
Craik,.................170
Quarles,...............451
Rogers, ...... 464
Fenner.................224
Campbell, .
Larcom,
Larcom,
Maekay,
Trench, .
A. T. Be Ver
Timrod,. .
Trench, .
Faber, .
Bloomfield,
Thomson, .
Thomson, .
Simms, .
Whitney, .
M. M. Bodge,
Rogers, .
Larcom, .
Kimball,
Scott, .
Russell, .
Spofford,
E. B. Proctor
Jennison, .
Lamb, .
Moulton, .
Blanchard,
OReilly,
Bums, .
Tupper, .
B. W. Proctor
Campbell, .
Winter,
Very,. .
Bobell, .
Goldsmith,.
Tennyson, .
Campbell, .
Stoddard, .
Saxe, . .
Campbell, .
Herrick,
R. Browning,
Hill, . .
Parsons,
E. B. Browning.
Tennyson, .
S. T. Coleridge,
Withers,
Hopkins,
Holmes,. .
Parnell,
Jonson, .
H. Smith, .
108
332
329
' 757
605
185
855
606
216
41
592
597
502
638
192
461
333
319
481
851
529
448
832
325
846
801
401
85
619
445
112
659
627
189
237
574
116
541
775
110
266
70
827
408
689
579
138
662
829
279
407
310
510


CONTENTS.
I Count my Time by Times that I Meet Thee,
Ideals,...................
I Die for thy Sweet Love, .
If,.......................
in Drap
If it Must Be,...........
If this Be All,..........
If Thou Wert by my Side,
If We Had but a Day, .
If You Love me, ....
I in Thee and Thou in Me,
Ilka Blade o Grass Keps its
Ill-chosen Pursuits, . .
Ill-christened,..........
II Penseroso,............
Imagined Reply of Eloisa,
Im Growing Old, ....
Imitation,...............
Immortality,.............
Im not a Single Man, .
Impressions du Matin, .
In a Graveyard, ....
In a Letter,.............
In an Hour, ......
In Arabia,...............
In Autumn,...............
In a Year,...............
In Blossom Time, ....
Incompleteness, ....
Independence, ....'.
I Never Cast a Flower away
In Extremis, .....
Influence, .......
In Garfields Danger, .
Ingratitude,.............
In Kittery Churchyard,
In Memory of Barry Cornwall
In no Haste, ....
In November, . .
, In Praise of his Lady Love
In School Days, ....
Inscription,.............
Insignificant Existence,
In Struggle,.............
Insufficiency of the World,
In the Dark,.............
In the Meadows, ....
In the Quiet of Nature,
In View of Death, . .
Invocation,..............
I prithee Send me back my Heart
I Remember, I Remember,
Irwin Russell,...........
I Saw from the Beach, .
Is it all Vanity,........
Isolation,...............
I Wandered by the Brookside
I will Abide in thine House,
I will not Love, .
!
mpare
Dew
wit'
all Others,
Jeanie Morrison,
Jerusalem the Golden,...............
Gilder, .
Fawcett,
B. W. Procter
M. R. Smith,
D. Gray .
A. Bronte, .
Heher, . .
Dickinson, .
L. Clark, .
Cranchy .
Ballantine,
Tupper, .
Tupper, .
Milton, .
Howe, .
Saxe, . .
Richardson,
M. Arnold, .
Hood, . .
O. Wilde, .
Hay, . .
Jennison, .
Perry, .
J. B. Bensel,
Boker, . .
R. Browning,
Coolbrith, .
A. A. Procter,
Thomson, .
C. B. Southey,
J. T. Fields,
Coolidge, .
Brackett,
Shakespeare,
Thaxter,
Swinburne,
Landor, .
/?. 27. Johnson,
Earl of Surrey,
J. <7. Whittier,
Byron, .
Watts, .
I?, i?. Broivnin
E. Young, .
(7. Arnold,.
_£. Taylor, .
Cotton, .
iif. Collins,
Riordan, .
Suckling, .
Hood, .
Bunner,. .
Moore, .
R. Lytton,
E. Gray, .
Zortf Houghton,
Whitney.
Landor, .
J.
Jasmine, .............................. Hayne,
Motherwell,
Massey,

XIX
232
219
446
513
822
53
258
188
128
176
28
614
618
376
289
474
459
24
737
648
253
832
415
38
804
68
153
443
594
515
226
814
52
484
589
552
327
834
551
640
94
855
67
680
23
566
154
144
850
550
280
808
387
838
240
287
638
328
. 257
. 392
. 367


I
XX
CONTENTS.
Jesus, Lover of my Soul,
John Anderson my Jo, .
John Gilpin,..........
Jim Bludso of the Prairie Belle,
John Bay, ............-
Joy to be Shared, . . ...
Judge Not,..............
Judgment in Studying it,
Jnly,...................
June,...................
June,...................
Just Judgment, ....
Justice,................
Justice the Regenerative Power,
Wesley, .
Burns, .
Cowper, .
Hay, . .
Hood, . .
E. Young. ,
A. A. Procter,
Dryden,
Jackson,
Bryant, .
Lowell, .
Pope, .
Richardson,
E. R. Lytton,
K.
Keep Faith in Love,..............................Miller, . .
Kilcoleman Castle,...............................Joyce, . .
Kindness first Known in a Hospital,. ............ i?. Browning,
L.
Labor,....................
Laborare est Orare, .
Lady Clara Vere de Vere, .
Lagrimas, -.............
Lake George,..............
LAllegro,................
Landing of the Pilgrims, .
Larvae,........... .
Last,....................
Last Lines,..............
Last Verses,.............
Last Verses,.............
Last Words,..............
Late Summer,.............
Late Valuation, ....
Laughter and Death, .
Launch thy Bark, Mariner,
Laura, m^ Darling,
Learning is Labor,
Left Behind,
Letters,
Life, .
Life'
Life!
Life!
Life!
Life>
Life a Victory, .
Life from Death,
Life in Death, .
Lifes Mystery,
Lifes Mystery,.
Lifes Theatre, .
Lifes Vicissitudes,
Life will be Gone ere 1
Light, .....
Light on the Cloud,............
Light Shining out of Darkness,
Like a Laverock in the Lift,
Like as a Nurse,............
Lines on a Prayer-book, ,
Lines to a Comic Author, ,
I have Lived,
Lord Houghton,
P S. Osgood,
Tennyson, .
Hay, .
Hillard,
Milton, .
Hemans,
Whitney, .
Allen, .
E. Bronte, .
M. Collins,
Motherwell,
S. M. B. Piatt
Hopkins,
Tupper, .
Blunt, . .
C. B. Southey
Stedman, .
Crabbe, .
Moulton, .
Tupper, .
Barbauld, .
Bryant, ,
A. Car y, ,
Crabbe,
B. W. Procter,
Tupper, .
JR. B. Lytton,
Holland, .
Savage, .
A. Cary,
Stowe, .
Shakespeare,
Shakespeart,
C. Bronte. .
Bourdillon,
Savage, .
Cowper,
Jean Ingelow,
Vaughan, .
Crashaw, .
S. T. Coleridge,
632
84
711
731
735
978
440
205
831
73
351
432
459
839
374
834
66



CONTENTS.
Stage
Listening for God, . .
Litany to the Holy Spirit,
Little Billee,...........
Little Breeches..........
Little Giffen, . . . .
Little Jerry, the Miller, ,
Little Kindnesses, . .
Little Martin Craghan,
Little Mattie............
Lone Mountain Cemetery,
Long Ago.................
Longfellow,..............
Lord Byron,..............
Lord, Many Times I am Aweary,
Lord Ullins Daughter, .
Lord, when I Quit this Earthly
Loss,
Losses, .
Lost Days,
Love,
Love,
Love,
Love
Love. .
Love,
Love Bettered by Time,
Love, Hope, and Patience in Educati
Love in Age,...............
Lovely Mary Donnelly, .
Love me if I Live, . ,
Love of Country and of Home,
Love of the Country, . .
Love Reluctant to Endanger,
Loves Reward,.............
Love shall Save us all, . .
Loves Immortality,....
Loves Jealousy,...........
Loves Sonnets,............
Loves Philosophy, ....
Love, the Retriever of Past Losses,
Love, the Solace of Present Calamity
Love Unalterable,
Low Spirits, .
Lucy, ....
Lyric of Action,
on
M.
Madonna Mia, ....
Maiden and weathercock
Maid of Athens, . .
Major and Minor, . .
Make thine Angel Glad,
Making Peace,....
Man,...............
Man and Woman, . .
Manhood,...........
Mans Dislike to be Led,
Mans Restlessness, .
Man was Made to Mourn,
Maple Leaves, ....
March,.............
March,.............
Marco Bozzaris, . .
Masks,.............
Maud Muller, ....
May,........
Gannett, . .
Herrick, . .
Thackeray, .
Hay, ....
Ticknor, .
Saxe,....
Talfourd, .
Gustafson,. .
E. B. Browning,
Bret Harte, .
H. H. Brownell,
Bunner, . .
Pollok, . .
Trench, . .
Campbell, .
Watts, .
M. B. Dodge,.
Broton, . .
D. G. Rossetti,
Botta, . .
8. Butler, .
Byron, . .
S. T. Coleridge,
Scott, . .
Tennyson, .
Hood, . .
S. T. Coleridge,
Tilton,
Allinaham,
B. W\ Procter,
Montgomery, .
Bloomfield,
H. Taylor,. .
Bourdillon, .
Thaxter, .
R. Southey, .
Gilder, . .
Boker, . .
Shelley, . .
Shakespeare, .
Shakespeare, .
Shakespeare, .
Faber, . .
Wordsworth, .
Hayne, . .
XXI
0. Wilde, .
H. W. Longfelloio, .
Byron, . .
Curtis, . .
C. F. Bates, .
S. M. B. Piatt,
Pope, . .
Tennyson, .
Simms, . .
Crabbe, . .
Rogers, . .
Burns, . .
T B. Aldrich,
Jackson, .
Ilform, . .
Halleck, . .
T. R. Aldrich,
J. G. Whittier,
Cheney, . .
228
266
783
730
854
474-
562
245
61
252
59
807
428
603
111
836
817
56
468
50
87
97
141
478
579
284
140
598
686
444
382
42
570
50
588
517
233
46
492
489
488
489
217
672
827
647
343
94
181
31
420
430
578
503
165
461
85
12
831
389
248
12
643
812


}
XXII
CONTENTS.
May,......................
May and the Poets, ....
May in Kingston,..........
May to April,.............
Measure for Measure, . .
Melancholy,...............
Melrose Abbey by Moonlight,
Memorial Hall,............
Memory....................
Memory,...................
Mene, Mene,...............
Mental Beauty,............
Mental Supremacy, ....
Mercy,....................
Mercy to Animals, ....
Merit beyond Beauty, . .
Middle Life,
Midnight, .
Midsummer,
Midsummer,
Midwinter,
Mine Own,
Miracle,
Misspent time,................
Monterey,.....................
More Poets Yet................
Morning and Evening by the Sea, .
Move Eastward, Happy Earth, .
Music in the Air,.............
Music when Soft Voices Die, .
Mutability,....................
My Ain Countree,..............
My Answer,....................
My Child......................
My Comrade and I, ,...........
My Heid is like to Bend, Willie, .
My Life is like the Summer Bose, .
My Little Boy that Died, ....
My Love is on her Way, ....
My Mind to me a Kingdom is, .
My Nasturtiums,...............
My Old Straw Hat,.............
My Own Song,..................
My Playmate...................
My Psalm,.....................
My Saint,.....................
My Slain,.....................
My Window Ivy, .......
Nameless Pain,..............
Names,......................
Nantasket,..................
Natura Naturans, . . ,
Nature,.....................
Nature,.....................
Natures Joy Inalienable, .
Natures Lesson.............
Natures Need,..............
Natures Question and Faiths Ansv
Natures Beverence,.........
Nearer Home, .............
Nearer, my God, to Thee, . .
Nearing the Snow-line,....
Nearness,...................
New Life, New Love, . ,
Mason, .
Hunt, .
Abbey, .
Freneau,
Spofford, .
Hood, .
Scott, .
Cranch, .
Goldsmith,
Rogers, .
Symonds, .
Aleenside, .
Tupper,. .
Shakespeare,
Cowper, .
Pope, .
Heddenvick,
Brownell, .
Saxton, .
Trowbridge,
Trowbridge,
Leland, .
Coolidge, .
A. He Vere,
Hoffman, .
Hobson, .
J. T. Fields,
Tennyson, .
Curtis, .
Shelley,. .
Shelley, .
Hemarest, .
Boker, .
Pierpont, .
Trowbridge,
Motherwell,
R. H. Wilde,
Crailc, .
Baillie, .
Hyer, . .
Jackson, .
E. Cook, .
Spofford, .
J. G. Whittier,
J. G. Whittier,
Moulton, .
Realf, . .
M. M. Hodge,
N.
T. B. Aldrich, . . 10
. 710
Clemmer, . .
Clouqh, . 132
H. W. Longfellow, . 342
Very . 627
Thomson . 596
Preston . 435
Sir H. Tat/lor, . . 571
R. Southey, . . . 515
J. G. Whittier, . . 645

S. F. Adams, . . 3
Holmes, . 278
BoTcer . 804
Symonds . 559

m




CONTENTS.
New Worlds,. ....
Night,................
Night,................
Night Storm, ....
No Life Vain, ...
No More,..............
No Ring,..............
No Spring without the Belove<
Not at All, or All in All,
Not for Naught, . .
Nothing hut Leaves,
November,.............
Now and Afterwards, .
Now Lies the Earth, .
Number One, ....
>d,
O.
Ode...........................
Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton,
Ode on Art,...............
Ode^n the Death of Thomson,
Ode on the Poets,.........
Ode on the Spring, ....
Ode to a Mountain Oak, .
Ode to an Indian Coin, . .
Ode to Disappointment. .
Ode to a Nightingale, . .
Ode to Evening,...........
Ode to Simplicity, ....
Ode to the Brave, ....
Oif Labrador,............
Of Myself,................
Oft in the Stilly Night, . .
Oh Watch you Well by Daylight,
Oh Why should the Spirit of Mortal be
O Lassie ayont the Hill, . .
Old,........................
Old Age and Death,..........
Old Familiar Faces,.........
O may.I Join the Choir Invisible,
On a Child,.................
Only a Curl, ........
On a Girdle,................
On a Sermon against Glory, .
On Completing my Thirty-Sixth Year,
On Doves and Serpents, .
One by One,.................
One Presence Wanting, . .
One Lesser Joy,.............
One Word is too often Profaned,
On his Blindness,...........
Only,.......................
Only Waiting,...............
On Man,.....................
On One who Died in May, .
On Reaching Twenty-Three,
On Reading Chapmans Homer,
On Resignation,.............
On Sin,.....................
On the Bluff, ,.....
On the Death of John Rodman Drak
On the Headland,..........
On the Hillside,..........
On the Lake,..............
On the Life of Man,....
On the Reception of Wordsworth,
e,
proud
at Oxford,
G. P. Lathrop,
Lazarus,
R. Southey,
Simms, .
HColeridge,
Clough, .
Cary, .
Shakespeare,
Tennyson, .
E. Elliott, .
Akerman, .
H. Coleridge,
Craik, . .
Tennyson, .
Hood,. .
Emerson, .
T. Gray, .
Sprague, .
W. Collins,
Keats, .
T. Gray, .
Boker, .
Leyden, .
H.K. White,
Keats, . .
W. Collins,
W, Collins,
W. Collins,
Collier, .
Cowley, .
Moore, .
Lover, .
Knox, . .
Macdonald,
Hoyt, . .
Waller, .
Lamb, .
G. Eliot,
Rogers, .
E. B. Brownii
Waller .
Akenside, .
Byron, .
Quarles,
A. A. Procter,
Byron, .
Coolidge, .
Shelley,. .
Milton, .
Hageman, .
Mace, .
Quarles,
C. Cook,. .
Milton, .
Keats, .
Chatterton,
Quarles,. .
Hay, . .
Halleck,
B. Taylor, .
Symonds, ,
Webster,
Quarles,
Talfourd, .
XX111
334
337
516
503
124
131
122
489
580
212
8
134
170
578
736
213
244
532
148
311
233
43
339
635
312
147
144
145
142
145
386
347
322
359
296
628
325
209
461
65
628
4
107
451
440
104
813
490
379
247
360
451
812
380
314
810
451
254
251
564
559
631
451
562




XXIV
CONTENTS.
ny
On the Picture of a Child Tired of Play,
On the Riglii,...............
On the Road,.................
On the Shortness of Life, . .
On the Tombs in Westminster Abbey,
On Time,........................
On True and False Taste in Music,
Other Mothers,..................
O Thou who Dryst the Mourners Te
Our Homestead,...............
Our Neighbor,................
Our Own,.....................
Ours,........................
Out of the Dark,.............
Out of the Deeps of Heaven, .
Outre-mort,..................
0 ye Tears,..................
ars,
p.
Pain and Pleasure,............
Pairing-time Anticipated, . .
Palmistry,....................
Passage from the Prelude, .
Paternal Love,................
Patience,.....................
Patience,.....................
Pats Criticism,..............
Payments in Store,............
Peace,........................
Peace and Pain,...............
Penance of the Ancient Mariner,
Peradventure,.................
Perfect Love,.................
Persia,.......................
Pescadero Pebbles,............
Philip my King,...............
Philosophy,...................
Picture of Marian Erie, . .
Plain Language from Truthful James,
Pleasant Prospect, ....
Pleasure Mixed with Pain, .
Plighted,..................
Poor Andrew,................
Power of Poesy,.............
Power of the Woi*ld, . .
Prayer,....................
President Garfield, ....
Press on,...................
Procrastination,...........
Procrastination and Forgetfulnes
Progress in Denial, ....
Prometheus,.................
Proposal,...................
Prospice,...................
Providence,.................
Pure and Happy Love, . .
Purity, ....................
Pursuit and Possession, .

Death
Willis, .
Holland,
Hutchinson,
Cowley, .
Beaumont,*.
Milton. . .
W. Collins,
Butts, . .
Moore, .
P. Cary,
Spofford, .
Sangster, .
Preston,
Shurtleff\ .
Stoddard, .
Jennison, .
Mackay,
Stoddard, . .
Cowper, ....
Spofford, . .
A. Fields, . .
Scott, ....
Richardson, .
Trench, ....
C. F. Adams, .
Scott, ....
Vaughan, . .
O'Reilly, . .
S. T. Coleridge, .
j. C. R. Dorr,
E. B. Browning,
Mitchell, . . .
Savage, ....
Craik, ....
Crahbe, ....
R. Browning,
Harte, . .
Lazarus, . . .
Wyatt, ....
Craik, ....
j£. Elliott, . .
^4. Z>e Kere, .
i£. Young, . .
Montgomery, . .
if. JK. Longfellow,
Benjamin, . .
Tupper, ....
i£. Young, . .
(Simms, ....
Byron, ....
jB. Taylor? . .
i2. Browning,. .
Vaughan, . .
Thomson, . .
G. Houghton, . .
T. i?. Aldrich, .
651
275
838
156
37
374
145
89
386
127
530
468
434
852
542
832
364
542
716
530
225
478
459
604
685
479
622
399
135
194
64
370
472
171
169
67
729
336
677
171
211
184
683
383
837
799
621
677
501
91
565
68
623
591
286
11

Q.
Quack,..........................................Cm66e, .
Quakerdom, .....................................Halpine,
Quebec at Sunrise,..............................Street, .
718
726
545


CONTENTS.
XXV
Quebec at Sunset,
Questionings,
Quince, ....
.... Street, .
.... Hedge, .
.... Praed, .
E.
Railroad Rhyme,................
Rain,..........................
Rattle the Window............
Reading the Milestone, . .
Real Estate,...................
Reason an aid to Revelation, .
Rebeccas Hymn,.................
Recognition of a Congenial Spirit,
Recompense,.....................
Recompense,.....................
Recompense,.....................
Recompense,.....................
Reconciliation,............
Refuge from Doubt, ....
Regret,....................
Relaxation,................
Remedial Suffering, ....
Remember,..................
Remember,..................
Repose,....................
Remembrance, ......
Remorse,...............' .
Rencontre,.................
Reporters,.................
Requiescat,................
Reverie,...................
Resigning,.................
Richards Theory of the Mind,
Riches of a Man of Taste,. .
Ring out, Wild Bells, ...
Ripe Grain,................
Rock me to Sleep,..........
Rondel,....................
Rory OMore,...............
Rosaline,..................
Rose Aylmer,...............
Rubies,....................
Rule, Britannia,...........


Ritter,
Tilton, . .
Tennyson, .
Miller, . .
G. Houghton, .
H. Taylor, .
R. Southey,
Lazarus, .
C. G. Rossetti,
Thomson,
Hay,
T. B. Aldrich,
Crabbe, . .
O. Wil'de, .
S.
Sabbath Morning, .
Sadness Born of Beauty,
Sailors Song, ....
Saint Peray,...........
Sands of Dee, . '.
Saturday Afternoon,
Scene after a Summer Showe
Schnitzerls Philosopede,
Scorn not the Sonnet, .
Sea-way,...............
Secrets,...............
Seeking the Mayflower,
Self,..................
Self-dependence, . .
Selfishness of Introspection,
Serve God and be Cheerful,
She and He,...............
Shelling Peas,...........
Graliame, .
Trench, . .
G. P. Lathrop,
T. W. Parsons,
Kingsley, .
Willis, . .
Norton, . .
Leland, .. .
Wordsworth, .
Hutchinson, .
Wheeler, .
Stedman, .
Symonds, .
M. Arnold,
E. B, Brotoning,
Newell, . .
E. Arnold,
Cranch, . .
545
259
771
Saxe,.................779
Bwrleigh,.............809
Stoddard,.............541
J. J. Piatt, .... 418
Trowbridge, .... 610
Cowley,...............156
Scott,................479
Moore,.................385
Annan,.................797
Simms,.................502
851
601
577
373
285
571
516
338
465
595
E. Bronte,............54
253
11
717
648
Thaxter,..............587
~ 172
774
6
576
Craik,
Prior,
Akenside,
Tennyson,
Goodale,.............237
Allen,
Fay, .
Lover,
Lodge,...............340
Laridor, .
Landor, .
Thomson,
15
222
746
328
327
597
239
603
335
763
321
651
396
745
675
830
633
538
560
25
66
395
20
719
fm


XXVI
CONTENTS.
Sheridans Ride,.....................
Shes Gane to Dwell in Heaven, . .
She Walks in Beauty,.................
She Was a Phantom of Delight, . .
Silent Mothers,......................
Silent Songs,........................
Silhouettes,.........................
Since All that is not Heaven must Fade,
Since Yesterday,.....................
Sir Marmadukes Musings,.............
Sir Walter Scott at Pompeii, ....
Sleep,...............................
Sleep,...............................
Sleep and Death,.....................
Sleep the Detractor of Beauty, . .
Sly Lawyers,...................
Snatches of Mirth in a Dark Life, .
Soft, Brown, Smiling Eyes,...........
Softly Woo away her Breath, ....
Solace of the Woods,.................
Solitude,............................
Somebodys Darling,..................
Somebodys Mother,.................. .
Somebody Older, .....................
Some Day of Days,....................
Sometime, ...........................
Somewhere,...........................
Song,................................
Song,................................
Song,................................
Song,................................
Song from Right,...................
Song of a Fellow-worker, ............
Song of Egla,........................
Song of Saratoga,....................
Song of the Hempseed,................
Song of the Ugly Maiden,.............
Song on May Morning,.................
Songs of Seven,......................
Songs Unsung,........................
Sonnet,..............................
Sonnet Composed on Leaving England,
Sonnets from Intellectual Isolation,
Sonnet on Chillon, ................
Sonnets to Edgar Allan Poe,..........
Sonnet to Hope,......................
Sonnet to Sleep,.....................
Sorrows of Werther, . ......
Soul of my Soul,.....................
Soul to Soul,....................... .
Sound Sleep,.........................
Spectacles, or Helps to Read, ....
Spent and Misspent,..................
Spiritual Feelers, .........
Squandered Lives, ...................
Stanzas from Hymn on the Nativity,
Stanzas from Casa Wappy, ....
Stanzas from Service,.............
Stanzas from Song of the Flowers, .
Stanzas from the Tribute to a Servant,
Stanzas from The True Use of Music,
Stanzas from The Schoolmistress, .
Stanzas in Prospect of Death, ....
Stay, Stay at Home, my Heart. . .
Still Tenanted,......................
Stonewall Jacksons Grave,...........
Storm at Appledore,..................
Strength through Resisted Temptation,
Strive, Wait, and Pray,..............
. Read,.................453
. Cunningham,.... 180
. .Byron,................93
. Wordsworth, .... 674
. Helen liich, .... 849
. Stoddard, . . 542
. O. Wilde,.............648
. Kehle,.................16
. Lord Houghton, . 286
. Tilton,...............601
. Landon,...............327
. T. B. Aldrich, ... 11
. Byron,.................97
. Fay, ....... 222
. Crabbe,...............163
. Crabbe,...............718
. Baillie,...............27
. Cranch, ...... 176
. B. W. Procter. . 446
. Simms,.................501
. H K. White, .... 634
. Lacoste,...............323
. Brine,................806
. F. Smith, ..... 509
. Perry,................416
. M. B. Smith, .... 513
. Saxe,.................474
. Campbell,.............115
. Campbell,.............707
. H. Coleridge, .... 134
. C. G. Rossetti, . 465
. Havergal,.............825
. OShaughnessy, . 404
. Brooks,................55
. Saxe,.................776
. E. Cook,..............149
. E. Cook,..............151
. Milton,...............378
. Ingelow,..............301
. Stoddard,.............541
. O. Wilde,.............648
. Keats,................311
. Symonds,..............561
. Byron,.................93
. Whitman,..............856
. Williams,.............650
. Sidney,...............499
. Thackeray, .... 783
. Sargent,..............469
. Tennyson,.............575
. C. G, Rossetti, . 465
. Byron,................706
. A. Cary,..............121
. Tupper,...............615
. B. Taylor,............566
. Milton,...............379
. Moir,.................381
. J. T. Trowbridge, . 612
. Hunt,. ...... 299
. Howe, . . . 290
. Wesley,...............632
. Shenstone, ..... 496
. Burns,.................83
. H. W. Longfellow. 342
. Hiram Rich, .... 849
. Preston, ..... 435
. Lowell,...............352
. Holland,..............273
. A, A. Procter, . 443


Ssa39
CONTENTS.
Strong Son of God,............
Submission to Supreme Wisdom,
Success Alone Seen,...........
Sufficient unto tlie Day, . .
Summer Dawn at Loch Katrine,
Summer Longings,..............
Summer Bain,..................
Sum up at Night,..............
Sundays,......................
Sunlight and Starlight, . .
Sun of the Sleepless,.........
Sunrise,......................
Sunset m Moscow, .....
Sunshine,......................
Sunshine in March,............
Sweet Meeting of Desires, . .
Tam OShanter,...........
Tears, Idle Tears, ....
Tell me, ye Winged Winds,
Tempestuous Deeps, . .
Thanatopsis, .
Thankfulness, .
Thanksgiving, .
That New World,
The Adieu, .
The Aged Oak at Oakley, . .
The American Flag,............
The Ancient Mariner Befreshed,
The Angels Kiss her,..........
The Angels Wing,.............
The Apollo, and Venus of Medici,
The Artists Dread of Blindness,
The Art of Book-keeping, . .
The Ascent to Fame,...........
The Avoidance of Beligious Dispute:
The Awful Vacancy, . .
The Baby,................
The Ballad of Baby Bell, .
The Ballad of Bouillabaisse
The Banks of Anner,. .
The Barefoot Boy,....
The Battle of Blenheim, .
The Battle of the Kegs, . .
The Bees,................
The Belfry Pigeon, . .
The Belle of the Ball, .
The Bells,...............
The Bible,...............
The Biblical Knowledge of Hudib
The Bird let Loose, ....
The Birth of St. Patrick, .
The Blessed Damozel, . .
The Blue and the Gray, . .
The Blue-birds Song, . ,
The Bower of Adam and Eve,
The Brave at Home, <> .
The Bride Beautiful, Body and So
The Bridge of Sighs,
The Broom Flower,.............
The Burial of Moses,..........
The Burial of the Champion of his
The Busts of Goethe and Schiller.
The Caliphs Magnanimity, .
The Canadian Spring, ....
as
ul,
Clas
XXV11
Tennyson, . . . 574
Pope,
Landon, . . . 326
Sanqster, . . . 468
Scott, ....
McCarthy,. .
Bennett,.... . 38
Herbert,. . . . 264
Vauqhan, . .
Whitney, . .
Byron, .... . 92
O. Wilde, . . . 648
E. D. Proctor, . . 449
E. Gray, . . . 823
Gosse, .... . 821
Patmore, . . . 410
Bums, . .
Tennyson, .
Maclcay, . .
Hopkins, . .
Bryant, . .
A. A. Procter,
Hoivells, . .
S. M. B. Piatt,
H. H. Brownell,
Alford, . .
Drake, . .
S. T. Coleridge,
A. T. De Vere,
Lover, . . .
Thomson, .
Webster, .
Hood, .
Beattie, . .
Dry den,...
Crabbe, . .
Macdonald, .
T. B. Aldrich,
Thackeray, .
Joyce, . .
J, G. Whittier,
R. Southey, .
Hopkinson,
Trench, . .
Willis, . .
Praed, . .
Poe, ....
Dryden, .
S' Butler, .
Moore, . .
Lover, . .
D' G' Rossetti,
Finch, . .
Street, . .
Milton, . .
B' Read, .
E. Spenser,
Hood, . .
Howitt, . .
Alexander,
Willis, .
W, A. Butler,
Abbey, . .
Street, . .
695
577
366
828
74
440
292
420
58
13
197
135
189
347
595
630
741
34
205
165
359
8
782
835
639
520
742
605
653
766
424
204
700
386
746
467
227
549
380
456
524
282
294
12
652
88
1
546


Kf!!
Ki
Peddler,
The Captious,.................
The Captive Soul,.............
The Cataract of Lodore, . .
The Cavaliers Song...........
The Chameleon,................
The Chess-hoard,..............
The Child and the Autumn Leaf,
The Child and the Mourners,
The Child and the Sea,
The Child Musician, .
The Children, . .
The Childs Plea, .
The Charms of Nature,
The Cigar...........
The Clergyman and the
The Close of Spring, .
The Closing Scene,. .
The Cloud, ....
The Col de Balm, .
The Comet, ....
The Common Lot, .
The Condemned, .
The Conqueror, . .
The Conquerors Grave,
The Coral Grove, .
The Coral Insect, .
The Courtin........
The Covered Bridge, .
The Cricket, ....
The Crowded Street, .
The Crowning Disappointment,
The Cry of the Human,
The Cuckoo..........
The Curtain of the Dark
The Daffodils, .
The Dead Bee, .
The Dead Christ, .
The Deaf Dalesman
The Death-bed, .
The Death of the Old Year.
The Death of the Virtuous.
The Development of Poetic Creatio:
The Diamond, .
The Difference, .
The Dignity and Patience of Genius
The Discoverer,............
The Dispute of the Seven Days,
The Distant in Nature and Experi
The Doorstep,............
The Double Knock, . .
The Dragon-fly,..........
The Ebb-tide,............
The Eggs and the Horses, .
The Eloquent Pastor Dead,
The Emphatic Talker, .
The End of the Virtuous, .
The Ermine, . .
The Erratic Genius,
The Evening Cloud,
The Evening Wind,
The Faded Violet, .
The Family Man, .
The Family Meeting,
The Farewell, .
The Fate of Poverty,
The Father, ...
The Ferry of Galloway, .
The First Day of Death,
The First Gray Hair,. .
enc
Cowper, .
E. Spenser,
R. Southey,
Motherwell,
Merrick,
R. B. Lytton,
Lover, . .
Mackay,
M. M. Dodge,
Dobson, .
Dickinson,.
Palfrey, .
Beattie,. .
Hood, .
F. Bates, .
C. T. Smith,
Read, .
Shelley, .
Havergal, .
Lunt,. .
Montgomery,
Crabbe, .
Tupper,. .
Bryant, .
Percival, .
Sigourney, .
Lowell, .
Barker, . .
C. T. Smith,
Bryant, .
E. Young, .
E. B. Browning,
Logan, .
Larcom,
Wordsworth,
F. Bates,. .
Howe, .
Wordsworth,
Hood, .
Tennyson, .
Barbauld, .
Akenside, .
Trench, .
Bourdillon,
Tupper,. .
S teaman, .
Crunch, .
Campbell, .
Stedman, .
Hood, .
Cornwell, .
R. Southey,
Anon., .
Blanchard,
Cowper, .
E. Young, .
Trench, .
R. B. Lytton,
Wilson, ..
Bryant, .
T. B. Aldrich
Saxe, . .
Sprague, .
Donne, .
Johnson,
B. Taylor, .
A. Cary,
Byron, .
T. H. Bayly
716
525
521
392
759
840
347
361
192
190
187
847
34
738
687
507
454
492
826
838
383
166
616
79
413
500
749
29
507
78
679
65
341
330
671
32
291
669
281
582
28
5
606
51
615
538
721
115
537
738
815
522
793
802
715
680
605
752
657
76
11
779
533
818
309
564
120
97
33
m


fcui
CONTENTS.
XXIX
The First Spring Day, .
The Flight of Youth, ....
The Flight of Youth, ....
The Flower o Dumblane, .
The Flowers of the Forest,
The Flowers in the Ground, .
The Folly of Hoarding, . .
The Force of Trifles, ....
The Fountain of Youth, .
The Four Seasons,..........
The Freedom of the Good,. .
The Free Mind,.............
The Fringed Gentian, . .
The Future Life,...........
The Generosity of Nature,. .
The Gift,..................
The Glory of Death, ....
The Golden Hand,...........
The Golden Silence, ....
The Gold under the Roses,. .
The Good Time Coming, .
The Grasshopper and Cricket,
The Great Critics,.........
The Greenwood,.............
The Groomsman to his Mistress.
The Happiness of Passing ones Age in Familia
The Hare and Many Friends,,
The Harvest Call, .....
The Health,..............
The Heavenly Canaan, .
The Heliotrope,............
The Heritage,..............
The Highest Good,....
The Holly Tree,..........
The Hope of the Heterodox, ,
The Horseman,............
The Horse of Adonis,....
The Hour of Death, ....
The Housekeeper, .....
The Human Tie, ....
The Humble Bee, ....
The Husband and Wifes Grave,
The Iconoclast,............
The Inner Calm,............
The Invocation, ... .
The Isles of Greece, .
The Ivy Green,.............
The Kingliest Kings, . .
The Kitten,..............
The Knights Steed, . .
The Laborer,.............
The Lack of Children, .
The Ladder of St. Augustine,
The Lady Jaqueline, ...
The Lady of the Castle,'. ,
The Land of the Leal, . ,
The Last Appeal, .....
The Last Flowers, ....
The Last Man,............
The Last Words, ....
The Learning or Hudibras,
The Lent Jewels, ....
The Lesson of the Bee, . ,
The Lie,.................
The Lighthouse,..........
The Light in the Window, .
The Light of Reason,...
The Lily-pond,...........
The Little Man,..........
. C. G, Rossetti,
. H. Coleridge,
. Stoddard, .
. TannahiU,.
. J. Elliot, .
. S. M. B. Fiat
. Thomson, .
. Tupper, .
. Butterworth,
. Tilton, .
. Cowper, .
. Garrison, .
. Bryant, .
. Bryant, .
. Lowell, .. .
. Webster, .
. E. Young, .
. J. J. Piatt,
. Winter, .
. Orne,. .
. Mackay,
Hunt, . .
. Maclcay,
. Bowles, .
. Parsons,
Places, Goldsmith,
. Gay, . .
. Burleigh, .
, Stoddard, .
, Watts, .
. Mace% .
. Lowell, .
. Parker, .
, R. Southey,
. Blackie, .
, W. Young,
. Shakespeare,
. Hemans,
. Lamb, . .
, M. M. Dodge
. Emerson, .
. Dana, \. .
. R. T. Cooke,
, Bonar, . .
, Hemans,
. Byron, .
. Dickens,
, Massey, .
. Baillie, .
. S. Butler, .
, Gallagher2.
. R. Browning,
, H. W. Longfellow,
, P. Cary,
. Bensel, .
. Nairn, .
. Kimball,
. Whitman,
, Campbell,
, Jackson,
. S. Butler,
. Trench, .
. Botta,
> Raleigh,
. S. H. Palfrey
. Mackay, .
. Dryden,
. G. P. Lathrop
, Mackay,
465
133
540
563
210
421
596
619
89
600
158
229
77
78
349
631
681
418
661
846
363
300
757
51
410
235
725
809
542
856
361
348
406
518
800
858
488
261
325
191
214
181
152
48
261
98
187
368
26
700
820
71
341
124
800
394
320
857
109
830
699
604
50
452
847
364
204
334
758
wm
iii
f£Pi


XXX
CONTENTS.
The Little Shroud,............
The Longing of Circe, ....
The Long White Seam, ....
The Lost May,.................
The Love-letter,..............
The Maid of Orleans Girding for Battle
The Marriage Knot,...............
The Marriage of Despair, ....
The Meeting,.....................
The Means to Attain Happy Life, .
The Midges Dance aboon the Burn,
The Misery of Excess,............
The Mistake,.....................
The Model Preacher,..............
The Modern Puffing System, . .
The Mood of Exaltation, ....
The Morning Hills, ......
The Mothers Grief, ......
The Mother, the Nurse, and the Fai
The Mysteries,................
The Mystery...................
The Mystery of Life,..........
The Mulberries,...............
Then, . '...................
The Name in the Bark, ....
The New Years Baby, ....
The Nightingale,...............
The Nun and Harp,..............
The Nuns Song,...............
The Old Man of the Mountain, ....
The Old Mans Comforts, and how he Gain
The Old Mans Motto, ....
The Old Oaken Bucket, .....
The Old Schoolhouse, ....
The Old Sergeant,.............
The Old Story,................
The Old Year and the New, .
The One Universal Sympathy, .
The One White Hair,............
The Only Light,...............
The Organist,...................
The Other Life the End of This, .
The Other World,................
The Paradise of Cabul, .....
The Parson,.....................
The Parting,....................
The Passage from Birth to Age,
The Passions,....................
The Past,.....................
The Paupers Deathbed, ....
The Paupers Funeral,............
The Perils of Genius,............
The Perpetuity of Song, ....
The Perversion of Great Gifts,' .
The Petrified Fern, . . .
The Picket Guard,................
The Pied Piper of Hamelin, ...
The Pilgrims and the Peas, . .
The Pilgrim Fathers,.............
The Pleasures Arising from Vicissitude,
The Pleasure of being Cheated,. .
The Poet, .................... .
The Poets Friends,..............
The Poets Pen,..................
The Poets Prayer,............
The Poets Song to his Wife, .
The Poplar Field, ...............
The Ponte di Paradiso,...........
The Post-boy,....................
d
h
. Landon,. . . .
. Mann............
. Ingelow, . . ;
. B. Taylor, . . .
. J. J. Platt, . '.
, It. Southey, . .
. Stoddard, . . .
Brooks, ....
II. W. Longfellow,
Earl of Surrey, .
Tannahill, . . .
Byron, ...
Stoddard, . . . .
Dryden,. ... ,
Moore,.............
A. T. De Vere, ,
Thompson, . . ,
Coolbrith, . . . .
Gay,...............
Howells...........
B. Taylor.........
Sir H. Taylor, .
Howells, . .
R. T. Cooke, . .
Trowbridge, . .
W. Carleton, . .
Trench,...........
Spofford..........
Tennyson, . .
Trowbridge, . .
R. Southey, . .
Saxe,.............
Woodworth, . .
Rogers, . .
Wulson, . .
Prescott, . .
C. F. Bates, ... .
E. B. Browning, .
Landor,...........
Wesley............
K. L. Bates, . .
E. Young, . .
Stowe,............
Michell, . .
Chaucer, . . . .
Drayton, . .
Rogers,...........
Collins,..........
Bryant............
C. A. B. Southey, .
R. Southey, . .
Crabbe.............
J. T. Fields, .
Rogers,...........
Branch,...........
Beers, ... .
R. Browning, .
Wolcot,.............
Pierpont, ....
Gray..............
S. Butler, ....
Landon, . .
Howells, . .
F. A. Hillard, .
E. Elliott, . .
B. W. Procter, .
Camper,............
Symonas, . .
Cowper............
326
842
307
567
418
517
781
56
342
551
563
100
780
207
760
186
853
154
726
292
567
570
292
153
607
709
605
529
581
611
517
473
666
464
655
433
31
67
743
632
32
681
544
371
810
198
462
145
73
514
519
163
225
460
53
35
690
792
422
243
701
327
292
827
212
445
157
560
161


CONTENTS.
The Power of Suggestion, ....
The Prairie, ......................
The Prayer to Mnemosyne, ....
The Press,.........................
The Pressed Gentian,...............
The Press of Sorrow,...............
The Primrose ......................
The Prince,........................
The Problem,.......................
The Prodigals,.....................
The Prophets Song,................
The Prop of Faith,.................
The Pulley,........................
The Purple of the Poet,............
The Pursuit,.......................
The Puzzled Census-taker, . .
The Quaker Grave-yard,.............
The Question,......................
The Raven,.........................
The Razorseller, *...............
The Headers of Dailies, ......
There is Nothing New under the Sun,
The Religious Journal,...............
Therell Come a Day,...............
The Restored Pictures,.............
The Return of Kane,................
The Rhodora, ....................
The Ride of Collins Graves.........,
The Right must Win,..................
The River in the Mammoth Cave, ,
The River of Life,.................
The Rose,..........................
The Rose,..........................,
The Rose of Jericho,...............
The Sabbath of the Soul,.............
The Sailors Wife,...................
The Sandpiper, ....................
The Sea,.............................
The Sea-limits,......................
The Seasons,.........................
The Seed Growing Secretly,...........
The Selfish,.........................
The September Gale,................
The Shadow,........................
The Ship Becalmed,.................
The Shipwreck,.......................
The Shower,..........................
The Sight of Angels,.................
The Silent Lover,....................
The Skylark,.........................
The Sleep,............................
The Smack in School,.................
The Snake, . ;....................
The Solace of Nature,................
The Soldanella,.......................
The Song of the Camp,.................
The Song of the Shirt,................
The Soul,.............................
The Souls Farewell,..................
The Souls Progress Checked, . .
The Source of Mans Ruling Passion, .
The Soyer,............................
The Speed of Happy Hours,.............
The Spider............................
The Spring-time will Return, . .
The Squires Pew,.....................
The Stanza added to Wallers Rose,
The Stars,............................
The Star-Spangled Banner,.............
Tupper, . .
Hay, ....
Symonds, .
E. Elliott,.
J. G. Whittier,
Holland, . .
Herrick, . .
Hutchinson, .
Emerson, .
Hobson, . .
Goldsmith,
Wordsworth, .
Herbert,. .
F. Smith, .
Vaughan, .
Saxe,....
Mitchell, . .
Winter, . .
A. Poe, . .
Wolcot, . .
Crabbe, . .
Gilder, . .
Crabbe, . .
Preston} . .
Trowbridge, .
Brownell, .
Emerson, .
OReilly, . .
Faber, . .
Prentice, . .
Campbell, .
T. B. Aldrich,
Waller, . .
Seaver, . .
Barbauld, .
Mickle, . .
Thaxter, . .
B. W. Procter.
D. G. Rossetti,
Bennett,
Vaughan,
Rogers, .
Holmes,.
Preston,
S. S. Coler
Wilson,
Vaughan,
J. J. Piatt,
Raleigh,
Hogg, .
E. B. Browning,
Palmer,
Trench,
Wordsworth, .
Clark,
B. Taylor,
Hood,
Dana, .
Gould, .
Cowper,
Tupper, .
Gilder,
Spencer,
Cornwell,
Sargent,
Taylor, .
H. K. White,
M. M. Dodge.
Key. ...
dge,
XXXI
617
253
560
211
646
273
266
830
213
190
237
668
263
508
622
776
844
660
425
792
717
231
717
436
608
57
214
399
216
847
114
12
628
482
798
372
591
444
467
37
621
461
733
435
135
657
624
418
452
271
60
762
605
666
128
568
281
182
238
161
616
231
524
815
470
572
636
192
318


U

xxxn
CONTENTS.
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
State of the World had Men Lived at Ease,
Sting of Death, ...........
Stomach of Man,............
Striving of Hope,..........
Sunflower..................
Sunrise never Failed us yet, .
Sun upon the Weirdlaw Hill,
Superfluous Man,...........
Sweet Neglect,.............
Teacher,...................
Tears of Heaven,...........
Tempest, ........
Terror of Death,...........
Test,............., . .
Three Fishers..............
Three Lights,..............
Three Warnings,............
Tides......................
Tiger......................
Tiger,.....................
Tongue, ...................
Touchstone,................
True Measure of Life, . .
Tryst,.....................
Two Angels.................
Two Birds,.................
Two Brides,................
Twofold Power of All Things,
Two Great Cities,..........
Two Highwaymen, ....
Two Kisses,................
Two'Ladders,...............
Two Streams,...............
Type of Struggling Humanity,
Tyranny of Mood,...........
Uncertain Man,.............
Undiscovered Country, . .
Unexpressed,...............
Unfulfilled................
Universal Lot,.............
Universal Prayer...........
University of Gottingen, .
Vacillating Purpose, ....
Vagabonds,.................
Voiceless,.................
Voice of the Grass, ....
Voices of Angels...........
Village Preacher,..........
Village Schoolmaster, . .
Violet,....................
Violet,..................' .
Way a Rumor is Spread, .
Way, the Truth, and the Life,
White Flag,...............
Will, .....................
Winged Worshippers, ...
Winters Evening...........
Wise Man in Darkness, ...
Wise Man in Light, .
Wit, ..........
Woodland,..................
Wood-turtle................
Word of Bane and Blessing, .
World,................f .
World......................
World a Grave, ....
World is too much with us, .
Worlds Wanderers, ....
Worth of Fame..............
Thomson, .
Hayne, .
B. B. Lytton,
B. H. Lathrop
Greenwell,
Thaxter,
Scott,
Saxe,
Jonson, .
Crabhe, .
Tennyson,
Thomson,
Keats,
Stedman,
Kingsley,
Whitney,
Thrale, .
Lont
Blake,
Trench,
Coioper.,
Allingham,
P. J. Bailey,
Stedman, .
Longfellow,
F. Bates,
Stoddard,
B. Southey,
Hageman,
Blunt, .
B. Browning,
Tilton, .
Holmes, .
Holland,
Preston,.
Coioper,
Stedman,
Story, .
E. B. Lytton,
Crabhe, .
Pope,
Canning,
Crabhe, .
Trowbridge
Holmes,
Boberts, . .
S. T. Cfoleridge,
Goldsmith,
Goldsmith,
Scott, .
Story, .
Byrom, .
Parker, .
Winter, .
Symonds, .
Sprague, .
Coioper, .
Prior, .
Prior, .
Dryden, .
Hayne, .
Fawcett,
Tupper,. .
Very, .
Quarles,
E. Young, .
Wordsworth,
Shelley, .
Baillie, .
596
257
751
837
823
587
480
775
310
164
585
591
310
535
321
637
784
343
39
605
714
18
26
536
344
32
540
516
247
802
70
602
279
275
436
714
536
543
841
169
433
708
163
786
276
459
135
235
235
481
543
704
406
658
559
532
158
439
439
207
256
221
620
627
450
684
675
492
26


CONTENTS,
xxxiii
The Worth of Hours,................
They are all gone,
They come the Merry Summer Months,
The Yellow of the Miser,.........
The Young Poets Visit to the Hall, .
The Zeal of Persecution,...........
This Name of Mine,.................
Thou art, O God,...................
Those Evening Bells,...............
Thought, ;.......................
Thou hast Sworn by thy God, ....
Thou Knowest.......................
Three Epitaphs,........... . .
Three Friends of Mine,.............
Three Kisses,........................
Three Kisses of Farewell,..........
Three Sonnets on Prayer,...........
Through Love to Light,.............
Thy Art be Nature,.................
Tibbie Inglis,.....................
Time, .............................
Time, its Use and Misuse,..........
To a Bavarian Girl, . *..........
To a Child Embracing his Mother, .
To a City Pigeon,..................
To a Dead Woman,...................
To a Distant Friend,...............
To a Friend afraid of Critics, ....
To a Fx*iend in Heaven,............
To a Mountain Daisy,...............
To an Early Primrose,................
To an Infant Sleeping,.............
To any Poet,...........
To a Sea-Bird .....................
To a Skylark,......................
To a Skylark,......................
To a Violin,..................
To a Virtuous Young Lady, .....
To a Young Lady,...................
To a Young Lady,...................
To Be, or Not to Be,...............
To Celia,..........................
To Critics,........................
To-day,............................
To-day,............................
To-day,............................
To England,........................
To Flush, my Dog,..................
To Freedom,........................
To Giulia Grisi,...................
To his Books,......................
To his Empty Purse,................
To his Mothers Spindle,...........
To Keep a True Lent,...............
To Lucasta, on Going beyond the Seas,
To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars, .
To Man,............................
To Mary,...........................
To Mary in Heaven,.................
To Misfortune,.....................
To Moscow, ..........................
To Murmurers,......................
To my Candle,......................
To my Cigar,.......................
To my Infant Son,..................
To my Love,........................
To my Mother,......................
To my Son,.........................
To my Soul,...................... .
............Lord Houghton, . . . 287
. . .... Vaughan,............521
............Motherwell, .... 394
. . . . . . F. Smith,...........508
............Crabbe,...................719
............Thomson,..................595
....G. Houghton, .... 285
............Moore,................387
.........Moore,...................387
............Cranch,...............175
............Cunningham,.... 179
. . ' . . . . J. C. It. Dorr, . . *. 195
............Herrick,..............266
............Longfellow............344
............E. B. Browning, . 64
............Saxe Holm, .... 276
............Trench,...................602
............Gilder....................233
............Wordsworth, .... 674
............Mary Hoioitt, . 295
............Shelley,..................492
............E. Young, . . . . 678
............B. Taylor,................569
............Hood,.................280
............Willis,...................650
............Bunner,...................808
............Wordsworth, .... 672
............Mackay,...................754
............Tennyson,.................576
............Bums,......................83
............H.K. White, .... 634
............Holland,..................274
............T. B. Aldrich, ... 32
............Bret Harte, .... 252
............Shelley,..................490
............Wordsworth, .... 673
............Tliaxier,.................588
............ Milton,..............380
...... Wordsivorth, .... 671
............Campbell,.............708
............Shakespeare, . . . 484
............Jonson,...............509
............Crabbe,...............168
............Carlyle,..............118
............S. M. B. Piatt, ... 419
............Prescott,.............434
............Boker,................46
............E. B. Browning, . . 62
............Barlow,...............29
............Willis,...............653
............Vaughan,..............626
............Chaucer,..............812
............Bloomfield, .... 42
............Herrick,..............267
............Lovelace,.............346
............Lovelace,.............346
............Cowper,...............362
............Wolfe,................664
............Burns,................82
............H.K. White%. ... 636
............E. D. Proctor, . . . 449
............Tupper,...............619
............Wolcot,...............664
............Sprague,..............533
...... Hood,......................734
............Saxe,.................476
............Poe,..................425
............G. P. Lathrop, . . . 334
...... Shakspeare, .... 489


xxxiv CONTENTS.
To Night, .
Too Late, .
Too Late, .
Too Late, .
Too Near,...........
To One who would Make a Confession,
Too Old for Kisses,
To Perilla, . .
To Bouse, the Artist
To Sappho, . .
To Seneca Lake, .
To Sleep, ....
To the Cuckoo, .
To the Fire, . .
To the Mocking Bird
To the Bainbow, .
To Time, ....
To Triflers, . .
To Victoria, . .
To William Lloyd Garrison,
Trailing Arbutus, .
Treasure in Heaven,
Tribute to Victoria,
Triumph, ....
Tropical Weather,
Trouble to Lend, .
True Death, . .
True Nobility, .
True Union, . .
Truth to Nature, .
Turn to the Helper,
Twilight, ....
Twilight at Sea, .
Two Aprils, . .
Two Love Quatrains,
Two Maidens, .
Two Patrons, .
Tying her Bonnet under her Chin,
B. White,.............634
A. A. Procter, . 441
Craik,.................172
Stedmcm,............537
Mansion, ..... 843
Blunt,..............802
Stoddard,..............780
Herrick,...............265
Appleton...............19
A. Fields,.........223
Percival,...........413
Wordsworth, .... 672
Wordsworth, .... 676
B. Southey, .... 522
R. H. Wilde, .... 649
Campbell,...........113
Bowles.................51
Buchanan, .... 807
C. F. Bates, .... 31
Appleton,..............19
R. T. Cooke, .... 152
Saxe,...............476
Campbell............115
Simms,..............504
Sargent,............471
Kimball,............319
Hood,...............284
Pope................431
Rogers,............. 462'
Pope,...............432
Miller,.............373
Wordsworth..........6712
Welby,..............850
Gallagher,..........820
Gilder,................232
Webster,............631
J. J. Piatt, .... 418
Perry,..............415
IT
Una and the Lion,.................
Uncrowned Kings,..................
Under the Leaves,.................
Under the Lindens, .......
Under the Portrait of John Milton, .
Under the Sod,..................
Under the Violets,................
Undeveloped Genius,...............
Unhappy Childhood, ...............
Union of Faith and Beason Necessary,
Universal Salvation...............
Unknown Greatness,................
Unrequiting, .....................
Unseen Spirits,..............
Unspoken Words, ..................
Unsung,...........................
Until Death,......................
Unwedded, ................... .
Up-hill,..........................
Urvasi,...........................
526
Aiken, . . 797
Laiqhton, . 324
Landor, . 743
Dryden, . 204
Tilton, . . 599
Holmes, . 278
Wordsworth, . 668
Simms, . . 503
Crabbe, . . 169
J. G. Whittier, 645
Sir H. Tai/lor, 569
F. Smith, . 509
Willis, . . 653
O'Reilly, . 401
10
Allen, . . 16
Larcom, . 330
C. G. Rossetti, 464
Bostwick, . 49
V.
Valborg Watching Axels Departure, .
Verses on his Own Death,............
G. Houghton, . .
Swift,..............
284
781


p>lf
itxjl


CONTENTS.
ut
Victory from God,....................
Villanelle,..........................
' Virtue,.............................
Virtue, The Measure of Years, . .
Virtue, the sole Unfailing Happiness,
Waiting,....................
Waiting for the Ship, ....
Wandering Willie,...........
Watchwords, .......
Waterloo,...................
Weak Consolation,...........
Weal and Woe,...............
We are Seven,...............
Weariness,................
We Have Been Friends Together,
Weighing the Baby,..........
We Sat by the Cheerless Fireside,
Westminster Bridge, ....
Wetmore Cottage, Nahant, .
What Ails this Heart o Mine, .
What Is the Little One Thinking abo
What I would Be,............
What Makes a Hero ? . . .
What Need ?.................
What She Thought,...........
What We Toil For,...........
What will it Matter ? . . .
What would I Save Thee from ?
When Coldness Wraps this Suffering
When Joys are Keenest, ....
When the Drum of Sickness Beats
Where is Thy Favored Haunt ? .
Where the Roses Grew, ....
Whilst Thee I Seek,.........
White Poppies,..............
, White Underneath,..........
Whittling,..................
Why, .......................
Why dont the Men Propose ? .
Why should we Faint and Fear to
Why so Pale and Wan, Fond Lover
Why thus Longing ? . .
Widowed,................
Widow Machree, ....
Widow Malone,...........
Wife to Husband, ....
Wind and Sea,...........
Windless Rain,.........
Wintry Weather, ....
Wisdom,.................
Wisdoms Prayer, ....
Wishes for Obscurity, .
Wishes of Youth, .". .
Wit,....................
Withered Roses, ....
Without and Within, .
Woodbines in October, .
Woodman, Spare that Tree,
Words for Parting, . .
Work and Worship, . .
Worship,...............
Worth and Cost, ....
Wouldnt you Like to Know,
Would Wisdom for Herself be Wooed,
w.
Clay
Live
9
Alone ?
ftfCv'
XXXV
Spenser, . . . 528
Gosse, .... . 821
Herbert, .... . 265
E. Young, . . . 683
Pope, ....
. Clemmer, . . . 131
. Brownell, . . . 60
. Scott,
. Coxe, . 816
. Byron, Trench, . . . 106 603
. Gilder,
. Wordsworth, . . . 673
. Longfellow, . . . 342
. Norton, . 398
. Beers, . 36
. Stoddard, . . . 542
. Wordsworth, . . . 675
. Story, . 543
. Blamire, . . . 40
. Holland, . . . 272
. Tennyson . . . 579
. Sir H. Taylor, . . 571
. 194
. 193
. Drummond, . . . 198
. Holland, . .
. Gilder, . 232
. Byron, . 92
. Sir H. Taylor, . . 571
. Stoddard, . .
. Keble, . 314
. Allen, . 15
. Williams, . . . 650
. Barr, . 798
. B. S. Palfrey, . . 405
. Pierpont, . . . 764
. Cranch, . . . 176
. T. H Bayly, . . . 688
. Keble, . 315
. Suckling, . .
. Sewall,
. Boyle, . 805
. Lover,
. Lever, . 745
. C. . B. Taylor, . . .' 565
. Hayne, . 257
. D. Gray, . . . 822

. Johnson, . . . 308
. Croione,
. Blanchard, . . . 801
.; Pope, . 432
. Winter, . 660
. Lowell, . 751
. C. E, Bates, . . . 31
. Morris, . 388
. Clement, . . . 129
. W.A. Butler,. . . 87
. Richardson, . . . 458
. Holland, . . . 273
. Saxe,
. Patmore, . . . 411

1"5K



r^v<£
XXXVI
CONTENTS
Wounds,.............................................Fawcett,.................220
Wrecked in the Tempest,.............................Falconer,................217
Written at an Inn at Henley,........................Shenstone,..............498
Written on Sunday Morning,..........................F. Southey, .... 519
Y.
Yawcob Strauss, . .
Ye Mariners of England,
Young Sophocles taking the Prize,
Youth and Age;..................
Youths Agitations,.............
Adams, .... . 685
Campbell, . . . 110
Lover, ....
A. Fields, . . . 223
. 140
it/. Arnold . . 24


hvO'VN.
J£k:
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
ABBEY, HENRY.
b. Rondout. N. Y., July 1], 1842. PAGE
Faciebat . -............. . 2
May in Kingston................ 2
The Caliphs Magnanimity 1
ADAMS, CHARLES FOLLEN.
b. Dorchester, Mass., April 21,1842.
Fritz and I............. 686
* Pats Criticism...............685
Yawcob Strauss.................685
ADAMS, SARAH FLOWER.
b. Cambridge, Eng., Feb. 22, 1805.
d. London, Aug. 14,1849.
Nearer, My God, to Thee ... 3
ADDISON, JOSEPH.
b. Milston, Wiltshire, Eng., May 1,1672.
d. London, Eng., June 17,1719.
Apostrophe to Liberty . . 3
Catos Soliloquy ............... 4
AIKEN, BERKELEY,
d. 1864. .
Uncrowned Kings................797
AKENSIDE, MARK.
b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Nov. 9,1721.
d. June 27,1770.
Aspirations after the Infinite
(.Pleasures of the Imagination)
Mental Beauty (Pleasures of the
Imagination) ................ 7
On a Sermon against Glory . 4
Riches of a Man of Taste (Pleas-
ures of the Imagination) . 6
The Development of Poetic
Creation (Pleasures of the
Imagination)................... 5
AKERMAN, LUCY EVELINA,
b. Feb. 21 1816.
d. Providence, R. I., Feb. 21,1874.
Nothing but Leaves ..... 8
ALDRICH, JAMES.
b. Orange Co., N. Y., July 10.1810.
d. New York, Oct., 1856.
A Death-bed................- 8
ALDRICH, THOMAS BAILEY,
b. Portsmouth, N. H., Nov. 11,1836.
After the Rain..................11
An Untimely Thought .... 10
PAGE
Destiny.................10
Maple Leaves............12
Masks...................12
Nameless Pain...........10
Pursuit and Possession .... 11
Rencontre...............11
Sleep....................H
The Ballad of Baby Bell ... 8
The Faded Violet........11
The Rose................12
To any Poet ........ 12
Unsung..................10
ALEXANDER, CECIL FRANCES,
b. about 1830, England.
The Burial of Moses .... 12
ALFORD, HENRY,
b. London, 1810. d. 1871.
The Aged Oak at Oakley. . . 13
ALLEN, ELIZABETH AKERS,
b. Strong, Me., Oct. 9, 1832.
Lives Greenville, N. J.
Endurance....................14
Every Day...................17
Last .......................15
Rock me to Sleep............15
Until Death.................16
Where the Roses Grew .... 15
ALLINGHAM, WILLIAM,
b. Ballyshannon, Ireland, 1828.
Lives in London.
Autumnal Sonnet.............18
Lovely Mary Donnelly .... 686
The Touchstone..............18
ALLSTON, WASHINGTON,
b. in Waccamaco, S. C., Nov. 5.1779.
d. Cambridge, Mass., July 9,1873.
Boyhood..................... 19
ANNAN, ANNIE R.
b. Mendon, N. Y., Sept. 23,1847.
Recompense...................797
ANONYMOUS.
The Eggs and the Horses . 793
Dr. Drollheads Cure .... 796
APPLETON, THOMAS GOLD,
b. Boston, March 3,1812.
To Rouse, the Artist .... 19
To William Lloyd Garrison, after
the war ....................19


XXXV1U
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES
ARNOLD, EDWIN.
b. London, Eng., ]832.
After Death in Arabia : . * 21
Florence Nightingale .... 22
She and He.....................20
ARNOLD, GEORGE,
b. New York, June 24, 1834.
d. Strawberry Farms, N. J., Nov. 9, 1865.
Cui Bono.......................23
In the Dark.................. 23
ARNOLD, MATTHEW.
b. Latcham, Eng., Dec. 24,1822.
Austerity of Poetry ..... 25
Early Death and Fame .... 25
East London....................24
Goethe {Memorial verses) ... 25
Immortality....................24
Self-dependence................25
Youths Agitations.............24
AYTON, SIR ROBERT,
b. Scotland, 1570. d. 1638.
Fair and Unworthy.............798
BAILEY, PHILIP JAMES,
b. Nottingham, Eng., 1816.
The True Measure of Life . 26
BAILLIE, JOANNA.
b. Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1762
d. at Hampstead, near London, Feb. 23.1851.
My Love is on her Way ... 27
Snatches of Mirth in a Dark Life 27
The Kitten......................26
The Worth of Fame...............26
BALLANTINE, JAMES.
b. Edinburgh, Scotland, 1808. d. 1833.
Ilka blade o grass keps its ain
drap o dew....................28
BARBAULD, ANNA LETITIA.
b. Leicestershire, Eng., June 20,1743.
d. near London, March 9,1825.
Life............................28
The Death of the Virtuous . 28
The Sabbath of the Soul . 798
BARKER, DAVID.
b. Exeter, Me., 1816. d. 1874.
The Covered Bridge..............29
BARLOW, JOEL.
b. Reading, Conn., March 24,1755.
d. Zarnowicke, Poland, Dec. 22,1812.
To Freedom......................29
BARNARD, LADY ANNE,
b. Filestore. Scotland, Dec. 8,1750.
d. May 8,1825.
Auld Robin Gray............<, 30
BARR, MARY A.
b. Glasgow, Scotland.
White Poppies. 798
BATES, CHARLOTTE FISKE.
b. New York, Nov. 30, 1838.
Consecration...............31
Make thine Angel Glad ... 31
The Old Year and the New . 31
To Victoria................31
Woodbines in October ... 31
BATES, FLETCHER,
b. New York, Nov. 19,1831.
The Clergyman and the Peddler 687
The Dead Bee..................32
The Two Birds.................32
BATES, KATHERINE LEE.
b. Falmouth, Mass., Aug. 12,1859.
The Organist..................32
BAYLY, THOMAS HAYNES,
b. Bath, England, 1797. d. 1839.
The first Gray Hair ..... 33
Why dont the Men Propose . 688
BEATTIE, JAMES.
b. Kincardineshire, Scotland, Oct. 20,1735.
d. Aug. 18,1803.
Beauties of Morning {The Min-
strel) . ..................34
Death and Resurrection {The
Minstrel)....................35
The Ascent to Fame {The Min-
strel) . 34
The Charms of Nature {The
Minstrel).....................34
BEERS, ETHELINDA ELLIOTT,
b. 1827. d. 1879.
The Picket Guard...............35
Weighing the Baby..............36
BEAUMONT, FRANCIS.
b. Leicestershire, 1586. d. March 9,1616.
On the Tombs in Westminster
Abbey.........................37
BENJAMIN PARK,
b. Demerara, Aug. 14,1809
d. New York, Sept. 12,1864.
Press on......................779
BENNETT, WILLIAM COX.
b. Greenwich, Eng., 1820. Lives London.
Summer Rain....................38
The Seasons....................37
BENSEL, ANNIE BERRY,
b. New York City, Aug. 2,1855.
The Lady of the Castle . 800
BENSEL, JAMES BERRY,
b. New York City, Sept. 30,1859.
In Arabia.....................38
BLACKIE, JOHN STUART,
b. Glasgow, Scotland, 1809.
The Hope of the Heterodox 800
___T


M
BLAKE, WILLIAM,
b. London, Nov. 28,1757.
The Tiger ........
BLAMIRE, SUSANNA.
b. Cumberland, Eng., 1744. d. 1794.
What ails this Heart o Mine
BLANCHARD, LAMAN.
b. Great Yarmouth- Eng., May 15,1803.
d. Feb. 15,1845.
Hidden Joys............801
The Eloquent Pastor Dead . 802
Wishes of Youth.......... 801
BLOOMFIELD, ROBERT.
b. Honington, Eng., Dec. 3,1766.
d. Aug. 19,1823.
A Spring Day (The Farmer's
Boy)......................
A Tempest (The Farmer's Boy).
Gleaners Song..............
* Harvesting (The Farmer's Boy)
Love of the Country ....
To his Mothers Spindle . .
40
40
43
41
42
42
BLUNT, WILFRED (?) (Proteus).
A Day in Sussex...............803
Cold Comfort................ 803
Laughter and Death............803
The Two Highwaymen .... 802
To One who would make a Con-
fession ......................802
BOKER, GEORGE HENRY,
b. Philadelphia, 1824.
Awaking of the Poetical Fa-
culty .........................45
Dirge for a Soldier.............47
In Autumn (Book of the Bead). 804
Love Sonnets....................46
My Answer (Book of the Bead). 804
Nearness (The Book of the Bead) 804
Ode to a Mountain Oak ... 43
To England......................46
BOLTON, SARAH K.
Entered into Rest. .
BONAR, HORATIUS.
b. Edinburgh, Scotland, 1808.
A Little While..........
The Inner Calm ....
805
............48
............48
BOSTWICK, HELEN LOUISE BARRON,
b. Charlestown, N. H., 1826.
Urvasi...........................49
BOTTA, ANNE CHARLOTTE LYNCH,
b. Bennington, Vt., 1820.
Love.............................50
The Lesson of the Bee .... 50
BOURDILLON, FRANCIS W.
b. Woolbedding, Eng., 1852.
Light.......................... 50
Loves Reward....................50
The Difference...................51

c *£.** mm&.

BRACKETT, ANNA C.
b. Boston, 1836.
In Garfields Danger........52
BRADDOCK, EMILY A.
d. 1879.
An Unthrift................. 805
BRADLEY, MARY E.
b. Easton, Maryland, Nov. 29,1835.
Beyond Recall...............52
BRAINARD, JOHN G. C.
b. New London, Conn, Oct. 21,1796.
d. New London, Conn, Sept. 26,1828.
Epithalamium..............
BRANCH, MARY BOLLES.
b. Brooklyn, N. Y., 3841.
The Petrified Fern ....
BRINE, MARY D.
Somebodys Mother ....
BRONTfi, ANNE.
b. Yorkshire, Eng., 1820. d May, 1849.
If this he All............
BRONTfi, CHARLOTTE.
b. Thornton, Yorkshire, E*g, April 21,
1816. d- March 31,1855.
Life will be Gone ere I Have
Lived.......................54
BRONTfc, EMILY.
b. Yorkshire, Eng., 1818. d. Dec, 1848.
Last Lines
Remembrance.................54
BROOKS, MARIA GOWEN.
b. Medford, Mass., 1795.
d. Cuba, Nov. 1.1,1845.
Song of Egla (From Zophiel)
The Marriage of Despair ,
BROWN, FRANCES.
b. Ireland, June 16,1818.
Losses
BROWNELL, HENRY HOWARD,
b. Providence, R. I., Feb. 6,
d. Oct 30,1872.
All Together .
Alone
At Sea . . . ,
Long Ago...........
MidnightA Lament
The Adieu ....
The Return of Kane ,


xl
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
j BROWNELL, C. D. W.
j Waiting for the Ship .... 60
I BROWNING, ELIZABETH BARRETT.
\ b. London, Eng., 1809.
j d. Florence, June 29, 1861.
A Character {From Aurora
Leigh).....................68
A Portrait...................63
Assurance {Sonnets from the Por-
tuguese) ........................64
Consolation {Av/rora Leigh) . . 63
Critics {Aurora Leigh) .... 689
Goodness {Aurora Leigh) . 688
Humanity {Aurora Leigh) . 689
In the Struggle (Aurora Leigh) . 67
Kindness First Known in a Hos-
pital (Aurora Leigh). . . . 66
Little Mattie................61
Only a Curl..................65
Perfect Love (Sonnets from the
Portuguese)................64
Picture of Marian Erie (Aurora
Leigh).....................67
Selfishness of Introspection
(Aurora Leigh).............66
The Cry of the Human ... 65
The One Universal Sympathy
(Aurora Leigh).............67
The Sleep....................... 60
Three Kisses (Sonnets from the
Portuguese)................64
To Flush, my Dog.............62
BROWNING, ROBERT.
b. Camberwell, Eng., 1812.
Dreams (The Ring and the Book) 71
Evelyn Hope....................69
How they brought the good
News from Ghent to Aix . 70
In a Year......................68
Prospice.......................68
The Lack of Children (The Ring
and the Book)................71
The Pied Piper of Hamelin . 690
The Two Kisses (In a Gondola), 70
BUNNER, H. C.
A Womans Way............808
Irwin Russell............808
Longfellow...............807
To a Dead Woman ...... 808
BURBIDGE, THOMAS,
b- England, 1817.
At Divine Disposal . . . . 808
Eventide............ 809
BURLEIGH, WILLIAM HENRY,
b. Woodstock, Conn., Feb. 2,1812.
d. Brooklyn, N. Y., March 18,1871.
Rain................... 809
The Harvest Call...........809
BURNS, ROBERT.
b. near Ayr, Scotland, Jan. 25,1759.
d. Dumfries, Scotland, July 21, 1796.
Farewell to Nancy.............84
For a* that and a that .... 82
From the Lines to a Louse 698
God the only just Judge (From
To the Unco Guid)............85
Highland Mary.................85
John Anderson, my Jo ... . 84
Man was Made to Mourn ... 85
Stanzas in Prospect of Death . 83
Tam O Shanter...............695
To a Mountain Daisy .... 83
To Mary in Heaven.............82
BUSHNELL, LOUISA.
Delay..........................86
BUTLER, SAMUEL.
b. Strencham, Worcestershire, Eng., 1612.
d. Sept. 25, 1680.
Love ..........................87
The Biblical Knowledge of Hu-
dibras (Hudibras)...........700
The Knights Steed (Hudibras). 700
The Learning of Hudibras (Hu-
dibras) ..................699
The Pleasure of being Cheated
(Hudibras)...................701
BRYANT, WILLIAM CULLEN,
b. Cummington, Mass., Nov. 3,1794.
d. New York, June 12,1878.
An Evening Revery (From an
unfinished Poem)............80
Blessed are they that Mourn . 72
June ....................... 73
Life..........................76
Thanatopsis...................74
The Conquerors Grave . . , 79
The Crowded Street.........78
The Evening Wind...........76
The Fringed Gentian .... 77
The Future Life.........., 78
The Past................. 73
BUCHANAN, ROBERT,
b. Glasgow, Scotland, 1841.
Dying........................807
To Triflers (Faces on the Wall) 80.7
BUTLER, WILLIAM ALLEN,
b. Albany, N. Y., 3825.
From Nothing to Wear . 701
The Busts of Goethe and Schil-
ler ............ . . 88
Work and Worship...........87
BUTTS, MARY F.
b. Hopkinton, R. I., 1837.
Other Mothers *............89
BUTTERWORTH, HEZEKIAH.
b. Warren, R. I., Dec. 22,1839.
The Fountain of Youth .... 89
BYROM, JOHN.
b. near Manchester, Eng., 1691.
d. Sept. 28,1763.
Careless Content...............705
Spectacles or Helps to Read 706
The Way a Rumor is Spread 704


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
xli
BYRON, LORD.
b. London, Jan. 22,1788.
d. Missolonghi, Greece, April 19, 1824.
Apostrophe to Ada, the Poets
Daughter {Childe Harold) .
Apostrophe to the Ocean (Childe
Harold)....................
Byrons Remarkable Prophecy
(Childe Harold)............
Calm and Tempest at Night on
Lake Leman (Childe Harold).
Critics (English Bards) . .
Epistle to Augusta..........
Fare Thee Well..............
Genius {Prophecy of Dante) .
Greece (Childe Harold)....
Inscription ..............
Love (The Giaour)...........
Maid of Athens..............
On Completing my Thirty-sixth
Year (His last verses). . .
One Presence Wanting (Childe
^ Harold).....................
She Walks in Beauty ....
Sleep {The Dream)...........
Sonnet on Chillon...........
Sun of the Sleepless........
The First Day of Death {The
Giaour)...................
The Isles of Greece {Don Juan).
The Misery of Excess {Childe
Harold) ...................
Waterloo {Childe Harold) . .
When Coldness Wraps this Suf-
fering Clay.................
CAMPBELL, THOMAS.
b. Glasgow, Scotland, July 27,1777.
d. Boulogne, France, June 15,1844.
Against Skeptical Philosophy
{Pleasures of Hope) ....
Apostrophe to Hope {Pleasures
of Hope)...................
Battle of the Baltic........
Domestic Happiness {Pleasures
of Hope)...................
Exile of Erin...............
Field Flowers...............
Hallowed Ground
Hohenlinden.................
Hope in Adversity {Pleasures of
Hope)......................
How Delicious is the Winning .
Lord Ullins Daughter ....
Song........................
Song........................
The Distant in Nature and Ex-
perience {Pleasures of Hope) .
The Last Man................
The River of Life ..*...
To a Young Lady.............
To the Rainbow..............
Tribute to Victoria.........
Ye Mariners of England . .
CANNING, GEORGE.
b. London, April 11,1770.
d. Chiswick, Aug. 8, 1827.
The University of Gottingen .
CAREW, THOMAS.
b. Devonshire, Eng., 1589. d. 1639.
Ask Me no More..............
Disdain Returned............
CARLETON, WILL.
100 b. Hudson, Michigan, Oct. 21,1845.
The New Years Baby {From
103 Farm Ballads).............
101 j CARLYLE, THOMAS.
706 b. Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland,
93 | Dec. 4,1795- d. Chelsea, London, 1881.
92 Cui Bono ?......................
99 | To-day..........................
118
118
709
119
118
105
94
9T
94
107
104
93
97
93
92
97
98
100
106
92
CARY, ALICE.
b. near Cincinnati, Ohio, April 26,1S20.
d. New York, Feb. 12,1871.
A Dream......................121
Counsel '.....................121
Life..........................119
Lifes Mystery................122
No Ring.......................122
Spent and Misspent............121
The Ferry of Gallaway ... 120
CARY, PHCEBE.
b. near Cincinnati, Ohio. Sept. 4,1824.
d. Newport, R. I., July 31,1871.
Answered . . . ,........127
Archie.....................125
Conclusions.................126
Dead Love...................123
Nearer Home..................123
Our Homestead...............127
The Lady Jaqueline..........124
117
117
114
116
112
111
108
112
116
110
111
115
707
CHATTERTON, THOMAS.
b. Bristol, Eng., Nov. 20,1752.
d. London, Aug. 25, 1770.
On Resignation...........
CHAUCER, GEOFFREY,
b. London, 1328 ? d. Oct. 25,1400.
Good Counsel.............
The Parson................
To his Empty Purse........
CHENEY, JOHN VANCE.
May................
CLARK, LUELLA.
b. America.
If You Love Me............
CLARK, SARAH D.
The Soldanella............
810
811
810
812
812
128
128
115
109
114
708
113
115
110
708
CLEMMER, MARY ANN.
b. Utica, N. Y.,1839.
Nantasket......................130
Waiting........................131
Words for Parting..............129
CLOUGH, ARTHUR HUGH.
b. Liverpool, Jan. 1,1819.
d. Florence, Nov. 13, 3861.
Becalmed at Eve................331
Natura Naturans................132
No More........................131


V~'
xlii
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
COLERIDGE, HARTLEY.
b. near Bristol, Eng., Sept. 19.1796.
d. Ambleside, Eng., Jan. 19,1849.
Address to Certain Gold-fishes 134
No Life Vain . . . 134
November...................133
Song.......................134
The Flight of Youth . . 133
COLERIDGE, SAMUEL TAYLOR.
b. Devonshire, Eng., Oct. 21,1772.
d. London, July 25, 1834.
Bell and Brook (Three Graves). 136
Broken Friendships (Christabel) 136
Complaint and Reproof . 141
Epigram......................711
From an Ode to the Rain . 710
From Dejection...............136
From Lines Composed in a Con-
cert-room ....................710
Hymn before Sunrise in the Val-
ley of Chamouni...............138
Lines to a Comic Author . 710
Love.........................141
Love, Hope and Patience in
Education...................140
Names........................710
Penance of the Ancient Mariner
(.Ancient Mariner)..........135
The Ancient Mariner Refreshed
by Sleep (Ancient Mariner) 135
The Ship Becalmed (Ancient
Mariner ...... . 135
The Voices of the Angels . 135
Youth and Age.............* 140
COLLIER, THOMAS STEPHENS,
b. New York, 1842.
An October Picture...........143
Complete ....................143
Off Labrador.................142
COLLINS, MORTIMER,
b. Plymouth, Eng., 1827. d. 1876.
In view of Death.............144
Last Verses..................144
COLLINS, WILLIAM.
b. Chichester, Eng., Dec. 25,1720.
d. Chichester, Eng., 1756.
Ode on the Death of Thomson 148
Ode to Evening................147
Ode to Simplicity.............144
Ode to the Brave..............145
On True and False Taste in
Music................ 145
The Passions..................145
COOK, CLARENCE CHATHAM,
b. Dorchester, Mass., Sept. 8, 1828.
On one who Died in May . 812
COOK, ELIZA,
b. London, Eng., 1817.
After a Mothers Death . 150
Ganging to and Ganging frae 150
My Old Straw Hat..............150
Song of the Hempseed .... 149
Song of the Ugly Maiden ... 151
COOKE, PHILIP PENDLETON,
b. Martinsburg, Va., Oct. 26,1816.
d. Jan. 20,1850.
Florence Vane..................151
COOKE, ROSE TERRY,
b. Hartford, Conn., Feb. 17, 1827.
The Iconoclast.................152
Then...........................153
Trailing Arbutus 152
COOLBRITH, INA D.
In Blossom Time................153
The Mothers Grief.............154
COOLIDGE, SUSAN (Sarah Woolsey)
b. Cleveland, Ohio.
Influence.......................814
Miracle.........................814
One Lesser Joy..................813
CORNWELL, HENRY S.
b. Charlestown, N. H., 1831.
The Dragon-fly..................815
The Spider......................815
COTTON, CHARLES.
b. Staffordshire, Eng., 1630. d. 1687.
Contentation....................154
In the Quiet of Nature (From
Retirement)....................154
COWLEY, ABRAHAM.
b. London, 1618. d. Chertsey, July 28,1667.
Distance no Barrier to the Soul
(Friendship in Absence) . 156
Of Myself.......................155
On the Shortness of Life . 156
Reason an aid to Revelation
(Reason)............... . 156
COWPER, WILLIAM.
b. Hertfordshire, Eng., Nov. 26,1731.
d. Norfolk, Eng., April 25, 1800.
A Faithful Picture of Ordinary
Society (Conversation) . 715
Alexander Selkirk...............161
Apostrophe to Popular Applause
(The Task)...................157
Descanting on Illness (Conversa-
tion) .........................715
John Gilpin....................711
Light Shining Out of Darkness. 157
Mercy to Animals (The Task) 160
Pairing-time Anticipated ... 716
The Captious (Conversation) . 716
The Freedom of the Good (The
Task) . .................158
The Emphatic Talker (Conversa-
tion) .........................715
The Poplar Field...............157
The Post-boy (The Task) . 161
The Souls Progress Checked
(Retirement).................161
The Tongue (Conversation) . 714
The Uncertain Man (Converses
tion).....................614


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
xliii
The Winters Evening (The
Task) ....................158
To Mary . ..............162
COXE, ARTHUR CLEVELAND,
b. Mendham, N. T May 10,1818.
Watchwords <.........
816
718
165
165
170
168
167
164
CRABBE, GEORGE.
b. Aldborough, Eng., Dec. 24,1754.
d. Feb. 8,1832.
Advice to one of Simple Life
(The Patron)........... .
Against Rash Opinions (Gentle-
man Farmer) ..................
Apostrophe to the Whimsical
(The Village) .......
Books (The Library)...........
Controversialists (The Library).
External Impressions Depend-
ent on the Souls Moods (Lov-
er's Journey) ................
Folly of Litigation (Gentleman
Farmer)....................
Friendship in Age and Sorrow
(Parting Hour)................168
Learning is Labor (Schools) . 164
Life (Parting Hour).............168
Mans Dislike to be Led (Dumb
Orators.................. . 165
Philosophy (Library) .... 169
Quacks (From Physic) .... 718
Reporters (From the Newspaper) 717
Sleep the Detractor of Beauty
(Edward Shore)................163
Sly Lawyers (From Law) ... 718
The Awful V acancy (The Parish
Register).....................165
The Condemned, His Dream and
its Awakening (Prisons) . 166
The Perils of Genius (.Edward
Shore).......................163
The Readers of Dailies (From
the Newspaper)................717
The Teacher (Schools) .... 164
The Religious Journal (From the
Newspaper) ....... 717
The Universal Lot (The Library) 169
The Vacillating Purpose (Ed-
ward Shore) ...... 163
The Young Poets Visit to the
Hall (The Patron) . 719
To Critics (The Library) . 168
Union of Faith and Reason Ne-
cessary (The Library) . 169
CRAIK, DINAH MARIA MULOCK.
b. Stoke-upon-Trent, Eng., 1826.
Green Things Growing .... 170
My Little Boy that Died . i72
Now and Afterwards .... 170
Philip My King..................171
Plighted........................171
Resigning......................17*2
Too Late .......................172
CRANCH, CHRISTOPHER PEARSE.
b. Alexandria, Va., March 8,1813.
A Thrush in a Gilded Cage 173
Compensation................174
I in Thee, and Thou in Me . 176
Memorial Hall...............174
Shelling Peas...............719
Soft, Brown, Smiling Eyes . 176
The Dispute of the Seven Days 721
Thought.....................175
Why ?.......................176
CRASHAW, RICHARD.
b. Cambridgeshire, Eng. d. Loreto, Italy.
Lines on a Prayer Book ... 816
CROLY, GEORGE.
b. Dublin, Aug., 1780. d. Nov. 24,1860.
Cupid Growing Careful.... 178
Evening................. 178
CROWNE, JOHN,
b. Nova Scotia, d. 1703.
Wishes for Obscurity .... 179
CUNNINGHAM, ALLAN.
b. Blackwood, Scotland, Dec. 7,1785.
d. London, Oct. 29,1842.
A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea 180
Shes Gane to Dwell in Heaven 180
Thou Hast Sworn by thy God 179
CURTIS, GEORGE WILLIAM,
b. Providence, R. I., Feb. 24,1824.
Egyptian Serenade...........181
Major and Minor.............181
Music in the Air............181
DANA, RICHARD HENRY,
b. Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 15,1787.
d. Feb. 2,1879.
The Husband and Wifes Grave 181
The Soul....................182
DEMAREST, MARY LEE.
My Ain Countree.............183
De VERE, SIR AUBREY,
b. Limerick, Ireland, 1788 ? d. 1846.
Columbus ....... o 184
Misspent Time...............184
De VERE, SIR AUBREY THOMAS.
b. Limerick, Ireland, 1814.
Affliction 185
All Things Sweet when Prized 186
Beatitude...................186
Bending Retween Me and the
Taper ....................185
Happy Are They ....... 185
Power of Poesy (Poetic Faculty) 184
The Angels Kiss Her ... 185
The Mood of Exaltation 186
De VERE, MARY AINGE.
A Love Song.................817
DICKENS, CHARLES.
b. Portsmouth, Eng., Feb. 7,1812.
d. Gads Hill, London, June 9,1870.
The Ivy Green ...... 187


Mi

JJ


xliv
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
DICKINSON, CHARLES M.
b. Lowville, N. Y., 1842.
The Children....................187
DICKINSON, MARY DO WE.
If we had hut a Day.............188
DOBELL, SYDNEY THOMPSON.
b. Peckham, Rye, Eng., 1824.
d. Aug. 22, 1874.
America.........................189
Home, Wounded ..................189
DOBSON, AUSTIN.
b. England, 1840.
Farewell, Renown ..... 190
More Poets Yet ...... 722
The Child Musician..............190
The Prodigals...................190
DODGE, MARY MAPES.
b. 1838.
Death in Life..............191
Heart Oracles..............192
My Window Ivy..............191
The Child and the Sea .... 192
The Human Tie..............191
The Stars..................192
DODGE, MARY B.
Loss.......................817
DONNE, JOHN.
b. London, 1573. d. March 31,1631.
The Farewell...............818
DORR, HENRY RIPLEY,
b. Rutland, VtM Oct. 27, 1858.
Door and Window............818
DORR, JULIA CAROLINE RIPLEY.
b. Charleston, S. C., 1825.
At Dawn ........ t 196
At the Last................193
Five.................. 195
Peradventure...............194
Thou Knowest...............195
What Need ?................194
What She Thought...........193
DRAKE, JOSEPH RODMAN.
b. New York, Aug. 7,1795. d. Sept. 21,1820.
The American Flag * , . 0 . 197
DRAYTON, MICHAEL.
b. Warwickshire, Eng., 1563. d. 163L
The Parting * 198
DRUMMOND, WILLIAM.
b. Hawthornden. Scotland, Nov. 13,1585.
d. Dec. 4,1649.
Despite All 198
What We Toil For 198
DRYDEN, JOHN.
b. Northamptonshire, Eng., Aug. 9,1631.
d. May 1,1700.
A Character {Absalom and Achi-
tophel) .....................722
Alexanders Feast .... 199
A Wife {Eleonora) . . . . . 206
Beautiful Death {Eleonoro) . 206
Charity {Eleonoro) . . . . . 206
From The Cock and the
Fox .....................722
Judgment in Studying the Bible
{Religio Laid).............205
The Avoidance of Religious Dis-
putes {Religio Laid) .... 205
The Bible {Religio Laid) . . . 204
The Light of Reason {Religio
Laid)......................204
The Model Preacher {Character
of a Good Parson) . . . 207
The Wit {Absalom and Achito-
phel)......................207
Under the Portrait of John .
Milton .................204
DUNBAR, WILLIAM.
b. Salton, Scotland, about 1460. d. about 1530.
All Earthly Joy Returns in Pain 208
DYER, SIR EDWARD,
b. about 1540.
My Mind to Me a Kingdom Is 819
EASTMAN, CHARLES GAMAGE.
b. Fryeburg, Me., June 1,1816.
d. Burlington, Vt., 1861.
A Snow Storm..................208
ELIOT, GEORGE (Marian Evans Cross).
b. Warwickshire, Eng., 1820. d. Dec. 2,1880.
O May I Join the Choir Invisible 209
ELLIOT, JANE.
b. 1727. d. 1805.
The Flowers of the Forest . 210
ELLIOTT, EBENEZER.
b. near Rotherham, Yorkshire, Eng., March
17,1781. d. Dec. 1,1849.
Not for Naught..............212
Poor Andrew.................211
The Poets Prayer...........212
The Press...................211
EMERSON, RALPH- WALDO,
b. Boston, Mass., May 25,1803.
d. Concord, Mass., April 27, 1882.
Concord Fight...............215
Forbearance. ...............215
Ode o 213
The Humble-Bee..............214
The Problem 213
The Rhodora 214
FABER, FREDERIC WILLIAM,
b. Durham, Eng., June 28,1814.
d. Brompton, Eng., Sept. 26, 1863.
Harsh Judgments. , . 216
Low Spirits . - ... 217
The Right Must Win ... 216
FALCONER, WILLIAM
b. Edinburgh, Scotland, about 1730
d. (lost at sea) 1769.
A Sunset Picture {The Skip-
ivreck) . , . . : 218


I
Wrecked in the Tempest (The
Shipwreck)...................217
FAWCETT, EDGAR,
b. New York City, 1847.
Ideals........................219
The Wood-Turtle...............221
Wounds........................220
FAY, ANNA MARIA.
b. Savannah, Ga., March 12,1828.
Roundel.......................222
Sleep and Death...............222
FENNER, CORNELIUS GEORGE,
b. Providence, It. I., Dec. 30,1822.
d. Cincinnati, O., Jan. 4,1847.
Gulf-Weed.....................222
FIELDS, ANNIE.
Aged Sophocles Addressing the
Athenians (Sophocles) . 224
At the Forge...............224
Passage from the Prelude . 225
To Sappho..................223
Young Sophocles Taking the
Prize (Last Contest of Aeschy-
lus) ........................223
FIELDS, JAMES THOMAS,
b. Portsmouth, N. H., Dec. 31,1817.
d. Boston, Mass., April 24, 1881.
A Character................226
A Protest..................226
Courtesy...................226
First Appearance at the Odeon 227
In Extremis................226
Morning and Evening by the Sea 225
The Perpetuity of Song . 225
FINCH, FRANCIS MILES,
b. Ithaca, N. Y., 1827.
The Blue and the Gray . . . 227
FRENEAU, PHILIP.
b. New York City, Jan. 2,1752.
d. Monmouth, N. J., Dec. IS, 1832.
May to April...............228
GALLAGHER, WILLIAM D.
b. Philadelphia, Aug., 1808.
The Laborer...................820
Two Aprils....................820
GANNETT, WILLIAM CHANNING.
b. Boston, Mass, 1840.
Listening for God..........228
GARRISON, WILLIAM LLOYD,
b. Newburyport, Mass., Dec. 12,1804.
d. New York, May 24,1879.
The Free Mind.................229
GASSAWAY, FRANK H.
Bay Billy.....................229
GAY, JOHN.
b. Devonshire, Eng., 1688.
d. London, Dec. 4,1732.
The Hare and Many Fiiends. . 725
The Mother, the Nurse, and the
Fairy; . t ^ ( . 726
GAY, WILLIAM WHEELER,
b. Malone, N. Y., Jan. 16,1854.
Apollo Belvedere
GILDER, RICHARD WATSON,
b. Bordentown, N. J., Feb. 8,1844.
And Were that Best..........233
A Thought...................233
I Count my Time by Times that
I Meet Thee................232
Loves Jealousy..............233
There is Nothing New under the
Sun.......................231
The Sower...................231
Through Love to Light. 233
Two Love Quatrains..........232
Weal and Woe................231
What Would I Save Thee From 232
GOLDSMITH, OLIVER.
b. Pallas, County of Longford, Ireland,
Nov. 10,1728. a. London, April 4,1774.
France (The Traveller) ....
Hope (The Oratorio of the Cap-
236
237
Memory (The Oratorio of the
Captivity)..................237
The Happiness of Passing Ones
Age in Familiar Places (De-
serted Village)................235
The Prophets Song (The Orato-
rio of the Captivity) .... 237
The village Preacher (Deserted
Village)....................234
The Village Schoolmaster (De-
serted Village)...............235
GOODALE, DORA READ.
b. South Egremont, Mass., Oct. 29,1866.
Ripe Grain 237
GOODALE, ELAINE.
b. South Egremont, Mass., Oct. 9,1863.
Ashes of Roses................237
GOSSE, EDMUND W.
b. London, 1849.
Sunshine in March.............821
Villanelle....................821
GOULD, HANNAH FLAGG,
b. Lancaster, Mass., Sept. 3,1789.
d. Newburyport, Mass., Sept. 5,1865.
A Name in the Sand .... 238
The Souls Farewell; . 238
GRAHAME, JAMES.
b. Glasgow, Scotland, 1765, d. 1811.
Sabbath Morning (The Sabbath) 239
GRAY, DAVID.
b. England, 1838. d. England, 1861.
Die Down, O Dismal Day ... 822
If it Must Be.................822
Wintry Weather................822
GRAY. ELINOR.
Isolation 240


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
xlvi
GRAY. ELLIS (Louisa T. Craigen).
b. Roxbury, Mass., Oct. 5, 1839.
Sunshine......................823
GRAY, THOMAS,
b. London, Dec. 26,1716.
d. Cambridge, Eng., July 24,1771.
Elegy in a Country Churchyard 240
Ode on a Distant Prospect of
Eton .......................244
Ode on the Spring.............243
The Pleasures Arising from
Vicissitude............243
GUSTAFSON, ZADEL BARNES,
b. Middletown, Conn., March 9,1841.
Little Martin Craghan .... 245
GREENWELL, DORA.
b. Green well Ford, Durham, Dec. 6,1822.
d. Clifton, JEng., March 29,1882.
The Sunflower............... 823
HAGEMAN, SAMUEL MILLER,
b. Princeton, N. J., 1848.
Only .... *...................247
The Two Great Cities .... 247
HALLECK, FITZ-GREENE.
b. Guilford, Conn., July 8,1790.
d. Guilford, Conn., Nov. 19,1867.
Burns.........................249
Marco Bozzaris................248
On the Death of Joseph Rodman
Drake........................251
HALPINE, CHARLES GRAHAME
(Miles OReilly)
b. Oldcastte, Co. Meath, Ireland, 1829.
d. New York City, Aug. 3,1868.
QuakerdomA Formal Call 72C
HARTE, FRANCIS BRET,
b. Albany, N. Y., Aug. 25,1839.
Dows Elat.....................727
Lone Mountain Cemetery . 252
Plain Language from Truthful
James........................729
To a Sea-bird..................252
HAVERGAL, FRANCES RIDLEY.
b. Astley Rectory, Eng,. Dec. 14,1836.
d. Caswell Bay, Swansea, June 3, 1879.
Autobiography................323
From MakingPoetry . 826
Song from u Right ..........825
The Col de Balm..............826
HAY, JOHN.
b. Salem, Ind., Oct. 8,1839.
A Womans Love 254
In a Graveyard...............253
Jim Bludso of the Prairie Belle 731
Lagrimas.....................255
Little Breeches..............730
On the Bluff.................258
Remorse......................253
The Prairie..................253
HAYNE, PAUL HAMILTON.
b. Charleston, S. C., Jan. 1,1831.
A Summer Mood................255
By the Autumn Sea,...........256
Jasmine......................257
Lyric of Action..............827
The Sting of Death...........257
The Woodland.................256
Windless Rain ....... 257
HEBEIi, REGINALD.
b. Cheshire, Eng., April 21,1783.
d. India, April 3,1826.
If Thou Wert by my Side ... 258
HEDDERWICK, JAMES,
b. Glasgow, Scotland, 1814.
Middle Life................258
HEDGE, FREDERIC HENRY,
b. Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 12,1805.
Questionings...............259
HEMANS, FELICIA DOROTHEA,
b. Liverpool, Eng., Sept. 25, 1794.
d. near Dublin, Ireland, May 16, 1835.
Breathings of Spring .... 260
Calm on the Bosom of thy God. 263
Evening Prayer at a Girls
School....................262
Landing of the Pilgrims . 263
The Hour of Death..........261
The Invocation.............261
HERBERT, GEORGE.
b. Wales, April 3,1593.
d. Bemerton, Wilts Co., Eng., Feb., 1633
Advice on Church Behavior
(Church Porch)............264
Bosom Sin....................265
From The Elixir ..........827
Sum up at Night (Church Porch) 264
The Pulley ........ 263
Virtue.......................265
HERRICK, ROBERT.
b. London, Aug. 20, 1591. d. Devon, 1674.
How the Heartsease First
Came,.......................266
Litany to the Holy Spirit . 266
The Primrose.................266
Three Epitaphs...............266
To Keep a True Lent .... 267
To Perilla.............265
HERVEY, THOMAS KIBBLE,
b. Manchester, Eng., 1804. d. Feb., 1859.
Cleopatra Embarking on the
Cydnus ......... 267
Epitaph......................268
HEYWOOD, THOMAS.
b. Lincolnshire, Eng., 1570. d. 1649.
Good-morrow..................268
HIGGINSON, THOMAS WENTWORTH.
b. Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 22,1823.
Decoration...................269


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
xlvii
HILL, AARON.
b. England, 1685. d. 1750.
How to Deal with. Common Na-
ture ......................825
HILLARD, F. A.
The Poets Pen.............827
HILLARD, GEORGE STILLMAN,
b. Machias, Me., sept. 22,1808.
d. Jan. 21, 1879.
Lake George.................269
HOFFMAN, CHARLES FENNO.
b. New York, 1806.
Monterey...................270
HOGG, JAMES.
b. Ettrick, Scotland, Jan. 25,1772-
d. Altrive, Scotland, Nov. 21,1835.
The Skylark................271
Melancholy............... 279
Number One...................736
The Art of Book-keeping . . . 741
The Bridge of Sighs......282
The Cigar................738
The Death-bed............281
The Double Knock.........738
The Song of the Shirt .... 281
To a Child Embracing his Mo-
ther ........... . . 280
To my Infant Son.............734
True Death...................284
HOPKINS, LOUISA PARSONS.
b. Newburyport, April 19,1834.
Autumn (Persephone) ... 829
Early Summer (Persephone) . 828
December.....................828
Hymn from Motherhood . 829
Late Summer (Persephone) . 829
Tempestuous Deeps............828
HOLLAND, JOSIAH GILBERT.
b. Belehertown, Mass., July 24,1819.
d. Oct, 12,1881.
A Song of Doubt (Bitter Sweet) .
A Song of Faith
Cradle Song
Life from Death
On the Righi.................
Strength Through Resisted
Temptation (Bitter Stoeet) .
The Press of Sorrow (Bitter
Sweet).....................
The Type of Struggling Human-
ity (Marble Prophecy) . .
To an Infant Sleeping (Bitter
Sweet).....................
What is the Little One Thinking
About ? (Bitter Sweet) . .
What will it Matter ? . .
Worth and Cost (Bitter Sweet) .
HOLME, SAXE. (?)
Three Kisses of Farewell. .
HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL,
b. Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 29,1809.
A Familiar Letter to several
Correspondents.............
Dorothy Q. A Family Portrait
Hymn of Trust................
Nearing the Snow-line ....
The September Gale ....
The Two Streams ....*.
The Voiceless................
Under the Violets............
HOOD, THOMAS,
b. London, May 23,1799.
d. London, May 3,1845.
Ballad.......................
Faithless Nelly Gray ....
Faithless Sally Brown ....
Farewell, Life!..............
Im not a Single Man ....
I Remember, I Remember .
John Day.....................
Love Bettered by Time . .
271
272
274
273
275
273
273
275
274
272
275
273
276
732
277
279
278
733
279
276
278
284
739
740
283
737
280
735
284
HOPKINSON, FRANCIS.
b. Philadelphia, 1738. d. May 9,1791.
The Battle of the Kegs .... 742
HOUGHTON, GEORGE.
b. Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 12,1850.
Ambition (Album Leaves) . . .
Charity . . .
Courage , . .
Daisy . . .
Purity . . .
Regret . . .
This Name of Mine (Album
Leaves)...................
Valborg Watching Axels De-
parture (Legend of St Olafs
Kirk)..................' .
285
286
285
286
286
285
285
284
HOUGHTON, LORD (Richard Monckton
Milnes).
b. Yorkshire, Eng., June 19, 1809.
All Things Once are Things For-
ever ......................289
Divorced.....................288
Forever Unconfessed .... 288
I Wandered by the Brookside 287
Labor .......................286
Since Yesterday .'...........286
The Worth of Hours .... 287
HOWE, JULIA WARD,
b. New York, May 27.1819.
Battle Hymn of the Republic 289
Imagined Reply of Eloisa
(Thoughts in Pere La Chaise). 289
Stanzas from the Tribute to a
Servant......................290
The Dead Christ.................291
HOWELLS, WILLIAM DEAN,
b. Martinsville, Ohio, March 1,1837.
Convention......................292
Thanksgiving....................292
The Mulberries..................292
The Mysteries...................292
The Poets Friends..............292


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES
xlviii
HOWITT, MARY.
b. Uttoxeter, Eng, 1804.
The Broom-Flower................294
Tibbie Inglis...................295
HOWITT, WILLIAM.
b. Derbyshire, Eng., 1795. d. March 2,1879.
Departure of the Swallow . 296
HOYT, RALPH.
b. New York, 1808, d. 1878.
Old.............................296
HUNT, LEIGH.
b. Southgate, Eng., Oct. 19, 1784.
d. Putney, Aug. 28,1859.
Abou Ben Adhem...............299
Death........................301
May and the Poets............301
Stanzas from Song of the
Flowers _.................299
The Grasshopper and Cricket . 300
HUTCHINSON, ELLEN MACKAY.
Autumn Song..................830
On the Road..................830
Sea-way......................830
The Prince...................830
INGELOW, JEAN,
b. Ipswich, Eng., 1830.
Like a Laverock in the Lift . . 307
Songs of Seven...............301
The Long White Seam .... 307
JACKSON, HELEN (H. H.)
b. Amherst, Mass., 1831.
July.........................831
March........................831
My Nasturtiums (The Century). 832
The Last Words . 830
JENNISON, LUCIA W. (Owen Innsley).
b. Newton, Mass., 1850.
At Sea.......................833
Dependence...................833
Her Roses....................832
In a Letter..................832
Outre-mort...................832
JOHNSON, ROBERT UNDERWOOD.
b.^Washington, D. C., Jan. 12,1853.
In November (From The Century) 834
JOHNSON, SAMUEL.
b. Lichfield, Eng., Sept. 18,1709;
d. London, Dec. 13, 1784.
Charles XII. (Vanity of Human
Wishes)........................308
Enviable Age (Vanity of Human
Wishes). *...................308
The Fate of Poverty (London) 309
Wisdoms Prayer (Vanity of
Human Wishes) ...... 308
JONSON, BEN.
b. Westminster, London, June 11,1574.
d. Aug. 16,1637.
Epitaph....................... 310
Good Life, Long Life . . . 310
Hymn to Cynthia...........310
The Sweet Neglect.........310
To Celia..................309
JOYCE, ROBERT DWYER.
Kilcoleman Castle.........834
The Banks of Anner .... 835
KAY, CHARLES DE.
Fingers.......................836
KEATS, JOHN.
b. London, 1795. d. Rome, Feb. 24,1821.
Beautys Immortality (Endy-
mion)..................... 312
Fancy.........................311
Ode on the Poets..............311
Ode to a Nightingale .... 312
On Reading Chapmans Homer 314
Sonnet Composed on Leaving
England ................ . 311
The Terror of Death .... 310
KEBLE, JOHN.
b. Fairford, Gloucestershire, Eng., April 25,
1792. d. Bournemouth, Eng., March 29,1866.
Since all that is not Heaven
must Fade............... . 316
Where is thy Favored Haunt ? 314
Why Should we Faint, and Fear
to Live Alone ?...........315
KEMBLE, FRANCES ANNE,
b. London, 1811.
Absence.......................317
Faith.........................318
KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT.
b. Frederick Co., Md., Aug. 1,1779.
d. Baltimore, Jan. 11, 1843.
The Star-Spangled Banner . 318
KIMBALL, HARRIET McEWEN.
b. Portsmouth, N. H., 1834.
Day Dreaming..................320
Good News ....................319
Heliotrope....................319
The Last Appeal...............320
Trouble to Lend...............319
KING, HENRY.
b. England, 1591. d. 1669.
From the Exequy on his
Wife........................836
KINGSLEY, CHARLES.
b. Holne, Devonshire, Eng., June 12,1819.
d. Eversley, Jan. 24,1875.
A Farewell....................321
Dolcino to Margaret...........321
Sands of Dee..................321
The Three Fishers.............321
KNOX, WILLIAM.
b. Roxburghe, Scotland, 1789. d. 1825.
Oh why Should the Spirit of
Mortal be Proud . ... 322


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
LACOSTE, MARIE R.
b Savannah, Ga., 1842.
Somebodys Barling............323
LAIGHTON, ALBERT,
b. Portsmouth, N. H. 1829.
By the Bead...................324
Under the Leaves..............324
LAMB, CHARLES.
b. London, Feb. 18, 1775.
d. Edmonton, Eng., Bee. 27,1884.
Hester........................325
Old Familiar Faces ..... 325
The Housekeeper.............325
LANDON, LiETITIA ELIZABETH,
b. Chelsea, Eng., 1802.
d. Africa, Oct. 16,1838.
Success Alone Seen............326
The Little Shroud.............326
Sir Walter Scott at Pompeii. 327
*The Poet.................327
LANDOR, WALTER SAVAGE,
b Ipsley Court, Warwickshire, Eng., Jan.
SO, 1775. d. Florence, Sept. 17,1864.
A Request.....................328
Beath of the Bay..............328
In No Haste...................327
I Will Not Love..............328
Rose Aylmer...................328
Rubies........................327
The One White Hair .... 743
Under the Lindens........743
LANIER, SIBNEY.
b. Macon, Ga., 1842. d. 1881.
Betrayal......................329
Evening Song..................328
From the Flats'-..............328
LAROOM, LUCY.
b. Beverly Farms, Mass., 1826.
A Strip of Bine...............332
Hand in Hand with Angels . . 332
Hannah Binding Shoes . . . 329
Heaven near the Virtuous (From
Hints)................... 333
The Curtain of the Bark (From
Hints)..................330
Unwedded..................330
LATHROP, GEORGE PARSONS.
b. Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, Aug. 25, 1851.
A Face in the Street .... 336
New Worlds................334
Sailors Song.............335
The Lily Pond.............334
To My Son.................334
LATHROP, ROSE HAWTHORNE.
The Striving of Hope (Closing
Clwrds)...............837
LAZARUS, EMMA,
b. New York, July 22,1849.
A March Violet............337
xlix ;
Night (Scenes in the Wood) . . 337 j
Pleasant Prospect (Scenes in the [
Wood) . ................... 336 |
Remember................. 338
LELANB, CHARLES GOBFREY.
b. Philadelphia, Aug. 15,1824.
City Experiences (Breitmann
About Town)...............744
Mine Own...................339
Schnitzerls Philosopede . , . 745
LEVER, CHARLES JAMES.
b. Dublin, Ireland, Aug. 31,1806.
d. Trieste, June 1, 1872.
Widow Malone...............745
LEYBEN, JOHN.
b. Denholm, Scotland, Sept. 8,1775.
d. Batavia, E. I., Aug. 21,1811.
Ode to an Indian Coin .... 339
LODGE, THOMAS.
b. Lincolnshire, Eng., 1556.
d. London, Sept., 1625.
Rosaline...................340
LOGAN, JOHN.
b. Fala, near Edinburgh, Scotland, 1748.
d. London, Dec. 28,1788.
The Cuckoo . ................341
LONGFELLOW, HENRY W.
b. Portland, Me., Feb. 27,1807.
d. Cambridge, Mass., March 24,1882.
A Bay of Sunshine.........345
Maiden and Weathercock . . 343
Nature....................343
President Garfield........837
Stay, Stay at Home, my Heart,
ana Rest................342
The Meeting...............342
The Ladder of St. Augustine . 341
The Tides.................343
Three Friends of Mine . . 344
The Two Angels............344
Weariness.................342
LONGFELLOW, SAMUEL,
b. Portland, Me., June 18,1819.
From Mire to Blossom .... 346
LOVELACE, RICHARD.
b. Woolwich, Eng., 1618. d. London, 1658.
To Lucasta, on Going beyond
the Seas....................346
To Lucasta, on Going to the
Wars..........................346
LOVER, SAMUEL.
b. Dublin, Ireland, 1797. d. July 6,1868.
Fatherland and Mother Tongue 748
Father Molloy...............748
Oh! Watch You Well by Bay-
light .......................347
Rory OMore....................746
The Angels Wing...............347
The Birth of St. Patrick . 746
The Child and the Autumn Leaf 347



I INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES,
'Widow Macliree...............747
Yield Not, Thou Sad One, to
Sighs.........................348
LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL.
' b. Cambridge, Mass., Feb. 22,1819.
After the Burial..............350
Auf Wiedersehen...............351
June (Under the Willows) . 351
Storm at Appledore............352
The Courtin' {Biglow Papers) 748
The Generosity of Nature
(Vision of Sir Launfal) . 349
The Heritage..................348
Without and Within .... 751
At a Club Dinner...............756
Be Quiet, do...................757
Clear the Way !.................362
Cleon and I.....................362
Extract from A Reverie in the
Grass ..................... 365
Happiness...................757
O ye Tears. -...............364
Tell me, ye Winged Winds . . 366
The Child and the Mourners 361
The Good Time Coming . 363
The great Critics..............757
The Light in the Window . 363
The little Man..................758
To a Friend afraid of Critics . 754
LUNT, GEORGE.
b. Newburyport, Mass., Dec. 31,1803.
The Comet....................838
LYTE, HENRY FRANCIS.
b. Ednam, Scotland, 1793. d. 1847.
Abide With Me................353
LYTLE, WILLIAM HAINES,
b. Cincinnati, Nov. 2,1826.
Killed battle Chickamauga, Sept. 20,1863.
Antony to Cleopatra .... 353
LYTTON, LORD (Edward Bulwer)
b. England, 1803. d. 1S73-
Caradoc, the Bard, to the Cym-
rians (King Arthur) .... 839
Is it all Vanity................838
Justice, the Regenerative Rower
{Richelieu).................. . 839
LYTTON, ROBERT BULWER (Owen
Meredith).
b. Herts, Eng., Nov. 8,1831.
A Character {Lucile)- ... . 753
Changes . . . 840
Fame {Lucile) . . . 753
Few in Many . . 752
Life a Victory . . 841
The Chess-board .
The Erratic Genius (Lucil*.) . . 752
The Stomach of Man << . 751
The Unfulfilled a . 841
MACAULAY, THOMAS BABINGTON.
b. Leicestershire, Eng., Oct. 25,1800.
d. London, Dec. 28,1859.
From The Lay of Horatius 354
MACDONALD, GEORGE.
b. Huntley, Scotland, 1825.
O Lassie ayont the Hill.... 359
The Baby.....................359
MACE, FRANCES LAUGHTON,
b. Orono, Me., Jan. 15,1836.
Easter Morning...............360
Only Waiting.................360
The Heliotrope...............361
MACKAY, CHARLES,
b. Perth, Scotland, 1812.
A Question Answered .... 365
MANN, CAMERON.
b. New York City, April 3, 1851.
The Longing of Circe .... 842
MARLOWE, CHRISTOPHER,
b. Canterbury, Eng., Feb. 26,1564.
d. Deptford, June 16, 1593.
A Passionate Shepherd to his
Love ..................842
MARSTON, PHILIP BOURKE.
b. London, 1850.
From Afar................ 843
Too Near...................843
MARVELL, ANDREW.
b. Winestead, Yorkshire, Eng., March 2,1621.
d. London, Aug. 17,1678.
A Drop of Dew...............367
MASON, CAROLINE ATHERTON.
May (From The Century) 844
An open Secret *' 844
MASSEY, GERALD,
b. Herts, Eng., May 29,1828.
And thou hast Stolen a Jewel 368
Jerusalem the Golden .... 367
The Kingliest Kings..........368
McCarthy, denis Florence.
b. Cork, Ireland, 1820.
Summer Longings..............369
McKAY, JAMES I.
A Summer Morning.............842
MERRICK, JAMES.
b. Reading, Eng., Jan. 8,1720.
d. Reading, Eng., June 5, 1769.
The Chameleon................759
MICKLE, WILLIAM JULIUS,
b. Langholm, Scotland, 1734.
The Sailor's Wife.......... 372
MICHELL, NICHOLAS.
Alexander at Persepolis . 370
.Persia * 370
The Paradise of Cabul. 371


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
li
MILLER, ABRAHAM PERRY,
b. Ohio, Oct. 15,1837.
Keep Faith in Love (Consolation)
Refuge from Doubt *i
Turn to the Helper
MILTON. JOHN.
b. London, Dec. 9,1608.
d. London, Nov. 8,1674.
Apostrophe to Light (Paradise
Lost) . :................
II Penseroso................
LAllegro...................
On his Blindness............
On Reaching Twenty-three .
On Time.....................
Song on May Morning ....
Stanzas from Hymn on the
Nativity..................
The Bower of Adam and Eve
(Paradise Lost)............
To a virtuous young Lady .
MITCHELL, WEIR.
The Quaker Graveyard (From
The Century).................
MOIR, DAVID MACBETH.
b. Musselburgh, Scotland, Jan. 5,1798.
d. Dumfries, July 6,1851.
Stanzas from Casa Wappy .
MONTGOMERY, JAMES.
b. Irvine, Scotland, Nov. 4,1771.
d. Sheffield, April 30,1854.
Aspirations of Youth . .
Forever with the Lord . .
Friend after Friend Departs
Love of Country, and of Home
Prayer ..................
The common Lot...........
MOORE, THOMAS.
b. Dublin, Ireland, May 28,1779.
d. Sloperton, Feb. 25,1852. .
As slow our Ship..............
Come, ye Disconsolate ....
Estrangement through Trifles
(Lalla Rookh)...............
Extracts from Miss Biddys Let-
ters (Fudge Family in Paris) .
I Saw from the Beach ....
Oft in the stilly Night ....
O Thou who Dryst the Mourn-
ers Tears....................
Recognition of a congenial
Spirit (Lalla Rookh) ....
The Bird Let loose............
The modern puffing System (An
Epistle to Samuel Rogers) .
Those Evening Bells ....
Thou Art, O God...............
MORRIS, GEORGE P.
b. Philadelphia, Oct. 12,1802.
d. New York, July 6,1864.
Woodman, Spare that Tree .
374
376
373
381
376
375
379
380
374
378
379
380
380
844
381
384
385
384
382
383
383
388
387
385
760
387
386
385
386
760
387
387
388
MORRIS, WILLIAM,
b. England, 1834.
April (Earthly Paradise) . 390
December . . 390
February . . 389
March . . 389
MOTHERWELL, WILLIAM,
b. Glasgow, Scotland, Oct. 13,1797.
d. Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 1, 1835.
Jeanie Morrison.............392
Last Verses.................391
My Heid is like to Rend, Willie 391
The Cavaliers Song,........392
They Come The merry Sum-
mer Months 394
MOULTON, ELLEN LOUISE CHANDLER,
b. Pomfret, Conn., April 16,1835.
At Sea.......................845
From a Window in Chamouni 846
Hie Jacet....................846
Left behind..................845
My Saint.....................845
NAIRNE, LADY CAROLINE OL1PHANT.
b Gask, Perthshire, Scotland. July 16, 1766.
d. Gask, Oct. 27, 1845.
The Land o the Leal .... 394
NEWELL, WILLIAM, D.D.
b. Littleton, Mass., Feb. 25,1804.
Serve God and he Cheerful . 395
NEWMAN, JOHN HENRY.
b. London, Eng., Feb. 21,1801.
A Voice from afar...........396
Flowers without Fruit .... 396
NORTON, ANDREWS.
b. Hingham, Mass., Dec. 31,1786.
d. Newport, R. I., Sept. 18,1853.
Scene after a Summer Shower 396
NORTON, CAROLINE S. S.
b. Hampton Court, Eng., 1808. d. 1877.
Bingen on the Rhine .... 397
We have been Friends Together 398
OREILLY, JOHN BOYLE,
b. Ireland, 1844.
Forever.....................400
Hidden Sins.................401
Peace and Pain..............399
The Ride of Collins Graves . 399
Unspoken Words..........401
ORNE, CAROLINE FRANCES.
The Gold under the Roses . 846
OSGOOD, FRANCES SARGENT,
b. Boston, Mass., June 18,1811.
d. Hingham, Mass., May 12,1850.
Laborare est Orare...........402
OSGOOD, KATE PUTNAM,
b. Fryeburg, Me,., 1840.
Before the Prime.............403
Driving home the Cows . 403
li
$


lii
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
OSHAUGHNESSY, ARTHUR W. E.
b. London, 1844. d. London, 1881.
Song of a Fellow-worker . 404
PALFREY, REBECCA S.
b. Cambridge, Mass.
White underneath...............405
PALFREY, SARAH HAMMOND (E.
Foxton).
b. Cambridge, Mass.
The Childs Plea...............847
The Light-house................847
PALMER, WILLIAM PITT,
b. Stockbridge, Mass., Feb. 22,1805.
The Smack in School .... 762
PARKER, THEODORE.
b. Lexington, Mass., Aug. 24, 1810.
d. Florence, Italy, May 10, I860.
The Higher Good............406
The Way, the Truth, and the
Life.......................406
PARNELL, THOMAS.
b. Dublin, Ireland, 1679
d. Chester, England, July, 1717.
Hymn to Contentment .... 407
PARSONS, THOMAS WILLIAM,
b. Boston, Aug. 18,1819.
Hudson River...............408
Saint Peray................763
The Groomsman to his Mistress 410
PATMORE, COVENTRY (Kearsey Digh-
ton).
b. Woodford, Eng., July 23,1823.
Sweet Meeting of Desires (The
Betrothal).................410
Would Wisdom for herself be
Wooed........................411
PERCIVAL, JAMES GATES.
b. Berlin, Conn., Sept. 15,1795.
d. Hazelgreen, Wis., May 2,1857.
Apostrophe to the Sun (Prome-
theus, Part II,)............411
The Coral Grove..............413
To Seneca Lake...............413
PERRY, NORA.
b. Providence, R. I.
After the Ball...............414
In an Hour ..................415
Some Day of Days.............416
Tying her Bonnet under her
Chin..........................415
PHELPS, ELIZABETH STUART,
b. Boston, Mass. Aug. 31, 1844.
A Letter.....................417
All the Rivers...............416
Deserted Nests...............417
George Eliot.................416
PIATT, JOHN JAMES.
b. Milton, Ind., March 1,1835.
A Song of Content............419
Reading the Milestone .... 418
The Golden Hand...............418
The Love-letter...............418
The Sight of Angels...........418
Two Patrons...................418
PIATT, SARAH M. B.
b. Lexington, Ky., 1835.
A Dreams Awakening .... 420
Asking for Tears..............421
Calling the Dead..............421
Last Words . .'.............419
Making Peace *................420
That New World................420
. The Flowers in the Ground . . 421
To-day........................419
PIERPONT, JOHN.
b. Litchfield, Conn., April 6,1785.
d. Medford, Mass., Aug. 29,1866.
My Child......................422
The Pilgrim Fathers .... 422
Whittling.....................764
POE, EDGAR ALLAN,
b. Boston, Mass., Feb. 19,1809.
d. Baltimore, Md., Oct. 7,1849.
Annabel Lee....................423
The Bells .....................424
The Raven......................425
To My Mother...................425
POLLOK, ROBERT.
b. Muirhouse, Renfrewshire, Scotland, 1799.
d. Southampton, Eng., Sept. 15, 1827.
Lord Byron (Course of Time) 428
POPE, ALEXANDER,
b. London, May 21, 1688.
d. Twickenham, May 30, 1744.
An Authors Complaint (Epistle
to Dr, Arbuthnot)............765
Belinda {Rape of the Lock) . 767
Charity, gradually Pervasive
{Essay on Man)...............431
Dullness {Dunciad).............765
Excessive Praise or Blame {Es-
say on Criticism).............432
From Eloisa to Abelard . 429
Just Judgment {Essay on Criti.
cism) .......................432
Man {Essay on Man) .... 430
Merit beyond Beauty {Rape of
the Lock)....................768
Submission to Supreme Wisdom
{Essay on Man)...............430
The Universal Prayer .... 433
True Nobility {Essay on Man) 431
Truth to Nature {Essay on
Criticism)...................432
Virtue, the sole Unfailing Hap-
piness {Essay on Man) ... 431
Wit {Essay on Criticism) . . 432
PRAED, WINTHROP MACKWORTH.
b. London, Eng., 1802.
d. July 15, 1839.
Quince.........................771
The Belle of the Ball .... 769


L
m
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
liii
PRENTICE, GEORGE DENNISON,
b. Preston, Conn., Dec. 18,1802.
cl. Louisville, Jan. 22,1870. -
The River in the Mammoth Cave 847
PRESCOTT, MARY N.
Asleep.........................435
The old Story..................433
To-day.........................434
PRESTON, MARGARET JUNKIN.
b. Lexington, Va., 1835.
Equipoise...............
Gods Patience..........
Natures Lesson ... .
Ours....................
Stonewall Jacksons Grave
Therell Come a Day .
The Shadow..............
The Tyranny of Mood .
PRINGLE, THOMAS.
b. Blaiklaw, Scotland, Jan. 5,1789.
d. London, Dec. 5,1834.
Afar in the Desert . .
434
435
435
434
425
436
435
436
437
PRIOR, MATTHEW.
b. Wimborne-Minster, Eng., July 21,1664.
d. Cambridgeshire, Sept. 18,1721.
An Epitaph.................. 773
For my own Monument ... 772
From The Thief and the Cor-
delier . . .............774
Richards Theory of the Mind
(Alma)......................774
The wise Man in Darkness
(Solomon)...................439
The wise Man in Light (Solomon) 439
PROCTER, ADELAIDE ANNE,
b. London, Eng., Oct. 30, 1825.
d. London, Feb. 2,1864.
A Lost Chord.................441
A Womans Question .... 442
Cleansing Fires...............442
Incompleteness................443
Judge Not.....................440
One by One....................440
Strive, Wait, and Pray . 443
Thankfulness.................440
Too Late.....................441
PROCTER, BRYAN WALLER
b. Wiltshire, Eng., Nov. 21,1789.
d. London, Oct. 5,1874.
A Petition to Time . .
A Prayer in Sickness .
History of a Life ....
I Die for thy sweet Love .
Life......................
Love me if I Live . .
Softly Woo away her Breath
The Poets Song to his Wife
The Sea....................
PROCTOR, EDNA DEAN,
b. Henniker, N. H.
But Heaven, O Lord, I cannot
Lose............................
444
445
445
446
444
444
446
445
444
446
Contoocook River
Daily Dying .
Heroes ....
Sunset in Moscow
To Moscow .
QUARLES, FRANCIS.
b. Stewards, near Rumford, Eng. 1592.
d. London, Sept. 8,1644.
Grief for the Loss of the Dead
On Doves and Serpents
On Man................
On Sin................
On the Life of Man .
The World.............
RALEIGH, SIR WALTER.
b. Hayes, East Budleigh, Eng.. 1552.
Beheaded, Westminster, Oct. 29,1618.
The Lie . .
The Silent Lover
447
448
448
449
449
451
451
451
451
451
450
452
452
READ, THOMAS BUCHANAN.
b. Chester County, Penn., March 32, 1822.
d. New York, May 11,1872.
Drifting ......................456
Sheridans Ride................453
The Brave at Home..............456
The Closing Scene..............454
REALF, RICHARD,
b. Uckfield, Eng., 1834.
d. Oakland, Cal., 1878.
My Slain...................
457
REDDEN, LAURA C. (Howard Glyndon).
Fair and Fifteen....................848
RICH, HELEN.
b. New York State, June 18,1827.
Silent Mothers...............849
RICH, HIRAM.
b. Gloucester, Mass., Oct. 28,1832.
Still Tenanted.............
849
RICHARDSON, CHARLES FRANCIS
, b. Francis, Hallowed, Me., May 29,1851.
Amends
Imitation
Justice .
Patience
Worship
RIORDAN, ROGER.
Invocation (From The Century)
RITTER, MARY L.
Recompense (From The Century)
ROBERTS, SARAH,
b. Portsmouth, N. H.
The Voice of the Grass . .
ROBERTSON, HARRISON,
b. Murfreesboro, Tenn., Jan. 16,1856.
An Idle Poet (From The Century)
Coquette
458
459
459
459
458
850
851
459
851
851
JliMv


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
liv
ROGERS, SAMUEL.
b. near London, July 30,1/63.
d. Dec. 13,1855.
Age {Human Life).............463
Exhortation to Marriage . 461
Guardian Spirits {Pleasures of
Memory)....................464
Heart Superior to Head ... 461
Man's .Restlessness..........463
Memory {Pleasures of Memory) 463
On a Child {Reflections).... 461
The Old School-house {Pleasures
of Memory).................464
The Passage from Birth to Age
{Human Life)...............462
The Perversion of Great Gifts 460
The Selfish {Reflections) . 461
True Union {Human Life) . 462
ROSSETTI, CHRISTINA GEORGIANA.
b. London, Eng., Dec., 1830.
At Home .....................466
Remember............... 465
Song.........................465
Sound Sleep................465
The First Spring Day . . 465
Up-hill ....................464
Wife to Husband............466
ROSSETTI, DANTE GABRIEL,
b. London, Eng., 1828.
d. London, Eng., April 11,1882.
Lost Days..................468
The Blessed Damozel .... 467
The Sea Limits.............467
RUSSELL, IRWIN.
d. New Orleans, Dec., 1879.
Her Conquest (From The Cen-
tury) .......................851
SANGSTER, MARGARET E.
b. New Rochelle, N. Y., 1838.
Our Own....................468
Sufficient unto the Day . . . 468
SARGENT, EPES.
b. Gloucester, Mass., Sept. 27,1812.
d. Dec. 30,1880.
A Life on the Ocean Wave . 465
A Summer Noon at Sea . 471
A Thought of the Past.... 470
Cuba.........................471
Forget me Not................469
Soul of my Soul ...... 469
The Spring-time will Return 470
Tropical Weather.......471
SAVAGE, MINOT JUDSON.
b. Norridgewock, Me., June 10,1841.
Lives Boston, Mass.
Life in Death................472
Light on tlie Cloud..........473
Pescadero Pebbles............472
SAXE, JOHN GODFREY,
b. Highgate, Vt., June 2,1816.
About Husbands...............778
Early Rising..................777
How Cyrus Laid the Cable . 775
I'm Growing old...............474
Little Jerry, the Miller . 474
Railroad Rhyme................779
Somewhere.....................474
Song of Saratoga..............776
The Family Man................779
The Old Man's Motto .... 473
The Puzzled Census-taker . 776
The Superfluous Man .... 775
To my Love.................. 476
Treasure in Heaven............476
Wouldnt you Like to Know 475
SAXTON, ANDREW BICE,
b. Middlefield, N. Y., April 5,1856.
Delay (From The Century) 852
Midsummer . 852
SCOTT, SIR WALTER.
b. Edinburgh, Scotland, Aug. 15,1771.
d. Abbotsford, Scotland, Sept. 21, 1832.
A Picture of Ellen {Lady of the
Lake).........................477
A Scene in the Highlands {Lady
of the Lake...................477
Breathes there a Man {Lay of
the Last Minstrel)...........478
Faith in Unfaith (The Betrothed) 479
Helvellyn......................481
Love (Lay of the Last Minstrel) 478
Melrose Abbey by Moonlight
{Lay of the Last Minstrel). 478
Paternal Love {Lady of the Lake) 478
Payment in Store {Redgauntlet) 479
Rebeccas Hymn {Ivanhoe) . 479
Summer Dawn at Loch Katrine
{Lady of the Lake)..........476
The Sun upon the Weirdlaw-
Hill........................480
The Violet....................481
Wandering Willie . * . 480
SEAVER, EMILY.
b. Charlestown, Mass., Nov. 5,1835.
The Rose of Jericho .... 482
SEWALL, HARRIET WINSLOW,
b. Portland, Me., June 30,1819.
Why thus Longing ?.............483
SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM,
b. Stratford-on-Avon, April 23,1564.
d. April 23,1616.
Constant Effort Necessary to
Support Fame {Troilus and
Cressidd) ..................486
End of all Earthly Glory {The
Tempest......................487
False Appearance {Merchant of
Venice)......................485
Fear no More {Cymbeline) . 488
Fear of Death {Measwre for
Measure)......................487
Good Counsel of Polonius to
Laertes {Hamlet)..............485
Ingratitude (As you Like It) . 484
Lifes Theatre . 484


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES. lv
Lifes V icissitudes {Henry VIII,) 487
Love, the Solace of present Cal-
amity ............. .... 488
Love, the Retriever of past
Losses.......................489
Love Unalterable..............489
Mercy (Merchant of Venice) . 486
No Spring without the Beloved. 489
The Horse of Adonis (Venus
and Adonis)..................488
To Be, or not to Be (Hamlet) 484
To my Soul....................489
SHELLEY, PERCY BYSSHE.
b. Field Place, Sussex, Eng., Aug. 4,1792.
Drowned in the Bay of Spezia, Italy, July
8,1822.
Death.........................492
Prom The Sensitive-Plant 493
From To a Lady with a
Guitar......................495
Good-Night....................495
Loves Philosophy.............490
Music, when soft Voices Die 492
Mutability....................465
One Word is too often Profaned 490
The Cloud ....................492
The Worlds Wanderers . 492
Time..........................492
To a Skylark..................490
SHENSTONE, WILLIAM.
b, Leasowes, near Hales-Owen, Eng., Nov., 1714.
d. Leasowes, near Hales-Owen, Eng., Feb. 11,
1763.
Stanzas from The School-
mistress ..................496
Written at an Inn at Henley 498
SHIRLEY, JAMES.
b. London, 1594. d. London, Oct. 29,1666.
Death the Leveller (Contention
of Ajax and Ulysses) 498
SHURTLEFF, ERNEST W.
b. Boston, April 4, 1862.
Out of the Dark.............852
SIDNEY, SIR PHILIP.
b. Penshurst, Kent, Eng., Nov. 2D, 1554.
d. Arnheim, Holland, Oct. 7,1586.
Sonnet to Sleep.............499
SIGOURNEY, LYDIA HUNTLEY,
b. Norwich, Conn., Sept. 1,1791.
d. Hartford, Conn., June 10,1863.
Benevolence.................500
Farewell of the Soul to the Body 499
The Coral Insect.........500
SIMMS, WILLIAM GILMORE.
b. Charleston, S. C., April 17, 1806.
d. Charleston, S. C., June 11,1870.
Friendship ........ 503
Heart essential to Genius . 502
Manhood........................503
Night-storm....................503
Progress in Denial.............501
Recompense.....................502
Solace of the Woods ... 501
Triumph.................504
Unhappy Childhood.......503
SMITH, ALEXANDER.
b. Kilmarnock, Scotland, Dec. 31,1830.
d. Wardie, near Edinburgh,- Jan. 25,1867.
Barbara (Horton).........504
Glasgow ......... 505
SMITH, CHARLOTTE TURNER.
b. Sussex, Eng., 1749. d. 1806.
The Close of Spring......507
The Cricket ........ 507
SMITH, FLORENCE.
b. New York City, March 11,1845.
d. Fort W ashington, July 19,1871.
Somebody Older...........509
The Purple of the Poet (Rain-
bow Songs)..............508
The Yellow of the Miser (Rain-
bow Songs) .............508
Unrequiting..............509
SMITH, HORACE,
b. London, Dec. 31,1779.
d. Tunbridge Wells, July 12,1849.
Address to a Mummy .... 511
Hymn to the Flowers .... 510
SMITH, MAY REILLY.
b. Brighton, N. Y., 1842.
If ... ................513
Sometime...............513
SOUTHEY, CAROLINE ANNE BOWLES,
b. Buckland, Eng., Dec. 6,1787.
d. July 20, 1854.
I never Cast a Flower away . 515
Launch thy Bark, Mariner . 514
The Paupers Deatli-bed . 514
SOUTHEY, ROBERT.
b. Bristol, Eng., Aug. 12,1774.
d. Cumberland, Eng., March 21, 1843.
Loves Immortality (Curse of
Kehama)..................517
Natures Questions and Faiths
Answer (Thalaba) 515
Night . 516
Remedial Suffering . 516
The Battle of Blenheim . . . 520
The Cataract of Lodore . . . 521
The Ebb-tide..............522
The Holly-Tree............518
The Maid of Orleans Girding for
Battle (Joan of Arc) .... 517
The old Mans Comforts, and
how he Gained them .... 517
The Paupers Funeral .... 519
The twofold Power of all
Things (Thalaba)............516
To the Fire...................522
Written on Sunday Morning . 519
SOUTHWELL, ROBERT,
b. Hogsham, Norfolk, Eng., 1560.
d. London, Feb. 21,1595.
Content and Rich........523
mm


/
a

lvi INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
SPALDING, SUSAN MAKE.
A Desire (From The Century) 853
SPENCER, WILLIAM ROBERT.
b. England, 1769. d. Paris, Oct. 23,1834.
The Speed of happy Hours . 524
SPENSER, EDMUND,
b. London, 1552 or 1553.
d. Westminster, Jan. 16.1599.
A Hospital {The Faerie Queene) 527
Angelic Care 528
Avarice 525
The Bride Beautiful, Body and
Soul (Epithalamium) .... 524
The Captive Soul {The Faerie
Queene)........................525
Una and the lAon{The Faerie
Queene)........................526
Victory from God {The Faerie
Queene)........................528
SPOFFORD, HARRIET E. PRESCOTT.
b. Calais, Me., April 3,1835.
A Four oClock................531
A Snowdrop....................531
Fantasia......................530
Hereafter................... 529
Measure for Measure .... 531
My own Song...................531
Our Neighbor..................530
Palmistry.....................530
The Nun and Harp..............529
SPRAGUE, CHARLES,
b. Boston, Mass., Oct. 26,1791.
d. Boston, Mass., Jan. 14,1875.
From the Ode on Shakespeare 534
Ode on Art....................532
The Family Meeting............533
The Winged Worshippers . 532
To my Cigar...................533
STEDMAN, EDMUND CLARENCE.
b. Hartford, Conn., Oct. 8,1333.
All in a Lifetime.............539
Laura, my Darling.............535
Seeking the Mayflower .... 538
The Discoverer................538
The Doorstep..................537
The Test......................535
The Tryst.....................536
The Undiscovered Country . 536
Too Late......................537
STODDARD, RICHARD HENRY.
b. Hingham, Mass., July, 1825.
Abraham Lincoln..............540
An old Song Reversed .... 540
At Last.......................540
How are Songs Begot and Bred 541
Out of the Deeps of Heaven. 542
Pain and Pleasure.............542
Rattle the Window.............541
Silent Songs..................542
Songs Unsung..................541
The Flight of Youth...........540
The Health....................542
The Marriage Knot..............781
The Mistake ...................780
The Two Brides.................540
Too old for Kisses.............780
We Sat by the Cheerless Fireside 542
When the Drum of Sickness
Beats................... 541
STORY, WILLIAM WETMORE.
b. Salem, Mass., Feb. 19,1819.
The Unexpressed.................543
The Violet 543
Wetmore Cottage, Nahant . 543
STOWE, HARRIET BEECHER.
b. Litchfield, Conn., June 1, 1812.
Lifes Mystery..................544
The other World.................544
STREET, ALFRED BILLINGS,
b. Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dec. 18,1811.
d. June 2,1881.
A Forest Walk...................548
A Picture (The Nook in the For-
est) ...........................549
Cayuga Lake {Frontenac) 547
Quebec at Sunrise 545
Quebec at Sunset (i 545
The Bluebirds Song.............549
rivu _ ci i ~ ___j. ... \ w
The Canadian Spring{Frontenac) 546
SUCKLING, SIR JOHN,
b. Whitton, Eng.. 1609.
d. Paris, May 7, 1641.
Constancy..................550
I Prithee Send me back my Heart 550
Why so Pale and Wan, Fond
Lover......................550
SURREY, EARL OF (Henry Howard).
b. England, 1516.
d. London, Jan. 21,1547.
From No Age is Content . 551
In Praise of his Lady Love com-
pared with all Others . 551
The Means to attain Happy Life 551
SWIFT, JONATHAN,
b. England, 1667. d. 1745.
Verses on his own Death ... 781
SWINBURNE, ALGERNON CHARLES,
b. Holmwood, Eng., April 5, 1837.
A Forsaken Garden...........553
A Match.....................555
From A Vision of Spring in
Winter...................552
From Christmas Antiphones 556
In Memory of Barry Cornwall 552
SYMONDS, JOHN ADDINGTON,
b. Cxford, Eng., April 10,1807.
Beati Illi..................558
Farewell....................559
From Friend to Friend .... 560
Mene, Mene..................558
New Life, New Love......... 559 |
On the Hillside............ 559
Self {The Alps and Italy). . 560
...Bi-Ul


INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
lvii
Sonnets from Intellectual Iso-
lation ..............561
The Ponte di Paradiso . 560
The Prayer to Mnemosyne . 560
The Will................559
TALFOURD, SIR THOMAS NOON,
b. Doxey, Eng., Jan. 26, 1795.
d. Stafford, Eng., March 13, 1854.
Little Kindnesses {Ion).... 562
On the Reception of Wordsworth
at Oxford...............562
TANNAHILL, ROBERT,
b. Paisley. Scotland, June 3, 1774.
d. Lancashire, Eng., May 17,1810.
The Flower o Dumblane . 563
. The Midges Dance aboon the
Burn......................563
TAYLOR, BAYARD.
b. Kennett Square, Penn., Jan. 11,1825.
d. Berlin, Dec. 19,1878.
A Funeral Thought.............565
Before the Bridal.............566
In the Meadows................566
On the Headland ...... 564
Proposal......................565
Squandered Lives..............566
The Father....................564
The Lost May..................567
The Mystery...................567
The Song of the Camp .... 568
To a Bavarian Girl............569
Wind and Sea..................565
TAYLOR, SIR HENRY,
b. Durham, Eng., 1800.
Love Reluctant to Endanger its
Object {Philip Van Artevelde) 570
Natures Need 571
Relaxation 571
The Mystery of Life 570
Unknown Greatness 596
What Makes a Hero ? . . 571
When Joys are Keenest {Philip
Van Artevelde)................571
TAYLOR, JANE. '
b. London, Sept. 23, 1783.
d. Ongar, Essexshire, April 2, 1824.
The Squires Pew . . 572
TENNYSON, ALFRED.
b. Somersby, Lincolnshire, Eng., 1809.
Ask me no More {The Princess) 578
A Welcome to Alexandra . 582
Break, Break. Break .... 584
Bugle Song {The Princess) . 577
Charge of the Light Brigade 584
Circumstance..................585
Come not when I am Dead . 585
Condition of Spiritual Commu-
nion {In Memoriam) .... 574
Couplets from Locksley Hall 573
Cradle Song {The Princess) . 578
Faith in Doubt {In Memoriam). 575
For his Childs Sake {The Prin-
cess) ........................577
Garden Song {Maud) .... 580
Go not, Happy Day {Maud) . 581
Hope for All (In Memoriam) . 571
Husband to Wife {The Miller's
Daughter).................. 579
Lady Clara Yere de Yere . 583
Love {The Millers Daughter) 579
Man and Woman (The Princess) 578
Move Eastward, Happy Earth 585
Not at All, or All in All (Merlin
and Vivien)..................580
Now Lies the Earth (The Prin-
cess) .........................578
Reconciliation (The Princess) 577
Ring out, Wild Bells {In Memo-
riam) ...................576
Soul to Soul {In Memoriam) . 575
Strong Son of God {In Memoriam) 574
Tears, Idle Tears {The Princess) 577
The Death of the Old Year . 582
The Nuns Song {Guinevere) . 581
The Tears of Heaven .... 585
To a Friend in Heaven {In Mer-
moriam)......................576
What I would be {The Miller's
Daughter)......................579
THACKERAY, WILLIAM MAKEPEACE
b. Calcutta, E. I., 1811.
d. London, Dec. 24,1863.
At the Church-gate............585
Little Billee. . ...... 783
Sorrows of Werther............783
The Ballad of Bouillabaisse 782
THAXTER, CELIA.
b. Portsmouth, N. H., 1835.
A Mussel Shell.
Beethoven
Courage
Discontent
Farewell .
In the Kltterj
Love shall SaVe us All'
Reverie.............
The Sandpiper . .
The Sunrise never Failed us yet
To a Violin.
y Churchyard
587
590
589
586
586
589
588
587
591
587
588
THOMAS, EDITH M.
b. Litchfield, 'Ohio, 1854.
Flower and Fruit.................853
THOMPSON, MAURICE,
b. Fairfield, Indiana, Sept. 9,1844.
Before Dawn......................854
The Morning Hills................853
THOMSON, JAMES.
b. Ednam, Roxburghshire, Scotland, Sept. 11,
1700. d. New Lane, near Richmond, Eng.,
Aug. 27, 1748.
A States Need of Virtue {Lib-
erty) ...........................594
Birds, and their Loves (77^ Sea-
sons) ...........................593
Contentment......................597
Death amid the Snows {The
Seasons).........................593
ip
liV, v ; .v :


lviii
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES,
Excess to be Avoided (The Cas-
tle of Indolence).............596
Harvest Time (The Seasons). 592
Health Necessary to Happy Life
{The Castle of Indolence) . 597
Independence (Liberty) . . 594
Natures Joy Inalienable (The
Castle of Indolence) .... 596
Pure and Happy Love (The Sea-
sons) .........................591
Repose (The Castle of Indolence) 595
Rule, Britannia..................597
The Apollo, and Venus of Medi-
ci (Liberty).....................595
The Polly or Hoarding (The Cas-
tle of Indolence)................596
The State of the World had Men
Lived at Ease (The Castle of
Indolence).....................596
The Tempest (The Seasons) . 591
The Zeal of Persecution (Liberty) 595
THRALE, HESTER L. (Piozzi).
b. Wales, 1740. d. 1821.
The Three Warnings .... 784
TICKNOR, FRANK O.
Gray.......................854
Little Giffen..............854
TILTON, THEODORE.
b. New York, N. Y., Oct. 2,1885.
Love in Age (Thou and I) . 598
Recompense..................601
Sir Marmadukes Musings . 601
The Four Seasons............600
The Two Ladders.............602
Under the Sod (Thou and 1) . 599
TIMROD, HENRY.'
A Common Thought............855
Decoration Ode..............855
Hark to the Shouting Wind . 855
TRENCH RICHARD CHENEVIX.
b. Dublin, Ireland, Sept. 9, 1807.
Falling Stars...............606
Happiness in Little Things of
the Present ....... 605
Harmosan -..................606
Lord, many Times I am Aweary 603
Patience....................604
Sadness born of Beauty . 603
The Bees.................. 605
The Diamond ....... 606
The Ermine..................605
The Lent Jewels.............604
The Nightingale.............605
The Snake...................605
The Tiger. .................605
Three Sonnets on Prayer ... 602
Weak Consolation (Lines to a
Friend)................603
TROWBRIDGE, JOHN TOWNSEND,
b. Ogden, N. Y., Sept. 8,1827.
Darius Green................788
Midsummer................. 609
Midwinter.....................608
My Comrade and I..............613
Real Estate...................610
Stanzas from Service ... 612
The Name in the Bark .... 607
The Old Man of the Mountain 611
The Restored Picture .... 608
The Vagabonds.................785
TUPPER, MARTIN FARQUHAR.
b. London, Eng., July 17,1810.
Argument (Indirect Influences). 617
Foreknowledge Undesirable
(Mystery)...................620
Hints on Pre-existence (Memory) 619
Ill-chosen Pursuits (Self-Ac-
quaintance) ..................614
Ill-christened (Names) .... 618
Late Valuation (Neglect) . 620
Letters (Writing).............615
Life (To-day)................ 620
Mental Supremacy (Beauty). 616
Tl A i.i ... .... .. \
Procrastination (To-morrotv). 621
Spiritual Feelers (Truth in
Things False)..............615
The Conqueror (Beauty) . 616
The Dignity and Patience of
Genius (Fame)..................615
The Force of Trifles (Indirect
Influences)....................619
The Power of Suggestion (Indi-
rect Influences) ................617
The Source of Mans Ruling Pas-
sion (Beauty)....................616
The Word of Bane and Blessing
(To-morroio)...................620
To Munnurers (Neglect) . 619
VAUGHAN, HENRV.
b. Newton, St. Bridget, South Wales, Eng., 1621
d. Newton, April 23,1693.
From Childhood ...........622
From Rules and Lessons . 624
From St. Mary Magdalen . 622
From the Christian Politician 623
Like as a Nurse..............626
Peace...................... 622
Providence...................623
Sundays.................... 624
The Pursuit..................622
The Seed Growing Secretly . 621
The Shower...................621
They are all Gone............621
To his Books.................626
VERY, JONES.
b. Salem, Mass., Aug. 28,1813.
d. 1880.
Home and Heaven..............627
Nature.......................627
The World ....... 627
WALLER, EDMUND.
b. Coleshill, Eng., March 3,1605 or 1606.
d. Beaconsfield, JBng., Oct. 21, 1687.
Old Age and Death............628
On a Girdle..................628
The Rose.....................628


WATTS, ISAAC.
b. Southampton, Eng., July 14,1674.
d. Theobalds, Newington, Eng., Nov. 25,1748.
Insignificant Existence *' . 855
Lord, when I quit this Earthly
Stage................... 856
The Heavenly Canaan .... 856
WEBSTER, AUGUSTA,
b. England, 1841.
From A Preacher .... 629
On the Lake................631
The Artists Dread of Blindness
(A Painter)...................630
The Gift........................631
Two Maidens.....................631
WELBY, AMELIA B.
b. St. Nicholas, Ind., Feb. 3,1819
d. Louisville, Ky., May 3,1852.
, Twilight at Sea..........856
WESLEY. CHARLES.
b. Epworth, Lincolnshire, Eng., Dec. 18,1708.
d. London, March 29,1788.
Come, let us Anew...............633
Jesus, Lover of my Soul . . . 632
Stan'zas from The True Use of
Music...................632
The Only Light.............632
WHEELER, ELLA.
Secrets....................633
WHITE, BLANCO.
b. Seville, Spain, July 11,1775.
d. Liverpool, Eng., May 20,1841.
To Night........................634
WHITE, HENRY KIRKE.
b. Nottingham, Eng., March 21, 1785.
d. Cambridge, Eng., Oct. 19,1806.
A Little before Death .... 636
Ode to Disappointment.... 635
Solitude........................634
The Stanzas added to Wallers
Rose........................636
To an Early Primrose .... 634
To Misfortune...................636
WHITMAN, SARAH HELEN,
b. Providence, R. I., 1803.
d. June 27,1878.
The Last Flowers................857
Sonnets to Edgar Allan Poe. 856
WHITNEY, ADELINE D. T.
b. Boston, 1824.
Behind the Mask.................637
Equinoctial.....................636
Hearth-glow.....................638
I will Abide in Thine House . 638
Larv...........................638
Sunlight and Starlight .... 638
The Three Lights ...... 637
WHITTIER, ELIZABETH HUSSEY,
b. Haverhill, Mass., Dec. 7, 1815.
d. Amesbury, Mass., Sept. 3,1864.
Charity.........................639
WHITTIER, JOHN GREENLEAF.
b. Haverhill, Mass, Dec. 17,1807.
Barbara Frietchie............642
In School-days...............640
Maud Muller .................643
My Playmate..................649
My Psalm.....................641
Natures Reverence (Tent on the
Beach)................... 645
The Barefoot Boy.............639
The Pressed Gentian..........646
Universal Salvation (Tent on the
Beach).......................645
WILDE, OSCAR.
Easter-day...............647
Impressions du Matin .... 648
Madonna Mia..............648
Requiescat...............648
Silhouettes..............648
Sonnet...................648
Sunrise .......... 648
WILDE, RICHARD HENRY
b. Dublin, Ireland, Sept. 24.1789.
d. New Orleans, Sept. 10,1847.
My Life is like the Summer
Rose.......................649
To the Mocking Bird .... 649
WILLIAMS, HELEN MARIA
b. near Berwick, Eng., 1762.
d. Paris, Dec., 1827.
Sonnet to Hope...........650
Whilst Thee I Seek.......650
WILLIS, NATHANIEL PARKER,
b. Portland, Me.. Jan. 20, 1807.
d. Idlewild, N. Y., Jan. 20,1867.
From Absalom ............654
On the Picture of a Child Tired
of Play...................651
Saturday Afternoon..........651
The Belfry Pigeon ..... 653
The Burial of the Champion of
his Class.................652
To a City Pigeon............650
To Giulia Grisi.............653
Unseen Spirits ,..........653
WILLSON, FORCEYTHE.
b. Little Genesee, N. Y., 1837.
d. 1867.
The Old Sergeant............655
WILSON, JOHN (Christopher North).
b. Paisley, Scotland, May 18,1785.
d. Edinburgh, April 3, 1854.
The Evening Cloud............657
The Shipwreck (Isle of Palms). 657
WINTER, WILLIAM.
b. Gloucester, Mass., July 15, 1836.
A Dirge.................661
After All ......... 659
Homage..................659
The Golden Silence......661
The Question............660
The White Flag..........658
Withered Roses..........660



' 4
'L '
; "W-i
L' !
"M
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES.
WITHER, GEORGE.
b. Brentworth, Eng. June 11, 1588.
d. London, May 2, 1667.
For a Servant...............663
For a Widower or Widow . 662
From Poverty ..... 662
Hymn for Anniversary Marriage
Bays................... 662
WOLCOT, JOHN (Peter Pindar).
b. Dodbrooke, Devonshire, Eng., 1738.
d. Somers Town, London, Jan. 13,181
To my Candle....................664
The Pilgrims and the Peas .792
The Razorseller.............792
WOLFE, CHARLES.
b. Dublin, Ireland, Dec. 14,1791.
d. Cove of Cork, now Queenstown, Feb, 21, 1823.
Burial of Sir John Moore . 665
Go, Forget Me..............665
To Mary....................664
WOOBWORTH, SAMUEL.
b. Scituate, Mass., Jan. 13, 1785.
d. New York, Dec. 9, 1842.
The Old Oaken Bucket .... 666
WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM,
b. Cockermouth, Eng., April 7, 1770.
d. Rydal Mount, April 23, 1850.
Apostrophe to the Poets Sister
(Lines composed a fexo miles
from Tintern Abbey) .... 667
Evening.......................675
From Intimations of Immor-
tality ......................650
Lucy..........................672
Scorn not the Sonnet . . 675
She was a Phantom of Delight. 674
The Daffodils ..............671
The Deaf Dalesman (Excursion) 669
The Prop of Faith 668
The Solace of Nature (Lines
composed a few miles above
Tintern Abbey)..............666
The World is too much with
us..........................675
Thy Art be Nature.............674
To a Distant Friend...........672
To a Skylark..................673
To a Young Lady...............671
To Sleep.....................,672
To the Cuckoo.................676
Twilight.................... 672
Undeveloped Genius (Excursion) 668
We are Seven..................673
Westminster Bridge . ... 675
WOTTON, SIR HENRY.
March 31, 1528. d. Eton, Dec., 1639.
A Happy Life..................676
WYATT, SIR THOMAS.
b. Alington Castle, Kent., Eng., 1503.
d. Sherborne, Eng., Oct. 11, 1542.
A Lovers Prayer..............677
Description of the One he would
Love........................677
Pleasure mixed with Pain . 677
YOUNG, EDWARD.
b. Upham, Hampshire, Eng., 1684.
d. weliwyn, Hertfordshire, April 12,1765.
All Change; no Death (Night
Thoughts)................VI. 683
Ambition (Night ThoxigMs) VII. 683
Cheerfulness in Misfortune
(Night Thoughts) . IX. 684
Conscience (Night Thoughts) II. 678
Cruelty (Night Thoughts) III. 681
Different Sources of Funeral
Tears (Night Thoughts). V. 682
Effect of Contact with the World
(Night Thoughts) ... II. 679
Effort, the Gauge of Greatness
{Night Thoughts) . . II. 680
False Terrors in view of Death
(Night Thoughts) . IV. 682
Insufficiency of the World
(Night Thoughts) ... II. 680
Joy to be Shared (Night
Thoughts)................II. 678
Power of the World (Night
Thoughts)................V. 683
Procrastination, and Forgetful-
ness of Death (Night
Thoughts) ...... I. 677
The Crowning Disappointment
(Night Thoughts) ... II. 679
The End of the Virtuous (Night
Thoughts)...............II. 680
The Glory of Death (Night
Thoughts)..............III. 681
The other Life the End of This
(Night Thoughts) . III. 681
The world a Grave (Night
Thoughts)...............IX. 684
Time, its Use and Misuse (Night
Thoughts)...............II. 678
Virtue, the Measure of Years
(Night Thoughts) ... V. 683
Wisdom (Night Thoughts) VIIJ. 684
YOUNG, WILLIAM.
b. Monmouth, Ills., 1847.
The Horseman (From The Cen-
tury) .................. . 858
1


Henry Abbey.
THE CALIPH'S MAGNANIMITY.
A traveller across the desert
waste
Found on his way a cool, palm-
shaded spring,
And the fresh water seemed to his
pleased taste,
In the known world, the most de-
licious thing.
Great is the caliph! said he; I
for him
Will fill my leathern bottle to the
brim.
He sank the bottle, forcing it to drink
Until the gurgle ceased in its lank
throat;
And as he started onward, smiled to
think
That he for thirst bore Gods sole
antidote.
Days after, with obeisance low and
meet,
He laid his present at the caliphs feet.
Forthwith the issue of the spring was
poured
Into a cup, on whose embossed
outside,
Jewels, like solid water, shaped a
gourd.
The caliph drank, and seemed well
satisfied,
Nay, wisely pleased, and straightway
gave command
To line with gold the mans work-
hardened hand.
The corn-tiers, looking at the round
reward,
Fancied that some unheard-of vir-
tue graced
The bottled burden borne for their
loved lord,
And of the liquid gift asked but to
taste.
The caliph answered from his potent
throne:
Touch not the water; it is mine
alone!
But soon after the humble giver
went.
Oerflowing with delight, which
bathed his face
The caliph told his courtiers the
intent
Of his denial, saying: It is base
Not to accept a kindness when ex-
pressed
By no low motive of self-interest.
The water was a gift of love to me,
Which I with golden gratitude re-
paid.
I would not let the honest giver see
That, on its way, the crystal of the
shade
Had changed, and was impure; for
so, no less,
His love, thus scorned, had turned to
bitterness.
I granted not the warm, distasteful
draught
To asking lips, because of firm mis-
trust,
Or kindly fear, that, if another
quaffed,
He would reveal his feeling of dis-
gust,
And he, who meant a favor, would
depart,
Bearing a wounded and dejected
heart.
HI


2 ABBEY,
MAY IN KINGSTON.
Our old colonial town is new with
May:
The loving trees that clasp across
the streets,
Grow greener sleeved with bursting
buds each day.
Still this years May the last years
May repeats;
Even the old stone houses half renew
Their youth and beauty, as the old
trees do.
'High over all, like some divine de-
sire
Above our lower thoughts of daily
care,
The gray, religious, heaven-touching
spire
Adds to the quiet of the spring-
time air;
And over roofs the birds create a sea,
That has no shore, of their May
melody.
Down through the lowlands now of
lightest green,
The undecided creek winds on its
way.
There the lithe willow bends with
graceful mien,
And sees its likeness in the depths
all day;
While in the orchards, flushed with
Mays warm light,
The bride-like fruit-trees dw'ell, at-
tired in white.
But yonder loom the mountains old
and grand,
That off, along dim distance, reach
afar,
And high and vast, against the sun-
set stand,
A dreamy range, long and irreg-
ular
A caravan that never passes by,
Whose camel-backs are laden with
the sky.
So, like a caravan, our outlived years
Loom on the introspective land-
scape seen
Within the heart: and now, when
May appears,
And earth renews its vernal bloom
and green,
We but renew our longing, and we
say:
Oh, would that life might ever be
all May!
Would that the bloom of youth
which is so brief,
The bloom, the May, the fullness
ripe and fair
Of cheek and limb, might fade not
as the leaf;
Would that the heart might not
grow old with care,
Xor love turn bitter, nor fond hope
decay;
But soul and body lead a life of
May!
FACIE BAT.
As thoughts possess the fashion of
the mood
That gave them birth, so every
deed we do
Partakes of our inborn disquietude
Which spurns the old and reaches
toward the new.
The noblest works of human art and
pride
Show that their makers were not
satisfied.
Eor, looking down the ladder of our
deeds,
The rounds seem slender; all past
work appears
Unto the doer faulty; the heart
bleeds,
And pale Regret comes weltering
in tears,
To think how poor our best has been,
how vain,
Beside the excellence we would at-
tain.


p§i
ADAMS ADDISON.
Sarah Flower Adams.
NEARER, MY GOD, TO THEE.
Nearer, my God, to tliee,
Nearer to tliee:
Een though it be a cross
That raiseth me,
Still all my song shall be,
Nearer, my God, to thee,
Nearer to thee.
Though like a wanderer,
Daylight all gone,
Darkness be over me,
My rest a stone,
Yet in my dreams, Id he
Nearer, my God, to thee,
Nearer to thee.
There let the way appear
Steps up to heaven;
All that thou sendest me
In mercy given,
Angels to beckon me
Nearer, my God, to thee,
Nearer to thee.
Then with my waking thoughts,
Bright with thy praise,
Out of my stony griefs,
Bethel Ill raise;
So by my woes to he
Nearer, my God, to thee,
Nearer to thee.
Or if on joyful wing,
Cleaving the sky,
Sun, moon, and stars forgot
Upward I fly,
Still all my song shall be,
Nearer, my God, to thee,
Nearer to thee.
Joseph Addison.
APOSTROPHE TO LIBERTY.
0 Liberty, thou goddess heavenly
bright,
Profuse of bliss, and pregnant with
delight!
Eternal pleasures in thy presence
reign,
And smiling plenty leads thy wanton
train;
Eased of her load, subjection grows
more light,
And poverty looks cheerful in thy
sight;-
Thou makst the gloomy face of na-
ture gay,
Givst beauty to the sun, and pleas-
ure to the day.
Thee, goddess, tliee, Britannias
isle adores;
How has she oft exhausted all her
stores,
How oft in fields of death thy pres-
ence sought,
Nor thinks the mighty prize too
dearly bought!
On foreign mountains may the sun
refine
The grapes soft juice, and mellow it
to wine;
With citron groves adorn a distant
soil,
And the fat olive swell with floods of
oil:
We envy not the warmer clime, that
lies
In ten degrees of more indulgent
skies;
Nor at the coarseness of our heaven
repine,
Though oer our heads the frozen
Pleiads shine:
Tis liberty that crowns Britannias
isle,
And makes her barren rocks and her
bleak mountains smile.


4
i i lii lii Mawwnpw^-y i ii<1i l.
AKENSIDE.
CATOS SOLILOQUY.
It must be so Plato, thou reasonst
well!
Else whence this pleasing hope, this
fond desire,
This longing after immortality?
Or whence this secret dread, and in-
ward horror,
Of falling into nought ? why shrinks
the soul
Back on herself, and startles at
destruction?
Tis the divinity that stirs within us;
Tis heaven itself that points out an
hereafter,
And intimates eternity to man.
Eternity! thou pleasing, dreadful
thought!
Through what variety of untried
being,
Through what new scenes and
changes must we pass ?
The wide, th unbounded prospect
lies before me;
But shadows, clouds, and darkness
rest upon it.
Here will I hold. If theres a power
above us
And that there is, all nature cries
aloud
Through all her works he must
delight in virtue;
And that which he delights in must
be happy.
But when ? or where ? This world
was made for Caesar.
Im weary of conjectures. This
must end them.
[Laying his hand on his sword.]
Thus am I doubly armed: my death,
and life,
My bane and antidote, are both
before me:
This in a moment brings me to an
end;
But this informs me I shall never
die.
The soul, secured in her existence,
smiles
At the drawn dagger, and defies its
point.
The stars shall fade away, the sun
himself
Grow dim with age, and nature sink
in years;
But thou shalt flourish in immortal
youth,
Unhurt amidst the wars of ele-
ments,
The wreck of matter, and the crush
of worlds.
What means this heaviness that
hangs upon me?
This lethargy that creeps through all
my senses ?
Nature oppressed, and harassed out
with care,
Sinks down to rest. This once Ill
favor her,
That my awakened soul may take
her flight,
Renewed in all her strength, and
fresh with life,
An offering fit for heaven. Let guilt
or fear
Disturb mans rest: Cato knows nei-
ther of them;
Indifferent in his choice to sleep or
die.
Mark Akenside.
ON A SERMON AGAINST GLORY.
Come then, tell me, sage divine,
Is it an offence to own
That our bosoms eer incline
Toward immortal Glorys throne?
For with me nor pomp, nor pleasure,
Bourbons might, Braganzas treasure,
So can fancys dream rejoice,
So conciliate reasons choice,
As one approving word of her impar,
tial voice.


AKEN8WE.
If to spurn at noble praise
Be the passport to thy heaven,
Follow thou those gloomy ways
No such law to me was given;
Nor, I trust, shall I deplore me,
Faring like my friends before me;
Nor an holier place desire
Than Timoleons arms acquire,
And Tullys curule chair, and Mil-
tons golden lyre.
[From Pleasures of the Imagination.]
THE DEVELOPMENT OF POETIC
AND ARTISTIC CREATIONS.
By these mysterious ties, the busy
power
Of memory her ideal train preserves
Entire; or when they would elude
her watch,
Reclaims their fleeting footsteps
from the waste
Of dark oblivion; thus collecting all
The various forms of being, to present
Before the curious eye of mimic art
Their largest choice: like Springs
unfolded blooms
Exhaling sweetness, that the skilful
bee
May taste at will from their selected
spoils
To work her dulcet food. For not
the expanse
Of living lakes in summers noontide
calm,
Reflects the bordering shade and sun-
briglit heavens
With fairer semblance; not the
sculptured gold
More faithful keeps the gravers
lively trace,
Than he whose birth the sister-
powers of art
Propitious viewed, and from his
genial star
Shed influence to the seeds of fancy
kind,
Than his attempered bosom must
preserve
The seal of nature. There alone,
unchanged
Her form remains. The balmy walks
of May
There breathe perennial sweets: the
trembling chord
Resounds forever in the abstracted
ear,
Melodious; and the virgins radiant
eye,
Superior to disease, to grief, and time,
Shines with unbating lustre. Thus
at length
Endowed with all that nature can
bestow,
The child of fancy oft in silence
bends
Oer these mixed treasures of his
pregnant breast
With conscious pride.' From them
he oft resolves
To frame he knows not what excel-
ling things,
And win he knows not w'hat sublime
reward
Of praise and wonder. By degrees
the mind
Feels her young nerves dilate: the
plastic powers
Labor for action: blind emotions
heave
His bosom; and with loveliest frenzy
caught,
From earth to heaven he rolls his
daring eye,
From heaven to earth. Anon ten
thousand shapes,
Like spectres trooping to the wiz-
ards call,
Flit swift before him. From the
womb of earth,
From oceans bed they come: the
eternal heavens
Disclose their splendors, and the
dark abyss
Pours out her births unknown.
With fixed gaze
He marks the rising phantoms. Now
compares
Their different forms; now blends
them, now divides;
Enlarges and extenuates by turns;
Opposes, ranges in fantastic bands,
And infinitely varies. Hither now,
Now thither fluctuates his inconstant
aim,


6
AKENSIDE.
With endless choice perplexed. At
length his plan
Begins to open. Lucid order dawns;
And as from Chaos old the jarring
seeds
Of nature at the voice divine repaired
Each to its place, till rosy earth un-
veiled
Her fragrant bosom, and the joyful
sun
Sprung up the blue serene; by swift
degrees
Thus disentangled, his entire design
Emerges. Colors mingle, features
join,
And lines converge: the fainter parts
retire;
The fairer eminent in light advance ;
And every image on its neighbor
smiles.
Awhile he stands, and with a fathers
joy
Contemplates. Then with Prome-
thean art
Into its proper vehicle he breathes
The fair conception which, embodied
thus,
And permanent, becomes to eyes or
ears
An object ascertained: while thus
informed,
The various objects of his mimic
skill,
The consonance of sounds, the feat-
ured rock,
The shadowy picture, and impas-
sioned verse,
Beyond their proper powers attract
the soul
By that expressive semblance, while
in sight
Of natures great original we scan
The lively child of art; while line by
line,
And feature after feature, we refer
To that divine exemplar whence it
stole
Those animating charms. Thus
beautys palm
Betwixt them wavering hangs: ap-
plauding love
Doubts where to choose; and mortal
man aspires
To tempt creative praise.
[ From Pleasures of the Imagination.]
Ill CUES OF A MAN OF TASTE.
What though not all
Of mortal offspring can attain the
heights
Of envied life; though only few pos-
sess
Patrician treasures or imperial state;.
Yet natures care, to all her children
just,
With richer treasures and an ampler
state,
Endows, at large, whatever happy man
Will deign to use them. His the
citys pomp,
The rural honors his. Whateer
adorns
The princely dome, the column and
the arch,
The breathing marbles and the
sculptured gold,
Beyond the proud possessors narrow
claim,
His tuneful breast enjoys. For him,
the Spring
Distils her dews, and from the silken
gem
Its lucid leaves unfolds: for him, the
hand
Of Autumn tinges every fertile
branch
With blooming gold, and blushes like
the morn.
Each passing hour sheds tribute from
her wings;
And still new beauties meet his
lonely wralk,.
And loves unfelt attract him. Not a
breeze
Flies oer the meadow, not a cloud
imbibes
The setting suns effulgence, not a
strain
From all the tenants of the warbling
shade
Ascends, but whence his bosom can
partake
Fresh pleasure unreproved. Nor
thence partakes
Fresh pleasure only: for th attentive
mind,
By this harmonious action on her
powers,


AKENSIDE.
Becomes herself harmonious: wont
so oft
In outward things to meditate the
charm
Of sacred order, soon she seeks at
home
To find a kindred order to exert
Within herself this elegance of love,
This fair inspired delight: her tem-
perd powers
Befine at length, and every passion
wears
A chaster, milder, more attractive
mien.
[From, Pleasures of the Imagination.]
MENTAL BEAUTY.
Thus doth beauty dwell
There most conspicuous, een in out-
ward shape,
Where dawns the high expression of
a mind:
By steps conducting our enraptured
search
To that eternal origin, whose power,
Through all th unbounded symme-
try of things,
Like rays effulging from the parent
sun,
This endless mixture of her charms
diffused.
Mind, mind alone, bear witness,
earth and heaven!
The living fountains in itself con-
tains
Of beauteous and sublime: here, hand
in hand,
Sit paramount the graces; here en-
throned,
Celestial Yenus, with divinest airs,
Invites the soul to never-fading joy.
[From Pleasures of the Imagination.]
ASPIRATIONS AFTER THE INFI-
NITE.
Say, why was man so eminently
raised
Amid the vast creation; why ordaind
Through life and death to dart his
piercing eye,
With thoughts beyond the limit of
his frame;
But that th Omnipotent might send
him forth
In sight of mortal and immortal
powers,
As on a boundless theatre, to run
The great career of justice; to exalt
His generous aim to all diviner deeds;
To chase each partial purpose from
his breast,
And through the mists of passion and
of sense,
And through the tossing tide of
chance and pain,
To hold his course unfaltering, while
the voice
Of truth and virtue, up the steep
ascent
Of nature, calls him to his high re-
ward,
Th applauding smile of heaven ?
Else wherefore burns
In mortal bosoms this unquenched
hope,
That breathes from day to day sub-
limer things,
And mocks possession? wherefore
darts the mind,
With such resistless ardor, to embrace
Majestic forms; impatient to be free;
Spurning the gross control of wilful
might;
Proud of the strong contention of
her toils;
Proud to be daring ?
For from the birth
Of mortal man, the sovereign Maker
said,
That not in humble nor in brief de-
light,
Hot in the fading echoes of renown,
Powers purple robes, nor Pleasures
flowery lap,
The soul should find enjoyment: but
from these
Turning disdainful to an equal good,
Through all th ascent of things en-
large her view,
Till every bound at length should
disappear,
And infinite perfection close the
scene.


8
AKERMAN ALDRICH.
Lucy Evelina Akerman.
NOTHING HUT LEAVES.
He found nothing thereon but leaves.
Matt. xxi. 19.
Nothing but leaves; the spirit
grieves
Over the wasted life:
Sin committed while conscience slept,
Promises made but never kept,
Hatred, battle, strife;
Nothing but leaves!
Nothing but leaves; no garnerd
sheaves
Of lifes fair, ripend grain;
Words, idle words, for earnest deeds;
We sow our seedslo! tares and
weeds;
We reap with toil and pain
Nothing but leaves!
Nothing but leaves; memory weaves
No veil to screen the past:
As we retrace our weary way,
Counting' each lost and misspent
day
We find, sadly, at last,
Nothing but leaves!
And shall we meet the Master so,
Bearing our witherd leaves ?
The Saviour looks for perfect fruit,
We stand before him, humbled,
mute;
Waiting the words he breathes,
Nothing but leaves!
James Aldrich.
A DEATH-BED.
Her suffering ended with the day;
Yet lived she at its close,
And breathed the long, long night
away,
In statue-like repose.
But when the sun, in all his state,
Illumed the eastern skies,
She passed through Glorys morning-
gate,
And walked in Paradise!
Thomas Bailey Aldrich.
THE BALLAD OF BABIE BELL.
Have you not heard the poets tell
How came the dainty Babie Bell
Into this world of ours?
The gates of heaven were left ajar:
With folded hands and dreamy eyes,
Wandering out of Paradise,
She saw this planet, like a star,
Hung in the glistening depths of
even,
Its bridges, running to and fro,
Oer which the white-winged Angels
go,
Bearing the holy Dead to heaven.
She touched a bridge of flowers,
those feet
So light they did not bend the bells
Of the celestial asphodels!
They fell like dew upon the flowers,
Then all the air grew strangely sweet!
And thus came dainty Babie Bell
Into this world of ours.
She came and brought delicious May,
The swallows built beneath the
eaves;
Like sunlight in and out the
leaves,
The robins went the livelong day;


The lily swung its noiseless bell,
And oer the porch the trembling
vine
Seemed bursting with its veins of
wine.
How sweetly, softly, twilight fell!
O, earth was full of singing-birds,
And opening spring-tide flowers,
When the dainty Babie Bell
Came to this world of ours!
O Babie, dainty Babie Bell,
How fair she grew from day to day!
What woman-nature filled her eyes,
What poetry within them lay:
Those deep and tender twilight
eyes,
So full of meaning, pure and
bright
As if she yet stood in the light
Of those oped gates of Paradise.
And so we loved her more and more;
Ah, never in our hearts before
Was love so lovely born.
We felt we had a link between
This real world and that unseen,
The land beyond the morn.
And for the love of those dear eyes,
For love of her whom God led forth,
(The mothers being ceased on earth
When Babie came from Paradise,)
For love of Him who smote our lives,
And woke the chords of ioy and
pain,
We said, Dear Christ! Our hearts
bent down
Like violets after rain.
And now the orchards, which were
white
And red with blossoms when she
came,
Were rich in autumns mellow
prime:
The clustered apples burnt like
flame,
The soft-cheeked peaches blushed
and fell,
The ivory chestnut burst its shell,
The grapes hung purpling in the
grange:
And time wrought just as rich a
change
In little Babie Bell.
Her lissome form more perfect grew,
And in her features we could
trace,
In softened curves, her mothers
face!
Her angel-nature ripened too.
We thought her lovely when she
came,
But she was holy, saintly now;
Around her pale angelic brow
We saw a slender ring of flame!
Gods hand had taken away the seal,
That held the portals of her speech ;
And oft she said a few strange words
Whose meaning lay beyond our
reach.
She never was a child to us,
We never held her beings key;
We could not teach her holy things:
She was Christs self in purity.
It came upon us by degrees:
We saw its shadow ere it fell,
The knowledge that our God had sent
His messenger for Babie Bell.
We shuddered with unlanguaged
pain,
And all our hopes were changed to
fears,
And all our thoughts ran into tears
Like sunshine into rain.
We cried aloud in our belief,
O, smite us gently, gently, God!
Teach us to bend and kiss the rod,
And perfect grow through grief.
Ah, how we loved her, God can tell;
Her heart was folded deep in ours.
Our hearts are broken, Babie Bell!
At last he came, the messenger,
The messenger from unseen lands;
And what did dainty Babie Bell ?
She only crossed her little hands,
She only looked more meek and
fair!
We parted back her silken hair:
We wove the roses round her brow,
White buds, the summers drifted
snow,
Wrapt her from head to foot in flow-
ers!
And thus went dainty Babie Bell
Out of this world of ours!


10
ALDRICH.
DESTINY.
Three roses, wan as moonlight and
weighed down
Each with its loveliness as with a
crown,
Drooped in a florists window in a
town.
The first a lover bought. It lay at
rest,
Like flower on flower, that night, on
Beautys breast.
The second rose, as virginal and fair,
Shrunk in the tangles of a ballots
hair.
The third, a widow, with new grief
made wild,
Shut in the icy palm of her dead
child.
AN UNTIMELY THOUGHT.
I wonder what day of the week
I wonder what month of the year
Will it be midnight, or morning,
And who will bend over my bier ?
What a hideous fancy to come
As I wait, at the foot of the stair,
While Lilian gives the last touch
To her robe, or the rose in her hair.
Do I like your new dress pompa-
dour?
And do I like you ? On my life,
You are eighteen, and not a day
more,
And have not been six years my wife.
Those two rosy boys in the crib
Up stairs are not ours, to be sure!
You are just a sweet bride in her
bloom,
All sunshine, and snowy, and pure.
As the carriage rolls down the dark
street
The little wife laughs and makes
cheer;
But ... I wonder what day of the
week,
I wonder what month of the year.
NAMELESS PAIN.
In my nostrils the summer wind
Blows the exquisite scent of the rose!
O for the golden, golden wind,
Breaking the buds as it goes,
Breaking the buds, and bending the
grass,
And spilling the scent of the rose!
0 wind of the summer morn,
Tearing the petals in twain,
Wafting the fragrant soul
Of the rose through valley and plain,
1 would you could tear my heart to-
day,
And scatter its nameless pain.
UNSUNG.
As sweet as the breath that goes
From the lips of the white rose,
As weird as the elfin lights
That glimmer of frosty nights,
As wild as the winds that tear
The curled red leaf in the air,
Is the song I have never sung.
In slumber, a hundred times
I have said the mystic rhymes,
But ere I open my eyes
This ghost of a poem flies;
Of the interfluent strains
Not even a note remains:
I know by my pulses beat
It was something wild and sweet,
And my heart is strangely stirred
By an unremembered word!
I strive, but I strive in vain,
To recall the lost refrain.
On some miraculous day
Perhaps it will come and stay;
In some unimagined Spring
1 may find my voice, and sing
The song I have never sung.
Kff!
is


ALDRICH.
11
RENCONTRE.
Toiling across the Mer de Glace
I thought of, longed for thee;
What miles between us stretched,
alas!
What miles of land and sea!
My foe, undreamed of, at my side
Stood suddenly, like Fate.
For those who love, the world is wide,
But not for those who hate.
THE FADER VIOLET.
What thought is folded in thy leaves!
What tender thought, what speech-
less pain!
I hold thy faded lips to mine,
Thou darling of the April rain!
I hold thy faded lips to mine,
Though scent and azure tint are fled
0 dry, mute lips! ye are the type
Of something in me cold and dead;
Of something wilted like thy leaves;
Of fragrance flown, of beauty dim;
Yet, for the love of those white hands,
That found thee by a rivers brim
That found thee when thy dewy
mouth
Was purpled as with stains of wine
For love of her who love forgot,
1 hold thy faded lips to mine.
That thou shouldst live when I am
dead,
When hate is dead, for me, and
wrong,
For this, I use my subtlest art,
For this, I fold thee in my song.
AFTER THE RAIN.
The rain has ceased, and in my room
The sunshine pours an airy flood;
And on the churchs dizzy vane
The ancient cross is bathed in blood.
From out the dripping ivy-leaves,
Antiquely-carven, gray and high,
A dormer, facing westward, looks
Upon the village like an eye:
And now it glimmers in the sun,
A globe of gold, a disc, a speck:
And in the belfry sits a dove
With purple ripples on her neck.
PURSUIT AND POSSESSION.
When I behold what, pleasure is Pur-
suit,
What life, what glorious eagerness
it is;
Then mark how full Possession falls
from this,
How fairer seems the blossom than
the fruit
I am perplext, and often stricken
mute
Wondering which attained the higher
bliss,
The winged insect, or the chrysalis
It thrust aside with unreluctant foot.
Spirit of verse that still eludst my
art,
Thou airy phantom that dost ever
haunt me,
O never, never rest upon my heart,
If when I have thee I shall little want
thee!
Still flit away in moonlight, rain, and
dew,
Will-o-the-wisp, that I may still
pursue!
SLEEP.
When to soft Sleep we give ourselves
away,
And in a dream as in a fairy bark
Drift on and on through the en-
chanted dark
To purple daybreak little thought
we pay
To that sweet bitter world we know
by day.
We are clean quit of it, as is a lark
So high in heaven no human eye may
mark

81 3SB 11 3aS3 SSI 81


12 ALDRICH ALEXANDER.
The thin swift pinion cleaving
through the gray.
Till we awake ill fate can do no ill
The resting heart shall not take up
again
The heavy load that yet must make
it bleed;
For this brief space the loud worlds
voice is still,
No faintest echo of it brings us pain.
How will it be when we shall sleep
indeed ?
MASKS.
Black Tragedy lets slip her grim dis-
guise
And shows you laughing lips and
roguish eyes;
But when, unmasked, gay Comedy
appears,
How wan her cheeks are, and what
heavy tears!
THE ROSE.
Fixed to her necklace, like another
gem,
A rose she wore the flower June
made for her;
Fairer it looked than when upon the
stem,
And must, indeed, have been much
happier.
MAPLE LEAVES.
October turned my maples leaves to
gold;
The most are gone now; here and
there one lingers;
Soon these will slip from out the
twigs weak hold,
Like coins between a dying misers
fingers.
TO ANY POET.
Out of the thousand verses you have
writ,
If Time spare none, you will not care
at all;
If Time spare one, you will not know
of it:
Nor shame nor fame can scale a
churchyard wall.
Cecil Frances Alexander.
THE BURIAL OF MOSES.
And he buried him in a valley in the
land of jYloab, over against Beth-peor; but
no man knowetli of his sepulchre unto
this day.
By Nebos lonely mountain,
On this side Jordans wave,
In a vale in the land of Moab
There lies a lonely grave.
And rio man knows that sepulchre,
And no man saw it eer,
For the angels of God upturned the
sod
And laid the dead man there.
That was the grandest funeral
That ever passd on earth;
But no man heard the trampling,
Or saw the train go forth
Noiselessly as the daylight
Comes back when night is done,
And the crimson streak on oceans
cheek
Grows into the great sun.
Noiselessly as the spring-time
Her crown of verdure weaves,
And all the trees on all the hills
Open their thousand leaves;
So without sound of music,
Or voice of them that wept,


On grey Beth-peors height,
Out of his lonely eyrie
Lookd on the wondrous sight;
Perchance the lion stalking,
Still shuns that hallowd spot,
For beast and bird have seen and
heard
That which man knowetli not.
But when the warrior dieth,
His comrades in the war,
With arms reversed and muffled
drum,
Follow his funeral car;
They show the banners taken,
They tell his battles won,
And after him lead his masterless
steed,
While peals the minute gun.
Amid the noblest of the land
We lay the sage to rest,
And give the bard an honord place,
With costly marble drest,
In the great minster transept
Where lights like glories fall,
And the organ rings, and the sweet
choir sings
Along the emblazond wall.
This was the truest warrior
That ever buckled sword,
This the most gifted poet
That ever breathed a word;
And had he not high honor,
The hillside for a pall,
To lie in state while angels wait
With stars for tapers tall,
And the dark rock-pines like tossing
plumes,
Over his bier to wave,
And Gods own hand, in that lonely
land,
To lay him in the grave ?
In that strange grave without a
name,
Whence his uncoffind clay
Shall break again, O wondrous
thought!
Before the Judgment Day,
And stand with glory wrapt around
On the hills he never trod,
And speak of the strife that won
our life
With the Incarnate Son of God.
O lonely grave in Moabs land!
O dark Beth-peors hill!
Speak to these curious hearts of
ours,
And teach them to be still.
God hath His mysteries of grace,
Ways that we cannot tell;
He hides them deep, like the hidden
sleep
Of him He loved so well.
Henry Alford.
THE AGED OAK AT OAKLEY.
I WAS a young fair tree;
Each spring with quivering green
My boughs were clad; and far
Down the deep vale a light
Shone from me on the eyes
Of those who passd, a light
That told of sunny days,
And blossoms, and blue sky;
For I was ever first
Of all the grove to hear
The soft voice under ground
Of the warm-working spring;
And ere my brethren stirrd
Their sheathed bud, the kine,


14
ALLEN.
And the kines keeper, came
Slow up the valley path,
And laid them underneath
My cool and rustling leaves;
And I could feel them there
As in the quiet shade
They stood with tender thoughts,
That passd along their life
Like wings on a still lake,
Blessing me; and to God,
The blessed God, who cares
For all my little leaves,
Went up the silent praise;
And I was glad with joy
Which life of laboring things
111 knows, the joy that sinks
Into a life of rest.
Ages have fled since then:
But deem not my pierced trunk
And scanty leafage serve
No high behest; my name
Is sounded far and wide;
And in the Providence
That guides the steps of men,
Hundreds have come to view
My grandeur in decay;
And there hath passd from me
A quiet influence
Into the minds of men:
The silver head of age,
The majesty of laws,
The very name of God,
And holiest things that are
Have won upon the heart
Of humankind the more,
For that I stand to meet
With vast and bleaching trunk,
The rudeness of the sky.
Elizabeth Akers Allen.
ENDURANCE.
How much the heart may bear, and
yet not break!
How much the flesh may suffer,
and not die!
I question much if any pain or ache
Of soul or body brings our end
more nigh;
Death chooses his own time; till that
is sworn,
All evils may be borne.
We shrink and shudder at the sur-
geons knife,
Each nerve recoiling from the cruel
steel
Whose edge seems searching for the
quivering life,
Yet to our sense the bitter pangs
reveal,
That still, although the trembling
flesh be torn,
This also can be borne.
We see a sorrow rising in our way,
And try to flee from the approach-
ing ill;
We seek some small escape; we weep
and pray;
But when the blow falls, then our
hearts are still;
Not that the pain is of its sharpness
shorn,
But that it can be borne.
We wind our life about another life;
We hold it closer, dearer than our
own:
Anon it faints and fails in deathly
strife,
Leaving us stunned, and stricken,
and alone;
But ah! we do not die with those we
mourn,
This also can be borne.
Behold, we live through all things,
famine, thirst,
Bereavement, pain; all grief and
misery,
All woe and sorrow; life inflicts its
worst
On soul and body, but we cannot
die.
Though we be sick, and tired, and
faint and worn,
Lo, all things can he home!



ALLEN.
15
WHERE THE ROSES GREW.
This is where the roses grew,
In the suijimer that is gone;
Fairer bloom or richer hue
Never summer shone upon:
O, the glories vanished hence!
O, the sad imperfect tense!
This is where the roses grew
When the July days were long,
When the garden all day through
Echoed with delight and song;
Hark! the dead and broken stalks
Eddying down the windy walks!
Never was a desert waste,
Where no blossom-life is born,
Half so dreary and unblest,
Half so lonesome and forlorn,
Since .in this we dimly see
All the bliss that used to be.
Where the roses used to grow!
And the west-winds wailing words
Tell in whispers faint and low
Of the famished humming-birds,
Of the bees which search in vain
For the honey-cells again!
This is where the roses grew,
Till the ground was all perfume,
And, whenever zephyrs blew,
Carpeted with crimson bloom!
Now the chill and scentless air,
Sweeps the flower-plats brown and
bare.
Hearts have gardens sad as this,
Where the roses bloom no more,
Gardens where no summer bliss
Can the summer bloom restore,
Where the snow melts not away
At the warming kiss of May;
Gardens where the vernal morns
Never shed their sunshine down,
Where are only stems and thorns,
Veiled in dead leaves, curled and
brown,
Gardens where we only see
Where the roses used to be !
LAST.
Friend, whose smile has come to be
Very precious unto me',
Though I know I drank not first,
Of your loves bright fountain-
burst,
Yet I grieve not for the past,
So you only love me last!
Other souls may find their joy
In the blind love of a boy:
Give me that which years have
tried.
Disciplined and purified,
Such as, braving sun and blast
You will bring to me at last!
There are brows more fair than mine,
Eyes of more bewitching shine,
Other hearts more fit, in truth,
For the passion of your youth;
But, their transient empire past,
You will surely love me last!
Wing away your summer time,
Find a love in every clime,
Roam in liberty and light,
I shall never stay your flight;
For I know, when all is past,
You will come to me at last!
Change and flutter as you will,
I shall smile securely still;
Patiently I trust and wait
Though you tarry long and late;
Prize your spring till it be past,
Only, only love me last!
ROCK ME TO SLEEP.
Backward, turn backward, O Time,
in your flight,
Make me a child again just for to-
night !
Mother, come back from the echoless
shore.
Take me again to your heart as of
yore;


ALLEN.
{ 16
Kiss from my forehead the furrows
of care,
Smooth the few silver threads out of
my hair;
Over my slumbers your loving watch
keep;
Rock me to sleep, mother, rock me
to sleep!
Backward, flow backward, O tide of
the years!
I am so weary of toil and of tears,
Toil without recompense, tears all in
vain,
Take them, and give me my child-
hood again!
I have grown weary of dust and de-
cay,
Weary of flinging my soul-wealth
away;
Weary of sowing for others to reap;
Rock me to sleep, mother, rock
me to sleep!
Tired of the hollow, the base, the
untrue,
Mother, O mother, my heart calls for
you!
Many a summer the grass has grown
green,
Blossomed and faded, our faces be-
tween:
Yet, with strong yearning and pas-
sionate pain,
Long I to-night for your presence
again.
Come from the silence so long and so
deep;
Rock me to sleep, mother, rock me
to sleep!
Over my heart in the days that are
flown,
No love like mother-love ever has
shone;
No other worship abides and en-
dures,
Faithful, unselfish, and patient like
yours:
None like a mother can charm away
pain
From the sick soul and the world-
weary brain.
Slumbers soft calm oer my heavy
lids creep;
Rock me to sleep, mother, rock me
to sleep!
Come, let your brown hair, just
lighted with gold,
Fall on your shoulders again as of
old;
Let it drop over my forehead to-
night,
Shading my faint eyes away from the
light;
For with its sunny-edged shadows
once more
Haply will throng the sweet visions
of yore;
Lovingly, softly, its bright billows
sweep;
Rock me to sleep, mother, rock me
to sleep!
Mother, dear mother, the years have
been long
Since I last listened your lullaby song:
Sing, then, and unto my soul it shall
seem
Womanhoods years have been only
a dream.
Clasped to your heart in a loving em-
brace,
With your light lashes just sweeping
my face,
Never hereafter to wake or to weep;
Rock me to sleep, mother, rock me
to sleep!
UNTIL DEATH.
Make me no vows of constancy, dear
friend,
To love me, though I die, thy whole
life long,
And love no other till thy days shall
end ;
Nay, it were rash and wrong.
If thou canst love another, be it so;
I would not reach out of my quiet
grave
To bind thy heart, if it should choose
to go:
Love should not be a slave.


ALLEN.
My placid ghost, I trust, will walk
serene
In clearer light than gilds those
earthly morns,
Above the jealousies and envies
keen
Which sow this life with thorns.
Thou wouldst not feel my shadowy
caress.
If, after death, my soul should lin-
ger here;
Mens hearts crave tangible, close
tenderness,
Loves presence, warm and near.
It would not make me sleep more
peacefully
That thou wert wasting all thy life
in woe
For my poor sake; what love thou
hast for me,
Bestow it ere I go!
Carve not upon a stone when I am
dead
The praises which remorseful
mourners give
To womens graves, a tardy recom-
pense,
But speak them while I live.
Heap not the heavy marble on my
head
To shut away the sunshine and the
dew;
Let small blooms grow there, and let
grasses wave,
And rain-drops filter through.
Thou wilt meet many fairer and more
gay
Than I; but, trust me, thou canst
never find
One who will love and serve thee
night and day
With a more single mind.
Forget me when I die! The violets
Above my breast will blossom just
as blue,
Nor iniss thy tears ; een Natures
self forgets;
But while I live, be true!
EVERY DAY.
O, tkifi.ing tasks so often done,
Yet ever to be done anew!
O, cares which come with every sun,
Mom after morn, the long years
through!
We shrink beneath their paltry
sway,
The irksome calls of every day.
The restless sense of wasted power.
The tiresome round of little things,
Are hard to bear, as hour by hour
Its tedious iteration brings;
Who shall evade or who delay
The small demands of every day ?
The boulder in the torrents course
By tide and tempest lashed in vain,
Obeys the wave-whirled pebbles
force,
And yields its substance grain by
grain;
So crumble strongest lives away
Beneath the wear of every day.
Who finds the lion in his lair,
Who tracks the tiger for his life,
May wound them ere they are aware,
Or conquer them in desperate
strife;
Yet powerless he to scathe or. slay
The vexing gnats of every day.
The steady strain that never stops
Is mightier than the fiercest shock;
The constant fall of water-drops
Will groove the adamantine rock;
We feel our noblest powers decay,
In feeble wars with every day.
We rise to meet a heavy blow
Our souls a sudden bravery fills
But we endure not always so
The drop-by-drop of little ills!
We still deplore and still obey
The hard behests of every day.
The heart which boldly faces death
Upon the battle-field, and dares
Cannon and bayonet, faints beneath
The needle-points of frets and cares;
The stoutest spirits they dismay
The tiny stings of every day.


ALLIN GHAM.
18
And even saints of holy fame,
Whose souls by faith have over-
come,
Who wore amid the cruel flame
The molten crown of martyrdom,
Bore not without complaint alway
The petty pains of every day.
Ah! more than martyrs aureole,
And more than heros heart of
fire,
We need the humble strength of soul
Which daily toils and ills require;
Sweet Patience! grant us, if you may,
An added grace for every day.
William Allingham.
THE TOUCHSTONE.
A man there came, whence none
could tell,
Bearing a touchstone in his hand;
And tested all things in the land
By its unerring spell.
Quick birth of transmutation smote
The fair to foul, the foul to fair;
Purple nor ermine did he spare,
Nor scorn the dusty coat.
Of heirloom jewels, prized so much,
Were many changed to chips and
clods,
And even statues of the gods
Crumbled beneath its touch.
Then angrily the people cried,
The loss outweighs the profit far;
Our goods suffice us as they are;
We will not have them tried.
And since they could not so avail
To check this unrelenting guest,
They seized him, saying, Let him
test
How real is our jail!
But, though they slew him with the
sword,
And in a fire his touchstone burned,
Its doings could not be oerturned,
Its undoings restored.
And when, to stop all future harm,
They strewed its ashes on the
breeze;
They little guessed each grain of
these
Conveyed the perfect charm.
AUTUMNAL SONNET.
Now Autumns fire burns slowly along the woods,
And day by day the dead leaves fall and melt,
And night by night the monitory blast
Wails in the keyhole, telling how it passed
Oer empty fields, or upland solitudes,
Or grim, wide wave; and now the power is felt
Of melancholy, tenderer in its moods
Than any joy indulgent Summer dealt.
Dear friends, together in the glimmering eve,
Pensive and glad, with tones that recognize
The soft invisible dew in each ones eyes,
It may be, somewhat thus we shall have leave
To walk with Memory, when distant lies
Poor Earth, where we were wont to live and grieve.


ALLSTON APPLE TON.
19
Washington Allston.
BO YHOOD.
Ah, then how sweetly closed those
crowded days!
The minutes parting one by one like
rays,
That fade upon a summers eve.
But oh! what charm, or magic
numbers
Can give me back the gentle slum-
bers
Those weary, happy days did
leave?
When by my bed I saw my mother
kneel,
And with her blessing took her
nightly kiss;
Whatever Time destroys, he cannot
this
Een now that nameless kiss I feel.
Thomas Gold Appleton.
TO ROUSE, THE ARTIST.
As when in watches of the night we
see,
Hanging in tremulous beauty oer
the bed,
The face we loved on Earth, now
from us fled;
So wan, so sweet, so spiritually
free
From taint of Earth, thy tender
drawings be.
There we may find a friend remem-
bered;
With a new aureole hovering round
the head,
Given by Arts peaceful immortal-
ity.
How many homes half empty fill the
place
Death vacates, with thy gracious sub-
stitutes !
Not sensuous with color, which may
disgrace
The memory of the body shared with
brutes;
But the essential spirit in the
face;
As angels see us, best, Affection
suits.
TO WILLIAM LLO YD GARRISON,
AFTER THE WAR.
Oh! happiest thou, who from the
shining height,
Of tablelands serene can look below
Where glared the tempest, and the
lightnings glow,
And see"thy seed made harvest wave
in light,
And all the darkened land with
Gods smile bright!
Leaving with him the "issue. Enough
to know
Albeit the sword hath sundered broth-
ers so,
Yet Gods vicegerent ever is the
Right.
Nor will he leave us bleeding, but
his Time
Which liealeth all things will our
wounds make whole.
While washed and cleansed of our
fraternal crime,
Freedom shall count again her starry
roll;
All there, and moving with a step
sublime
To music God sounds in the human
soul.


M:
20
ARNOLD.
Edwin
SHE AND HE.
She is dead! they said to him.
Come away;
Kiss her! and leave her! thy love
is clay!
They smoothed her tresses of dark
brown hair;
On her forehead of marble they laid
it fair:
Over her eyes, which gazed too
much,
They drew the lids with a gentle
touch;
With a tender touch they closed up
well
The sweet thin lips that had secrets
to tell;
About her brows, and her dear, pale
face
They tied her veil and her marriage-
lace;
And drew on her white feet her
white silk shoes;
Which were the whiter no eye could
choose!
And over her bosom they crossed
her hands;
Come away, they said, God
understands!
And then there was Silence; and
nothing there
But the Silence and scents of
eglantere,
And jasmine, and roses, and rose-
mary ;
For they said, As a lady should lie,
lies she!
And they held their breath as they
left the room,
With a shudder to glance at its still-
ness and gloom.
Arnold.
But he who loved her too well to>
dread
The sweet, the stately, the beautiful
dead,
He lit his lamp, and took the key,
And turnd it! Alone again he
and she!
He and she; but she would not speak,
Though he kissd, in the old place,
the quiet cheek;
He and she; yet she would not smile,
Though he calld her the name that
was fondest erewhile.
He and she; and she did not move
To any one passionate whisperof love!
Then he said, Cold lips! and breast'
without breath!
Is there no voice ? no language of
death
Dumb to the ear and still to the
sense,
But to heart and to soul distinct,
intense ?
See, now, 1 listen with soul, not
ear
What was the secret of dying, Dear ?
Was it the infinite wonder of all,
That you ever could let lifes flower
fall ?
Or wras it a greater marvel to feel
The perfect calm oer the agony
steal ?
Was the miracle greatest to find
how deep,
Beyond all dreams, sank downward
that sleep ?
Did life roll backward its record,
Dear,
And show, as they say it does, past
things clear ?
sw
\V:


ARNOLD.
21
And was it the innermost heart of
the bliss
To find out so what a wisdom love is ?
Oh, perfect Dead! oh, Dead most
dear,
I hold the breath of my soul to hear:
I listen as deep as to horrible
hell,
As high as to heaven! and you do
not tell!
There must be pleasures in dying,
Sweet,
To make you so placid from head to
feet!
T would tell you, Darling, if I were
dead,
And twere your hot tears upon my
brow shed.
I woiild say, though the angel of
death had laid
His sword on my lips to keep it unsaid.
Yon should not ask, vainly, with
streaming eyes,
Which in Deaths touch was the
chiefest surprise;
The very strangest and suddenest
thing
Of all the surprises that dying must
bring.
Ah! foolish world! Oh! most kind
Dead!
Though he told me, who will believe
it W'as said?
Who will believe that he heard her
say,
With the soft rich voice, in the dear
old way:
The utmost wronder is this,I hear,
And see. you, and love you, and kiss
you, Dear;
I can speak, now you listen with
soul alone;
If your soul could see, it would all
be shown.
What a strange delicious amaze-
ment is Death,
To be without body and breathe
without breath.
I should laugh for joy if you did
not cry;
Oh, listen! Love lasts!Love never
will die.
I am only your Angel who was your
Bride;
And I know, that though dead, I
have never died. *"
AFTER DEATH IN ARABIA.
He who died at Azan sends
This to comfort all his friends:
Faithful friends! It lies, I know,
Pale and white and cold as snow;
And ye say, Abdallahs dead!
Weeping at the feet and head,
I can see your falling tears,
1 can hear your siglis and prayers;
Yet I smile and whisper this,
I am not the thing you kiss;
Cease your tears, and let it lie;
It was mine, it is not I.
Sw'eet friends! What the women lave
For its last bed of the grave,
Is a tent which I am quitting,
Is a garment no more fitting,
Is a cage from which, at last,
Like a ha wit my soul hath passed.
Love the inmate, not the room,
The wearer, not the garb, the
plume
Of the falcon, not the bars
Which kept him from these splendid
stars.
Loving friends! Be wise and dry
Straightway every weeping eye,
What ye lift upon the bier
Is not worth a wistful tear.
Tis an empty sea-shell, one
Out of which the pearl is gone:
The shell is broken, it lies there;
The pearl, the all, the soul, is here.


~w~
' i.\j
ARNOLD.
Tis an earthen jar, whose lid
Allah sealed, the while it hid
That treasure of his treasury,
A mind that loved him; let it lie!
Let the shard be earths once more,
Since the gold shines in his store!
Allah glorious! Allah good!
Now thy world is understood;
Now the long, long wonder ends;
Yet ye weep, my erring friends,
AVliile the man whom ye call dead,
In unspoken bliss, instead,
Lives and loves you; lost, tis true,
By such light as shines for you;
But in light ye cannot see
Of unfulfilled felicity,
In enlarging paradise,
Lives a life that never dies.
Farewell, friends! Yet not farewell;
Where I am, ye, too, shall dwell.
I am gone before your face,
A moments time, a little space.
When ye come where I have stepped
Ye will wonder why ye wept;
Ye will know, by wise love taught,
That here is all, and there is naught.
Weep awhile, if ye are fain,
Sunshine still must follow rain;
Only not at death, for death,
Now I know, is that first breath
Which our souls draw when we enter
Life, which is of all life centre.
Be ye certain all seems love,
Viewed from Allahs throne above;
Be ye stout of heart, and come
Bravely onward to your home!
La Allah ilia Allah! yea!
Thou love divine! Thou love alway!
He that died at Azan gave
This to those who made his grave.
FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE.
If on this verse of mine 4
Those eyes shall ever shine,
Whereto sore-wounded men have
looked for life,
Think not that for a rhyme,
Nor yet to fit the time,
I name thy name, true victor in
this strife!
But let it serve to say
That, when we kneel to pray,
Prayers rise for thee thine ear shall
never knowr;
And that thy gallant deed,
For God, and for our need,
Is in all hearts, as deep as love can
go-
Tis good that thy name springs
From two of Earths fair things
A stately city and a soft-voiced bird;
Tis well that in all homes,
When thy sweet story comes,
And brave eyes fill that pleasant
sounds be heard.
Oh voice! in night of fear,
As nights bird, soft to hear,
Oh great heart! raised like city on a
hill;
Oh watcher! worn and pale,
Good Florence Nightingale,
Thanks, loving thanks, for thy large
work and will!
England is glad of thee
Christ, for thy charity,
Take thee to joy when hand and
heart are still!


ARNOLD.
23
George Arnold
IN THE DARK.
[The authors last poem, written a few
days before his death.]
All moveless stand the ancient
cedar-trees
Along the drifted sand-hills where
they grow;
And from the darkness comes a wan-
dering breeze,
And waves them to and fro.
A murky darkness lies along the
sand.
When bright the sunbeams of the
morning shone,
And the eye vainly seeks by sea and
land
Some light to rest upon.
No large, pale star its glimmering
vigil keeps;
An inky sea reflects an inky sky;
And the dark river, like a serpent,
creeps
To where its black piers lie.
Strange salty odors through the dark-
ness steal,
And through the dark, the ocean-
thunders roll;
Thick darkness gathers, stifling, till
I feel
Its weight upon my soul.
I stretch my hands out in the empty
air;
I strain my eyes into the heavy
night;
Blackness of darkness! Father,
hear my prayer!
Grant me to see the light!
CUI BONO?
A harmless fellow, wasting useless
days,
Am I: I love my comfort and my
leisure;
Let those who wish them toil for
gold and praise;
To me the summer-day brings more
of pleasure.
So, here upon the grass, I lie at ease,
While solemn voices from the Past
are calling,
Mingled with rustling whispers in the
trees,
And pleasant sounds of water idly
falling.
There was a time when I had higher
aims
Than thus to lie among the flow-
ers and listen
To listening birds, or watch the sun-
sets flames
On the broad rivers surface glow
and glisten.
There was a time, perhaps, when I
had thought
To make a name, a home, a bright
existence:
But time has shown me that my
dreams are naught
Save a mirage that vanished with
the distance.
Well, it is gone: I care no longer
now
For fame, for fortune, or for empty
praises;
Rather than wear a crown upon my
brow,
Id lie forever here among the
daisies.
So you, who wish for fame, good
friend, pass by;
With you I surely cannot think to
quarrel:
Give me peace, rest, this bank
whereon I lie,
And spare me both the labor and
the laurel!



uy%
c
24
ARNOLD.
Matthew Arnold.
YOUTH'S AGITATIONS.
When I shall be divorced, some ten
years hence,
From this poor present self which I
am now;
When youth has done its tedious
vain expense
Of passions that forever ebb and flow;
Shall I not joy youths heats are left
behind,
And breathe more happy in an even
clime?
Ah no, for then I shall begin to find
A thousand virtues in this hated
time!
Then I shall wish its agitations back,
And all its thwarting currents of de-
sire;
Then I shall praise the heat which
then I lack,
And call this hurrying fever, gener-
ous fire;
And sigh that one thing only has
been lent
To youth and age in common dis-
content.
IMMORTALITY.
Foiled by our fellow-men, depressd,
outworn,
We leave the brutal world to take its
way,
And,Patience! in another life, we say,
The world shall be thrust down, and
we up-borne.
And will not, then, the immortal
armies scorn
The worlds poor, routed leavings?
or will they,
Who faild under the heat of this
lifes day,
Support the fervors of the heavenly
morn ?
No, no! the energy of life may be
Kept on after the grave, but not
begun;
And he who flaggd not in the
earthly strife,
From strength to strength advancing
only he,
His soul well-knit, and all his battles
won,
Mounts, and that hardly, to eternal
life.
EAST LONDON.
Twas August, and the fierce sun
overhead
Smote on the squalid streets of Beth-
nal Green,
And the pale weaver, through his
windows seen
In Spitalfields, lookd thrice dis-
pirited.
I met a preacher there I knew, and
said:
111 and oerworkd, how fare you in
this scene ?
Bravely! said he; for I of late
have been
Much cheerd with thoughts of
Christ, the living bread.
O human soul! as long as thou canst
so
Set up a mark of everlasting light,
Above the howling senses ebb and
flow,
To cheer thee, and to right thee if
thou roam
Not with lost toil thou laborest
through the night!
Thou makst the heaven thou hopst
indeed thy home.




ARNOLD.
25
AUSTERITY OF POETRY.
That son of Italy who tried to blow,
Ere Dante came, the trump of sacred
song,
In his light youth amid, a festal
throng
Sate with his bride to see a public
show.
Fair was the bride, and on her front
did glow
Youth like a star; and what to youth
belong
Gay raiment, sparkling gauds, ela-
tion strong.
A prop gave way! crash fell a plat-
form! lo,
Mid struggling sufferers, hurt to
death, slie lay!
Shuddering, they drew her garments
off and found
A robe of sackcloth next the smooth,
white skin.
Such, poets, is your bride, the Muse!
young, gay,
Radiant, adornd outside; a hidden
ground
Of thought and of austerity within.
[From. Memorial Verses.']
GOETHE.
He took the suffering human race,
He read each wound, each weakness
clear;
And struck his finger on the place,
And said: Thou ailest here, and
here!
EARLY DEATH AND FAME.
Fob him who must see many years,
I praise the life which slips away
Out of the light and mutely; which
avoids
Fame, and her less fair followers,
envy, strife,
Stupid detraction, jealousy, cabal,
Insincere praises; which descends
The quiet mossy track to age.
But, when immature death
Beckons too early the guest
From the half-tried banquet of life,
Young, in the bloom of his days;
Leaves no leisure to press,
Slow and surely, the sweets
Of a tranquil life in the shade
Fuller for him be the hours!
Give him emotion, though pain!
Let him live, let him feel: I have lived.
Heap up his moments with life!
Triple his pulses with fame!
SELF-DEPENDENCE.
Weary of myself, and sick of asking
What 1 am, and what I ought to be,
At this vessels prow I stand, which
bears me
Forwards, forwards, oer the starlit
sea.
And a look of passionate desire
Oer the sea and to the stars I send:
Ye who from my childhood up have
calmd me,
Calm me, all, compose me to the
end!
Ah, once more, I cried, ye stars,
ye waters,
On my heart your mighty charm
renew;
Still, still let me, as I gaze upon you,
Feel my soul becoming vast like
you

From the intense, clear, star-sown
vault of heaven.
Over the lit seas unquiet way,
In the rustling night-air came the
answer:
Wouldst thou be as these are ? Live
as they.
Unaffrighted by the silence round
them,
Undistracted by the sights they see,
These demand not that the things
without them
Yield them love, amusement, sym-
pathy.


on
26
BAILEY BAILLIE.
And with joy the stars perform
their shining,
And the sea its long moon-silverd
roll;
For self-poised they live, nor pine
with noting
All the fever of some differing soul.
Bounded by themselves, and unre-
gardful
In what state Gods other works may
be,
In their own tasks all their powers
pouring,
These attain the mighty life you
see.
O air-bom voice! long since, severely
clear,
A cry like thine in mine own heart
I hear:
Resolve to be thyself; and know,
that he
Who finds himself, loses his misery!
Philip James Bailey.
THE TRUE MEASURE OF LIFE.
We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breath;
In feelings, not in figures on the dial.
We should count time by heart-throbs when they beat
For God, for man, for duty. He most lives,
Who thinks most, feels noblest, acts the best.
Life is but a means unto an endthat end.
Beginning, mean, and end to all things, God.
Joanna Baillie.
THE WORTH OF FAME.
Oh who shall lightly say, that Fame
Is nothing but an empty name!
Whilst in that sound there is a charm
The nerves to brace, the heart to
warm,
As, thinking of the mighty dead,
The young from slothful couch will
start,
And vow, with lifted hands out-
spread,
Like them to act a noble part?
Oh! who shall lightly say that Fame
Is nothing but an empty name!
When, but for those, our mighty
dead,
All ages past a blank would be,
Sunk in oblivions murky bed,
A desert bare, a shipless sea?
They are the distant objects seen,
The lofty marks of what hath been.
Oh! who shall lightly say that Fame
Is nothing but an empty name!
When memory of the mighty dead
To earth-worn pilgrims wistful eye
The brightest rays of cheering shed,
That point to immortality?
THE KITTEN.
Wanton droll, whose harmless
play
Beguiles the rustics closing day,
When drawn the evening fire about,
Sit aged crone and thoughtless lout,
And child upon his three-foot stool,
Waiting till his supper cool;
TV5 51


BAIL 1AE.
27
And maid, whose cheek outblooms
the rose,
As bright the blazing fagot glows,
Who, bending to the friendly light
Plies her task with busy sleight;
Come, show thy tricks and sportive
graces,
Thus circled round with merry faces.
Backward coild, and crouching
low,
With glaring eyeballs watch thy foe,
The housewifes spindle whirling
round,
Or thread, or straw, that on the
ground
Its shadow throws, by urchin sly
Held out tc lure thy roving eye;
Then onward stealing, fiercely spring
Upon the futile, faithless thing.
Now, wheeling round, with bootless
skill,
Thy bo-peep tail provokes thee still,
As oft beyond thy curving side
Its jetty tip is seen to glide;
Till from thy centre, starting fair,
Thou sidelong rearst, with rump in
air,
Erected stiff, and gait awry,
Like madam in her tantrums high:
Though neer a madam of them all,
Whose silken kirtle sweeps the hall
More varied trick and whim displays,
To catch the admiring strangers
gaze ....
But not alone by cottage fire
Do rustics rude thy feats admire;
The learned sage, whose thoughts
explore
The widest range of human lore,
Or, with unfetterd fancy, fly
Through airy heights of poesy,
Pausing, smiles with alterd air,
To see thee climb his elbow-chair,
Or, struggling on the mat below,
Hold warfare with his slipperd toe.
The widowd dame, or lonely maid,
Who in the still, but cheerless shade
Of home unsocial, spends her age,
And rarely turns a letterd page;
Upon her hearth for thee lets fall
The rounded cork, or paper ball,
Nor chides thee on thy wicked watch
The ends of ravelld skein to catch,
But lets thee have thy wayward will,
Perplexing oft her sober skill....
MY LOVE IS ON HER WAY.
Oh, welcome bat and owlet gray,
Thus winging low your airy way!
And welcome moth and drowsy fly
That to mine ear comes humming by!
And welcome shadows dim and deep,
And stars that through the pale sky
peep;
Oh welcome all! to me ye say
My woodland love is on her way.
Upon the soft wind floats her hair,
Her breath is on the dewy air;
Her steps are in the whisperd sound,
That steals along the stilly ground.
Oh, dawn of day, in rosy bower,
What art thou to this witching hour ?
Oh, noon of day, in sunshine bright,
What art thou to this fall of night ?
SNATCHES OF MIRTH IN A DARK
LIFE.
Didst thou neer see the swallows
veering breast,
Winging the air beneath some murky
cloud
In the sunned glimpses of a stormy
day,
Shiver in silvery brightness ?
Or boatmans oar, as vivid lightning
flash
In the faint gleam, that like a spirits
path
Tracks the still waters of some sul-
len lake ?
Or lonely tower, from its brown mass
of woods,
Give to the parting of a wintry sun
One hasty glance in mockery of the
night
Closing in darkness round it ? (Gentle
friend!
Chide not her mirth who was sad
yesterday,
And may be so to-morrow.)


28
BALL AN TINE BARBAULD.
James Ballantine.
ILKA BLADE O' GRASS KEPS ITS AIN DRAP O' DEW.
Confide ye aye in Providence, for Providence is kind,
And bear ye a lifes changes, wi a calm and tranquil mind,
Though pressed and hemmed on every side, liae faith and yell win through,
For ilka blade o grass keps its ain drap odew.
Gin reft frae friends or crost in love, as whiles nae doubt yeve been,
Grief lies deep hidden in your heart, or tears flow frae your een,
Believe it for the best, and trow theres good in store for you,
For ilka blade o grass keps its ain drap o dew.
In lang, lang days o simmer, when the clear and cloudless sky
Refuses ae wee drap o rain to nature parched and dry.
The genial night, wi balmy breath, gars verdure spring anew,
And ilka blade o grass keps its ain drap o dew.
Sae, lest mid fortunes sunshine we should feel owre proud and hie,
And in our pride forget to wipe the tear frae poortiths ee,
Some wee dark clouds o sorrow come, we ken na whence or hoo,
But ilka blade o grass keps its ain drap o dew.
Anna Letitia Barbauld.
LIFE.
Life I know not what thou art,
But know that thou and I must part;
And when, or how, or where we met,
I own to mes a secret yet.
Life! weve been long together
Through pleasant and through cloudy
weather;
Tis hard to part when friends are
dear
Perhaps twill cost a sigh, a tear;
Then steal away, give little warn-
ing,
Choose thine own time;
Say not Good Night,but in some
brighter clime
Bid me Good Morning.
THE DEATH OF THE VIRTUOUS.
Sweet is the scene when virtue dies!
When sinks a righteous soul to rest,
How mildly beam the closing eyes,
How gently heaves th Expiring
breast.
So fades a summer cloud away
So sinks the gale when storms are
oer,
So gently shuts the eye of day,
So dies a wave along the shore.
Triumphant smiles the victor brow,
Fanned by some angels purple
wing;
Where is, O Grave! thy victory now!
And where, insidious Death, thy
sting!


PS

BARKER BARE 0 W.
29
Farewell, conflicting joys and fears,
Where light and shade alternate
dwell!
How bright the unchanging morn
appears;
Farewell, inconstant world, fare-
well!
- as sinks the day,
its load the spirit
Its duty done, -
Light from
flies;
While heaven and earth combine to
^ say
Sweet is the scene when Virtue
dies!
David Barker
THE COVERED BRIDGE.
Teli. the fainting soul in the weary
form, ^
Theres a world of the purest
bliss,
That is linked as the soul and form
are linked,
By a covered bridge with this.
Yet to reach that realm on the other
shore,
We must pass through a transient
gloom,
And must walk unseen, unhelped,
and alone
Through that covered bridge the
tomb.
But we all pass over on equal terms.
For the universal toll
Is the outer garb, which the hand of
God
Has flung around the soul.
Though the eye is dim and the bridge
is dark.
And the river it spans is wide,
Yet Faith points through to a shin-
ing mount
That looms on the other side.
To enable our feet on the next days
march
To climb up that golden ridge,
We must all lie down for a one
nights rest
Inside of the covered bridge.
Joel Barlow.
TO FREEDOM.
Sun of the moral world! effulgent
source
Of mans best wisdom and his stead-
iest force,
Soul-searching Freedom! here assume
thy stand,
And radiate hence to every distant
land;
Point out and prove how all the
scenes of strife,
The shock of states, the impassiond
broils of life,
Spring from unequal sway; and how
they fly
Before the splendor of thy peaceful
eye;
Unfold at last the genuine social plan,
The minds full scope, the dignity of
man.
Bold nature bursting through her
long disguise,
And nations daring to be just and wise.
Yes! righteous Freedom, heaven and
earth and sea
Yield or withhold their various gifts
for thee;


Protected industry beneath thy reign
Leads all the virtues in her filial
train;
Courageous Probity, with browserene;
And Temperance calm presents her
placid mien;
Contentment, Moderation, Labor,
Art,
Mould the new man and humanize
his heart;
To public plenty, private ease di-
lates,
Domestic peace, to harmony of states.
Protected Industry, careering far,
Detects the cause, and cures the rage
of war,
And sweeps, with forceful arm, to
their last graves,
Kings from the earth and pirates
from the waves.
Lady Anne Barnard.
AULD ROBIN GRAY.
Whes the sheep are in the fauld, when the cows come hame,
When a the weary warld to quiet rest are gane;
The woes of my heart fa in showers frae my ee,
Unkenned by my gudeman who soundly sleeps by me.
Young Jamie lood me weel, and sought me for his bride,
But, saving ae crown piece, hed naething else beside.
To make the crown a pound, my Jamie gaed to sea;
And the crown and the pound, O they were baith for me!
Before he had been gane a twelvemonth and a day,
My father brak his arm, our cow was stow'n away;
My mother she fell sick my Jamie was at sea
And Auld Robin Gray, O! he came a-courting me.
My father coudna work my mother coudna spin;
I toiled day and night, but their bread I coudna win;
Auld Rob maintained them baith, and, wi tears in his ee,
Said, Jenny, O! for their sakes, will you marry me
My heart it said na, and I looked for Jamie back;
But hard blew the winds,, and his ship was a wrack;
His ship it was a wrack! Why didna Jamie dee ?
Or, wherefore am I spared to cry out, Wae is me!
My father arjgued sair my mother didna speak,
But she looked in my face till my heart was like to break;
They gied him my hand, but my heart was in the sea;
And so Auld Robin Gray, he was gudeman to me.
I hadna been his wife, a week but only four,
When, mournfu as I sat on the stane at my door,
I saw my Jamies ghaist I coudna think it he,
Till he said, Im come hame, my love, to marry thee!


BATES.
31
0 sair, sair did we greet, and mickle say of a ;
Ae kiss we took, na mair I bade him gang awa.
1 wish that I were dead, but Im nae like to dee;
For O, I am but young to cry out, Wae is me!
I gang like a ghaist, and I carena much to spin,
I darena think of Jamie, for that wad be a sin;
But I will do my best a gude wife aye to be,
For Auld Robin Gray, 0! he is sae kind to me.
Charlotte Fiske Bates.
MAKE TEiNE ANGEL GLAD.
From the morning even until now,
Evil over thee full power hath had;
Oh, remember late the shattered
vow!
Turn to God, and make thine
angel glad.
Sin will seek to snare thy heart
again;
Though her beauty make thee al-
most mad,
Though resistance make thee pale
with pain,
Turn to God, and make thine
angel glad.
CONSECRATION.
A LOVERS MOOD.
All the kisses that I have given,
I grudge from my soul to-day,
And of all I have ever taken,
I would wipe the thought away.
How 1 wish my lips had been her-
mits,
Held apart from kith and kin,
That fresh from Gods holy service,
To Loves they might enter in.
THE OLD YEAR AND THE NEW.
The years have linings just as gob-
lets do:
The old year is the lining of the
new,
Filled with the wine of precious
memories,
The golden was doth line the silver
is.
WOODBINES IN OCTOBER.
As dyed in blood, the streaming
vines appear,
While long and low the wind about
them grieves;
The heart of Autumn must have
broken here
And poured its treasure out upon
the leaves.
TO VICTORIA.
A monarch soul hath ruled thyself, O Queen,
Else what it is, thy kingdom had not been.


BATES.
i
Fletcher Bates.
THE TWO BIRDS.
As leaves turned red
And some fell dead,
For sunnier skies two songsters fled;
But ere they went,
In merriment
They sung how summer had been
spent.
One song confest,
I had my nest
Near yonder mountains lofty crest;
Where none intrude
In lonely mood
I carolled oft in solitude.
The other sung
I built among
The cottagers, where old and young
Who trod the vale
Would often hail
Me, as their little nightingale.
Then off they flew,
Like specks they grew,
Then faded in the heavenly blue.
Our human lot
Was theirs, I wot,
For one was missed, and one was not.
THE DEAD BEE.
Where honeysuckles scent the way,
I heard thee humming yesterday;
Thy little life was not in vain,
It gathered sweets for others gain,
And somewhere in a dainty cell
Is stored delicious liydromel.
O poet! in thy calm retreat,
From joy and grief extracting sweet,
Some day thy fancys wings must fold,
And thou lie motionless and cold.
Perhaps thy garnered honey then
May be the food of living men.
Katharine
THE ORGANIST.
Slowly I circle the dim, dizzy stair,
Wrapt in my cloaks gray fold,
Holding my heart lest it throb to the air
Its radiant secret, for though 1 be
old,
Though 1 totter and rock like a ship
in the wind,
And the sunbeams come unto me
broken and blind,
Yet my spirit drinks youth from
the treasure we hold,
Richer than gold.
Princes below me, lips wet from the
wine,
Hush at my organs swell;
Ladies applaud me with clappings as
fine
As showers that splash in a mu-
sical well.
Lee Bates.
But their eai-s only hear mighty mel-
odies ringing,
And their soids never know tis my
angel there singing,
That the grand organ-angel awakes
in his cell
Under my spell.
There in the midst of the wandering
pipes,
Far from the gleaming keys,
And the organ-front with its gilded
stripes,
My glorious angel lies sleeping at
ease.
And the hand of a stranger may beat
at his gate,
And the ear of a stranger may listen
and wait,
But he only cries in his pain for
these,
Witless to please.


BA YL Y.
33
Angel, my angel, the old mans hand
Xnoweth thy silver way.
1 loose thy lips from their silence-
band
And over thy heart-strings ray fin-
gers play,
While the song peals forth from thy
mellow throat,
And my spirit climbs on the climb-
ing note,
Till 1 mingle thy tone with the
tones away
Over the day.
So I look up as I follow the tone,
Up with my dim old eyes,
And I wonder if organs have angels
alone,
Or if, as my fancy might almost
surmise,
Each man in his heart folds an angel
with wings,
An angel that slumbers, but wakens
and sings
When thrilled by the touch that is
sympathy-wise,
Bidding it rise.
,Thomas Haynes Bayly.
THE FIRST GRAY HAIR.
The matron at her mirror,
With her hand upon her brow,
Sits gazing on her lovely face,
Ay, lovely even now!
Why doth she lean upon her hand
With such a look of care ?
Why steals that tear across her
cheek ?
She sees her first gray hair!
Time from her form hath taen away
But little of its grace;
His touch of thought hath dignified
The beauty- of her face.
Yet she might mingle in the dance
Where maidens gayly trip,
So bright is still her hazel eye,
So beautiful her lip.
The faded form is often markd
By sorrow more than years,
The wrinkle on the cheek may be
The course of secret tears;
The mournful lip may murmur of
A love it neer confessd,
And the dimness of the eye betray
A heart that cannot rest.
But she hath been a happy wife:
The lover of her youth
May proudly claim the smile that
pays
The trial of his truth;
A. sense of slight of loneliness
Hath never banishd sleep:
Her life hath been a cloudless one;
Then wdierefore doth she weep ?
She lookd upon her raven locks,
What thoughts did they recall ?
Oh! not of nights when they were
deckd
For banquet or for ball;
They brought back thoughts of early
youth,
Ere she had learnd to check,
With artificial wreaths, the curls
That sported oer her neck.
She seemd to feel her mothers hand
Pass lightly through her hair,
And draw it from her brow, to leave
A kiss of kindness there.
She seemd to view her fathers smile,
And feel the playful touch
That sometimes feignd to steal away
The curls she prized so much.
And now she sees her first gray hair!
Oh, deem it not a crime
For her to weep, when she beholds
The first footmark of Time!
She knows that, one by .one, those
mute
Mementos will increase,
And steal youth, beauty, strength
away,
Till life itself shall cease.


84
BEATTIE.
Ah, lady! heed the monitor!
Thy mirror tells thee truth;
Assume the matrons folded veil,
Resign the wreath of youth:
Go! bind it on thy daughters brow,
In her thouIt still look fair
Twere well would all learn wisdom,
who
Behold the first gray hair!
James Beattie.
[From The Minstrel.]
THE ASCENT TO FAME.
Ah! who can tell how hard it is to
climb
* The steep where Fames proud tem-
ple shines afar?
Ah! who can tell how many a soul
sublime
Has felt the influence of malignant
star,
And waged with Fortune an eternal
war ?
Checked by the scoff of Pride, by
Envys frown,
And Povertys unconquerable bar,
In lifes low vale remote has pined
alone,
Then dropped into the grave, un-
pitied and unknown!
[From The Minstrel.\
THE CHARMS OF NATURE.
Oh, how canst thou renounce the
boundless store
Of charms which Nature to her
votary yields!
The warbling woodland, the resound-
ing shore,
The pomp of groves, and garniture
of fields;
All that the genial ray of morning
gilds,
And all that echoes to the song of
even,
All that the mountains sheltering
bosom shields,
And all the dread magnificence of
heaven.
Oh, how canst thou renounce, and
hope to be forgiven ?
[From The Minstrel.]
BE A UTIES OF MORNING.
But who the melodies of morn can
tell ?
The wild brook babbling down the
mountain side;
The lowing herd; the slieepfolds
simple bell;
The pipe of early shepherd dim
descried
In the lone valley; echoing far and
wide
The clamorous horn along the cliffs
above;
The hollow murmur of the ocean-
tide ;
The hum of bees, the linnets lay of
love,
And the full choir that wakes the
universal grove.
The cottage-curs at early pilgrim
bark;
Crowned with her pail the tripping
milkmaid sings;
The whistling ploughman stalks
afield; and, hark!
Down the rough slope the ponderous
wagon rings;
Through rustling corn the hare as-
tonished springs;
Slow tolls the village-clock the
drowsy hour;
The partridge bursts away on whir-
ring wings;
Deep mourns the turtle in seques-
tered bower,
And shrill lark carols clear from her
aerial tower.
W kM


jMT
BEERS.
35
[From The Minstrel.']
DEATH AND RESURRECTION.
Wheke now the rill, melodious,
pure, and cool,
And meads, with life, and mirth,
and beauty crowned ?
Ah! see, the unsightly slime, and
sluggish pool,
Have all the solitary vale em-
browned ;
Fled each fair form, and mute each
melting sound,
The raven croaks forlorn on naked
spray.
And hark! the river bursting every
mound,
Down the vale thunders, and with
wasteful sway
Uproots the grove, and rolls the shat-
tered rocks away.
Yet such the destiny of all on earth:
So flourishes and fades majestic man.
Fair is the bud his vernal morn
brings forth,
And fostering gales a while the nurs-
ling fan.
0 smile, ye heavens, serene; ye mil-
dews wan,
Ye blighting whirlwinds, spare his
balmy prime,
Nor lessen of his life the little span.
Borne on the swift, though silent
wings of Time,
Old age conies on apace to ravage all
the clime.
And be it so. Let those deplore
their doom
Whose hope still grovels in this dark
sojourn;
But lofty souls, who look beyond the
tomb,
Can smile at Fate, and wonder how
they mourn.
Shall Spring to these sad scenes no
more return ?
Is yonder wave the Suns eternal
bed ?
Soon shall the' orient with new lusCe
burn,
And Spring shall soon her vital influ-
ence shed,
Again attune the grove, again adorn
the mead.
Shall I be left forgotten in the
dust,
When Fate, relenting, lets the flower
revive ?
Shall Natures voice, to man alone
unjust,
Bid him, though doomed to perish,
hope to live ?
Is it for this fair Virtue oft must
strive
With disappointment, penury, and
pain ?
No: Heavens immortal spring shall
yet arrive,
And mans majestic beauty bloom
again,
Bright through the eternal year of
Loves triumphant reign.
Ethel Lynn Beers.
THE PICKET-GUARD.
All quiet along the Potomac,
they say,
Except, now and then, a stray
picket
Is shot as he walks on his beat to
and fro,
By a rifleman hid in the thicket.
Tis nothing a private or two, now
and then,
Will not count in the news of the
battle;
Not an officer lost only one of the
men *
Moaning out, all alone, the death-
rattle.


mrvr-'jar
§3i
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r-.^/rrjiyawTt;:
BEERS.
All quiet along the Potomac to-night,
Where the soldiers lie peacefully
dreaming;
Their tents, in the rays of the clear
autumn moon
Or the light of the watch-fires, are
gleaming.
A tremulous sigh, as the gentle night-
wind
Through the forest-leaves softly is
creeping;
While the stars up above, with their
glittering eyes,
Keep guard for the army is
sleeping.
Theres only the sound of the lone
sentrys tread
As he tramps from the rock to the
fountain,
And thinks of the two in the low
trundle-bed,
Far away in the cot on the moun-
tain.
His musket falls slack his face,
dark and grim,
Grows gentle with memories
tender,
As he mutters a prayer for the chil-
dren asleep
For their mother may Heaven
defend her!
The moon seems to shine just as
brightly as then,
That night when the love yet un-
spoken,
Leaped up to his lips when low-
murmured vows
Were pledged to be ever unbroken.
Then drawing his sleeve roughly over
his eyes,
He dashes off tears that are well-
\r\cr
And gathers his gun closer up to its
place,
As if to keep down the heart-
swelling.
He passes the fountain, the blasted
pine-tree,
The footstep is lagging and weary;
Yet onward he goes through the
broad belt of light,
Toward the shade of the forest so
dreary.
Hark! was it the night wind that rus-
tled the leaves ?
Was it moonlight so wondrously
flashing ?
It looked like a rifleAll! Mary,
good-by!
And the life-blood is ebbing and
plashing.
All quiet along the Potomac to-
night,
No sound save the rush of the
river;
While soft falls the dew on the face
of the dead
The pickets off duty forever!
WEIGHING THE BABY.
How many pounds does the baby
weigh
Baby w7ho came but a month ago ?
How many pounds from the crown-
ing curl
To the rosy point of the restless
toe?
Grandfather ties the kerchief knot,
Tenderly guides the swinging
weight,
And carefully over his glasses peers
To read the record, only eight.
Softly the echo goes around:
The father laughs at the tiny girl;
The fair young mother sings the
words,
While grandmother smooths the
golden curl.
And stooping above the precious
thing,
Nestles a kiss within a prayer,
Murmuring softly Little one,
Grandfather did not weigh you
fair.


Nobody weighed the babys smile,
Or the love that came with the
helpless one;
Nobody weighed the threads of care,
From which a womans life is spun.
No index tells the mighty worth
Of a little babys quiet breath
A soft, unceasing metronome,
Patient and faithful until death.
Nobody weighed the babys soul,
For here on earth no weights there
be
That could avail; God only knows
Its value in eternity.
Only eight pounds to hold a soul
That seeks no angels silver wing,
But shrines it in this human guise.
Within so frail and small a thing!
Oh, mother! laugh your merry note,
Be gay and glad, but do nt for-
get
From babys eyes looks out a soul
That claims a home in Eden
yet.
Francis Beaumont.
ON THE TOMBS IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY.
Mortality, behold and fear
What a change of flesh is here!
Think how many royal bones
Sleep within these heaps of stones:
Here they lie, had realms and lands,
Who now want strength to stir their
hands,
Where from their pulpits seald with
dust
They preach, In greatness is no
trust.
Heres an acre sown indeed
With the richest royallest seed
That the earth did eer suck in
Since the first man died for sin:
Here the bones of birth have cried
Though gods they were, as men
they died!
Here are sands, ignoble things,
Dropt from the ruind sides of kings:
Heres a world of pomp and state
Buried in dust, once dead by fate.
William Cox Bennett.
THE SEASONS.
A blue-eyed child that sits amid
the noon,
Oerliung with a laburnums droop-
ing sprays,
Singing her little songs, while softly
round
Along the grass the chequered sun-
shine plays.
All beauty that is throned in woman-
hood
Pacing a summer gardens foun-
tained walks,
That stoops to smooth a glossy span-
iel down
To hide her flushing cheek from
one who talks.
A happy mother with her fair-faced
girls,
In whose sweet spring again her
youth she sees,
With shout and dance and laugh and
bound and song,
Stripping in autumn orchards,
laden trees.

££6=r4


38
BENSEL.
An aged woman in a wintry room
Frost on the pane, without the
whirling snow
Reading old letters of her far-off
youth,
Of sorrows past and joys of long
ago.
SUMMER RAIN.
O gentle, gentle summer rain,
Let not the silver lily pine,
The drooping lily pine in vain
To feel that dewy touch of thine,
To drink thy freshness once again,
O gentle, gentle summer rain!
In heat, the landscape quivering lies;
The cattle pant beneath the tree;
Through parching air and purple
skies
The earth looks up in vain for
thee:
For thee, for thee it looks in vain,
O gentle, gentle summer rain!
Come thou, and brim the meadow
streams,
And soften all the hills with mist;
O falling dew from burning dreams,
By thee shall herb and flower be
kissed :
And earth shall bless thee yet again,
O gentle, gentle summer rain!
James Berry Bensel.
IN ARABIA.
Choose thou between! and to his
enemy
The Arab chief a brawny hand dis-
played.
Wherein, like moonlight on a sullen
sea,
Gleamed the gray scimetars en-
graven blade.
Choose thou between death at my
hand and thine!
Close in my power my vengeance
1 may wreak;
Yet hesitate to strike. A hate like
mine
Is noble still. Thou hast thy
choosingspeak!
And Ackbar stood. About him all
the band
That hailed his captor chieftain,
with grave eyes,
His answer w'aited, while that heavy
hand
Stretched like a bar between him
and the skies.
Straight in the face before him Ack-
bar sent
A sneer of scorn, and raised his
noble head;
Strike! and the desert monarch,
as content,
Rehung the weapon at his girdle
red.
Then Ackbar nearer crept and lifted
high
His arms toward the heaven so far
and blue,
Wherein the sunset rays began to
die,
While oer the hand a deeper
silence grew.
Strike! I am ready! Didst thou
think to see
A son of Ghera spill upon the
dust
His noble blood ? Didst hope to
have my knee
Bend at thy feet, and with one
mighty thrust
The life thou hatest flee before thee
here ?
Shame on thee! on thy race! art
thou the one
Who hast so long thy vengeance
counted dear?
My hate is greater; I did strike thy
son,


BLAKE.
39
Tliy one son, Noumid, dead before
my face:
And by the swiftest courser of my
stud
Sent to thy door his corpse. Aye,
one might trace
Their flight across the desert by
his blood.
Strike! for my hate is greater than
thy own!
But with a frown the Arab moved
away,
Walked to a distant palm and stood
alone,
With eyes that looked where pur-
ple mountains lay.
This for an instant: then he turned
again
Toward the place where Ackbar
waited still,
Walking as one benumbed with bit-
ter pain,
Or with a hateful mission to fulfil.
Strike, for I hate thee! Ackbar
cried once more.
Nay, but my hate I cannot find!
said now
His enemy. Thy freedom I restore.
Live; life were more than death to
such as thou.
So with his gift of life the Bedouin
slept
That night untroubled; but when
dawn broke through
The purple East, and oer his eye-
lids crept
The long, thin fingers of the light,
he drew
A heavy breath and woke: above him
shone
A lifted daggerYea, he gave
thee life, '
But .1 give death! came in fierce
undertone.
And Ackbar died.. It was dead
Noumids wife.
William Blake.
THE TIGER.
Tiger! Tiger! burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry ?
In what distant deeps or skies
Burned the fire of thine eyes ?
On what wings dare he aspire ?
What the hand dare seize the fire ?
And what shoulder, and what art,
Could twist the sinews of thine
heart ?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand forged thy dread
feet ?
What the hammer ? what the
chain ?
In what furnace was thy brain ?
What the anvil ? What dread grasp
Dare its deadly terrors clasp ?
When the stars threw down their
spears,
And watered heaven with their tears,
Did He smile his work to see ?
Did He who made the lamb make
thee ?
Tiger! Tiger! burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry ?


Full Text
?


Copyright, 1882,
-By Thomas Y. Crowell & Co.
i.


TO THE MEMORY OP
1512 iFrtenlJ
HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW,
THIS WORK IS DEDICATED.
-------
Thy name, O poet, shall go sounding on
While breaks the wave on shore of Machigonne.*
The sky and ocean whence thy genius stole
The charm which draws the universal soul,
Alone remain the same as on that day
Now lying five and seventy years away.
These type the fate of what thy voice hath sung;
Like sea and sky, the heart is ever young.
Mans joys and griefs a thousand years ago,
Throb still the same as do the waters flow;
The light and dark, as then, divide his sky,
Though earth has seen so many millions die.
Who best meets man, not men, as ages move,
Will be secure of human praise and love;
Who best meets man will share, and only he,
With heaven and ocean, immortality.
C. F. B.
* The Indian name of Portland.


< 70 BROWNING.
j 1 have lived, shall I say, so much since
; then,
| Given up myself so many times,
j Gained me the gains of various
men,
Ransacked the ages, spoiled the
climes;
Yet one thing one in my souls
full scope,
Either I missed, or itself missed
me,
And I want and find you, Evelyn
Hope!
What is the issue ? let us see!
1 loved.you, Evelyn, all the while;
My heart seemed full as it could
hold,
There was space and to spare for the
frank young smile,
And the red young mouth, and the
hairs young gold.
So, hush! I will give you this leaf to
keep:
See, I shut it inside the sweet, cold
hand.
There, that is our secret! go to sleep;
You will wake, and remember, and
understand.
[From, In a Gondola.')
THE TWO KISSES.
The Moths kiss, first!
Kiss me as if you made believe
You were not sure, this eve,
How my face, your flower, had
pursed
Its petals up; so, here and there
You brush it, till I grow aware
Who wants me, and wide open burst.
The Bees kiss, now!
Kiss me as if you entered gay
My heart at some noonday,
A bud that dared not disallow
The claim, so all is rendered up,
j And passively its shattered cup
Over your head to sleep I bow.
HOW THEY BROUGHT THE GOOD I
NEWS FROM GHENT TO AIX.
I sprang to the stirrup, and Joris
and he:
I galloped, Dirck galloped, we gal-
loped all three;
Good speed! cried the watch as
the gate-bolts undrew,
Speed! echoed the wall to us gal-
loping through.
Behind shut the postern, the lights
sank to rest,
And into the midnight we galloped
abreast.
Not a w;ord to each other; we kept
the great pace
Neck by neck, stride by stride, never
changing our place;
I turned in my saddle and made its
girths tight,
Then shortened each stirrup and set
the pique right,
Rebuckled the check-strap, chained
slacker the bit,
Nor galloped less steadily Roland a
whit.
Twas moonset at starting; but while
we drew near
Lokeren, the cocks crew and twilight
dawned clear;
At Boom a great yellow star came
out to see;
At Duffeld twas morning as plain as
could be;
And from Mecheln church-steeple we
heard the half-chime
So Joris broke silence with Yet
there is time!
At Aerschot up leaped of a sudden
the sun,
And against him the cattle stood
black every one,
To stare through the mist at us gal-
loping past;
And I saw my stout galloper Roland
at last,
With resolute shoulders, each butting
away
The haze, as some bluff river head-
land its spray; _



BYRON.
10B
The sky is changed ? and such a
change! O night,
And storm, and darkness, ye are
wondrous strong,
Yet lovely in your strength, as is
the light
Of a dark eye in woman! Far along
From peak to peak, the rattling
crags among,
Leaps the live thunder! Not from
one lone cloud,
But every mountain now hath
found a tongue,
And Jura answers, throxigh her
misty shroud,
Back to the joyous Alps, who call to
her aloud!
And this is in the night: Most
glorious night!
Thou wert not sent for slumber! let
me be
A sharer in thy fierce and far de-
light,
A portion of the tempest and of
thee!
How the lit lake shines, a phos-
phoric sea,
And the big rain comes dancing to
the earth!
And now again tis black, and
now, the glee
Of the loud hills shakes with its
mountain-mirth,
As if they did rejoice oer a young
earthquakes birth.
Sky, mountains, river, winds, lake,
lightnings! ye!
With night, and clouds, and thun-
der, and a soul
To make these felt, and feeling,
well may be
Things that have made me watch-
ful ; the far roll
Of your departing voices, is the
knoll
Of what in me is sleepless, if I
rest. goal P
But where of ye, O tempests, is the
Are ye like those within the human
breast ?
Or do ye find, at length, like eagles,
. some high nest!
Could I embody and unbosom now
That which is most within me,
could I wreak
My thoughts upon expression, and
thus throw
Soul, heart, mind, passions, feel-
ings, strong or weak,
All that I would have sought, and
all I seek,
Bear, know, feel, and yet breathe
into one word,
And that one word were light-
ning, I would speak;
But as it is I live and die unheard,
With a most voiceless
sheathing it as a sword.
thought
[From Childe Harold.']
BYRON'S REMARKABLE PROPHECY.
And if my voice break forth, tis not
that now
I shrink from what is suffered: let
him speak
Who hath beheld decline upon my
brow,
Or seen my minds convulsion leave
it weak;
But in this page a record will I seek.
Not in the air shall these my words
disperse,
Though I be ashes; a far hour shall
wreak [verse,
The deep prophetic fulness of this
And pile on human heads the moun-
tain of my curse!
That curse shall be Forgiveness.
Have I not
Hear me, my mother Earth! behold
it, Heaven!
Have I not had to wrestle with my
lot?
Have I not suffered things to be for-
given ?
Have I not had my brain seared, my
heart riven,
Hopes sapped, name blighted, Lifes
life lied away ?
And only not to desperation driven,
Because not altogether of such clay
As rots into the souls of those whom
I survey.


182 CLOUGH.
But O blithe breeze! and O great seas,
Though neer that earliest parting
past,
On your wide plain they join again,
Together lead them home at last.
One port, methought, alike they
sought .
One purpose hold whereer they
fare;
O bounding breeze, O rushing seas,
At last, at last unite them there!
Or vestal, say, of saintliest clay,
For once by balmiest airs betrayed
Unto emotions too, too sweet
To be unlingeringly gainsaid.
Unowning then, confusing soon
With dreamier dreams that oer
the glass
Of shyly ripening woman-sense
Reflected, scarce reflected, pass
A wife may be, a mother, she
In Hymens shrine recalls not now
She first in hour, ah, not profane!
With me to Hymen learnt to bow.
NATURA NATVRANS.
Beside me, in the car, she sat;
She spake not, no, nor looked to
me.
From her to me, from me to her,
What passed so subtly, stealthily ?
As rose to rose, that by it blows,
Its interchanged aroma flings;
Or wake to sound of one sweet note
The virtues of disparted strings.
Ah no! yet owned we, fused in one,
The power which, een in stones
and earths
By blind elections felt, in forms
Organic breeds to myriad births;
By lichen small on granite wall
Approved, its faintest, feeblest stir
Slow-spreading, strengthening long,
at last
Vibrated full in me and her.
Beside me, nought but this? but
this,
That influent; as within me dwelt
Her life; mine too within her breast,
Her brain, her every limb, she felt.
We sat; while oer and in us, more
And more, a powrer unknown pre-
vailed,
Inhaling and inhaled, and still
Twas one, inhaling or inhaled.
Beside me, nought but this; and
passed
I passed; and know not to this day
If gold or jet her girlish hair
If black, or brown, or lucid-gray
Her eyes young glance. The fickle
chance
That joined us yet may join again;
But I no face again could greet
As hers, w'hose life was in me then.
As unsuspecting mere a maid
As fresh in maidhoods bloomiest
bloom
In casual second-class did eer
By casual youth her seat assume;
In me and her------sensation strange!
The lily grew to pendent head;
To vernal airs the mossy bank
Its sheeny primrose spangles spread;.
In roof oer roof of shade sun-proof
Did cedar strong itself outclimb;
And altitude of aloe proud
Aspire in floral crown sublime;
Flashed flickering forth fantastic
flies;
Big bees their burly bodies swung;
Rooks roused with civic din the elms;
And lark its wild reveille rung;
In Libyan dell the light gazelle,
The leopard lithe in Indian glade,
And dolphin, brightening tropic seas,
In us were living, leapt and played.
Their shells did slow Crustacea build;
Their gilded skins did snakes re-
new;
"While mightier spines for loftier kind
Their types in amplest limbs out-
grew ;
Yea, close comprest in human breast,,
What moss, and tree, and livelier
thing


CRANCH.
I live and feel and think and know ?
What the allegiance that I owe
To tides beyond all time and space ?
What form of faith must I embrace ?
Why thwarted, starved, and over-
borne
By fate, an exile, driven forlorn
By fitful winds, where each event
Seems but the whirl of accident ?
Why feel our wings so incomplete,
Or, flying, but a plumed deceit,
Renewing all our lives to us
The fable old of Icarus ?
Tell me the meaning of the breath
That whispers from the house of
death.
That chills thoughts metaphysic
strife,
That dims the dream of After-life.
Why, if we lived not ere our birth,
Hope for a state beyond this earth ?
Tell me the secret of the hope
That gathers, as we upwards ope
The skylights of the prisoned soul
Unto the perfect and the whole;
Yet why the loveliest things of earth
Mock in their death tlieir glorious
birth.
Why, when the scarlet sunset floods
The west beyond the hills and woods,
Or June with roses crowds my porch,
Or northern lights with crimson
torch
Illume the snow and veil the stars
With streaming bands and wavering
bars,
Or musics sensuous, soul-like wine
Intoxicates with trance divine,
Why then must sadness like a thief
Steal my aromas of belief,
And like a cloud that shuts the day
At sunrise, turn my gold to gray ?
Tell me why instincts meant for good
Turn to a madness of the blood;
And, baffling all our morals nice,
Nature seems nearly one with vice;
What sin and misery mean, if blent
With good in one divine intent.
Why from such source must evil
spring,
And finite still mean suffering ?
177
Look on the millions born to blight;
The souls that pine for warmth and
light:
The crushed and stifled swarms that
pack
The foul streets and the alleys black,
The miserable lives that crawl
Outside the grim partition wall
Twixt rich and poor, twixt foul and
fair,
Twixt vaulting hope and lame de-
spair.
On that walls sunny side, within,
Hang ripening fruits and tendrils
green,
Oer garden-beds of bloom and spice,
And perfume as of paradise.
There happy children run and talk
Along the shade-flecked gravel-walk,
And lovers sit in rosy bowers,
And music overflows the hours,
And wealth and health and mirth
and books
Make pictures in Arcadian nooks.
But on that walls grim outer stones
The fierce north-wind of winter
groans;
Through blinding dust, oer bleak
highway,
The slant suns melancholy ray
Sees stagnant pool and poisonous
weed,
The hearts that faint, the feet that
bleed,
The grovelling aim, the flagging
faith,
The starving curse, the drowning
death!
O wise philosopher! you soothe
Our troubles with a touch too
smooth.
Too plausibly your reasonings come.
They will not guide me to my home;
They lead me on a little way
Through meadows, groves, and gar-
dens gay,
Until a wall shuts out my day,
A screen whose top is hid in clouds,
Whose base is deep on dead mens
shrouds.
Could I dive under pain and death,
Or mount and breathe the whole
heavens breath,


222 FAY FENNER.
Anna Maria Fay.
SLEEP AND DEATH.
Oft see we in the garish round of
day
A danger-haunted world for our
sad feet,
Or fear we tread along the peopled
street
A homeless path, an uncompan-
ioned way.
So too the night doth bring its own
array
Of darkling terrors we must singly
meet,
Each soul apart in its unknown re-
treat,
With life a purposeless, uncon-
scious play.
But though the day discovers us
afraid,
Unsure of some safe hand to be
our guide,
Best we at night, as if for each
were said,
He giveth unto His beloved sleep.
Nought less than all do we in sleep
confide,
And death hut needs of us a trust
as deep.
RONDEL.
When love is in her eyes,
What need of Spring for me ?
A brighter emerald lies
On hill and vale and lea.
The azure of the skies
Holds nought so sweet to see,
When love is in her eyes,
What need of Spring for me ?
Her bloom the rose outvies,
The lily dares no plea,
The violets glory dies,
No flower so sweet can be;
When love is in her eyes,
What need of Spring for me ?
Cornelius George Fenner.
GULF-WEED.
A weary weed, tossed to and fro,
Drearily drenched in the ocean
brine,
Soaring high and sinking low,
Lashed along without will of mine;
Sport of the spume of the surging sea;
Flung on the foam, afar and anear,
Mark my manifold mystery,
Growth and grace in their place
appear.
I bear round berries, gray and red,
Rootless and rover though I be;
My spangled leaves, when nicely
spread,
Arboresce as a trunkless tree;
Corals curious coat me oer,
White and hard in apt array;
Mid the wild waves rude uproar,
Gracefully grow I, night and day.
Hearts there are on the sounding
shore,
Something whispers soft to me,
Restless and roaming for evermore,
Like this weary weed of the sea;
Bear they yet on each beating breast
The eternal type of the wondrous
whole:
Growth unfolding amidst unrest,
Grace informing with silent soul.


HOLLAND.
275
[From the Marble Prophecy.]
THE TYPE OF STRUGGLING
HUMANITY.
Laocoon thou great embodiment
Of human life and human history!
Thou record of the past, thou proph-
ecy
Of the sad future, thou majestic voice,
Pealing along the ages from old time!
Thou wail of agonized humanity!
There lives no thought in marble like
to thee!
Thou hast no kindred in the Vatican,
But standest separate among the
dreams
Of old mythologies alone alone!
The beautiful Apollo at thy side
Is but a marble dream, and dreams
are all
The gods and goddesses and fauns
and fates
That populate these wondrous halls;
but thou,
Standing among them, liftest up thy-
self
In majesty of meaning, till they sink
Far from the sight, no more signifi-
cant
Than the poor toys of children. For
thou art
A voice from out the worlds experi-
ence,
Speaking of all the generations past
To all the generations yet to come
Of the long struggle, the sublime de-
spair,
The wild and weary agony of man!
ON THE RIGHT.
On the Righi Kulm we stood,
Lovely Floribel and I,
While the mornings crimson flood
Streamed along the eastern sky.
Reddened every mountain-peak
Into rose from twilight dun;
But the blush upon her cheek
Was not lighted by the sun!
On the Righi Kulm we sat,
Lovely Floribel and I,
Plucking bluebells for her hat
From a mound that blossomed
nigh.
We are near to heaven, she sighed,
While her raven lashes fell.
Nearer, softly I replied,
Than the mountains height may
tell.
Down the Righis side we sped,
Lovely Floribel and I,
But her morning blush had fled
And the bluebells all were dry.
Of the height the dream wras born;
Of the lower air it died;
And the passion of the morn
Flagged and fell at eventide.
From the breast of blue Lucerne,
Lovely Floribel and I
Saw the brand of sunset burn
On the Righi Kulm, and die.
And we wondered, gazing thus,
If our dream would still remain
On the height, and wait for us
Till we climb to heaven again!
- WHAT WILL IT MATTER?
If life awake and will never cease
On the futures distant shore,
And the rose of love and the lily of
peace
Shall bloom there forevermore,
Let the world go round^and round,
And the sun sink into the sea;
For whether Im on or under the
' ground,
Oh, what will it matter to me ?


Thou who canst love us, though
thou read us true,
As on the bosom of the aerial lawn
Melts in dim haze each coarse un-
gentle hue.
So too may soothing hope thy leave
enjoy
Sweet visions of long severed
hearts to frame:
Though absence may impair, or cares
annoy,
Some constant mind may draw us
still the same.
SINCE ALL THAT IS NOT HEAVEN
MUST FADE.
Since all that is not heaven must
fade,
Light be the hand of ruin laid
Upon the home I love:
With lulling spell let soft decay
Steal on, and spare the giant sway,
The crash of tower and grove.
Far
down some woodland
opening
deep
In their own quiet dale should sleep
The relics dear to thought,
And wild-flower wreaths from side to
side
Their waving tracery hang, to hide
What ruthless time has wrought.
Such are the visions green and
sweet
That oer the wistful fancy fleet
In Asias sea-like plain,
Where slowly, round his isles of
sand,
Euphrates through the lonely land
Winds toward the pearly main.
Slumber is there, but not of rest;
There her forlorn and weary nest
The famished hawk has found,
The wild dog howls at fall of night,
The serpents rustling coils affright
The traveller on his round.
What shapeless form, half
high,
Half seen against the evening sky,
Seems like a ghost to glide,
And watch from Babels crumbling
heap,
Where in her shadow, fast asleep,
Lies fallen imperial pride ?
With half-closed eye a lion there
Is basking in his noontide lair
Or prowls in twilight gloom.
The golden citys king he seems,
Such as in old prophetic dreams
Sprang from rough oceans womb.
But where are now his eagle wings,
That sheltered erst a thousand kings,
Hiding the glorious sky
From half the nations, till they own
No holier name, no mightier throne ?
That vision is gone by.
Quenched is the golden statues ray,
The breath of heaven has blown
away
What toiling earth had piled,
Scattering wise heart and crafty
hand,
As breezes strew on oceans sand,
The fabrics of a child.
Divided thence through every age
Thy rebels, Lord, their warfare wage,
And hoarse and jarring all
Mount up their heaven-assailing cries
To thy bright watchman in the skies
From Babels shattered wall.
Thrice only since, with blended
might
The nations on that haughty height
Have met to scale the heaven:
Thrice only might a seraphs look
A moments shade of sadness brook;
Such power to guilt was given.
Now the fierce Bear and Leopard
keen
Are perished as they neer had been,
Oblivion is their home:
Ambitions boldest dream and last
Must melt before the clarion blast
That sounds the dirge of Rome.


LOWELL.
i
i
STORM AT APPLEDORE.
\
| Hoav looks Appledore in a storm ?
I have seen it when its crags
seemed frantic,
Butting against the mad Atlantic,
When surge on surge would heap
enorme,
Cliffs of emerald topped with snow,
That lifted and lifted, and then let
go
A great white avalanche of thunder,
A grinding, blinding, deafening ire
Monadnock might have trembled un-
der;
And the island, whose rock-roots
pierce below
To where they are warmed with
the central fire,
Tou could feel its granite fibres
racked,
As it seemed to plunge with a
shudder and thrill
Eight at the breast of the swooping
hill,
And to rise again snorting a cataract
Of rage-froth from every cranny and
ledge,
While the sea drew its breath in
hoarse and deep,
And the next vast breaker curled its
edge,
Gathering itself for a mightier leap.
North, east, and south there are reefs
and breakers
You would never dream of in
smooth weather,
That toss and gore the sea for acres,
Bellowing and gnashing and snarl-
ing together;
Look northward, where Duck Island
lies,
And over its crown you will see arise,
Against a background of slaty skies,
A row of pillars still and white,
That glimmer, and then are out of
sight,
As if the moon should suddenly kiss,
While you crossed the gusty desert
by night, 1
The long colonnades of Persepolis;
Look southward for White Island
light,
The lantern stands ninety feet oer
the tide;
There is first a half-mile of tumult
and fight,
Of dash and roar and tumble and
fright,
And surging bewilderment wild and
wide,
Where the breakers struggle left and
right,
Then a mile or more of rushing
sea,
And then the lighthouse slim and
lone;
And whenever the weight of ocean is
thrown
Full and fair on White Island head,
A great mist-jotun you will see
Lifting himself up silently
High and huge oer the lighthouse
top,
With hands of wavering spray out-
spread,
Groping after the little tower,
That seems to shrink and shorten
and cower,
Till the monsters arms of a sudden
drop,
And silently and fruitlessly
He sinks again into the sea.
You, meanwhile, where drenched
you stand,
Awaken once more to the rush and
roar,
And on the rock-point tighten your
* hand,
As you turn and see a valley deep,
That was not there a moment be-
fore,
Suck rattling down between you and a
heap [fall
Of toppling billow, whose instant
Must sink the whole island once
for all;
Or watch the silenter, stealthier seas
Feeling their way to you more and
more;
If they once should clutch you high
as the knees,
They would whirl you down like a
sprig of kelp,
Beyond ali reach of hope or help;
And such in a storm is Appledore.


rS&TTS
862 MACKAY.
Which that child, the livelong day,
Chanted to itself in play:
When the wind blows, the blossoms
fall,
But a good God reigns over all.
The widows lips impulsive moved;
The mothers grief, though unre-
proved,
Softened, as her trembling tongue
Repeated what the infant sung;
And the sad lover, with a start,
Conned it over to his heart.
And though the child if child it
were,
And not a seraph sitting there
Was seen no more, the sorrowing
three
Went on their way resignedly,
The song still ringing in their ears
Was it music of the spheres ?
Cleon is a slave to grandeur,
Free as thought am I;
Cleon fees a score of doctors,
Need of none have I;
Wealth-surrounded, care-environed,
Cleon fears to die;
Death may come hell find me
ready,
Happier man am I.
Cleon sees no charms in Nature,
In a daisy, I;
Cleon hears no anthems ringing
Twixt the sea and sky;
Nature sings to me forever,
Earnest listener, I;
State for state, with all attendants
Who would change ? Not I.
CLEAR THE WAY!
Who shall tell ? They did not know.
But in the midst of deepest woe
The strain recurred when sorrow grew,
To warn them, and console them too:
When the wind blows, the blossoms
fall,
| But a good God reigns over all.
CLEON AND I.
Cleon hath ten thousand acres,
Neer a one have I;
Cleon dwelleth in a palace,
In a cottage, I;
Cleon hath a dozen fortunes,
Not a penny, I;
Yet the poorer of the twain is
Cleon, and not I.
Cleon, true, possesseth acres,
But the landscape, I;
Half the charms to me it yieldeth
Money cannot buy;
Cleon harbors sloth and dulness,
Freshening vigor, I;
He in velvet, I in fustian
Richer man am I.
Men of thought! be up and stirring,
Night and day:
Sow the seed withdraw the cur-
tain
Clear the way!
Men of action, aid and cheer them,
As ye may!
Theres a fount about to stream,
Theres a light about to beam,
Theres a warmth about to glow,
Theres a flower about to blow;
Theres a midnight blackness chang-
ing
Into gray;
Men of thought and men of action,
Clear the way!
Once the welcome light has broken,
Who shall say
What the unimagined glories
Of the day ?
What the evil that shall perish
In its ray ?
Aid the dawning, tongue and pen;
Aid it, hopes of honest men;
Aid it, paper aid it, type
Aid it, for the hour is ripe,
And our earnest must not slacken
Into play.
Men of thought and men of action,
Clear the way!


PERCIVAL.
411
It was as if a harp with wires
Was traversed by the breath I drew;
And oh, sweet meeting of desires!
She, answering, owned that she
loved too.
WOULD WISDOM FOR HERSELF
BE WOOED.
Would Wisdom for herself be wooed,
And wake the foolish from his
dream,
She must be glad as well as good,
And must not only be, but seem.
Beauty and joy are hers by right;
And, knowing this, I wonder less
That shes so scorned, when falsely
diglit
In misery and ugliness.
Whats that which Heaven to man
endears,
And that which eyes no sooner see
Than the heart says, with floods of
tears,
Ah! thats the thing which I
would be ?
Not childhood, full of fears and frets:
Not youth, impatient to disown
Those visions high, which to forget
Were worse than never to have
known.
Not these; but souls found here and
here,
Oases in our waste of sin,
When everything is well and fair,
And God remits his discipline;
Whose sweet subdual of the world
The worldling scarce can recognize;
And ridicule, against it hurled,
Drops with a broken sting and dies.
They live by law, not like the fool,
But like the bard who freely sings
In strictest bonds of rhyme and rule,
I And finds in them not bonds but
I wings.
James Gates Percival.
{From Prometheus, Part //.]
APOSTROPHE TO THE SUN.
Centre of light and energy! thy way
Is through the unknown void; thou
hast thy throne,
Morning, and evening, and at noon
of day,
Far in the blue, untended and alone;
Ere the first-wakened airs of earth
had blown,
On thou didst march, triumphant in
thy light;
Then thou didst send thy glance,
which still hath flown
Wide through the never-ending
worlds of. night,
And yet thy full orb burns with flash
as keen and bright.
Thy path is high in Heaven; we
cannot gaze
On the intense of light that girds thy
car;
There is a crown of glory in thy rays,
Which bear thy pure divinity afar,
To mingle with the equal light of
star;
For thou, so vast to us, art in the
whole
One of the sparks of night, that fire
the air,
And as around thy centre planets
roll,
So thou too hast thy path around the
Central Soul.
Age oer thee has no power; thou
bring st the same
Light to renew the morning, as when
first, |flame,
If not eternal, thou, with front of
On the dark face of earth in glory
burst,
And warmed the seas, and in their
bosom nursed
The earliest things of life, the worm
and shell;


426
And the silken, sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;
This it is and nothing more.
Presently my soul greAv stronger; hesitating then no longer,
Sir, said I, or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you here I opened wide the door;
Darkness there and nothing more.
Deep into the darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word Lenore ?
This I whispered, and an echo murmured hack the word Lenore!
Merely this and nothing more.
Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
Surely, said I, surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;
Tis the wind and nothing more.
Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore.
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou, I said, art sure no craven,
Ghastly, grim and ancient Raven, wandering from the Nightly shore
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Nights Plutonian shore!
Quoth the Raven, Nevermore.
Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as Nevermore.
But the Raven, sitting lonely on that placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing farther then he uttered; not a feather then he fluttered
Till I scarcely more than muttered Other friends have flown before
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.
Then the bird said Nevermore.
% ^ -

POE.


/'V
II
SHELLEY.
What thou art we know not;
What is most like thee ?
From rainbow clouds there flow not
Drops so bright to see,
As from thy presence showers a rain
of melody.
Like a poet hidden
In the light of thought,
Singing hymns unbidden,
Till the world is wrought
To sympathy with hopes and fears it
heeded not:
Like a high-born maiden
In a palace-tower,
Soothing her love-laden
Soul in secret hour
With music sweet as love, which
overflows her bower:
Like a glow-worm golden
In a dell of dew,
Scattering unbeholden
Its aerial hue
Among the flowers and grass, which
screen it from the view:
Like a rose embowered
In its own green leaves,
By warm winds deflowered,
Till the scent it gives
Makes faint with too much sweet
these heavy-winged thieves.
Sound of vernal showers
On the twinkling grass,
Bain-awakened flowers,
All that ever was
Joyous, and clear, and fresh, thy
music doth surpass.
Teach us, sprite or bird,
What sweet thoughts are thine:
I have newer heard
Praise of love or wine
That panted forth a flood of rapture
so divine.
Chorus hymeneal,
Or triumphal chant,
Matched with thine would be all
But an empty vaunt,'
A thing wherein we feel there is some
hidden want.
What objects are the fountains
Of thy happy strain ?
What fields, or waves, or moun-
tains ?
What shapes of sky or plain ?
What love of thine own kind ? what
ignorance of pain ?
With thy clear keen joyance
Languor cannot be:
Shadow of annoyance
Never came near thee:
Thou lovest; but neer knew loves
sad satiety.
Waking or asleep,
Thou of death must deem
Things more true and deep
Than we mortals dream,
Or how could thy notes flow in such
a crystal stream ?
We look before and after,
And pine for what is not:
Our sincerest laughter
With some pain is fraught;
Our sweetest songs are those that tell
of saddest thought.
Yet if we could scorn
Hate, and pride, and fear;
If we were things born
Not to shed a tear,
know not how thy joy we ever
should come near.
Better than all measures
Of delightful sound,
Better than all treasures
That in books are found,
Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner
of the ground!
Teach me half the gladness
That thy brain must know,
Such harmonious madness
From my lips would flow,
The world should listen then, as I am
listening now.
- - . ..... -
SllSl s T Y" ^.| gg


542
STODDARD.
Hairs are white that once were black,
Each of fate the message saith;
j And the bending of the back
Salutation is to death.
, PAIN AND PLEASURE.
j Pain and pleasure both decay,
11 Wealth and poverty depart;
| Wisdom makes a longer stay,
! Therefore, be thou wise, my heart.
11 Land remains not, nor do they
| Who the lands to-day control,
i Kings and princes pass away,
Therefore, be thou fixed, my soul.
If by hatred, love, or pride
Thou art shaken, thou art wrong;
Only one thing will abide,
Only goodness can be strong.
OUT OF THE DEEPS OF HEAVEN.
Out of the deeps of heaven
A bird has flown to my door,
As twice in the ripening summers
Its mates have flown before.
Why it has flown to my dwelling
Hor it nor I may know;
And only the silent angels
Can tell when it shall go.
That it will not straightway vanish,
But fold its wings with me,
And sing in the greenest branches
Till the axe is laid to the tree,
Is the prayer of my love and terror;
For my soul is sore distrest,
Lest I wake some dreadful morning,
And find but its empty nest!
WE SAT BY THE CHEERLESS
FIRESIDE.
We sat by the cheerless fireside,
Mother, and you, and I;
All thinking of our darling,
And sad enough to die.
He lay in his little coffin,
In the room adjoining ours,
A Christmas wreath on his bosom,
His brow in a band of flowers.
We bury the boy to-morrow,
I said, or seemed to say;
Would I could keep it from coming
By lengthening out to-day!
Why cant I sit by the fireside,
As I am sitting now,
And feel my gray hairs thinning,
And the wrinkles on my brow ?
God keep him there in his coffin
Till the years have rolled away!
If he must be buried to-morrow,
Oh, let me die to-day!
THE HEALTH.
You may drink to your leman in
gold,
In a great golden goblet of wine;
Shes as ripe as the wine, and as bold
As the glare of the gold:
But this little lady of mine,
1 will not profane her in wine.
I go where the garden so still is,
(The moon raining through,)
To pluck the white bowls of the
lilies,
And drink her in dew!
SILENT SONGS.
If I could ever sing the songs
Within me day and night,
The only fit accompaniment
Would be a lute of light.
A thousand dreamy melodies,
Begot with pleasant pain,
Like incantations float around
The chambers of my brain.
But when I strive to utter one,
It mocks my feeble art,
And leaves me silent, with the thorns
Of music in my heart!


I
THOMSON.
597
[From The Castle of Indolence.]
HEALTH NECESSARY TO HAPPY
LIFE.
Ah! what avail the largest gifts of
Heaven,
When drooping health and spirits go
amiss?
How tasteless then whatever can be
given?
Health is the vital principle of
bliss,
And exercise of health. In proof of
this,
Behold the wretch, who slugs his life
away,
Soon swallowed in diseases sad
abyss;
While he whom toil has braced, or
manly play,
As light as air each limb, each thought
as clear as day.
If those, who sit at shepherds board,
Soothe not their taste by wanton
art;
They take what Natures gifts afford,
And take it with a cheerful heart.
If those who drain the shepherds
bowl,
No high and sparkling wines can
boast,
With wholesome cups they cheer the
soul,
And crown them with the village
toast.
If those who join in shepherds sport,
Gay dancing on the daisied ground,
Have not the splendor of a court:
Yet love adorns the merry round.
RULE, BRITANNIA!

Oh, who can speak the vigorous joys
of health!
Uncloggd the body, unobscured the
mind:
The morning rises gay, with pleasing
stealth,
The temperate evening falls serene
and kind.
In health the wiser brutes true glad-
ness find:
See! how the younglings frisk along
the meads,
As May comes on, and wakes, the
balmy wind;
Rampant with life, their joy all joy
exceeds;
Yet what but high-strung health this
dancing pleasaunce breeds?
When Britain first, at Heavens
command,
Arose from out the azure main,
This was the charter of the land,
And guardian angels sung this
strain:
Rule, Britannia, rule the
waves;
Britons never will be slaves.
The nations, not so blessed as thee,
Must, in their turns, to tyrants
fall;
While thou shalt flourish great and
free,
The dread and envy of them all.
Rule, etc.
CONTENTMENT.
If those, who live in shepherds
bower,
Press not the rich and stately bed:
The new-mown hay and breathing
flower
A softer couch beneath them
spread.
Still more majestic shalt thou rise,
More dreadful from each foreign
stroke;
As the loud blast that tears the skies
Serves but to root thy native oak.
Rule, etc.
Thee haughty tyrants neer shall
tame:
All their attempts to bend thee
down


I
H
s
*
!r
664 WO LOOT WOLFE.
|
j John Wolcot (Peter Pindar).
TO MY CANDLE.
Thou lone companion of the spec-
j tred night !
i I wake amid thy friendly watchful
| light.
I To steal a precious hour from life-
! less sleep.
Hark, the wild uproar of the winds!
and hark! I the dark,
Hells genius roams the regions of
And swells the thundering horrors
of the deep!
From cloud to cloud the pale moon
hurrying flies,
Now blackened, and now flashing
through the skies; [beam.
But all is silence here, beneath thy
I own I labor for the voice of praise
For who would sink in dull obliv-
ions stream ?
Who would not live in songs of dis-
tant days ?
How slender now, alas! thy thread
of fire!
Ah! falling falling ready to ex-
pire!
In vain thy struggles, all will soon be
oer.
At life thou snatchest with an eager
leap;
Now round I see thy flame so feeble
creep,
Faint, lessening, quivering, glim-
mering, now no more!
Thus shall the suns of science sink
away,
And thus of beauty fade the fairest
flower
For wheres the giant who to Time
shall say,
Destructive tyrant, I arrest thy
power!
Charles Wolfe.
TO MARY.
If I had thought thou couldst have
died,
I might not weep for thee;
But I forgot, when by thy side,
That thou couldst mortal he:
It never through my mind had passed
The time would eer be oer,
And I on thee should look my last,
And thou shouldst smile no more!
And still upon that face I look,
And think twill smile again;
And still the thought I will not brook,
That I must look in vain!
But when I speak, thou dost not say
What thou neer leftst unsaid;
And now I feel, as well I may,
Sweet Mary! thou art dead!
If thou wouldst stay, een as thou art,
All cold and all serene
I still might press thy silent heart,
And where thy smiles have been!
While een thy chill, bleak corpse I
have,
Thou seemest still mine own;
But there I lay thee in thy grave
And I am now alone!
I do not think, whereer thou art,
Thou hast forgotten me;
And I, perhaps, may soothe tlib
heart,
In thinking too of thee:


SPORTIVE, SATIRICAL, HUMOROUS,
AND
DIALECT POEMS.
Charles Follen Adams.
YAW COB STRAUSS.
I haf von funny leedle poy
Vot gomes schust to mine knee;
Der queerest sckap, der createst
rogue,
As efer you dit see.
He runs,und schumps,und schmashes
dings
In all barts off der house;
But vot off dot ? he vas mine son,
Mine leedle Yawcob Strauss.
He get der measles and der mumbs,
Und eferyding dots oudt;
He sbills mine glass off lager bier,
Poots schnuff in do mine kraut.
He fills mine pipe mit Limburg
cheese,
Dot vas der roughest chouse:
Id dake dot vrom no oder poy
But leedle Yawcob Strauss.
He dakes der milk-ban for a dhrum,
Und cuts mine cane in dwo,
To make der schticks to beat it mit,
Mine cracious, dot vas drue!
I dinks mine hed vas schplit abart,
He kicks oup sooch a touse:
But nefer mind; der poys vas few
Like dot young Yawcob Strauss.
He asks me questions such as dese:
Who baints mine nose so red ?
Who was it cuts dot schmoodth blace
oudt
Yrom der hair ubon mine hed ?
Und vhere der plaze goes vrom der
lamp
Yeneer der glim I douse,
How gan I all dose dings eggsblain
To dot schmall Yawcob Strauss ?
I somedimes dink I schall go wild
Mit sooch a grazy poy,
Und wish vonce more I gould haf
rest,
Und beaceful dimes enshoy;
But ven he vas ashleep in ped,
So guiet as a mouse,
I prays der Lord, Dake anyding,
But leaf dot Yawcob Strauss.
PATS CRITICISM.
Theres a story thats old,
But good if twice told,
Of a doctor of limited skill,
Who cured beast and man
On the cold-water plan,
Without the small help of a pill.
On his portal of pine
Hung an elegant sign,
Depicting a beautiful rill,
And a lake where a sprite,
With apparent delight,
Was sporting a sweet dishabille.
Pat McCarty one day,
As he sauntered that way,
Stood and gazed at that portal of
pine;
Note. Thackerays Bouillabaisse and Trowbridges Vagabonds, being really
pathetic poems, are placed here for convenience rather than fitness, their colloquial
style adapting them to this rather than the other department.