Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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Full Text
University of Colorado at Denver 1974-75
University of Colorado Bulletin


Ulfl?Ol 15611,31
Contents
GENERAL INFORMATION ................... 1
ACADEMIC CALENDAR ..................... 1
COLLEGE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES ..... 12
DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES .... 17
DIVISION OF NATURAL AND
PHYSICAL SCIENCES ............... 25
DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES......... 34
ETHNIC PROGRAMS .............. 42
SPECIAL PROGRAMS .............. 45
PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS ........... 45
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ....................... 50
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION .................. 62
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND
APPLIED SCIENCE .................... 65
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN....... 87
COLLEGE OF MUSIC ..................... 91
GRADUATE SCHOOL ...................... 92
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS ..125
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS ..............134
FACULTY ..............................134
INDEX ................................139
This bulletin contains general information and course descriptions. Students should consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes as well as particular registration information.
University of Colorado Bulletin.
1200 University Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80302. Vol. LXXIII, No. 57, December 10, 1973,
General Series No. 1701. Published five times monthly by the University of Colorado.
Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado.


General
Information
^ ** ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ~— ■p ^ f ^F" —
DENVER CAMPUS ACADEMIC CALENDAR*
(NOTE: Prospective students are advised that slight variations in the calendar may exist on different campuses of the University. Specific information should be obtained from the campus to which the individual expects to apply.)
DEADLINE DATES FOR APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION
The following dates will be applicable for the academic year 1974-75 at the University of Colorado at Denver. Interested applicants are advised that all credentials required in the admission process must be on file with the Office of Admissions and Records prior to the deadline dates indicated below if consideration for admission is to be made for the term desired. Transfer applicants should take into account the time involved in having official transcripts sent from collegiate institutions attended previously and apply sufficiently in advance of the application deadline to insure that these documents are on file by the required date. Foreign students are advised that 120 days are usually required for credentials to arrive in this office from most international locations.
Summer Fall Spring
1974 1974 1975
Undergraduate:
New Freshman and Transfer Students May 24 Aug. 2 Dec. 20
Nursing (fall only) Special Student to March 1
Degree Student Status Change May 24 Aug. 2 Dec. 20
Graduate:
Business Environmental Design Apr. 1 June 1 Nov. 1
(fall only) Apr. 15
Public Administration Apr. 1 July 1 Nov. 15
Graduate School Apr. 15 July 1 Dec. 1
School of Education Mar. 1 June 1 Nov. 1
Nursing (fall only) Pediatric Psychology Jan. 15
(fall only) Special Student to Apr. 1
Degree Student Status
Change (see Graduate School dates above)
Special Students:
Undergraduate and Graduate levels May 24 Aug. 2 Dec. 20
Intra-U ni versity
Transfers: Apr. 15 July 1 Dec. 1
Fall Semester 1974
Students are advised to obtain a copy of the Fall
Semester 1974 Schedule of Courses for complete calendar information and instructions regarding registration.
Aug. 2 (Fri.)—Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the fall semester 1974.
Aug. 27, 28, 29 (Tues-Thurs.)—Registration.
Sept. 2 (Mon.)—Labor Day holiday. All offices closed.
Sept. 3 (Tues.)—Classes begin.
Sept. 3, 4 (Tues.-Wed.)—Late application and registra-tration. A late fee will be assessed all late registrants.
Nov. 28-30 (Thurs.-Sat.)—Thanksgiving holiday. No classes, all offices closed.
Dec. 2 (Mon.)—Classes resume.
Dec. 21 (Sat.)—Classes end.
Spring Semester 1975
Students are advised to obtain a copy of the Spring
Semester 1975 Schedule of Courses for complete calendar information and instructions regarding registration.
Dec. 3, 4, 5 (Tues.-Thurs.)—EARLY REGISTRATION: students enrolled fall semester 1974 only.
Dec. 20 (Fri.)—Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the spring semester 1975.
Jan. 14, 15 (Tues.-Wed.)—OPEN REGISTRATION: (New applications for admission will not be accepted or considered on the days of open registration.)
Jan. 20 (Mon.)—Classes begin.
Jan. 20, 21 (Mon.-Tues.)—Late application and registration. A late fee will be assessed all late registrants.
Mar. 24-29 (Mon.-Sat.)—Spring vacation. No classes.
Mar. 28 (Fri.)—All offices closed.
Mar. 31 (Mon.)—Classes resume.
May 21 (Wed.)—Classes end.
May 24 (Sat.)—Commencement in Boulder.
Summer Term 1975
May 21 (Wed.)—Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the summer term 1975.
June 11-12 (Wed.-Thurs.)—Registration.
June 16 (Mon.)—Classes begin.
July 4 (Fri.)—Independence Day holiday. No classes. Offices closed.
Aug. 8 (Fri.)—Classes end.
*The University reserves the right to alter the academic calendar at any
time.


2 / University of Colorado at Denver
THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER ... AN URBAN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
History
Beginning in 1912, courses were made available to residents of the Denver metropolitan area through the Extension Division of the University of Colorado in Boulder. Classes were held in scattered locations throughout the city until 1938, when they were gathered in one center. Increasing enrollment necessitated two moves to larger quarters, and the Denver Center came to its present location at 14th and Araphoe Streets in 1957. In 1965, the Denver Center became a degreegranting institution, enabling students to complete full academic programs in Denver.
In January 1973, the Board of Regents adopted a resolution changing the names of the University’s centers because of an amendment to the Constitution of the State of Colorado which gave the centers legal status as separate branches of the University. The Denver Center was renamed the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD).
Location
UCD is situated at the hub of a tremendous growth area. The downtown campus is accessible to both city dwellers and suburban commuters from a five-county area with a population of 1,295,000. Located across Cherry Creek from the Auraria Urban Renewal Area, UCD will share facilities with Metropolitan State College and the Community College of Denver in the Auraria Higher Education Center complex while remaining a unique urban institution in itself. The campus is close to major business establishments and government offices in downtown Denver, as well as to civic and cultural centers.
Enrollment
UCD is one of the largest state-supported institutions of higher education in Colorado in terms of enrollment. The average number of students enrolled for credit is more than 7,000 during the fall and spring semesters and 4,000 during the summer term.
Academic Programs
Academic and public service programs are especially geared to the needs of the urban population and environment, as well as to traditional fields of study. Students may earn degrees in more than 50 undergraduate fields and some 20 graduate areas. These educational endeavors emphasize quality instruction, research, and professional training. Academic programs within the University are offered by colleges that admit freshmen, by professional schools that admit students who have completed at least two years of preprofessional study, and by the Graduate School. Colleges and schools on the Denver Campus include:
College of Undergraduate Studies
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Environmental Design
College of Music
Graduate School
Graduate School of Public Affairs
Accreditation and Memberships
The University of Colorado at Denver is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is a member of the Association of Urban Universities.
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is a member of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. The School of Education is accredited by the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education and membership is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science has earned high accreditation ratings from the Engineers Council on Professional Development. The College of Environmental Design is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board and is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. The College of Music is a member of the National Association of Schools of Music.
The Graduate School of Public Affairs is a recognized member of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.
Year-Round Operation
Classes on the Denver Campus are scheduled six days a week, both day and evening. Students may begin studies at the start of any one of the academic terms of the year, which include a fall semester of 16 weeks, a spring semester of 16 weeks, and an 8-week (halfsemester) summer term. More than half of the courses on the Denver Campus are offered during evening hours, permitting students maximum flexibility in planning for both employment and educational goals.
Faculty
More than 160 highly qualified faculty members teach full time on the Denver Campus; 84 percent have earned doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban scene and responsive to the needs of the urban student.
Students
Strongly motivated people from all walks of life make up the student body. The diversity of interests, knowledge, occupations, backgrounds, and age stimulates a unique learning experience for these men and women. Ages range from 16 to 70. About 60 percent of the students enrolled are at the junior, senior, fifth year, graduate, or special student-with-baccalaureate-degree levels.
Prospectus
As an urban university, the Denver Campus has a fundamental commitment to meet the needs of the urban community; it seeks to keep pace with the needs of the present-day city-oriented student and at the same time plan for the demands of the future. Programs are continually being enlarged and expanded to offer students a broad scope of educational opportunities, whether the student is seeking a general education or has a desire to study in a highly specialized area.
UCD’s primary role is to provide graduate, professional, and upper division education, with undergraduate programs designed especially for those students who plan to undertake graduate work or postbaccalaureate professional study.


General Information / 3
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Colorado at Denver seeks to identify applicants who have a high probability of successful completion of an academic program. Admission decisions are based on evaluation of many criteria. Among the most important are:
1. Maturity, motivation, and potential for academic growth.
2. Ability to work in the academic environment of an urban, nonresidential campus.
3. Evidence of scholarly ability and accomplishment shown on national aptitude and achievement tests (ACT/SAT).
4. General level of previous academic performance.
An applicant who is granted admission to UCD must
reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal background acceptable to the University. The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors of proved academic ability may be admitted to UCD for courses which supplement their high school programs. Credits for University courses taken in this manner may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. Interested high school students may contact the Office of Admissions and Records for complete information and application instructions (telephone [303] 623-1181).
Admission of Freshmen
(Those who have not had prior collegiate experience)
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Undergraduate Studies.
1. General Requirements Applicable to Each College. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate as a result of the completion of the General Education Development Test (GED). Applicants who present the High School Equivalency Certificate of the GED must score at or above the 6th percentile on each section of the test to be eligible for consideration for admission. Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.”
All applicants must present 15 units of acceptable secondary school credit. While the College of Undergraduate Studies does not specify particular units, the College of Business and Administration, the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Music have the following requirements:
College of Business and Administration
English....................................................... 3
Mathematics (college preparatory) ............................ 2
Natural sciences (laboratory type) ........................... 2
Social sciences (including history) .......................... 2
Electives..................................................... 6
(Foreign languages and additional academic courses.
May include up to 2 units in business areas.)
15
College of Engineering and Applied Science
English .................................................. 3
Algebra .................................................. 2
Geometry ................................................. 1
(Trigonometry and solid geometry recommended.*)
Natural sciences ......................................... 2
(Physics and chemistry recommended.)
Social studies and humanities ............................ 2
(Foreign languages and additional units of English, history, and literature are included in the humanities.) Electives ...............................,................ 5
15
College of Music
English................................................... 3
Theoretical music ....................................'
Physical science .....................................
Social science............................................ 8
Foreign language......................................
Mathematics ..........................................
Additional high school units ............................. 4
15
It is expected that all students will have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. In lieu of the personal audition, applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length on IVi ips monaural) or a statement of excellence by a qualified teacher. Interested students should write to the College of Music, Denver Campus, for audition or interview applications.
2. Colorado Resident Applicants.+ Colorado resident applicants who meet the above general qualifications arc divided into three categories:
a. Applicants who ranked in the upper one-half of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT) or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board are assured admission.
b. Applicants who ranked in the upper two-thirds of their high school graduating class and who have an ACT composite score from 18 to 22 or a combined score of 800 or higher on the SAT will be considered for admission on an individual basis. These applicants cannot be assured admission.
c. Applicants who ranked in the lower one-third of their high school graduating class, or who have a composite ACT score below 18 or a combined SAT score below 800 will be considered for admission on an individual basis by the Admissions Committee.
3. Nonresident Applicants.t Nonresident applicants must meet the general requirements stated above, and, in addition, must rank in the upper one-half of their high school graduating class and present an ACT composite score of 24 or higher or a combined SAT score of 1050 or higher to be considered for admission.
Nonresident applicants are advised that the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado does not maintain residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the individual without dependence on University services.
°Beginning engineering students must be prepared to start analytic geometry-calculus. A student who does not have trigonometry should expect to attend at least one extra summer term.
tSee page 9 for definition of “resident” and “nonresident” classification.


4 / University of Colorado at Denver
How to Apply for Admission
1. Applicants may apply for the fall semester, the spring semester, or the summer term. A schedule of deadlines for the various semesters and terms will be supplied with the application form. An application that is received after the stated deadline for one semester or term will be considered for the next semester or term if the applicant notifies the Office of Admissions and Records of his intention.
2. An Application for Admission may be obtained by contacting:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Telephone (303) 623-1181
A Colorado resident may also obtain this form from the office of his high school principal or counselor.
3. The application for admission must be completed in total and submitted to the above address prior to the stated application deadline for the term of enrollment desired. All applications for admission must be accompanied by a check or money order in the amount of $ 10. This application fee is nonrefundable.
In the event the applicant is granted admission but is prevented from enrolling during the term indicated on the application, the application fee will be valid for one full year (12 months) from the date of the term for which the applicant was applying.
4. The applicant must request that a high school transcript, including his rank-in-class, be mailed to the above address by his high school.
5. The applicant must take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board on one of the national testing dates. The student must request that test scores be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver (ACT code # 0533, or SAT code # R-4875).
If the applicant took one of these tests prior to his application for admission to the University of Colorado and did not designate the Denver Campus to receive a score report, he must request the testing agency to send the score to the Denver Campus. This is accomplished on a Request for Additional Score Report form available at test centers or from the appropriate office listed below.
Information regarding these tests may be obtained either from the applicant’s high school counselor, the UCD Office of Admissions and Records, or from one of the following offices of the national testing agencies:
Registration Department (ACT)
American College Testing Program
P.O. Box 414
Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
When a complete application (application form, transcript of high school work completed, statement of rank-in-class, required entrance test scores, counselor recommendation, and the nonrefundable $10 application fee) is received by the Office of Admissions and Records, a decision of admission eligibility will be made, and the applicant will be notified.
Admission of Transfer Students
New transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Undergraduate Studies.
1. Colorado Resident Applicants * Colorado resident applicants are divided into the following three categories:
a. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of more than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) from an institution of university rank, have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended are assured admission to UCD. Applicants who have completed less than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) of collegiate work acceptable to the University of Colorado must meet requirements for admission as freshmen.
b. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of at least 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a college, have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended also are assured admission to UCD.
c. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of less than 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a college, have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be considered for admission on an individual basis. Primary factors affecting the admission decision in such cases are: (a) the UCD college or school to which admission is desired; (b) quality of previous work attempted; (c) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (d) time since the last collegiate attendance.
2. Nonresident Applicants.* Nonresidents must meet the general requirements stated above, and, in addition, must have a transferable grade-point average of 2.5 in order to be admitted to the College of Business and Administration or the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The above general requirements are sufficient for admission as a nonresident to the Colleges of Music or Undergraduate Studies.
Nonresident applicants are advised that the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado does not maintain residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the individual without dependence on University services.
Applicants should consult the appropriate college or school section of this bulletin to determine specific entrance requirements.
In the event a transfer applicant to one of the professional schools of the University has not completed all required coursework for that college or school, he may be admitted to the College of Undergraduate Studies in one
fSee page 9 for definition of “resident” and “nonresident” classification.


General Information / 5
of the preprofessional programs pending completion of such work for admission to the desired professional school.
Transfer applications may be obtained from:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Telephone: (303) 623-1181
When to Apply
Interested applicants who are currently enrolled in a collegiate institution should submit their applications for transfer admission after they have registered for the final term at the current institution. Evaluation of transfer credits will be based on an official transcript of record indicating work completed up to the last term of enrollment and courses for which the student is currently enrolled. A final, official transcript of record will be required upon completion of the final term.
Credentials Required for Transfer Admission
1. A University of Colorado transfer application.
2. The application fee of $10 in check or money order. (This fee is nonrefundable.)
3. An official transcript of record from each collegiate institution attended previously. If the applicant is currently enrolled at a collegiate institution and is submitting a transcript listing all courses except for the final term of enrollment, another official transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term.
4. An official high school transcript. If the applicant is a GED graduate, a GED Certificate of High School Equivalency, GED test scores,, and a transcript of any high school work completed must be submitted. Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.”
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Transfer of College-Level Credit
The Office of Admissions and Records and the various deans’ offices cannot make an evaluation of credits from another collegiate institution or give specific degree advisement until complete and official credentials are on file and the applicant has been admitted. In general, transfer credits from other accredited collegiate institutions will be accepted insofar as they meet the degree, grade, and residence requirements of the student’s chosen program of studies at the University.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University of Colorado in the following instances:
1. When it has been earned at a college or university of recognized standing, from Advanced Placement Examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education.
2. When a grade of C or higher has been attained.
3. When the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution.
The University of Colorado will accept up to 72 semester credits (or 108 quarter credits) of junior college work to apply toward the baccalaureate degree at the University of Colorado. No credit is allowed for vocational-technical courses.
A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
Readmission of Former Students
1. Former students of the University of Colorado who have not attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application prior to the deadline for the term they wish to attend.
2. Former students of the University of Colorado who have attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application form to apply for readmission. In addition, a $10, nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application if the student has taken 12 semester or 18 quarter hours since his last attendance at the University of Colorado. The student must request that an official transcript of record from the institution(s) attended be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver. Consideration for readmission will be made after receipt of all the above listed credentials.
The University reserves the right to deny readmission to former students whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Intra-University Transfer
Denver Campus students wishing to change colleges or schools within the University of Colorado, or to change campuses within the University of Colorado system, must make application through the Office of Admissions and Records, Denver Campus, Room 203. This application must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term for which they wish to register.
Admission of Special Students
Persons who wish to take University courses but do not plan to work for a degree from the University of Colorado (graduate or undergraduate) are referred to as special students. Special students enrolled during the academic year (fall and spring semesters) must be 21 years of age or older and must have a high school diploma or the equivalent. To accommodate students who live in the Denver metropolitan area but who are attending other collegiate institutions and wish to take courses during the summer, the University does not require that special students be 21 years of age during the summer term.
Certified school teachers with a baccalaureate degree who seek only a renewal of the certificate currently held and who do not require institutional endorsement or recommendation may qualify for the University-wide special student classification outlined above.
Persons holding a baccalaureate degree who seek teacher certification may qualify for the special student classification but must apply for and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program separately and meet all


6 / University of Colorado at Denver
requirements for the School of Education. Applications for teacher education are considered once each year (deadline is February 1 for the following summer term and/or academic year). Information regarding such application may be obtained from the School of Education office, Denver Campus, 892-1117, ext. 276.
Special students may take courses on a pass/fail basis; however, such credit will be counted as part of the total pass/fail credit allowed by the various colleges and schools should the student apply for and be accepted to degree status.
Continuation as a special student is contingent upon the student maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or higher.
Applying Special Student Credits Toward Degree
Special students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by submitting the Special to Degree Application, complete academic credentials, and the application fee. Accepted degree applicants may transfer a maximum of 12 semester credits taken as a special student to an undergraduate degree program with the approval of the appropriate academic dean. Acceptance of credit toward degrees at the University changed in fall 1970. Special students enrolled prior to that date may transfer credit in accordance with provisions in effect between January 1969 and August 1970.
Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree at this University are encouraged to submit the complete Graduate Application and supporting credentials as soon as possible. However, a department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a special student at the University, or any combination thereof. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter, or summer term for which the student has applied for admission to the Graduate School.
CREDIT FOR NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES
U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)
University of Colorado at Denver students may participate in Army ROTC programs offered on the Boulder Campus.
1. The Basic Course. This program is available to freshmen and sophomores. Freshmen are required to enroll for one hour of military science course work per week. Sophomores are required to enroll for two three-hour military science courses.
2. The Advanced Course. This program is available to juniors and seniors who have completed the Basic Course successfully or to students (including qualified veterans) who have demonstrated outstanding academic qualifications and are desirous of an Army career. Students admitted to the Advanced Course receive $100 per month during the fall and spring semesters.
Upon successful completion of the Advanced Course and receipt of a baccalaureate degree, the student may be commissioned in the U.S. Army.
Scholarships
Scholarships covering tuition, books, laboratory fees, and a monthly subsistence allowance of $100 for each month of the academic year (fall and spring semesters) are available to qualified students who are motivated toward a career in the U.S. Army.
1. Four-Year Scholarship. High school seniors may compete for Army ROTC Scholarships to pursue the four years normally required to complete a baccalaureate degree. To be eligible for this competition the student must take the ACT or SAT not later than the December test dates of the senior year, and submit his application for the ROTC scholarship before December 31. Application forms and instructions may be obtained from the high school counselor or the Army ROTC office, University of Colorado, Boulder, 80302.
2. Students enrolled in Army ROTC may apply for scholarships to cover the remaining time required to complete their degree program. Applications and information may be obtained from the ROTC instructor.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling
If copies of discharge, separation papers, and a DD Form 295 (Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service) are submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records at the time of application for admission or subsequently, an evaluation will be made and credit awarded as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that such credit is applicable to the degree sought at this University.
Credit will be allowed for college courses satisfactorily completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute, subject to the usual rules involving credit of this nature.
Credit for Advanced Placement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board
College credit and advanced placement will be awarded to students who present scores of 3, 4, or 5 on Advanced Placement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board. For detailed information contact the Office of Admissions and Records. See page 7 of this section for more information.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
An exciting challenge with rewarding opportunities is available to incoming UCD students who can earn university credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) testing service. Students who score at the 67th percentile or above in subjects approved by the University college or school from which they plan to be graduated will be granted advanced standing and University credit. The cost per examination is $15.
Students who wish to challenge subject areas for credit are urged to examine carefully the list of approved examinations for the college or school to which they are applying, or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of the lower division require-


General Information / 7
ments, in order to determine the applicability of such credit to specific graduation requirements.
CLEP subject examinations are administered at UCD during the third week of each month (the subject examination on Monday and the general examination Tuesday). CLEP subject examinations are also administered nationally during the third week of each month (students should check with the institutions for testing days). Arrangements to take these examinations must be made well in advance of the testing date.
Colorado residents may obtain CLEP materials from the regional office by contacting:
College Level Examination Program c/o College Entrance Examination Board 2142 South High Street Denver, Colorado 80210
Colorado residents may also obtain CLEP information from the several test centers thoughout the state, preferably from the center located nearest to their high school. In Colorado, testing centers are located at:
Metropolitan State College, Denver Colorado State University, Fort Collins El Paso Community College, Colorado Springs Southern Colorado State College, Pueblo University of Denver, Denver Fort Lewis College, Durango University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
Students living outside of Colorado may secure CLEP information and application forms by writing:
Institutional Testing Department College Level Examination Program Box 1822
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
Students interested in obtaining advanced standing and University credit through CLEP tests should consult the Office for Student Relations, the college or school to which they are applying for admission, or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of lower division undergraduate requirements for specific subject examinations acceptable to that college or school for the desired degree program.
Advanced Standing by Examination
Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standing for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A nonrefundable fee is charged for each examination taken.
Advanced Placement Program
The University is a cooperating member of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board, which provides able high school students, while still in high school, an opportunity to take work and then to be examined for credit on the college level.
Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Test. For students who achieve scores of 3, 4, or 5 in the CEEB’s Advanced Placement Examination, college credit and advanced
placement will be granted. Students with scores below 3 may be considered by the department concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade but will count toward graduation and other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate.
Study Abroad Program
The University of Colorado Study Abroad Program offers educational opportunities overseas in 14 countries for junior and senior college students. For information contact the Office of International Education, 914 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80302, (telephone 443-2211, ext. 7741). For fall 1975 programs call or write by January 10, 1975.
UNIVERSITY-WIDE GRADING SYSTEM
Effective with the fall semester 1974, all colleges and schools of the University of Colorado will employ the same grading system. Grades awarded will be:
A—4 grade points per credit hour; superior B—3 grade points per credit hour; good C—2 grade points per credit hour; fair D—1 grade point per credit hour; minimum passing F—0 grade points; failing
The instructor is responsible for determining the requirements for whatever grade is to be assigned.
The cumulative grade-point average is computed by dividing the total number of credit points earned by the total number of hours attempted.
In addition to the grades indicated above, the instructor may assign one of the following:
1/F—Incomplete/failing: automatic conversion to F grade after one academic year if the course is not made up.
I/W—Incomplete/withdrawal: automatic conversion to W after one academic year if the course is not made up.
IP—In progress (graduate students only)
P—Pass
H—Honors (given only in the Honors Program)
NC—for students registered on an audit/no grade basis.
Y—symbol used to indicate that an entire grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
W—Drop without discredit.
Regulations Governing the Award or Accumulation of Additional Grades
1. Pass/Fail. Up to 16 semester credit hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. No more than 6 semester credit hours of course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis in any given semester. The pass (P) grade is not included in the student’s grade-point average; the fail (F) grade is included. For additional information see the general information portion of each college or school section of this bulletin.
2. Honors. Credit hours earned in honors courses with grades of H or P count toward the student’s degree but are not included in the grade-point average calculation.
3. Withdrawal. A notation of withdrawal will be placed on the permanent record of any student who withdraws with approval during any term. Students who


8 / University of Colorado at Denver
cease to attend classes and do not officially withdraw from the University will be subject to grades of F in all course work for which they were enrolled during that term.
REGISTRATION
See Academic Calendar in this bulletin for dates. See the appropriate Schedule of Courses for complete registration information for each semester or summer term.
Note: There is a penalty fee for late registration.
EXPENSES
Educational expenses at UCD normally involve tuition, fees, books, and required materials. The Denver Campus does not maintain residence facilities so all costs related to housing must be arranged by the student at his own convenience. Students are advised that transportation and parking costs should be considered in the determination of expenses.
Tuition and Fees*
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Regents of the University of Colorado in accordance with appropriate legislation enacted annually by the Colorado General Assembly. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term during the year. The student is advised to check with the Office of Admissions and Records for specific tuition and fee information for the term for which he intends to apply.
Tuition for the Fall Semester 1974
Credit Hours of Enrollment Residents Nonresidents
0.0 -3.0 $ 45.00 $108.00
3.1 -4.0 60.00 144.00
4.1 -5.0 75.00 180.00
5.1 -6.0 90.00 216.00
6.1 -7.0 105.00 594.50
7.1 -8.0 120.00 594.50
8.1 -9.0 135.00 594.50
9.1 or more 148.00 594.50
1. A student activity fee will be charged in addition to the above tuition as follows:
Summer term 1974 ..............................$3
Fall semester 1974 ............................ 7
Spring semester 1975 .......................... 7
2. There is a one-time nonrefundable matriculation fee of $15 for new degree students and $5 for new special students to the University of Colorado. This fee will be assessed at the time of initial registration. Charges then will not be made for adding or dropping courses or for transcript orders. If a special student is admitted to degree status, he will be assessed a $10 matriculation fee at the time of his first registration after the change has been made.
3. Students certified by the Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation pay $72.
4. Graduate students who enroll for a comprehensive examination only will pay $45. Such students will be assessed regular tuition and fees if they need hours toward graduation.
°The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition and fees at any time.
5. Students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course pay a $10 breakage deposit.
Assessment of Charges and Payment Regulations
All tuition and fees are assessed during registration and must be paid at that time. Any student who registers for courses is liable for payment of tuition and fees even though he may drop out of school. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent semester or term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credits. The only exceptions to this regulation are notes and/or other types of indebtedness maturing after graduation.
Arrangements may be made through the Finance Office at the time of registration to defer payment of a portion of tuition and fees after a minimum down payment or one-third of the total tuition, whichever is greater. Specific information regarding deferred payment will be found in the Schedule of Courses which is published in advance of each term or semester.
Personal checks will be accepted for any University obligation. Any student giving a check that is not acceptable to the bank may be dropped immediately from the rolls of the University.
The student should refer to the Schedule of Courses for charges imposed for late registration, schedule changes, and late payments.
Refund policies and policies related to adding and dropping courses and withdrawing from the University will be found in the Schedule of Courses published prior to each semester or term.
TRANSCRIPTS
Transcripts of records should be ordered from the University of Colorado Transcript Section, Regent Hall 125, Boulder, Colorado 80302, or from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s written request. A student having financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Copies of transcripts from other institutions cannot be furnished.
WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY
A student who leaves the University without officially withdrawing will receive a grade of F in each course for which he is registered. Withdrawal forms may be obtained from the office of the academic dean of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
OTHER REGULATIONS
Students are advised to refer to the Schedule of Courses each semester for specific information regarding course loads, adding or dropping classes, adjustments in tuition as a result of dropped classes, etc. Where requirements differ from one academic area to another, the student is advised to abide by the regulations stated by the college or school in which he is enrolled.


General Information / 9
CLASSIFICATION OF IN-STATE AND OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS*
A student is initially classified as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for tuition purposes at the time an application and all supporting credentials have been received in the Office of Admissions and Records. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. After the student’s status is determined, it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary. The student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of informing the tuition classification officer, Office of Admissions and Records, in writing within 15 days after such a change occurs.
An unemancipated minor whose parents move their domicile from Colorado to a location outside the state is considered an out-of-state student from the date of the parents’ removal from the state. He will be assessed nonresident tuition at the next registration. The student, or his parents, is REQUIRED to send written notification to the tuition classification officer within 15 days after such a change occurs.
If an adult student or an emancipated minor establishes domicile outside Colorado, he is to send written notification within 15 days to the tuition classification officer.
Petitioning for Classification Change
Detailed instructions on the procedure to be followed, the necessary petition forms, and a copy of the appropriate Colorado statute governing tuition classification at state-supported institutions in Colorado are available from the tuition classification officer, University of Colorado at Denver, Office of Admissions and Records, Room 203.
Classification Notes
1. Petitions will not be acted upon until an application for admission to the University and complete supporting credentials have been received.
2. Changes in classification are made effective at the time of the student’s next registration.
3. A student who willfully gives wrong information to evade payment of the out-of-state tuition is subject to legal and disciplinary action.
SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
Services offered by the Office for Student Relations are available to the student, either as an individual or as part of an organization. The dean for Student Relations is concerned with the total University experience of each student. His associates and staff provide personalized assistance to the student in educational, social, organizational, and the behavioral areas. Undergraduate colleges and schools conduct orientation programs for incoming students before each semester begins, and academic advising throughout the academic year.
Counseling Center
The services of the counseling center are available by appointment to all students. Individual counseling,
Classification standards conform to state statutes and judicial decisions and are applicable to all of Colorado's state-supported colleges and universities.
group experiences, and student testing are provided by trained and qualified counselors. Interviews are confidential, and there is no fee for the testing or counseling.
Financial Aid
A large proportion of UCD students receive financial assistance through grants, loans, or the Work-Study program. In addition, a large number of students find part- or full-time employment in the community. Shortterm emergency loans also are available.
Most financial aid is awarded on the basis of the student’s financial need, with academic achievement a secondary consideration. For current information on deadlines, applications, and types of aid available the student should consult the Office of Financial Aid at UCD or his high school counselor.
Job Opportunities
Part-time job opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid. Career placement, after graduation, is available through the Boulder Campus Placement Center. Applications and further information are available through the Office of Financial Aid.
Office of Veterans Affairs
All student veterans, whether new, transfer, or previous students, must notify the Office of Veterans Affairs of intent to enroll each semester. The office is responsible for assisting veterans in being properly certified with the Veterans Administration Regional Office and in obtaining all VA benefits they are entitled to receive.
The Office of Veterans Affairs also provides veterans with professional counseling services, tutorial benefits, a reading and study skills program, employment referral services, and aid in obtaining emergency situation shortterm loans.
Students From Other Countries
Appropriate immigation certifications and work permits may be obtained through the Office for Student Relations. Counseling, assistance with housing, and special information is available from the foreign student adviser at UCD.
Health Insurance Program
Effective with the summer term 1974 and thereafter, student health insurance coverage through Blue Cross-Blue Shield will be mandatory for all students carrying 6.1 credit hours or more. Students may elect to waive this coverage by signing a waiver card and filing this with registration materials. If the waiver card is not filed upon registration, the health insurance assessment will be automatic. Cost to the student for the fall and spring semesters has not been set. Further information regarding this program may be obtained from the Office for Student Relations, Room 602.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Numerous student clubs and organizations exist to provide a variety of interests for students desiring extracurricular activities. The student newspaper, The Fourth Estate, is published weekly, and there is an active student government.


10 / University of Colorado at Denver
Students participate in dramatic and musical productions, reading programs, special seminars and workshops, intramural sports, and debate. Lectures and programs are offered throughout the academic year.
Students are vitally concerned with current issues such as environmental action, politics, education for minority groups, and women’s liberation, and student clubs for such issues invite participation and ideas.
Several honorary societies, fraternities, and professional associations have active student chapters at Denver, and UCD students also are eligible for membership in Boulder Campus organizations.
ALUMNI PROGRAMS
All graduates and former students of the University of Colorado are eligible for membership in the CU Alumni Association. The Colorado Alumnus newspaper is mailed eleven times each year.
Two Denver area alumni clubs (Denver East and Denver West) have been formed, and a wide range of activities is provided by these groups. Membership and further information is available through the alumni office on the Boulder Campus.
FACILITIES
The UCD Campus comprises an eight-story tower and classroom building providing over 50 classrooms, 26 teaching laboratories, faculty and administrative offices, an auditorium, cafeteria, and student lounges.
Work was completed in 1973 on an expansion project which added 12 new classrooms and laboratories on a third level in the classroom building.
Bookstore
Textbooks and supplies are available at the UCD bookstore, located on the first floor of the Bromley Library building. The bookstore is open from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, and is closed Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. It also remains open on the first day of registration. Students must present their validated ID card when paying for purchases by check. Bank Amer-icard and Master Charge credit cards are also accepted.
Library
The Charles D. Bromley Library is located at Fourteenth and Lawrence Streets, adjacent to the classroom building. Hours of service are from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. The library is closed on Sunday. Special holiday and vacation hours are posted in the library.
The library collection includes reserve books, reference materials, journals, microforms, records, and tapes. Microform equipment and listening facilities are provided. General reference service, interlibrary loans, and assistance with individual library problems are available through the reference office on the second floor.
UCD students also may use the Norlin Library on the Boulder Campus, or any library in a Colorado state-supported institution of higher learning, for research materials not available in the Bromley Library by presentation of the student’s validated ID card. Books may
be borrowed through interlibrary loan to minimize the inconvenience to students who wish to use Norlin Library resources.
Child Care Center
A Child Care Center is available for use by students who have young children to be cared for while attending classes or using the library. It is operated by the UCD student government and a committee of interested parents. For information call 892-1117, ext. 395.
Classroom Locations
Most classes and laboratory sections meet in the main UCD buildings. A few courses are scheduled at other facilities. Locations are designated in the Schedule of Courses under Building Codes.
Parking
Parking is available at nearby commercial off-street lots both day and evening, and student-operated lots provide parking at special rates.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
Cooperative Education is a new program at UCD. Based on the precept that experience is often the most effective educator, this program is designed to provide students of sophomore standing or above with an opportunity for preprofessional employment. This is accomplished by placing students as employees with businesses, agencies, and institutions which are operating in a capacity related to the student’s course work.
The program is now expanding its placement opportunities. Normally students work full time for one semester and then attend classes full time for the following semester. However, half-time positions are also available. This program enables students in all disciplines to gain experience and income while attending college.
It is also possible for students in the College of Undergraduate Studies to receive credit for current job experiences. This allows students who already have jobs in their field of study to earn academic credit. Also, because there is a scarcity of paid positions in the liberal arts fields, students can obtain volunteer internships from the Cooperative Education office and receive both credit and valuable experience for their efforts.
Students interested in any of these options can apply or obtain more information in Room 811 or by calling ext. 555. Students in the College of Undergraduate Studies should also refer to Cooperative Education in the Special Programs section of this bulletin.
BUREAUS AND AGENCIES Bureau of Community Services
The Bureau of Community Services provides assistance to community groups, agencies, and organizations in planning and developing programs to solve a variety of problems. Bureau staff, with support from UCD faculty and graduate students, conduct training programs in the areas of leadership development, resource mobilization, community planning, and community organization. In addition, consultation is provided to


General Information / 11
numerous groups engaged in community development efforts.
Division of Continuing Education
The Division of Continuing Education is responsible for noncredit programs, off-campus credit classes, correspondence study, audiovisual services, continuation education, speech services, and community services in the Denver metropolitan area. These programs and resources of the University of Colorado are an integral part of the statewide coordinated program of off-campus instruction under the guidelines established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
The program provides opportunity for advancement in business, government, and the professions; offers liberal education programs contributing to cultural, intellectual, and personal vitality; and presents programs designed to help solve social, community, and individual problems.
Noncredit programs are open to all adults regardless of previous education or training. Some advanced courses require a background in a specific subject mat-
ter area. Except in certificate programs, no grade is awarded upon completion of a course.
Off-campus credit offerings supplement the regular academic programs offered at UCD. Admission requirements and refund policies for off-campus instruction are identical with requirements for enrollment in UCD. Individuals who have never been enrolled on any campus of the University of Colorado usually are admitted to off-campus instruction as special students.
Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Continuing Education Bulletin or other information may write or call the division office at UCD, 1100 14th Street, 892-1117, ext. 286.
Speakers Bureau
Faculty and administrative personnel are available for outside speaking engagements on a wide variety of subjects. This public service activity helps to promote interaction between Denver Campus personnel and the urban community. Requests for speakers are handled through the UCD Office of Information Services, ext. 246.


College of
Undergraduate Studies
HERBERT G. ELDRIDGE, Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Undergraduate Studies was established, effective July 1, 1971, in order to respond directly to the needs of urban students in innovative ways. The responsibility of the College is to serve the higher educational needs of qualified university students in the Denver metropolitan area. Reflecting the varied objectives of the urban student, the instructional program provides opportunities for general education in the arts and sciences both as an end in itself and as preparation for professional and graduate work. New programs in interdisciplinary studies particularly appropriate to the urban environment are being planned and implemented. Since many CUS students are employed full time during the day, numerous courses are offered in the evening.
The College is organized into three divisions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences. Each division offers a wide variety of curricula including traditional undergraduate majors, interdisciplinary studies, and preprofessional programs. In order to broaden the student’s perspectives the College requires 12 semester hours of course work in each of the areas represented by the three divisions. However, the student is given a wide selection of courses to satisfy each of the three area requirements and the other requirements for his degree.
The College offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.). A student may complete a major in one of the following disciplines: anthropology, biology, chemistry, communication and theatre, distributed studies, economics, English, fine arts, French, geography, German, history, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology, and Spanish.
Students also enroll in the College of Undergraduate Studies to prepare themselves for admission to one of the professional schools of the University, which include the School of Dentistry, School of Education, School of Journalism, School of Law, School of Medicine, School of Nursing, and School of Pharmacy. Each professional school has specific requirements which must be followed if the student intends to pursue a career in one of these fields.
Interdisciplinary majors are currently being developed in each division of the College. These include Urban Studies (Social Sciences), Environmental Science (Natural and Physical Sciences), Advanced Writing (Arts and Humanities), the Environment of the Arts (Arts and Humanities), and American Studies (Arts and Humanities). Some courses applicable to these new majors are already being offered, and others will be initiated in subsequent years. Interested students should
contact the office of the appropriate divisional dean for information.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Freshmen
The student must be a high school graduate and must present 15 units of acceptable secondary work. (The College of Undergraduate Studies does not specify particular units.) An applicant who has not graduated from high school must present satisfactory scores on the General Educational Development Test (GED) and a high school equivalency certificate to be considered for admission. Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.” High school is interpreted as grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. Students should refer to the General Information section of this bulletin for complete admission requirements.
Transfer Students
Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students as outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin.
Applicants (residents and nonresidents) will be considered for admission provided a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better has been attained on all work attempted at all institutions attended. If the applicant has been away from the collegiate environment for more than three years, he will be considered on the basis of all factors available: high school record, test scores, original collegiate admission qualifications, college performance, and interim experiences that might suggest potential success in the College of Undergraduate Studies. A maximum of 72 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward a degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Tests. For students who have taken an advanced placement course in high school and who make scores of 3, 4, or 5 in the CEEB’s Advanced Placement Examination, advanced placement as well as college credit will be granted. Students who make scores of 2 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade


College of Undergraduate Studies / 13
but will count toward graduation and the meeting of other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Prospective students who plan either to graduate from the College of Undergraduate Studies or to enroll in the College to fulfill lower division requirements for professional schools may earn college-level credit for advanced standing in the following CLEP Subject Examinations scored at the 67th percentile and above:
American Literature
Analysis and Interpretation of Literature
English Literature
American Government
American History
General Psychology
Introductory Economics
Western Civilization
Biology
General Chemistry Geology
Introductory Calculus
For complete information about the CLEP program, students should refer to the General Information section of this bulletin.
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM
The University of Colorado sponsors an active study abroad program, which is open to students from all campuses of the University. Specific programs exist in Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Israel, Nigeria, Taiwan, and Japan. Less formal programs are available in other Latin American, Middle Eastern, and Asian nations. Full information may be obtained at the University’s Office of International Education at Boulder or from International Education advisers on the Denver Campus.
ADVANCED STANDING BY EXAMINATION
Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standing for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A non-refundable fee is charged for each examination taken. The fee is assessed at the lowest resident tuition charge currently in effect for the Denver Campus. Arrangements for the examinations are made through the Office of Admissions and Records.
ACADEMIC ADVISING
Students in the College are expected to assume the responsibility for planning their academic programs in accordance with College rules and policies and major requirements.
To assist students with this planning the College maintains an advising staff located in Room 804 of the Tower Building. Students are urged to consult with the staff of this office concerning individual academic problems.
As soon as the student has determined his major, he must declare his intentions to his discipline adviser. The discipline adviser will be responsible not only for the
student’s advising but also for the certification of the completion of his major program for graduation.
Students planning to earn a degree from one of the professional schools (Education, Journalism, Nursing, and Pharmacy) should see an adviser in that school. Each professional school has certain specific requirements.
The Denver Campus also has a counseling service available through the Office for Student Relations to which a student may go for assistance with problems of a vocational or personal nature.
CREDIT FOR ARMY ROTC
Students in the College of Undergraduate Studies may participate in the Army ROTC program through the College of Arts and Sciences on the Boulder Campus. The College of Undergraduate Studies will accept a maximum of 12 hours of ROTC course work toward the baccalaureate degree. For more information about the ROTC program, see the General Information section of this bulletin.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Courses and Credits
The University operates on the semester system. The term “course” as used in this bulletin means a one-semester course. Except for laboratory courses, the credit-hour value assigned to a course is roughly equivalent to the number of hours per week of class work involved in the course (thus a 3-semester-hour course normally meets 3 hours per week). The value of a course in semester-hour credits is indicated by that part of the course number which follows the dash. Example: Chem. 103-5. “Chem. 103” is the identifying department number, and “5” indicates that the course is for 5 semester hours credit.
Course Numbering System
Course levels are designated as follows: 100 level, freshman; 200 level, sophomore; 300 level, junior; 400 level, senior; 500 level, graduate.
Upper Division Credit
Courses numbered 300 or above and all honors courses are awarded upper division credit.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned. Freshman classification, 0 to 29 semester credits; sophomore, 30 to 59 semester credits; junior, 60 to 89 credits; and senior, 90 to 120 credits.
Course Load Policy
The normal course load is 12 to 18 hours. Students registered for fewer than 12 hours are regarded as part-time students. Students wishing to register for 20 hours or more must obtain approval from the dean. These totals include all courses taken for credit in the University, but do not include correspondence courses, noncredit courses, and courses taken at other institutions. To receive credit, the student must be officially registered for each course.
Students who hold or expect to hold full- or part-time employment while enrolled in the College must


14 / University of Colorado at Denver
register for course loads they can expect to complete without unusual difficulty. Recommended course loads are given below, but each student must weigh his own abilities and assess the demands of each course in determining an appropriate schedule. The College assumes that all courses elected will be completed. Employed 20 hours per week—10 to 13 semester hours or 3 to 4 courses
Employed 30 hours per week— 8 to 11 semester hours or 3 courses
Employed 40 hours per week— 6 to 9 semester hours or 2 to 3 courses
Independent Study
With the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and divisional dean, students may register for independent study. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project (normally not to exceed 3 credits per semester) shall be arranged at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits taken on an independent study basis may apply toward the bachelor’s degree.
Credit for Courses in the Professional Schools and in Physical Education
Students may count toward the Bachelor of Arts degree as many as 24 credit hours of course work for curricula leading to degrees other than the B.A. (Business, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Environmental Design, Journalism, Music, Nursing, and Pharmacy). Vocational and technical courses from a two-year program may not be included. Activity courses in physical education, up to a maximum of 8 hours, will count toward the 120 required for the degree.
Correspondence Study
Students in the College of Undergraduate Studies, with the approval of the dean, may take work in correspondence study offered by the University’s Division of Continuing Education. A maximum of 30 hours of correspondence work may count toward the degree.
Adding and Dropping Courses
All changes of schedule must be made by processing the official drop/add card. No change will be made in a student’s schedule until all necessary signatures have been entered on the drop/add card and the card has been returned to the Office of Admissions and Records. Restrictions on changes of schedule are noted below:
Adding Courses. Courses may not be added after the second week of classes except under unusual circumstances.
Dropping Courses. Students receive a grade of F in any course that they discontinue without officially dropping. Students will be allowed to drop during the first two weeks of the semester with no signatures required on the drop card. After the second week the instructor must certify that the student is passing if the course is to be dropped without discredit. After the tenth week of the semester, courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control (accident, illness, etc.). The instructor and the dean must approve the drop under these circumstances.
Withdrawal
When a student withdraws from the University, he must obtain the approval of the dean’s office (Room 804) and the Office of Admissions and Records. A notation of withdrawal is made on the permanent record page. Students who leave the University without officially withdrawing will receive grades of F for all course work. After the tenth week of the semester, a student will not be permitted to withdraw except for reasons clearly beyond his control.
Attendance Regulations
The matter of classroom attendance is left to the discretion of the instructor. It is the responsibility of the student to determine at the beginning of each semester his instructor’s policies on attendance.
Students who do not attend the first class session in limited enrollment courses of 15 or less will lose their place in the class unless arrangements have been made with the instructor prior to the first class session.
Repeating Courses
A student who fails a course may repeat that course one time in order to demonstrate competence at a passing level. If a course failed is repeated, the original F will remain on the record, but will be excluded from the grade average.
Pass/Fail Option
All students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis may do so during regular registration procedures. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be effected during the normal two-week drop-add period. After two weeks, it will not be possible for the student to change his registration unless approved by the dean of the College as a specific exception. The following restrictions should be noted on the use of the P/F option:
1. Not more than 16 semester hours of course work passed may be credited toward the 120 hours required for graduation. These 16 hours are in addition to those taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education, and student teaching.
2. The use of the pass/fail option may be restricted in certain major programs.
3. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis may not be included in the minimum of 30 hours of C or better required for the major.
4. Only 6 hours of course work may be P/F in any given semester.
5. Grades of D and above convert to a P. The P grade is not included in the student’s grade-point average.
6. Grades of F equal a letter grade of F and will count in the grade-point average.
7. Transfer Students. No course may be taken on a P/F basis by transfer students graduating with only 30 semester hours completed at the University of Colorado.
Grade-Point Average Requirements and Scholastic Suspension
A minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) is required of all students in the College of Undergraduate Studies. If a student’s GPA drops below
2.0 at the end of any semester (excluding summer term) the student will be required to achieve better than a


College of Undergraduate Studies / 15
2.0 in succeeding semesters, as described in the following sliding scale, or he will be suspended. The student must then continue to meet the sliding scale every semester until his grade-point average reaches 2.0. Scholastic records of students will be reviewed as soon as possible after the close of each spring semester, and the student will be informed in writing if he is to be suspended.
Grade-Point Average in the Most
Hours Deficiency Recent Semester
1-10 2.2
11-20 2.3
21-30 2.4
over 30 2.5
The “Hours Deficiency” is the number of credit hours of B work the student must earn to raise his GPA to 2.0. Hours of deficiency may be computed as follows: multiply total number of hours by 2 to obtain the GPA points that would have been attained with a 2.0 average. Subtract from this figure the total grade points shown on the last grade slip. The difference is the hours of deficiency.
In an effort to raise his grade-point average, a student in the College may register for courses in the University of Colorado summer term and for correspondence study through the University, irrespective of his academic status.
Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. However, grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado are used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and his progress toward the degree.
First Suspension. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term), after which the student will automatically be readmitted to the College of Undergraduate Studies. The student will then be expected to meet the sliding scale (based on his CU record only) until his cumulative GPA reaches 2.0. Failure to do so will result in a second suspension.
A student under a first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if he has demonstrated marked academic improvement in one of the following ways:
1. By achieving a cumulative 2.5 average on all summer or correspondence work attempted at the University of Colorado since suspension. (A student must register for a minimum of 6 credits in the summer term or through correspondence work.)
2. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to a 2.0 through correspondence or summer work at the University of Colorado.
3. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to a 2.0 at another institution. (The cumulative grade-point average is defined as the grade-point average at the University of Colorado in combination with the work taken at all other institutions.) Upon return to CU, however, the student retains his old grade-point average. (GPA from another institution does not transfer back to CU.)
Second Suspension. A student suspended for a second time will be readmitted only under unusual circumstances, and only by petition to the Committee on Academic Progress of the College of Undergraduate Studies. Each petition will be examined individually.
The committee will expect the student to show that his chances for successfully completing his education in the College have been materially improved by factors such as increased maturity or a relief from stressful circumstances. The deadline for petitions to the Committee on Academic Progress for reinstatement for any fall semester is August 1. The deadline for petitions for reinstatement for any spring. semester is December 1.
Students who complete 12 or more semester hours at another institution must apply for readmission to the University of Colorado as transfer students, regardless of their status in the University of Colorado. They also must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted (at the University of Colorado and elsewhere) in order to be considered for readmission.
Committee on Academic Progress
The Committee on Academic Progress (CAP) is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty. The committee constitutes the bridge between the faculty in its legislative capacity and the students upon whom the legislation comes to bear. CAP alone is empowered to grant waivers of, exemptions from, and exceptions to the academic policies of the College.
One of the major responsibilities of the committee is the handling of suspensions and reinstatement of suspended students. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term). However, students suspended a second time will be reinstated only under unusual circumstances and only by petition to the committee.
The Committee on Academic Progress is composed of five faculty members and three student members.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the intent to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University.
In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work to someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with their instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc., in order to avoid this and similar offenses.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION College Requirements
The following four requirements apply to all Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts students:
1. Arts and Humanities—12 semester hours.
2. Natural and Physical Sciences—12 semester hours.
3. Social Sciences—12 semester hours.
Lists of courses that will satisfy the above area requirements are available in the Fall and Spring Schedules of Courses, in each divisional office, and in the dean’s office.


16 / University of Colorado at Denver
4. Foreign Language. This requirement is satisfied by:
a. Completion of a Level III high school course in any classical or modern foreign language; or
b. Completion of a third-semester course (normally 211, but in French, German, 201 or 211) in the College; or
c. Demonstration of third-semester proficiency by test.
d. This requirement also may be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (12 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201 or 211, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test.
Students who elect to continue a language studied before entering the College will be placed in courses appropriate to their level of preparation and will continue from the level indicated until the third-semester course has been passed. A student who enrolls in a course at a lower level than that in which he has been placed will not receive credit for the course.
Students who may go on to do graduate work are advised to complete the fourth semester of a foreign language in preparation for language requirements of graduate schools.
Foreign Language Placement. Placement of students in college-level foreign language courses is based on units of high school language study and on the verbal SAT score or English ACT score according to the following schedule:
Verbal SAT Score English ACT Score High School Foreign Language Levels or Units Approved Courses, Strongly Advised for the Freshman Year
600-800 25-36 4 or more Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below third-year (300-level) courses.
200-599 0-24 4 or more Exempt from requirement. Recommended 300 - level courses; no credit allowed below fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses.
600-800 25-36 3 Exempt from requirement. Recommended 300 - level courses; no credit allowed below fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses.
200-599 0-24 3 Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below fourth - semester (202 or 212) courses.
600-800 25-36 2 Third semester courses (201 or 211).
200-599 0-24 2 Second semester courses (102).
600-800 25-36 1 Second semester courses (102).
200-599 0-24 1 Beginning course (101).
A student may enroll in a course at a lower level than that in which he is placed upon consultation with the appropriate faculty member. However, he will not receive credit for any course taken at a level lower than his placement. Exceptions to this policy can be made only by the discipline adviser and will normally
be considered only when there has been a lapse of five or more years since previous study of the language. There is ample opportunity for language review by enrolling on a noncredit basis in lower-level language courses upon consultation with the adviser.
Students may request a placement test to place them in a higher level course than that assigned, or to demonstrate proficiency sufficient to satisfy the college foreign language requirement.
Students who do not wish to continue a language studied previously may begin a new language without penalty. However, students are strongly urged to begin or continue their college-level language study immediately upon enrollment in the College. Students also are urged to consult with the appropriate faculty member concerning any problems that might arise regarding foreign language study or the foreign language requirement.
Note: Physical education is no longer required for completion of the bachelor’s degree. However, a maximum of 8 hours of physical education credit will count toward the 120 hours required for the degree.
Major Requirements
A candidate for the degree Bachelor of Arts shall fulfill such requirements as may be stipulated for his major program. These requirements shall include at least 30 semester hours of work in the major area (as determined by his adviser) of C grade or higher, at least 16 hours of which shall be at the upper division level. The grade average in the major shall be at least C. Not more than 48 semester hours in one discipline may be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. The student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the major. The adviser shall be responsible for determining when a student has satisfactorily completed the requirements for the major and for so certifying to the dean of the College.
For requirements of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, consult the fine arts section in the alphabetical listings under the description of courses and programs.
Upper Division Requirement
Students must complete at least 45 hours of upper division work (courses numbered in the 300s and 400s) to be eligible for the bachelor’s degree. Any student may register for upper division courses providing he has satisfied the prerequisites or has the approval of the discipline in which the course is offered.
Courses transferred from a junior college carry lower division credit. Exceptions to this require approval of the dean of the College and the appropriate discipline representative, who may ask the student to validate upper division credit by taking an advanced standing examination.
Total Credit-Hour and Grade-Point Requirement
To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies, students must pass at least 120 semester hours with an average of at least
2.0 (C) in all courses attempted at the University of Colorado.
Residence Requirement
A candidate for a degree from the College of Undergraduate Studies must earn his last 30 hours in the


College of Undergraduate Studies / 17
University of Colorado and be enrolled as a degree student in the College of Undergraduate Studies.
Senior Progress Report
Upon completion of 80 semester hours of course work, each student should request a Progress Report in the Office of the Dean to determine his status with respect to the above requirements.
At the beginning of their last semester, students are required to file Diploma Cards, showing the date when they intend to be graduated. Diploma Cards are available in the College of Undergraduate Studies, Office of Admissions and Records, and at registration. During their senior year, students must clear all schedule changes with the Degree Requirements section of the Office of the Dean.
Graduation with Honors
The Honors Program of the College is outlined in the Special Programs section of this bulletin. In addition to graduation with honors, a student may be graduated with distinction if, prior to his final semester, he has taken at least 30 hours at the University of Colorado and if his cumulative grade-point average by the end of the semester, prior to his final semester’s work toward the degree, is 3.5 or higher, both at the University of Colorado and in all collegiate work attempted.
Summary Check List of Graduation Requirements
The student alone is ultimately responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements. Questions concerning them should be directed to the Office of the Dean of the College of Undergraduate Studies. Upon completion of degree requirements (including the fulfillment of a major) the student will be awarded the appropriate degree.
General Requirements
1. 120 semester hours passed.
2. 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all University of Colorado work.
3. 45 hours of upper division work.
4. The last 30 hours in residence in the College.
Area Requirements
1. Arts and Humanities: 12 hours.
2. Natural and Physical Sciences: 12 hours.
3. Social Sciences: 12 hours.
4. Foreign language: third-semester proficiency or completion of a level III high school foreign language course.
Major Requirements
1. 30 to 48 hours in the major area.
2. 30 hours of C-grade or better in the major area.
3. A 2.0 grade-point average in all major work.
4. 16 hours of upper division courses in the major, C-grade or higher.
5. Special requirements as stipulated by the major program.
Note-. Not more than 48 hours in any one discipline and not more than 24 hours outside the College can be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree.
Students may elect to satisfy their degree requirements according to the above requirements or accord-
ing to those in effect when they first enrolled as a degree student in the College of Undergraduate Studies.
Students planning to transfer to the Boulder Campus are responsible for informing themselves of the degree requirements on that campus.
Division of
Arts and Humanities
ROBLEY D. RHINE, Assistant Dean
The Division of Arts and Humanities includes the disciplines of communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, Spanish, and speech pathology and audiology. Complete undergraduate majors are offered in communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, and Spanish. Requirements for each major are explained before the course listings for the respective disciplines. Information on preprofessional programs is given in that section of this bulletin.
This division offers course work in several special programs including Comparative Literature, American Studies, and the Writing Program. The Writing Program is designed to prepare professional writers in the techniques and vocabularies of several varied fields such as fine arts, science, engineering, creative writing, business, social sciences, and literature. Two cocurricular programs also are open to students: Theatre and Community Speaking and Forensics.
Students interested in majoring in any of the disciplines or in participating in any of the specialized programs should request additional information from the divisional office or the discipline representative.
Description of Courses and Programs
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.
ARTS AND HUMANITIES
A.H. 398-3. Cooperative Education. Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations. Prer., sophomore standing and 2.5 GPA.
COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE
A major in communication and theatre at both the bachelor’s and master’s level may be completed on the Denver Campus.
Students majoring in communication and theatre must present a minimum of 40 semester hours (although the individual areas within communication and theatre may require additional hours) including C.T. 202 and C.T. 400. The student must elect to pursue one of the several areas of emphasis within the communication and theatre field. Each area has its own requirements for graduation, and specific programs will be developed


18 / University of Colorado at Denver
in consultation with academic advisers to insure proper balance of courses within the major. Lists of required and suggested courses in each major area may be obtained from the divisional office.
Communication and theatre majors planning to teach communication and theatre at the secondary level should acquaint themselves with the certification requirements of the North Central Accrediting Association.
Each student pursuing a program in the School of Education must meet minimal standards of competence in oral communication. Additional information may be secured through the School of Education office.
C.T. 40-0. Speech Clinic for Foreign Students. Group assistance for foreign students wishing to improve their spoken English.
C.T. 41-0. Reading Clinic for Foreign Students. Group assistance for foreign students wishing to improve speech and comprehension in reading English.
C.T. 42-0. Writing Laboratory for Foreign Students. Group assistance for foreign students wishing to improve their writing in English.
C.T. 140-5. Structure and Pronunciation of English for Foreign Students. Practice in speaking and understanding spoken English. Structure, grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary.
C.T. 141-3. Written Composition for Foreign Students I. Beginning course in written English composition for foreign students. Oral and written work.
C.T. 142-3. Written Composition for Foreign Students II. Second semester course. Continued work on grammar, syntax, and spelling. Organization and development of material for longer
connected discourse.
C.T. 200-3. Voice and Diction. Improvement of the normal speaking voice, articulation, and pronunciation.
C.T. 202-3. Principles of Communication I. A lecture-discussion-recitation approach to communication theory and its application in everyday communication. This course is intended to give students a point of view and certain basic knowledge that will help them become better communicators regardless of their fields of specialization.
C.T. 203-3. Principles of Communication II. Further development
of the principles of communication. Specific topics such as argumentation, source credibility, attitude, organization, language style, and mass communication will be expanded by both theoretical refinement and analysis of specific research studies. Prer., C.T. 202.
C.T. 210-3. Speechmaking. The theory and practice of developing
ideas, supporting materials, organization, style, delivery, and audience adaptation.
C.T. 213-2. Community Speaking and Intercollegiate Forensics I.
Available for those students who wish to develop their understanding, appreciation, and skill by participation in the off-campus speaking and intercollegiate forensics program.
C.T. 214-2. Community Speaking and Intercollegiate Forensics II. Designed for students participating in the intercollegiate forensics program who have had some background in community speaking or intercollegiate forensics. Prer., consent of instructor. C.T. 2S0-3. Introduction to Oral Interpretation. Study and performance of the narrative, lyric, and dramatic modes of literature. Not open to freshmen.
C.T. 270-3. Introduction to Theatre. A study of the theory and practice of theatrical art, historical and contemporary. Readings, lectures, demonstrations, play-going, and participation in live productions.
C.T. 273-2. Stage Movement. (Dance 242.) Analysis and practice of stage movement, including the study of basic techniques in gesture, mime, and pantomime as related to period drama, modern drama, and musical comedy. Emphasis is placed on developing an awareness of the use of the body as a means of expression.
C.T. 276-3. Stagecraft. Theory and practice. An introduction to stagecraft, including basic mechanical drawing, mechanics, lighting, and their application to the scenic arts.
C.T. 308-3. Introduction to Phonetics.
C.T. 314-2. Advonced Community Speaking and Intercollegiate Forensics. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.T. 315-3. Discussion. Theory and practice in group discussion processes, decision making, and participant and leader behavior combined with interpersonal laboratory.
C.T. 320-3. Argumentation. Theory of argumentation and debate applied to contemporary issues. Briefing and presenting arguments.
C.T. 330-3. Communication in Instruction. Principles of communication as applied to the teaching situation. Particular attention will be paid to verbal and nonverbal communication and the impact of perception, culture, social systems, and value and belief systems upon the communicative process. Laboratory experiences. Limited to education majors, or consent of the instructor.
C.T. 349-variable credit. Problems in English as a Foreign Language.
Study in problem areas in the field of English as a foreign language. Work that is basically investigative in character. Prer., consent of supervising instructor.
C.T. 350-3. Oral Interpretation of Literature: Poetry. Exploration of poetry through analysis and performance. Prer., C.T. 250.
C.T. 360-3. Introduction to Broadcasting. The evolution, organization, and function of broadcasting. Theoretical and practical understanding of program techniques.
C.T. 361-3. Radio Programming and Production. Introduction to basic elements of radio including the audio console, microphone, turntables, tape recorders, tape editing, timing, and combo operation. Emphasis on applying the basic principles and practices through professional production of live and taped radio programs, including news, weather, sports, documentaries, features, remotes, music programs, etc. Prer., C.T. 360.
C.T. 362-3. Television Production. Introduction to basic television production principles, practices, techniques, facilities, and equipment, including cameras, audio equipment, lighting, films, video tape, graphics, sets, etc. The lab applies the principles through production and direction of television programs, including news-wealher-sports, interviews, documentaries, demonstrations, and a final program of the student’s choice. Prer., C.T. 360.
C.T. 373-3. Acting. Theory and practice to enable the student to improve his techniques and to utilize these techniques in creative acting. Formal and informal performance of scenes throughout the semester.
C.T. 374-3. Directing. A study of the director’s function in the live theatre with particular emphasis on play analysis and the relationship of creative communication existing between the director and the production team. Readings, improvisations, and informal scenes.
C.T. 378-3. Black Theatre. Black playwrights through the Harlem renaissance to the present American Black Revolution.
C.T. 399-voriable credit. Problems in Communication and Theatre.
Study in problem areas in the field of communication and theatre. Work that is basically investigative in character. Prer., consent of supervising instructor.
C.T. 400-3. Rhetorical and Aesthetic Dimensions of Communication.
The study of communication as a process which integrates instrumental and consumatory elements. Prer., C.T. 202, senior standing in communication and theatre, or C.T. 202 and consent of instructor.
C.T. 415-3. Discussion and Conference Leadership. An examination of the psychology, philosophy, and methods of leadership in the discussion group. Prer., C.T. 315.
C.T. 420-3. Persuasion. The theory of human motivation as it operates in individuals and groups. Analysis of persuasive materials and preparation of persuasive appeals.
C.T. 421-3. The Psychology of Communication. An examination of psychological factors affecting comprehension and retention of speech and formation of linguistic habits, set, attitude formation and change, perception, values, and meaning. Prer., C.T. 202 for majors.
C.T. 422-3. Information Exchange and Analysis. Consideration of the descriptions, models, proposed dimensions, and mathematical treatments of the information exchange process. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.T. 423-3. Group Communication Theory. Detailed analysis and observation of group processes from the viewpoint of modem information and communication theory. Prer., C.T. 315 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 426-3. American Speeches. A critical analysis of the rhetorical methods of selected American speakers.
C.T. 428-3. Intercultural Communication. Exploration of the theory and practice of interpersonal communication between cultures.


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Particular emphasis upon oral and non-oral communication, perceptual orientation value and belief systems, and community styles.
C.T. 429-3. Communication of Directed Change. Studies and theories of the communication of directed change; examination of the communication process underlying the diffusion of new ideas and practices. This course directs inquiry at application of theory in an urban milieu. Prer., C.T. 202 and 203.
C.T. 430-2. Teaching of Communication and Theatre. Fundamental problems of the teacher of communication and theatre—textbooks, courses of study, methods, etc. Prer., 7 hours of communication and theatre or consent of instructor.
C.T. 433-3. Teaching With Group Methods. The study of group forces, potentials, and the teacher’s role in creating effective learning groups. Designing, developing, and evaluating participative educational activities as alternatives to traditional teaching methods.
C.T. 435-3. Creative Dramatics. The study of creativity, its role and application in dramatics, and the manner in which creative dramatics assists in the growth and development of children and youth.
C.T. 442-3 to 6. Practice of Teaching English as a Foreign Language.
Supervised practice in teaching audio-lingual classes, written composition, and reading. Prer., C.T. 441 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 450-3. Advanced Oral Interpretation. Exploration of prose forms; theory and analysis of fiction and nonfiction. Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350.
C.T. 451-3. Advanced Oral Interpretation. Exploration of poetic forms; theory and analysis of modern poetry. Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350. C.T. 452-3. Dramatic Interpretation. Analysis of dramatic literature. Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350.
C.T. 460-3. Radio-TV Station Organization and Operation. Procedures, organization, and problems of management and operation of radio and television broadcast stations. Prer., C.T. 360 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 465-3 to 4. Television in Education. (Educ. 436.) Utilization of television at all levels of education. Theory and practice in defining needs, identifying alternative solutions, producing materials, and evaluating results. Fourth credit hour requires comprehensive project design. Prer., C.T. 360 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 471-3. History of the Theatre I. Study of theatres, methods of presentation, actors, and acting from primitive times to 1700, emphasizing perception of contemporary theatre as a way of understanding and appreciating the place of theatre in historical contexts.
C.T. 473-3. Advanced Acting. Research, analysis, and preparation and performance of roles in period and modern drama, emphasizing theories and techniques of historical and presentational styles. Prer., C.T. 373.
C.T. 475-3. Playwriting: The Short Form. (Engl. 305.) Play, radio, and television scripts. Prer., any course in drama or consent of instructor.
C.T. 478-3. Drama Theory. Examination of critical and theoretical ideas from Aristotle to the present day.
C.T. 479-0 to 4. Theatre Practice. Participation in University Theatre productions. Credit hours to be arranged by director of the theatre. Not more than 2 hours may be earned in any one semester or in the summer session. Prer., consent of the director of the theatre.
C.T. 481-3. History of the Theatre II. Continuation of C.T. 471. From 1700.
C.T. 485-3. Playwriting: The Long Form. (Engl. 306.) Full-length plays, etc. Prer., consent of instructor.
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
Students wishing to pursue graduate work in comparative literature should consult the Graduate School Bulletin.
On the 400 level, students may read all texts in translation; however, reading knowledge in at least one foreign language is highly recommended. On the 500
and 600 levels, students must be able to read in two foreign languages or obtain the consent of the instructor.
C.L. 410-6. Background Readings in Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Texts.
C.L. 411-3. Basic Literary Concepts.
C.L. 412-3. Literary Genres: Narrative Prose.
C.L. 413-3. Literary Genres: Lyric Poetry.
C.L. 414-3. Literary Genres: Verse Epic.
C.L. 415-3. Literary Genres: Drama—Baroque.
C.L. 435-3. Studies in the Novel: The Modern Novel.
C.L 436-3. Studies in the Drama: Contemporary European Drama— Ibsen to Brecht.
C.L. 437-3. Studies in Poetry: The Lyric as Genre and Attitude.
C.L. 473-3. Philosophy and Literature. (Phil. 473.)
C.L. 487-3. International Literary Relations: The United States and the Hispanic World.
ENGLISH
A major in English at both the bachelor’s and master’s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus.
Students majoring in English must present a total of 36 hours in English of which 18 hours must be in upper division courses. None of the required 36 hours may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Engl. 100 and 101 do not apply toward the major requirement. Engl. 275-276-277 (Survey of English Literature), 9 hours; Engl. 300 (Critical Writing), 3 hours; 300-400 level American literature course, 3 hours; Engl. 497 (Topics in American and British Literature), or Engl. 498 (Major American and British Authors), 3 hours, are required courses.
English majors interested in graduating with honors should confer with the honors adviser as soon as possible, but definitely no later than the beginning of the spring term of their junior year.
Students who contemplate teaching should obtain in the School of Education sheets listing curriculum required for a teaching certificate and should consult the School of Education, which supervises the teachertraining program. Since fulfilling requirements for education and English involves close scheduling, students should fulfill at least some of the college requirements during their freshman and sophomore years.
English for foreign students and courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language are listed under Communication and Theatre in this bulletin.
For additional literature courses see Comparative Literature and Mexican American Education Program.
Note: A considerable amount of writing is required in all English courses and is graded on form as well as on content.
Engl. 100-3. Exposition I. Basic composition; writing themes, reading expository essays, and participating in student-teacher conferences.
Engl. 101-3. Exposition II. Continuation of Engl. 100 with emphasis on writing a research paper. Siudents are urged to take Engl. 100 before 101, unless they have successfully completed a basic composition course.
Engl. 110-3. Introduction to Literature. Reading and analysis of short stories and novels.
Engl. 111-3. Introduction to Literature. Reading and analysis of plays.
Engl. 112-3. Introduction to Literature. Reading and analysis of poetry.
Engl. 120-3. Great Books. Close study of literary classics of Western civilization: the Odyssey or Iliad, Greek drama, and several


20 / University of Colorado at Denver
books of the Bible. Not open to students who have credit in Hum. 101, 102.
Engl. 121-3. Great Books II. Close study of literary classics of Western civilization from Plato to the Renaissance: selected dialogues of Plato, the Aeneid, the Inferno, and a few works by other writers. Not open to students having credit in Hum. 101-102.
Engl. 200-3. Advanced Expository Writing. Prer., completion of 24 hours of college credit.
Engl. 206-3. Modern Grammatical Usage.
Engl. 210-2. Narration. Prer., completion of 24 hours of college credit.
Engl. 222-3. Great Books III. Close study of several major works of the 17th, }8th, and 19th centuries.
Engl. 223-3. Great Books IV: Twentieth Century Literature. Close study of several major works of 20th century poetry, drama, and fiction.
Engl. 232-3. Masterpieces of American Literature. (Formerly Engl.
132. ) Close reading and analysis of American literary classics: novels, poems, plays, and essays of the 19th and 20th centuries. Engl. 233-3. Masterpieces of American Literature (Formerly Engl.
133. ) Continuation of Engl. 232, but may be taken independently of that course.
Engl. 234-3. The American Writer and the Black Man. Close reading and analysis of significant literary works by 19th and 20th century black or white American writers treating black Americans: novels, poems, plays, and essays.
Engl. 235-3. The American Writer and the Block Man. Continuation of Engl. 234, but may be taken independently of that course. Engl. 238-3. Survey of Afro-American Literature. (Bl. St. 232.) From the beginnings to 1914.
Engl. 239-3. Survey of Afro-American Literature. (Bl. St. 233.) From 1914 to 1960. Continuation of Engl. 238, but may be taken independently of that course.
Engl. 250-3. Masterpieces of British Literature. (Formerly Engl.
170. ) An intensive study of a small number of major works of British literature. Not open to English majors.
Engl. 251-3. Masterpieces of British Literature. (Formerly Engl.
171. ) Continuation of English 250, but may be taken independently of that course. Not open to English majors.
Engl. 275-3. Survey of English Literature. Chronological study of the greater figures and forces in the main stream of English literature from the beginning through the 16th century, including Shakespeare. May not be taken by majors after Engl. 460, 461, or 470.
Engl. 276-3. Survey of English Literature. Continuation of Engl.
275. English literature of the 17th and 18th centuries. May not be taken after Engl. 450, 451, or 462. Prer., Engl. 275.
Engl. 277-3. Survey of English Literature. Continuation of Engl.
276. English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. May not be taken after Engl. 441, 442, 444, or 445. Prer., Engl. 275 and 276.
Engl. 297/397-3. Topics in Literature. Not open to freshmen.
Note: Before taking any 300-level course in English, a student must have earned 24 semester hours of college credit.
Engl. 300-3. Critical Writing. Practical criticism of novels, poems, and plays with emphasis on written work. Introduction to and practice in using various critical approaches to works of literature. Prer., junior standing. Open to English majors only except by consent of the instructor.
Engl. 305-3. Playwriting: The Short Form. (C.T. 475.) Plays, radio, and television scripts. Prer., C.T. 240, 342, or any course in drama, or consent of the instructor. Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English major.
Engl. 306-3. Playwriting: The Long Form. (C.T. 485.) Full-length plays, etc. Prer., Engl. 305 or consent of the instructor. Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English majors.
Engl. 308-3. Writing Workshop. The writing of short stories. Prer., Engl. 200 or 210, or consent of instructor.
Engl. 309-3. Writing Workshop. Continuation of Engl. 308. Prer., Engl. 308.
Engl. 310-3. Writing Workshop. The writing of poetry. Prer., Engl. 200 or 210, or consent of instructor.
Engl. 311-3. Writing Workshop. Continuation of Engl. 310.
Engl. 315-3. Report Writing. (Formerly Engineering English 401.) Instruction and practice in various forms of reports, papers, and articles. Emphasis on style and editing. Prer., junior standing. Engl. 316-2. Study of Poetry. Reading of representative English and American poets with emphasis on form and prosody.
Engl. 330-3. Twentieth Century American Literature. Reading course in American novelists, poets, and dramatists of the 20th century. Primarily for nonmajors.
Engl. 331-3. Whitman.
Engl. 336-3. Black American Literature.
Engl. 338-3. American Literature. (Formerly Engl. 430.) Chronological survey of the literature from Bradford to Whitman.
Engl. 339-3. American Literature. (Formerly Engl. 431.) Chronological survey of the literature from Whitman to Faulkner. Continuation of Engl. 338.
Engl. 366-3, Shakespeare. Development of Shakespeare as a dramatist to 1600.
Engl. 367-3. Shakespeare. Shakespeare’s art at maturity. Continuation of Engl. 366.
Engl. 369-3. Milton'. Milton’s poetry and selected prose.
Engl. 371-3. The Bible as Literature. Survey of literary achievements of the Hebrews, as represented by the King James Bible —The Old Testament.
Engl. 373-3. Chaucer A study of Chaucer’s major works with emphasis upon the Canterbury Tales. Reading in Middle English after a short introduction to the language.
Engl. 297/397-3. Topics in Literature. Not open to freshmen.
Note: Before taking any 400-level course in English, a student must have earned 36 semester hours of college credit.
Engl. 400-3. Development of British Drama. From beginning through the Restoration.
Engl. 401-3. Development of British Drama. From 1700 to the present.
Engl. 402-3. American Drama. Famous American plays from beginning to O’Neill.
Engl. 403-3. American Drama. Famous American plays from O’Neill to the present.
Engl. 404-3. Contemporary Drama. Continental, British, and American drama since Ibsen.
Engl. 410-3. Development of the English Novel. From beginning to 1830.
Engl. 411-3. Development of the English Novel. From 1830 to 1914. Continuation of Engl. 410.
Engl. 412-3. Contemporary Chicano Literature. (M.Am. 412.)
Engl. 418-3. Development of the American Novel. From beginning to 1900.
Engl. 419-3. Development of the American Novel. Continuation of Engl. 418. From 1900 to present.
Engl. 420-3. Twentieth Century Literature. The novel, with emphasis on new tendencies.
Engl. 421-3. Twentieth Century Literature. English and American poetry.
Engl. 422-3. British and Irish Literature of the Early 20th Century.
Chronological survey, 1900-1925. Prer., senior standing.
Engl. 423-3. British and Irish Literature of the Later 20th Century. Chronological survey, 1925-present. Prer., senior standing.
Engl. 425-3. British and Irish Drama: 1900 to the Present. A survey of the English-Irish theatre since 1900.
Engl. 432-3. American Poetry. From beginning through the 20th century.
Engl. 441-3. The Early Romantics. Major emphasis on Blake, Coleridge, and Wordsworth. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277.
Engl. 442-3. The Later Romantics. Major emphasis on Keats, Shelley, and Byron. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277.
Engl. 444-3. The Victorians. Main currents of Victorian thought in prose and poetry. 1830-1860. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277.
Engl. 445-3. The Later Victorians. Continuation of Engl. 444. 1860-1900. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277.
Engl. 450-3. Restoration and 18th Century. From 1660 to 1740. Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Addison, and Steele and their contemporaries.


College of Undergraduate Studies / 21
Engl. 451-3. Restoration and 18th Century. From 1740-1800. Gray, Johnson, Goldsmith, Boswell, Cowper, Burns, and Blake and their contemporaries.
Engl. 460-3. Elizabethan Poetry. Nondramatic poetry of Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and others. Prer. for majors, Engl. 275.
Engl. 461-3. The Sixteenth Century. Selected prose and nondramatic poetry from Skelton and More through Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Prer. for majors, Engl. 275.
Engl. 462-3. The Seventeenth Century. Poetry and prose of Bacon, Donne, Jonson, their contemporaries and followers. Prer. for majors, Engl. 276.
Engl. 470-3. Medieval Literature. Selections read in modem English, representative of the life and thought of the Middle Ages (up to 1500). Prer. for majors, Engl. 275.
Engl. 480-2. (Writing) Advanced Composition for Secondary School Teachers of English. (Educ. 482.) Emphasis on improving students’ ability to write expository and argumentative essays by means of careful criticism of students’ writing. Extensive discussion of such matters as the content of secondary school composition courses and methods of criticizing and evaluating the writing of secondary school students. Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English major. Engl. 481-2. Literature for Adolescents. (Educ. 481.) The reading and evaluation of books suitable for junior and senior high school pupils. Attention is given to sources of information about books and criteria for selection, as well as to the actual writers. Not for graduate credit in English.
Engl. 482-2. Teaching of English. (Educ. 452.) Required of all who wish recommendation as high school English teachers. Prer., senior standing, 20 hours in English (including Engl. 275, 276, 277, 338-339, 481, and 484) are advised for prospective teachers. Not for graduate credit in English.
Engl. 484-3. English Grammar. Study of the English language and of the various grammars of English. Required for candidates for teacher certification only.
Engl. 485-3. History of the English Language. Outline of history of the language, including a brief survey of sound changes affecting modern English, of history of grammatical forms, and of the vocabulary. Elementary knowledge of English grammar assumed.
Engl. 486-3. Writing Topics. Individual papers based on upper division courses from each of the following three areas: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences. For Writing Program majors only.
Engl. 489-3. Semantics. Study of the meaning of words, their change of meaning, and the relationship between words and reality.
Engl. 497-3. Topics in American and British Literature. Courses such as the following will be offered at regular intervals: Regional Literature—the Frontier; Regional Literature—the
South; American Humor and Folklore; American Literary Criticism; Satire; Comedy; Tragedy. Prer., senior standing. Open to English majors only, except by permission of the instructor. Not for graduate credit.
Engl. 498-3. Major American and British Authors. Intensive study of works of one major British or American author. Prer., senior standing. Open to English majors only, except by permission of the instructor. Not for graduate credit.
Engl. 499-variable credit. Independent Study.
FINE ARTS
The Department of Fine Arts offers both a B.A. degree and a B.F.A. degree in painting, sculpture, printmaking, or design. The B.A. degree must include 40, but not more than 48, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. The B.F.A. degree must include 54, but not more than 72, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. Students wishing to apply for the B.F.A. degree must have a 2.0 average in all course work at the time of application, which may not be earlier than the end of the junior year. Application forms are available in the divisional office.
The core curriculum for fine arts majors includes 12 hours of Studio I (Fine Arts 100, 101, 102), Fine Arts 180-181, Fine Arts 496, and 6 hours of upper division art history. The recommended program for the B.F.A. includes at least two years in one creative field (painting, printmaking, design, or sculpture) plus 9 semester hours in drawing. Students who are candidates for the B.F.A. must take a minimum of 20 hours while in residence.
The core curriculum is set up to facilitate as much as possible a variety of viewpoints and creative approaches for the beginning student. If this seems restrictive to an individual student because of prior experience, etc., discipline advisers are open to alternative possibilities that would accomplish the same end.
Studio I Courses
For an orientation to studio practice, including drawing and an exploration of two- and three-dimensional media, fine arts majors are required to take 12 hours of Studio I courses under four different instructors. Either Fine Arts 100, 101, or 102 can be repeated up to 6 hours. There are no prerequisites for Studio I courses, but all 12 hours are prerequisites for most 300- and 400-level courses. Most upper division studio courses, unless otherwise stated, can be repeated to the maximum credit of 6 hours. Students enrolled in 400-level courses will be asked to present work in progress to the UCD fine arts faculty before the end of each semester enrolled. This will enable communication with instructors other than the one listed for the specific course.
Note: More specific descriptions of these courses will be available each semester at registration.
Fine Arts 100-3. Drawing. Exploration of drawing approaches and media.
Fine Arts 101-3. Three-Dimensional Media. Primarily exploration in three-dimensional form.
Fine Arts 102-3. Two-Dimensional Media. Primarily exploration in two-dimensional form: design and color.
Life Drawing
Fine Arts 300-3. First Year Life Drawing and Composition. Problems in drawing from life; exploring the possibilities in pictorial design and composition. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course. May be repeated to maximum credit of 6 hours.
Fine Arts 400-3. Advanced Drawing. Problems in drawing with emphasis on individual development. Prer., 6 hours Fine Arts
300. May be repeated.
Printmaking
Fine Arts 340-3. First Year Printmaking. Introduction to intaglio and relief printing, including metal engraving and etching, and woodcut. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours credit.
Fine Arts 440-3. Second Year Printmaking. Continued study and experimentation in intaglio, relief printing media. Prer., Fine Arts 340. May be repeated.
Fine Arts 342-3. Silk Screen. (Serigraphy.) Silk screen techniques as they relate to fine art prints, with possible practical applications to posters, brochures, and other projects requiring multiple editions. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or consent of instructor. May be repeated.
Painting
Fine Arts 320-3. First Year Painting. Basic investigation of the materials of the painter and their use in expressing the student’s


22 / University of Colorado at Denver
ideas. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. May be repeated.
Fine Arts 420-3. Second Year Painting. Expressive pictorial problems involving varied subject matter and painting media, with emphasis on individual development. Prer., Fine Arts 320 or equivalent. May be repeated.
Sculpture
Fine Arts 350-3. Sculpture. Studies of the human figure in wax and casting them in bronze. Prer., Fine Arts 101.
Fine Arts 351-3. Sculpture. Creative investigation of various sculptural materials and concepts. Prer., Fine Arts 350.
Fine Arts 450-3. Advanced Sculpture. Work in large sculptural forms. Prer., Fine Arts 351.
Fine Arts 451-3. Advanced Sculpture. Individual sculptural themes. Prer., Fine Arts 450.
Design
Fine Arts 212-2. Lettering. A combined lecture and studio course dealing with calligraphic communication. Problems in historical and creative calligraphy. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or consent of instructor. May not be repeated.
Fine Arts 315-3. First Year Photography I. Using lecture as an introduction to history, technique, and concepts of photography as it relates to the fine arts. Emphasis on photography as a means to a formal and expressive end. Students must have access to a camera. Fine Arts majors only. Open upon consultation. Prer., 10 hours of basic art.
Fine Arts 316-2. Graphic Design. Problems in advertising illustration and television graphics design. Various media explored. Stress on individuality, critical judgment, and creativity. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or consent of instructor. May not be repeated.
Fine Arts 319-3. First Year Photography il. Emphasis on processes and critical evaluation of student’s photographs. Prer., Fine Arts 315.
Fine Arts 415-3. Second Year Photography I. Advanced work with photographs and refined technical processes. Prer., Fine Arts 319.
Fine Arts 419-3. Second Year Photography II. Continuation of Fine Arts 415.
Fine Arts 418-3. Creativity and Problem Solving. Exploration of the process of problem solving through the means fundmental to all artistic endeavors, i.e., making and doing. Prer., Fine Arts 102 plus one more 100-level fine arts course. Open, with consent of instructor, to students in other disciplines. May be repeated.
Art History
Note: Not all art history courses are offered every year. Check current Schedule of Courses.
Fine Arts 180-3. History of Art I (Survey). History of art of all ages, reflecting the various cultures of mankind from the prehistoric to the Renaissance.
Fine Arts 181-3. History of Art II (Survey). History of art of all ages, reflecting the various cultures of mankind from the Renaissance to the present.
Fine Arts 470-3. Primitive Art. (African and Pacific areas.) Native arts of various African peoples as well as those of the major island groups of the Pacific area.
Fine Arts 471-3. Pre-Columbian Art. Architecture, sculpture, painting of the high cultures of Meso-American and the Andean area before the Spanish conquest.
Fine Arts 472-3. North American Indian Art. Survey of major tribal styles of the North American continent.
Fine Arts 476-3. Pre-Classical Art and Archaeology. (Anthro. 427 and Gen. Classics 427.) Greece and Crete from the neolithic period to the end of the Mycenaean world.
Fine Arts 477-3. Classical Art and Archaeology. (Anthro. 428 and Gen. Classics 428.) Greek art and archaeology from the end of the Mycenaean world through the Hellenistic era.
Fine Arts. 487-3. American Art. Study of American art and architecture from the Colonial period through the 19th century.
Fine Arts 488-3. American Art. Study of American art and architecture from the 19th century to the present.
Fine Arts 489-3. Origins of Modern Art I. History of European movements of the late 19th century from the French Revolution to Realism.
Fine Arts 490-3. Origins of Modern Art II. History of European movements of the late 19th century from Realism through Post Impressionism.
Fine Arts 492-3. Modern Art I. A survey of major trends in painting and sculpture from Post-Impressionism through Dada (1884-1924).
Fine Arts 493-3. Modern Art II. A survey of major trends in painting and sculpture from Surrealism to the present (1924-).
Independent Study and Seminar
Fine Arts 399, 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Individual projects or studies assigned by the major professor. To be arranged.
Fine Arts 494-3. Seminar in German Literature and the Visual Arts.
Interdisciplinary, team-taught course with German discipline. Fine Arts 496-3. Art Seminar. For Fine Arts majors, undergraduate and graduate. Course based on an exchange of ideas basic to the student’s own creative work, and to contemporary philosophies and tendencies in the field. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. Fine Arts 180-181, or consent of instructor. May be repeated once with consent of instructor.
FRENCH
Students who have completed a Level III high school French course have automatically satisfied the college graduation requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of French 201 or 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied French in high school and who wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credit, see the College of Undergraduate Studies General Information section of this bulletin.
Students majoring in French must complete 30 hours beyond the first year. Students presenting four years of high school French for admission must complete 30 hours beyond the second year. Required courses are 211-212, 301-302, 311-312, 401-402, plus 6 hours of literature courses at the 400 level.
Note: For comparative literature, see that section.
French 101-5. Beginning French I.
French 102-5. Beginning French II. Prer., French 101.
French 201-3. Second Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversation.
Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French.
French 202-3. Second Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversation. Prer., French 201 or two years of high school French.
French 211-3. Second Year French Reading and Conversation I. Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French.
French 212-3. Second Year French Reading and Conversation II. Prer., French 211 or three years of high school French.
French 301-2. French Phonetics and Pronunciation. Prer., French 212 or equivalent.
French 302-2. Oral Practice. Prer., French 301 or consent of instructor.
French 305-3. French Composition. Prer., French 202 or 212 or equivalent.
French 306-3. French Composition. Prer., French 305 or consent of instructor.
French 311-3. Main Currents of French Literature. Prer., French 212 or consent of instructor.
French 312-3. Main Currents of French Literature. Prer., French 311 or consent of instructor.


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French 401-3. Advanced Composition. Prer., French 305 or consent of instructor.
French 402-3. Advanced Composition. Prer., French 401 or consent of instructor.
French 403-3. Advanced Oral Practice. Prer., French 301 and 302, or consent of instructor.
French 420-2. French Civilization to 1789. Prer., French 312 or 302, or consent of instructor.
French 421-2. French Civilization from 1789 to Present Day. Prer., French 312, 302, or 420, or consent of instructor.
French 436/536-3. Eighteenth Century French Novel, Theatre, and Poetry.
French 443/543-3. Nineteenth Century French Novel.
GERMAN
Students who have completed a Level III high school German course have automatically satisfied the college requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (12 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201 or 211, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied German in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed.
The German major must take 35 semester hours beyond first year proficiency. Not more than 12 semester hours of 200-level courses and not more than 6 semester hours of courses given in English translation may be taken for credit toward the 35-hour minimum. Required courses for the B.A. are German 301-302: Conversation, Grammar, Composition; German 401-402: Structural Analysis, Composition, Stylistics; German 423: German Civilization; and German 495: Methods of Teaching German (required of students who desire the recommendation of the discipline representative for secondary school teaching positions). Native German speakers or students with advanced training may request permission to substitute more advanced German courses to fulfill the 35-hour minimum.
German 101-4, Sect I. German 102-4, Sect I. German 211-4, Sect 1.
These three sections together comprise a 12-hour, one-semester course. Satisfactory completion of intensive German fulfills the foreign language requirement.
German 101-4. Beginning German I.
German 102-4. Beginning German II. Prer., German 101 or one year of high school German.
German 201-4. Advanced German I: Reading. Prer., German 102 or two years of high school German.
German 202-4. Advanced German II: Reading. Prer., German 201 or three years of high school German.
German 211-4. Advanced German I: Communication Skills. Prer., German 102 or two years of high school German..
German 212-4. Advanced German II: Communication Skills. Prer., German 211 or three years of high school German.
German 222-4. Scientific German. Prer., German 201 or 211, or upon consultation.
German 301-3. Conversation and Grammar. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor.
German 302-3. Conversation and Composition. Prer., German 301 or consent of instructor.
German 311-3. Die deutsche Novelle. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor.
German 312-3. Das deutsche Drama. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor.
German 333-3. Deutsche Klassik. Prer., German 311 and 312, or consent of instructor.
German 334-3. Deutsche Romantik. Prer., German 311 and 312,
or consent of instructor.
German 381-3. German Literature in Translation I.
German 382-3. German Literature in Translation II.
German 401-3. Structural Analysis, Composition, and Stylistics I. Prer., German 302 or consent of instructor.
German 402-3. Structural Analysis, Composition, and Stylistics II. Prer., German 401 or consent of instructor.
German 411-3. Deutsche Literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts.
German 412-3. Deutsche Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts.
German 423-3. German Civilization. (In translation.)
German' 436-3. Die deutsche Lyrik. Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor.
German 437-3. Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgeschichte I. Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor.
German 438-3. Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgeschichte II.
Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor.
German 494-3. Seminar in Literature and the Visual Arts. Interdisciplinary, team-taught course with Fine Arts discipline.
German 495-3. Methods of Teaching German. Required of students who desire the recommendation of the discipline representative for secondary school teaching positions. For student teaching in German, see Educ. 451 in the School of Education Bulletin. German 499-variable credit. Independent Study.
PHILOSOPHY
A program for the philosophy major must include a minimum of five courses (15 hours) at the 300 level; a minimum of three courses (9 hours) at the 400 level; and a minimum of one course (3 hours) at the 500 level. The balance of the courses for the major may be taken at the discretion of the student.
The following courses are recommended (not required) for philosophy majors who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy: Symbolic Logic (Phil. 344); History of Philosophy (Phil. 300, 302, 402, 403, 404); Ethics (Phil. 315); Metaphysics (Phil. 335); Epistemology (Phil. 336); Philosophical Method (Phil. 350); several courses concerned with a single philosopher (e.g., Phil. 580, 581, 582, etc.); and one course concerned with the relationship of philosophy to some other discipline (e.g., Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of History, etc.).
General prerequisites (which may vary for some courses) are: 100-level—none; 200-level—3 hours;
300-level—6 hours; 400-level—9 hours; and 500-level —12 hours. The prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor.
Phil. 115-3. Ethics. Introductory study of major philosophies on the nature of the good of man, principles of evaluation, and moral choice.
Phil. 130-3. Philosophy and the Physical World. An introduction to philosophy through the consideration of topics and problems related to the physical and biological sciences such as freedom and determinism; mind and body; artificial intelligence; sciences and ethics; current theories of the universe, space, time, matter, energy, causality, etc.
Phil. 144-3. Introductory Logic. Introductory study of definition, informal fallacies, and the principles and standards of correct reasoning.
Phil. 150-3. Critical Reasoning. An introduction to concept formation, variant forms of reasoning and argument, and criteria for their evaluation.
Phil. 160-3. Philosophy and Religion. An introduction to philosophy through problems of religion, such as the existence of God, faith and reason, religious language, etc.
Phil. 170-3. Philosophy and the Arts. Consideration of philosophic questions involved in the analysis and assessment of artistic experiences and of the objects with which the arts, including the literary arts, are concerned.


24 / University of Colorado at Denver
Phil. 220-3. Classical Social Theories. Introductory study of major philosophies of the past in relation to political, economic, and social issues.
Phil. 221-3. Modern Social Theories. Present social issues, together with theoretical analyses by communist, fascist, and democratic thinkers.
Phil. 224-3. Philosophical Aspects of Society. Systematic discussion and analysis of the philosophic ideas of community, freedom, political power, the nature and role of violence, etc., together with the challenge of war, poverty, and racism to contemporary culture.
Phil. 240-3. Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Examination of some major concepts and problems of scientific thought: explanation, confirmation, causality, measurement, and theory construction.
Phil. 260-3. Oriental Religions.
Phil. 290-3. A Philosophical Classic. Detailed study of one major philosophic text which illustrates a variety of types of philosophical concerns. Emphasis on techniques for analysis, discussion, and assessment of philosophical argumentation. Such works as The Republic, Leviathan, and Treatise of Human Nature.
Phil. 300-3. Greek Philosophy. History of Pre-Socratic, Attic, and Hellenistic philosophy. No prer.
Phil. 301-3. Medieval Philosophy.
Phil. 302-3. Modern Philosophy. History of philosophy from Descartes through Kant. No prer.
Phil. 315-3. Ethicol Theory. Selected problems in classical and contemporary ethical theory.
Phil. 320-3. Social and Political Philosophy. A nonhistorical, systematic treatment of basic issues in social and political philosophy, with reference to theories of being, knowledge, and human nature.
Phil. 328-3. Philosophy of Education.
Phil. 335-3. Metaphysics.
Phil. 336-3. Epistemology.
Phil. 344-3. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.
Phil. 350-3. Philosophical Method. An examination of major differing conceptions of the nature and goals of philosophical inquiry and endeavor.
Phil. 360-3. Philosophy of Religion. Nature of religion and methods of studying it.
Phil. 370-3. Aesthetic Theory. Introduction to major theories of aesthetics and contemporary discussions of problems in aesthetics; i.e., the nature of art, the problem of evaluations in art.
Phil. 389-3. Oriental Philosophy. No prer.
Phil. 400-3. Nineteenth Century Continental Philosophy.
Phil. 401-3. Nineteenth Century British Philosophy.
Phil. 402-3. Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy.
Phil. 403-3. Twentieth Century Speculative and Idealistic Philosophy. Phil. 404-3. Twentieth Century Phenomenology and Existentialism.
Phil. 405-3. Studies in Contemporary Philosophy.
Phil. 410-3. American Philosophy.
Phil. 424-3. Philosophical Problems and Contemporary Culture. Issues and controversies in contemporary culture, their relation to modem theories of society, and their manifestations in the arts, science and technology, education, religion, and ethics. No prer., Phil. 426-3. Philosophy of Law. Consideration of various views of the nature of law, its role in society, and its relation to other disciplines. Investigation of philosophic commitments which underlie and affect legal conceptions and procedures. No prer. Phil. 427-3. Philosophy of History. Contemporary issues in critical and speculative theory of history, including the problems of methodology, explanation, values, and the relationship between history and social philosophy.
Phil. 430-3. Philosophy of Mind. Consideration of the problems in the philosophy of mind, including the mind-body problem, the problem of our knowledge of other minds, the compatibility of free will and determinism, etc., and discussion of such concepts as action, intention, motive, desire, enjoyment, memory, imagination, dreaming, self-knowledge, etc.
Phil. 443-3. Logical Theory. Prer., Phil. 144 or Phil. 344, or consent of instructor.
Phil. 444-3. Intermediate Symbolic (Mathematical) Logic. Prer., Phil 344 or consent of instructor.
Phil. 446-3. Theories of Human Nature.
Phil. 449-3. Philosophy of Language.
Phil. 473-3. Philosophy and Literature.
Phil. 493-3. Existentialist Philosophies.
Phil. 496-3. Senior Major Colloquium.
Phil. 499-3. Independent Study.
SPANISH
Students who have completed a Level III high school Spanish course have automatically satisfied the college graduation requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Spanish 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied Spanish in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credit, see the College of Undergraduate Studies General Information section of this bulletin.
A major in Spanish consists of the following requirements :
1. A total of 35 credit hours in Spanish courses (beyond Spanish 102), including the following minimum distribution: (a) at least 9 hours in upper division courses primarily devoted to language theory and practice (301-302, 401-402, 495); (b) at least 8 hours in upper division literature courses including at least one course treating Spanish Peninsular literature and one treating Spanish-American literature; (c) at least 12 hours in courses numbered 400 or above.
2. A total of 6 hours in courses from one or more of the following areas: (a) courses in Latin American studies (e.g., history, political science, etc.), (b) courses in Mexican American Studies, (c) linguistics, and (d) upper division courses in another foreign language or comparative literature.
Students who entered the University before fall 1969 may choose to complete the current major program or the program in effect at the time of their first registration.
Students planning to acquire certification for teaching at the secondary level should note that the School of Education will require Spanish 495 (Methods of Teaching Spanish) and that the 3 credit hours earned in that course will count toward the major and will be subject to the 48-hour maximum from one discipline allowed by the College of Undergraduate Studies for the B.A. degree. This means that students who begin the major program with Spanish 101 and who intend to include secondary certification in their B.A. program must include Spanish 495 in their electives in Spanish.
To be admitted to practice teaching of Spanish, majors must take the language skills tests of the Modern Language Association Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students of Spanish and make satisfactory scores.
Students must see an adviser prior to registration for their final semester. Failure to do so may result in a delay of their graduation. Students considering entering graduate school for an advanced degree in Spanish, either at the University of Colorado or at any other institution, should see an adviser as early as possible since admission to a graduate program will depend to a great extent on courses taken in the major.


College of Undergraduate Studies / 25
It is strongly recommended that all majors include some study in a Spanish-speaking country in their major programs. Credit earned will normally count toward satisfaction of the major requirements, but the student should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to assure full transfer of credit. It should be noted that courses taken abroad and designated as Spanish will also be subject to the 48-hour maximum rule of the College of Undergraduate Studies.
Students interested in study abroad should consult a member of the Spanish faculty or Professor James Wolf, Denver Campus representative for the International Education Office.
Note: For comparative literature courses, see that section.
Spanish 101-5. Beginning Spanish I.
Spanish 102-5. Beginning Spanish II. Prer., Spanish 101 or placement.
Spanish 205-3. History of the Spanish Language in the Southwest. Spanish 211-3. Second Year Spanish I. Prer., Spanish 102 or placement.
Spanish 212-3. Second Year Spanish II. Prer., Spanish 211 or placement.
Spanish 301-3. Pronunciation, Diction, and Conversation. Prer., Spanish 212, 211 (with grade A or B), or equivalent.
Spanish 302-3. Conversation and Oral Composition. Prer., Spanish
301.
Spanish 314-2. Introduction to Literature. Prer., Spanish 212, 211 (with grade A), or equivalent.
Spanish 331-3. Twentieth Century Spanish Literature. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 332-3. Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 333-3. Spanish Literature: Middle Ages Through Golden Age. Prer., Spanish 314 and 6 hours literature at 300 level. Spanish 334-3. Twentieth Century Spanish-American Novel and Essay. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 335-3. Spanish-American Novel and Essay to 20th Century. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 336-3. Spanish-American Poetry and Short Story. Prer., Spanish 314 and 3 hours of literature at 300 level.
Spanish 401-3. Advanced Rhetoric and Composition I. Prer., Spanish
302.
Spanish 402-3. Advanced Rhetoric and Composition II. Prer., Spanish 401.
Spanish 414-2. Gaucho Literature.
Spanish 417-3. Readings in Spanish Literature.
Spanish 418-3. Readings in'Spanish-American Literature.
Spanish 422-3. Mexican Literature.
Spanish 430-3. Generation of 1898.
Spanish 431-3. Spanish-American Literature, Independence through Romanticism.
Spanish 440-3. Romanticism in Spain.
Spanish 441-3. Modernism.
Spanish 450-3. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel.
Spanish 451-3. Contemporary Spanish-American Novel.
Spanish 452-3. Golden Age Drama.
Spanish 453-3. Golden Age Prose.
Spanish 490-2. Senior Seminar.
Spanish 495-3. Methods of Teaching Spanish.
Spanish 499-1 to 3. Independent Study.
SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY
NATALIE HEDBERG, Coordinator
The B.A. degree in speech pathology and audiology is not available on the Denver Campus. The following
courses are open to undergraduates: S.P.A. 440, S.P.A. 472, and S.P.A. 499. For graduate level courses see Speech Pathology and Audiology in the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
S.P.A. 440-2. Introduction to Language and Learning Disabilities. An
orientation to the field of the language and learning disorders as found in preschool, elementary, and secondary children. Diagnostic and remedial techniques and treatment programs will be surveyed. Films, case studies, guest speakers, and field trips will provide a comprehensive view of the field.
S.P.A. 472-2. Speech and Language Development in Children. The underlying processes in the development of speech and language, normal and atypical.
S.P.A. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study.
Division of Natural and Physical Sciences
PHYLLIS W. SCHULTZ, Assistant Dean
The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences includes the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography, geology, mathematics, physical education, physics, and psychology.
The division offers a wide variety of programs of study which include undergraduate majors within a discipline, interdisciplinary programs, and preprofessional programs.
It is possible to satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics, and psychology. The description of the program of each discipline includes the requirements for a major within that discipline.
In conjunction with the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the division is developing an interdisciplinary program with a major in environmental science. The program will offer several subject concentrations within both basic and applied environmental science. Included within the basic approach will be concentrations in ecology, earth science, population studies, and physics-chemistry. Included within the applied approach will be concentrations in conservation of natural resources, systems analysis, and environmental quality control.
Students interested in this program will be advised of core course requirements, program advisers, and other specific details through the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences office as this information becomes available.
Students enrolling in medical and health-related preprofessional programs should consult with the Medical Arts Committee of the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences at the beginning of their preprofessional education and at selected intervals thereafter. Appointments for advising must be made in the division office, Room 508. The Medical Arts Committee has two main functions: (1) the counseling of students enrolled in various health-related programs: Child Health Associate program, medical technology, physical therapy, predentistry, predental hygiene, premedicine, prenursing, and prepharmacy, and (2) evaluating each student’s abilities and making recommendations to the appropriate pro-


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fessional schools. Requirements for preprofessional programs are listed in the Preprofessional Programs section in this bulletin.
Course options are available for the nonscience major. There are three sets of courses from which a student may satisfy the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences’ area requirement of 12 hours. Any combination of these courses will satisfy the requirement.
Set I, Topics in Science—133-1, are modular courses designed for, but not limited to, majors outside of the Natural and Physical Sciences. Each module carries 1 semester hours of credit and is offered in a 1/3-semester time block of five weeks, during which the course meets the equivalent time of three lectures a week. There are no prerequisites and each module is a self-contained unit designed to cover a given problem or topic in science in a unified way. It is recommended that a student take a single module during each five-week period with a maximum of three per semester.
The topics will change from semester to semester and from year to year. The Schedule of Courses for each semester will give the list of current topics offered. (For general descriptions, see Topics in Science entries under each discipline involved.)
Set II courses are one or two semesters in length and have no formal prerequisites. These include both introductory survey courses and special topics courses and are also usually designed with the nonscience major in mind.
Set III includes all other Natural and Physical Science courses offered in the division. Although these courses are generally designed for the science major, they are open to students with the proper prerequisites.
Description of Courses and Programs
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.
BIOLOGY
A major in biology at both the bachelor’s and master’s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus.
The undergraduate major in biology is designed to be as flexible as possible to allow each student, in consultation with a biology adviser, to build a program that meets his needs. Each student majoring in biology is required to take 17 hours of core biology courses: Biol. 201, 202, Living Systems I and II; Biol. 341, Principles of Ecology; Biol. 383, General Genetics; and Biol. 361, Cell Biology. A minimum total of 32 hours in biology is required. The additional 15 hours of courses are to be selected in consultation with a biology adviser. All majors are required to take chemistry, physics, and mathematics in addition to the 32 hours in biology. It is advisable for the student to contact a biology adviser early in his academic career to plan his individual programs.
Biol. 133-1. Topics in Biology. Different five-week courses dealing with various topics in biology. See Schedule of Courses for the particular topics being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirements.
Biol. 201-4. Living Systems I. (Psych. 201.) An interdisciplinary approach to the structure and function of living systems—cells, organisms, and populations. Emphasis on the behavioral aspects and energy flow through each of the levels of organization analyzed. Primarily intended for students majoring in science. Biol. 202-4. Living Systems II. (Psych. 202.) Continuation of Biol. 201. Prer., Biol. 201.
Biol. 311-4. Morphology of Nonvascular Plants. Lect. and lab. An evolutionary survey of lower plant forms: algae, lichens, and bryophytes. Basic principles of evolution and ecology of lower plants are emphasized. Experimental lab projects are included in course. Prer., Biol. 201 and 202, or college botany.
Biol. 313-5. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Three semester hours lecture credit and 2 semester hours lab credit. Phytogeny of all chordate groups, the evolutionary progression of their organ systems, and their recapitulation during ontogeny and in the adult forms. Dissection of representative major vertebrate types. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202, or college zoology.
Biol. 322-3. Essentials of Animal Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 2 semester hours of lecture credit. An introduction to the essentials of animal physiology. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202; a year of general chemistry.
Biol. 325-4. Human Biology and Pathogenesis I. A study of normal structure, function, ecology, and development of man as a biologically integrated whole, culminating in a discussion of intrinsic and extrinsic bio-psycho-sociological factors which: (1) lead to the development of disease and (2) are used in response to threats of illness. Human beings viewed as multi-leveled open systems subject to changing developmental and environmental influences, and comprising various subsystems, whose interactions are responsible for or influence the meeting of basic biological needs. Prer., Biol. 101-102 or Biol. 201-202; General Chemistry or consent of instructor.
Biol. 326-4. Human Biology and Pathogenesis II. Continuation of Biol. 325. Prer., Biol. 325.
Biol. 341-3. Principles of Ecology. Principles pertaining to biological communities; population interactions and relations with the environment. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202. Biol. 361-3. Cell Biology. A survey of the interrelationships between cell structure and function. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202.
Biol. 383-3. General Genetics. A survey course introducing molecular, classical, developmental, and population genetics to the student who has a basic background in biology. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202.
Biol. 384-2. Lab in General Genetics. An experimental course designed to acquaint students with techniques used in the study of genetics. Independent study projects and general laboratory exercises are included. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202 and Biol. 383.
Biol. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. (Psych. 395-3; Anthro. 395-3.) An interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution, his biological makeup, his development as a social being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-discussion sections. Prer., one course in anthropology, biology, or psychology.
Biol. 410-3. Behavioral Genetics. (Psych. 410-3.) An interdisciplinary course designed for any upper division student interested in the relationships between behavior and heredity. Prer., consent of instructor.
Biol. 412-3. Quantitative Genetics. Survey of the principles of genetics of quantitative traits. Topics include gene frequencies, effects of mutation, migration, and selection; correlations among relatives, heritability, inbreeding, crossbreeding, and selective breeding. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202 and Biol. 383.
Biol. 425-3. Comparative Psychology. (Psych. 425-3.) Behavior of animals. Similarities and differences between animals. Principles of behavior in a variety of species. Prer., 6 hours of psychology or consent of instructor.
Biol. 427-4. Environmental Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 3 semester hours of lecture credit. A consideration of physiological adaptations of both plants and animals to such environmental parameters as temperature, light, and water. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202; a year of chemistry and a course in physiology.
Biol. 439-3. Animal Societies. (Psych. 439.) The behavior of animals in relation to one another. Relations within groups and


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between groups. Interaction between members of societies as determined by characteristics of the animals and their environments. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and consent of instructor.
Biol. 441-4. Plant Ecology. Interactions of environmental factors upon plant communities. Emphasis on population dynamics and major ecosystems of North America. Field study centers on methods of vegetation analysis. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202.
Biol. 443-4. Animal Ecology. The environment, the ecosystem, and the animals in them. Intra- and inter-species relations, communities, migrations, food chains, natural balance, effect of man and his population pressures. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202, or college zoology and botany.
Biol. 447-3. Ecological Methods. Empirical facets of ecological study. Emphasis upon hypothesis testing and sampling techniques based on known environmental phenomena. Independent study of a field problem. Prer., Biol. 341 or equivalent.
Biol. 452-3. Human Genetics. Basic principles of genetic phenomena evident in all life, with emphasis on those principles operative in humans. Heredity of man’s normal and defective traits. Modes of inheritance, pedigree analysis, consanguinity, sex associated traits, chromosomal aberrations, mutations and causes, karyotyping, multiple births, gene linkage studies, histocompatibilities, and metabolic disorders. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202.
Biol. 461-4. Vertebrate Embryology. Development stressing vertebrate animals from fertilized egg through organ systems, with introduction to experimental analysis. Prer., Biol. 101 and 102 or Biol. 201 and 202, or college zoology.
Biol. 499-variable credit. Independent Study in Biology. Prer., open to seniors with consent of instructor.
CHEMISTRY
A major in chemistry at either the bachelor’s or master’s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus.
For graduation at the bachelor’s level, students majoring in chemistry must present credits in the following courses or their equivalents: Chem. 103, 106, 317, 335, 336, 418, 451, 452, 455; Phys. Ill, 112, 114; Math. 140, 241, 242. In view of the current renumbering and reorganization of courses throughout the College, it is especially important that a student interested in the chemistry major consult a member of the chemistry faculty as his adviser. If this is done before the junior year, delays in graduation may thereby be avoided.
Qualified majors are strongly urged to participate in the Independent Study (Chem. 493) program.
A chemistry adviser must be consulted before a Distributed Studies Program with chemistry as the primary field is undertaken. Such a program must include the following courses or their equivalent: Chem. 103, 106, 335, 336 (or 331, 332), 451. Thirty hours are required in chemistry. For further information, see the Distributed Studies Program section of this bulletin.
Students planning chemistry as a career should be familiar with the recommendations of the American Chemical Society for the professional training of chemists. Among these recommendations are a reading knowledge of German or Russian, one semester of inorganic chemistry (Chem. 401), and two semesters of advanced work from the following courses: Chem. 501, 506, 516, 517*, 518*, 531, 532, and 559. Six hours of Chem. 493 will satisfy the special courses requirement. Further information regarding these recommendations may be obtained from the advisers.
Chem. 100-2. General Chemistry. Lecture and recitation only. For students with no previous chemistry or with inadequate back-
•Laboratory work is included.
ground in chemistry. This course is in preparation for Chem. 101 or Chem. 103. Prer., working knowledge of one year of high school algebra.
Chem. 101-5. General Chemistry. Lect. and lab. A first course in principles of chemistry intended primarily for prenursing, physical education, physical therapy, and other students wanting to fulfill curriculum or natural science requirements. No previous knowledge of chemistry is required. Prer., working knowledge of one year of high school algebra.
Chem. 102-5. General Chemistry. Lect. and lab. Introduction to
organic and biochemistry for prenursing, physical education, physical therapy, and other students wanting such a course to satisfy curriculum or natural science requirements. Prer., Chem. 101 or equivalent.
Chem. 103-5. General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab. A first college chemistry course for students with adequate high school chemistry. Prer., one year of high school chemistry or Chem. 100, and working knowledge of one year of high school algebra.
Chem. 106-5. General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab. Includes ionic equilibrium, types of bonding, transition metal chemistry, and some elementary quantitative analytical techniques. Prer., Chem. 103 or equivalent.
Chem. 133-1. Topics in Chemistry. Different 5-week course modules dealing with various topics in chemistry. See current Schedule of Courses for particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement. Chem. 317-4. Quantitative Analysis. Lect. and lab. Introduction to analytical chemistry with emphasis on classical wet methods. Prer., Chem. 106.
Chem. 331-4. Organic Chemistry. Two lect. and one lab. per week. An introduction to the study of the structure, reactions, and properties of organic compounds including synthetic methods of preparation, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and structure elucidation by modern spectroscopic methods. The laboratory program emphasizes modern techniques for the synthesis and identification of organic compounds. For nonchemistry majors, including premedical and predental students preparing for application to the University of Colorado Schools of Medicine or Dentistry. Open without petition to lower division students who have the prerequisite. Prer., Chem. 106.
Chem. 332-4. Organic Chemistry. Two lect. and one lab. per week. Continuation of Chem. 331. Open without petition to lower division students who have the prerequisite. Prer., Chem. 331.
Chem. 335-5. Organic Chemistry. Two lect. and two lab. per wk. Required course for chemistry majors. Lecture is the same as Chem. 331 with a more extensive laboratory program. Open without petition to lower division students who have the prerequisite. Prer., Chem. 106.
Chem. 336-5. Organic Chemistry. Two lect. and two lab. per week. Continuation of Chem. 335. Open without petition to lower division students who have the prerequisite. Prer., Chem. 335.
Chem. 401-3. Modern Inorganic Chemistry. Lect. An introduction to inorganic chemistry. Includes atomic theory and bonding, particularly of transition metal complexes, and the chemistry of selected transition metal and main group elements systematized by physical principles. Prer., Chem. 451 and concurrent registration in Chem. 452, or consent of instructor.
Chem. 418-4. Instrumental Analysis. Lect. and lab. Survey of the techniques of modern instrumental analytical chemistry. Emphasis on relationships between techniques and their application to problems. Prer., Chem. 317.
Chem. 451-3. Physical Chemistry. Lect. Applications of thermodynamics to chemistry. Includes study of the laws of thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solutions, electrochemistry, chemical equilibria, and phase equilibria. Prer., Chem. 335, Phys. Ill, 112, 114, Math. 240, or equivalent courses.
Chem. 452-3. Physical Chemistry. Continuation of Chem. 451, with emphasis on quantum mechanics, molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and additional topics of current interest. Prer., Chem. 451.
Chem. 455-3. Experimental Physical Chemistry. One lect. and two 3-hour labs, per wk. Instruction in the experimental techniques of modern physical chemistry with emphasis on experiments illustrating the fundamental principles of chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics, and chemical kinetics. For chemistry majors. Prer., Chem. 451 or equivalent course in thermodynamics, Chem. 452 or equivalent course in quantum mechanics. Chem. 452 may be taken concurrently.


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Chem. 481-3. General Biochemistry. Three lect. per wk. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of proteins; enzymes: mechanisms and kinetics; intermediary metabolism; Krebs cycle, carbohydrates, lipids; energetics and metabolic control; and an introduction to electron transport and photosynthesis. Prer., one year of organic chemistry.
Chem. 482-3. General Biochemistry. Continuation of Chem. 481. Topics include macromolecules; metabolism of nucleic acids and nitrogen-containing compounds; biosynthesis and function of macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and proteins; biochemistry of subcellular systems; and special topics. Prer., Chem. 481. Chem. 493-1 to 3. Independent Study in Chemistry. Consent of instructor required.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Students in the College may enroll in courses in computer science for College of Undergraduate Studies credit. Mathematics majors may select an option in computer science.
C.S. 201-3. Introduction to Computer Science. (E.E. 201.) An elementary course in computer science covering computer programming methods. Fortran programming, numerical applications, and non-numerical applications. Prer., high school algebra, trigonometry, and geometry.
C.S. 311-3. Computer Applications in the Mathematical Sciences.
An advanced Fortran course for scientists and engineers. Aspects of optimal programming with respect to various goals and examination of goals that are appropriate to given contexts. Prer., C.S. 201, A.Math. 232, Math. 313, 319, or equivalent. C.S. 401-3. Introduction to Programming Languages and Processors. (E.E. 401.) A study of programming languages and digital processors. Conceptual aspects of programming languages, translators, data structures, hardware organization, and system architecture. Relationship of language features to processor features. Prer., E.E. 201 or C.S. 201.
C.S. 453-3. Assembly Language Programming. (E.E. 453.) A laboratory course in programming at the machine code level. Lectures deal with the organization of the machine, its effect on the order code, and techniques for programming in Assembly Language. Primary emphasis is on preparing and running programs. Prer., C.S. 201, or consent of instructor.
C.S. 459-3. Computer Organization. (E.E. 459.) This course is concerned with computer arithmetic units, memory systems, control systems, and input-output systems. The emphasis is completely on logic structure rather than electronic circuitry. Prer., E.E. 257 or equivalent.
GEOGRAPHY
Students majoring in geography must complete the following basic courses or their equivalents: Geog. 100, 101, 199, 302, and 306. Distributed majors selecting geography as a primary or secondary subject should consult with the discipline adviser.
Geography courses, traditionally, have emphasized the man-environment relationship. Students interested in environmental problems will find the nonregional courses of particular value to their program. A number of these courses involve faculty from other disciplines and provide a general background on which more advanced work may be based.
Man and His Physical Environment I, II, III is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduction to the physical environment and evolution of the earth. They may be taken concurrently or in any order.
Geog. 100-4. Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geol. 100-4.) A general introduction to elements of weather, physical climatology, and world regional climate classification.
Geog. 101-4. Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geol. 101-4.) Study of earth materials, features, and processes, and how they relate to man.
Geog. 102-4. Man and His Physical Environment III. (Geol. 102-4.) Study of structure of the crust of the earth, history of the earth, and development of life forms throughout geologic time.
Geog. 199-3. Introduction to Human Geography. A systematic introduction to the broad field of man-land relationships. Emphasis is placed on the patterns and forms of man’s changing use of the land.
Geog. 200-3. World Regional Geography. The cultural distributions of the world. The relationships of man and the landscape based on broad divisions of cultural, ethnic, and geographic distributions in the world.
Geog. 301-3. Economic Geography: Primary Activities. An introduction to rural land use patterns and agricultural production.
Geog. 302-3. Economic Geography: Secondary Activities. An introduction to location analysis of manufacturing activities.
Geog. 305-3. Cartography I. Techniques of mapping various distributions with emphasis on research and design.
Geog. 306-3. Map and Air Photo Analysis. Introduction to the skills and reasoning ability needed to analyze and use maps and air photos as research tools. Elementary field techniques are introduced on two all-day Saturday field trips.
Geog. 320-2. Descriptive Meteorology. Nonmathematical description of the structure and composition of the earth’s atmosphere; heat balance, cloud formations, and wind circulation. Observational techniques, including weather map analysis and the meteorological satellite program.
Geog. 361-3. Geographic Analysis of Issues in American Society. The
geographic viewpoint, especially regional differentiation and systems models, applied to such socio-economic concerns as pollution, poverty, racism, violence, and political reorganization. Geog. 370-3. Africa. A physical-cultural approach to an understanding of man-land relationships on the continent; changes in physical environment and cultural practices. Population and land-use problems.
Geog. 371-3. Middle East. A physical, cultural, economic approach to the arid lands of the Middle East including Arab lands of the Sahara.
Geog. 375-3. Far East. Regional survey of the physical and cultural features characterizing the geography of the Far East. Emphasis on problems underlying future development and economic capabilities of South and East Asia.
Geog. 400-3. Climatology. Analysis of energy exchange, temperature, wind, pressure, and atmospheric humidity as elements and controls leading to an understanding of physical climatology. The Koeppen, Thornthwaite, and other systems are evaluated and applied to a survey of regional climates. Prer., Geog. 100 or equivalent.
Geog. 402-3. Population Geography. Analysis of population dynamics, distributions, densities, and migration flows; spatial relationships between population trends and variables with social, economic, and environmental factors.
Geog. 406-3. Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photos. Interpretation of aerial photographs for research purposes. Emphasis on analysis of vegetation, land-forms, agriculture, and urban-industrial patterns. Prer., Geog. 306 or consent of instructor.
Geog. 407-3. Location Analysis of Human Activities. The study of spatial order in human use of the earth, emphasizing theories of locational structure and methods of analysis.
Geog. 410-3. Urban Geography. An introduction to the horizontal and vertical characteristics of urban settlements. Includes the origin of cities, basic definitions of urban areas, central place theory, economic bases of towns, classification of cities, and urban planning.
Geog. 412-3. Introductory Quantitative Methods in' Geography. The
application of statistical and other quantitative techniques to geographically organized data, areal distributions, and the solution of geographic research problems.
Geog. 414-3. Transportation Geography. Concepts and theories leading to description and an understanding of the relationships between people, products, and transportation systems over space and time. Political, sociological, and environmental impacts of transportation facilities will be examined,
Geog. 420-3. Microclimatology. Examination of microscale climatic patterns, with emphasis on the physical processes in the lowest layer of the atmosphere. The needs and responses of man, animals, and plants in the prairie, forest, and urban atmospheric environment will be examined, as will urban and regional planning implications of various microclimates. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 100 or consent of instructor.


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Geog. 430-3. Conservation Practice. Introduction to various aspects of resources, environment, and population. Emphasis on food production, water, soil, and climate.
Geog. 463-4. Principles of Geomorphology. (Geol. 463.) Systematic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind, and marine processes and the landforms resulting therefrom. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 101 or equivalent and elementary chemistry, or consent of instructor.
Geog. 494-4. World Mineral Resources. (Geol. 494.) Nontechnical study of distribution, reserves, and uses of mineral resources. Geog. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Independent research primarily for undergraduate major students. Prer., consent of department.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Students majoring in the geological sciences must take the following courses within the discipline: Physical Geology (Geol. 207-208), Mineralogy (Geol. 301), Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411). Introductory Paleontology, Stratog-raphy, and Petrology (Geol. 341, 342, 323) are recommended. In addition, students must take the following courses in allied fields: Chem. 103, 106; Math. 140, 230; Phys. Ill, 112, and 114. A less mathematical option that does not require structural geology and field geology is available to students who do not plan a career in the geological sciences.
Physical Geology (Geol. 207, 208) and Mineralogy (Geol. 301) and Introductory Petrology (Geol. 323) are presently offered on the Denver Campus, as are the required courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Introductory Paleontology (Geol. 341) is offered occasionally. Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411) must be taken on the Boulder Campus in order to complete a career-oriented major in the geological sciences. Alternatively, a student may complete all the requirements for a distributed studies major and environmental sciences major, with emphasis in geology, on the Denver Campus.
Man and His Physical Environment I, II, III is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduction to the physical environment and evolution of the earth. They may be taken concurrently or in any order.
Geol. 100-4. Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geog. 100-4.) A general introduction to elements of weather, physical climatology, and world regional climate classification.
Geol. 101-4. Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geog. 101-4.) Study of earth materials, features, and processes, and how they relate to man. Includes Sunday field trips.
Geol. 102-4. Man and His Physical Environment III. (Geog. 102-4.) Study of structure of the crust of the earth, history of the earth, and development of life forms throughout geologic time. Includes Sunday field trips.
Geol. 207-4, 208-4. Physical Geology and Geophysics. General introduction to geologic processes of the earth’s surface and interior. Physical properties of the earth as a planet. Intended for students desiring major work in the geological sciences. Includes three Sunday field trips per semester. Prer., two years of high school science or mathematics and science. (Geol. 208-3 does not prerequire Geol. 207-3. Students may follow Geol. 101 with Geol. 208 if they wish additional work in geophysics and internal processes, or they may begin the 207-208 sequence with Geol. 208 if scheduling so requires.)
Geol. 301-4. Mineralogy. Principles of mineralogy, including crystallography, crystal chemistry, and a systematic study of the more important nonsilicate and silicate minerals. Origins and occurrences of minerals. Prer., physical geology and college-level chemistry, or consent of instructor.
Geol. 323-4. Introductory Petrology. An introduction to the classification, distribution, and origin of igneous, metamorphic and
sedimentary rocks, including their identification in hard specimens. Prer., physical geology and mineralogy.
Geol. 341-4. Introductory Paleontology. The study of fossils, including a survey of the organic world and its history in the geologic past. Includes invertebrates, protista, vertebrates and plants, an introduction to evolution and paleoecology, and discussion of the uses of fossils in geologic correlation. Prer., introductory geology or biology. Offered occasionally.
Geol. 425-3. Groundwater. Occurrence, movement, and problems of pollution of subsurface water and the hydrologic properties of water-bearing materials. Prer., Geol. 101 (Geog. 101) or consent of instructor.
Geol. 463-4. Principles of Geomorphology. (Geog. 463-4.) Systematic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind and marine processes, and the landforms resulting therefrom. Prer., elementary geology or equivalent and elementary chemistry, or consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.
Geol. 494-4. World Mineral Resources. (Geog. 494-4.) Nontechnical study of distribution, reserves, and uses of mineral resources.
MATHEMATICS
A major in mathematics can be completed by students in the College of Undergraduate Studies by satisfying the following requirements, completing each of the required courses with a grade of C or better:
1. At least 30 semester hours of mathematics courses.
2. At least 18 semester hours of mathematics courses numbered above 300, approved by adviser.
3. Math. 140, 241, 242, 300, 313, 314.
4. Either Math. 431-432 or Math. 321-422.
Students who plan to do graduate work in mathematics should take Math. 431-432; students who wish to obtain a secondary teaching certificate are encouraged to complete Math. 321-422; students planning to major in mathematics must see an adviser from that discipline.
Students who choose the computer science option in the mathematics major are required to take the following courses, all with grades of C or better:
Math. 140, 241, 242 Math. 300, 314, 315 Math. 431, 432 Math. 443 Math. 481
C.S. 201
C.S. 302 or 303 C.S. 453
C.S. 465 (E.E. 455 or E.E.457)
C.S. 501 C.S. 546
Variations in these courses must be approved by a mathematics adviser.
At the graduate level, master’s degrees are available in mathematics, applied mathematics, and basic science (math, option).
The Department of Mathematics offers a Teaching Internship Program which consists of three phases as follows:
Phase 1. A junior-level student who is majoring in mathematics or applied mathematics, and who shows promise as a teacher, is sponsored by a member of the full-time faculty of the department. A freshman-level course is then assigned to the student, on an honorarium basis, with the understanding that the faculty member will attend all sessions of the course. The student will thus be acting as an intern and will be provided with a critique of his performance after each lecture.
It is the interested student’s task to convince a faculty member that he or she should sponsor the


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student. No faculty member is required to perform this function nor is any compensation afforded to the sponsor for so doing.
Phase 2. After completion of one or two semesters of fully supervised classroom exposure, and upon the student’s entry into the senior year of study, the faculty sponsor may recommend that the intern be accepted as an undergraduate teaching assistant. With approval of the mathematics faculty, the student will then be assigned broader responsibility for one (or at most, two) freshman courses, with the faculty sponsor exercising such supervision as may appear appropriate under individual circumstances.
Phase 3. Upon completion of a baccalaureate program the intern hopefully would be prepared to accept a graduate teaching assistantship in the department, or in a related interdisciplinary area, as the next step in his or her professional career.
No student may obtain more than 9 hours credit in mathematics courses numbered below 140.
Moth. 101-3. College Algebra. A course intended for precalculus students who are not prepared to take Math. 140 directly. Topics covered include set concepts, functions including exponential and logarithmic, systems of equations and inequalities including elements of matrices, and polynomials. Prer., IV2 years of high school algebra, one year of plane geometry, and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class.*
Math. 102-3. College Trigonometry. A course intended for precalculus students who are not prepared to take Math. 140 directly. Includes trigonometric functions and their values and graphs, right angle trigonometry, identities and equations, inverse trigonometric functions, the law of sines and the law of cosines and applications, complex numbers, complex roots of equations, De Moivre’s theorem and roots of complex numbers, and elements of complex algebra. Prer., IV2 years of high school algebra, one year of plane geometry, and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class.*
Math. 107-3. Algebra for Social Science and Business. Logic, set theory, permutations, combinations, probability, matrix algebra. Does not prepare students for Math. 140. Prer., one year high school algebra.
Math. 108-3. Polynomial Calculus. A one-semester course in the calculus. No knowledge of trigonometry or analytic geometry is presupposed. Intended especially for social science and business students and for the general liberal arts student. Those planning to take more than one semester of calculus should take Math. 140 instead of Math. 108. Prer., V/2 years high school algebra.
Math. 133-1. Topics in Mathematics. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in mathematics. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular topics being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Math. 140-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. Basic concepts from plane analytic geometry, elements of vector algebra; intuitive introduction to limits, continuity, differentiability, and integrability; elementary applications of differentiation and integration. Replaces Math. 130. Students with credit in Math. 108 will receive no credit for Math. 140. Math. 102 may be taken concurrently with Math. 140. Prer., Math. 101 and 102.
Moth. 241-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. The second of a three-semester sequence (Math. 140, 241, 242) in calculus. This course deals with inverse functions, trig and inverse trig functions, log, exponential, and hyperbolic trig functions. Also includes the Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus, Rolle’s Theorem, the mean value theorems, methods of integration and polar coordinates. Prer., Math. 140.
•Students without prerequisites are advised (and with an unsatisfactory placement test score will be directed) to consider enrollment in precollege courses D.C.E. 350, 351, 353, and 354, as needed, through the Division of Continuing Education.
Math. 242-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III. The third of a three-semester sequence (Math. 140, 241, 242). This course deals with infinite series, the intermediate value theorems, L’Hospital’s Rule and indeterminate forms; Taylor’s and Mac-laurin’s series, including series definitions of transcendental functions. Prer., Math. 241 or consent of department.
Math. 300-3. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics. The student learns to prove and critique proofs of theorems by studying elementary topics in abstract mathematics, including such necessary basics as logic, sets, functions, equivalence relations, etc. Prer., Math. 241 or consent of instructor.
Math. 303-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. Designed to help provide appropriate mathematical background to teach K-6 mathematics. This is not a methods course but each topic is related to the elementary curriculum through concurrent examination of relevant text and laboratory materials as each topic is studied. Topics include sets, the concept of number, place value numeration and associated algorithms, the structure of the natural numbers, the integers, and the rational numbers. Applications and problem solving are included. Carries credit only for elementary education majors.
Math. 304-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. Designed to meet objectives as described for Math. 303 above. Topics include intuitive and logical development of geometric ideas relevant to K-6 curriculum; measurement of length, area, volume, mass, angle, temperature, and time; stress is on the metric system; further study of the rational number system; applications and problem solving. Carries credit only for elementary education majors. Prer. Math. 303 or consent of instructor.
Moth. 314-3. Introduction to Modern Algebra. Groups, rings, fields, polynomials. Prer., Math. 300.
Moth. 315-3. Introduction to Linear Algebra. Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, determinants. Prer., Math. 314.
Math. 319-3. Applied Linear Algebra. Designed primarily for majors in applied science and engineering. Topics include matrix algebra, determinants, matrix inversion, rank and equivalence of matrices, systems of linear equations, and matrix calculus. Prer., Math. 241 with grade of C or better.
Math. 321-3. Higher Geometry I. Axiomatic systems. The foundations of Euclidean and Lobachevskian geometries. Prer., Math. 241 with grade of C or better.
Math. 352-3. Computable Functions. Turing Computers, computable functions, alternate formulations of computable functions, the halting problem and noncomputable functions. Church’s thesis, universal machines, Godel’s incompleteness theorem, and undecidable theories. Prer., college algebra or consent of instructor.
Math. 383-3. Introduction to Statistics. Study of the elementary statistical measures. Introduction to statistical distributions, statistical inference, and hypothesis testing. Prer., college algebra or equivalent. Not for mathematics majors.
Math. 403-3. Introduction to Topology. Metric spaces and topological spaces; homotopy and homology in simplicial complexes. Prer., Math 300 or consent of instructor.
Math. 411-3. Theory of Numbers. Divisibility, greatest common divisor, prime numbers, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, congruences and other topics. Prer., Math. 300 or consent of instructor.
Math. 412-3. Topics in Mathematics. Special topics in mathematics will be covered. Students should check the current Schedule of Courses to obtain the topics to be covered as well as the prerequisites. With permission, this course may be taken for credit more than once.
Math. 422-3. Higher Geometry II. An introduction to the study of synthetic projective geometry. The relation of the projective and affine planes. Coordinates in the projective plane. Prer., Math. 315 with grade of C or better.
Math. 426-3. Elementary Differential Geometry. Differential forms in Euclidean 3-space, vector fields, frame fields, Frenet formulas, calculus of differential forms on surfaces, geometry of surfaces, Gaussian curvature, second fundamental form. Prer., Math. 315, Math. 432, or consent of instructor.
Math. 427-3. Mathematical Tools for Urban Planning. Development of the fundamental techniques of applied quantitative methods. This course covers those topics required for the two subsequent quantitative methods courses, Math. 428 and Math. 429.


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Math. 428-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods I.
Matrix algebra related to model building and linear and nonlinear programming leading to a study of the Theory of Games with applications in engineering and other applied areas such as planning, transportation and environmental problems. Prer., Math. 427 and consent of instructor.
Math. 429-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods II.
Parametric and nonparametric statistics which treat statistics in a Decision Framework (includes introduction to Decision Theory). Bayesian Statistics and applications with exercises in probability representative of simple probabilistic models (e.g., Queueing, single-server models, etc.). Prer., Math. 427 or consent of instructor.
Math. 431-3. Advanced Calculus I. Calculus of one variable, the real number system, continuity, differentiation, integration (possibly Riemann-Stieltjes). Prer., Math. 241 and Math 300. Math. 432-3. Advanced Calculus II. Sequences and series, convergence, uniform convergence; Taylor’s theorem; calculus of several variables including continuity, differentiation and integration; Picard’s theorem in ordinary differential equations and Fourier series if time permits. Prer., Math. 431.
Math. 433-3. Advanced Calculus III. Vector fields, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem; Green’s, Stoke’s, and divergence theorems; Taylor’s theorem for functions of several variables; calculus on manifolds if time permits. Prer., Math. 432 or consent of instructor, and Math. 313 or 319.
Math. 443-3. Ordinary Differential Equations. Elementary systematic introduction to linear nth order differential equations, including equations with regular singular points. Existence, uniqueness, and successive approximations of solutions for linear and nonlinear equations. Prer., Math. 242.
Math. 444-3. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. Boundary value problems for the wave, heat, and Laplace equations; separation of variables method, eigenvalue problems, Fourier series, orthogonal systems. Prer., Math. 443.
Math. 445-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists I. Topics include complex algebra, Cauchy Riemann equations, Laurent expansions, theory of residues, complex integration, and introduction to conformal mapping. Technique and applicability are stressed. Prer., ordinary differential equations.
Math. 446-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists II. A continuation of Math. 445, with coverage dependent partly on the interests of the class. Topics include Schwartz-Christofel transformations and thorough development of techniques of conformal mappings. Solution of boundary value problems will be emphasized. Prer., Math. 445.
Math. 447-3. Calculus of Variations for Engineers and Scientists.
Techniques and applications of the powerful tools of the variational calculus will be developed and both classical and modern optimization problems will be attacked. Prer., ordinary and partial differential equations.
Math. 448-3. Laplace Transforms for Engineers and Scientists. Topics include the general methods, transforms of special functions, heaviside expansion theorems, transforms of periodic functions, convolution integrals, the inverse transforms, and solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prer., ordinary differential equations.
Math. 449-3. Tensor Analysis for Engineers and Scientists. Review of vector concepts. Indicial notation, oblique coordinates, generalized coordinates, summation conventions. Contravariant and covariant tensors. Tensor algebra and tensor calculus. The course is designed primarily to familiarize the professional with the foundations of this useful subject rather than to develop detailed applications. Prer., differential equations and matrix analysis.
Math. 451-3. Introduction to Mathematical Logic. Sentential logic and first order logic. Completeness theorems. Prer., Math. 300 with a grade of C or better.
Math. 453-3. Boolean Algebras. Axioms, subalgebras, ideals, direct and free products, free algebras, representation theorem, completions. Prer., Math. 314.
Math. 455-3. Set Theory. Axioms of set theory, algebra of sets, cardinal numbers, ordinal numbers, axiom of choice and continuum hypothesis. Prer., Math. 300.
Math. 457-3. Theory of Equations. A study of the classical theory of equations, including such topics as higher degree polynomials and their zeroes, symmetric functions of polynomial coefficients; general solution of the cubic and quartic equations; resultants, and elementary graphical analysis. Prer., Math. 242.
Math. 461-3. Analog Computation and Simulation. (Same as E.E. 450.) Analog computing techniques including time and amplitude scaling, and programming of linear and nonlinear differential equations. Simulation of dynamic systems, iterative analog computing. Laboratory work on an analog machine is required. Digital simulation languages are studied. Prer., ordinary differential equations and familiarity with Laplace transforms. Math. 465-3. Numerical Analysis I. Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations. Solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Interpolation, integration. Solution of ordinary differential equations. Least squares. Sources of error and error analysis. Computer implementation of numerical methods. Matrix eigenvalue problems and summation of infinite series. Prer., E.E. 201 and Math. 315, or Math. 319.
Math. 466-3. Numerical Analysis II. Continuation of Math. 465. Prer., Math. 465.
Math. 467-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering. (Same as E.E. 455.) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science. Those methods suitable for solution by highspeed digital computers are emphasized. Prer., E.E. 201 and Math. 443.
Math. 468-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists I. Tche-bychev approximations, approximation by rational functions, linear and nonlinear, regression analysis, applications of interpolating polynomials, economic value, and cost analysis. Comparisons of estimation and approximation techniques, and other related topics. Prer., third-semester calculus and one course in statistics.
Math. 469-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists II. A continuation of Math. 468. Selected topics will be developed extensively in accordance with the needs of the class. With the consent of the department, students may register for this course more than once. Prer., Math. 468 or consent of instructor.
Math. 470-3. Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. (Educ. 455.) Problems in teaching mathematics including objectives, sequence of topics, methods of presentation, materials, testing, and recent curricular developments. Prer., Math. 241. Carries credit only for students in secondary education.
Moth. 472-3. History of Mathematics. A history of the development of mathematical techniques and ideas from early civilization to the present including the interrelationships of math and sciences. Prer., Math. 241.
Math. 481-3. Introduction to Probability Theory. Axioms, combinatorial analysis, independence and conditional probability, discrete and absolutely continuous distributions, expectation and distribution of functions of random variables, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, simple Markov chains. Prer., Math. 241.
Math. 482-3. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Point and confidence interval estimation. Principles of maximum likelihood, sufficiency, and completeness; tests of simple and composite hypothesis, linear models, and multiple regression analysis. Analysis of variance distribution free methods. Prer., Math. 481.
Moth. 493-2, 494-2. Honors Seminar. Intended for candidates for departmental honors and other superior students. Topics covered vary from year to year. Student participation is stressed.
Math. 495-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Elementary Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department.
Math. 496-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Middle School Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department.
Math. 497-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Secondary Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department.
Moth. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Variable credit depending upon the student’s needs. This course is listed for the benefit of the advanced student who desires to pursue one or more


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topics in considerable depth. Supervision of a full-time faculty member is necessary and the dean’s office must concur. Students may register for this course more than once with departmental approval. Prer., consent of department.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
A basic activity program in physical education is available for nonmajors. Although physical education credit is not required for completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree, a maximum of 8 hours of elective credit consisting of activity courses may be applied toward the graduation requirement of 120 hours. Activity classes 102 through 213 may be taken on an elective basis. One course may be taken each semester and a specific activity may be counted for credit only once. The student will have the option of being graded by letter grade or pass/fail.
The basic activity program is designed to offer students a wide variety of recreational activities stressing sports that have lifetime carry-over value.
The discipline of physical education does not offer a major in physical education or recreation. However, a variety of courses are offered which are the equivalent of those given on the Boulder Campus for majors. It is possible over a four-year period to take the majority of the courses required for the major on the Denver Campus.
An Urban Recreation Specialist program, designed to prepare people to work in urban recreation centers, is being developed. The program is interdisciplinary in nature, and students from any discipline may enter the program if they have junior status and an interest in urban recreation.
For information on the majors program, the graduate program in Physical Education and Recreation, and the Urban Recreation program, contact the discipline representative on the Denver Campus.
P.E. 133-1. Topics in Physical Education. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in physical education and recreation. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
P.E. 293-2. Personal Living. Maintenance and improvement of health.
P.E. 295-2. Community Health. Communicable diseases and their relations to public health. The germ theory of disease, infection and immunity, vaccines, toxoids, antitoxins, and hereditary defects. An investigation of community health services.
P.E. 296-2. First Aid. Knowledge and skills of emergency treatment for common accidents and illnesses. Leads to the American Red Cross Standard and Advanced Certification.
Rec. 332-2. Wilderness Camping Practicum. Designed in three stages, providing opportunities for group and solo wilderness camping. Additional fee required.
P.E. 370-3. Society ond Sport. A study of the sociological foundations of physical education with emphasis upon the social structure of sports groups, the dynamics of sports groups, risk-taking in sports, and sports in their relationship to socialization of individuals and groups.
P.E. 420-2. Organization and Administration of Physical Education.
Policies and practices used in the development of sound physical education practices.
Rec. 431-2. Program Planning in Recreation. To acquaint the student with the basic principles in developing a well-rounded recreation program with specific objectives.
Rec. 435-2. Organization and Evaluation in Recreation. The study of organizational structures of the several types of recreational services and evaluation techniques used to determine the effectiveness of these structures as related to administration of programs, policies, and the public.
Rec. 437-2. Management of Parks and Recreation Facilities. Lect., field work, and lab. experience in park and recreation administration. Problems in management, finance, and evaluation of park and recreation facilities.
Rec. 438-2. Maintenance of Park and Recreation Facilities. Lect., field work, and lab. experience in maintenance of parks and recreation facilities. Problems in planning, scheduling, and performing operations for public use.
P.E. 446-2. Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries. Practical and theoretical study of massage, bandaging, treatment of sprains, bruises, strains, and wounds.
PHYSICS
Required of all physics majors are Phys. Ill, 112, 114, 213, 214, 215, two years of calculus, and one year of another science. Majors preparing for graduate study in physics should also take Phys. 317, 321, 322, 331, 332, 341, 491, 492, and 495, and additional mathematics courses. Students not going to graduate school in physics or wishing an interdisciplinary physics major must consult an adviser for the suitable additional program. An acoustical option is currently being developed. Students should also be aware of the engineering physics major available through the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Several new interdisciplinary programs involving physics are currently being considered, including environmental science, geophysical systems, and chemical physics. Students interested in these programs should take the introductory calculus physics sequence as soon as possible, and consult an adviser for the latest status of these programs.
Phys. 105-4. General Astronomy. The methods and results of modern astronomy (solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology) at an elementary level.
Phys. 106-4. General Astronomy. Continuation of Phys. 105. Prer., Phys. 105.
Phys. 111-4. General Physics. First semester of 4-semester sequence for science and engineering students. Covers vectors, kinematics, dynamics, momentum of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, and introduction to thermodynamics. Prer., knowledge of algebra, geometry and trigonometry; Coreq., calculus through derivatives and indefinite and definite integrals of polynomials and trigonometric functions, as typically covered in Math. 140.
Phys. 112-4. General Physics. Covers electricity and magnetism. Prer., Phys. Ill; Coreq., Math. 241.
Phys. 114-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys. 112-4. One 2-hour lab. per wk.
Phys 133-1. Topics in Physics. Different 5-week course modules dealing with various topics in physics. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Phys. 199-variable credit. Independent Study for Lower Division’.
Phys. 201-5, 202-5. General Physics. Four demonstration lect. and one lab. per wk. Phys. 201: mechanics, heat, and sound; Phys. 202: electricity, light, and modern physics. An elementary but thorough presentation of the fundamental facts and principles of physics. Majors in mathematics, chemistry, and others taking calculus are urged to take Phys. Ill, 112, 114, 213, and 215. Prer., IV2 years high school algebra and satisfactory grade on mathematics placement test.
Phys. 213-3. General Physics. Covers wave motion, physical optics, and introduction to special relativity, quantum theory, and atomic physics. Prer., Phys. 112 and 114.
Phys. 214-3. Introductory Modern Physics. To be taken by physics majors and interested nonmajors. Introduces students to the nature of modern physics and provides majors with perspective on the frontiers of this field. Emphasis on concepts without mathematical developments. Includes relativity, atomic and nuclear physics, solid state and particle physics. Prer., Phys. 213.


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Phys. 215-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys. 213. One 2-hour lab. per wk.
Phys. 307-3. Physical Environmental Problems. Current environmental problems from the viewpoint of the physical sciences. Sources, effects, detection, and control of air, water, noise, radiation, and heavy metal pollutions. Factors affecting traffic movement and safety, and transportation alternatives which produce less pollution. Some lectures by outside experts. This course and Phys. 308 are designed as a complementary sequence but may be taken separately. Prer., one year of college science or mathematics.
Phys. 308-3. Energy. This course will examine the central role of energy in our environment. Topics will include the macroscopic flow of energy in the world, the conversion and degradation of energy, thermal pollution, and energy resources and consumption. Energy will be examined as an environmental problem and for its utility in solving problems. The implications of energy as a limit to population will be discussed. This course is designed to complement Phys. 307, but may be taken separately. Prer., one year of college science or mathematics.
Phys. 317-2, 318-2. Junior Laboratory. Contains experiments on data handling, electrical measurements, electronics, optics, vacuum techniques, heat and thermodynamics, mechanics, and modern physics. Emphasis will be on developing basic skills and on design of experiments. Each student will carry at least one project experiment each semester. Coreq., Phys. 321, 331, or consent of instructor.
Phys. 321-3. Classical Mechanics and Relativity. Topics covered include: Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, oscillations, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, central forces, and scattering. Analytical procedures employing the methods of vector analysis and calculus will be stressed. Prer., Phys. 214 and A. Math. 232, or equivalent.
Phys. 322-3. Classical Mechanics, Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics.
Topics covered include: noninertial reference frames, rigid body motion, coupled oscillators, introduction to quantum mechanics, Bohr theory, simple solutions to Schroedinger equation, and perturbation theory. Prer., Phys. 321.
Phys. 331-3, 332-3. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism. Elements of mathematical theory of electricity and magnetism, including magnetostatics, electrostatics, polarized media, direct and alternating current theory, and introduction to electromagnetic fields and waves. Prer. for Phys. 332: Phys. 331; Coreq. for Phys. 331: Phys. 321.
Phys. 341-3. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. Statistical mechanics applied to macroscopic physical systems; statistical thermodynamics, classical thermodynamic systems; applications to simple systems. The relationship of the statistical to the thermodynamic points of view is examined. Prer., Phys. 213.
Phys. 362-3. Sound, Music, and Noise. This course will consider the basic nature of sound waves, the musical scale, why musical instruments sound the way they do, the reproduction of sound, the ear and hearing, vocal communication, room acoustics, noise pollution, and the sonic boom. No prer. Although this course is mainly descriptive, some high school algebra will be used.
Phys. 363-1. Sound Laboratory. Laboratory course to accompany Phys. 362 as an option. Students will do an acoustical project on a subject of their own choice. Coreq. or prer., Phys. 362 or consent of instructor.
Phys. 431-3. Introduction to Radiation and Health Physics. Designed to introduce students to the physics of ionizing radiation (nuclear emissions and X-rays) and their applications. Subjects will include detection techniques, error analysis, half-life determinations, instrument design and calibration, and a brief study of the chemical and biological effects. An integral laboratory is included. Prer., Phys. 213, 215, and two semesters of calculus, general chemistry, and general biology.
Phys. 441-4. Sound Measurement and Noise Control. This course covers the basics of sound and hearing, the effects of noise, various ways to measure and analyze sound and noise, and techniques for noise control. Two lect., two lab. per week. An additional lecture or field trip may be substituted for a lab occasionally. Prer., one year of physics, or Phys. 362 and 363 and one year of calculus, or consent of instructor.
Phys. 451-3. Light. Basic electromagnetic theory of light using Maxwell’s equations. Examples in geometrical optics; extensive applications in physical optics including diffraction and polarization. Spectra, including Zeeman effect and fluorescence. Recent advances in experimental techniques; microwaves, optical masers, image converters, etc. Prer., Phys. 332.
Phys. 491-3, 492-3. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Topics include a quantum mechanical treatment of the one-electron atom, atomic shell structure, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, band theory of solids, X-rays, nuclear properties, radioactivity, and the properties of the fundamental particles. Prer., Phys. 322 and 332. Phys. 495-2, 496-2. Senior Laborotory. Individual project laboratory with emphasis on modern physical experimentation.
Phys. 499-variable credit. Independent Study for Upper Division. Students must check with a faculty members before taking this course.
PSYCHOLOGY
Majors should include college algebra in their lower division schedules and enroll in Math. 383 concurrently with Psych. 210. At least 30 semester hours and not more than 48 semester hours in psychology must be completed, with at least 16 hours in upper division courses. No grade below C in required psychology courses is acceptable toward the major.
Specific course requirements are as follows: Psych. 201-202; Psych. 210 or 211-212; at least one biotropic course, including Psych. 395, 405, 410, 412, 416, 420, 425, 439; at least one sociotropic course, including Psych. 364, 430, 431, 440, 445, 449, 464, 466, 471, 485, 493; at least one advanced laboratory course, including Psych. 416, 420, 440, and 485; and at least one integrative course, Psych. 451.
Psych. 100-3. Introduction to Psychology. A one-semester survey course for nonmajors. Covers such topics in psychology as personality, frustration and conflict, learning and memory, and the biological bases of behavior.
Psych. 133-1. Topics in Psychology. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in psychology. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Psych. 201-4. Living Systems I. (Biol. 201.) An interdisciplinary approach to the structure and function of living systems—cells, organisms, and populations. Emphasis on the behavioral aspects of and energy flow through each of the levels of organization analyzed. Lect., lab. and rec. sections.
Psych. 202-4. Living Systems II. (Biol. 202.) A continuation of Psych. 201.
Psych. 210-4. Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology. Research methods and analysis of data. Intended for those who plan to major in psychology. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and college algebra; prer. or coreq., Math. 383 (Statistics).
Psych. 245-3. Psychology of Social Problems. An examination of social psychological aspects of a variety of social issues and problems in contemporary society. Includes such topics as poverty or minority status, prejudice, drug use, student protest, and patterns of sexual behavior. Consideration of theory and research relative to the topics as well as the definition of social behavior as a “problem.”
Psych. 300-2. Honors Seminar. Current theoretical issues and problems in psychology. Prer., major in psychology and consent of instructor.
Psych. 320 3 and 321-3. Human Behavior and Maturation' Through the Life Span. Three hours lect. per week. Analysis of the normal range of behaviors found in each development stage from birth through senescence.
Psych. 340-3. Social Psychology of the Mexican American. Focuses on the relationship between sociocultural factors and the perceptual, cognitive, and motivational development of the Mexican American. Prer., 6 sem. hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 364-3. Child and Adolescent Psychology. Principles of normal development and patterns of child-rearing. Prer., 6 hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. (Biol. 395-3, An-thro. 395-3.) An interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution, his biological makeup, his development as a social being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Prer., at least one course in anthropology, biology, or psychology.


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Psych. 400-2. Honors Seminar. Topic to be determined. Prer., major in psychology, senior standing, and consent of instructor. Psych. 405-3. Physiological Psychology. The morphological, neuro-chemical, and physiological bases of behavior. Prer., Psych. 201, 202 and 6 additional hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 410-3. Behavioral Genetics. (Biol. 410-3.) The inheritance of behavioral characteristics. Prer., consent of instructor.
Psych. 414-3. Psychology of Thinking. Covers main theories and research findings in the area of cognition. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and 6 additional hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 416-4. Psychology of Perception. The study of sensory processes and of variables related to perception. Lect. and lab. Prer., Psych. 201, 202 and 210 or 211.
Psych. 420-4. Psychology of Learning. Conditions and applications of learning as found in experimental literature. Prer., Psych. 201,202 and 210 or 211.
Psych. 421-2. Theories of Learning and Motivation. An advanced survey of past and present major theoretical formulations in learning and motivation. Prer., Psych. 420 and consent of instructor. Psych. 425-3. Comparative Psychology. (Biol. 425-3.) Similarities and differences between animals. Principles of behavior in a variety of species. Prer., 6 hrs. of psychology or consent of instructor.
Psych. 430-3. Abnormal Psychology. Borderline disorders as extreme variations of the normal personality. Major functional and organic disorders. Theories of mental disorders and methods of psychotherapy. Not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych. 431. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and upper division standing.
Psych. 431-4. Psychopathology. Intensive analysis of the major theories of personality and behavior disorders. Open to majors only, and not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych. 430. Prer., Psych. 201-202, 6 additional hrs. of psychology, and upper division standing.
Psych. 433-3. Mental Hygiene. Psychological principles underlying the nature of mental and emotional health and a positive program for preventive and remedial treatment. Prer., Psych. 430 or 431 or consent of instructor.
Psych. 439-3. Animal Societies. (Biol. 439-3.) The behavior of animals in relation to one another. Relations within groups and between groups. Interaction between members of societies as determined by characteristics of the animals and their environments. Prer., Psych. 201-202, and consent of instructor.
Psych. 440-4. Social Psychology. Psychological principles underlying social behavior. Analysis of special topics such as attitude surveys, public opinion research, propaganda, intergroup relations. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and 210 or 211-212.
Psych. 445-3. Psychology of Personality. The physiological and psychological nature of personality. Individual differences. The development of personality. Prer., 16 sem. hrs. of psychology. Psych. 449-3. Cross-Cultural Psychology. The influence of culture and subculture on personality, including sex roles, patterns of child rearing, attitudes and values, and mental illness. Prer., 12 sem. hrs. of courses in psychology, sociology, and/or anthropology in any combination.
Psych. 451-3. History of Psychology. Development of psychological theories since 500 B.C. Schools of psychology and their adherents. Readings of primary and secondary sources. Prer., 16 sem. hrs. of psychology and senior standing.
Psych. 464-3. Developmental Psychology. Principles and theories of child development. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and 210 or 211-212.
Psych. 466-3. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Psychology of retarded, handicapped, and superior children. The relation of special traits to educational and social needs. Prer., Psych. 201-202, a course in developmental or child psychology, and upper division standing.
Psych. 467-2. Psychology of Mental Retardation. Psychological problems of mental deficiency. Concern with causes, identification characteristics, and treatment of the mentally retarded with an emphasis on research findings. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and 364 or 464.
Psych. 471-3. Survey of Clinical Psychology. Theories and practices relating to problems of ability and maladjustment. Diagnostic procedures and treatment methods with children and adults. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and Psych. 431, or consent of instructor. Psych. 472-3. Community Psychology. New approaches to preventing psychological distress detailed in terms of theory and practice. Special topics include “psychology in the streets,” the
creation of alternative institutions, and methods of consultation in poverty areas. Prer., at least 6 hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 485-4. Principles of Psychological Testing. Principles underlying construction, validation, and use of tests of ability and personality. Prer., Psych. 210 or 211-212.
Psych. 493-3. Industrial Psychology. Application of psychological principles and research findings to industrial problems, including problems of management, employees, and consumers, and such special topics as advertising, methods of appraisal, and human engineering. Prer., 6 sem. hrs. of psychology and a statistics course.
Psych. 494-3. Psychology of Sports. A survey of psychological conditions affecting performance in athletics. Includes assessment of psychological demands of sports, assessment of the athlete, preparation of the athlete for coping with the psychological demands of sports. Prer., 9 sem. hrs. in psychology.
Psych. 496-3. Performance Under Stress. Examines the processes which influence the effects of stress on performance in academic, vocational, and other interpersonal situations. Prer., Psych. 420.
Psych. 499-1, 2, 3. Independent Study. Prer., consent of instructor.
Division of Social Sciences
FREDERICK S. ALLEN, Assistant Dean
Important new problems confront society. The social sciences are vitally concerned with these problems, examples of which are the population explosion, urban concentration, rapidly changing technology, the strains of race relations, and the thrust of once under-developed societies. To approach these and other contemporary problems, education in the social sciences must identify key concepts and emphasize the basic analytical processes by which knowledge of human behavior is assembled. Such education must also include explorations among disciplines in the social sciences and between the social sciences and other disciplines.
The Division of Social Sciences includes the following disciplines: anthropology, economics, history, political science, and sociology. The division offers courses in the various disciplines, in interdisciplinary studies, and in preprofessional studies.
Students can satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in all the disciplines included in the division. The requirements for each major are explained before the course listings for the respective disciplines.
Students should be aware of the possibilities for a distributed studies major in the social sciences. The most usual combinations are economics and sociology, and history and political science. See the Special Programs section of this bulletin for details on a distributed studies major.
The division also has developed a major in urban studies. The program is designed to provide a broad educational experience for persons who are interested in careers related to the problems of urban life. The major is appropriate for students intending to enter the fields of business, law, medicine, or public school teaching, to work in or with federal, state, or local agencies or volunteer and community action groups, or to enter graduate programs in the social sciences or environmental planning. Interested students should contact the Division of Social Sciences office for informa-


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tion concerning advisers, requirements, courses currently offered and proposed, and options involved in the program.
For preprofessional programs, see listings and requirements in that section of this bulletin.
Description of Courses and Programs
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.
ANTHROPOLOGY
Majors in anthropology must take Anthro. 103 and 104, Principles of Anthropology I and II, or demonstrate knowledge of materials covered by these courses. Majors also must take Anthro. 201 and 202, Introduction to Physical Anthropology I and II; Anthro. 407, History of Anthropology; and either Anthro.. 280, Nature of Language; or Anthro. 480, Anthropological Linguistics; or Anthro. 481, Language and Culture.
Anthro. 103-3. Principles of Anthropology I. Physical anthropology and archaeology. Evolution of man; his physical and cultural development from his beginnings through the rise of early civilization. Includes consideration of man as a biological organism, his origin and relationship with nonhuman and prehuman primates and development of culture as an adaptive device. Anthro. 104-3. Principles of Anthropology II. Cultural-social anthropology and linguistics. Study of man from the standpoint of the many and varied cultures he has manifested through time to the present. Survey of relationships between environment, technology, social organization, language, and ideology. Nature of anthropology and its analysis of the similarities and differences in human cultural adaptations.
Anthro. 201-4. Introduction to Physical Anthropology I. Theory of biological evolution; examination of man’s organic structure, function, and behavior from an evolutionary-comparative perspective; analysis of fossil evidence of human evolution. Laboratory work emphasizing osteometry and osteology.
Anthro. 202-4. Introduction to Physical Anthropology II. On-going human evolution with emphasis on quantitative assessment of genetic variation in man.
Anthro. 220-3. Principles of Archaeology. Basic introduction to concepts, techniques, and theory of archaeological excavation and interpretation. Two lect., 1 two-hour lab. per week. Lectures, demonstrations, and practical work.
Anthro. 227-3. The Evolution of New World Culture. Cultural evolution in the New World from the earliest hunting cultures through the rise of civilization as seen from the perspective of archaeological evidence and theory.
Anthro. 240-3. Principles of Ethnology. Intensive survey of concepts, methods, and objectives in the comparative study of world cultures. Comparative analysis of selected ethnographic materials within a framework of sociocultural evolution and cultural ecology. Introductory techniques of fieldwork, library research, and report writing.
Anthro. 280-3. The Nature of Language. Survey of languages of the world and their historical relationships. Introduction to language analysis. Study of theories of the origin of language, its relationship to other forms of communication, to cognition, and to systems of writing.
Anthro. 310-3. Cultural Pluralism. The cultural and social anthropology of the plural ethnic and racial component of modern complex societies (nation-states). The focus will be on the forms and processes of sociocultural identity, its maintenance and change with national integration. Although comparative across nations, there will be an emphasis on U.S. society.
Anthro. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. (Biol. 395-3; Psych. 395-3.) Interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution, his biological makeup, his development as a social
being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-discussion sessions. Prer., one course in anthropology, biology, or psychology. Anthro. 399-3. Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology. Directed investigation of a specific topic of current importance. The topic may be within the subfields of anthropology or interdisciplinary with anthropology. Prearranged topics will be announced. Prer., consent of instructor.
Anthro. 407-3. History of Anthropology. Foundations and development of major concepts and approaches (theory and method) in the study of man and culture. Discussion of principal contributors and their works to mid-20th century. Prer., anthropology major or consent of instructor.
Anthro. 408-3. Recent Trends in Anthropology. Current directions in socio-cultural theory, method and technique as exemplified in the reported research and theoretical works of major anthropologists from mid-20th century to the present. Prer., anthropology major or consent of instructor.
Anthro. 410-3. Race and Man. Concepts of human race: history, theory, and applications thereof. Biological factors in the establishment and maintenance of human diversity.
Anthro. 411-3. Human Paleontology. Detailed consideration of the fossil evidence for human evolution. History, description, interpretation of key fossils, and review of current and controversial issues.
Anthro. 412-3. Advanced Physical Anthropology. Introduction to population genetics and its application to understanding problems of process in human evolution and the formation of races in man.
Anthro. 414-3. Primatology. Survey of the Primate Order in evolution. Morphology and behavior from a comparative point of view, with emphasis on issues related to the origin and evolution of the most social member of this order.
Anthro. 416-3. Ecology, Adaptation and Culture. Culture, culture change, and evolution from the perspective of human behavioral adaptations to environmental variables. A general systems, multifactorial (sociocultural and biophysical) approach to cause and effect.
Anthro. 417-3. Human Ethology. Ethological principles and their application to anthropological investigations. Methods and techniques of data collection. Practice in the assessment of behavior in natural settings.
Anthro. 420-3. North American Archaeology. Prehistoric and proto-historic cultures of North America, excluding the American Southwest, emphasizing materials which form a basis for regional cultural reconstructions.
Anthro. 421-3. Archaeology of the American Southwest. Prehistoric cultures of the southwestern U.S. and adjacent Mexico, their origins, characteristics, and interrelationships.
Anthro. 422-3. Archaeology of Mesoamerica. Prehistoric and proto-historic cultures of Mexico and northern Central America, including the Aztecs and the Maya.
Anthro. 423-3. Plains Archaeology. Prehistoric and protohistoric cultures of the Great Plains, their origins, characteristics, and relationships.
Anthro. 431-3. Applied Cultural Anthropology. Concepts, methods, and problems in the application of anthropology to community and institution organization, development and administration; exemplified through analysis and discussion of U.S. and cross-cultural case materials. Urban and medical problems as well as ethical issues to be included.
Anthro. 434-3. Psychological Anthropology. A comparative study of the relationship between culture and social character and between culture and individual personality. Anthropological perspectives on the effects of various sociocultural contexts on individual experience. The relationships of sociocultural situations to motives, values, cognition, personal adjustment, stress, and qualities of personal experience are emphasized.
Anthro. 435-3. Culture Process — Maintenance, Change, and Evolution'. Theories and perspectives in the study of culture process. Analysis and discussion of case materials dealing with persistence, innovation, situations of culture contact and acculturation, directed change and resistance, and long-term sociocultural development.
Anthro. 436-3. The American Indian in Contemporary Society. Beginning with the historical background on American Indian acculturation and persistence, but emphasizing the present-day relations between Indian communities and the dominant society, stressing conditions and events in Denver and the Southwest generally.


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Anthro. 440-3. Comparative Social Organization. Principles in the comparative study of human social systems, types of social structure, social control, sociocultural integration, and processes of social change and societal development. Focus on the analysis of ethnographies. Prer., Anthro. 240 or 407, or consent of instructor.
Anthro. 443-3. Economic Anthropology. Cross-cultural survey and comparison of economic systems. Economic structures and their functional relationships with other social institutions in a range of societies from simple to complex.
Anthro. 444-3. Urban Anthropology. An anthropological approach to the comparative study of factors influencing urbanization in different parts of the world along with the implications of environments, economy, values, and psychology of urban living in general. Cross-cultural, but with emphasis on the modern western world.
Anthro. 450-3. Family Dynamics. The course examines processes of change in values, roles, and relations involved in marriage and family structure, using contemporary cross-cultural materials leading to understanding of such problems as generation gap and sex role change. Special attention is given to changing structure of authority, economics, and the emotional components associated with marriage and family life of today’s America.
Anthro. 481-3. Language and Culture. The course explores the relationships between culture and language in the following contexts: language acquisition, language and individual, social dialects, language and education, language and world view, the role of language in cultural interaction and social structure, planned language change including language problems in new nations and at the international level.
Each course listed below will cover the major aspects of cultural and social anthropological interest relating to the peoples and cultural systems within the areas indicated. Following a survey of the geographical affiliations of the inhabitants, the culture-history of the area will be reviewed. The ways of life of the indigenous populations, their relations with each other and to other peoples, and the effects of culture change will be discussed.
Anthro. 452-3. Ethnography of the American Southwest.
Anthro. 453-3. Ethnography of Mexico and Central America.
Anthro. 454-3. Ethnography of Andean South America.
Anthro. 455-3. Ethnography of the Plains Indians.
Anthro. 470-3. Ethnography of China, Japan, and Korea.
Anthro. 474-3. Ethnography of India, Pakistan, and Ceylon.
Anthro. 476-3. Ethnography of Southeast Asia.
ECONOMICS
Students majoring in economics must take a minimum of 30 and not more than 48 semester hours in economics, of which 22 must be in upper division courses. The following courses are required of all economics majors: Econ. 407-408; either Math. 107-108 and Econ. 380, or Math. 140, 241, 242 (students planning to go to graduate school in economics should take the latter option); Econ. 381 and Computer Science 201 (Introduction to Computing). Majors are urged to take Econ. 380 and 381 as soon as possible, and prior to or in conjunction with Econ. 407 and 408.
Students majoring in distributed studies may make economics their primary area of concentration by taking 30 semester hours in economics. Required courses for this option are Econ. 407-408 and a course in statistics.
For all courses numbered above 300, the prerequisite, unless otherwise indicated, is Econ. 201 and 202, or Econ. 300.
Introductory Courses
Econ. 201-3. Principles of Economics I. Purpose is to teach fundamental principles, to open the field of economics in the way most helpful to further and more detailed study of special problems, and to give those not intending to specialize in the subject an outline of the general principles of economics (macroeconomics). Open to qualified freshmen.
Econ. 202-3. Principles of Economics II. Continuation of Econ. 201 (microeconomics). Prer., Econ. 201.
Econ. 250-3. Capitalism and Slavery I. History of the development of slavery as an American institution from 1619 to 1970. Includes growth of the slave trade, development of the plantation system, stimulation of the American economy by slavery, economic implications of the Civil War, theoretical freeing of the slaves in 1863, and the development of modern slavery in America from Reconstruction to the present.
Econ'. 251-3. Capitalism and Slavery II. Continuation of Econ. 250. Econ. 300-3. Accelerated Principles of Economics. Condensation of Econ. 201 and 202. Intended for students who have taken Soc. Sci. 210 and 211. Open to seniors without prerequisite. Not open to students who have taken Econ. 201 and 202.
Econ. 379-3. Consumer Economics. Application of microeconomics to the problems of the ordinary consumer: budget management, purchases, interest, etc. Intended for nonmajors.
Econ. 380-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Economics I. Introduction to the use of mathematics in economics research. Prer., Math. 107 and 108; Econ. 201 and 202.
Econ. 381-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in' Economics II. Introduction to statistical methods and their application to quantitative economic research. Prer., Econ. 381 and 201 and 202.
Econ. 481-3. Introduction to Econometrics. The application of mathematical and statistical techniques to problems of economic theory. Emphasis is on principles rather than computational methods or mathematical rigor. Major topics include demand, production, and cost analysis. Prer., two semesters of calculus and one semester of statistics, or consent of instructor.
Econ. 482-3. Introduction to Econometrics II. Continuation of Econ. 481. Prer., Econ. 481.
Economic Theory and Thought General Courses
Econ. 201 and 202. See Introductory Courses section.
Econ. 300-3. See Introductory Courses section.
Econ. 403-3. The Price System. Course in microeconomics designed for teachers and other nonmajors. Production, price, and distribution theory in a free-market system. Assumptions and conditions of a free-market and other market structures.
Econ. 404-3. Income, Employment, and Economic Activity. Course in macroeconomics designed for teachers and other nonmajors. Theory and applications of national income determination, the role of money in the economy, and economic growth. Policy problems in dealing with unemployment, inflation, growth, and our international balance of payments.
Econ. 407-3. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Production, price, and distribution theory. Study of value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market structures, with special reference to the contribution of modern economic theorists. Econ. 408-3. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. National income and employment theory. Emphasis on national income analysis, contemporary theories of consumption, investment, and employment.
Econ. 409-3. History of Economic Thought. Survey of the development of economic thought from ancient to modern times.
Econ. 410-3. Radical Political Economy. An introduction to modern radical economics, emphasizing Marxian critiques of capitalism: Marx’s theory of capitalist development; contemporary analyses and empirical studies of monopoly capitalism and imperialism; Marxian views of the future of capitalism; mainstream critiques of radical political economics.
Econ. 492-variable credit. Special Economic Problems. (For majors in economics; others by consent of instructor.) Designed to give seniors a chance to evaluate critically some practical or theoretical problems under supervision, and to present results of their thinking to fellow students and instructors for critical evaluation.


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Econ. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required.
Fiscal and Monetary Theory and Policy;
Public Finance
Econ. 411-3. Monetary and Banking Systems. Survey of major monetary and financial institutions, such as commercial banks, Federal Reserve System, and savings institutions, and the structure of debt from the standpoint of how their operation affects the money supply and its circulation.
Econ. 412-3. Monetary Theory and Policy. Theories of inflation and deflation and their effects upon economic growth and prosperity. Goals of monetary policy; problems involved in trying to achieve these goals; survey of some recent monetary policies in action.
Econ. 421-3. Public Finance I. Taxation, public expenditures, debts, and fiscal policy. Role of public finance in times of peace and war. National, state, and local taxation, with some special attention to the state of Colorado.
Econ. 422-3. Public Finance II. Continuation of Public Finance I. Either course may be taken separately.
International Economics and Economic Development
Econ. 441-3. International Trade and Finance. Theories of interregional and international trade, private and public trade, world population and resources, tariffs, and commercial policy. International economic organization.
Econ. 477-3. Economic Development—Theory and Problems I. Theoretical and empirical analysis of problems of economic development in both underdeveloped and advanced countries.
Econ. 478-3. Economic Development—Theory and Problems II. Current conditions of economic development, with emphasis on accelerating and maintaining growth.
Econ. 487-3. Economic Development of Latin America. Current problems of economic development in Latin America.
Econ. 489-3. The Economics of Africa and the Middle East. Current problems of development faced by African and Middle Eastern economies. Emphasis on case studies, regionalism, planning, and ramification of economic change.
Economic History, Systems, and Institutions
Ecort. 250 and 251. See Introductory Courses section.
Econ. 451-3. Economic History of Europe. Evolution of industrial society with emphasis upon the growth and development of English industry and commerce.
Econ. 452-3. Economic History of the United States. American economic organization and institutions and their development from colonial times to the present.
Econ. 471-3. Comparative Economic Systems. Critical study of socialism, capitalism, communism, cooperatives, and other proposed economic systems.
Human Resources Economics and Labor Economics
Econ. 460-3. Introduction to Human Resources. Economics of investments in man, including the economics of poverty and the application of cost benefit analysis to social welfare programs. Econ. 461-3. Labor Economics. Study of problems associated with determination of wages, hours, and working conditions in the American economy. History and analysis of economic effects of trade unionism and other social institutions, including agencies of formal government which have been developed to promote equality of bargaining power between labor, management, and the public.
Econ. 462-3. Economics of Collective Bargaining. Scientific analysis of processes by which labor and management democratically reach agreements; how differences between labor and management are settled by means of grievance procedure and arbitration; and overall economic effect of collective bargaining on goods produced by the national economy. Demonstrations, workshops, and lectures.
Econ. 463-3. Income Security. Development of social insurance in various countries, with emphasis on the United States. Security in old age, unemployment, accident, sickness, and other income-
loss situations. Economic analysis of costs and risks of social security; types of carriers, problems of administration. Critical examination of recent American social security legislation.
Econ. 464-3. Collective Bargaining, Labor Law, and Administration'. Study of social pressures that are shaped into labor policy acceptable to labor, management, and the general public by various means of social control. Evolution of a “common law” of labor relations out of free collective bargaining and arbitration. Prer., senior status.
Government and Business; Industrial Organization
Ecort. 456-3. Economics of Agriculture. Economic analysis of the agricultural sector and of problems and policies related to agriculture and other primary industries.
Econ. 469-3. Government in the Economy. Analysis of the role of government in the economy, neo-classical microeconomic theory as a point of departure for understanding what a free market system can and cannot accomplish. Prer., Econ. 403 or equivalent.
Econ. 474-3. Economic Organization of American Industry. Structure and performance of some important American manufacturing industries.
Ecort. 476-3. Government Regulation of Business. Economic characteristics of public utilities and analysis of problems of regulation and control.
Urban, Regional, and Environmental Economics
Econ. 425-3. Urban Economics. Analysis of the level, distribution, stability, and growth of income and employment in urban regions. Urban poverty, housing, land use, transportation, and local public services, with special reference to economic efficiency and social progress.
Econ. 453-3. Resource Economics. Application of economic theory to resource-oriented industries.
HISTORY
Undergraduate students majoring in history must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in history, 16 of which must be upper division. Not more than 45 hours in the student’s major area will count toward the 120-hour requirement. As of fall 1973, a student must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or better in the major to graduate.
A history major may fulfill his lower division course requirements through any one of the following three options:
1. Hist. 101 and 102;
2. Any two 200-level courses in Ancient, European, African, or Asian history;
3. Either Hist. 101 or 102, plus one 200-level course in Ancient, European, African, or Asian history;
Plus any one of the following three options:
4. Hist. 150, plus either Soc. Sci. 210 or 211;
5. Hist. 150, plus any 200-level course in American or Latin American history;
6. Any two 200-level courses in American or Latin American history.
Hist. 101-3. History of Western Civilization I. Contributions of Greek thought; Roman and Christian elements in early European civilization; rise of Islam; feudalism; conflict of papacy and empire; medieval learning, literature, and art; rise of dynastic states; the Reformation; the age of discovery; thought and culture in the early modern period.
Hist. 102-3. History of Western Civilization II. Scientific revolution; French absolutism and English constitutionalism, theory, and practice; rise of Russia and Prussia; the Enlightenment; French Revolution and spread of Liberalism and Nationalism; evolution of an industrial society; Romanticism and Realism; the unification of Italy and Germany; Imperialism; the age of World Wars; Totalitarianism; contemporary European philosophy, art and science.


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Hist. 150-3. Introduction to United States History. Survey of American history from colonial times to the 1960s. Emphasis on the major forces and events that have shaped American society. Hist. 215-3. Afro-American History I. Major emphasis on the events that have occurred in the life of the Afro-American from the time of his first landing in the U.S. to the present.
Hist. 216-3. Afro-American History II. Continuation of Hist. 215. Hist. 250-3. Topics in American History. Topical approach to American history, surveying the major forces that have affected the development of the United States and treating each topic as a complete unit. Suggested background: Hist. 150.
Hist. 258-3. History of Colorado.
Hist. 271-3. History of the Modern Far East I. An introduction to Asian civilization. Focus on Japan, China, and Southeast Asia in the 19th century.
Hist. 272-3. History of the Modern Far East II. Asia in world affairs. Focus on Japan, China, and Southeast Asia in the 20th century. Hist. 281-3. History of Latin America I. An introduction to Latin civilization in America. Focus on period before independence. Hist. 282-3. History of Latin America II. Latin America since independence. Focus on Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.
Hist. 384-3. History of the Mexican-Americons in Colorado. A history of the Mexican-American experience in Colorado with emphasis on 20th century urbanization, especially within the Denver metropolitan area.
Hist. 395-3. Problems in African History.
Hist. 405-3. The Rocky Mountain West. Emphasis will be on growth and change in Colorado.
Hist 406-3. History of the British Empire/Commonwealth. Analysis of development, administration, and dissolution of the empire.
Hist. 423-3. Europe During the Renaissance. Social and intellectual history of Europe from the 14th to the 16th centuries.
Hist. 424-3. Europe During the Reformation. Social and intellectual history of Europe from the 16th to the 18 th centuries.
Hist. 430-3. France Since 1815. A topical approach to the evolution of modern France. The topics are essentially political, economic, and cultural.
Hist. 431-3. Nineteenth Century Europe. Social and economic change in the political and intellectual context between 1789 and 1914. Suggested background, Hist. 102.
Hist. 432-3. Twentieth Century Europe. Social and economic change in the political and intellectual context between 1914 and 1970. Suggested background, Hist. 102.
Hist 437-3. International History of Europe in the 19th Century. The
diplomatic process, major crises, leading personalities, interaction between domestic and foreign policies, reflections on causes and consequences of war. Suggested background, Hist. 102 or 431.
Hist. 438-3. International History of Europe in the 20th Century. International organization and traditional diplomacy. The Versailles settlement, the rise of revisionist powers, causes of World War II, wartime diplomacy, the Cold War, and decline of Europe’s position in the world. Suggested background, Hist. 102 or 432.
Hist. 441-3. History of Africa to 1840. Part I of a two-semester sequence introducing the student to political, economic, and cultural change in Africa.
Hist. 442-3. History of Africa From 1840. Part II of a two-semester sequence introducing the student to political, economic, and cultural change in Africa.
Hist. 445-3. Social and Economic Change in African History. An
examination of change in African life. Emphasis on new directions in commerce, agriculture, labor, religion, family structure, and urbanization.
Hist. 446-3. History of Ireland. Analysis of the relationship between the English and the Irish from the Irish perspective.
Hist. 449-3. The Gilded Age: U.S. History 1865-1900. A study of the evolution and growth of major American institutions since the Civil War. Topics will include the rise of heavy industry, the growth of the city, emergence of “big politics,” changes in religion, social thought, manners and morals, and many others.
Hist. 450-3. A Political History of Africa. An analysis of the variety of political units in Africa and the ways in which they have changed.
Hist. 453-3. Civil War and Reconstruction. Focuses on events leading to the outbreak of war, the war itself and its impact on North and South, and the efforts to reconstruct Southern society during the post-war period.
Hist. 454-3. The Progressive Movement and After, 1900-1929. Domestic affairs and foreign policy. In domestic affairs, emphasis on the Progressive Movement and the reaction against it in the twenties. In foreign affairs, emphasis on slowly increasing but reluctant participation in world power politics.
Hist. 455-3. Recent America, 1929 to Present. Major trends in U.S. history since the Great Crash, emphasizing the changing role of the federal government in total national life, and the development of the spirit of internationalism in foreign policy. Suggested background, Hist. 454.
Hist. 456-3. The Jacksonian Era. Study of a period of change and conflict. Emphasis on conditions that produced striking alterations in the social, psychological, and economic organization of the United States, as well as violence and war.
Hist. 460-3. Mexican American Southwest. The history of Mexican Americans from the origins of the Aztec Empire to modern times. Emphasis on the fusion of Spanish and Indian cultures in Mexico and the Southwest, the development of Mexican American society, and its relations to American society.
Hist. 463-3. American Society and Thought to 1865. Analysis of social ideas to 1865, and the impact of these ideas on American society.
Hist. 464-3. American’ Society and Thought Since 1865. Analysis of social ideas since 1865, and the impact of these ideas on American society.
Hist. 465-3. History of American Economic Growth I. Study of English mercantilism in the American Colonies and the development of the early national economy in the 1850s.
Hist. 466-3. History of American Economic Growth II. Study of industrialization during and since the Civil War, America’s role as a world economic power, the great depression of the 1930s, and internal developments since 1945.
Hist. 467-3. Diplomatic History of the United States to 1900. The
development of American foreign policy, emphasizing the evolution of the basic policy of isolation from European affairs and increasing involvement in the Pacific and East Asia.
Hist. 468-3. Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1900. The conflict between isolationism and internationalism in American foreign policy, ending in the triumph of the latter. Suggested background, Hist. 467.
Hist. 469-3. The Old South and National Disunion. Early development of the southern United States, the institution of slavery, and the sectional conflict leading to national disunion.
Hist. 470-3. History of Urban America. Development of the American city from colonial times to the present. The chief focus of the course will be upon major changes in the process of urbanization. Subjects will include town promotion, rise of heavy industrial cities, utopian towns, emergence of the city “boss,” urban transportation, and the future of American cities. Hist. 473-3. History of China. Deals with traditional China covering a period from the “beginning” to the mid-19th century. Both descriptive and interpretive approaches are employed, concentrating on those “factors” (intellectual, social, political, technological, economic, et al.) involved in the development of the Chinese civilization. In the attempt to understand the problems and challenges confronting the Chinese, it is hoped that the course will provide an appreciation for the Chinese and Chinese history and their relationship to our own world.
Hist. 474-3. History of China. A combination of descriptive material with a broad analytical base is applied to an investigation of the emergence and development of modern China. The aim of the course is to both sketch and analyze the dimensions of the “Chinese crisis” compounded of dynastic and Imperial collapse, imperialist incursions, social, political, and intellectual re-orientation, the plight of a people ravaged by poverty, oppression, and war, and the dramatic re-shaping of 20th-century China caught in the throes of national and social revolution.
Hist. 479-3. United States Military History to 1900. Development of the military and naval art of war in American history, in both its peacetime and wartime aspects, from colonial times to the end of the Spanish-American war. Emphasizing the increasing influence of technology on warfare after 1850.
Hist. 480-3. United States Military History since 1900. American military and naval history since the Spanish-American War,


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presented as a continuing evolution in both war and peace and emphasizing the dominating influence of technology upon operations, organization, and policies.
Hist. 481-3. Mexico and Central America Since Independence I.
Study of society, economics, and politics in the 19th century.
Hist. 482-3. Mexico and Central America Since Independence II.
Study of society, economics, and politics in the 20th century.
Hist. 483-3. Mexican American History. Study of Chicano history from origins of Aztec Empire to Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848).
Hist. 484-3. Mexican American Southwest. History of Chicano experience in Southwest since 1848 to modern times.
Hist. 487-3. History of Colonialism in Southern Africa. Analysis of European and Aslan communities in Africa: their origins and development and their relations with the indigenous African population.
Hist. 489-3. The Modern Near East, 1789 to the Present. Emphasis on the modernization of the region from Egypt through Persia, Anatolia, and Arabia, not only in political terms, but also in terms of the economic, social, and intellectual changes which have transformed the Near East in the last century and a half. Hist. 492-3. The Second World War. Basically a military-political orientation, examining the grand strategy, diplomacy, and campaigns of the war in some detail. Emphasizes the influence of technology upon the conflict.
Hist. 494-3. Imperial Russia. The Old Regime, industrialization, and culture in the 19th century.
Hist. 495-3. The Russian Revolution. Origins of the revolutionary movement, and Revolution of 1905, reform efforts, the impact of World War I, the Bolshevik victory in 1917, the Civil Wars.
Hist. 496-3. The Soviet Regime. Rise of Stalin, economic development 1928-1938, impact of World War II, the Khrushchev era.
Hist. 498-3. Senior Colloquium. Readings and discussion of eminent modern historians and their writings. Recommended but not required for senior history majors.
Hist. 499-voriable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours in political science, of which at least 21 semester hours must be in upper division courses. Courses must be distributed among the primary fields as listed in this bulletin, i.e., American government and politics, comparative politics, international relations, public administration, and political theory and public law. The major must include the following: Pol. Sci. 100, 110, 200, 440, and 441; Econ. 201 and 202; and one upper division course in each of the primary fields of political science. In addition, it is strongly recommended that all majors enroll for Pol. Sci. 201, 202 (or the Pol. Sci. 211-212 sequence) and 445.
For all courses numbered 300 and above, the prerequisite, unless otherwise indicated, is either the Pol. Sci. 100-110 sequence or consent of the instructor.
American Government and Politics
Pol.Sci. 100-3. Introduction to Political Science. Introduction to the study of politics and the political system and its environment. Designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts of political science, features of the political process, types of political institutions, and political behavior. Required of all majors.
Pol.Sci. 110-3. The American Political System. General introduction to the American political system with emphasis upon the interrelations among the various levels and branches of government, formal and informal institutions, processes, and behavior. Required of all majors. Prer., Pol.Sci. 100. Not open to those who have had Pol.Sci. 101 and/or 102.
Pol.Sci. 200-3. Research in Contemporary Political Topics. Application of basic political concepts to current political problems. Emphasis on the relationship between theories of political action and empirical tests of these theories. Prer., Pol. Sci. 100. Pol.Sci. 210-3. Power in American Society. Who has power in the United States; how is power distributed and used; what are the sources of power and legitimacy; checks and potential checks on decision making by the powerful; consequences of power allocation and use for citizen well-being; continuity and change in the structure of power in America. Prer., Pol.Sci. 110 or consent of instructor.
Pol.Sci. 400-3. Government Regulation of Business. Consideration of theory and practice of government relationship to business and professional activity on both state and national levels. Analysis of selected regulatory programs and policies (Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federal Trade Commission Act) and their impact on the constitutional system.
Pol.Sci. 402-3. Legislatures and Legislation. Structure and organization of legislatures and process of statute lawmaking; political forces and interest groups; problems of representation and the public interest.
Pol.Sci. 403-3. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. History and practice of party politics in the United States. Nature, structure, organization, and functions of political parties and pressure groups. Analysis of pressure politics and political behavior.
Pol. Sci. 404-3. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. Continuation of Pol. Sci. 403.
Pol.Sci 405-3. Public Opinion and Political Behavior. Theories of public opinion and propaganda; the formation, management, and measurement of political attitudes; behavior of men and groups in politics, especially Americans. Systematic consequences of political attitudes.
Pol.Sci. 406-3. State Government and Administration. Present-day national, state and interstate relations; constitutional development; legislative, executive, and judicial processes and problems; administrative organization and reorganization; state finances; major state services; future of the states. Special attention to the government of Colorado.
Pol.Sci. 407-3. Urban Politics. Examination of the structure of political and social influence in urban areas; selection of urban leadership; relationship of the political system to governmental and social institutions.
Pol.Sci. 408-3. Municipal Government and Administration. Municipalities and their relations to the states and the national government; local politics; forms of municipal government; application of ideas and techniques of public administration to management of municipal affairs; activities of cities, e.g., planning, public utilities, law enforcement, and fire protection.
Pol.Sci. 409-3. Comparative Metropolitan Systems. Comparative analysis of the major metropolitan systems in different countries; the structural environment, decision making in the bureaucracies and political groupings, governmental interaction and communication.
Pol.Sci. 451-3. Black Politics. Examination of black politics in the United States: the role of black interest groups, structure and functions of black political organizations, goals and political styles of black politicians, trends and the future of black politics in the United States.
See also Pol. Sci. 435 and 439 listed under Public Administration.
Comparative Politics
Pol.Sci. 201-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics I: Technological Societies. Comparison of legal-institutional features; social, economic, and ideological forces; and patterns of recruitment and decision making; patterns of political-system maintenance and change. Emphasis on persistent elements and postwar innovations in Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. Not open to those who have had Pol.Sci. 211 and/or 212.
Pol.Sci. 202-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics II: Pretechnologi-cal Societies. Comparison of the basic political features of the economically developing polities within the non-Western world. The traditional political culture, nationalism, political integration, political structures, political groups in developing societies, modes of political recruitment, the style of development politics and political implications of planned socioeconomic change; evolution and revolution in the third world.


40 / University of Colorado at Denver
Pol.Sci. 410-3. Advanced Comparative Politics—Western Europe. An
intensive and comparative analysis of the political systems and processes of Western Europe. Emphasis on political culture and constitutionalism; executive-legislative relationships: electoral systems; political parties and interest groups; administrative and judicial processes; and the impact of social changes on political institutions. Prer., Pol.Sci. 201 or consent of instructor. Pol.Sci. 411-3. Advanced Comparative Politics—Third World. An intensive comparative examination of the political process in the non-Western world. Survey of different methodological approaches to the study of the non-Western political systems. The components of political development. Effective political units in a transitional society. Prevailing “styles” of political action, including the use of violence.
Pol.Sci. 413-3. Political Behavior and Political Systems in Latin America. Governments and politics of selected countries of Latin America. Politics and government in theory and practice. Political parties, movements, and conflicts. The relationships between political problems and physical and social environments.
Pol.Sci. 415-3. Political Systems of the Middle East and North Africa. Comparative analysis of the major parameters of the political process in the Middle East and North Africa. Islamic political theory and its contemporary manifestation. The role of nationalism and the “quest for modernity” in the political development of this region. Parties and programmed modernization in transitional polities. Violent and nonviolent change.
Pol.Sci. 416-3. Politics and Government of East Asia. Political and governmental changes within China, Japan, and Korea from the 19th century to the present. Primary emphasis on contemporary political systems and sociopolitical problems.
Pol.Sci. 418-3. Politics of Southeast Asia. Impact of the West on political theory and institutions in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Constitutions, political parties, movements, and conflicts. Influence of geographical, economic, and social factors on the political systems in each country.
Pol.Sci. 419-3. Political Systems of Sub-Saharan Africa. Analysis of major types of political systems in sub-Saharan Africa and intensive case studies of selected countries exemplifying each type. Anticolonial movement, adoption and rejection of Western political institutions and values. Special political problems of multiracial and multicultural societies.
Pol.Sci. 460-3. Politics of South Asia. Study of the political and administrative systems of India, Pakistan, Ceylon, and Nepal. Impact of British rule on development of political institutions on the subcontinent as well as problems of political development at all levels.
International Relations
Pol.Sci. 421-3. International Politics. The system of national states, concepts of national interest, goals of foreign policies, conduct of diplomacy, and the bearing of these elements on the problem of peace. Presentation and evaluation of the solutions that have been offered for the maintenance of peace. Great powers and regions of the earth in international politics today, and their roles in international tensions.
Pol.Sci. 423-3. American Foreign Policy. Examination of the foundations, assumptions, objectives, and methods of U.S. foreign policy. Special attention to the revolutionary international environment and to adaptations thereto.
Pol.Sci. 428-3. International Behavior. Presentation of alternate theoretical frameworks for the explanation of international processes. Theories of conflict behavior and social organization applied to problems of war and peace. Major emphasis on the role of systematic empirical research in the development of theories of international behavior.
Pol.Sci. 472-3. Soviet and Chinese Foreign Policy. Foreign policies of the Soviet Union and of Communist China, including Sino-Soviet conflict; including the international Communist movement, its ideological bases, impact on international politics, and its relations to domestic developments in the U.S.S.R.
Pol.Sci. 473-3. The Middle East and World Affairs. Evolution and revolution in the Middle East. The character of nationalism in the area. Analysis of intraregional and international problems affecting the Middle East with special emphasis on the Arab-Israeli imbroglio. Impact of major-power intervention.
Pol.Sci. 474-3. Sub-Saharan Africa in World Affairs. An examination of the international behavior of the new Africa. Includes pre-
independence antecedents and post-independence determinants, motives, techniques, and results of African state relations in the inter-African and world-wide settings. Impact of major-power intervention.
Pol.Sci. 475-3. Africa in U.S. Foreign Policy. Examination of historical background, assumptions, objectives, methods, and results of U.S. policy toward black Africa. Special attention to areas under foreign or minority rule, ethnic factors, potency of economic and political variables, and stresses between alliance policy and sympathy for self-determination.
Pol.Sci. 476-3. International Relations in the Far East. Developments and problems in the modern-day relations of China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and the Western powers. The Far East in world politics today.
Pol.Sci. 477-3. Latin America in World Politics. Basic elements in Latin American international relations. United States-Latin American relations and policies. Foreign policy formulation in major Latin American republic.
Public Administration
Pol. Sci. 406 and 408 may be used by majors in political science to satisfy the requirement in the field of public administration.
Pol.Sci. 432-3. Public Administration. Role of administration in government; trends in American public administration; techniques of management; theories of public administration.
Pol.Sci. 435-3. Natural Resources: Policy and Administration. Resources in the American economy; consideration of constitutional, political, and geographic factors in the development of resources policy; organization, procedures, and programs for administration and development of natural resources.
Pol.Sci. 437-3. Public Financial Administration. Governmental fiscal policy, administrative organization for fiscal administration in governmental units, revenue administration, budgeting, preaudit and postaudit, treasury management and debt administration, purchasing, financial reporting. Economic sources of political corruption.
Pol.Sci. 439-3. National Policies and Administration. Major policies and programs of the national government and their administration; the role of the President and other administrators in formulating public policy; problems of centralization and public accountability.
Political Theory and Public Law
Pol.Sci. 420-3. Theories of Social and Political Change. Conservative, radical, and incremental approaches to change. Role of psychological and sociological factors in political change. Comparative perspectives on change. Self-perpetuation processes of power systems and their vulnerabilities. Requisites of system maintenance and system change. Selected case studies.
Pol.Sci. 440-3. Early Political Thought. Main currents of political thought in their historical setting from Plato to the 17th century, with a critical evaluation of those elements of continuing worth.
Pol.Sci. 441-3. Modern Political Thought. Main currents of political thought in their historical setting from 17th century to the present. Pol.Sci. 440 is not a prerequisite for Pol.Sci. 441. Pol.Sci. 443-3. Jurisprudence. Origins of modern legal institutions and role of law in society throughout the ages. Contrast between Anglo-American and legal systems stemming from the Roman Law. Law cases are studied only insofar as they mirror historical and sociological developments.
Pol.Sci. 445-3. American Political Thought. History and development of American political theories and ideas from colonial period to present.
Pol.Sci. 446-3. Administrative Law. General nature of administrative law, types of administrative action and enforcement, analysis of rulemaking adjudication, administrative due process, judicial review.
Pol.Sci. 447-3. Constitutional Law I. Nature and scope of the following American constitutional principles as developed by the U.S. Supreme Court: federalism, jurisdiction of the federal courts, separation of powers, the taxing power, and the commerce power. Case method.


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Pol.Sci. 449-3. American Judicial System. Examination of the principal actors in the legal system: police, lawyers, judges, citizens. About half of the course will be devoted to the study of judicial behavior, especially at the Supreme Court level.
Pol.Sci. 490-3. Revolution and Political Violence. Study, discussion, and evaluation of alternative frameworks for the analysis of revolution and political violence. The theoretical material will be firmly couched in case situations such as Western, class, colonial, urban, international, historical, racial, religious, and intergenerational violence. Development by the class of its own theoretical model.
General Courses in Political Science
Pol.Sci. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Intended to give an opportunity for advanced students with good scholastic records, and with appropriate courses completed, to pursue independently the study of some subject of special interest to them. Subjects chosen and arrangements made to suit the needs of each student. Primarily for seniors. Prer., 15 semester hours in political science and consent of instructor.
SOCIOLOGY
Majors in sociology are required to complete 30 hours in sociology with a grade of C or better. Of these courses, 16 must be upper division. As no fixed sequence of courses is prescribed, it is recommended and expected that students will select an adviser from the sociology faculty to help them develop their programs. This is particularly important for those intending to do graduate work in sociology.
Soc. 111-3. Introduction to Sociology. Sociology as a science; man and culture; social groups; social institutions; social interactions; social change.
Soc. 128-3. Race and Minority Problems. Race and racism; facts and myths about great populations, including psychological, social, and cultural sources of bias and discrimination.
Soc. 129-3. The Negro in American Life and History. Examination of the myth and the reality of the Negro in America since the Colonial Period.
Soc. 191-3. Contemporary Social Issues. Introductory consideration of some 30 current social controversies, such as democracy, capitalism, race and ethnic groups, marriage, the family, crime, international tensions, and world order. Designed to improve the student’s ability to understand current debate and to formulate opinions for himself.
Soc. 192-3. Contemporary Social Issues. Continuation of Soc. 191. Soc. 199-variable credit. Independent Study in Sociology. Consent of instructor required.
Soc. 221-3. Elementary Population Studies. Elements of demography, natality, mortality, international and internal migration, population growth, population policy.
Soc. 222-3. Human Ecology. Ecological organization and processes in urban, rural, and regional areas.
Soc. 239-3. Mass Society. Study of the emergence of modern society. Emphasis on the role of masses and of separated and isolated individuals who lack unifying values and purposes.
Soc. 246-3. Introduction to Social Psychology. Survey of the following varieties of social psychology: psychoanalysis, symbolic in-teractionism, culture and personality, structural-functionalism, and psychological social psychology. Topics treated on the introductory level.
Soc. 248-3. Social Movements. Social bases and development features of such modern, social, and political movements as communism, socialism, liberalism, and conservatism.
Soc. 250-3. Social Problems and Social Change. Sociological analysis of problems resulting from recent social changes including occupational shifts and the redefinition of work, adolescent roles and responses, the massification of education, public responses to crime, deliquency, and mental illness, race and minority relations, community disorganization, and the effects of population growth and redistribution on underdeveloped areas. Emphasis on the development of concepts and theoretical propositions for problem analysis.
Soc. 255-3. Analysis of Modern Society. Examination of various sociological views of modern society including those of Lundberg, Richardson, Mills, Riesman, Goffman, Sorokin, Cohen, and others. Soc. 315-3. History of Sociological Thought I. Major social theorists from early times to date, including Aristotle, Plato, Machiavelli, Comte, Spencer.
Soc. 316-3. History of Sociological Thought II. Continuation of Soc. 315. Prer., Soc. 315.
Soc. 317-3. Statistics. Quantitative techniques used in analyzing social phenomena. Prer., Math. 107 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Soc. 409-3. Undergraduate Research Practicum. Practical experience for undergraduates in application of principles of research design and data processing to a social research problem selected by the instructor.
Soc. 417-3. Research Methods. Design of social research. Application of statistical techniques and procedures to social phenomena. Prer., Soc. 317 or consent of instructor.
Soc. 421-3. Advanced Population Studies. The sociological importance of population study. Advanced demographic analysis and population theory. Natality, mortality, problems of population growth and international and internal migrations, population policy, and aspects of population planning and control.
Soc. 424-3. Migration'. World migration patterns. Migration examined as an effect and as an influence. Planned and unplanned migration.
Soc. 426-3. Urban Sociology. The city in terms of its social structure, residential and institutional patternings, processes of interaction, demographic processes, and patterns of growth and change.
Soc. 433-3. Communities. Review and appraisal of community studies.
Soc. 443-3. Technology and Modernization. Description and analysis of changing social structure and social relationships as a response to technological innovation and change.
Soc. 444-3. Social Stratification. Status, social mobility, and class in selected societies; elites and leadership problems.
Soc. 446-3. Persons in Society. The self in society—socialization, presentation of self and identity, social types, roles, and careers in historical situations. Persons in theories of social organization and action.
Soc. 449-3. Social Control. Informal and formal regulative processes in social behavior, with reference to techniques and processes of social control, such as propaganda, the political order, and other institutions.
Soc. 451-3. Social Institutions. Organized system of practices and social roles developed about values. Machinery evolved to regulate the practices and behavior—family, church, government, economy, recreation, education.
Soc. 453-3. Social Change. Process of change in Western society and its effects on the individual, the family, and economic and political institutions. Attention to extremist response to tensions produced by rapid social change in America. Historical analysis of the causes of Western development as a context in which to study the factors aiding and impeding the modernization of the emerging nations.
Soc. 454-3. Social Mobility. Status, occupational, and income change examined from viewpoints of individual, organization, and society as a whole. Mobility theories proposed by Sorokin, Rogoff, Lenski, Svalastoga, Lipset, and Duncan. Special attention to methods of analyzing change, comparative social mobility, and status equilibration.
Soc. 455-3. Sociology of the Family. The family as a social institution. Historized development and contemporary cross-cultural analysis with emphasis on the contemporary American family.
Soc. 458-3. Contemporary American Social Movements. Examination of contemporary social movements and bases of cleavage and conflict in contemporary America. Radical Right and New Left, civil rights, and student activism studied in the light of contemporary social facts and their historical roots.
Soc. 467-3. Sociology of Education. Sociological study of the techniques of education. Classroom procedures, school administration, educators’ roles, and reciprocal relations of school and community.
Soc. 470-3. Sociology of Law. Consideration of the formulation, interpretation, and legitimacy of legal rules within a context of social organization.


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Soc. 477-3. The Sociology of Work. The analysis of work in a variety of organizational settings with an emphasis on the changing meanings of work. Concern is also directed to the interrelationships of the work and the non-work world.
Soc. 478-3. Industrial Sociology. The way in which the factory and the community influence sociological aspects of industrial relations.
Soc. 479-3. Large-Scale Organization. Analysis of sociological theories of bureaucracy and inquiry into bureaucratic developments in governmental, industrial, military, and welfare institutions.
Soc. 490-3. Senior Seminar. Seminar for senior sociology majors considering important concepts, issues, and problems in sociology. Soc. 495-3. Criminology. Nature and causes of crime as a social phenomenon. Processes of making laws, breaking laws, and reaction toward the breaking of laws. Cultural significance of the processes of determining the reactions of the community to offenders of the law; theory of practice of punishment; purposes, uniformity, and similarities of the kinds of disposition. Sociological concepts are used in this area—culture, mores, institutions, competition, conflict, social change, and social control. Soc 496-3. Juvenile Delinquency. Factors involved in delinquent behavior. Problems of adjustment of delinquents and factors in treatment and in post-treatment adjustment.
Soc. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required.
SOCIAL SCIENCE
These courses can satisfy, in part, the area requirement in the social sciences.
Soc.Sci. 210-3. The Study of Man in Society I. An integrated introduction to concepts and methods of the social sciences as they apply to analysis of societal contexts and analyses of societies at given points in time.
Soc.Sci. 211-3. The Study of Man in Society II. Continuation of Soc.Sci. 210. Emphasis on processes in society—social and cultural change and evolution, industrialization, urbanization, and other dynamic institutions.
Soc.Sci. 320-3. The Legal Process. Nature of legal reasoning and methods of legal development. Reciprocal relations of law with political philosophy and ethics. Materials drawn from both public and private law.
Soc.Sci. 321-3. The American Indian and Federal Law. In comparison with other citizens, what has been and is the legal status of American Indians? The objectives of this course are to survey a special status as set forth in Federal law, to identify its problems, costs and benefits to Native Americans, and to acquaint course participants with applications and politics of the law through the study of actual case materials.
Soc.Sci. 324-3. The Consumer and the Law. A study of the rights of the consumer when dealing with corporations, unions, and government agencies.
Soc.Sci. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto I. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the Black, disadvantaged community.
Soc.Sci. 326-3. Pathology of the Ghetto II. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the Black, disadvantaged community.
Soc.Sci. 327-3. Comparative Urban Cultures. Emphasis on historical background and social concerns of cultural and ethnic groups which constitute a city.
Soc.Sci. 329-3. The Asian Americans. An investigation of the historical, social, and psychological identity of the Asian Americans and their communities in the United States.
Soc.Sci. 330-3. Women in' a Changing World. Offers an understanding of the historical, economic, and sociocultural background of women’s changing roles and function in the contemporary world. The approach and material to be used are multidisciplinary. The goal is to reach a balanced understanding through analysis and discussion based on objective information.
Soc.Sci. 402-3. (Health Ad. 602.) Economic and Political Determinants in a Health Care System. Designed to acquaint the student with the health care industry, in terms of both the organization and delivery of health care services and the socioeconomic consequences of those services.
Soc.Sci. 405-3. Education and Culture in Historical Perspective. An
analysis of the interaction of culture and education in Western society since the Renaissance.
Soc.Sci. 410-3. World Politics in the 1970s. A study of great power politics, the role of the United Nations organization, and select crisis situations in the contemporary period.
Soc.Sci. 411-3. Business and Society. (B.Ad. 411.) Examination of the interrelationships between business, society, and the environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socio-economic-business system, current public policy, issues and social responsibility, and ethics. Prer., Econ. 201-202, Pol.Sci. 110, Soc. 111.
Soc.Sci. 420-3. Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis. The course will focus on a contemporary problem confronting Metropolitan Denver.
URBAN STUDIES MAJOR
All students majoring in urban studies will be expected to meet the following course requirements:
1. Soc. Sci. 210 and 211, The Study of Man in Society I and II.
2. Four of the following five upper division courses: Urban Economics (Econ. 425); Urban History (Hist. 470); Urban Politics (Pol. Sci. 407); Urban Anthropology (Anthro. 444); and Urban Sociology (Soc. 426).
3. In addition, each student must successfully complete the Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis (Soc. Sci. 420). This course will focus upon the analysis of a single local urban problem from an interdisciplinary perspective. Extensive field work will further familiarize the student with the roles and techniques required in the analysis of urban problems and will serve to integrate in a practical applied setting theories and sources of information developed in previous academic work.
4. This core program specifies 21 of the 30 hours currently required as the minimum in a given major for graduation. In addition to the required core courses, a student selecting this major will be required to take an additional 12 hours according to one of the following options:
Option I — concentration in a given discipline. (The student is required to take an additional 12 hours in a given discipline, the exact courses in this concentration to be specified by the discipline concerned.)
Option II — distributive option. (The student is required to take an additional 12 hours from a list of recommended courses, the actual course to be worked out in consultation with a faculty adviser.)
Ethnic Programs
Programs for minority groups were established on the Denver Campus in 1969. Since then the quality and scope of these programs have expanded greatly. Courses are presently offered in Asian American, Black, Mexican American, and Native American Studies.
Student organizations provide assistance with recruiting, counseling, personal guidance, and tutoring; financial help is available through grants and the Work-Study Program.
The Study Skills Center, located in the library building, offers tutoring and help for students who are academically deficient.


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ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
ANDREW G. WILLIAMS, Director
Soc.Sci. 329-3. The Asian Americans. Will examine the experience of Asian Americans from a sociological perspective. Emphasis will be on an analysis of activities and problems. The history of the groups will be reviewed and the contemporary situation in their communities will also receive attention. Class will be structured around lecture/discussion, reading materials, speakers, films, and field trips. Students will have the opportunity to work on projects related to Asian American communities and peoples.
Soc.Sci. 330-3. Topics on Asian Americans. Course will examine specific topics on Asian Americans to be selected by the instructor and the students, studying in detail subjects related to the Asian American experience and communities.
BLACK STUDIES
CECIL E. GLENN, Director
Bl.St. 101-5. Swahili I. Beginning Swahili with emphasis on oral communication. Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in reading and speaking. Language lab. and conversation session. (Taught at Metropolitan State College.)
Bl.St. 102-5. Swahili II. Intermediate Swahili with review of essentials of grammar; detailed analysis of texts. Language lab. and conversation session. (Taught at Metropolitan State College.)
Bl.St. 112-3. Introduction' to Black Studies. A course designed to acquaint new students with the history, purpose, organization, and goal of the Black Education Program.
Bl.St. 115-3. Law and Minorities. Designed to acquaint students with the legal system of American society, including contracts, buying and selling, wills and inheritance, family relations, civil wrongs, and criminal law in order to develop a cooperative relationship between the law and minorities.
Bl.St. 110-3. Black Contemporary Social Issues. Designed to expose the student to those areas of intellectual, social, cultural, economic, political, and educational concerns relevant to the Afro-American experience. Principally an introductory survey of primary issues currently affecting the black man.
Bl.St. 160-3. Economic History of Africa. A study of the black man in Africa before and after the coming of Europeans with emphasis on the economic aspect of Africa’s historical development.
Bl.St. 201-3. Swahili III. Advanced Swahili with emphasis on the development of spoken fluency and on reading of contemporary Swahili materials. Prer., Swahili II. (Taught at Metropolitan State College.)
Bl.St. 203-3. Behavioral Analysis I. A psychology course which deals with the interrelationships between the black individual and his social environment. Social influences upon motivation, perception, and behavior. The development and change of attitudes and opinions in the ghetto.
Bl.St. 204-3. Behavioral Analysis II. Psychological analysis of small groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena such as riots. Continuation of Bl.St. 203.
Bl.St. 210-3. Politics of Contemporary Africa I. Systematic survey of modern Africa with special emphasis on selected countries, both independent and nonindependent. Southern Africa: political impacts of racial and religious problems, stressing recent development in Rhodesia, South Africa, and the Portuguese colonies of Angola and Mozambique.
Bl.St. 215-3. Afro-American History I. Survey of the history of Afro-Americans. Study, interpretations, and analysis of major problems, issues, and trends affecting the black man from preslavery to the present.
Bl.St. 216-3. Afro-American History II. Continuation of Bl.St. 215. Bl.St. 220-3. Black Social Movements. (Soc. 228.) Developmental paradigms for black social movements. Differential linear movements, theories of nationalism, integration, separatism, rhetorical nationlism, and tyranny.
Bl.St. 221-3. Black Social Theory. (Soc. 229.) Historical paradigms for black social movements. Strategies and tactics of racial oppression, recurring ideology, Pan-Africanism, nationalism,
civil rights, black power, and riot movements. Continuation of Bl.St. 220.
Bl.St. 223-3. Religion of the Black Man. Critical examination of the black family’s utilization of religious beliefs and practices. Bl.St. 227-2. Interrelated Studies. An integrated study of the development of the black man in the arts, history, literature, politics, economics, etc.
Bl.St. 232-3. Survey of Afro-American Literature I. (Engl. 238.) Chronological study of Afro-American literature beginning with the 18th century. The Harlem Renaissance, the depression writers, and writers from the 1940s to the present.
Bl.St. 233-3. Survey of Afro-American Literature II. (Engl. 239.) Continuation of Bl.St. 232.
Bl.St. 250-3. Capitalism and Slavery I. (Econ. 250.) The development of slavery as an American institution from 1619 to 1970, the plantation system, the growth of the slave trade, the stimulation of the American economy by slavery, the Civil War as an economic conflict between the industrialists of the North and the agriculturalists of the South.
Bl.St. 251-3. Capitalism and Slavery II. (Econ. 251.) Post-Civil War to the present, trade unions, legislation, the urban crisis, and “Black Capitalism.” Continuation of Bl.St. 250.
Bl.St. 270-3. African-American Art History I. (Fine Arts 270.) A study of black art in both Africa and the Americas; problems in depicting real life experiences of black people.
Bl.St. 271-3. African-American Art History II. (Fine Arts 271.) Continuation of Bl.St. 270.
Bl.St. 280-3. Afro-American Music History and Appreciation I. A
study of the history of black music. The African background and the influences of Europe and the Carribbean. Emphasis on Afro-American folk mtvic.
Bl.St. 281-3. Afro-American Music History and Appreciation II. Music since 1900—religious and secular. The development of jazz, modern rhythm, and blues today. Black musicians and their technical development. Continuation of Bl.St. 280.
Bl.St. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto. (Soc.Sci. 325.) Designed to analyze black ghetto frustration and despair as elements in urban crisis, with emphasis on possible solutions through various community agencies.
Bl.St. 326-3 (Soc.Sci. 326.) Continuation of Bl.St. 325.
Bl.St. 330-3. Law and the Black Man. A two-semester seminar which will place major emphasis on the law and legal institutions in America. Particular emphasis will be placed on the legislative and judicial functions in the struggle for civil rights. All major U.S. Supreme Court decisions, as well as significant legislative enactments, will be examined in depth.
Bl.St. 370-3. Culture, Racism, and Alienation. Effects of racism on the individual personality of the recipient and the donor of practices evolving from participation in a racist culture.
Bl.St. 390-3. Modern African Literature I. (Engl. 390.) A survey of contemporary African literature. The main forces which have shaped modern African literature, and the crisis and conflicts of the African man and his culture in contact with these forces as they are portrayed by the African writer.
Bl.St. 391-3. Modern African Literature II. (Engl. 391.) Continuation of Bl.St. 390.
Bl.St. 412-3. Civil Rights and Fair Employment Practices. Designed to give the student the necessary background to enter the field of civil rights and equal employment opportunities. Emphasis on Fair Employment Practices procedures. Field visits.
Bl.St. 434-3. Black Art and Society I. (Fine Arts 434.) A two-semester seminar dealing with black art in relationship to society. The influences of the black revolution, black culture, political thought, and integration.
Bl.St. 435-3. Black Art and Society II. (Fine Arts 435.) Continuation of Bl.St. 434.
MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
NEREYDA LUNA BOTTOMS, Director
M.AM. 100-3. Introduction to Mexican American Studies. Required of all incoming M.A.E.P. students. Course will review techniques for studying languages, science, mathematics, and other areas. Systems of notetaking, research methods (including proper use of library facilities), preparing for and taking examinations, as well as building self-confidence will be discussed.


44 / University of Colorado at Denver
M.AM. 111-3. introduction to Drama: Chicano Workshop. Designed to encourage and guide the development of student acting, directing, and playwriting, with a concentration on the specialized techniques and content of Teatro Campesino.
M.AM. 112-3. Bilingual Skills. A basic language course in which students with a background of both Spanish and English can learn the similarities as well as the differences in the two languages. Oral as well as written exercises in Spanish. Readings in Southwest folklore.
M.AM. 127-3. Contemporary Mexican American I. (Soc. 127.) An introductory sociology course in which the basic terminology of the Chicano milieu is defined and a survey made of the Chicano movement from its early manifestations to the present.
M.AM. 135-1. Beginning International Folk Dance, Spanish and Mexican. (P.E. 135.) Basic dances of Mexico and Spain: El Jarabe Tapatio, La Bamba, jotas, and paso dobles.
M.AM. 136-1. Advanced International Folk Dance, Spanish and Mexican. (P.E. 136.) An advanced course in the dances of Spain and Mexico including: jotas, paso dobles, zapateados, and huastecas, and jaranas.
M.AM. 137-3. Contemporary Mexican American II. (Soc. 137.) Continuation of M.AM. 127. A more detailed breakdown of the many facets of the Chicano movement today.
M.AM. 205-3. History of Spanish Language in the Southwest. (Spanish 205.) The Spanish spoken in the Southwest is compared to that spoken in other areas of the world. The course is the first and most basic in the linguistic series in the Spanish department. Basic linguistic terminology is introduced and applied in the analysis of Southwest Spanish. Field research will be expected of student.
M.AM. 211-3. Contemporary Mexican Literature in Translation. Mexican literature since World War I has been in the forefront of literary innovations directly reflecting the rapid progress and changes in the society. The purpose of the course is literary but serves also to dispel many false views of Mexico as a rural, traditionally conservative country.
M.AM. 212-3. Contemporary Latin American Literature in' Translation. The approach is the same as in M.AM. 211. The best of the contemporary Latin American authors are studied: Borges, Fuentes, Rulfo, Carpentier, Cortazar, and others.
M.AM. 213-3. History of Chicano Art. A survey of art, indigenous as well as that with Spanish and Mexican influence. The focus on the Mexican American includes the fields of painting, sculpture, and architecture.
M.AM. 300-3. The Chicano Movement. A study of the ideas of the contemporary thinkers and leaders of today’s Mexican American and the events which have shaped them.
M.AM. 302-3. Methodology of Tutoring the Educationally Disadvantaged. A course designed to improve the tutorial skills of upperclassmen, especially Chicanos, or those who expect to help minority students. Concentration on tutoring of basic skills required for M.A.E.P. and Special Services tutors.
M.AM. 310-3. Mexican American Ethnic Relations. (Same as Anthro. 310.) The anthropology of North Americans of Spanish, Spanish-Indian, and Mexican National descent, ethno-his-torical backgrounds, current interrelations and social movements among rural and urban groups. Cultural patterns, identity maintenance, and the social forms and problems of national incorporation.
M.AM. 311-3. Mexican Literature in Translation—Poetry. A survey of the masterpieces of Mexican poetry in English translations from Aztec poetry to modern day.
M.AM. 312-3. Mexican Literature in Translation—Narrative. A
survey of the masterpieces of Mexican narrative works in English translations, from the Popol Vuh a Chilam Balam to the contemporary period.
M.AM. 313-3. Arts of the Mexican Revolution. A study of the art forms that developed during the years of the Mexican Revolution. Both plastic and letters included.
M.AM. 340-3. Social Psychology and the Mexican American. (Psych. 340.) Exposes students to the research on Mexican Americans in the fields of intelligence and achievement, language and learning ability, attitudes, perception, personality, and motivation.
M.AM. 369-3. Historical Geography of the Southwest. Regional study of man and culture in relationship to the environment.
M.AM. 383-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado I. (Hist.
383. ) Research-oriented seminar course in which the student is expected to gather material on the subject from original sources.
M.AM. 384-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado II. (Hist.
384. ) Continuation of M.AM. 383.
M.AM. 399-3. History of the Mexican in the Southwest. A survey of the history of the Southwestern region of the U.S. from the indigenous origins, through Spanish conquest and colonization and later Anglo invasion.
M.AM. 405-3. Intergroup Relations. (Soc. 405.) A study of intergroup (race) relations at the small group level. Includes analysis of a group that has been stratified into a majority number of white students and a fixed number of minority students.
M.AM. 412-3. Contemporary Chicano Literature—Poetry. (Engl.
412. ) A study of the present poetry produced by Chicanos.
M.AM. 413-3. Contemporary Chicano Literature—Short Story. (Engl.
413. ) A study of the present narrative literature produced by Chicanos. No political slant is imposed. The literary value is emphasized.
M.AM. 430-3. Chicano and the U.S. Social System. A study of the Mexican American in his contact with the systems of justice, education, politics and social sets, primarily in the Southwest.
M.AM. 432-3. Education irf Multilingual Communities. (Soc. 432.) A combined social problem and sociolinguistic approach to education in multilingual communities in the United States Southwest. Topics considered will include historical and contemporary trends in schools’ language policies and practices; intra-school social and academic stratification; and consequences for student achievement, aspirations, and vocational choice and channeling.
M.AM. 459-3. Mexican American in the Southwest. A study of the development of the social structures of the Mexican American in the Southwest and the forces that have affected them.
M.AM 460-3. The Chicano Community and Community Organizations.
(Soc. 460.) Examination of the origin of the terms “community” and “barrio.” A comparative analysis of the internal barrio structure and the larger society. Community organization and community development. Positive and negative role models/leaders. Methods and techniques of community organization as related to La Raza.
M.AM. 462-3. The New Chicano Movement. (Soc. 462.) A seminar in which extensive field research is required of the students aimed at discovering the current role of the Chicano in American society.
NOTE: Spanish 101 and 102. Special M.A.E.P. sections are taught by a Chicano with an understanding of the particular problems of the bilingual student.
NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES
LINDA MASON, Director
N.AM. 250-3. The American Indian Experience. An introduction to Native American literature and other expressive forms with emphasis on the aesthetic, linguistic, psychological, and historical properties, as well as the contemporary, social, and cultural influence upon the native author and his material.
N.AM. 321-3. The American Indian and Federal Law: A Survey of Legal Status and Problems. (Soc.Sci. 321.) A survey of the special status of American Indians, as well as the problems, costs, and benefits affecting various tribal groups and individuals as exemplified in a selection of actual case studies.
N.AM. 436-3. The American Indian in Contemporary Society. (Anthro. 436.) Begins with the historical background on American Indian acculturation and persistence, but emphasizes the present day relations between Indian communities and the dominant society, stressing conditions and events in Denver and the Southwest generally.
N.AM. 472-3. North American Indian Art. (Fine Arts 472.) Survey of major tribal styles of the North American continent.


College of Undergraduate Studies / 45
Special Programs
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
DANIEL GUIMOND, Coordinator
The University of Colorado at Denver offers undergraduates an opportunity to earn academic credit for approved work experience through the Cooperative Education Program. The College of Undergraduate Studies participates in this program. Students placed by the Co-op office in paid or volunteer assignments, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, may be eligible, subject to the guidelines below:
1. The student should normally have reached the sophomore level of University work and must be a degree student in the College of Undergraduate Studies.
2. The participating student should have at least a 2.5 grade-point average. Students with GPAs in the
2.0 (C) to 2.4 range must obtain the approval of the dean in order to participate in the program.
3. Job experiences approved for credit should be preprofessional in nature and should be generally related to the student’s major area of study. Jobs of a routine nature, lacking experience relative to the undergraduate academic curriculum, are not suitable for University credit.
4. A job in which the learning possibilities and responsibilities of the student remain static will not be approved for more than one semester. In contrast, a job in which the learning opportunities and responsibilities vary and increase may be eligible for credit over a longer time span.
5. Projects will be granted from 1 to 6 hours of credit per semester, 3 being the normal credit for each project. However, certain projects, such as full-time intensive internship, may be granted as much as 6 credits.
6. Twelve semester hours will be the normal maximum number of credits that a student can earn in Cooperative Education. In some disciplines, Cooperative Education hours may not count toward satisfying requirements for the major.
Information and forms for placement and credit are available in Room 811 or call ext. 555.
DISTRIBUTED STUDIES PROGRAM
Students working toward the B.A. degree may elect a major in a Distributed Studies Program in any one of the three divisions of the College. Requirements are a minimum of 60 semester hours in two or three subjects in which a discipline major program for the B.A. is offered. One of these shall be designated the primary subject. Discipline advisers shall have the prerogative of designating acceptable secondary subjects. A student’s Distributed Studies Program shall be approved by a committee composed of an adviser in the student’s primary subject and one in each of his secondary subjects.
Primary Subject. Minimum of 30 hours. (Not more than 30 hours will be required.) The grade-point average in the primary subject must be at least 2.0; 30 hours of work must carry grades of C or better; 12 hours must be in upper division courses in which
grades of C or better have been earned. The adviser for the primary area may stipulate specific course requirements.
Secondary Subjects. Minimum of 30 hours distributed in one or two disciplines. A secondary subject shall consist of at least 12 hours in one discipline.
Language Courses. No first-year course in English (100-101) or foreign language (101-102) may be used in satisfaction of the requirements of either a primary or a secondary subject.
HONORS PROGRAM
The Honors Program of the College of Undergraduate Studies is designed for the student who likes to deal creatively with ideas and who desires to extend his education beyond the usual course requirements.
The Honors Program also is responsible for determining which students merit the award of the bachelor’s degree with honors: cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude. These awards are made on the basis of special honors work and not simply on the basis of grades. All honors courses are awarded upper division credit.
A student may participate in either discipline honors or general honors, or both. To become a candidate for discipline honors, the student must (1) have a 3.0 grade-point average; (2) complete special work such as seminars, or research projects required by his particular discipline; (3) take both the Undergraduate Program Area Test (in Humanities, Natural Science, and Social Science) and the Advanced Graduate Record Examination; and (4) take an oral examination given by a committee of faculty members in his discipline and a member of the Honors Council. To become a candidate for general honors, the student must (1) have a 3.0 grade-point average; (2) complete at least four general honors courses; (3) take the Undergraduate Program Area Test; and (4) take oral and written honors examinations.
Any qualified student may enroll in honors courses without becoming a candidate for graduation with honors. There are no examinations in the honors courses themselves; and no letter grades are awarded, only the marks H (Honors), P (Pass), and F (Fail).
Detailed information concerning the Honors Program may be obtained from Dr. Fahrion, director, or in the Office of the Dean.
Preprofessional Programs
CHILD HEALTH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM
The Child Health Associate Program at the University of Colorado Medical Center is a three-year program designed to train men and women in ambulatory pediatric care of infants, children, and adolescents. The program emphasizes the medical and psycho-social aspects of health care. Graduates of the program receive a Bachelor of Science (Child Health Associate) degree from the School of Medicine and are licensed to work in association with a physician in such settings as private physicians’ offices, neighborhood health clinics, and public health facilities.


46 / University of Colorado at Denver
Two years of college (60 semester or 90 quarter hours, including one year of biology; one year of chemistry; one year of psychology; and one year or 6 semester hours from one of the following areas—English, humanities, social sciences, or communication) are required.
Courses in anthropology, organic chemistry, and/or Spanish are recommended.
For further information write:
Child Health Associate Program Box 2662
University of Colorado Medical Center 4200 East Ninth Avenue Denver, Colorado 80220
or telephone 394-8272. At UCD, contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
The Child Health Associate Program also has been approved to award a Master of Science degree in Child Health Associate for those students who meet the criteria for admittance into the Graduate School.
PREDENTAL HYGIENE
In conjunction with the School of Dentistry, a degree program in dental hygiene is available at the University of Colorado.
Dental hygiene enjoys an important role in the field of health science. The dental hygienist is concerned with the prevention of dental disease and is the only member of the auxiliary group in the dental profession who performs a service directly for a patient.
The dental hygienist must satisfactorily complete a college program and pass the state board examination. After being licensed by the state in which he or she wishes to practice, the dental hygienist has many opportunities for employment in private dental offices, state and city health agencies, federal government agencies, public and private schools, boards of education, industrial dental clinics and hospitals, and in schools of dental hygiene as directors and teachers.
Prerequisites. Two years of college (60 semester or 90 quarter hours, including English composition, 6 semester hours; mathematics, 3 semester hours; psychology, 3 semester hours; philosophy, 3 semester hours; speech, 3 semester hours; sociology, 3 semester hours; general chemistry with laboratory, 8 semester hours; and general biology with laboratory, 8 semester hours).
For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
PREDENTISTRY
The University of Colorado School of Dentistry admitted its first class in June 1973.
The student planning to seek admission to the School of Dentistry should consult the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508, concerning his program. A minimum of 90 semester hours of accredited college or university work must be completed. While there is no prescribed curriculum, the following courses are required:
Semesters
General chemistry____________________________________ 2
Organic chemistry _________________,_________________ 2
General biology______________________________________ 2
Calculus _____________________________________ 1
Genetics ..........._......................... 1
English............................:__________ 2
Applications are due December 15 for the class starting the following June.
TEACHER EDUCATION
Students are referred to the School of Education office on the Denver Campus for detailed information concerning teacher education programs at all levels: elementary, secondary, and community college.
Two avenues are open to students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in teaching.
. 1. Elementary education majors and distributed studies majors preparing to teach at the secondary school level normally transfer from the College of Undergraduate Studies to the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year and continue on to receive the Bachelor of Science degree in Education.
2. Students with a major program in the College of Undergraduate Studies who seek certification for teaching at the secondary school level remain in the College of Undergraduate Studies for the bachelor’s degree, but take approximately 20 hours of professional education courses in the School of Education.
Pre-Education Program
Students pursuing elementary education or distributed studies majors for secondary school teachers should so indicate on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by faculty members of the School of Education on the Denver Campus. Application for transfer to the School of Education and for admission to the teacher education program should be made during the last semester of the sophomore year. The minimum requirements for acceptance are:
1. Completion of at least 60 semester hours of acceptable college work with a grade-point average of 2.5 for all courses attempted, and 2.5 for all courses attempted at the University of Colorado; 2.5 in the major teaching field; 2.5 in the prerequisite sequence of education courses. No student will be recommended for a certification to teach in any field or subject in which the grade-point average is less than 2.5.
2. Students planning to student teach at the secondary school level will be held for general education requirements as follows:
Semester Hours
Physical education ________________________________ 2
Two 2-semester course combinations of at least 12 semester hours credit each (i.e., four semesters) in each of the following three fields: humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.
A total of at least 40 semester hours is required in general education.
3. Elementary education majors also must take, during their first two years, Math. 103, Biol. 201, and Biol. 202.
Bachelor of Arts (in the College of Undergraduate Studies) With Teacher Certification
Students in the College of Undergraduate Studies who intend to pursue a regular major curriculum in


College of Undergraduate Studies / 47
one of the disciplines or programs in the College, and who also desire secondary school teacher certification, must apply for and be accepted into the teacher education program. The requirements for such admission are identical with those in 1 above. These students also must meet all requirements for a bachelor’s degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies.
Early planning is crucial for students intending to enter the teacher education program. Since the School of Education is initiating a new program at the secondary level, students are urged to consult the school early and regularly concerning new course requirements.
Professional Preparation for College Teachers
The School of Education offers counsel to prospective college-level teachers and has a number of courses suitable to their needs. A program for the preparation of community college teachers is now available in some subject fields.
PREJOURNALISM
Students are referred to the School oj Journalism Bulletin for detailed information concerning requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in journalism, which is granted only on the Boulder Campus.
Prejournalism students should so designate themselves on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by members of the faculty of the School of Journalism (Boulder).
Students normally transfer to the School of Journalism at the beginning of the junior year. Application for intra-University transfer must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term for which the student wishes to register, or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.25 in prior work at the University of Colorado is required.
PRELAW
Students are referred to the School of Law Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the professional degree, Juris Doctor (J.D.), which is granted only on the Boulder Campus.
The School of Law of the University of Colorado requires a bachelor’s degree for admission, but does not stipulate courses that shall constitute a prelaw curriculum.
The Law School Admission Test is required of all applicants for admission to the School of Law and should be taken as early as possible during the senior year in the College of Undergraduate Studies.
Students are urged to consult the Admissions Office of the School of Law, Room 118, Fleming Law Building, Boulder, Colorado 80302.
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
This curriculum leading to a B.S. degree awarded by the School of Medicine consists of six semesters of course work in the College of Undergraduate Studies followed by 12 months of clinical training at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver.
Normally, 94 semester hours of credit are earned in
the College of Undergraduate Studies and 40 semester hours of credit are allowed at the School of Medicine.
To be eligible for admission to the clinical year at the School of Medicine a student must have met all course requirements prerequisite to clinical training as established by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. These are a minimum of three years, 90 semester hours, of collegiate work with a minimum of 16 semester hours in chemistry and 16 semester hours in biological sciences. A minimum of one semester of college mathematics is required and a strong recommendation is made that physics be included in the course work taken. In addition, the student must meet the course requirements of the University of Colorado in medical technology.
The clinical training period begins about June 15 of each year and continues for one calendar year. No students are admitted to the clinical program at any time other than in June.
Students must meet the grade-point requirements for graduation as outlined in the School of Medicine Bulletin.
Curriculum for B.S. Degree in Medical Technology
Courses fulfilling requirements as well as general electives are to be chosen in consultation with the student’s adviser.
1. Six semesters of requirements to be taken in the College of Undergraduate Studies:
Biology Semester Hours
One full year of general biology (Biol. 201-4, 202-4). It is strongly recommended that the student take the following: Animal Physiology (Biol. 322-3), Biology of Microorganisms (Biol. 301-4), Pathogenic Microbiology (Biol. 436-4) 18
Chemistry
This should include one academic year of general chemistry (ordinarily Chem. 103-5 and 106-5) and two semesters of
organic chemistry (Chem. 331-4 and 332-4) ____________ 18
Mathematics
Math. 107-3, Algebra for Social Science and Business: Math. 108-3, Polynomial Calculus_______________________________ 6
Physics
Principles of physics (Phys. 201-5, 202-5) __ 5-10
Electives (advised, not required)
It is recommended that at least 8 credit hours be selected from psychology or the social sciences. The remainder can be in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, or mathe-
matics _______________________________________.......— 28-30
General Curriculum (advised, not required)
Humanities ___________________________________i________ 6
Speech or communication _______________________________ 3
Social sciences _______________________________________ 6
Modern language ..............................-________ 3-10
Physical education............................I ....... 2
Total semester hours 94-96
The courses in biology, chemistry, and physics named above should include laboratory work.
2. One calendar year on the Medical Center campus in Denver. Requirements are listed in the School of Medicine Bulletin. Forty semester hours of credit are allowed.
For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.


48 / University of Colorado at Denver
PREMEDICINE
Students are referred to the School of Medicine Bulletin for information concerning admissions policies of the School of Medicine and details of the curriculum leading to the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree.
There is no prescribed curriculum for the premedical student, although certain courses are required (see below). Students intending to seek admission to the School of Medicine should fulfill all requirements for the bachelor’s degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies, even though in certain cases students may be admitted to a medical school without an undergraduate degree.
However, on all application and registration materials, premedical students should so designate themselves so that they may be advised by the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508. Such students are urged to consult regularly with their advisers concerning choice of and requirements, applications, and evaluation for medical schools.
In addition to an excellent overall academic record, premedical students must present superior work in the following courses:
Semester Hours
General chemistry (2 semesters) _______________________________8-10
Organic chemistry (2 semesters) ..............................8-10
General biology or zoology (2 semesters) .....................8-10
Physics, including laboratory (2 semesters) __________________ 8
Literature (2 semesters) ______________________________________ 6
Analytic geometry and calculus (2 semesters) ____________________6
Genetics (1 semester) ____________________________________________3
Beyond these specific courses, however, the School of Medicine strongly discourages premedicine students from taking courses covering material to be studied in medical school. Rather, the undergraduate years should provide a liberal education as the foundation for technical and professional post-graduate study. A student should choose a major from those fields that interest him most; it is not necessary that the major be in a technical or scientific area.
PRENURSING
Students are referred to the School of Nursing Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in nursing.
Prenursing students should so designate themselves on all application and registration materials so that advising may be obtained through the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
The nursing program is a 414-year curriculum involving two years of prenursing studies in the College of Undergraduate Studies followed by a 214-year program in the School of Nursing. Transfer from the College of Undergraduate Studies to the School of Nursing is normally made at the beginning of the junior year, but applications for admission to the upper division nursing program must be submitted at least six months prior to the start of the fall semester.
Preprofessional requirements for admission to the School of Nursing include the completion of 60 semester hours with a grade average of at least 2.0. The following courses are required:
Natural Sciences
Biology: One year general biology or zoology including laboratory (Biol. 201-202)
Chemistry: One year general chemistry with laboratory, including inorganic and organic (Chem. 101-102)
Social Sciences
Psychology: One year of course work in general psychology including content in the physiological basis of behavior (Psych. 100 in addition to Biol./Psych. 201-202)
Sociology: Two courses in general sociology (Soc. Ill and one other course or Soc. Sci. 210 and one other course. Soc. Sci. 211 will meet requirement)
Cultural Anthropology: One course (Anthro. 104)
General Education and Electives
At least two 2-semester sequences in two areas below:
History
Communication and theatre Economics English literature Ethnic studies Fine arts Foreign language
Honors Mathematics Philosophy Political Science
PREPHARMACY
Students are referred to the School of Pharmacy Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Pharmacy degree.
All academic advising for prepharmacy students is conducted by faculty members of the School of Pharmacy. Students should contact the school office, Ekeley 274 (Boulder Campus), and arrange to meet with advisers.
Application for transfer to the School of Pharmacy must be filed no later than 90 days prior to the term for which the student wishes to register, or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration.
Prior to enrolling for professional courses in the School of Pharmacy, students must have completed the following courses and must have compiled a grade-point average of 2.0 or higher:
Semester Hours
Inorganic chemistry—including quantitative and
qualitative analysis _____________________________________ 10
General biology or zoology________________________„_________... 8
College mathematics (algebra and trigonometry) . 5-6
English composition, literature, or foreign language __________6
Physical education_____________________________________________2
Organic chemistry______________________________________________8
General physics_______________________________________________10
Principles of economics _______________________________________6
Electives (nonprofessional) ___________________________________8
PHYSICAL THERAPY
The curriculum in physical therapy at the University of Colorado is an accredited program approved by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Physical Therapy Association. Upon successful completion of the program, students are granted a Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy from the School of Medicine. The curriculum is composed of two phases of study:
Phase One. Prephysical therapy constitutes the first three years. In these years the student fulfills his requirements for Phase Two and acquires a liberal university education.
Phase Two. Physical therapy education is accomplished during the final year. It is directed toward principles and practice of physical therapy as a professional career. Phase Two is offered only at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver.


College of Undergraduate Studies / 49
University Requirements for Graduation
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy must satisfy the following requirements:
1. Completion of Phase One to include 90 semester hours (135 quarter hours). A minimum of 2 semester hours (3 quarter hours) must be in upper division courses (courses numbered 300 or above).
2. Completion of Phase Two to include 57 quarter hours. Of the 57 hours, a grade of C or better is required in at least 40 hours and a C average must be maintained.
3. Residence requirement requires 30 semester hours (45 quarter hours) at the University of Colorado. This requirement is automatically fulfilled during Phase Two.
Selection of Students for Phase Two—
Physical Therapy (Senior Year)
1. A maximum of 32 students is accepted.
2. Selection is made by a Selection Committee.
3. Selection is based on:
a. Scholastic achievement of 3.0 (both in specific prerequisites and in cumulative grade-point average).
b. Personal interview.
c. Health status.
d. State of residency.
4. Categories of students eligible to apply for selection:
a. Physical therapy majors in attendance at any of the University of Colorado campuses must apply by July 15 following their sophomore year. Selection will be made during the summer. (An eligible sophomore must have completed 60 semester hours.)
b. Other eligible candidates must apply by March 1 of their junior year and will be selected at the end of their junior year. (An eligible junior must have completed or be registered for his 90th semester hour or 135th quarter hour.) Persons qualified for this selection are limited to those:
(1) enrolled in other accredited institutions in Colorado
(2) residents of states participating in the WICHE program which do not have physical therapy programs
(3) Colorado residents attending schools in other states
c. Applications will not be accepted from persons who do not fall in the above categories.
Specific Requirements—Phase One
These requirements may be met only in an accredited college or university and must be completed before final acceptance into Phase Two.
Required Courses Minimum Credit Hours
Biological Sciences_________14 semester hrs. (21 quarter hrs.)
General Biology Anatomy (human, preferred)
Physiology (human, preferred)
(Prer., 1 year of chemistry)
Humanities ________________12 semester hrs. (18 quarter hrs.)
Psychology ________________ 6 semester hrs. ( 9 quarter hrs.)
Social Science ____________ 6 semester hrs. ( 9 quarter hrs.)
Physical Education ________ 3 semester hrs. ( 5 quarter hrs.)
Kinesiology
Physical Education activity courses (1 year need not be for credit)
Physical Sciences
♦General Physics___________3 semester hrs. (5 quarter hrs.)
(Recommended content to include mechanics, heat, electricity)
♦General Chemistry_________6 semester hrs. (9 quarter hrs.)
Recommended Courses—Phase One
The curriculum is designed to offer students the opportunity to elect several courses in their areas of special interest. Listed below are courses related to physical therapy which would benefit a physical therapy major.
Biology
Embryology
Genetics
Psychology
Child and Adolescent Psychology Physiological Psychology Psychology of the Exceptional Child Psychology of Mental Retardation Psychology of Learning Child Development
Physical Therapy
Introduction to Physical Therapy (strongly recommended) Physical Education
Human Development and Movement Behavior Exercise Physiology Community Health Developmental Physiology
Other Courses Introduction to Statistics Anthropology Communication Skills First Aid
For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
•Any student anticipating further study in Graduate School should enroll in general physics (one full year to include laboratory work), general chemistry (to include organic chemistry), and mathematics.


College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
DODDS I. BUCHANAN, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration of the University of Colorado at Denver exists to serve today’s need for competent and responsible administrative and related professional personnel, for the continued education of men and women already in such positions, and to further research and new thinking about administrative problems.
The problems of administration are common to many kinds of public and private endeavor, and the College of Business attempts to confront these problems as they pertain to the management of business enterprises.
The major purpose of the College of Business is to provide young men and women with opportunities both for a liberal education and for professional training. They are given help in preparing not only for effective careers but also for satisfying living and constructive citizenship.
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers graduate-level education in business to persons with undergraduate degrees in business and other academic fields and prepares them for work in the broad spectrum of business enterprise.
Organization
Within the broad framework of policy established by the Regents of the University of Colorado, policy decisions for the College of Business are made by the Educational Policy Committee of the faculty under the chairmanship of the dean and are subject to review by the faculty as a whole.
The College’s activities are administered by the associate dean on the Denver Campus, by the heads of its several instructional divisions, and by other faculty directors of particular programs.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interests and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations:
AIESEC—international business association
Beta Alpha Psi—professional and honorary accounting fraternity
Beta Gamma Sigma—honorary scholastic fraternity in business
Beta Sigma—professional business fraternity for women
CSBA—Chicano business students association
CUAMA—University of Colorado student chapter of the American Marketing Association
Delta Phi Epsilon—honorary graduate fraternity in business education
Delta Sigma Pi—professional business fraternity for men
MBA Association—University of Colorado association of master’s students in business
Phi Chi Theta—professional business and economics fraternity for women
Rho Epsilon—professional real estate fraternity
Sigma lota Epsilon—professional and honorary management fraternity
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. Understanding of the activities that constitute business enterprise and of the principles underlying administration of those activities.
2. Ability to think logically and analytically through the kinds of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. Comprehension of the human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the arts of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Each student in the College of Business is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic requirements and regulations established for the College and for the student’s classes. Upon admission to the College of Business,, the student has the responsibility for conferring with the associate dean or the student adviser in the College concerning his academic program.
Standards of Performance
Each student is held to basic standards of performance established for his classes in respect to attendance, active participation in course work, promptness in completion of assignments, correct English usage both in writing and in speech, accuracy in calculations, and general quality of scholastic workmanship. Fulfillment of these fundamental responsibilities must be recognized


College of Business and Administration / 51
by a student as a requirement for continuance and as an essential condition for achievement of satisfactory academic standing. Only those who meet these standards should expect to be recommended for a degree.
In general, examinations are required in all courses for all students, including graduating seniors.
To be in good standing, the student must have an overall grade-point average of not less than 2.0 (C) for all course work attempted. This includes both business and nonbusiness courses and applies to work taken at all of the University campuses.
When spring semester grades become available, the College of Business Committee on Academic Deficiency will review the records of all students not meeting academic standards. Students below standard will be notified of (1) probationary status of one academic year or (2) suspension.
To return from probationary status to good standing, the student must not only achieve a grade-point average of 2.0 or better for the academic year but also bring his cumulative grade average on all courses attempted, and on all College of Business courses attempted, to a
2.0 level or above.
To receive credit, all courses must be listed on the student’s registration in the Office of Admissions and Records. Courses completed on the University of Colorado Denver Campus are credited toward College of Business degree requirements exactly as the same courses taken on the Boulder Campus. Credits earned on the Denver Campus are applicable toward residence requirements only when earned after admission to the College of Business.
Transfer Credit
Credits in business subjects transferred from other institutions to the University of Colorado will be limited to the number of credit hours given for similar work in the regular offerings of the College of Business. In general, the College will limit transfer credit for business courses taken at a lower division level, which it applies toward degree requirements, to such courses as the College offers at that level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is given by the appropriate division head. Transfer students must take 30 hours of degree requirements in residency. For a detailed explanation of transfer credit, see the General Information section of this bulletin.
Cooperation Education Credit
Cooperative education courses must be approved by the Office of the Associate Dean. A maximum of 12 hours of nonclassroom sources of credit will be counted toward the B.S. degree in business, with not more than 3 hours of such credit per semester. Such courses will be administered in the same manner as Independent Study credit.
Correspondence Credit
Not more than 9 semester hours of credit in business courses taken through correspondence study at the University of Colorado or any other institution of higher learning will be counted toward the B.S. degree in
business. All correspondence courses will be evaluated by the Office of the Associate Dean to determine their acceptability.
Credit by Examination
Students who are able to offer substantial evidence of prior study of the subject matter of a given course may make application for an advanced standing examination. If performance on the examination is satisfactory, the student will be given credit for the course but will not receive a grade for the course. A student who has received a failing grade in a course may not take an advanced standing examination in the same course. Arrangements are made through the Office of Admissions and Records.
General College Level Examination credits (CLEP) are not acceptable under the present program (NBC/ 120). Those students under the old program (OBC/ 128) may receive credit for certain General Examinations.
Students may use CLEP in lieu of B.Ad. 400 courses normally taken to establish proficiency for registration in graduate business courses. Students are responsible for checking with the Graduate Office of Business Administration for details and approval.
ROTC Credit
Students may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours credit in courses completed in the advanced ROTC program on the Boulder Campus toward nonbusiness elective requirements and toward the 120 semester-hour total degree requirements for the B.S. degree in business. No credit toward degree requirements is granted for basic (freshman and sophomore) ROTC courses.
Independent Study Credit
Upper division undergraduate business students desiring to do work beyond regular business or nonbusiness course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the students must have prior approval of the associate dean. Complete information and request forms are available in the Office of the Associate Dean.
A maximum of 12 semester hours of nonclassroom sources of credit may be applied toward a B.S. degree in business, with not more than 3 hours of such credit per semester.
Adding and Dropping Courses
1. Students will be allowed to drop and add during the first two weeks of the semester with no signatures required on the Drop/Add form.
2. After the second week, the instructor must indicate either a drop “without credit” or failing. The dean’s signature is not required.
3. After the tenth week, courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control (accident, illness, etc.); in addition to the instructor’s certification (as in 2 above), the student’s dean must approve the drop.


52 / University of Colorado at Denver
Withdrawal
A student leaving the University before the end of the semester should secure a Withdrawal Form from the Office of the Associate Dean and follow the instructions on the form. The completed form should be returned to the Office of Admissions and Records. Students who attend classes will be charged an appropriate amount or receive a refund according to a definite schedule published in the official Schedule of Courses each term.
Registration for Business Courses
A student may register for only those courses for which he has the stated prerequisite training. If junior standing is required, the student should have earned at least 60 semester hours of credit; for senior standing, 90 semester hours.
Scholastic Load
The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate student in the College of Business is 15 semester hours, with 19 hours the maximum except as indicated below. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s load.
A student having a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher for the most recent semester in which he completed at least 15 semester hours, with the approval of the associate dean, may register for a load exceeding 19 semester hours.
Pass/Fail
A maximum of 16 hours of a combination of business and/or nonbusiness course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree in business. Transfer students are limited to 1 semester hour pass/fail for every 8 attempted at the University. For business majors, pass/fail courses may not be included in “core” courses or in the area of emphasis. Advanced standing examinations will count toward the 16 hours of option. A maximum of 6 hours of pass/fail may be taken in any one semester. Complete information may be obtained from the College of Business office.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Admission of Freshmen
The College of Business and Administration expects entering freshmen to present 15 units of the following
secondary course work:
Units
English _____________________________________________________ 3
Mathematics (college preparatory) ___________________________ 2
Natural science (lab-science course) ________________________ 2
Social science (including history) ________________________ 2
Electives (areas such as foreign languages, additional courses in English, mathematics, natural or social sciences; may include up to 2 credits in business) _________ 6
15
Preferred Admission. Students given first consideration are those who rank in the upper half of their high school graduating class, have a combined Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) score of 1000 or above or a composite American College Test (ACT) score of 23 or above, and have completed the high school course units as recommended by the appropriate college.
Considered on an Individual Basis. Students considered on an individual basis are those who rank in the lower half of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and show variations from the high school course unit “expectations.”
Admission of Transfer and Former Students
Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students to the University of Colorado (see General Information section).
Former students who have attended another college or university and who have completed 12 or more semester hours must reapply as transfer students and must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted to be eligible for readmission.
A maximum of 72 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree in the College of Business and Administration.
Students who do not meet the prescribed requirements may petition the Office of Admissions and Records for special consideration for entrance. Doubtful cases will be referred to the associate dean of the College.
Intra-university Transfer
Students seeking admission to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University must formally apply at the Office of Admissions and Records for intra-university transfer. Application for admission to the College must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records at least 90 days prior to the appropriate deadlines.
Recommended Preparation for Study in Business
Prospective students in business are encouraged to pursue a broad college preparatory program in high school, with particular emphasis on English, mathematics, the social sciences, and speech.
A candidate for the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree normally enters as a freshman. During the first two years he acquires a broad background in mathematics, communications, and the social and behavioral sciences. He will complete required basic courses in each of the core areas of business study, for the most part during his junior year. The remainder of his degree program will consist of courses selected to further his professional preparation through more advanced work and electives.
REQUIREMENTS FOR B.S. (BUSINESS) DEGREE
The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is conferred after completion of these requirements:
Total Credits. Not fewer than 120 acceptable semester hours of credit, of which at least 51 hours must be in nonbusiness courses (including 9 hours of upper division work) and at least 51 hours in business courses.


College of Business and Administration / 53
The remaining 18 hours may be in either, or some combination of both.
Residence. Completion of at least one full academic year’s work (normally 30 semester hours, usually in the senior year, after admission to the College of Business and Administration, and to include the 12 hours in the area of emphasis). Courses completed on the Denver Campus after the candidate has been admitted to the College are acceptable toward this requirement.
Grade Average. A scholastic grade average of at least 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree; an average of at least 2.0 for all business courses; an average of at least 2.0 in the student’s area of emphasis.
Graduation with Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty of the College of Business, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation.
Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado while completing 30 hours as a business school student will be graduated cum laude.
Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado while completing 30 hours as a business school student will be graduated magna cum laude.
Courses. Completion of required courses in six groups: (A) Societal Studies, (B) Behavioral Studies, (C) Communications, (D) Information Systems, Quantitative Methods, and Data Processing, (E) Business Processes, and (F) Electives. These requirements are summarized below.
Required Courses
Group A: Societal Studies
The activities of a business enterprise are carried on within a complex economic-political-social-cultural environment. Understanding of that environment is indispensable for socially responsible and successful endeavor.
Required Areas Semester Hours
Principles of Political Science (Pol. Sci. 100) ___________ 3
American National Government (Pol. Sci. 110) ______________ 3
Principles of Sociology ___________________________________ 3
Principles of Economics (Econ. 201 and 202) _______________ 6
Business Law (B.Law 300) __________________________________ 3
Business and Government (B.Ad. 410) or
Business and Society (B.Ad. 411) ___________________________ 3
21
Group B: Behavioral Studies
Management is concerned with the activities of people and with their behavior individually, in work groups, and as members of an organization. In this regard the perceptions and methods of the behavioral sciences contribute increasingly to the understanding and effectiveness on the part of managers. In addition to courses in Group A which are both societal and behavioral, these behavioral studies are required:
Required Areas Semester Hours
Principles of Psychology______________________________________ 6
Introduction to Management
and Organization (Org.B. 300) _____________________________- 3
9
Group C: Communications
Probably no skills are more essential for effectiveness in management than those in communication, both oral and written. The business curriculum provides for further development of these skills in alternative ways, depending upon the student’s inclinations and present communication competency. Two courses selected from the following list are required (6 hours):
Required Areas Semester Hours
Exposition (Engl. 100 or 101) ________________________\
Introduction to Literature (Engl. 110 or 111 or 112) _J
Report Writing (Engl. 315) ___________________________I
Principles of Communication (C.T. 202) ...............l
Communication and Social Change (C.T. 210) __________I 0
Discussion (C.T. 315) _______________________________I
Argumentation (C.T. 320) ____________________________1
Persuasion (C.T. 420) _______________________________'
6
Group D: Information Systems, Quantitative Methods, and Data Processing
Management relies heavily upon information systems, mathematical and statistical tools of analysis, and increasingly sophisticated decision-making techniques. In respect to each of these, computers may play an important role. These courses are required:
Required Areas Semester Hours
Mathematics (Math. 107 and 108) ............................ 6
Business Information and the Computer (B.Ad. 200) .......... 3
Business Statistics (Stat. 200) ____________________________ 3
Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects (Acct. 200) ______ 3
15
Group E: Business Processes
This group of courses is devoted to study of the basic processes involved in any enterprise. Using this background, the student pursues more advanced study in a field (area of emphasis) in which he has developed particular interest. In the area of emphasis he develops facility in more complicated forms of analysis and further develops his qualifications for employment.
Required Areas Semester Hours
Basic Finance (Fin. 305) _____________________________________ 3
Operations Analysis (Mgt.Org. 300) ___________________________ 3
Principles of Marketing (Mk. 300) ____________________________ 3
Cases and Concepts in Business Policy (B.Ad. 450) or Management Game and Cases in Business Policy (B.Ad. 451) or
Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship
(B.Ad. 452) ................................................. 3
Area of emphasis (see description of the areas available) .12
24
Group F: Electives
Over one-third of the total hours required for the B.S. degree in business are in elective courses. These elective studies will almost certainly enhance the student’s professional qualifications. Excess hours in required areas may be used as electives. A maximum of 12 hours credit in advanced ROTC on the Boulder Campus may be applied toward nonbusiness elective requirements. A maximum of 6 hours credit for physical education theory courses also may be applied to nonbusiness electives. Physical education activity courses may not be counted toward a B.S. degree in business.


54 / University of Colorado at Denver
In the allocation of elective hours, these requirements
must be met:
Semester Hours
Business electives_______________________________________ 9
Nonbusiness electives, at least 9 hours of which
must be in courses numbered 300 and above_____________18
Free electives—either business or nonbusiness
or any combination___________________________________ 18
Total Electives ________________________________________.45
TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS______________________________ 120
Model Degree Program
Freshman Year Semester Hours
♦Communications ________________________________________ 6
College Algebra (Math. 107) _____________________________ 3
College Calculus (Math. 108) ____________________________ 3
Principles of Political Science (Pol. Sci. 100) _________ 3
American National Government (Pol. Sci. 110) .......... 3
t Principles of Sociology________________________________ 3
^Introduction to Business (B.Ad. 100) ___________________ 3
Nonbusiness electives____________________________________ 6
Total semester hours ____________________________________30
Group B: Behavioral Studies _____________________________ 9
Group C: Communications _________________________________ 6
Group D: Information Systems, Quantitative Methods,
and Data Processing____________________________ 15
Group E: Business Processes_____________________________ 24
Group F: Electives______________________________________ 45
TOTAL HOURS...............................-__________120
Residence requirement ____________________________________ 30
A Diploma Card must be filed with the Office of the College of Business and Administration at least 90 days prior to the desired graduation.
Area of Emphasis—Required Courses
Although one area of emphasis will be listed on the student’s official records, students so desiring may accomplish the effect of a dual area of emphasis by careful selection of courses. A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for the second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours.
Sophomore Year
Principles of Economics (Econ. 201, 202) ___________________ 6
^Principles of Psychology__________________________________ 6
Business Information and the Computer (B.Ad. 200) __________ 3
Business Statistics (Stat. 200) _____________________________ 3
Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects (Acct. 200) ______ 3
§Nonbusiness electives_______________________________________ 9
Total semester hours_____.__________________________________30
Junior Year
Principles of Marketing (Mk. 300) ___________________________ 3
Basic Finance (Fin. 305) ____________________________________ 3
Introduction to Management and Organization
(Mgt.Org. 330) ________________________________________ 3
Operations Analysis (Mgt.Org. 300) __________________________ 3
Business Law (B.Law 300) ................................... 3
§Nonbusiness electives ______________________________________ 3
Business electives___________________________________________ 3
Either business or nonbusiness electives_____________________ 9
Total semester hours_________________________________________30
Senior Year
Business Policy (B.Ad. 450, 451, or 452) ___________________ 3
Business and Government (B.Ad. 410) or
Business and Society (B.Ad. 411) _________________________ 3
Area of emphasis requirements________________________________12
Business electives........................................ 3
Either business or nonbusiness electives_____________________ 9
Total semester hours_________________________________________30
Graduation Check List
The student alone is responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements. Questions concerning graduation should be directed to the Office of the College of Business and Administration.
Graduation Requirements Semester Hours
Group A: Societal Studies____________________________________ 21
•Courses selected from the following: Engl. 100 or 101; Engl. 110, 111, or 112; Engl. 120 or 121; C.T. 202; C.T. 210; C.T. 315; C.T. 320; C.T. 420.
fRequirement may be met with any Principles of Sociology course for 3 semester hours.
XApplies as a business elective. It is recommended, but not required. §For completion of the B.S. (Bus.) degree requirements, the student’s rogram must include at least 9 semester hours in upper-division non-usiness courses.
#Requirements may be met by taking Psy. 100 plus one of the following 3-semester-hour courses: Psy. 133 (an array of 3 one-hour courses), 364, 395, 430, 433, 493, or 496; or Psy. 203 and 204; or Psy. 201 and 202.
Accounting
Required: Acct. 214, 322, 323, 432, and one three-hour accounting elective.
Computer-Based Information Systems Required: C.S. 312; Mg.Sc. 445, 455; Stat. 490.
Finance
Required: Fin. 401, 402, 433, 455.
Recommended electives: Fin. 434, 440, 453, 454, 484.
Management and Organization Personnel and Industrial Relations Area Required: Mgt.Org. 434, 438.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 333, 335, 337, 440, 444, 447, 450, 452, 456; B.Ad. 452, 470; O.Ad. 440; Econ. 461; Psy. 485, 487; Soc. 479.
Operations Management Area
Required (any two of the following three courses): Mgt.Org. 440, 444, 447.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 335, 337, 434, 450, 460; Acct. 432; B.Ad. 452, 470; Mg.Sc. 445, 455; Mk. 485; Stat. 470, 480, 484.
Organizational Behavior Area
Required (any two of the following three courses): Mgt.Org. 333, 335, 337.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 434, 438, 444, 447, 450, 456, 460; B.Ad. 470.
Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship Area Required (any two of the following three courses): B.Ad. 470; Fin. 401; Mgt.Org. 438.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 333, 335, 434, 440, 447, 450, 452, 460; Acct. 322, 432; B.Ad. 452; Fin. 401, 402; Mk. 480; O.Ad. 440.
Transportation and Traffic Management Area Required (any two of the following three courses): Mgt.Org. 450, 452, 458.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 337, 434, 438, 440, 456, 460; Acct. 322, 432; B.Ad. 470; Mk. 470, 485; O.Ad. 440, 441.
Marketing
Required: Mk. 330, plus 9 additional semester hours of marketing beyond Mk. 300.
Office Administration
Required: O.Ad. 300, 420, 421, 440, 441.
Real Estate
Required: R.Es. 430, 473, 401 or Fin. 454.
Recommended electives (minimum 3 semester hours): Acct. 441; Ins. 484; Fin. 401, 402, 455; R.Es. 533; Arch. 450, 451.


College of Business and Administration / 55
Statistics
Required (any four of the following six courses): Stat. 300, 470,
480, 482, 484, 490.
Recommended electives: Mgt.Org. 440, 444, 447; Mk. 300;
Mg.Sc, 445, 455.
COMBINED PROGRAMS
Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Such combined programs have been arranged for engineering and business, pharmacy and business, environmental design and business, and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well.
The two programs of study proceed concurrently, terminating together with the award of two degrees. Generally, at least five years will be needed for such combined programs.
For students in combined programs, the requirements for the degree in business are as follows:
1. Completion of at least 48 semester credits in business and economics, to include Econ. 201 and 202 (6 semester hours), required courses in business (30 semester hours), and a business area of emphasis (12 semester hours).
2. Completion of at least 30 of these semester hours at the University of Colorado while concurrently enrolled in the College of Business.
3. Completion of nonbusiness requirements in mathematics, communications, and the social and behavioral sciences in a degree program approved in advance by the College of Business. In addition, for some courses and areas of emphasis, there are prerequisite requirements which must be met.
4. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business.
Shown below is the combined engineering-business program. For other combinations, students must consult with the associate dean of the College of Business.
The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows:
Courses Semester Hours
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics (Should be completed during the student’s sophomore or junior
year.) ________________________________________________ _ 6
Acct. 220. Introductory Accounting ... 3
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer ___________ 3
Stat. 200. Business Statistics________________________________ 3
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing ............................... 3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance________________________________________ 3
Mgt.Org. 300. Operations Analysis___________________.... ... 3
Mgt.Org. 330. Introduction to Management
and Organization _____________________________________ 3
B.Law 300. Business Law_______________________________________ 3
B.Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B.Ad. 411.
Business and Society_______________________________ 3
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy (Cases and Concepts in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 451. (Management Games and Cases in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 452. (Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship) _________________________________________ 3
Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields: accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, real estate, small business management, statistics, or transportation management. All work
in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado College of Business.
Areas of Emphasis ________________________ 12
48
GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The graduate programs leading to the Master of Business Administration degree are offered through the faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration. (Note: An application for admission to the Graduate School of Business Administration must be accompanied by a nonrefundable fee of $20 when the application is submitted.)
Graduate programs leading to the Doctor of Business Administration, Master of Science, and Master of Business Education are offered through the University of Colorado Graduate School. Master's degree programs in business are accredited by the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business.
Requirements for Admission—Master’s Program
Admission to the graduate programs will be determined by the following criteria:
1. Applicant’s undergraduate academic record.
2. Letters of recommendation submitted from former teachers or employers.
3. The applicant’s scores on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business, which is required of all applicants. (This test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the country. For information and to make application for the test, write to the Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 966, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.)
In general, students failing to meet minimum standards are not admitted on provisional status. Under exceptional circumstances, a student may be admitted on a provisional status for a specified probationary term. At the end of the probationary period, the Business Graduate Committee will review the student’s performance and recommend to the dean whether the student should be admitted to regular degree status or dropped from the graduate program.
Only graduate students admitted as regular degree or provisional students and senior undergraduates in engineering who intend to pursue graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the 400-level “fundamentals” courses (which are specifically for degree candidates) or for any of the required 600-level courses in the M.B.A. program. These courses are not open to nondegree special students.
Students who were registered as special students before the fall semester 1970 may request that work completed as a special student be applied toward a graduate degree. Students registering as special students after the fall semester 1970 can request that work taken as a special student be applied toward a degree only if they are admitted to the Graduate School during the term in which they are taking work as a special student.
Seniors in this University who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who need not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet their requirements for bachelor’s degrees, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the director of graduate studies.


56 / University of Colorado at Denver
Completed applications, including ATGSB scores, transcripts, and letters of reference, must be in the Office of Graduate Studies, Graduate School of Business Administration, not later than 60 days prior to the term for which admission is sought.
Requirements for Degrees—Master's Programs
Students in master’s degree programs in business are expected to have or to acquire an adequate background preparation in:
Accounting Business Finance Business Law Financial Institutions Management Science
Marketing
Operations Management Organizational Behavior Principles of Economics Statistics
Statistics, Financial Institutions, Management Science, and Introduction to Management and Organization are not required for candidates for the Master of Business Education degree.
An undergraduate degree program in business administration usually provides appropriate background in each of these fields. At the University of Colorado, the appropriate undergraduate courses are: Acct. 200 and 214; B.Law 300; Econ. 201 and 202; Fin. 305; Op.Mg. 300; Org.B. 300; Mk. 300; Stat. 200 and 490.
For students lacking such preparation, 3-credit graduate fundamentals courses are offered in each of the background fields: Econ. 400, B.Ad. 401 (Acct.), B.Ad. 402 (Stat.), B.Ad. 403 (Mk.), B.Ad. 404 (Org. B.), B.Ad. 405 (Fin.), B.Ad. 406 (Law), and B.Ad. 407 (Mg.Sc.). These fundamentals courses do not carry graduate credit, nor may they be used to satisfy requirements for the bachelor’s degree in business. They are open only to graduate students admitted on a regular or provisional status, qualified nonbusiness senior undergraduates who intend to pursue graduate study in business, and special students who apply for graduate admission during the term in which they are enrolled for the course.
All students entering the Master of Business Administration or Master of Science programs are required to take either B.Ad. 402 (Fundamentals of Business Statistics) or to pass satisfactorily a qualifying examination covering this subject matter.
A student with a bachelor’s degree in business normally can complete the requirements for the master’s degree in one year. Students with no undergraduate work in business normally require two years.
Advising. A graduate degree candidate should report to the head of the division of his area of emphasis, the associate dean, or student adviser for advising.
During his first term of residence, each student should prepare a degree plan. This plan with appropriate signatures should be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies.
Qualifying Examinations. Satisfactory performance on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business and admission into a master’s program with the status of a regular degree student will constitute the qualifying examination for graduate study.
Course Load. The normal course load for graduate students is 12 semester hours. Additional hours may be taken upon approval of the student’s adviser, subject to the general rules of the Graduate School.
Minimum Hours Required as Regular Degree or
Provisional Student. A candidate for a master’s degree in business must complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work after being admitted to the program. This requirement in no way changes the minimum of 30 semester hours needed for a degree.
Comprehensive Examination. Each candidate for a master’s degree is required to take a comprehensive-final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination is given near the end of the candidate’s last semester of residence while he is still taking required courses for the degree, provided he is making satisfactory progress in those courses.*
It is the responsibility of each student during his last term of residency to file an application for candidacy with the Office of Graduate Studies at least 10 weeks before the date of the comprehensive examination. Comprehensive examinations are given in November, April, and July.
Minimum Grade-Point Average. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved in courses taken after the student’s admission to the graduate program. If a student’s cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0 he will be placed on academic probation and given one regular semester (summer terms excluded) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required average within the allotted time period will result in dismissal.
Work receiving the lowest passing grade, D, may not be counted toward a degree, nor may it be accepted for the removal of deficiencies.
Time Limit. All work, including the comprehensive-final examination, should be completed within five years or six successive summers. Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination. A candidate for the master’s degree is expected to complete his work with reasonable continuity. (Under unusual circumstances, students whose residency is interrupted for legitimate reasons, such as military service, may apply for an extension of time.)
Master of Business Administration
The Master of Business Administration program is devoted to the concepts, analytical tools, and communication skills required for competent and responsible administration. The administration of an enterprise is viewed in its entirety and within its social, political, and economic environment.
In addition to the general requirements for a master’s degree listed above, the candidate for the M.B.A. degree must complete the specific requirements of the M.B.A. curriculum (30 semester hours) as follows:
Core Requirements Semester Hours
a. Business and Its Environment
B.Ad. 610. Business and Its Environment I_____________ 3
B.Ad. 611. Business and Its Environment II____________ 3
b. Analysis and Control
B.Ad. 615. Business and Economic Analysis_____________ 3
(B.Ad. 620. Administrative Controls .................. 3
fB.Ad. 630. Business Research ........................ 3
°A student must be registered when he takes this examination. fB.Ad. 620 and/or B.Ad. 630 mav be waived if a student has had similar work in his graduate or undergraduate program. Waiver will be upon recommendation of faculty teaching the course(s) and approval of the director of graduate studies. In such cases, the additional hours will be taken as electives or, upon approval of his area adviser and the Graduate Committee, in his area of emphasis. Waiver will be upon petition to the director of graduate studies.


College of Business and Administration / 57
c. Human Factors
B.Ad. 640. Organizational Behavior.................... 3
d. Planning and Policy
B.Ad. 650. Business Policy_____________________________ 3
21
Area Of Emphasis
a. Area of Emphasis________________________________________ 9f
Total __________________________________________________30
Areas of emphasis include accounting, finance, management science (see below), marketing!, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, and transportation management.
Courses comprising the area of emphasis must be approved by the head of the division or his designated representative.
M.B.A. Management Science Program
For the student who selects management science as his area of emphasis, the M.B.A. program is as follows:
Semester Hours
Policy Formulation and Administration (15 semester hours)
B.Ad. 610-611. Business and Its Environment I and II _ 6
B.Ad. 615. Business and Economic Analysis_____________ 3
B.Ad. 640. Organizational Behavior____________________ 3
B.Ad. 650. Business Policy____________________________ 3
Analysis and Control—Area of Emphasis (15 semester hours)
At least three courses from the following:
Mg.Sc. 615. Decision Analysis......................... 3
Mg.Sc. 625. Computer Oriented Decision Modeling_______ 3
Mg.Sc. 635. Mathematical Programming __________________ 3
Mg.Sc. 675. Seminar in Management Science_____________ 3
Mg.Sc. 685. Advanced Topics in Management Science ____ 3
At least two additional courses from those listed above or from the following:
Stat. 470. Elements of Mathematical Statistics _______ 3
Stat. 480. Multiple Correlation and Regression
Analysis ____________________________________________ 3
Stat. 482. Sampling and Inference_____________________ 3
Stat. 484. Business Forecasting_______________________ 3
Op.Mg. 640. Operations Management______________________ 3
E.D.E.E. 548. Applied Probability Models _____________ 3*
E.D.E.E. 545. Production Automation Systems___________ 3*
E.D.E.E. 595. Selected Topics_______________________1-6*
B.Ad. 620. Administrative Controls____________________ 3
No thesis is required in the M.B.A. program. In the total program there must be a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work at the 600 level. Independent study courses (499 or 699) are normally not acceptable for credit in the final 30 semester hours of the M.B.A. program.
M.B.A. candidates may begin work for their final 30 semester hours at the start of the fall, spring, or summer terms.
Master of Science
The Master of Science degree affords opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and a related minor field.
fA minimum of 3 hours of courses at the 600 level must be taken in the area of emphasis. (The student also must have a minimum of 24 hours of 600-level courses.)
£ Requirements for an area of emphasis in marketing in the M.B.A. will consist of 9 hours as follows: Mk. 600, Mk. 605, and one additional 3-hour marketing course at the 400 level or higher.
•With the approval of the head of the Management Science Division.
Major Fields. For detailed information concerning requirements and recommended programs for each of the major fields, students should consult the following professors:
Accounting________________________________Professor Tracy
Finance ________________________________Professor Kester
Management Science______________________Professor Jedamus
Marketing_______________________________Professor Cateora
Organizational Behavior_________________Professor Steinmetz
Minor Fields. Fields available in the College of Business and Administration for selection as a minor are:
Accounting Office Administration
Business Education Operations Management
Finance Organizational Behavior
Management Science Transportation Management
Marketing
With the approval of the student’s adviser, minor fields may be chosen among other business subjects, from the social sciences, or from law. In exceptional cases, minors are permitted in other subject matter areas on recommendation of the Business Graduate Committee and with the approval of the dean of the Graduate School.
Minimum Requirements
The minimum requirements for the M.S. degree, after all undergraduate background deficiencies have been removed, are normally met by Plan I, shown below. Candidates m:y be permitted to fulfill the degree requirements under Plan II, upon approval in advance by their advisory committee.
Plan I. In this plan, the requirement is 30 semester hours of graduate credit including a thesis (4 to 6 hours credit) based upon original research by the candidate. At least 16 of the 30 semester hours must be in courses numbered at the 600 level or above. A minimum of 20 semester hours credit, including B.Ad. 630 (Business Research), is required of all candidates and, including the thesis, must be earned in a major field. Not fewer than three courses, normally 9 semester hours but not fewer than 6, must be completed in a minor field.
Plan II. In this plan, a minimum of 30 semester hours must be completed, of which at least 16 must be in courses numbered at the 600 level or above. Requirements must be met in both a major and a minor field. No thesis is required.
Candidates for the M.S. degree, whether following Plan I or Plan II, may not receive credit for 600 level courses with B.Ad. prefix, except B.Ad. 630 and, in some cases, B.Ad. 620 (Administrative Controls).
For both Plan I and Plan II, there will be written comprehensive examinations covering major and minor fields. The candidate’s committee may require an oral final comprehensive examination subsequent to the written examination.
Doctor of Business Administration
Please refer to the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Bulletin for information regarding the Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.) program.


58 / University of Colorado at Denver
Description of Courses
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration offer courses in the subject areas shown below:
Accounting
Business Administration Business Education Business Law Finance Insurance
Management Science Marketing
Office Administration Operations Management Organizational Behavior Real Estate
Small Business Management Statistics
Transportation Management
Courses numbered from 100 to 299 are intended for lower division students.
Courses numbered from 300 to 399 are intended for upper division students. Sophomores in the College of Undergraduate Studies also will be admitted if they are considered eligible by that college to register for upper division courses.
Courses numbered 400 to 499 are intended for upper division students. With a few exceptions, they also carry graduate credit. The 400 numbered “fundamentals” courses—B.Ad. 401 (Acct.), B.Ad. 402 (Stat.), B.Ad. 403 (Mk.), B.Ad. 404 (Org.B.), B.Ad. 405 (Fin.), B.Ad. 406 (Law), B.Ad. 407 (Mg.Sc.) — are open only to regular degree or provisional graduate students, not to those admitted with nondegree status, and to nonbusiness seniors who expect to pursue graduate studies in business and who appear to have the qualifications for admission to such a program.
Courses numbered in the 600s are intended primarily for graduate students.
For each course there is indicated the course prefix; the course number and, after the hyphen, the number of credits carried by the course; the course title and description; and, following, the course prerequisites.
Schedules of classes are issued before the start of each semester. These provide a complete list of offerings for the forthcoming semester, together with names of instructors, class hours, and room assignments.
ACCOUNTING
Acct. 200-3. Introductory Accounting—Finonciol Aspects. The preparation and interpretation of the principal financial statements of the business enterprise, with emphasis on asset and liability valuation problems and the determination of net income. Prer., sophomore standing.
Acct. 214-3. Introductory Accounting—Managerial Aspects. The
analysis of cost behavior and the role of accounting in the planning and control of business enterprises, with emphasis on management decision-making uses of accounting information. Prer., Acct. 200. Accounting majors must take this course.
Acct. 322-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting. Intensive analysis of problems and theory of financial statements of condition and net income and other published financial statements of business organizations. Consideration of the role of professional accounting organizations in establishing generally acceptable accounting principles, especially the AICPA and AAA. Prer., Acct. 214.
Acct. 323-3. Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice I. Continuation of Acct. 322. Prer., Acct. 322.
Acct. 424-3. Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice II. Continuation of Acct. 323, with additional emphasis on theory and current problems. Prer., Acct. 323.
Acct. 425-3. Accounting Problems and Cases. In-depth analysis of contemporary accounting issues and problems, the development of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Prer., Acct. 322 and 323.
Acct 432-3. Cost Accounting. Cost analysis of the manufacturing, marketing, and administrative function of business organizations, primarily for purposes of control and decision making. Prer., Acct. 214, Mgt.Org. 330, Stat. 200.
Acct. 441-3. Income Tax Accounting. Provisions and procedures of federal income tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and business organizations, including the management problems of tax planning and compliance. Prer., Acct. 214.
Acct. 442-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Continuation of Acct. 441, with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partnerships, corporations, and estates and trusts. Consideration also is given to federal estate and gift taxes. Prer., Acct. 441.
Acct. 454-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. The design and analysis of management information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers, computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process. Prer., 9 semester hours of accounting. Acct. 462-3. Auditing Theory. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the American Institute of CPA’s reviewed. Prer., Acct. 323 or consent of instructor.
Acct 480 3. Business and Governmental Budgeting and Control. Development and operation of various budgets for planning and control of business and governmental activities. Includes the integration of program budgets, responsibility center budgets, and fund accounting in governmental accounting systems. Prer., Acct. 214 or consent of instructor.
Acct. 612-3. Financial Accounting Practice and Procedures. Designed to be a graduate-level treatment of substantially the same material covered in Acct. 322 and 323. Should not be taken by students who have taken Acct. 322 and 323 or their equivalent. Restricted to graduate students. Prer., B.Ad. 401 or equivalent. NOTE: This course is not a 600-level seminar for purposes of the M.B.A. area of emphasis in accounting.
Acct. 626-3. Seminar in Managerial Accounting. In-depth exploration of the broad professional field of managerial accounting, especially as related to organizational decision making, planning, and control. Development and current problems of the managerial accounting function analyzed. Prer., Acct. 432 and 454 or equivalent.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
B Ad. 100-3. Introduction to Business. Nature of business enterprise; role of business in our society; problems confronting business management. Career opportunities in business. Business students are advised to take this course during their freshman year. Not open to upper division students in the College of Business. Open only to freshmen and sophomores.
B.Ad. 200-3. Business Information and the Computer. A study of the sources and uses of business information. Includes computer programming, data presentation, descriptive statistics, and interpretation of business, economic, and demographic data. Prer., Math. 108 or equivalent. Students should enroll in B.Ad. 200 and Stat. 200 in consecutive semesters.
B.Ad. 410-3. Business and Government. The study of government regulation of the business system. Topics include regulation of business concentration, markets for labor, money, other resources, and final products. Prer., Econ. 201 and 202. Completion of Pol. Sci. 110 is recommended before taking this course. Does not carry graduate credit for majors in business. If both B.Ad. 410 and 411 are taken, elective credit will be given for the latter to the business student.
B.Ad. 411-3. Business and Society. An examination of interrelationships between business, society, and the environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socio-economic-business system, current public policy issues, and social responsibilities and ethics. Prer., Econ. 201 and 202. Completion of Pol.Sci. 110 and Soc. Ill is recommended before taking this course. If both B.Ad. 410 and 411 are taken, elective credit will be given for the latter to the business student.
B.Ad. 450-3. Cases and Concepts in Business Policy. Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, social-political, technological, and competition components of the external environment with the internal characteristics of the firm; and deriving through analysis the appropriate interaction between the firm and its environment to facilitate accomplishment of the firm’s objectives. Extensive use of actual case studies from business supple-


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mented by readings in business policy and strategy. Required for graduation. Students should register for this course only after completion of all other core course requirements for the B.S. degree. Does not carry graduate credit. Prer., Fin. 305, Mk. 300, Mgt.Org. 300, Mgt.Org. 330, and Stat. 200.
The following graduate fundamentals courses (B.Ad. 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, and 407) do not carry graduate credit, nor may they be used to satisfy requirements for the bachelor’s degree in business. They are open only to graduate students admitted on a regular or provisional status, to qualified nonbusiness senior undergraduates who intend to pursue graduate study in business and to special students who will be applying for graduate admission during the term in which they are enrolled for the course.
B.Ad. 401-3. Fundamentals of Accounting. Provides basic understanding of accounting essential for graduate study of business. Open only to graduate degree candidates and qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for graduate business study. Does not carry graduate credit.
B.Ad. 402-3. Fundamentals of Business Statistics. Provides basic understanding of business statistics essential for graduate study of business. Open only to graduate degree candidates and to qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for graduate business study. Does not carry graduate credit.
B.Ad. 403-3. Fundamentals of Marketing. Provides basic understanding of marketing essential for graduate study of business. Open only to graduate degree candidates and to qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for business graduate study. Does not carry graduate credit. This course may be waived if the student has completed Mk. 300 and one additional 3-hour marketing course approved by his adviser.
B.Ad. 404-3. Fundamentals of Management and Organization'. Provides basic understanding of organization theory, personnel management, labor relations, and organizational behavior essential for graduate study in business. Open only to graduate degree candidates and qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for business graduate study. Does not carry graduate credit.
B.Ad. 405-3. Fundamentals of Finance. Provides basic understanding of financial institutions and business finance essential for graduate study of business. Open only to graduate degree candidates and to qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for gradiu > ate business study. Does not carry graduate credit. Prer., B.Ad. 401 or equivalent.
B.Ad. 406-3. Legal Environment of Business. Provides basic understanding of the private and public law essential for graduate study in business. Open only to graduate degree candidates and to qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for business graduate study. Does not carry graduate credit.
B.Ad. 407-3. Introduction to Management Science. A survey of the analytical methods of management science operations research as applied to decision problems in business. A major objective of the course is to develop an understanding of the power and the limitations of mathematical-statistical models and to develop skills in problem formulation. Open only to graduate degree candidates and to qualified nonbusiness seniors preparing for graduate business study. Does not carry graduate credit. Prer., B.Ad. 402 or equivalent.
All candidates for the Master of Business Administration are required to complete B.Ad. 610, 611, 615, 620, 630, 640, and 650. With the exception of B.Ad. 620 and B.Ad. 630, they may not be counted toward the requirements of the Master of Science.
B.Ad. 610-3. Business and Its Environment I. Deals with the philosophy and role of business and business executives in social, governmental, and economic environment. Consideration is given to (1) executive’s social and ethical responsibilities to employees, customers, and general public; (2) relations between business and government, public regulation and social control of business (in general, political and legal processes as they affect democratic industrialized societies); (3) relations between business and organized labor.
B.Ad. 611-3. Business and Its Environment II. Continuation of B.Ad. 610.
B.Ad. 615-3 Business and Economic Analysis. A presentation of the concepts, tools, and methods of economic analysis relevant to a broad cross section of decisions within the business firm. Particular attention will be given to market demands and the interrelationships between price policy, costs, promotional outlays, operating rates and production schedules, capital budgets, and financing in the short and long run. Prer., Econ. 400 or equivalent.
B.Ad. 620-3. Administrative Controls. Nature and techniques of control in modern managerial context. Intensive case analysis to study theory and application of control methods. Prer., B.Ad. 401, 402, 405, or equivalents.
B.Ad. 630-3 Business Research. Nature, scope, and importance of business research and research methodolgy. Emphasizes sources of information, methods of presentation, methods of analysis, and interpretation of statistical data. Involves individual investigation and report writing on problems of current business interest.
B.Ad. 640-3. Organizational Behavior. Application of behavioral science concepts and research to management of organizations. Prer., B.Ad. 404 or equivalent.
B.Ad. 650-3. Business Policy. Emphasizes problem analysis and decision making at integrative-management level. Devoted to internal policy making. Considerable use of case method of instruction. Emphasis on integrated use of managerial accounting, statistics, and other tools of research, analysis, and control in making company-wide policy decisions.
BUSINESS LAW
B.Law. 300-3. Business Law. To understand the legal significance of business transactions as part of the decision-making process in business. Coverage of text and statutes includes: law and its enforcement; integration of the Uniform Commercial Code with the law of contracts, bailments, warehousemen and carriers, documents of title, sales of goods, and commercial paper. Prer., junior standing.
FINANCE
Fin. 305-3. Basic Finance. An introduction to finance and the financial management of business. The course includes a study of the monetary system and other institutions comprising the money and capital markets. It also includes a study of the financial manager’s role in business, with emphasis on the investment of capital in assets and on financing the asset requirements of business firms. Prer., Econ. 201 and 202, and Acct. 200.
Fin. 333-3. Investments. Study of the basic problems concerning the development and implementing a personal investment program. Includes analysis of investment risks, alternative investment media, designing and executing an investment program. Intended for business students not majoring in finance. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 355-3. Financial Markets. Discusses major operating characteristics and problems of money and capital markets, both national and international. Emphasizes the sources and availability of money and capital for financing business and the market structure for the employment of savings. Prer., Fin. 305. Fin'. 401-3. Business Finance I. The financial management of business, incorporating theoretical concepts, analytical methodology, and their practical application for financial decisions and policy formulation. Emphasizes planning and control of current assets, short-term financing, intermediate and long-term financing, and design of capital structure. Selected readings and case problems are used. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 402-3. Business Finance II. The financial management of business with emphasis on the following areas: long-term financing, hybrid securities and leasing, marketing security issues, cost of capital, evaluation of investments in capital assets, dividend policy, valuation, acquisitions, and capital structure adjustments. Selected readings and cases are used. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 433-3. Investment and Portfolio Management. Discusses investment problems and policies and the methodology for implementing them. Includes portfolio analysis, selection of investment media, and measurement of performance. Prer., Fin. 401; coreq., Fin. 402.
Fin. 434-3. Security Analysis. An application of the theories and methodology for the selection of investment media for implementing an investment portfolio. Prer., Fin. 402 and 433.


60 / University of Colorado at Denver
Fin. 440-3. International Financial Management. Considers international capital movements and balance of payments problems. Emphasizes special problems of international operations as they affect the financial functions. Reviews both public and private foreign and international institutions as well as the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 454-3. Mortgage Financing. Functions and practices of various real estate mortgage financing institutions. Embraces mortgage lending, servicing, and mortgage banking relative to all types and uses of real estate. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 455-3. Monetary and Fiscal Policy. Analyzes the theoretical and practical problems concerning the use of monetary and fiscal devices for controlling national and international economic relationships. Emphasizes the major theories and analytical models for current monetary and fiscal policies. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 601-3. Problems and Policies in Financial Management I. Emphasizes the planning and control responsibilities of financial management in relation to internal investment decisions and financing asset requirements. Analytical skills are developed in analyzing case studies covering a broad range of policies and problems. Specific topics include: management of working capital, capital position, short-term financing and intermediate and long-term financing, and designing the capital structure. Prer., B.Ad. 405 or equivalent.
Fin. 633-3. Investment Management and Analysis. Develops the theory of investment management and security values; portfolio management including the analysis of investment risks and constraints for both short- and long-run investment policies and objectives; the analysis and use of investment information; and the development and application of the tools for determining security values. Prer., Fin. 601 and 602, or equivalent.
INSURANCE
Ins. 484-3. Principles of Insurance. Fundamental principles of insurance and their application in life, disability, property, and liability insurance. Provides the basic knowledge for intelligent solution of personal and business insurance problems as well as for further specialized study of insurance.
MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION Operations Management
Mgt.Org. 300-3. Operations Analysis. An introduction to the application of analytical techniques in the design, implementation, and control of operational systems in manufacturing, service, public, and other organizations. Some topics which will be included are: inventory models, linear programming, forecasting, waiting line analysis, and quality control. Prer., Acct. 200; coreq., Stat. 200.
Mgt.Org. 440-3. Control Systems in Operations Management. Study of management problems and procedures in controlling operations of organizations. Application of quantitative methods and evaluation techniques to such areas as cost control, inventory control, quality control, and production control. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300.
Mgt.Org. 444-3. Sociotechnical Work Systems: Synthesis and Design.
A study of the relationships between people and the technical and physical environments in which they work. Includes consideration of the theory of and methods for analysis, measurement, and synthesis of work systems, and of organizational methods for stimulating innovation through work design. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300.
Mgt.Org. 447-3. Operations Management: Policy and Practice. Study of operations management policy formulation and administration. Emphasis is on developing decision-making skills through the use of such learning techniques as case study, field research, and simulation. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300.
Mgt.Org. 460-3. Purchasing and Materials Management. Study of the processes for acquiring and controlling materials, components, and services required for operations system management. Includes analysis of management alternatives in problems such as source selection, inventory control, value analysis, negotiation, and legal questions. Prer., Mgt.Org. 300.
Organizational Behavior
Mgt.Org. 330-3. Introduction to Management and Organization. An
introductory study of management fundamentals, organization theory, motivation, the behavioral aspects of individual cognitive processes, the behavior of small work groups, and leadership. Students are urged to complete Psych. 203 and 204 and Soc. 111 before taking this course.
Mgt.Org. 333-3. The Individual and the Organization. Analysis of historical and contemporary models of the motivation of people in work organizations. Included is a study of human needs, perception, judgment, values, attitudes, learning, alienation, and their relationship to managerial styles, performance evaluation, and organizational development. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 335-3. Managing Task-Oriented Groups. Analysis of task-group behavior in work organizations. Includes study of the influences upon group performance of group formation, communication consensus, leadership, norms, change, conflict, and collaboration, and analysis of group member roles, group structure, and intergroup relationships. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 337-3. Managing Complete Organizations. Analysis of historical and contemporary models for differentiating, integrating, and adapting efforts of organizations, using the entire organization as the unit for analysis. The course examines the influence of environment and technology on the organization’s internal structure and method of operation, considering goals, authority, decision making, communication, and control structures and processes. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
MgtOrg. 434-3. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice. Analysis of legal, political, social, and managerial aspects of collective bargaining and union-management relations. Includes study of conflict theory and strategies for conflict resolution. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 438-3. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice. Study of problems in developing and applying specific personnel systems (organization, placement, growth, reward, maintenance) in modern organizations, and analysis of their impact on organizational effectiveness. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 330.
Transportation Management
Mgt.Org. 457-3. Urban Transportation. Analysis of the two aspects of urban transportation, freight and people. Issues in policy, modes, governmental actions and structure, investment and costs, and effect upon urban environment.
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Mg.Sc. 625-3. Computer Oriented Decision Modeling. Application of the methods of computer science to problems in industrial management. Emphasis is placed on simulation as a method for studying the behavior of dynamic systems and the use of optimization models for their control. Prer., B.Ad. 407 or equivalent. Mg.Sc. 635-3. Mathematical Programming. A study of linear and nonlinear programming algorithms, both deterministic and chance-constrained, including linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, quadratic programming, and related techniques. Prer., B.Ad. 407 or equivalent.
Mg Sc. 675-3. Seminar in Management Science. Application of operations research methods to problems of business and industry, with emphasis on the functional fields of marketing, financial management, and production. Prer., B.Ad. 407 or equivalent, plus 6 additional semester hours of Management Science or Statistics at the 400 level of higher.
MARKETING
Mk. 300-3. Principles of Marketing. Analytical survey of problems encountered by businessmen in distributing goods and services to markets. Takes a marketing-management approach in attacking problems related to product planning, channels of distribution, pricing, advertising, and personal selling. Emphasizes the role of the consumer in the marketing process and the social responsibility of the marketer.
Mk. 330-3. Marketing Research. Fundamental techniques. Practical experience in research methodology: planning an investigation, questionnaires, sampling, interpretation of results, report preparation. Research techniques for product analysis, motivation research, sales and distribution-costs analyses, and adver-


College of Business and Administration / 61
tising research. Student will incur project expenses in this course. Prer., Mk. 300 and Stat. 300, or Stat. 200.
Mk. 340-3. Marketing Institutions and Retailing. A study of the macroeconomic foundations of marketing intermediaries, middlemen, and institutional alignments. Emphasis placed on the development and change of institutional structures and functions and the roles played by various participants in moving goods from origin to ultimate consumer, with particular focus on retailing functions and strategies. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 350-3. Principles of Advertising. Analysis of principles and practices in national and retail advertising from executive’s point of view. Considers whether a firm should advertise; product and market analysis as a planning phase of advertising program; media; survey of creation and production of advertisements; advertising budgets, copy testing, and organization. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 360-3. Industrial Marketing. Major activities involved in marketing of industrial goods. Analysis of industrial market structures; habits and motives of industrial purchasers; types of industrial products; pricing problems; distribution channels. Problems in selling to agencies of government. Oriented to engineers and others who may enter the fields of industrial selling or industrial marketing. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 420-3. Consumer Behavior. Survey of noteworthy contributions of the behavioral sciences to the understanding and prediction of consumer behavior. Contributions of various research techniques in the social sciences to the understanding of consumer purchasing and decision-making processes, with particular attention to formal and informal influence patterns. Survey of models of consumer purchasing behavior, brand loyalty, and product cycles. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 450-3. Advertising Management. Advertising problems from management point of view. Stimulating primary and selective demand; selection of media; building promotional programs; advertising appropriations and campaigns; evaluations of results; agency relations. Prer., Mk. 350.
Mk. 470-3. Soles Management. Problems involved in managing a sales force. Includes sales organization, operating a sales force (recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision, stimulation), sales planning (forecasting, budgeting, territories), sales analysis and control. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 480-3. Marketing Policies and Strategies. Detailed consideration of process of formulating and implementing marketing policies. Major emphasis on markets, distribution channels, and product analysis. Problem approach utilized to develop student’s analytical ability and to integrate all major areas of marketing. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 490-3. International Marketing. Studies managerial marketing policies and practices of firms marketing their products and services in foreign countries. An analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in international marketing. Relates marketing activities to the market structure and marketing environments. Prer., Mk. 300 or consent of instructor.
Mk. 600-3. Marketing Management. Analysis of marketing problems and policies requiring decisions by marketing executives. Integrates all areas of marketing management and relates the marketing activities of a firm to finance, production, and other major policy areas. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 403.
Mk. 605-3. M.B.A. Seminar in Marketing. A comprehensive survey of current problems and issues in marketing from the perspective of the firm. An analysis of the firm’s process of adjustments to market changes. (Required of all M.B.A. students with an area of emphasis in marketing.) Prer., Mk. 600.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
O.Ad. 440-3. Principles of Office Management. Analysis of principles and their application in the planning, organizing, and controlling of office activities. Methods of developing office systems; importance as a preliminary step in office automation.
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
For undergraduate courses, see Management and Organization.
In addition to the courses listed below, those shown
above with numbers 440, 444, 447, and 460 may be taken for graduate credit.
Op.Mg. 640-3. Operations Management. Study of the strategies and techniques of formal analysis for the management of operations systems. Student develops skills in problem definition and means of implementing solutions in specific situations where technological, economic, and human factors must be considered. Prer., B.Ad. 404 and 407 or equivalent.
ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
For undergraduate courses, see Management and Organization.
Org.B. 632-3. Behavior of Task Groups. A study of interpersonal competence in organization. Topics include group information and development, interpersonal communication, leadership, interpersonal attraction, roles, power, conformity and normative behavior, group cohesiveness, performance, effectiveness, conflict, decision making, social exchange, equity, competition, interpersonal encounter, and intergroup processes. Prer., B.Ad. 640 or Org.B. 601 or equivalent.
Org.B. 634-3. Seminar in Industrial Relations. The application of theory and research integrating labor relations and personnel management into the total manpower system. Topics may include manpower research and policy, public policy, collective bargaining trends and patterns, integrating the organization’s manpower system, current issues. Emphasis on national and organizational manpower research and research designs. Prer., Mgt.Org. 434 and 438, or equivalent.
Org B. 636-3. Behavior in Complex Organizations. Analysis of behavior and interfaces required for total organizational functioning. Issues discussed include bureaucracy, technological influences, organizational socialization, structure, goals, environmental influences, adaptation, information, communication and control systems, lateral relationships, system integration, conflict resolution, change, organizational development, and organizational decision processes. Prer., B.Ad. 640 or Org.B. 601 or equivalent.
REAL ESTATE
R.Es. 300-3. Principles of Real Estate Practice. Activities in the current field of real estate practice. Prer., upper division standing.
R.Es. 401-3. Urban Land Economics. The nature of urban real estate and the market forces affecting its utilization. Prer., R.Es. 300.
R.Es. 430-3. Real Estate Appraising. Methods of real estate appraising are studied and applied by a field problem in appraising. Prer., R.Es. 300.
R.Es. 473-3. Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions. Business and legal aspects. Estates in land, purchase and sales contracts, conveyances, mortgage and trust deed transactions, property taxes, landlord and tenant, wills and inheritance. Prer., B.Law 300 and R.Es. 300.
STATISTICS
Stat. 200-3. Business Statistics. Application of statistical theory to the solution of business problems. Includes the study of probability, sampling distributions, statistical inference, and decision analysis. Prer., B.Ad. 200. NOTE'. Students are encouraged to take Stat. 200 in the semester following completion of B.Ad. 200.
Stat. 300-3. Intermediate Statistics. Intermediate level consideration of problems associated with managerial decision making under uncertainty. Prer., Stat. 200.
Stat. 470-3. Elements of Mathematical Statistics. An examination of the mathematical properties of various statistical methods that are used in business research and in business decision making. Prer., Stat. 200.
Stat. 480-3. Multiple Correlation and Regression Analysis. Application of correlation and regression to business problems, including linear, curvilinear, and multiple. Computer programming for correlation and regression analysis. Prer., one year of statistics or B.Ad. 402 or consent of instructor.


School of Education
THOMAS A. BARLOW, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The Denver Campus offers undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare teachers and other educational workers. The education of school personnel has long been a recognized responsibility of the University. No program of studies involves the coordination of more scholastic disciplines than does teacher education. None is more fundamental, more significant, more far-reaching, or more enduring in its impact on society.
The teacher education program, both undergraduate and graduate, is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Membership also is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education.
Students interested in pursuing a program of studies leading to initial teacher certification should consult the School of Education Bulletin. Those desiring to pursue graduate programs or to take courses as graduate students should consult the Graduate School Bulletin.
All students wishing to take work in professional education are urged to seek advice from a faculty member of the School of Education to insure that requirements for both certification and the degree program sought are fully understood.
All application forms for School of Education programs are available in the School of Education Office, Room 706, ext. 276.
Undergraduate Programs
Students desiring to pursue degree and/or certification programs should obtain the School of Education Bulletin and become familiar with the requirements and other information contained therein. The first two years of college work are taken in the College of Undergraduate Studies. However, all students are urged to consult appropriate School of Education advisers in their freshman and sophomore years if they plan to become teachers.
The Denver Campus is initiating a new program in undergraduate teacher preparation unique to its urban situation. Since transfer of credits for partial completion of the program is difficult, students entering the undergraduate program at both the elementary and secondary school levels are urged to plan completion of their professional education work on the Denver Campus.
This initial certification program is designed to prepare classroom teachers for one of two levels of certification: elementary or secondary. To foster a K-12 perspective, all program candidates will have school-based tutoring experiences in both elementary and secondary situations. Although the program is not designed to meet the requirements of certification simul-
taneously at both levels, it will facilitate such certification if the candidate desires to invest additional time for the completion of necessary work in special methods courses, academic disciplines, and student teaching. A key feature of the program will be extensive experiences in both school and community agencies in addition to professional course work. Further information may be obtained from the School of Education Office, Room 706.
Undergraduate teacher certification programs are available on the Denver Campus in the following areas: elementary education; and secondary education in the fields of English, German, Spanish, mathematics, science, social studies, and speech. A professional year program, unique to the Denver Campus, will be operational in 1974-75.
A personal interview with one or more faculty members in the specific area of the student’s interest is desirable. It is mandatory in the field of elementary education prior to admission to the teacher education program.
Graduate Programs
Complete master’s programs are available in elementary education, counseling and guidance, counseling in the noneducational setting, library-media, selected secondary school teaching areas, reading, and social foundations. Students should refer to the Graduate School Bulletin for complete information.
Professional education course work in other educational fields is available on the Denver Campus: curriculum and instruction, educational psychology, educational research, statistics and measurement, community college teaching and administration, student personnel guidance and services (college), school administration (elementary, secondary, general), teaching the emotionally disturbed, and supervision. All credits earned on the Denver Campus in graduate degree programs are transferable to the same programs offered on the Boulder Campus.
Insofar as possible, student advisement is provided by Denver Campus faculty. It is sometimes necessary, however, to assign students to faculty members on the Boulder Campus for advising in programs not offered completely at Denver.
Description of Courses
The value of each course in semester hours is given as part of the identifying department number: for example, Educ. 300-2 identifies Educational Psychology for the Elementary School as a 2-semester-hour course.


School of Education / 63
Undergraduates preparing to teach are expected to follow the sequence and placement of courses outlined in the School of Education Bulletin.
With some exceptions, chiefly in the curriculum for elementary majors, courses numbered 400 to 499 are usually taken during the senior year. Certain of these courses (excluding student teaching) may be carried by graduate students for graduate credit, provided they are approved by the student’s adviser and the necessary extra requirements for graduate credit are met.
Courses numbered 500 to 599 are graduate courses and are open to qualified seniors only with the consent of the instructor and the dean. Courses numbered 600 and above are open only to graduate students.
Course prerequisites for undergraduate programs are indicated in the listing of courses that follows. Note also the statements in the Schedule of Courses available several weeks before the beginning of each semester. These provide a complete list of offerings and a statement of time and place. Not all courses are offered every year.
Courses for Undergraduates
These courses are open only to students who have been admitted to the teacher education program. A comprehensive revision of offerings in the elementary and secondary education programs will be effective fall semester, 1974. Students interested in either or both of these undergraduate programs may obtain a copy of the new program from the School of Education Office, Room 706.
Courses for Undergraduates and Graduates
Students pursuing an undergraduate sequence in teacher education may take the required 400-level courses as prescribed. Other 400-level courses are open only to seniors who obtain advance permission from the dean of the School of Education, and to graduate students in education as indicated in the Graduate School Bulletin.
Educ. 406-1 to 6. Workshop In Curricular and Instructional Developments. Consideration is given to current trends in curriculum development and in organization for instruction. In-depth study of one or more specific plans for classroom procedure. Educ. 408-1 to 4. Seminar in Urban Education. An examination of specific problems and characteristics of urban secondary schools, and their relationship to the inner-city, poverty, attitudes, and socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds. Outside consultants from city and educational agencies will act as informants and resource people.
Educ. 412-2. Educational Measurement. Introduction to principles and practices of measurement and evaluation in public schools. Consideration of standardized tests and “informal” evaluation techniques; emphasis on construction and use of teacher-made tests.
Educ. 414-2. Mental Hygiene in Education. Planned to help teachers gain an understanding of and method for dealing with normal as well as maladjusted children; also attention to maintaining mental health.
Educ. 415-2. Problems and Trends in Education. A broad overview of current problems in schools and school systems. Consideration of practices and policies in U.S. schools for solution of such problems. Evaluation procedures for solving educational problems.
Educ. 417-3. Foundations in Education for Mexican Americans. Surveys Mexican Americans in the United States to include the impact of Indo-Hispanic roots, socioeconomic-education profiles, aspirations and conflicts, contemporary concerns, and suggestions for educational change.
Educ. 418-3. Elementary School Curriculum for Mexican Americans.
Effect of the standard elementary school curriculum on bi-lingual-bicultural children; strengths and weaknesses. Planning for change in the teacher, curriculum, school, and community. Educ. 419-2. Teaching the Bright Learner. To assist the teacher in identifying, understanding, and challenging children with unusual abilities.
Educ. 422-2. Education of Mentally Retarded. Study of characteristics and needs of educable and trainable mentally retarded children.
Educ. 423-2. Education of Exceptional Children. Types of physically, mentally, and socially handicapped children; methods of diagnosis; suggested educational adjustments; and teaching techniques.
Educ. 427-2. Teachers, Materials, and Learning. Provides elementary and pre-school teachers and aides with an opportunity to become involved with a range of concrete materials in science, environmental studies, language arts, and music, and to consider the implications of their own learning for their work in school.
Educ. 436-3 or 4. Television in Education. (C.T. 465.) Utilization of television in elementary, secondary, and higher education.
Educ. 437-2. Language Arts for Urban Schools. Adaptation of intact senses for listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Diagnosis for weaknesses in listening, speaking, and coordination and application of dramatic play, oracy procedures, sensory imagery, and creative expression. Preparation of cases, records, and application of differential instruction. (Elective at the undergraduate level.)
Educ. 438-2. Kindergarten Education. History of the kindergarten. Characteristics of young children. Daily and weekly program and planning. Testing and evaluation, and parent-teacher cooperation.
Educ. 439-6. Instructional Aids Laboratory. A variety of experiences and assignments in the public schools.
Educ. 440-9. Basic Elementary Block. Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction for elementary pupils.
Educ. 442-3. Developing Reading Skills in the Junior and Senior High School. Teaching techniques to improve reading skills in content fields. Current secondary school reading program.
Educ. 443-2. Teaching Reading in Content Areas at the Secondary Level. Format variations from content area to content area, materials, equipment, readability of content materials, vocabulary, variations in comprehension, and variations in study procedures. *Educ. 450-12. Student Teaching—Elementary School. Kindergarten and grades one through six.
‘Educ. 451-8. Student Teaching—Secondary School. Student teacher attends a senior or junior high school in Boulder-Denver metropolitan area.
Educ. 452-3. Methods and Materials in English. (Engl. 482.) Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology.
Educ. 453-3. Methods and Materials in Social Studies. Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology.
Educ. 454-3. Methods and Materials in Science. Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology.
Educ. 455-3. Methods and Materials in Mathematics. Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related subjects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology.
Educ. 460-3. Educational Media: Theory and Practice. The scope of audiovisual materials, operation of equipment, selection, effective utilization, and some production. Not open to those who have credit in Educ. 360 or other basic audiovisual courses.
Educ. 465-2. Reading as a Social Force. An overall survey of mass communication fields (print, radio, film), with special emphasis on social relationships and implications of reading. Library science course.
Educ. 467-2. Children's Literature. Reading and evaluation of books for children, information about children’s books, children’s interests in reading, important authors and illustrators, and problems in the guidance of reading.
Educ. 470-3. Theories of Counseling. Examines the major theories of counseling including analytical, humanistic, and behavioral
°Does not give graduate credit.


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points of view. Emphasis upon translating theories to applied settings. Prer. or coreq., Educ. 479.
Educ. 476-2. Intercultural Education for Teachers. Intercultural factors and problems and their influence on the student, the teacher, and the educative process.
Educ. 477-3. Bilingual and Bicultural Education. This course describes the essential features of bilingualism and their relationship in the learning process. Various components of bilingual education, curricula, methodology, as well as diagnostic and assessment processes are presented with emphasis on the needs of bicultural children. Various bilingual educational models for non-English speaking children, bilingual children, as well as for the development of fluency in bilingualism among all children are presented. The incorporation and presentation of bilingual content and the role of monolingual and bilingual school personnel in the instructional program are topics for discussion.
Educ. 479-2. Foundations of Guidance and Personnel. Synthesis of basic psychological and socioeconomic principles as a foundation for professional training: meaning, philosophy, principles, history, trends, scope, etc.
Educ. 480-3. Elementary Statistical Methods. Required of most master’s degree candidates. Measures of central tendency and variability; standard scores and the normal distribution; correlation, regression, and prediction; statistical inference and means, proportions, correlation, and coefficients. The r-test and hypothesis testing.
Educ. 481-3. Literature for Adolescents. (Engl. 481.) Reading and evaluation of books for junior and senior high school pupils. Emphasis on modern literature.
Educ. 482-3. Advanced Composition for Secondary School English Teochers. (Engl. 480.) Emphasis on evaluation, criticism, and improvement of writing.
Educ. 484-1 to 4. Workshop in the Application of Psychological Developments to Education. Principally for in-service education dealing with school-oriented application of psychological principles and practices useful in the education process, including such aspects as human relations, group dynamics, interpersonal communication, and role differentiation.
Educ. 489-3. Introduction to School Administration. Responsibilities of boards of education and administrators; nature of administrative leadership, and introductory consideration of finance and public relations. State, local, and federal relationships in education.
Educ. 493-2. Administration and Supervision of Compensatory Education. Implementation, organization, supervision, and evaluation of programs for the educationally deprived. Includes both theory and practice.
Educ. 495-3. Environmental Education. Theory and practice of environmental education, including use of resource personnel and the study of curricular and instructional development. Field experiences are incorporated. Primarily oriented to elementary and junior high school.
Educ. 497-4. Senior Seminar in Elementary Education. Accompanies the student teaching assignment and yields undergraduate credit only.
Educ. 498-1 to 2. Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching. Accompanies student teaching and yields undergraduate credit only.
Educ. 499-1 to 4. Independent Study.
For courses in the education series numbered 500 and above see the Graduate School section of this bulletin.


College of Engineering and Applied Science
PAUL E. BARTLETT, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Engineering is the art and science by which the resources of nature are used for the benefit of man and the resources of society are used to preserve a wholesome global environment. The engineer has the primary duty to undertake research and study of the effects of present and prospective technology on man and his environment, to communicate his findings effectively to decision-making groups, and to implement decisions and designs which will shape tomorrow’s world. There will not be enough engineers to meet the anticipated need.
Engineering study and practice requires qualities such as initiative, energy, willingness to take responsibility, reliability, rigorous honesty, good judgment, and the ability to work and cooperate with others and to work through to the conclusion of an assignment. Obviously, the fundamentals of sound citizenship are a necessity in any profession.
Today the key decisions affecting the future of mankind are increasingly complex and technological or quantitative in nature. Engineers require a broad social orientation which will enable them to participate in the decision-making process.
The prospective engineering student should enjoy mathematics and also have a keen interest in science and its methods. Sound curiosity about the principles governing the behavior of forces and materials and the ability to visualize structures and machines are necessary prerequisites. The ability to express ideas in both written and spoken form is of primary importance.
Career of Service
Engineering offers wide opportunities for a professional career. Upon graduation, the young engineer normally enters employment that provides basic practical training in the field he has studied. Professional progress depends on hard work, initiative, and demonstrated capacity for increased responsibility.
More representation by women and minority groups is urgently needed in engineering today, because of the increasing role of the engineer in social decision making.
Few college graduates have employment opportunities equalling those of the engineer. The best estimates available indicate that the nation is not producing as many engineers as it will need. Many serious social problems require engineering answers. Most engineers are versatile men and women who can transfer as needed from one discipline to another and who progress readily into administration and management. The need is becoming especially acute for engineers capable of dealing with problems of pollution, ecological and urban planning, and of computer modeling.
Registered Professional Engineer
Currently, registration is required in all states for the legal right to practice professional engineering. Although there are variations in the state laws, graduation from an accredited curriculum in engineering, subscription to a code of ethics, and four years of qualifying experience are required. In addition, two days of examinations, covering the engineering sciences and the applicant’s practical experience, are required in most states. Those who cannot qualify for registration are expected to work under experienced registered professional engineers.
Educational Opportunities—Degrees
In all of the engineering fields leading to degrees, the student will have an unparalleled opportunity to study with teachers, many of whom have national and international reputations.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science on the Denver Campus offers complete four-year courses leading to the B.S. degree in civil and environmental engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, and applied mathematics. Many of the courses leading to the B.S. degree in aerospace engineering sciences, architectural engineering, chemical engineering, engineering design and economic evaluation, mechanical engineering, and engineering physics are offered on the Denver Campus. Students who plan to complete a portion of their program on the Denver Campus and then transfer to the Boulder Campus for the remaining requirements are encouraged to obtain and familiarize themselves with the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin. It gives a comprehensive listing of all curricula, course descriptions, and programs offered by the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
The course requirements during the freshman year are essentially the same throughout the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
About two-thirds of the sophomore year is common to all, and the remainder of the courses begin to point to the various fields of engineering taught; however, real specialization begins in the junior year and carries on through the senior year. A fifth year of study leading to the master’s degree is strongly urged for students of more than usual ability who feel they can profit from additional study. Those in this category are likely to achieve greater ultimate success in the engineering profession.
At the University of Colorado, it is also possible for a student to obtain the bachelor’s degree in both engineering and business in five years plus one or two summer terms.


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Most departments offer varied programs in each of these degree fields—some of these amounting to joint degrees in computing and engineering, or with additional work two engineering degrees. Also, any of these degree programs can be modified for an excellent premedical program.
If subjects in the liberal arts courses, such as science and mathematics, and engineering subjects, such as graphics and certain specialized courses, have been elected, a graduate of the College of Undergraduate Studies may obtain an engineering degree in four semesters.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science on the Denver Campus offers M.S. degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics, and the Master of Engineering. Graduate courses in other fields also are offered.
For information regarding courses and requirements leading to the degree Master of Engineering and Master of Science or to the Ph.D. degree, see the Graduate School Bulletin and the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
Undergraduate Research
Research is an important part of many, if not most, engineering careers. Recent years have seen a strong movement in the College of Engineering and Applied Science to include undergraduates in the type of research programs formerly restricted to graduate students. Undergraduates, including some freshmen, have helped to carry out valuable projects in pollution control, bioengineering, solid state electronics, and other fields, including systems analysis and many areas of computerization.
At the same time, instructional laboratories are moving from routine apparatus manipulation to placing major emphasis upon experimentation and original projects. Students and faculty alike have responded to this change with new zest, achieving in many cases socially or scientifically valuable results along with an enhanced understanding of research methods.
Summer Courses
Summer term courses are planned for regular students who must clear deficiencies, and transfer students. Courses also are offered for high school graduates who wish to enter as freshmen and those who need to remove subject deficiencies. For information about courses, students should write to the dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, UCD, for the Schedule of Summer Courses.
For many students there are several advantages in starting their college careers during the summer term. Most required freshman and sophomore courses are normally offered on the Denver Campus during the summer and are taught by the regular staff. Generally, the summer classes are smaller than regular academic-year classes, which means that students can get more individual attention. Beginning during the summer term gives the student a head start and enables him to take a lighter load during the fall semester, or to take additional courses to enrich his program.
Completing a few courses in the summer before their first regular semester also helps many students to make a more efficient transition from high school to college-level work.
Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds
Money contributed to the University Development Foundation for assistance to engineering students is deposited in appropriate accounts and used according to the restrictions imposed by the donors. Numerous industries match employee contributions. A list of companies contributing to scholarships and fellowships and different loan funds available can be obtained from the dean’s office.
Student Organizations
The following honorary engineering societies have active student chapters in the College of Engineering and Applied Science:
Alpha Chi Sigma, professional chemical fraternity Chi Epsilon, civil and architectural fraternity Eta Kappa Nu, electrical engineering society Phi Tau Sigma, society for mechanical engineers Sigma Tau, engineering society Tau Beta Pi, engineering society
Student chapters of the following professional societies are well established on the Boulder Campus and students on the Denver Campus are eligible for membership:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics American Institute of Chemical Engineers American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Society of Manufacturing Engineers Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Society of Women Engineers and Architects
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
In order to enroll, the student must meet the admission requirements of the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the admission requirements described in the General Information section of this bulletin. Persons of sufficient maturity and experience who do not meet the prescribed requirements for admission may be admitted upon approval of the dean.
Women are encouraged to include the field of engineering in their educational plans, and are urged to contact an engineering adviser to find out what opportunities in engineering are available to them.
Beginning students in engineering should be prepared to start analytic geometry-calculus. No credit toward a degree will be given for algebra or trigonometry (courses will be offered to allow a student to make up deficiencies). Any student who questions the adequacy of his pre-college background in mathematics should see the applied mathematics coordinator for suggestions.
In order to be prepared for the type of mathematics courses that will be taught, the student must be competent in the basic ideas and skills of ordinary algebra, geometry, and plane trigonometry. These include such topics as the fundamental operations with algebraic expressions, exponents and radicals, fractions, simple factoring, solution of linear and quadratic equations, graphical representation, simple systems of equations, complex numbers, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and geometric progressions, logarithms, the trigonometric functions and their use in triangle solving and simple


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applications, and the standard theorems of geometry, including some solid geometry. It is estimated that it will usually take seven semesters to cover this material adequately in high school.
Transfer Students
Students transferring from other accredited collegiate institutions are admitted if they meet the requirements outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin and the freshman requirements for entering the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
In general, a resident of Colorado will be granted admission provided an overall grade-point average of
2.0 (C) or better has been attained.
Transfer from within the University to the College of Engineering and Applied Science will be approved if one of the three following conditions is fulfilled:
1. Transfer may be effected at the end of the first semester in residence at the University of Colorado (without regard to grades earned here) provided the prior academic record fulfills the admission requirements of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
2. A transfer will be approved if the student has attained an overall grade average of 2.0 (C) in all work attempted at the University of Colorado.
3. Other transfers may be approved by the dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science (or his designee) after a formal petition has been submitted.
Transfer hours of credit may be accepted upon approval by the Office of Admissions and Records and the major department. The grade-point average of the student, whether he is transferring from within the University or from another institution, does not transfer into the College of Engineering and Applied Science. This includes students changing from special student to degree status. The grade-point average is computed from the time the student is enrolled as a degree student in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Transfer credit hours must be evaluated by the major department before they may be applied to the student’s engineering degree requirements.
Advanced Placement
Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board’s advanced placement tests or by special examinations administered by the department involved. For students who have taken an advanced placement course in high school and who make scores of 4 or 5 in the CEEB’s Advanced Placement Examination, advanced placement as well as college credit will be granted. Students who make scores of 3 may be considered for advanced placement and college credit by the department concerned. All placement and credit must be validated by satisfactory performance in subsequent course work, in accordance with the practices being followed in the transfer of credits from other colleges and universities. These stipulations concerning advanced placement may differ from those stated for other colleges and schools of the University.
College Level Examination (CLEP) Credit
Prospective students may earn college-level credit through the College Level Examination Program
(CLEP) examinations, provided that they score at the 66th percentile or above. The number of credits so earned must be within the limits of the number of elective hours of the individual department. Prospective students desiring recognition of such credit must request that scores be reported to the Office of Admissions, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 Fourteenth St., Denver, Colorado 80202. Notification that the credit has been approved will be returned. A list of subjects in which CLEP examination credit will be accepted may be obtained at the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The currently approved list includes 23 subjects in the fields of computing, business, science, mathematics, the humanities, and social sciences.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Freshman Year
Fundamentals taught in the freshman year are of prime importance in the more advanced classes, and every effort is made to register a beginning freshman in the proper courses. (Course requirements for freshmen are detailed within the curriculum given under each department.)
All freshmen are urged to consult their instructors whenever they need help in their assignments.
Course Load Policy
Full-time Students. Full-time undergraduate students should register for the regular work as outlined in the departmental curricula. Additional courses may be allowed when there is satisfactory evidence that these extra courses can be taken profitably and creditably. Permission to take more than 21 hours or fewer than 12 hours may be granted only after written petition to the associate dean. The petition must carry the approval of the departmental faculty adviser.
Employed Students. Suggested course loads for undergraduate students employed 10 or more hours per week are as follows:
Employed 40 or more hours per week—two courses (maximum
of 9 semester hours).
Employed 30 to 39 hours per week—three courses (maximum of
12 semester hours).
Employed 20 to 29 hours per week—four courses (maximum of
15 semester hours).
Employed 10 to 19 hours per week—five courses (maximum of
18 semester hours).
Course Scheduling and Abbreviations
For information on scheduling of courses, write to the associate dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, Denver Campus, or consult the Schedule of Courses issued at the beginning of each semester.
The University reserves the right to cancel any listed course or to make a substitution in instructors. Courses for which there is insufficient enrollment may be cancelled by the College.
The 1-credit lecture-recitation period is 50 minutes long. A laboratory period includes two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field.
Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory or other work, it is understood that classes will consist of lectures and discussions. Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are as follows:


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Calc.—Calculation Coreq.—Corequisite Hrs.—Hours Lab.—Laboratory
Lect.—Lecture Prer.—Prerequisite Rec.—Recitation Wk.—Week
The value of a course in semester-hour credits is indicated by that part of the course number which follows the dash. Example: Chem. 103-5. “Chem. 103” is the identifying department number, and “5” indicates that the course is for 5 semester hours credit.
Refer to the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin for the complete list of course descriptions.
Credits
Students may receive credit for only those courses for which they have officially registered. Exceptions to this are credits obtained through special examinations, correspondence courses, CLEP, and transfer credits from other institutions. Students who have had extensive experience in the work covered by any required course and feel they would be able to pass an examination over the course, may apply for such an examination. Credit will be allowed upon successful completion of the test. See General Information section for complete details.
Schedule Changes
All official changes of registration are made by processing the appropriate Change of Schedule Form. Courses may be added on or before the tenth day of each semester. After the second week, courses may be added only by special approval of the instructor and department offering the course. Courses may be dropped without penalty before the end of the second week of the semester. After the second week, but before the end of the tenth academic week, a student may drop a course without penalty if he is passing the course; otherwise a grade of F will be entered on his record. After the tenth academic week, a student may not drop a course except under circumstances clearly beyond his control. A student may not drop or add a course if in so doing he violates any other rule.
Repetition of Courses
A student may not register for credit in a course in which he already has received a grade of C or better. When a student takes a course for credit more than once, all grades are used in determining his grade-point average. An F grade in the repetition of a required course necessitates a subsequent satisfactory completion of the course.
Sequence of Courses
Full-time students should complete the courses in the department in which they are registered according to the order shown in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin. (Part-time students may need to modify the order of courses with adviser approval.) Any course in which there is a failure or an unremoved incomplete should, upon the first recurrence of such course, take precedence over other courses; however, each student must be registered so that departmental requirements will be completed with the least possible delay.
Students who do not earn a grade of C or better in a course that is prerequisite to another, may not
register for the succeeding course unless they have the permission of both the department and the instructor of the succeeding course.
Students may enroll for as much as 50 percent of their courses in work that is not a part of the prescribed curricula of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, provided they have at least a 2.0 grade average in all college work attempted. Exceptions to this policy may be made with the consent of the academic deans involved and may be made for students taking the combined engineering-business program.
Withdrawal
A student may withdraw from the University without academic penalty before the end of the second week of the semester. After the end of the tenth week of the semester, a student will not be allowed to withdraw officially from the University except for circumstances clearly beyond his control. If the student interrupts his course of study, he may be required to take any preparatory courses that have been changed or added in his absence, or repeat any courses in which his preparation is thought to be weak.
Changing Departments
Students who wish to change to another department must apply for transfer by petition, and this petition must have the approval of both departments concerned and of the dean.
Class Standing
To be classified as a sophomore in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a student must have passed 30 semester hours; to be classified as a junior, 60 hours; and to be classified as a senior, 90 hours of credit. All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted at the University of Colorado.
Class Attendance
Successful work in the College of Engineering and Applied Science is dependent upon regular attendance in all classes. Students who are unavoidably absent should make arrangements with instructors to make up the work missed. Students who, for illness or other good reason, miss a final examination must notify the instructor or the Office of the Dean no later than the end of the day on which the examination is given. Failure to do so will result in an F in the course.
Counseling
Freshman students are counseled by the associate dean’s office, and by representatives from each academic department. These representatives are readily available to assist students with academic, vocational, or personal concerns.
Students are assigned specific departmental advisers for academic planning and should consult with the departmental associate chairman or designated representative for assignment.
Scholastic Deficiency
To remain in good standing in the College of Engineering and Applied Science a student must maintain a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0. The


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student who fails to meet this requirement will be subject immediately to the authority of the Committee on Scholastic Deficiency. When spring semester grades become available, the committee will review all cases of scholastic deficiency and notify each student of its decision. At this time, the committee action may result in suspension, warning, or mandatory reduction of academic load and extracurricular activities. Any student suspended by the committee may, by petition, be granted a personal hearing before the committee during the fall registration period.
Pass/Fail Option
The primary purpose of offering courses in which the undergraduate may be graded pass or fail (P/F) rather than A, B, C, D, or F, is to encourage the undergraduate student to broaden his educational experience by electing challenging courses without serious risk that his academic record might be jeopardized.
A grade of P in a course means that the course hours may be counted toward the 136 credit hours required for graduation, but the course hours will not be used in the computation of the student’s grade-point average. A grade of F for a student enrolled P/F in a course will be recorded, and the credit hours of the course will be used in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average just as is done with a grade of F in a normal registration.
The maximum number of credit hours which a student may elect to take P/F is 16 semester hours. Not more than one course per semester or summer term may be taken P/F. Courses which a student may select to be taken P/F shall be designated by his major department. A student who has not designated a major field will not be allowed the P/F option.
A transfer student may count toward graduation one credit hour of P/F courses for each 9 credit hours completed in the College; however, the maximum number of P/F hours counting toward graduation shall not exceed 16 credit hours, including courses taken in the Honors Program under the program’s P/F grading system.
The student will indicate pass/fail enrollment at the beginning of the term. The instructor will report pass or fail for students so registered in his course.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure he has fulfilled all the requirements, to file his intended date of graduation in his departmental office at the close of his third year, to fill out a Diploma Card at registration at the beginning of his last year, and to keep his departmental adviser and the dean’s office informed of any changes in his plans throughout his last year.
In order to be eligible for one of the bachelor’s degrees in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a student, in addition to being in good standing in the University, must meet the following minimum requirements:
Courses. The satisfactory completion of the prescribed and elective work in any curriculum as determined by the appropriate department.
Hours. A minimum of 136 semester hours, of which the last 30 shall be earned after matriculation and
admission as a degree student, is required for students in the four-year curricula; however, many students will need to present more than the minimum hours because of certain departmental requirements and because they may have enrolled in courses which do not carry full credit toward a degree. The hours required for students in the combined business and engineering program vary by departments; as a guide, 172 semester hours are considered a minimum, but most students follow a program which brings the total above this figure.
Grade Average. A minimum grade-point average of
2.0 (C) for all courses attempted.
Faculty Recommendation. The recommendation of the faculty of the department offering the degree and the recommendation of the faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Correspondence Courses. Correspondence courses must be completed before the beginning of the student’s final semester in school.
Simultaneous Conferring of Degrees. For combined business and engineering students, the degree B.S. in business and the degree B.S. in engineering must be conferred at the same commencement.
Commencement Exercises. Commencement exercises are held in May and August on the Boulder Campus. Students finishing in December may attend commencement the following May or receive diplomas by mail.
Graduation With Honors
Honors at graduation are conferred in recognition of high scholarship and professional attainments. Honors and special honors are recorded on diplomas and indicated on the commencement program.
Seniors with an average of 3.8 or above are usually graduated with special honors, and those with an average of 3.5 to 3.79 with honors. Grades earned during the semester of graduation will not be considered in the determination of honors.
Social-Humanistic Content of the Engineering Curriculum
The faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science recommends that 24 semester hours should be considered the minimum social-humanistic content of the degree-granting departments.
These hours should be taken from courses in the categories listed below, with not fewer than 6 hours each from categories 1 and 2:
1. Humanities courses such as literature (including foreign literature either in the original language or in translation or second-year language), philosophy, fine arts, music (critical or historical), and humanistic courses in Integrated Studies.
2. Social studies courses such as economics, sociology, political science, history, anthropology, psychology, and social sciences.
Such courses as public speaking, elementary foreign languages, technical writing, accounting, contracts, and management should be considered as technical and should be submitted for technical electives where applicable with departmental approval.
Qualified students will be permitted to take appropriate honors courses as substitutes for social-humanistic courses.


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English for Engineering
Engineering students may choose certain combinations of courses: a) Engl. 120, 121, 222, 223 in sequence; or b) Engl. 120, 121 and two of the following introductory literature courses: Engl. 110 (Introduction to Literature-Fiction), Engl. Ill (Introduction to Literature-Plays), Engl. 112 (Introduction to Literature-Poetry). Students who achieve a B average in two of the following English courses—110, 111, 112, 120, and 121—may take immediately thereafter any courses listed under electives. No social-humanistic credit will be given for Engl. 100 or 101, nor for courses dealing with English as a foreign language. See English in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin for course descriptions.
COMBINED BUSINESS AND ENGINEERING CURRICULA
Undergraduates in the College of Engineering and Applied Science with career interests in administration may complete all of the requirements for both a B.S. degree in engineering and a B.S. degree in business by extending their study programs to five years including one or two summer terms. The 48 semester credits required in the College of Business and Administration may be started in the second, third, or fourth year, depending upon the curricular plan for the particular field of engineering in which the student is enrolled.
It is also possible for qualified graduates (GPA: 2.75 or better) to complete the requirements for a master’s degree in business within one year after receiving the baccalaureate degree in engineering. Before deciding upon the business option, a student should carefully consider, in consultation with departmental advisers, the relative advantages of the combined B.S. businessengineering curricula, the M.S. degree program of the College of Business, and the M.S. degree program in the student’s own engineering discipline.
Combined business and engineering programs are available for students in aerospace engineering sciences, applied mathematics, architectural engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, engineering design and economic evaluation, engineering physics, and mechanical engineering.
The student taking a combined undergraduate program is not required to submit formal application for admission to the College of Business. He is permitted to enroll in business courses on the basis of a program approved by his adviser in the College of Engineering and Applied Science and by an assigned adviser from the College of Business.
Requirements for both the undergraduate business and engineering degrees must be completed concurrently. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business. Not fewer than 30 semester credits in business courses must be earned to establish residency credit. Courses offered by the College of Business may be used in lieu of electives required for undergraduate engineering degrees, subject to the approval of the individual department.
The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows:
Courses Semester Hours
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics ................... 6
(Should be completed during the student’s sophomore or junior year.)
Acct. 200. Introductory Accounting ........................... 3
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer_____________ 3
Stat. 200. Business Statistics _______:_______________________ 3
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing_____________________________ 3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance_______________________________________ 3
Mgt.Org. 300. Operations Analysis_____________________________ 3
Mgt.Org. 330. Introduction to Management and
Organization ____________________________________________ 3
B.Law 300. Business Law_______________________________________ 3
B.Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B.Ad. 411.
Business and Society_____________________________________ 3
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy (Cases and Concepts in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 451 (Management Game and Cases in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 452 (Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship) ......................... 3
Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields: accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, or transportation management. All course work in the area of emphasis must be taken in the University of Colorado College of Business and Administration ___________12
48
The student should note that for some courses, and for some areas of emphasis, there are prerequisite requirements which must be met. Since some of the courses may be taken as engineering electives, it is possible to obtain the two degrees in as few as 166 semester hours; however, most students will require more.
JOINT ENGINEERING DEGREES
A student may obtain two engineering degrees by meeting the requirements and obtaining the approval of both departments concerned. Thirty hours of elective or required subjects in addition to the largest minimum number required by either of the two departments must be completed.
PREMEDICINE OPTION
A professional school in a field such as medicine requires a student to have a college education prior to pursuing its professional courses. In practically all cases, medical students are university graduates, although occasionally a student may enter medical school after three years of university training. A student can prepare for medical school either in the College of Undergraduate Studies or in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The desirability of obtaining an engineering education prior to undertaking a study of medicine is increasing continually, as medicine itself is evolving. A great deal of additional equipment, much of it electronic, is being developed to assist the medical practitioner in his treatment of patients. Bioengineering, engineering systems analysis, probability, and communication theory are highly applicable to medical problems. Also, improved communication techniques are allowing the storage and retrieval of information not previously available to the medical doctor. An advanced knowledge of basic mathematics and computing techniques, along with increased understanding of physical chemistry, are improving the scientific base upon which medical knowledge rests. It is therefore desirable that the medical practitioner and researcher in the future be well equipped with the tools which engineering can offer.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 71
An engineering background with a premedicine option is a valuable combination for admission to medical school.
There are two equally important goals for the student who plans to enter medical school. The first is acquisition of the knowledge and vocabulary necessary to proceed with the courses at medical school. The second is to become an educated and well-balanced man or woman.
Concerning the first goal, it is clear that without some knowledge of the basic sciences and the ability to formulate thoughts, the student will be unable to profit from the courses at medical school. To provide at least a minimum of the necessary knowledge, the courses listed below are prescribed and must be completed with superior grades. General overall requirements for entry into most medical schools are given. Students can meet these requirements by careful substitution of electives in the engineering curriculum. In some cases where additional hours may be required, interested students should consult with the departmental chairman.
General chemistry*__________________2 sem. (8-10 sem. hrs.)
Organic chemistry __________________2 sem. (8-10 sem. hrs.)
General biology or zoology*_________2 sem. (8 sem. hrs.)
Genetics____________________________1 sem. (3 sem. hrs.)
The second goal, becoming a well-educated, well-balanced man or woman, is of particular importance. The student entering medical school is confronted with a mass of new knowledge and techniques. These fully occupy his or her time and give little opportunity for the pursuit of the broader aspects of education.
Three features of the university education are stressed here. The first is the possession of an active critical mind—a mind which can discern problems, find out what is known about them, and draw relevant and unprejudiced conclusions from this knowledge. The University of Colorado School of Medicine requires that at least 30 semester hours be devoted to a field of learning in physical sciences, life sciences, social sciences, engineering, or subjects of comparable intellectual content. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of chosen subjects and a true understanding of the problems presented and the solutions that have been advanced. Study of courses that will be taken at medical school is strongly discouraged.
Second, a student must acquire understanding of mankind. This is particularly important for the physician whose life is spent in caring for people and whose effectiveness is increased in proportion to the degree of this understanding. The study of man involves a vast number of intellectual disciplines—from anthropology to the arts; from psychology to world history; from political economy to the study of religion—and is properly the study of a lifetime. The student must obtain the foundations of such a study at his university. Present-day developments in the field of medicine suggest that far more people with an engineering background should continue their education and enter the practice of medicine. Whatever the person decides to study, he must be aware of the importance of this study for future effectiveness as a human being.
Finally, a student should carry away from the university a scholarly enthusiasm. Intellectual curiosity and ardent pursuit of truth are prime requisites for
•See appropriate chairman for possible substitution of courses.
knowledge. Without these, neither the individual practice of medicine nor the general understanding of medical science can progress further.
The School of Medicine requires no set courses for the second and third features of the university education beyond those required by the student’s college or university, but it stresses their great importance.
To complete this program in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, it is strongly recommended that the student follow a full four-year college course (with the equivalent of at least 136 semester hours) and take a B.S. degree. It would be possible for a student who applied himself with unusual vigor to prepare for medical school in three years. In such cases, a minimum of 15 semester hours should be devoted to a major field of learning, instead of the 30 hours required for the four-year student. This student will not, of course, receive a degree in the premedical field. The study and practice of medicine require persistent hard effort, and so should the premedical education.
Exceptions may be made to one or more of the set requirements for students who have demonstrated unusual intellectual ability.
The Admissions Committee of the School of Medicine welcomes inquiries and visits from prospective students, particularly at the time of their first interest in medicine as their chosen profession.
Students desiring to enter a premedical program should consult the representative of the department involved.
GRADUATE STUDY IN ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering and Applied Science on the Denver Campus offers M.S. degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics. Graduate courses in other fields are also offered.
For information regarding courses and requirements leading to the degrees Master of Engineering and Master of Science or to the Ph.D. degree, see the Graduate School Bulletin and the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
Education for Employed Professional Engineers
Continuing education for employed engineers grows more important each year. Therefore, the College puts great emphasis upon making graduate courses readily available through night and televised courses. A new degree, the Master of Engineering, permits graduate students more flexibility in defining specialized interdisciplinary fields that meet their professional needs. This degree has standards fully equivalent to those of the Master of Science degree.
Concurrent B.S. and M.S. Degree Program in Engineering
Students who plan to continue in the Graduate School after completion of the requirements for the B.S. degree may make application for admission to the concurrent degree program through their department early in the second semester of their junior year (after completion of at least 84 semester hours). Requirements are the same as for the two degrees taken separately: 136 credit hours for the B.S. degree and


72 / University of Colorado at Denver
24 hours plus thesis (Plan I) or 30 credit hours (Plan II) for the M.S. degree. Social-humanistic requirements must be completed within the first 136 credit hours. A 3.0 grade-point average for all work attempted through the first six semesters (at least 96 credit hours) and written recommendations from at least two departmental faculty members are required.
The purpose of the concurrent degree program is to allow the student who qualifies for graduate study and expects to continue for an advanced degree to plan his graduate program from the beginning of the senior year rather than from the first year of graduate study. The student can then reach the degree of proficiency required to begin research at an earlier time, and can make better and fuller use of courses offered in alternate years.
The student will choose or be assigned a faculty adviser to help him develop the program best suited to his particular interests. Those in the program will be encouraged to pursue independent study on research problems or in areas of specialization where no formal courses are offered. A liberal substitution policy will be followed for courses normally required in the last year of the undergraduate curriculum. The program selected shall be planned so that the student may qualify for the B.S. degree after completing the credit-hour requirements for the degree if the student so elects, or if the student’s grade-point average falls below the
3.0 required to remain in the program. In this case, all hours completed with a passing grade while in the program will count toward fulfilling the normal requirements for the B.S. degree. There will be no credit given toward a graduate degree for courses applied to the B.S. degree requirements; however, students are still eligible to apply for admission to the Graduate School under the rules set forth in the Graduate School Bulletin. Normally, however, the student will apply for admission to the Graduate School when at least 130 of the 136 credit hours required for the B.S. degree have been completed, and will be awarded the B.S. and M.S. degrees simultaneously upon meeting the requirements set forth for the concurrent degree program.
Graduate Work in Business
Undergraduates in engineering who intend to pursue graduate study in business may complete some of the business background requirements as electives in their undergraduate programs. Seniors in engineering who have such intentions and appear likely to qualify for admission to graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the graduate fundamentals courses which are designed to provide qualified students with needed background preparation in business.
Major Departments
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING SCIENCES
The primary objective of the aerospace engineering sciences curriculum is to provide sound general training in subjects fundamental to the practice of and research in this branch of engineering sciences. The major part
of the first three years is devoted to the study of mathematics, physics, mechanics, chemistry, and the humanities. The fourth year is devoted to the professional courses in the fields of physics of fluids (fluid dynamics); propulsion and energy conversion; flight dynamics, control, and guidance; space system analysis; materials and structural mechanics; space environment; and bioengineering.
Planning of graduate study for students having sufficient ability and interest should begin by the start of the junior year. Such a plan should consider the foreign language requirements of appropriate graduate schools, and an advanced mathematics program included in technical electives consisting of Math. 431-432 and Math. 481 or 443.
Technical Electives
The minimum total number of semester hours for the B.S. degree is 136. Students who wish to combine the business and aerospace engineering sciences curricula are advised to consider obtaining the B.S. degree in aerospace and the M.S. degree in business rather than a combined B.S. degree. Business courses may not be substituted for technical electives in the aerospace curriculum.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete aerospace engineering sciences program is not available on the Denver Campus. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan on transferring to the Boulder Campus at the start of their junior year. The complete curriculum degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.
^Curriculum for B.S. (Aerospace Engineering Sciences)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I_______________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics_______________________________4
fEngl. 120. Great Books____________________________________3
tSocial-humanistic elective________________________________6
16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II______________ 3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics_______________________________4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics__________________________1
fEngl. 121. Great Books____________________________________3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I____________________ 2
tSocial-humanistic elective________________________________3
16
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III______________3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra__________________________3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I___________________________3
fEngl. 222. Great Books____________________________________3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics_______________________________3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics__________________________1
tSocial-humanistic elective________________________________3
19
•The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
•j-For other options in English, see the English listings in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin.
J Students may take electives Pass/Fail subject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 73
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations_________3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing__________________3
C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II___________________ 3
tEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature_________________ 3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics____________________________3
§Chem. 202. General Chemistry________________________4
79
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
CHARLES I. SHERRILL, Coordinator
The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences offers all courses in mathematics, both required and elective, for undergraduate and graduate students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Three curricula leading to the degree B.S. (A.Math.) in the College are offered. In Option I, the student takes a minor in a specific engineering department, satisfying an adviser from that department. In Option II, the student takes a distributed engineering minor including a solid grounding in mechanics or particles and continua, electronics, and materials. (This option is intended for the above-average student.) Option III is a joint mathematics-computer science program.
Math. 300 is not a required course for the major. However, students who have done A work in calculus have reported that Math. 300 has proved to be very helpful in subsequent mathematics courses. Therefore, such students are strongly advised to take Math. 300.
Modern industrial and scientific research is so dependent on advanced mathematical concepts that applied mathematicians are needed today by almost all concerns which are engaged in such research.
The undergraduate curriculum is designed to give training in mathematics and in engineering and science. The use of numerical methods and electronic computers is included.
Nontechnical electives should be broadening and have cultural value. Courses in the humanities and the social sciences are required. Students interested in research should take a foreign language as early as possible. Under all circumstances, a student must plan a complete program and obtain the approval of a departmental adviser at the beginning of the sophomore year.
Description of Courses
Refer to the mathematics section of this bulletin on page 29 for complete descriptions of all mathematics courses.
â– ^Curriculum for B.S. (A.Math.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I_______________3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics______________________________4
fEngl. 120. Great Books___________________________________3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing_______________________3
Approved elective_______________________________________-_3
16
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. The student must take a minimum of 18 hours in approved elective engineering courses excluding chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses.
â– j-For other options in English, see the English listings in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin.
J Students may take electives Pass/Fail subject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
§Or Chem. 103, General Chemistry.
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II_____________3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I___________________2
tEngl. 121. Great Books____________________________________3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics_______________________________4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics______________________ 1
Approved elective__________________________________________2
15
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III_____________3
fEngl. 222. Great Books---------------------------------- 3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics______—---------------------- 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics_________________________1
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics_________________________________3
Approved elective_________________________________________3
16
Spring Semester
tEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature-----------------------3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry----------------------------- 5
Approved electives-------------------------------------- 9
17
Iunior Year Fall Semester
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra-----------------------------3
Math. 431. Advanced Calculus I__________________________________3
Approved electives_____________________________________________12
18
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations_____________________ 3
Math. 481. Introduction to Probability Theory___________________3
Approved electives_____________________________________________12
18
Senior Year Fall Semester
Approved electives----------------------------------------- 18
Spring Semester
Approved electives_________________________________________ 18
Requirements under each option are as follows:
Option I Semester Hours
Minor in a specific engineering department _______________18-30
Technical electives____________________________________ 15-22
Other electives__________________________________________11-30
tRequired social-humanistic electives ...................... 12
(Electives must include Math. 432.)
Option II
Distributed engineering minor ____________________________18-30
(A minimal program would consist of the following courses: Aero. 304, Aero. 311, C.E. 212, C.E. 213, E.E. 303, M.E. 301, or their equivalents. Each of
these courses is for 3 hours credit.)
Technical electives________________________________________15-22
Other electives____________________________________________11-30
tRequired social-humanistic electives ....................... 12
(Electives must include Math. 432.)
Option III
Specific courses required under Option III:
E.E. 257 ________________________________________________ 3
E.E. 357 (C.S. 311) ...................................... 3
Aero. 546 (C.S. 546) ..................................... 3
E.E. 453 (C.S. 453) ...................................... 3
E.E. 459 (C.S. 459) _____________________________________ 3
E.E. 555 (C.S. 555) ...................................... 3
E.E. 450 (Math. 461)____________________________________ 3
Math. 465 ________________________________________________ 3
Math. 466 ________________________________________________ 3
Technical electives_________________________________________6-22
Other electives ...........................................11-30
tRequired social-humanistic electives ....................... 12


74 / University of Colorado at Denver
Bachelor of Science Degree in Applied Mathematics
The B.S. degree in applied mathematics requires the completion of a minimum of 136 credit hours of course work with an average grade of C or better (a 2.0 grade-point average) and a grade of C or better in all mathematics courses. Course work in the social studies-humanities area must be approved by the student’s adviser. Work in certain other areas may be acceptable toward the social studies-humanities requirement, but must first be approved by the student’s adviser. Of the 12 hours required in the social-humanistic area in addition to the literature courses, at least 6 hours must be in courses at the 300 level or higher.
Note: Neither Math. 101 nor Math. 102 count toward the B.S. (A.Math.) degree.
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
JOHN R. MAYS, Coordinator
The architectural engineering curriculum is devised and administered by the joint efforts of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the College of Environmental Design. The purpose of the program is to prepare a student for a career in the building industry and for research at the graduate level on building-related topics. The building industry is the largest single-industry in the United States and includes many diverse skills and fields of knowledge. This course of study fulfills the academic requirements for registration as a professional engineer.
The architectural engineering curriculum is recommended for those wishing to specialize within the building industry in engineering design, construction and contracting, or sales engineering. The architectural engineering student may select any one of three areas of specialization offered: construction engineering, environmental engineering, or structural engineering.
Specialization in construction is for students planning a career in contracting and building construction. This program offers courses in construction management, planning and scheduling techniques, cost accounting, estimating and pricing, and in building materials and construction methods.
Those students interested in environmental design may concentrate their efforts in the fields of illumination and building electrical systems design; heating-venti-lating-air conditioning systems design; sanitation and water supply; or acoustics. A broad range of courses is available covering these subjects.
The third area of specialization is for those who are interested in the design of structural systems for buildings. Courses available are structural analysis, indeterminate structures, and steel, concrete, and timber design, among others.
The five-year course leading to the combined degree in architectural engineering and business offers opportunity for complementing the architectural engineering background with study in one of the major areas of business administration, such as personnel and business management, marketing, and finance.
The freshman year in architectural engineering is the same as that for all engineering students. In the
sophomore year, the student is introduced to the functions of the specialty divisions within the building industry and is provided a basis for understanding architecture and the relationship and contribution of architectural engineering to architecture. In addition, there is more advanced work in mathematics and physics. The junior year is devoted largely to the engineering sciences with a continuation of those courses fundamental to understanding architecture and building. The last year is devoted to engineering analysis, design, or construction of buildings, the field of specialization being determined by the student’s choice of his technical electives. In the senior year, 6 hours of social-humanistic courses are required as nontechnical electives.
The junior, senior, and fifth years of the combined curriculum in architectural engineering and business are devoted to pursuit of the full requirements for the architectural engineering degrees, as well as the course work necessary to a specific major study area within the College of Business and Administration.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete architectural engineering program is not available on the Denver Campus. Students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus to complete the requirements.
^Curriculum for B.S. (Arch.E.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I____________ 3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I ________________ 2
fEngl. 120. Great Books _______________________________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics __________________________ 4
C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering __________________________________________2
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II___________ 3
fEngl. 121. Great Books _______________________________ 3
E.D.E.E. 102. Fundamentals of Design II________________ 2
E.Phys. 112. General Physics___________________________ 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics______________________ 1
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing ___________________ 3
16
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III _____________ 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra__________________________3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics_______________________________ 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics______.___________________ 1
fEngl. 222. Great Books _________________________________ 3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I___________________________ 3
Specialty requirement (structures and construction majors take C.E. 221; environmental majors take Arch.E. 362) ___ 3
19
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations _______________ 3
tCh.E. 210. Chemical and Physical Properties of Materials _ 4
Arch.E. 240. Building Materials and Construction __________ 3
C.E. 312. Mechanics of Materials___________________________ 3
fEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature_______________________3
16
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
•j-For other English options, see the English department listings in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin.
JChemistry 103-5 may be substituted for Ch.E. 210-4, in which case the technical elective requirement is reduced by 1 credit hour.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 75
Junior Year Fall Semester
C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II_____________________________ 3
C.E. 316. Materials Testing Laboratory (not required
of environmental majors) _________________________________ 1
Arch.E. 330. Basic Structural Analysis and Design
(structures majors substitute C.E. 350) __________________3-4
Arch.E. 354. Illumination I___________________________________ 3
Arch. 320. Architectural Appreciation and Design______________ 3
Specialty requirement (structures and environmental majors—E.E. 303, 343; construction—Acct. 212) ______________3-4
16-18
Spring Semester
Arch.E. 363. Environmental Acoustics _____________________ 3
Arch. 321. Architectural Appreciation and Design__________ 3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics ______________________________ 3
Technical elective _______________________________________ 3
Specialty requirement (structures—C.E. 331, M.E. 362; environmental—M.E. 362, technical elective, 3; construction—Acct. 214, B.L. 300)_________________________ 6
18
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Arch.E. 441. Construction Costs, Estimating, Pricing______ 3
Arch. 470. History/Philosophy ____________________________ 3
Arch.E. 362. Mechanical Systems for Building (environmental majors substitute technical elective) _____________ 3
Sociohumanistic elective (construction majors required
to take Econ. 201) ____________________________________ 3
Specialty requirement (structures—C.E. 456, 457; environmental—technical elective; construction—
E.D.E.E. 351, Engr.Sci. elective) ___________________5-6
17-18
Spring Semester
Arch.E. 470. Applied Structural Design (construction
majors substitute Arch.E. 446) _________________________ 3
Arch. 471. History/Philosophy ______________________________ 3
Technical elective _________________________________________ 6
Sociohumanistic elective (construction majors required to
take Econ. 202) ________________________________________ 3
Specialty requirement (structures—C.E. 458, technical elective; environmental—technical elective; construction—C.E. 497) ____________________________________3-4
18-19
Courses Available for Engineering Science Electives
Upon consultation with his adviser, the student must select not fewer than 8 additional semester hours of engineering sciences from the following list of courses:
Aero. 304-3. Analytical Dynamics
Aero. 311-3. Fluid Dynamics I
Aero. 312-3. Fluid Dynamics II
C.E. 316-1. Materials Testing Laboratory
C.E. 331-3. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics
C.E. 380-3. Soils and Foundation Engineering
Ch.E. 320-3. Momentum, Energy, and Mass Transport
E.E. 302-3. Statistical Thermodynamics
E.E. 303-3. Electric Circuits I
E.E. 343-1. Electrical Laboratory I
E.E. 403-2. Elements of Electronics
E.E. 443-1. Elements of Electronics Laboratory
E.D.E.E. 331-3. Engineering Materials
E.D.E.E. 351-3. Engineering Statistics I
M.E. 301-3. Science of Materials
M.E. 312-3. Thermodynamics II
M.E. 362-3. Heat Transfer
Courses Available for Specialization
Upon consultation with his adviser, the student must select not fewer than 29 semester hours of courses applicable to his area of interest and specialization. The areas of specialization are construction engineering, environ-
mental engineering, and structural engineering. In addition to the courses listed below, other courses, not listed, may be proposed by a student and approved by his adviser if they are found to be applicable.
Arch.E. 330-4. Basic Structural Analysis and Design Arch.E. 446-3. Constr. Planning and Scheduling Arch.E. 455-3. Illumination II Arch.E. 457-3. Building Electrical Systems Design Arch.E. 458-3. Building Electrical Systems Design II Arch.E. 470-3. Applied Structural Design Acct. 200-3. Intro. Accounting-Financial Aspects Acct. 214-3. Intro. Accounting-Managerial Aspects B.Ad. 410-3. Business and Government
B. L. 300-3. Business Law
C. E. 221-3. Plane Surveying
C.E. 332-3. Applied Fluid Mechanics
C.E. 350-3. Structural Analysis
C.E. 380-3. Soils and Foundations Engineering
C.E. 453-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering
C.E. 456-2. Design of Timber Structures
C.E. 457-3. Design of Steel Structures
C.E. 458-3. Reinforced Concrete Design
C.E. 459-3. Applied Structural Design
C.E. 481-2. Intermediate Soils Engineering
C.E. 497-3. Engineering Economy
Econ. 201-3. Principles of Economics I
Econ. 202-3. Principles of Economics II
E.E. 313-3. Electromagnetic Fields I
E.E. 316-3. Energy Conversion I
E.E. 354-2. Power Lab I
E.E. 381-3. Introduction to Probability Theory
E.E. 451-2. Power Lab II
E.E. 452-2. Power Systems Lab
E.E. 471-2. Power Transmission Laboratory I
E.E. 472-2. Power Transmission Laboratory II
Engl. 315-3. Report Writing
Fin. 305-3. Basic Finance
Fin. 401-3. Business Finance
M.E. 314-2. Measurements I
M.E. 316-2. Measurements II
M.E. 371-3. Systems Analysis I
M.E. 372-3. Systems Analysis II
M.E. 421-3. Air Conditioning
M.E. 424-3. Refrigeration
M.E. 442-3. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
Mk. 300-3. Principles of Marketing
R.Es. 300-3. Principles of Real Estate Practice
Description of Courses
Arch.E. 240-3. Building Materials and Construction. A study of construction methods and techniques including foundations and structural framing concepts, and particularly materials, components and systems applications in building construction. Arch.E. 330-4. Basic Structural Analysis and Design. First principles of structural analysis and the design of structural components of concrete, steel, or timber. Prer., C.E. 312.
Arch.E. 350-3. Environmental Systems III. Analysis and application of the methods of construction and the controlling of the planned environment. A study of structural, mechanical, electrical and illumination, acoustical, and construction technologies and their effect upon the design process. Prer., E.S. 251.
Arch.E. 351-3. Environmental Systems IV. Continuation of Arch.E. 350 (Environmental Systems III). Prer., Arch.E. 350.
Arch.E. 354-3. Illumination I. A study of the fundamentals of illumination and the application of these principles to the illumination of buildings. Prer., E.Phys. 112 or Phys. 202.
Arch.E. 362-3. Mechanical Systems for Buildings. Fundamentals of heating and air conditioning systems and environmental controls in buildings. Prer., Phys. 202 or E.Phys. 112.
Arch.E. 363-3. Introduction to Acoustics and Noise. (Aero. 363.) Engineering and physiological foundations of acoustics. Individual and social response to sound. Environmental noise problems. Engineering and legal control of noise. Prer., junior standing or consent of instructor.
Arch E. 400-1 to 6. Independent Study.
Arch.E. 441-3. Construction Costs, Estimating, and Prices. Introduction to building construction cost accounting and controls,


76 / University of Colorado at Denver
analysis of direct and indirect cost fundamentals and collecting systems, methods engineering and value engineering. Also included is a study of the types of estimates, quantity take-off techniques and pricing applications, and the preparation of a detailed estimate for a building project including all cost analyses, a complete quantity survey, development of unit prices, and the final assembly of the bid proposal. Prer., Arch.E. 240, senior standing, or consent of instructor.
Arch.E. 446-3. Construction Planning and Scheduling. A comprehensive study of construction management including the contractor’s role in pre-construction activities; the construction contract; bonds and insurance; purchasing and subcontracts; contractor’s central office and job organization; plant, tools, and equipment; methods engineering; value engineering; labor relations and hiring; and the particular application of CPM/PERT techniques to the planning, scheduling, and control of a construction project. Prer., Arch.E. 240 and 441, senior standing, or consent of instructor.
Arch.E. 457-3. Building Electrical Systems Design I. Design of the secondary electrical distribution systems for buildings. Application of the N.E.C. Prer., E.E 214 or 303
Arch.E. 458-3. Building Electrical Systems Design II. Three lect.-rec. periods per wk. Analysis and design of electrcial systems for special equipment in commercial buildings such as motor controllers, elevators, sound and signal systems. Prer., Arch.E. 457.
Arch.E. 470-3. Applied Structural Design. (C.E. 459.) One lect-rec. and two computation periods per wk. Lectures on professional engineering practice. Individual design problems involving the use of timber, concrete, steel, and other materials. Prer., C.E. 457-or 458.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
WILLIAM C. HUGHES, Coordinator
Meeting the crisis in oil and energy, depolluting the water and air, producing new and better materials to replace those that are limited or scarce—these are jobs in which one will find the chemical engineer.
Chemical plants (including refineries and gasification plants) convert natural resources into industrial and consumer products. Among their products are many that often are not identified with chemical engineering— oils, metals, glass, plastic, rubber, paints, soaps and detergents, foods, beverages, synthetic and natural fibers, nuclear and exotic fuels, medicines, and many others.
The department is very much interested in research directed toward ecologically sound development of chemical processes. It is also working hard on energy problems and is stressing problems of energy conversion in its instructional program.
Many essentials of life originate in chemical engineering. Recycling of wastes and resources is not a new idea in chemical engineering but a long-standing principle. Since the earth now is perceived as a self-renewing system, intelligent generalization of the recycle theory to the entire cycle of natural resources is a challenge and opportunity for chemical engineers. Cleaning up pollution from chemical plants and from most other sources is largely a chemical engineering problem. The chemical engineer efficiently uses and conserves natural resources to create valuable end products and to preserve environmental values.
Thus, chemical engineering continually changes and progresses. The Department of Chemical Engineering therefore helps students to prepare to be immediately valuable to industry and eventually to lead future developments in industry and research. Whether they plan to go into industry or on to graduate work, students
are urged to watch, understand, and enjoy the sparkle and interplay of new ideas and new technologies.
Chemical engineering is an ideal premedical course, and a special premedical and bioengineering program is offered. Paralleling the technical courses are studies in literature, social sciences, and humanities.
Each student is offered the opportunity for close and careful counseling by the faculty and by other members of the University community. Several students each year plan programs that will qualify them not only as chemical engineers but also for professional training in medical, law, or business schools or for graduate work in systems engineering or computing science. (The department has its own analog computer and a process-control computer built around a standard digital minicomputer.) In chemical engineering, students may choose combined five-year programs leading to double degrees with chemical engineering and such diverse fields as business, philosophy, or Asian studies. The department believes that, since no two students are alike, no two programs should be alike either.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete chemical engineering program is not available on the Denver Campus. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus at the start of their junior year. The complete curriculum, degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.
^Curriculum for B.S. (Ch.E.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I_______________3
fChem. 103. General Chemistry_____________________________5
tEngl. 120. Great Books____________________________________3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I _______.___________2
#Ch.E. 130. Introduction to Chemical Engineering----------2
15
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II______________3
fChem. 106. General Chemistry______________________________5
tEngl. 121. Great Books___________________________________3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing________________________3
14
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III_____________3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics____________________________ 4
tEngl. 222. Great Books____________________________________3
Chem. 331. Organic Chemistry_______________________________4
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra _________________________3
17
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations_________________3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics_______________________________4
tEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature________________________3
Chem. 332. Organic Chemistry_______________________________4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics__________________________1
Ch.E. 212. Chemical Engineering Material and
Energy Balances ____________________________________ 3
18
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. tQualified students may take Chem. 107 and Chem. 108.
7 For other English options, see the English listings in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin.
#Or C.E. 130 or E.E. 130.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 77
CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
JOHN R. MAYS, Associate Chairman
Civil and environmental engineering covers the broadest field of engineering generally studied in American universities today. Civil and environmental engineering offers an interesting and highly challenging career to the student interested in the design and construction of buildings, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures; in transportation systems including highways, canals, pipe lines, airports, rapid transit lines, railroads, and harbor facilities; in the transmission of water and the control of rivers; in the development of water resources for urban use, industry, and land reclamation; in the control of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment; in the construction and contracting industry; and in general in the rapidly expanding problems concerned with man’s physical environment and the growth of cities. Furthermore, civil-and-environmental-engineering-educated students frequently find very rewarding employment in other fields: for example, in aerospace structures, electric power generation, city planning, the process industries, industrial engineering, business management, and law or medicine (after appropriate education in law or medical school). The breadth of the civil and environmental engineering undergraduate program provides an excellent educational background for many fields of endeavor.
The curriculum is designed to give the student, besides a good background in the humanities, a broad knowledge of the basic engineering sciences of chemistry, mathematics (including differential equations), physics, mechanics (including fluid mechanics and soil mechanics), electrical engineering, and thermodynamics. A minimum of 24 semester hours is allocated to the subject area of social-humanistic studies. These hours may be devoted to literature, the social sciences, or to selected courses in engineering which emphasize the impact of engineering on people and their problems.
Specialized training is achieved through certain required courses followed by advanced technical courses which may be elected in the senior year. Random selection of these technical electives is not advisable and in general is not allowed, the objective being to permit a graduate to take his place in the ranks of his profession with sufficiently firm groundwork of fundamental engineering science and a knowledge in specialized fields to equip him to cope intelligently with the technical problems of present-day expanded civil and environmental engineering.
A five-year program has been arranged for those students who wish to pursue the combined curriculum for the civil engineering and business degrees.
A student interested in a premedical option should consult with an adviser and the department chairman at the earliest possible time in order to make proper plans for an acceptable program. See the description of the Premedical Option on page 70.
‘‘‘Curriculum for B.S. (C.E.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I......... 3
fEngl. 120. Great Books ____________________________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics _____________________________ 4
C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil and Environmental
Engineering .......................................... 2
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I ________,__________ 2
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II _____ .... 3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing ______________________ 3
fEngl. 121. Great Books __________________________________3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ----------------------------- 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics_________________________ 1
14
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ____________ 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra_________________________ 3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics ----------------------------- 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics ........................ 1
fEngl. 222. Great Books __________________________________ 3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I__________________________ 3
C.E. 221. Plane Surveying ________________________________3
19
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations ............... 3
fEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature ______________________ 3
Chem. 103/202. General Chemistry (or Chem.E. 210).........5-4
C.E. 312. Mechanics of Materials _____________I........... 3
§ Civil and environmental engineering elective ........... 3
tEngineering science elective ............................ 3
20-19
Junior Year Fall Semester
C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II____________ ____________ 3
C.E. 331. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics ___________________ 3
C.E. 360. Transportation Engineering________________________ 3
#E.E. 303. Electrical Circuits I............................ 3
tEngineering science elective_____________________________ 3
Social-humanistic elective _________________________________ 3
18
Spring Semester
C.E. 332. Applied Fluid Mechanics __________________________ 3
C.E. 341. Sanitary Engineering I............................ 4
C.E. 350. Structural Analysis ____________________________ 3
C.E. 316. Materials Testing Laboratory _______1___________ 1
C.E. 380. Soils and Foundations Engineering ._}___________ 3
Social-humanistic elective ................................. 3
17
Senior Year Fall Semester
Geol. 497. Geology for Engineers ........................... 4
C.E. 457. Design of Steel Structures ........J____________ 3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics ________________________________ 3
§Civil and environmental engineering elective............. 3
Social-humanistic elective _______________________________ 3
Engineering science elective.............................. 2
18
Spring Semester
C.E. 499. Senior Seminar.....................1............ 1
C.E. 458. Reinforced Concrete Design _________i___________ 3
§Civil and environmental engineering electives __________ 7
tEngineering science elective ...........................2-3
Social-humanistic elective _______________I___________ 3
16-17
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
â– J-For other English options, see the English listings in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin.
^Engineering science electives shall be taken from the list of courses approved by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. § Civil and environmental engineering electives shall be chosen to form an integrated program subject to the approval of the department.
#E.E. 213 may be substituted for E.E. 303.


78 / University of Colorado at Denver
Description of Courses
C.E. 130-2. Introduction to Civil ond Environmentol Engineering. A
survey of the broad subject area of civil, environmental, and architectural engineering designed to assist the student in selecting his subject area specialty.
C.E. 212-3. Analytical Mechanics I. A vector treatment of force systems and their resultants: equilibrium of frames and machines, including internal forces and three-dimensional configurations; static friction; properties of surfaces, including first and second moments; hydrostatics; minimum potential energy and stability. Prer. or coreq., Math. 242.
C.E. 213-3. Analytical Mechanics II. A vector treatment of dynamics of particles and rigid bodies including rectilinear translation, central-force, free and forced vibration, and general motion of particles, kinematics of rigid bodies; the inertia tensor; Euler’s equations of motion; energy and momentum methods for particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. Prer., C.E. 212. C.E. 221-3. Plane Surveying. Observation, analysis, and presentation of basic linear, angular, area, and volume field measurements common to civil engineering endeavor. Prer., Math. 140. C.E. 222-3. Engineering Measurements. Elementary principles of measurements; methodology, instrumentation, and analysis of data. Prer., C.E. 221.
C.E. 312-3. Mechanics of Materials. Mechanical properties of materials; stresses and strains in members subjected to tension, compression, and shear; flexural and shearing stresses in beams; deflections of beams, column analysis, principal stresses, static equivalent load, fatigue. Prer., C.E. 212.
C.E. 316-1. Materials Testing Laboratory. One 3-hour lab. per wk. Lab. emphasizing mechanical properties of commonly used structural materials, such as steel, aluminum, timber, and concrete, and the testing and research techniques necessary to obtain these properties. Prer. or coreq., C.E. 312.
C.E. 331-3. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics. Basic principles of fluid mechanics. Fluid properties, hydrostatics, fluid flow concepts, including continuity, energy, momentum, boundary-layer theory, and flow in closed conduits. Prer. or coreq. C.E. 213.
C.E. 332-3. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Application of principles of fluid mechanics and dimensional analysis to problems in open channel flow, pipe systems, hydraulic machinery, fluid flow measurement, and hydraulic models. Includes laboratory demonstrations and experiments. Prer., C.E. 331.
C.E. 340-2. City Planning. Essential principles of city planning, with particular emphasis on the contribution that can be made by civil engineers. Includes detailed discussion of land use, land use boundaries, transportation, street systems, public buildings, parks and recreation, utility design, and zoning. Prer., junior standing.
C.E. 341-4. Sanitary Engineering I. Elements of hydrology, public water supplies, and sewerage. Elements of hydrology include rainfall-runoff relationships, stream discharge, and ground water. Public water supplies include the study of rates of consumption, quality, source of supplies, methods of treatment and disinfection. Sewerage includes collection, treatment, and disposal of wastes; study of characteristics of sewage; design and operation of storm and sanitary sewers. Prer. or coreq., C.E. 331.
C.E. 350-3. Structural Analysis. First principles of structural analysis applied to statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Prer., C.E. 312.
C.E. 360-3. Transportation Engineering. Introduction to the technology, operating characteristics and relative merits of highway, airway, waterway, railroad, pipeline, and conveyor transportation systems. Evaluation of urban transportation systems. Recent transportation system innovations. Prer., junior standing or consent of instructor.
C.E. 380-3. Soils and Foundations Engineering. Introduction to physical and mechanical properties of soils; seepage, consolidation, shear strength, bearing capacity, lateral earth pressures, stability, and pile behavior, with preliminary analysis of structures affected by soil properties. Prer., C.E. 312 and 331. The latter may be taken concurrently.
C.E. 400-1 to 6. Independent Study.
C.E. 442-4. Municipal Design Projects. Analysis and design of municipal public works, including: street systems; drainage and flood control systems; water collection, treatment, and distribution systems; sewage collection and treatment systems. The
interplay between these systems and their correlation with land characteristics and use. Prer., C.E. 340, 341, and 360.
C/E. 448-3. Introduction to Environmental Pollution. A multidisciplinary examination of the problems of environmental pollution. The course with focus particularly on the chemical, social, biological, economic, and engineering aspects of environmental pollution: composition and sources; health and social costs; methods of reduction and control. Open to any nonengineering or engineering student having at least junior standing. Prer., upper division standing.
C.E. 451-3. Matrix Structural Analysis. Finite element analysis of skeletal structures. Systematic formulation of stiffness and flexibility methods for analysis of skeletal structures. Application of modern computational tools to structural analysis. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 453-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering. (E.D.E.E. 453, E.E. 455.) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science. Those methods suitable for solution by high speed digital computers are emphasized. Prer., E.E. 201, Math. 319, and Math. 443 or equivalent.
C.E. 456-2. Design of Timber Structures. Design of floor systems, beams, columns, and trusses. Design of joints; glued laminated construction. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 457-3. Design of Steel Structures. Methods used in design of structural steel members and their connections. Introduction to plastic design of steel frames. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 458-3. Reinforced Concrete Design. Ultimate strength methods for design of reinforced concrete structures. Prer., C.E. 350. C.E. 460-3. Highway Engineering. Evaluation of alternate highway routes. Discussion of highway drainage, finance, maintenance, pavement design, traffic operations, and principles of economic analysis. Impact of the highway on the environment. Prer., C.E. 360 and 380.
C.E. 481-2. Intermediate Soils Engineering. Continuation of C.E. 380
into selected topics in soils engineering. Grain size, consistency and plasticity, properties governing pavement design, permeability and seepage, stress distribution, settlement analysis, stabilization of soils. Prer., C.E. 380.
C.E. 495-1 to 6. Special Topics. This category is intended for special topics which students may wish to pursue on their own initiative, with guidance from a professor who agrees to limited consultation on the work and to award credit when the project is completed.
C.E. 497-3. Engineering Economy. Application of economic and financial principles to engineering alternatives. Calculation of annual costs, present worth, and prospective rates of return on investment. Depreciation and replacement studies. Economic aspects of public works. Preparation of engineering reports on economy studies. Prer., senior standing.
C.E. 498-2. Engineering Contracts. Laws met by the practicing engineer, types of contracts, specification writing, laws on contracts, agency, partnership, sales, and property, with primary emphasis on rights and duties of the engineer. Prer., senior standing in civil or architectural engineering.
Electives for Qualified Undergraduates
The following graduate courses are open to qualified undergraduates to meet the requirements for technical or professional electives. Description of courses primarily for graduates may be found in the Graduate School section of this bulletin and in the Graduate School Bulletin.
C.E. 511-3. Introduction to Structural Dynamics. Introduction to the dynamic response of structural systems, both linear and nonlinear. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.E. 512-3. Intermediate Mechanics of Materials. Intermediate-level course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. Plane stress and strain; stress-strain relations, with emphasis on elastic and inelastic behavior of members and theories of failure. Discussion of basic methods of structural mechanics with applications to unsymmetric and curved beams, thick-walled pressure vessels, torsion of members of noncircular sections, and other selected problems in stress analysis. Prer., C.E. 312 and differential equations.
C.E. 533-3. Applied Hydrology. Engineering applications of principles of hydrology. Hydrologic cycle, rainfall and runoff,


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 79
groundwater, storm frequency and duration studies, stream hydrography, flood frequency, and flood routing. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.E. 551-3. Motrix Structural Analysis. Finite element analysis of skeletal structures. Systematic formulation of stiffness and flexibility methods for analysis of skeletal structures. Application of modern computational tools to structural analysis. Differs from C.E. 451 by the addition of individual student projects. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 553-3. Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering. Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of civil engineering problems with emphasis on obtaining solutions with high-speed electronic computers. Applies methods to all types of civil engineering problems. Prer., senior or graduate standing. C.E. 562-3. Urban Transportation Planning. Definition of the urban transportation problem, sociology of urban regions, history of urban growth, models of urban growth, population forecasts, land use surveys and planning, trip generation, characteristics, distribution, and assignment, modal split, system evaluation, CBD transportation planning. Prer., consent of instructor.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
W. THOMAS CATHEY, Associate Chairman
The professional possibilities in electrical engineering include teaching and research in a university; research in development of new electrical or electronic devices, instruments, or products; production and quality-control of electrical products for private industry or government; and sales or management for a private firm or branch of government. More specific ways in which modern electrical engineering graduates may use their talents include the following:
1. They might emphasize their circuit logic and computer software training, in which case they would be occupied with the design of electronic computers and with their application to data handling and to the solution of engineering problems.
2. Alternatively, graduates might be interested in continuing their training in electromagnetic fields. This work would then lead to the study of how radio waves propagate from one point to another on the earth, or perhaps between man-made satellites.
3. If they choose communication theory, the work might involve signal processing of data from biological, seismic, or space probe experiments; or they could work in the design of classical systems such as a radio-telephone link. Their knowledge of communication theory would provide a solid base to study such diverse fields as propagation of information in biological systems or the design of high-speed data links between computers.
4. Many graduating engineers are interested in electrical devices—in the conversion of the latest scientific discoveries into useful tools or instruments. Engineers now working with lasers exemplify this aspect of the profession.
5. They might choose to go into biomedical electronics. In this field they would be working closely with the medical profession in the design of better measuring instruments, or in the design of more sophisticated prosthetic devices.
6. New opportunities are developing in the area of system modeling for urban and environmental problems and in instrumentation for pollution measurement.
What should the student expect in an electrical engineering course of study at the University of Colorado? A sound background based on the time-tested principles
of physics, chemistry, and mathematics forms the core of his first two years. An early, intensive training in the theory and laboratory application of electrical circuits is covered in his sophomore year. In his third year the student learns more fundamentals in electronic circuits, electromagnetic and transmission theory, electrical machines and transformers, heat, and mechanics. In the summer between the junior and senior years, many students find an opportunity to put their knowledge to work with jobs in industry or research projects being conducted at the University. In the senior year he may elect courses from a wide variety of subject matter to fit his particular interests. Throughout his entire four years, he reinforces his understanding of the theory in well-equipped laboratories.
The students are also encouraged to develop interests outside of their electrical engineering specialty. Students enroll in at least one nontechnical subject each semester, frequently in the College of Undergraduate Studies, thus providing themselves with a well-rounded background and a sense of awareness and responsibility for their later role in society. They are urged to attend meetings of their student professional society, where practicing engineers from many engineering specialties speak of their experiences.
The curriculum is arranged so that transfer students may join the program without appreciable loss of time or credit. For example, a transfer student who has completed the mathematics and physics of the freshman and sophomore years and who has a total of about 68 credit hours acceptable to the department could obtain the degree in four semesters.
The areas of specialization that electrical engineering students may enter upon graduation are so numerous it is impossible for the four years of training to cover them in detail. Intense specialization may be left to possible additional training graduates may receive when they assume positions with industrial firms, or acquired by specialization in a research field through graduate work beyond the bachelor’s degree. Students who have earned a B average or better during their four years and who have elected courses in their senior year that strengthen particularly their mathematical background may decide to take additional graduate work. The curriculum in electrical engineering is designed to make it possible for the graduating senior with high scholarship to finish a master’s degree in electrical engineering in about one additional full year of work at any of the nation’s major universities.
Curriculum for B.S. (E.E.)
In the standard curriculum the student has considerable freedom in the electives during the senior year. The student may select these electives to provide a good foundation in several of the seven electrical engineering areas listed: communications, digital, electronics, fields, materials, power, and systems. Some of these electives may be used for courses in other branches of engineering or in other colleges. Those students primarily interested in taking courses in the digital or computer area may do so in this curriculum or in the joint E.E. and computer degree option discussed below. If they do not care to take all the courses required in the latter curriculum or if they are not strong in mathematics, they may prefer to use the standard curriculum to specialize in computers.


80 / University of Colorado at Denver
Combined Business Option
Students wishing to take the combined engineering-business program should not start this program until their fourth year, with the exception of electing Econ. 201 and 202 for two of their social-humanistic electives. Students with a B average may wish to consider obtaining a master’s degree in business administration. For both of these programs, please refer to the College of Engineering and Applied Science introductory section of this bulletin.
Premedical Option
A program has been developed which permits the student to satisfy the entrance requirements for medical school, such as those of the University of Colorado, while earning a B.S. in electrical engineering.
There are several possible ways of satisfying the medical school requirements of genetics, plus 6 or 8 hours each of biology and organic chemistry. For example, biology may be taken during the freshman year in the biology department or in the junior year in the aerospace engineering sciences department.
Students interested in this program should inquire at the departmental office as early as possible, preferably before taking Chem. 103, 202, or equivalent.
Curriculum for B.S. (E.E. and C.S.)
The joint degree in electrical engineering and computer science is a comprehensive program covering both hardware and software aspects of computer system design. This program is administered in cooperation with the Department of Computer Science. It is directed to students whose major interests are in the computer itself and in a broad range of applications. The program leads to a B.S. (E.E. and C.S.) and can be extended for one year to obtain either an M.S. in computer science or an M.S. in electrical engineering.
A student need not make a decision to enter this program until the second semester of the sophomore year. The details of the program are listed in the section following the normal curriculum. The purpose of the changes is to add to the mathematics background in such a way as to provide a basis for graduate work in computer-related fields and to permit inclusion of courses in logic circuits, scientific application of computers, logic structure of computers, and assembly language programming. Also the student will obtain actual operating experience with the departmental computers. Should students leave the program in favor of returning to the standard curriculum, they will need to satisfy the departmental requirements of mechanics and E.E. 354, which have been waived in the E.E. computer option curriculum. For other computer-related programs, see the Graduate School Bulletin.
’''Curriculum for B.S. (E.E.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I______________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ___________________________ 4
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I _________________ 2
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modern
Electrical Engineering ________________________________ 2
fSocial-humanistic elective ______________________________ 3
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II________________ 3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics _______________________________4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics ___________________________ 1
tE.E. 201. Introduction to Computing_________________________ 3
fSocial-humanistic elective__________________________________ 6
17
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III .............. 3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics___________________________ 1
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I_________________________________ 4
fE.E. 253. Circuits Lab. I___________________________________ 1
fSocial-humanistic elective__________________________________ 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra___________________________ 3
18
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations _________________ 3
§Chem. 202. General Chemistry__________________________________ 4
E.E. 214. Circuit Analysis II ______________________________ 4
E.E. 254. Circuits Lab. II _________________________________ 1
E.E. 257. Logic Circuits_____________________________________ 3
fSocial-humanistic elective ________________________________ 3
18
Iunior Year
Fall Semester
E.E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I _________________________ 3
E.E. 321. Electronics I _____________________________________ 3
E.E. 361. Electronics Lab. 1 ________________________________ 2
#C.E. 313. Applied Mechanics_________________________________ 3
E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability Theory_________________ 3
fSocial-humanistic elective__________________________________ 3
17
Spring Semester
E.E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields II__________________________ 3
E.E. 322. Electronics II_____________________________________ 3
E.E. 316. Energy Conversion I________________________________ 3
E.E. 354. Power Laboratory I_________________________________ 2
E.E. 362. Electronics Lab. II____,___________________________ 2
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics _________________________________ 3
fSocial-humanistic elective _________________________________ 3
19
Senior Year
Fall Semester
| [Electives_________________________________________________14
fSocial-humanistic elective _________________________________ 3
17
Spring Semester
||Electives__________________________________________________16
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
fOf the 24 hours of required social-humanistic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in English and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area.
JFor some students, the material in these courses may be a repetition of material covered in high school or through practical experience. If this seems to be the case, the student should request waiver of the course from his adviser prior to or during the first week of the semester in which he is registered for the course.
§Or Chem. 103, General Chemistry.
#The mechanics requirement may be satisfied by the 3-hour course C.E. 313, or the 6-hour sequences of either C.E. 212 and C.E. 213, or E.Phys. 221 and E.Phys. 322. Students who first take E.E. 313 may, with permission, take only C.E. 213.
11 The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation. Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering, mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his undergraduate adviser.
Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas. Communications (C), Digital (D), Electronics (E), Fields (F), Materials (M), Power (P), and Systems (S). Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies, every student’s program must include at least 12 semester hours of E.E. theory courses in at least 3 areas, and must include a minimum of 3 laboratory courses in 3 areas. These distribution requirements could be met through E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3), shown in each area, only if the subject


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 81
^Curriculum for B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I________________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics_______________________________ 4
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I_____________________ 2
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modem
Electrical Engineering ............................. 2
t Social-humanistic elective ______________________________ 3
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............. 3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics_______________________________ 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics__________________________ 1
tE.E. 201. Introduction to Computing_______________________ 3
t Social-humanistic electives _____________________________ 6
17
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ------------- 3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics __________________________ 1
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I ______________________________ 4
tE.E. 253. Circuits Lab. I ................................ 1
fSocial-humanistic electives________________________________ 6
IS
Spring Semester
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ------------------------- 3
E.E. 214. Circuit Analysis II_______________________________ 4
E.E. 254. Circuits Lab. II__________________________________ 1
E.E. 257. Logic Circuits____________________________________ 3
E.E. 458. Logic Lab_________________________________________ 1
#Chem. 202. General Chemistry ______________________________ 4
Social-humanistic elective _________________________________ 3
19
Junior Year
Fall Semester
E.E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I _________________________ 3
E.E. 321. Electronics I ------------------------------------ 3
E.E. 361. Electronics Lab. I________________________________ 2
E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability or
Math. 481. Introduction to Probability _____________________ 3
E.E. 459. Computer Organization ____________________________ 3
E.E.' 460. Computer Laboratory_______________________________ 1
fSocial-humanistic elective__________________________________ 3
18
Spring Semester
E.E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields II ________________________ 3
E.E. 322. Electronics II ___________________________________ 3
E.E. 362. Electronics Lab. II_______________________________ 2
E.E. 316. Energy Conversion I________________________________ 3
matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3) course may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements.
The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work should certainly take additional mathematics. Some preliminary consulting with a department graduate adviser is desirable.
Some students, after satisfying their minimum E.E. requirements, may wish to use some of their remaining elective hours in areas other than E.E., Math., or Physics. With the approval of their adviser, they can take additional courses in other departments of the University. One restriction on these electives is that there may be no performance courses such as in music or physical education.
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
•j-Of the 24 hours of required social-humanistic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in English and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area.
JFor some students, the material in these courses may be a repetition of material covered in high school or through practical experience. If this seems to be the case, the student should request waiver of the course from his adviser prior to or during the first week of the semester in which he is registered for the course.
#Or Chem. 103, General Chemistry.
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics__________________________ 3
E.E. 453. Assembly Language Programming____________ 3
17
Senior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 401. Introduction to Programming Language
and Processors___________________________________________ 3
E.E. 422. Electronics III .................................. 3
**Math. 413. Advanced Finite Mathematics I .................. 3
tSocial-humanistic elective _________________________________ 3
11 Electives ................................................ 6
18
Spring Semester
E.E. 559. Advanced Computer Architecture ____________________ 3
***Math. 465. Numerical Analysis ............................ 3
fSocial-humanistic elective _______________________________ 3
11 Electives ................................................ 6
15
Description of Courses
E.E. 130-2. Problems and Methods of Modern Electrical Engineering.
Application of mathematical techniques to the solution of a variety of problems from electrical engineering and related fields. Translation of engineering problems into mathematical models, and the engineering interrelation of the mathematical results. Approximation techniques. Series expansions and transcendental functions in engineering problems. Problems will include optimization techniques, feedback, resonance, etc. Co-req., Math. 140.
E.E. 200-1 to 3. Independent Study. An opportunity for students to do independent, creative work. Prer., consent of instructor.
E.E. 201-3. Introduction to Computing. (C.S. 201.) An elementary course in computing, covering computer programming methods, FORTRAN programming, numerical applications, and non-numerical applications.
E.E. 213-4. Circuit Analysis I. Transient solution of circuits by classical and Laplace transform techniques. Steady-state sinusoidal solutions by means of phasors. Prer. or coreq., Math. 242.
E.E. 214-4. Circuit Analysis II. Additional steady-state solutions, polyphase circuits, Fourier series. Pulses, impulses. Mechanical analogs. Prer., E.E. 213.
E.E. 253-1. Circuits Laboratory I. Electric circuits and measurements; cathode-ray oscilloscope; electrical instruments, transients in circuits involving resistance, inductance, and capacitance; and resistance measurements. Coreq., E.E. 213.
E.E. 254-1. Circuits Laboratory II. Impedance measurements, resonance, Fourier series, polyphase measurements, magnetic measurements, introduction to analog computer. Prer., E.E. 253; prer. or coreq., E.E. 214.
E.E. 257-3. Logic Circuits. The design of combinatorial and sequential switching circuits. Includes a study of Boolean alge-
°°Or equivalent math substitution with approval of adviser.
||The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation. Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering, mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his undergraduate adviser.
Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas: Communication (C), Digital (D), Electronics (E), Fields (F), Materials (M), Power (P), and Systems (S). Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies, every student’s program must include at least 12 semester hours of E.E. theory courses in at least 3 areas, and must include a minimum of 3 laboratory courses in 3 areas. These distribution requirements could be met through E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3), shown in each area, only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3) course may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements.
The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work should certainly take additional mathematics. Some preliminary consulting with a department graduate adviser is desirable.
Some students, after satisfying their minimum E.E. requirements, may wish to use some of their remaining elective hours in areas other than E.E., Math., or Physics. With the approval of their adviser, they can take additional courses in other departments of the University. One restriction on these electives is that there may be no performance courses such as in music or physical education.
000E.E. 455, Computer Techniques in Engineering, may be substituted.


82 / University of Colorado at Denver
bra, minimization techniques, circuit analysis and synthesis, state transition tables, and race conditions.
E.E. 300-1 to 3. Independent Study. An opportunity for students to do independent, creative work. Prer., consent of instructor. E.E. 313-3. Electromagnetic Fields I. Maxwell’s equations postulated for free space and developed for material regions; boundary conditions. Uniform plane waves. Static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields. Poynting’s power theorem; reflection and transmission of uniform plane waves in layered media. Theory of hollow waveguides and two-conductor transmission lines. Smith chart; impedance matching. Elements of antenna theory. Prer., Math. 242 and E.Phys. 112.
E.E. 314-3. Electromagnetic Fields II. Continuation of E.E. 313. Prer., E.E. 313.
E.E. 316-3. Energy Conversion I. Theory of transformers. Singly excited transducers. Energy relations in rotating machines. Basic rotating energy converters. Prer., E.E. 214 and 313.
E.E. 321-3. Electronics I. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices and vacuum tubes; audio, video, and radio-frequency circuit applications. Prer., E.E. 213.
E.E. 322-3. Electronics II. Continuation of E.E. 321. Prer., E.E. 214 and 321.
E.E. 354-2. Power Laboratory I. Basic electro-mechanical energy conversion concepts as applied to the synchronous machine, induction machine, and d.c. machine; armature windings; the transformer. Prer., E.E. 254; prer. or coreq., E.E. 316.
E.E. 357-3. Computer Applications in the Mathematical Sciences. An advanced FORTRAN programming course for scientists and engineers. Emphasis on the use of computer as computational tools in engineering and in science. Programming of typical mathematical applications. Prer., E.E. 201 or C.S. 201 or equivalent; coreq., A.Math. 232 or Math. 313 or 319, or equivalent.
E.E. 361-2. Electronics Laboratory I. Experimental investigations of the characteristics of semiconductor devices and their applications. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 321.
E.E. 362-2. Electronics Laboratory II. Continuation of E.E. 361. Prer., E.E. 361; prer. or coreq., E.E. 322.
E.E. 381-3. Introduction to Probability Theory. Basic concepts, conditional and total probability, repeated independent trials, continuous distributions, functions and moments of random variables, Central Limit Theorem, characteristic functions. Prer., Math. 242.
E.E. 400-1 to 3. Independent Study. An opportunity for students to do independent, creative work. Prer., consent of instructor. E.E. 401-3. (D) Introduction to Programming Languages and Processors. (C.S. 401.) A study of programming languages and digital processors. Conceptual aspects of programming languages, translators, data structures, hardware organization and system architecture. Relationship of language features to processor features. Prer., E.E. 201.
E.E. 413-3. (S). Control Systems Analysis. (Ch.E. 557). Linear analysis and analog simulation of electrical, chemical, hydraulic and mechanical systems using block diagrams and signal flow graphs. Comparison of open and closed loop configurations. Stability studies using Nyquist, Bode, and root locus methods. Effects of simple networks on system response. Introduction of state variable techniques and digital computer solutions. Prer., senior standing with background of Laplace transforms.
E.E. 415-3. (S) Nonlinear Control Systems. The analysis and design of nonlinear feedback control systems; types and characteristics of equilibrium states; limit cycle phenomena; the behavior of nonlinearities such as hysteresis, saturation, and dead zone; phase space, describing function analysis. Lyapunov and Popov stability will be introduced. Prer., E.E. 413.
E.E. 416-4. (P) Energy Conversion II. General theory of electrical machines based on matrix analysis and Lagrange’s equations of motion. Holonomic and nonholonomic machines, transformation theory; synchronous, induction, and d.c. machines. Prer., E.E. 313 and 316.
E.E. 421-3. (S) Linear System Theory. Characterization of linear systems by impulse response, convolution, transfer function. Linear differential equations and linear difference equations as models. Applications to circuits, biological systems, etc. Transform methods including Fourier series and transforms. Laplace transforms and z transforms. Prer., E.E. 381 or Math. 481.
E.E. 422-3. (E) Electronics III. Application of electronic and other devices in wave shaping, wave generation, switching and digital systems. Prer., E.E. 257, and 322.
E.E. 424-3. (C) Communication Theory. Introduction to principles of modern communication theory and signal processing. Random processes will be introduced and used to compare the noise performance of AM, FM, and various digital modulation systems. Definition of information and channel capacity. Introduction to error correcting codes and further topics in modern communication theory. Prer., E.E. 381 and 421.
E.E. 432-3. (M) Introduction to Quantum Electronics (Lasers). Introduction to lasers and other quantum electronic devices and to the general quantum principles that govern their operation. No background in the mathematical formalism of quantum theory is required. Discussion of various laser types, applications. Prer., E.E. 302 or equivalent and 314.
E.E. 450-3. (S) Analog Computer Simulation. (Math. 461.) Analog computing techniques including time and amplitude scaling, programming of linear and nonlinear differential equations. Applications of these techniques to simulate dynamic systems including an introduction to iterative analog computing. Some laboratory work on an analog computer and with digital simulation languages will be required. Prer., A.Math. 232 or Math. 443 and background in basic Laplace transform and matrix operations. *E.E. 451-2. (P) Power Laboratory II. Experimental investigations of the design and operating characteristics of synchronous machines, induction machines, transformers, power rectifiers, and single-phase machines. Prer., E.E. 316 and 354.
*E.E. 452-2. (P) Power Systems Laboratory. A continuation of E.E. 451 with emphasis on interactions and dynamic systems; special types of electric power equipment; transient phenomena. Prer., E.E. 354.
E.E. 453-3. (D) Assembly Language Programming. (C.S. 453.) A laboratory course in programming at the machine language level. Lectures will deal with the organization of the machine, its effect on the order code, and techniques for programming in assembly language. Primary emphasis will be on preparing and running programs. Prer., E.E. 201 or consent of instructor.
E.E. 454-2. Controls Laboratory. Introductory experiments on response of control components; open- and closed-loop response of servosystems; simulation of systems on analog computers; design of compensating networks. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 413 or consent of instructor.
E.E. 455-3. (D) Computer Techniques in Engineering. (E.D.E.E. 453, C.E. 453.) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science. Those methods suitable for solution by high speed digital computers are emphasized. Prer. E.E. or C.S. 201 and A.Math. 232 or Math. 443.
E.E. 458-1. (D) Logic Circuits Laboratory. Concerned with the actual wiring of electronic logic circuits and with investigation of the properties and characteristics of those circuits. Circuits will be built from solid state gates and memory elements. Circuits of the type used in digital computers, data processing systems, control systems, and communication systems will be studied. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 257.
E.E. 459-3. (D) Computer Organization. (C.S. 459.) This course is concerned with computer arithmetic units, memory systems, control systems, and input-output systems. The emphasis is completely on logic structure rather than electronic circuitry. Prer., E.E. 257, or equivalent.
E.E. 460-1. (D) Computer Laboratory. This course will provide laboratory experience both with digital computer subsystems and with complete computer systems. The student will construct small subsystems and work with actual subsystems of a full digital computer. Prer., E.E. 257, 458, or equivalent. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 459.
E.E. 461-2. (E) Electronics Laboratory III. Experimental work with oscillators, counting and switching circuits, r-f amplifiers, modulators and demodulators. Prer., E.E. 362.
E.E. 463-2. (F) Transmission Laboratory. Experiments with transmission line and waveguide systems, slotted line, bolometer power bridge, cavity frequency meter, and crystal detector. The artificial line, time-domain reflectometer, directional coupler, hybrid tee, stub impedance matching, antenna patterns, micro-wave superheterodyne receiver. Transmission at low frequencies, including 60 Hz. Prer., E.E. 314.
E.E. 464-3. (F) Electro-Optics Laboratory. Lasers, polarization effects upon reflection and refraction. Diffraction, antenna simulation, interference, imaging, spatial filtering. Optical modulation, detection. Longer projects are selected from holography,
°Taught in Boulder only.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 83
pattern recognition, optical communications, acousto-optical effects. Prer., E.E. 314. E.E. 413 or 421 suggested.
E.E. 465-2. (C) Communications Laboratory. Laboratory experiments demonstrating and verifying material taught in E.E. 421. Extensive use is made of spectrum analysis to study signals and signal processing in filters, samplers, modulators, converters, and detectors. Topics include AM, FM, PM, and noise. Prer., or coreq., E.E. 421.
E.E. 491-499 1 to 3. Special Topics. Credit and subject matter to be arranged. Prer., variable.
Electives for Qualified Undergraduates
Most 500-level graduate courses are open to qualified undergraduates to meet the requirements for technical or professional electives. Description of these courses and courses primarily for graduates may be found in the Graduate School section of this bulletin and in the Graduate School Bulletin.
To register for 500-level courses, a student must have a B average or consent of instructor.
ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION
Engineers in today’s world of rapidly expanding technology are expected not only to be competent planners and designers of technical devices and systems, but also significant contributors to the betterment of their environment in the social and humanistic sense as well. It is no longer sufficient to build more powerful machines, more useful devices, and more effective controlling systems if the total effect is to deplete man’s resources, damage his environment, or contribute to the destruction of his economic welfare. To be effective in his modern role, the engineer, of course, must have a solid background in the natural sciences and mathematics, the engineering sciences, modern economic theory and practice, and current thought in the social sciences and humanities. He also must have opportunities to develop his judgment in the proper application of this background to contemporary problems.
The curriculum in the Department of Engineering Design and Economic Evaluation therefore stresses the importance of educational techniques which furnish opportunities to study in reasonable depth the sciences and mathematics as useful analytical tools. It also encourages the expansion of the individual’s concepts of the problems of the society in which he serves, and furnishes many opportunities to develop his own abilities as a thoughtful and responsible contributor to the solution of these problems.
Starting in the freshman year and continuing throughout the curriculum, graphical, mathematical, numerical (computer), and physical models are used, first to teach known principles, and ultimately as tools in themselves for the effective conceptualization of new problems. Finding a possible solution to a problem is not enough; sound judgment must be applied in reaching an optimum solution. Many engineering problems are non-numerical in character, and the engineer must learn to manage problems having elements of great uncertainty.
Graduates in engineering design and economic evaluation are primarily concerned with the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of men, materials, and equipment. Assignments such as operations management, design for engineering or manufacturing, and consulting in industry and small busi-
ness are typical. Many other types of opportunities are offered to graduates of this program.
If a student’s interests and abilities lead him into graduate studies and research, the department offers opportunities to pursue feasibility evaluation, quantitative economic analysis and planning, product design and development, systems design, industrial engineering, and operations research. A logical and recent development in the graduate activities of this department is biomechanics. Research in biomechanics is leading to a better understanding of the mechanical functions of living organisms, including man, from an engineer’s point of view. This understanding, when joined with physiology and medicine, promises to contribute heavily to man’s knowledge of himself and his environment.
Entry into the E.D.E.E. program at all levels is intentionally made as flexible as possible. Lengthy chains of prerequisites have been avoided as well as the traditional insistence on certain rigid patterns of courses. Wherever possible, students are admitted to advanced courses on the basis of their intellectual maturity rather than on set prerequisites. Individuals are encouraged to discuss their objectives with the department’s advising staff and to develop a course plan which best meets their aspirations.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete program in Engineering Design and Economic Evaluation is not available on the Denver Campus. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus at the start of their junior year. The complete curriculum, degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.
’'■Curriculum for B.S. (E.D.E.E.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ______________ 3
Phys. 111. General Physics ._________________1____________ 4
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I____________________ 2
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing ______________________ 3
fE.D.E.E. 130. Introduction to Engineered Systems____________ 2
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II______________ 3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics __________________________4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics_________________________ 1
! Social-humanistic elective ............................. 3
E.D.E.E. 203. Fundamentals of Design III _________________ 3
tTechnical elective ................................ _^_3
17
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ____________ 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ___________,____________ 3
§E.Phys. 213. General Physics_____________________________ 3
|.C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I_____________1____________ 3
ISocial-humanistic elective .............................. 3
E.D.E.E. 221. Product Definition ___________j.___________ 3
18
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. iOr any 130 course in engineering.
$A minimum of three elective courses must he taken from E.D.E.E. offerings.
§Or Chem. 103-5, Biol. 101-3, M.C.D.B. 105-4, or Ch.E. 210-4.
[.Or M.E. 281, 282.
I ISocial-humanistic electives must include a minimum of two literature courses.


84 / University of Colorado at Denver
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Differential Equations_____________________ 3
*C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II____________________ 3
E.D.E.E. 222. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design .. 3
E.D.E.E. 331. Engineering Materials___________________ 3
||Econ. 201. Principles of Economics I________________ 3
**Ch.E. 210. Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter _4
19
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CLYDE ZAIDINS, Coordinator
The purpose of the curriculum outlined by the Department of Physics and Astrophysics is to give the student a thorough, fundamental training in physics and in the applications of physics. The courses are broad in scope, and the curriculum provides many electives so that a student may supplement his general training in physics by work in other fields.
During the freshman and sophomore years the work is general, yet a thorough training in mathematics and fundamental methods and principles of the physical sciences is stressed. This leads to an appreciation of related fields and their application to engineering practice.
During the junior and senior years the work in physics is amplified to conform to the versatility of the physicist’s profession. This leads to a comprehensive knowledge of the various branches of physics such as nuclear physics, atomic physics, electronics, thermodynamics, mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. Individual initiative and resourcefulness are stressed. This general knowledge of the diverse fields of physics is intended to give the student the ability to deal with industrial problems that cannot be solved by a standardized procedure in a specialized field. The training prepares the student for a career in physics where there are many and varied opportunities in development work and industrial research. It is also basic for graduate work in physics and specialized training in research.
Not all of the courses required for the engineering physics program are offered on the Denver Campus. Students wishing to complete this program should plan to complete courses on the Boulder Campus. Complete course descriptions may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.
^Curriculum for B.S. (E.Phys.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I_______________ 3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I____________________ 2
fEngl. 120. Great Books____________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics________________________________4
12
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II______________ 3
fEngl. 121. Great Books__________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics .____________________________ 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics__________________________ 1
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing________________________ 3
Elective ............................................... _3
17
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. fFor other English options, see the English listings in the College of Undergraduate studies section of this bulletin.
#Or M.E. 281, 282.
||Or any approved social-humanistic elective; Econ. 201, 202 required for E.D.E.E. and business.
o0Or any approved chemistry course of 3 or more hours.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ______________ 3
fEngl. 222. Great Books _____________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics _______________________________ 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics--------------------------- 1
tEcon. 201. Principles of Economics ........................- 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra __________________________ 3
16
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations__________________ 3
#Chem. 202. General Chemistry------------------------------- 4
fEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature ________________________ 3
E.Phys. 214. Introductory Modern Physics ___________________ 3
tEcon. 202. Principles of Economics------------------------- 3
§ Elective _________________________________________________ 3
19
Iunior Year Fall Semester
11 Upper division mathematics elective _____________________ 3
E.Phys. 317. Junior Laboratory______________________________ 2
E.Phys. 321. Classical Mechanics and Relativity ............. 3
E.Phys. 331. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism ....... 3
§ Electives_________________________________________________- 6
17
Spring Semester
E.Phys. 318. Junior Laboratory.............................. 2
E.Phys. 322. Classical Mechanics, Relativity, and
Quantum Mechanics_________________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 332. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism _______ 3
E.Phys. 341. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics .... 3
**Chem. 453. Physical Chemistry ---------------------------- 3
**Chem. 454. Physical Chemistry Laboratory___________________ 2
§ Elective .................................................. 3
19
Senior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 403. Electronics _______________________________________ 2
E.E. 443. Electronics Laboratory_____________________________ 1
E.Phys. 491. Atomic and Nuclear Physics _____________________ 3
E.Phys. 495. Senior Laboratory ______________________________ 2
§ Electives _________________________________________________10
18
Spring Semester
E.Phys. 492. Atomic and Nuclear Physics______________________ 3
11Phys. 496. Senior Laboratory ______________________________ 2
§ Electives_________________________________________________ 13
18
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
FREDERIC 0. WOODSOME, Coordinator
Mechanical engineering is perhaps the broadest in scope of all the engineering fields. It is not identified with nor restricted to a particular technology, a particular vehicle, a particular device, or a particular system, but is concerned with many areas of modern technology.
A field of this width and diversification cannot be mastered in all its details in four college years. The
JOr a foreign language. If a language is elected, economics must be taken in the senior year in place of 3 hours of technical electives.
§Of the 37 hours of electives listed, at least 6 hours must be in social-humanistic courses, and 14 hours in engineering courses other than physics, at least 3 of which are not in mathematics.
#Or Chem. 103.
°°One semester of any upper division chemistry course with associated laboratory may be substituted for physical chemistry.
||Or Phys. 455, or a 3-hour physics elective.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 85
objective of the undergraduate program is to give the student a broad intellectual horizon and to inculcate such habits and skills of study that he will learn new science as it appears and take the initiative in applying it. In an era when technology is changing rapidly, the education of an engineer must provide him with a sound base for working in fields which perhaps do not even exist at the time he gets his degree.
There can be only one firm foundation for a career as challenging as that faced by the mechanical engineer. Starting with mathematics, physics, and chemistry, he must also acquire some mastery of the engineering sciences: dynamics, materials, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transport, thermodynamics, systems analysis, and controls. Along with the study of these fundamentals, he must experience the ways in which scientific knowledge can be put to use in the development and design of useful devices and processes—this is the art of engineering.
The department recognizes the extremely broad and varied demands which the advances of modern technology have imposed upon the mechanical engineer. In an effort to accommodate the professional objectives of the individual student, it therefore provides two plans— A and B—for the curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering. In the first two years, the program emphasizes the fundamentals of the engineering sciences that are essential for an understanding of most branches of professional engineering.
Plan A specifies a typical mechanical engineering curriculum and is intended for those students who wish to obtain a broad, general education in mechanical engineering without an emphasis on any of the specific professional aspects.
The mechanical engineering department has a Plan B option which is designed for the student who knows what he intends to do upon graduation. This option allows the student to pursue any course plan during his last four semesters that meets the requirements of his professional objective and has been approved by his advisory committee. Premedical students have had no difficulty in arranging their undergraduate program in regard to requirements for entrance into the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
Under Plan B, the specific requirements of the junior and senior years of the program are determined after a detailed conference with an appropriate departmental adviser. In the course of this conference, the professional objectives of the individual student are studied in detail, and a specific plan (with a minimum of 136 credit hours) designed to meet these objectives is determined. With liberal use of courses throughout the University, the following may be considered typical among the professional concentrations which can be achieved:
“Curriculum for B.S. (M.E.)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
fEngl. 120. Great Books____________________________________ 3
tM.E. 130. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering __________ 2
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I _______________ 3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing________________________ 3
Social-humanistic electives _______________________________ 6
17
Spring Semester
fEngl. 121. Great Books_________________________j__________ 3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics_______________________________ 4
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II_______________ 3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I ____________________2
Social-humanistic elective ________________________________ 3
15
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
M.E. 281. Mechanics I __________________________________ 3
fEngl. 222. Great Books_________________________________ 3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics .._________________________ 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics_______________________ 1
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III __________ 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra_______________________ 3
17
Spring Semester
M.E. 282. Mechanics II__________________________________ 3
fEngl. 223. Contemporary Literature_____________________ 3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics ___________________________ 3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics ______________________ 1
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations______________ 3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics_______________________________ 3
16
Junior Year Fall Semester
M.E. 312. Thermodynamics II ______________________________ 3
M.E. 314. Measurements I _________________________________ 2
M.E. 371. Systems Analysis I ............................. 3
M.E. 383. Mechanics III___________________________________ 5
Chem. 202. General Chemistry______________________________ 4
17
Spring Semester
M.E. 362. Heat Transfer .................................. 3
M.E. 301. Introduction to Materials Science I J.__________ 3
M.E. 316. Measurements II _____________________________ 2
M.E. 372. Systems Analysis II ____________________________ 3
M.E. 384. Mechanics IV____________________________________ 4
M.E. 441. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
Laboratory___________1________________________________ 1
Social-humanistic elective _____________________________ 3
19
Senior Year Fall Semester
M.E. 442. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory_________________ 3
M.E. 414. Mechanical Engineering Design ____________________ 3
M.E. 401. Introduction to Materials Science II _____________ 3
Technical elective ________________________________________ 6
Free elective ______________________________________________ 3
Thermodynamics Heat transfer Fluid mechanics Management Electro-mechanical
Design
Power
Applied mechanics Control theory Materials science
Not all of the courses required for the mechanical engineering program are offered on the Denver Campus. Students wishing to complete this program should plan to complete some courses on the Boulder Campus.
Spring Semester Social-humanistic elective Technical electives ______
18
3
14
17
°The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
â– j-Or other English options; see the English listings in the College of Undergraduate Studies section of this bulletin.
JOr C.E. 130 or E.E. 130.


86 / University of Colorado at Denver
Description of Courses
Engr. 301-3. Thermodynamics. Introduction to energy and its transformations, entropy and information theory, states of matter, and statistical mechanics, with engineering applications. Prer., Phys. 213 and junior standing, or consent of instructor.
M.E. 130-2. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering. Introductory survey of statics, mechanics of materials, thermodynamic processes, machine design; emphasis is on engineering approach to problem solving.
M.E. 195-1 to 3. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Subject matter to be selected from topics of current technological interest. Credit to be arranged.
M.E. 281-3. Mechanics I. Elements of vector algebra, abstract statics of a system of bound vectors, equilibrium of rigid bodies, dynamics of a particle. Prer., sophomore standing.
M.E. 282-3. Mechanics II. Kinematics of rigid bodies, principle of virtual work, kinetics of a system of particles. Prer., M.E. 281. M.E. 295-1 to 3. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Subject matter to be selected from topics of current technological interest. Credit to be arranged.
M.E. 301-3. Introduction to Materials Science I. The development of the physical principles relating the structural features of materials to their observed properties. Prer., E.Phys. 213.
M.E. 312-3. Thermodynamics II. Power and refrigeration cycles, thermodynamic processes of compressors and expanders, mixtures, and reactive systems. Prer., Engr. 301.
M.E. 314-2. Measurements I. Principles of digital and analog measurements; systems for sensing, transporting, modifying, and outputting information; impedance matching of components; systematic and random error analysis; Students’ t and Chi squared significance tests. Prer., Engr. 301, junior standing. M.E. 316-2. Measurements II. Two lab. periods per wk. Application of the theory of measurement to a wide variety of instruments and measurement systems. Prer., M.E. 314.
M.E. 342-3. Component Design. Synthesis and analysis of small components based on engineering science fundamentals of solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics. Design optimization techniques. Prer., junior standing.
M.E. 362-3. Heat Transfer. Basic laws of heat transfer by conduction, convection, radiation, and engineering. Prer., junior standing.
M.E. 371-3. Systems Analysis I. Representation of mechanical and electrical lumped parameter elements and systems, steady-state sinusoidal analysis, integral transform theory. Prer., junior standing.
M.E. 372-3. Systems Analysis II. Transfer function, the root-locus method, analog simulation; hydraulic, pneumatic, and electrical systems applications. Prer., M.E. 371.
M.E. 383-5. Mechanics III. Kinetics of rigid bodies, impulsive motion and nonconservative systems, vibration of one degree of freedom systems, analysis of stress, deformation, strain, strain rate, fundamental laws of a continuum, fluid statics, linear elasticity. Prer., M.E. 282.
M.E. 384-4. Mechanics IV. Approximate theories, dimensional analysis and similitude, fluid dynamics, stability, moving reference frames. Prer., M.E. 383.
M.E. 395-1 to 3. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Subject matter to be selected from topics of current technological interest. Credit to be arranged. Prer., consent of instructor.
M.E. 400-1 to 6. Independent Study.
M.E. 401-3. Introduction to Materials Science II. Application of the physical principles controlling the structure-property relationships in ceramics, metals, polymers, and composite materials. Specific properties considered to include mechanical, electrical, and magnetic behavior. Prer., M.E. 301.
M.E. 414-3. Mechanical Engineering Design. Review of mechanics of materials and stress analysis; detailed design of various machine elements such as screws, springs, brakes, and gears. Prer., M.E. 383.
M.E. 421-3. Air Conditioning. Physical and thermodynamic laws of water vapor and air mixtures; basic principles of heating and ventilating; determination of heating and cooling loads; examination of heating and cooling systems. Prer., M.E. 362.
M.E. 422-3. Air Conditioning Design. Design, layout of heating, ventilating, air conditioning systems. Prer., M.E. 421.
M.E. 424-3. Refrigeration. Principles of mechanical refrigeration; absorption cycle; liquefaction of gases; properties of refrigerants. Thermodynamic analysis of refrigeration systems. Prer., M.E. 312 and 362.
M.E. 440-1 to 3. Special Projects. Individual study (under direction of a faculty member) of an area of mechanical engineering not covered by the course offerings of the department. Prer., senior standing in mechanical engineering.
M.E. 441-1. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Project selection for M.E. 442, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Study of relevant work reported in the literature and the work of previous students, formulation of objective, preparation of oral and written proposal. Prer., M.E. 314 and 316.
M.E. 442-3. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Three lab. periods per wk. Approximately 20 percent of semester spent on experience project assignments on conventional equipment; remaining 80 percent on an individual, live, on-going project on which a design or instrumentation change is made. The student carries out all the planning, testing, and reporting necessary to evaluate the change. Prer., M.E. 312 and 316.
M.E. 450-3. Nuclear Engineering. Elements of atomic and nuclear processes. Basic concepts of reactor theory, design, and operation. Prer., senior standing in engineering.
M.E. 455-3. Energy Conversion I. Thermodynamics of thermochemical, thermo-electric, thermionic, and chemical-electric conversion systems. Prer., M.E. 312.
M.E. 457-4. Combustion Phenomena. The multicomponent fluid equations of motion and chemical thermodynamics are used to study a variety of combustion problems. These include droplet and particle combustion, boundary layer combustion, detonation and deflagration wave theory, topics related to internal combustion engines, liquid and solid rockets. Prer., M.E. 312 and 384. M.E. 461-4. Analytical Methods of Engineering I. Solutions of linear algebraic equations and applications to theory. Topics include matrix analysis, eigenvalue problems, bilinear and quadratic forms, boundary and initial value problems of physics, derivation of equations by wave propagation, fluid flows and heat conduction; solution of wave equations by the method of characteristics and applications to elastic wave propagation and supersonic flows. Prer., A.Math. 232 or 236 or consent of instructor. M.E. 462-4. Analytical Methods of Engineering II. Boundary and initial value problems of physics. Topics include solution of partial differential equations of physics by the methods of separation of variables; Sturm-Liouville theory; variational principles and applications; Green’s functions and applications. Prer., A.Math. 232 or 236 or consent of instructor.
M.E. 471-4. Fluid Mechanics. Viscous incompressible and compressible fluid flows. Topics include derivation of equation governing viscous compressible fluid motion; specializations to simple flows; boundary-layer theory; nozzles and diffusers; transition. Prer., M.E. 384 or consent of instructor.
M.E. 483-4. Vibration Analysis. Single and multiple degree of freedom jumped parameter systems. Shock spectra. Generalized coordinates; Lagrange’s equations. Vibration of continuous systems. Prer., M.E. 384.
M.E. 485-4. Mechanisms. Analysis and synthesis of two- and three-dimensional kinematic systems. Plane motion: linear and angular velocity and acceleration, relative velocity and instantaneous centers; the Kennedy-Aronhold theorem. Four-bar linkage, coupler curves, the Euler-Savary equation. Three-dimensional motion: finite rotation, Euler’s and Chasles’ theorem. Geometric and algebraic methods for generating specified motions. Prer., M.E. 383.
M.E. 486 4, Lagrangian Dynamics. Brief review of Newtonian dynamics, Lagrange’s equations for particles, systems and rigid bodies. Conservative and nonconservative systems, potential energy and dissipation functions. Constraints. Quasi-coordinates. Nonmechanical systems. Prer., M.E. 281 and 282 or equivalent.
M.E. 487-4. Rigid-Body Dynamics. Kinematics of a rigid body, principal axes, and moments of inertia, angular momentum of a rigid body, Euler equations. Applications include topics such as motion of a rigid body with a fixed point under no forces, the spinning top, stability of a sleeping top, the gyrocompass, motion of a billiard ball, rotating machinery, etc. Prer., M.E. 282 or equivalent.
M.E. 490-1. Senior Seminar. Purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the broad range of activities they may engage in as practicing engineers. The manner of instruction is by discus-


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sions with practicing engineers. Prer., senior standing in mechanical engineering.
M.E. 491-2. Legal Aspects of Engineering Practice. Professionalism in engineering; canons of ethics. Legal system. Law of contracts, torts, agency, property, sales, business associates, negotiable
instruments, and patent protection. Prer., senior standing in mechanical engineering.
M.E. 495-1 to 3. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Subject matter to be selected from topics of current technological interest. Credit to be arranged.
College of Environmental Design
DWAYNE C. NUZUM, Dean
^ ^
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Designers and planners of the physical environment have moved in recent years into expanded roles and responsibilities. Changes in breadth of concern and scope of service have brought the architect, the landscape architect, the urban and regional planner, the technologist in environmental systems, and often the interior designer closer together. All are being asked to make decisions from more alternatives which have longer lasting effects. Lines of demarcation among these professions are being minimized and interdependence among them is increasing.
The requirements necessitate a broader base of educational experience, including not only a background for design technique, but also an increased association with and understanding of the physical and social sciences. The social and economic determinants to contemporary life, the complexities of urban and regional interdependence and the allied problems of transportation growth and population, the effect of business and governmental activity, rapid technological advances —all require of the environmental designer a broad base if he is to meet present needs and anticipate and guide the future.
Preparation for professional service through careers in these fields is partially fulfilled through the academic process. Accordingly, in August 1969, through action of the Board of Regents, the University of Colorado was authorized to expand its offerings and change the designation of the School of Architecture to the College of Environmental Design. The change included phasing out the five-year undergraduate architecture curriculum and replacing it with a four-year undergraduate degree in environmental design. A series of graduate programs in architecture, urban design, and planning have been initiated.
Full professional status in most environmental design fields requires a minimum of five or six years of academic experience and two or three years of practical experience followed by state registration or licensing through a professional examination.
Qualifications for success in these careers are not easily measured. A candidate for this profession must have the ability to complete successfully an academic program ranging from fundamental humanistic and scientific courses through applied technical activity to full creative development. He should have a background of secondary education that includes, as part
of a college preparatory program, courses in mathematics and physics. Some experience in creative activity may aid him in predetermining his personal satisfaction from the creative process.
Denver Campus Program
The College of Environmental Design on the Denver Campus offers two graduate programs: the Master of Architecture in Urban Design and the Master of Urban and Regional Planning—Community Development. Other undergraduate and graduate programs are available only on the Boulder Campus of the University, and students should see the College of Environmental Design Bulletin.
Note: Courses in landscape architecture are offered during the spring semester 1974. It is anticipated that expansion of this program will begin in fall 1974 and a full program leading to a master’s degree in landscape architecture will be developed during the following years at the Denver Campus.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN
The urban design program is conducted in facilities within an urban renewal project in the core of the metropolitan area. The curriculum focuses upon the complex problems that are generated by change and growth in this vigorous urban and regional laboratory. Emphasis is given to participatory community and public-funded design, research, and technology. Special efforts are made to utilize the vast resources of information that are available from federal, state, and local agencies and institutions which are concentrated in the immediate community. Specific courses and projects attempt to incorporate these allied academic, civic, and citizen resources.
The sequential format, content, and progression of the urban design program is purposely parallel to the graduate architectural program with the major exception of the final two semesters. Secondary exceptions in the first part of the three-and two-year sequences are in emphasis, atmosphere, and faculty backgrounds. Direct daily contact with students and instructors in the planning division is very important and beneficial.
A specific effort is made in professional practice, internship, and directed elective courses to expose urban design students to broader group-oriented factors in the


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problem-solving process. Placement of students in combination architecture, urban design, and planning firms is a major consideration in the internship requirements.
In all three sequences, the final year is a synthesis of the special civic scale factors influencing urban design within the four options previously described. In this phase the student is carefully advised throughout the course of his independent research and design studies. Opportunities to work in association with the Community Design Center, the Bureau of Community Services, and the New Towns Center (all adjuncts of the College of Environmental Design) are available. Many other real problems and/or case studies from the community which require anticipatory and feasibility design and development are also available. Whenever possible, team projects in cooperation with allied disciplines and institutions are encouraged.
One-Year Program
A one-year program leading to the degree Master of Architecture in Urban Design is available to students holding a Bachelor of Architecture degree. The degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester credit hours.
The program is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced study in architecture with options in the following areas: anticipatory design, technology and research methods, community action design, urban and regional design and development, and health and recreational facilities design.
Course Requirements Semester Hours
Urban design studio___________________________________ 12
Urban design seminar __________________________________ 4
Research factors/methods_______________________________ 3
Planning........................................... 5
Electives (professional)_______________________________ 6
Independent study______________________________________ 2
32
The design studio is the focal point for the area of specialization that is selected by the student and each project is developed on an independent study basis with meetings, seminars, and evaluations scheduled by the faculty adviser and student. Cognate courses are selected with the guidance of the faculty adviser from related courses offered by the College of Environmental Design or other colleges within the University.
Two-Year Program
A two-year program leading to the degree Master of Architecture in Urban Design is available to students holding a Bachelor of Environmental Design degree. The degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 64 semester credit hours. Prerequisites for the two-year program are two semesters of architectural history and two semesters of basic structures (statics, strength of materials, structural analysis). These courses may be taken on the Denver Campus after admission to the program if not taken before.
Course Requirements Semester Hours
Urban design studio _______________________________________ 23
Urban design seminar_______________________________________ 4
Technologies ______________________________________________ 13
History/philosophy _________________________________________ 3
Research factors/methods ___________________________________ 3
Professional administration and internship_________________ 10
Planning_______________
Electives (professional)
64
5
3
Three-Year Program
A three-year program leading to the degree Master of Architecture in Urban Design is available to students who hold a B.S. or B.A. degree in any field. The degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 96 semester credit hours. Additional prerequisites or corequisites are one year of college or high school physics and college math through beginning calculus. Also required is a brief portfolio showing creative work—designs, inventions, drawings, paintings, sculpture, photographs, and writings.
Course Requirements
Urban design studio_______________________
Urban design seminar _____________________
Technologies _____________________________
History/philosophy _______________________
Graphics__________________________________
Research factors/methods _________________
Professional administration and internship
Planning _________________________________
Electives (professional) _________________
Semester Hours ____________ 33
_____________ 4
............ 25
........... 6
___________ 6
_____________ 3
___________ 10
_____________ 5
_____________ 4
96
Financial Aid
Graduate scholarships, fellowships, loans, and teaching assistantships are available to qualified students who demonstrate need. Information about scholarships, loans, and fellowships can be obtained by writing:
Office of Financial Aid University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302
Information about teaching assistantships can be obtained by writing directly to:
Director of Master of Architecture in Urban Design
College of Environmental Design
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 14th Street
Denver, Colorado 80202
Admission
In order for a student to be considered for admission into the graduate program, he must submit application forms, college transcripts, three recommendations, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work by April 15 preceding the fall semester that he wishes to enter. Application form and information may be obtained by writing to:
Director of Master of Architecture in Urban Design
College of Environmental Design
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 14th Street
Denver, Colorado 80202
MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (MURP-CD)
The MURP-CD program changes and develops constantly as it adapts to the needs of a student body which is extremely diverse in terms of backgrounds and


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future goals. There are no specific background requirements, except a bachelor’s degree, for admission to the program. Thus, there are students in the program whose orientations are based on the physical sciences and the social sciences, on quantitative constructs and non-quantitative constructs, on “action”/participatory views of society, and on nonaction views.
Some students enter the program as a means of preparing for jobs in the planning profession. Others have goals as diverse as achieving self-growth and self-awareness, becoming activists in social problem-solving processes, or gaining theoretical understanding of how cities grow and change.
It is impossible to meet all of these conflicting needs in a maximal way since each requires a different educational approach. To maximize one set of needs is to exclude others. Thus, this program attempts to optimize, rather than maximize the learning experience for the greatest number of students. This attempt involves moving back and forth between four sets of conflicting goals:
1. To provide the standard knowledge base implied in a professional degree on the one hand and to provide an open “community of learning” in which students determine what is relevant knowledge for themselves on the other,
2. To develop people who are at one and the same time “community developers” and “planners,” when, in fact, each of these concepts is based on a different history, different set of assumptions, and different professional role for the individual,
3. To develop individuals who are competent to work professionally today and who at the same time will be competent in a very changed profession—five to ten years hence—to play a leadership role in creating that changed profession,
4. To provide students with background on the nature of, and potential solutions to urban problems, and to motivate students to take an active role in solving these problems.
Curriculum
Forty-eight hours of program study are required for graduation (this is typically two years of study for a fulltime student). These 48 hours of study are spent in three different types of activity, with approximately the same emphasis on each: core courses, experimental learning, and electives.
Core Courses. Core courses expose the student to the large array of basic theories and methods in planning and community development. They are intended on the one hand to broaden the student’s notions of what planning and community development are about and on the other to suggest specific areas for further study as the student’s program progresses.
Experiential Learning. One of the appropriate places to learn about planning and community development is in the field where these activities will actually be practiced. Students in experiential learning become involved in a vast array of activities, including work in agencies, regional planning studies, urban planning studies, and community development projects.
Electives. Through electives students develop their program of study in areas they feel will be most relevant to them. This study typically consists of courses provided by the College of Environmental Design, courses offered in other departments on the Denver Campus
(e.g., engineering, business, economics, public affairs, sociology), and courses in Boulder.
Areas of Concentration, Specialization, and Generalization. An attempt is being made, as the program grows, to add courses which will allow students who are so inclined to develop expertise in particular areas of specialty. (Those students preferring to explore a more general education or to develop specialization outside of the planning programs are encouraged to do so). The list of specialty areas currently being developed includes the following:
Community development: aimed at preparing students for intimate contact with the community. Physical/land use planning: aimed at preparing students to produce plans which are concerned to a great deal with the physical environment. Quantitative methods: aimed at preparing students to develop simulation models, perform advanced data analysis, and conduct policy analysis and formation.
Financial Aid
Graduate scholarships, fellowships, loans, and teaching assistantships are available to qualified students who demonstrate need. Information about scholarships, loans, and fellowships can be obtained by writing:
Office of Financial Aid University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80302
Information about teaching fellowships can be obtained by writing directly to:
Director of Urban and Regional Planning— Community Development University of Colorado at Denver 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Admission
In order for a student to be considered for admission into the graduate program, application forms must be submitted by April 15 for the fall semester and by November 15 for the spring semester. Applications for admission are reviewed by a faculty-student committee. Criteria for admission consists of academic performance, experience, interest, and motivation for study in this field by the applicant. Application forms and information may be obtained by writing to:
Director of Urban and Regional Planning— Community Development University of Colorado at Denver 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Graduate Student Transfers
In addition to the various program credit hour sequences described for Urban Design and Urban Regional Planning, graduate students who are interested in transferring from other programs and/or institutions are considered individually to determine the course of study and hours necessary to complete the degree desired.


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Course Descriptions
URBAN DESIGN
Graduate Courses
U.D. 400-5, 401-5. Urban Design Studio. Three studio-seminar periods per wk. Deals with the interrelationships among users/ activities, external and internal environments, and structures within the context of the natural environment. Scope of study expands from small groups of users to communities.
U.D. 410-3, 411-3. Urban Design Communication I and II. A visual communication course to develop fundamental graphic media such as freehand and rigid drawing methods, color theories, simple pattern and model techniques, problem progress from two dimensional levels, designs, maps into multidimensional, complex skills, techniques, and systems using some artificial visual presentation means such as photography, typography, electrography.
U.D. 450-3, 451-3. Urban Design Systems I and II. First of a series planned to acquaint students of architecture and planning with the man-made systems which alter or supplement the natural environment. The year sequence includes beginning structures, water supply, waste water, power, transportation, land use planning. Scale is regional.
U.D. 452-2, 453-2. Urban Design Structures I and II. Analysis of basic structural systems.
U.D. 470-3, 471-3. Urban Design History/Philosophy I and II. Research and discussion of historical and contemporary architecture, urban design, and planning. Particular attention is directed toward individual and communal sociological and economic philosophies and their role in the design of man-made urban and regional environment.
U.D. 500-6, 501-5. Urban Design Studio. Three studio-seminar periods per wk. Solving design problems within a community context, identified and defined by the student. Exploration and application of contemporary technology. A study of advanced architectural, urban-design, and planning problems which integrate large scale organization and communication concepts of society.
U.D. 550-4, 551-2. Urban Design Systems III and IV. Mechanical Systems and Acoustics and Illumination and Electrical Systems.
U.D. 552-2, 553-2, 554-2. Urban Design Structures III, IV, and V. Timber, Steel, and Concrete.
U.D. 582-2, 584-2. Professional Administration and Practice. A study of ethics, management, documents, organization, and production procedures in private and public design office practice. Includes preparation of construction drawings for a limited structure designed by each student.
U.D. 600-5, 601-7. Urban Design Studio. A study of advanced architectural, urban design, and planning problems which integrate large-scale organization and communication concepts of society. The program includes design studio and/or community action center study options and choice of problems. A series of studies of particular aspects of urban design, with emphasis on economic, social, and political determinants. Topics include the design, implementation, and evaluation of urban residential sectors, urban cores, institutional areas, and circulation systems. U.D. 601 is a continuation of U.D. 600 with emphasis upon implementation techniques, use of research methods within the design process, and evaluation techniques.
U.D. 620-2, 622-2. Urban Design Seminar. An outline of the history and theories of urban design including case studies in urban design, urban planning, new towns, and urban renewal projects. Specific emphasis will be in the understanding of functional determinants and design theories which generate form. A study of the scope and complexities of contemporary urban physical environment, leading to greater understanding of the relationship between social and technological sciences and urban design.
U.D. 650-3. Urban Design Systems V. Systems Synthesis. A synthesis of the preceding Environmental Systems and Structures courses. The student will perform the structural frame design and select and detail the mechanical and electrical systems of a specific building.
U.D. 651-3. Urban Design Systems Seminar. Provided as an elective for students with strong structural interests. Principles of thin shell concrete, space frames, unique shapes, and new building materials.
U.D. 681-2. Urban Site Analysis. A seminar in individual case studies that determine site environmental resources. An inventory and analysis of spatial, physical, biological, and sociocultural assets and liabilities for particular urban and regional locations and activities.
U.D. 684-2, 685-2. Internship. Eight hours per wk. Work in a practicing professional office (architecture, urban design, and planning) during the regular semester. The student is placed in an office by the college and receives academic credit instead of pay. For three-year graduate students, two semesters are required.
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING—COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
U.C.D. 560-variable credit. Experiential Learning Laboratory. A
series of designed and programmed experiences dealing with the particular aspects of urban community development with emphasis on the interpersonal, group process, and organizational dimensions of such enterprises.
U.C.D. 654-3. Housing Development in the Planning Process. An introduction to the relationship of housing to the planning and development process of a community, with special emphasis on organizing and managing the development process of low and moderate income housing programs.
U.C.D. 665-3. Community Development Methodology. A continuation of U.C.D. 650 with emphasis upon techniques of organization, program development, administration, and evaluation.
U.C.D. 666-variable credit. Special Topics in Community Development. Individual or group study of some specific aspect of community development history, theory, or practice.
U.C.D. 668-2. Social Factors and Urban Design. Review and critique of social theories and empirical studies dealing with the physical aspects of any human environment which may affect individual, group, and collective behavior.
U.R.P. 612-3. Probability and Statistics in Planning. Introduces the student with a minimum background in mathematics to basic concepts in probability and statistics and their relationship to the planning process.
U.R.P. 620-3. Theory and Principles of Planning. Reviews and evaluates various arguments about what “planning” is, and ought to be. Identifies emerging trends toward less physical emphasis, greater citizen involvement, and closer ties to decision-making. Identifies the traditional “planning process” method.
U.R.P. 621-3. Planning Methodology. Introduces the student to emerging methods for performing the planning process. Considers topics such as systemic planning, appropriate use of quantitative models, various operations research techniques available to the planner, improved methods of goal setting, etc.
U.R P. 623-3. Quantitative Methods in Planning I. Provides the student with mathematical concepts which are used in quantitative approaches to solving planning problems. Also introduces the student to FORTRAN programming.
U.R.P. 624-3. Regional Analysis and Planning. A review of data and methodologies for regional analysis with application to defining and organizing integral areas, clusters of towns, combined resource, and public facilities development.
U.R.P. 626-3. Land Use Planning. Introduces the nondesign student to general planning graphics, and then allows him to use this knowledge while undertaking an abbreviated planning process for a small community. The problem acquaints the student with basic approaches to physical planning, problems of development of small communities, standards used in planning, and elements of physical design.
U.R.P. 628-3. Legal Aspects of Planning. A review of the legal framework within which planning operates and the mechanisms for planning implementation.
U.R.P. 631-3. Quantitative Methods in Planning II. An extension of U.R.P. 623 in which students develop and operationalize simple mathematical, computer-based modes.
U.R.P. 666-variable credit. Special Topics in Planning. Individual or group study of some specific aspect of urban and/or regional planning.
Note: Additions and deletions to courses are under faculty consideration at this time.


College of Music
DAVID BASKERVILLE, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The music program on the Denver Campus emphasizes contemporary music and its relationship to the mass communications media: television, recording, radio, film, advertising, and the entertainment industries. Music majors can undertake studies on the Denver Campus leading to partial fulfillment of requirements detailed in the College of Music Bulletin for baccalaureate and graduate degrees in music. It is anticipated that by fall 1974, music majors can complete all of the requirements in Denver for a baccalaureate degree. Graduate students, professional musicians, and music educators should also find courses of special interest to them.
The College of Music also offers courses which are open to nonmusic majors.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
In addition to the entrance requirements of the University outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin, the entering student must meet the following requirements of the College of Music:
Required High School Units
English_______________________________
Mathematics Foreign language
Social science 1______________________
Physical science Theoretical music
Additional high school units__________
3 8
4
Total ________________________________________15
It is expected that all students will have had previous experience as performers. Two years of piano study are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. In lieu of the personal audition, applicants may substitute tape recordings (about five minutes in length at 7(4 ips) or a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher. Interested students should write to the College of Music, Denver Campus, for audition or interview applications.
PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES
Music majors and nonmusic majors are invited to audition for UCD’s vocal and instrumental ensembles. Rehearsals are generally scheduled to accommodate those who are otherwise employed during the day. Each offers 1 hour credit. In addition to providing worthwhile musical education, participation in these ensembles provides a welcome cultural enhancement of student life. The ensembles are described below.
Description of Courses
Music 100-3, 101-3. Theory and Musicianship. A study of harmonic styles from early periods to the present day, with emphasis on contemporary practices. Prer., placement test.
Music 106-2. Music Fundamentals. An introduction to the rudiments of music notation, basic ear training, reading of music. Intended for the student with little or no musical background. No credit for music majors.
Music 180-2, 181-2. Introduction to Music. An overview of the world of music today, with an investigation of how earlier styles contributed to current practices. Analytical techniques. For freshman music majors and qualified nonmusic majors.
Music 182-2. Music for Listeners. A course for nonmusic majors who want to learn how to listen to music with greater understanding and pleasure. For nonmusic majors only.
Music 200-4. Theory and Musicianship. Continuation of Music 101. Music 207-2. Instrumentation I. Introduction to scoring music for instruments—ranges, transpositions, capabilities in solo and small ensembles. Prer., Music 200.
Music 230-1. Piano Class. Section 1 is for the student with no previous piano experience. Sections 2 and 3 are more advanced. A study of music reading, improvisation, transposition, functional keyboard performance. Facilities fee, $18.
Music 350-3, 351-3. Sound Reinforcement and Recording. Operating principles and performance characteristics of microphones, amplifiers, speaker systems, equalizers, mixers and multi-track recorders. No prior technical background required. Three class hours plus two lab hours per week. Facilities fee, $18.
Music 360-3, 361-3. Electronic Music. An introduction to sound synthesis for composers, performers, educators, and media personnel. A study of the aesthetics and technology of electronic music; use of the Arp, Moog and Buchla synthesizers. Facilities fee, $18.
Music 380-3, 381-3. History of Music. Survey of Western art music with stylistic analyses of representative works from all major periods. Prer., Music. 200.
Music 382-3. Music Literature. Study of music masterpieces from choral, orchestral, chamber music, and operatic repertoire. For nonmusic majors only. Prer., Music 182 or consent of instructor. Music 402-2. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. Linear practices of Bach and his contemporaries. Prer., Music 207.
Music 403-2. Scoring and Arranging. Writing for instruments and voices in various combinations, with emphasis on contemporary styles. Prer., Music 207.
Music 405-2. Instrumentation II. Continuation of Music 403.
Music 406-2. Analysis I. Selected works through the 18th century. Prer., Music 380 or equivalent.
Music 407-2. Analysis II. Selected works of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Prer., Music 380 or equivalent.
Music 408-2. Writing for Voices. Composition and arranging for the human voice, in small groups and large ensembles. Emphasis on contemporary practices. Prer., Music 200.
Music 420-3. Composition. Creative work in small to large forms. May be repeated for credit. Prer., Music 207, consent of instructor.
Note: All courses numbered Music 460 are ensembles. They may be distinguished and identified by their respective section numbers.
Music 460-1, Section 1. Sound Lab I. An instrumental ensemble concerned with the study of performance practices of various epochs, including contemporary styles. Exploration and performance of a broad range of literature.


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Music 460-1, Section 2. Sound Lab II. A continuation of the work begun in Sound Lab I. For more advanced instrumentalists. Music 460-1, Section 3. Jazz Orchestra. Study and performance of contemporary jazz compositions and arrangements for large ensemble. For advanced performers. Prer., consent of instructor.
Music 460-1, Section 4. Electronic Music Ensemble. An innovative instrumental group composed of four to six synthesizers, electric piano and organ, percussion, guitar, and occasional interface with modulators and computers. Prer., consent of instructor. Music 460-1, Section 5. Chamber Music Ensemble. Study and performance of music of earlier times and today for small groups of instruments and voices. Prer., consent of instructor.
Music 460-1, Section 6. The New Singers. A select group of vocalists and instrumentalists studying and performing music in various contemporary styles. Study of sound reinforcement and recording techniques used with voices. Prer., consent of instructor. Music 460-1, Section 7. Evening Chorus. Study and performance of traditional and more recent literature conceived for large vocal ensembles. Open to all University students who enjoy singing. Prer., consent of instructor.
Music 460-1, Section 8. Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of wind music from Mozart to Hindemith. Prer., consent of instructor.
Music 464-3. Development of Jazz. A study of the origins, historical development, and contemporary trends of the blues, jazz, and soul. Also open to nonmusic majors.
Music 468-2. Youth Music and Today's Teacher. Examination of contemporary music preferred by young people, its style, texts, meaning, and influences on behavior. Use of this repertory in the general music class and correlation of its practices to traditional music.
Music 484-3. Music Aesthetics. Various philosophies of music as they have developed during the past 100 years in writings of philosophers, psychologists, sociologists, composers, critics and historians.
Music 485-3. 17th and Early 18th Century Music. Music of Baroque era examined in terms of vocal and instrumental styles and national influence. Prer., Music 380.
Music 488-3. Late 18th and 19th Cenutry Music. Music in various vocal and instrumental media examined with respect to tenets of Classic and Romantic styles. Prer., Mus. 381.
Music 489-2. Contemporary Music. Study and analysis of music philosophies of composers of the 20th Century. Prer., Music 381 or consent of instructor.
Graduate Courses
Music offerings at the graduate level were being formulated at the time of this publication. For current information, graduate students can obtain details from the College of Music office, Denver Campus.
Graduate School
DENIS R. WILLIAMS, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The Graduate School of the University of Colorado offers programs on four campuses. Work leading to advanced degrees can be completed on the Denver Campus. In addition, graduate level course work can be taken on the Denver Campus and used for credit toward an advanced degree.
The Graduate School is administered by the dean of the Graduate School with associate deans on each campus. The dean’s office is located on the Boulder Campus. The primary information source for Denver students is the Office of the Associate Dean located in the tower building, Room 810, telephone 892-1117, ext. 414 or 415. Officers of the Graduate School are: Milton E. Lipetz, Dean; Richard A. Blade, Coordinator of Graduate Studies (Colorado Springs); Eunice M. Blair, Assistant Dean of the Graduate School of Nursing; Seymore Katsh, Associate Dean of the Graduate School and Research Affairs (Medical Center); Ernest Patterson, Assistant Dean of the Graduate School; Deward Walker, Associate Dean of the Graduate School; and Denis R. Williams, Associate Dean of the Graduate School (Denver Campus).
Anyone wishing further information not given in this bulletin should contact:
Associate Dean of the Graduate School
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 14th Street
Denver, Colorado 80202
The Graduate School office on the Denver Campus is open 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and until 7 p.m. on Wednesdays.
Degrees Offered
The Graduate School of the University of Colorado at Denver offers instruction leading to the following advanced degrees:
Master of Arts (M.A.)
Master of Education (M.Ed.)
Master of Science (M.S.)
Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
The M.A. can be earned in the following fields:
Anthropology History
Biology Mathematics
Communication and Theatre Pediatric Psychology
(Communication) Political Science
Economics Speech Pathology and
Education Audiology
English Urban Sociology
The M.S. can be earned in the following fields:
Applied Mathematics Electrical Engineering
Chemistry Engineering
Civil Engineering
Significant course work in the following graduate programs can be taken on the Denver Campus:
Communication and Theatre Computer Science
(Theatre) Fine Arts


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Geography Physics
Music Spanish
Philosophy
Facilities for Graduate Study and Research on the Denver Campus
Facilities for research in many fields are available at UCD as well as specialized institutes, seminars, and meetings of national standing.
The Graduate Student on the Denver Campus
Approximately 1,100 students are enrolled in graduate programs on the Denver Campus and an additional 1,300 special students take graduate courses. Of these, approximately 45 percent are part-time students.
Faculty
The faculty operating in these programs is mainly housed on the Denver Campus, although resources of other campuses at the University of Colorado are used. A full list of the graduate faculty of the University is given in the Graduate School Bulletin.
FINANCIAL AID FOR GRADUATE STUDY
Scholarships and Fellowships
The University of Colorado administers various forms of financial aid for graduate students: fellowships, scholarships, and a number of awards from outside agencies.
The Graduate School each year awards to qualified regular degree graduate students approximately 60 tuition scholarships, and approximately 60 fellowships paying up to $2,500 plus tuition.
Special fellowships and scholarships are also available for study in certain departments.
Applications for fellowships and scholarships are due in the department before the announced department deadline. Awards are announced about March 15.
The University participates in a number of government-sponsored fellowship programs, including those of the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and National Defense Education Act.
Teaching Associateships and Assistantships
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time teaching associates or assistants. Tuition for up to 9 credit hours per semester may be paid by the University depending upon the number of appointment hours per week. Data for 1974-75 are not yet available. Information for 1973-74 is given below:
Appointment Hours per Week 20
13.3-19
10-13
Tuition Hours per Semester Granted 9 6 3
Less than 10: No tuition hours granted. No waiver of nonresident tuition.
(Students taking hours in excess of these amounts will pay resident tuition for such excess hours. In-state tuition rates apply during a summer term which intervenes between two academic year appointments, even though no appointments is in effect during that summer.) Assistants and associates must be enrolled students for the full term of their appointment.
Research Assistantships
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Holders of these positions pay resident tuition. Assistants must be enrolled students.
Loan Funds
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans through the National Defense Student Loan Program and for part-time jobs through the College Work-Study Program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
Employment Opportunities
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the College Work-Study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, political affiliation, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
International Education
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There are also occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact Professor James Wolf.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION General Requirements
Students may be admitted to the Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
Admission to the Graduate School is not admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree must make special application at the time and in the manner prescribed by the requirements for the degree sought.
A student who is granted admission must reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal background acceptable to the University. The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by


94 / University of Colorado at Denver
the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Regular Degree Students
Qualified students are admitted by the appropriate department to regular degree status. In addition to departmental approval, an applicant for admission as a regular degree student must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have done work equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this University.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by his previous scholastic record.
3. Have had adequate preparation to enter upon graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the advanced degree intended or not. If the student fails to maintain this standard of performance, he will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School.
Pass/Fail Grades. In order to permit a meaningful evaluation of an applicant’s scholastic record, not more than 10 percent of those credit hours that are relevant to his intended field of graduate study shall have been earned with pass/fail grades, nor more than 20 percent overall. Applicants whose academic record contains a larger percentage of pass/fail credits must submit suitable additional evidence that they possess the required scholastic ability. If the applicant does not submit satisfactory additional evidence, he can be admitted only as a provisional student.
Provisional Degree Students
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. With the concurrence of the dean of the Graduate School a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term, which may not normally exceed one academic year. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, as may be required by the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. If the student fails to maintain such a standard of performance, he will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Graduate students who expect to study at UCD should contact the Office of the Graduate School on the
Denver Campus concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission from another institution must present (1) a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the Denver Campus Graduate School office, and (2) two official transcripts of all academic work completed to date. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefund-able application processing fee of $20 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairman of each department, or a committee named for the purpose, shall decide whether an applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions and Records, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as special students (below).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 60 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Completed applications for foreign students must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records prior to May 1 for the fall semester and by October 1 for the spring semester.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1974-75, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid).
All credentials presented for admission to the University of Colorado become the property of the University.
Seniors in the University of Colorado
A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet his requirements for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
Graduate Record Examinations
The Graduate Record Examination (verbal, quantitative, and advanced) is requested of applicants for fellowships and scholarships. At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for assistantships, or of any student before his status is determined.
Students who are applying for the fall of 1975 should take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the Graduate School office or the Student Relations office on the Denver Campus, or from the Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Special Students
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Colo-


Graduate School / 95
rado at Denver, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. Special students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted. They may register for any number of hours with the concurrence of the major department.
Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this university are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible. A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a special student at the University or any combination thereof. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter, or summer term for which the student has applied for admission to the Graduate School.
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to the Graduate School and who expect to study in the Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures for properly approved courses of study if they (1) wish to receive credit for courses; (2) wish to take courses NC, that is, to attend classes regularly but not to take the examinations or receive grades or credit; (3) wish to consult with members of the faculty while working on thesis, report, or doctoral study; (4) wish to take the master’s comprehensive-final, doctoral comprehensive, or doctoral final examination; (5) wish to earn residence credit; or (6) are certified as candidates for the Ph.D., D.Mus.A., Ed.D., or D.B.A. degrees.
Master’s Thesis or Report
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree, if he expects to present a thesis or M.Ed. report in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours, or for M.Ed. report for 2 semester hours. He may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits he expects to receive for his thesis or report. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. If the thesis or report is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
Full Load
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if he is registered for not fewer than 5 semester hours in work numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours of other graduate work or thesis.
A full load for purposes of determining residence credit during the summer term is 3 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or 6 semester hours of other graduate work, or thesis.
Maximum Load
No graduate student may receive graduate credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at UCD is 10 hours per 8-week summer term.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this bulletin.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. A student should not expect to get from formal courses all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirements for an advanced degree. He should work on his own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching his own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, and proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
For all advanced degrees except the Ph.D. degree, the quality of the student’s work must attain an average of B in all work offered for the degree.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted in Graduate School.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of the Graduate School, whose decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
Grading System
The standing of a student in work intended for an advanced degree is to be indicated by the marks A, B, and C.
A—Excellent, 4 credit points for each credit hour.
B—Good, 3 credit points for each credit hour.
C—Fair, 2 credit points for each credit hour.
Work receiving the lowest passing grade, D, may not be counted toward a degree, nor may it be accepted


96 / University of Colorado at Denver
for the removal of deficiencies. Marks below B are not accepted for the doctoral degree.
An in progress grade shall be a valid grade only until the end of the semester following that in which the grade is given. By the end of this interval, the instructor concerned shall have turned in a final grade of A, B, C, D, F, W (withdrawal). If no reports are received from the instructor within the allotted time, the dean shall be authorized to report a final grade of W (withdrawal). Should a student later wish to receive credit for the course for which a W has been recorded, he will have to reregister for it.
The only exceptions to the foregoing rules are these:
1. Should a student enter the armed forces before he has completed a course and an in progress is reported, this in progress may be carried on the records for the duration of his service provided arrangements have been made with the dean of the Graduate School.
2. An in progress given for thesis or M.Ed. report will be valid until the thesis or report has been completed.
A graduate student may repeat once a course for which he obtained a grade of C or D, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of his advisory committee and the chairman of his department, provided the course has not previously applied toward a degree. Courses in which the grade F is received may not be repeated.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use and spelling of the English language may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. The satisfaction of this requirement depends not so much upon the ability to pass formal tests, although these may be demanded, as it does upon the habitual use of good English in all oral and written work. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE
A student regularly admitted to the Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Minimum Requirement
The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master’s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master’s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Quality of Work
The student must attain at least a B average in all work offered for the degree.
Status
After a student has made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term and after he has removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations, or otherwise, he should confer with his major department and request that a decision be made on his status. This definite status must be set by his major department before a student may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See special departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Work already applied toward a master’s degree received at another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master’s degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
All work accepted by transfer must come within the five-year time limit or be validated by special examination.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established, in the Graduate School of this University, a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to the Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 8 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.


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2. Comes within the five-year time limit.
3. Has not been applied toward another degree.
4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and is approved by the dean of the Graduate School.
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the Graduate School.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University, dependent upon the master’s degree sought, is noted below:
Degree Semester Hours
M.A. or M S__________________________________________ 8
M.Bus.Ed. _________________________________________ 8
M.Ed________________________________________________ 8
M.Mus________________________________________________ 8
M.Mus.Ed_____________________________________________ 8
M.F.A. (Painting) ___________________________________16
M.F.A. (Education) __________________________________ 8
Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward
an advanced degree must be made on the form specified
for this purpose and submitted to the Graduate School
by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. This form is to be completed by the student, endorsed by his adviser, the departmental chairman or his designated representative, and the dean of his college if applicable, and sent to the Graduate School. An official transcript of credit must accompany the request. (Information required: course title, number, credit hours, when and where taken, grade received, and certification that student was enrolled in graduate school at the time.) It is the student’s responsibility to see that the appropriate bulletin of the institution from which the courses are requested transferred is available in the Graduate School office. If such a bulletin is not available, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain the bulletin and transmit it to the Graduate School office. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in Graduate School.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at this University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours of other graduate work. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. A student who is noticeably deficient in his general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master’s degree must file application in the dean’s office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive-final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean’s office and in various departments and must be signed by a representative of both the major and minor, if any, fields of study, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that his program outlined in the application meets the requirements set in his particular case.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master’s degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive-final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications obtainable from the Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in the Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid at the Business Office when the thesis is deposited in the Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master’s degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
Comprehensive-Final Examinations
Each candidate for a master’s degree is required to take a comprehensive-final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of the candidate’s last semester of residence while he is still taking required courses for the degree, provided he is making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive-final examination must be observed:


98 / University of Colorado at Denver
1. A student must be registered when he takes this examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean’s office at least three days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. If a candidate fails the comprehensive-final examination, three months must elapse before he may again attempt it.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before he may again attempt it.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester* which come after the comprehensive-final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the permission of the instructor.
Time Limit
All work, including the comprehensive-final examination, should be completed within five years or six successive summers. Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination. A candidate for the master’s degree is expected to complete his work with reasonable continuity.
Schedule of Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1974-75
For Dec. 1974 For May 1975 Degree Commence-
Candidates merit
Beginning of the semester Last day for requesting transfer prior to semester degree of credit; completed materials
is awarded. must be received in Graduate
School office by 5 p.m.
Applications for admission to candidacy must be submitted at least 10 weeks before student expects to take the comprehensive-final examination. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive degree. (This may be picked up in the department or in the Graduate School office.)
Check with department. Check with department. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
Nov. 27 April 29 Last day for scheduling of comprehensive-final examination with Graduate School.
Dec. 2 May 2 Last day for taking comprehensive-final examination.
Dec. 9 May 9 Last day for filing thesis in
Graduate School. At time of filing, thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by the Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on indicated date will graduate at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
Description of Courses and Programs
Graduate credit is given for courses which are listed in the Graduate School section of this bulletin or which have otherwise been approved by the dean of the Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless he has the approval of the department.
Courses of study offered toward an advanced degree in this University are divided into the three groups listed below:
1. Courses primarily for graduates, numbered 500 and above. In general, courses of this group only are described in this section.
2. Courses for graduates and advanced undergraduates, numbered from 400 to 499, which may be taken for graduate credit, are described in the individual college and school sections of this bulletin.
3. A few special or professional undergraduate courses which may be credited toward an advanced degree as a minor. Courses retain their undergraduate numbers.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years.
ANTHROPOLOGY
Admission to the master’s program in anthropology is open to any holder of the baccalaureate degree, not necessarily in anthropology, provided he meets the following requirements: (1) the undergraduate record, especially that of the last two years of training, must be of good quality—a B or better grade-point average in anthropology is recommended; (2) some acquaintance with anthropology should have been acquired through formal study. Applicants will be expected to have had at least an introductory (general) course and first-level specialized courses in ethnology, archaeology, linguistics, and physical anthropology. An applicant deficient in background may be admitted as a provisional candidate but will be required to make up his deficiencies without graduate credit during his first year of graduate study.
Besides undergraduate transcripts, applicants also must submit Graduate Record Examination scores for


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University ol Colorado at Denver 1974 University of Colorado Bulletin

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Contents GENERAL INFORMATION ... . . . ................. . ... . ...... 1 ACADEMIC CALENDAR ............................ . ...... .. . 1 COLLEGE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES ..... ... 12 DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES . ......... 17 DIVISION OF NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES ....................... ......... 25 DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES .................... 34 ETHNIC PROGRAMS .................................... 42 SPECIAL PROGRAMS .............. ....... . ........ ... ... 45 PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS .... .............. 45 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ........ . ............. ..... ....... .. .... 50 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION .......... . .... ... .... .... . . ...... 62 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE ........................................ 65 COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ......... . .. 87 COLLEGE OF MUSIC .... . ............ . ........ . . . .. . ........ 91 GRADUATE SCHOOL ............ . . .............. . . . . ........ 92 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS ........ 125 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS ....... . .................... 134 FACULTY .. .. . . ....... ... . . . . . . . .... ........... ........ ............ 134 INDEX . .......... . .................... . ... . ............... . . . ....... 139 This bulletin contains general information and course descriptions. Students should consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes as well as particular registration information. University of Colorado Bulletin . 1200 Un i versity Avenue , Bo ul der, Colorado 80302. Vol. LXXIII , No . 57, December 10 , 1973 , General Ser ies No . 1 7 01. Publ i shed f i ve times monthly by the Un i versity of Colorado. Second class posta g e paid at Boulder, Colorado .

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General Information DENVER CAMPUS ACADEMIC CALENDAR"' (NOTE: Prospective students are advised that slight variatio n s in the calendar may exist on different cam puses of the University. Specific information should be obtained from the campus to which the individ u al ex pects t o apply.) DEADLINE DATES FOR APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION The following dates will be applicable for the academic year 1974-75 at the University of Co l o rado at Denver. Interested applicants are advised tha t all credentials required in the admission p ro cess must be on file with the Office of Admissions and R ecords prior to the deadli n e dates indicated below if consideration for admission is to be made for t h e term desired . Transfer applicants sho u ld take into account the time involved in having official transcripts sent from collegiate institu t i o ns attended previously and apply sufficiently in ad vance of the application deadline to insure that these documents are on file by the required date. Foreign students are advised that 120 days are us u ally required for credentials to arrive in this office from most international locations. Summer Fall Spring 1974 1974 1975 UNDERGRADUATE: New Freshman and Transfer Students May24 Aug. 2 D ec. 20 Nursing (fall only) March 1 Special Student to Degree Student Status Change May24 Aug. 2 Dec . 20 GRADUATE: B usiness Apr. I Jun e 1 N ov.1 Environmental D esign (fall only) Apr. 15 P ublic Administration Apr. 1 July 1 Nov. 15 Graduate School Apr. 15 July 1 Dec. 1 School of Educati o n Mar. 1 June 1 Nov. 1 Nursing (fall only) Jan. 15 Pediatric Psychology (fall only) A pr. 1 Special Student to Degree Student Status Change (see Graduate School dates above) SPECIAL STUDENTS: U n dergraduate and Graduate levels May 24 Aug.2 Dec. 20 INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFERS: Apr. 15 July 1 D ec. 1 Fall S e mest er 1974 Students are advised to obtain a copy of the Fall Semest e r 1974 Schedule of Courses for complete calen dar information and instructions regarding registration. Aug. 2 (Fri.)-Application deadline. All required credenti als must be on file for consideration for the fall semester 1974 . Aug. 27, 28 , 29 (Tues-Thurs.)-R egistration. Sept. 2 (Mon.)-Labor Day holiday. All offices closed. Sept. 3 (Tues .)-Classes begin . Sept . 3 , 4 (Tues .-We d .) _:_Late application and registra tration. A late fee will b e assessed all late registrants. Nov . 28-30 (Thurs.-Sat .)-Thanksgiving h oliday . N o cla sses, all offices closed. Dec. 2 (Mon.)-Cia sses resume . Dec. 21 (Sat.)-Classes end. Sprin g Semester 1975 Students are advised to obtain a copy of the Spring Semester 1975 Sch e dul e of Courses for comp l ete calen dar information and instructions regarding registration. Dec. 3, 4, 5 (Tues.-Thurs.)-EARL Y REGIST R A TION: students enrolled fall semester 1974 only. Dec. 20 (Fri.)-Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for t h e spring semester 197 5. Jan. 14 , 15 (Tues.-Wed.)-O PEN REGISTRATIO N: (New applications for admission will not be accepte d or considered on the days of open registration.) Jan. 20 (Mon.)-Ciasses begin. Jan. 20, 21 (Mon.-Tues.)-Late applicat i on and registr a tion. A late fee will be as s essed all late registrants. Mar. 24-29 (Mon.-Sat .)-Spring vacation. No classes. Mar. 28 (Fri.)-All offices closed. Mar. 31 (Mon .)-Classes resume. May 21 (W ed.)-Classes end. May 24 (Sat.)-Commencement in Boulder. Summe r Te r m 1975 May 21 (Wed.)-Application deadline. All required cre dentials must be on file for consideration for t h e summer term 1975 . June 11-12 (Wed .-Thurs.)-R egistration. June 16 (Mon.)-Classes begin. July 4 (Fri .)-Independence D a y holiday. No classes. Offices closed. Aug. 8 (Fri.)-Classes end. 0The U ni ve r s ity r eserves the t o alte r the acad e rnic c a l endar at any time .

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2 I University of Colorado at Denver THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER ..• AN URBAN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS History Beginning in 1912 , courses were made available to residents of the Denver metropolitan area through the Extension Division of the University of Colorado in Boulder . Classes were held in scattered locations throughout the city until1938, when they were gathered in one center. Increa sing enrollment necessit ate d two moves to l arger quarters, and the D enver Center came to its present location at 14th and Araphoe Streets in 1957. In 1965, th e D enve r Center b eca me a degree granting institution, enabling students to complete full academic programs in D enver . In J anuary 1973, the Board of Regents adopted a resolution changing the n ames of th e University's centers because of an amendment to the Constitution of the Stat e of Colorado whi ch gave the centers l ega l status as separate br anches of the University. The Denver Center was ren amed the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD). location UCD is situ ate d at th e hub of a tremendous growth area. The downtown campus is accessible to both city dwellers a nd suburb an commuters from a five -county area with a population of 1 ,2 95 , 000 . Located across Ch erry Creek fro m the Auraria Urban R e new al Area, UCD will share facilities with M e tropolit a n State College and the Community Coll ege of D e n ver in the Auraria High er Education C enter complex while remaining a uniqu e urb an institution in itself. The campus is close to m ajor business est a bli shment s a nd government offices in downtown D enver, as well as to civic and cultur a l cen ters. Enrollment UCD i s one of the largest s tate -s upported institutions of high er ed u cat ion in Colorado in t erms of enrollment. The average number of stude nts enrolled for credit is more th a n 7 ,000 during the fall and spring semesters and 4 , 000 dur ing the s umm er term. Academic Programs Academic a nd public service progr a m s a re especially geared to th e needs of th e urban popul a t io n a nd environ ment, as well as to tradition a l fields of s tudy. Students ma y earn degrees in mor e than 50 und ergra du a te fields and some 2 0 gra du a t e a r eas. These educational en dea vo r s e mph asize qualit y instruction , research , and professional training. Academic progr a ms within the University a r e offered b y colleges that a dmit freshmen , by profe ssional sc hools that admit students who have completed at l east two years of preprofessional study, and b y the Graduate School. Colleges a nd schools on the Denv er Campus include: Coll ege of Undergraduate Studies Coll ege of Busin ess a nd Administration and Gr aduate School of Business Adm i nistration S ch ool of Education College of Engineering and Applied Scie nce Coll ege of Environmental Design College o f Music Grad u a te School Gra du a te School of Public Affairs Accreditation and Memberships The University of Colorado at Denver is fully ac credited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools , and is a member of the Associa tion of Urban Universities. The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is a mem ber of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. The School of Education is accredited by the National Council of Accreditat i on of Teacher Education and membersh i p is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education. The College of Engineering and Applied Science has earned high accreditation ratings from the Engineers Council on Professional Development. The College of Environmental Design is accredited by the National Architectural Accred i ting Board and is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. The College of Music is a member of the National Associa tion of Schools of Music. The Graduate School of Public Affairs is a recognized member of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. Year-Round Operation Classes on the Denver Campus are scheduled six days a week , both day and evening. Students may begin studies at the start of any one of the academic terms of the year, which include a fall semester of 16 weeks, a spring semester of 16 weeks, and an 8-week (half semester) summer term. More than half of the courses on the Denver Campus are offered during evening hours, permitting students maximum flexibility in planning for both employment and educational goals. Faculty More than 160 highly qualified faculty members teach full time on the Denver Campus; 84 percent have earned doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban scene and responsive to the needs of the urban student. Students Strongly motivated people from all walks of life make up the student body . The diversity of interests, knowl edge , occupations , backgrounds , and age stimulates a unique learning experience for these men and women. Ages range from 16 to 70. About 60 percent of the stu dents enrolled are at the junior , senior, fifth year , grad uate , or special student-with-baccalaureate-degree levels. Prospectus As an urban university, the Denver Campus has a fundamental commitment to meet the needs of the urban community ; it seeks to keep pace with the needs of the present-day city-oriented student and at the same time plan for the demands of the future . Programs are con tinually being enlarged and expanded to offer students a broad scope of educational opportunities , whether the student is seeking a general education or has a desire to study in a highly specialized area . UCD's primary role is to provide graduate , profes sional, and upper division education, with undergraduate programs designed especially for those students who plan to undert a ke graduate work or postbaccalaureate profes sional study .

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REQUIREMENT S FOR ADMISSION The University of Colorado at Denver seeks to identify applicants who have a high probability completion of an academic program. AdmiSSion deci sions are based on evaluation of many criteria. Among the most important are: . 1. Maturity, motivation, and potential for academic growth. 2. Ability to work in the academic environment of an urban, nonresidential campus. 3. Evidence of scholarly ability and accomplishment shown on national aptitude and achievement t ests (ACT/SAT). 4. General level of previous academic performance. An applicant who is granted admission to UCD must reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal back ground acceptable to the University. The University re serves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obli gations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful mis sions, processes, and functions as an educational institu tion. High School Concurrent Enrollment High school juniors and seniors of proved academic ability may be admitted to UCD for courses which sup plemen t their high sc h ool programs. Credits for Uni versity courses taken in this manner may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. Interest ed high school students may contact the Office of Ad missions and Records for complete information and ap plication instructions (telephone [303] 623-1181). Admission of Freshmen (Those who have not had prior c ollegiate experience) New freshmen may apply for admission to the Col leges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Undergraduate Studies. 1. General Requirements Applicable to Each College. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate as a result of the completion of the General Education De velopment Test ( GED). Applicants who present the High School Equivalency Certificate of the GED must score at or above the 6th percenti l e on each section of the test to be eligible for consideration for admission . Individ u als applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, "English as a Second Language." All applicants must present 15 units of acceptable seco n dary school credit. While the College of Under graduate Studies does not specify particular units, the College of Business and Administration, the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Music have the following requirements: COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION English .. .......... .... ...... ..... .. .. .... ........ ... ..... ............. .......... . . .. ... .. ....... 3 Mathematics (college preparatory) .. . ... .... .... . ... ..... ...... ...... . ...... 2 atural sciences (laboratory type) ...... . ................ . ......... ......... 2 Social sciences (including history) .............................. .... .... ... . .. 2 Electives .......... . . . ........ . ... . ........ . . ... ..... .. ... ......................... . . . ........... 6 (Foreign languages and additional academic courses. May include up to 2 units in business areas.) 15 Genera l Information I 3 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE (Trigonometry and solid geometry recommended. * ) Natural sciences . ... . . .................. .... .. . . .... ... ..................... . . . ...... . . ... 2 (Physics and c h emistry recommended.) Social studies and humanities .. . ......... .. .............. . ... . ..... ........ . . .... 2 (Foreign languages and additional units of English , h istory, and literature are included in the humanities.) Electives . ... . .... . .... .......... ..... . .. . ......... .. . . .. . . . ...... . ...... .... ..... ..... . .... ... 5 15 COLLEGE OF MUSIC Eng l ish ............... . ............ . ... . .... ............... .... .. . ....... . ....... . .... . . . .... .... 3 Theoretical music .... . ... ......... ... .. . ... ..... . . . ... .. ... . ... . . . ..... . ......... ! 8 Additional high school units .. ... ... .... .... . .... ......... . . . .... .. .. ... . . ..... . .. 4 15 It is expected that all students will have had previous experience i n an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recom me n ded . The C o llege of Music requires an audition of all entering fresh me n and undergraduate tr a nsfer students. In lieu of the per s onal audition, applicants may sub s titute tape recordings (about I 0 min utes in length o n 7 Y 2 ips monaural) or a s tatement of excellence by a qualified teac h er. Interested students should write to the College of Music , Denver Campus, for audition or interview a p plications. 2. Colorado Resident Applicants . t Colorado resident applicants who meet the above general qualifications arc divided into three categories: a. Applicants who ranked in the upper one-h a lf of their high school graduating class and have a com posite score of 23 or higher on the American Col lege Test (ACT) or a combined score of 1000 or higher on t h e Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Boa r d are as sured admission. b. Applicants who ranked in the upper two-thirds of their high school gradua t ing class and who have an ACT composite score from 18 to 22 or a com bined score of 800 or higher on the SAT will be considered for admission on an individual basis. These applicants cannot be a ssured admission . c. Applicants who ranked in the lower one-third of their hig h school grad u ating class, or who have a composite ACT score below 18 or a combined SAT score below 800 will be considered for admis sion on an individual basis by the Admissions Committee . 3 . Nonresident Applicants. t Nonresident applicants must meet the general requirements stated above, and, in addition, must rank in the upper one-half of their high school graduating class and present an ACT composite score of 24 or higher or a combined SAT score of 1050 or higher to be considered for admission. Nonresident applicants are advised that the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado does not maintain residence facilities . Housing is avail a ble in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the individ u al without dependence on University services. •Beginning e n g ineering students m u s t b e prepar e d t o s t art a n a l y tic ge om etry-calculus. A student w h o d oes n o t h ave tri gono m e t ry s h ould e xp e ct t o atte nd a t l eas t o n e extra sum m e r t erm. t See page 9 for definiti o n of "resident" a n d " n onresi d ent" cl assifi cati o n.

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4 1 University of Colorado at Denver How to Apply for Admission 1. Applicants may apply for the fall semester, the spring semester, or the summer term. A sc hedu.le of deadlines for the various semesters and terms wtll be supplied with the application form . An application that is received after the stated deadline for one semester or term will be considered for the next se mester or term if the applicant notifies the Office of Admissions and Records of his intention. 2. An Application for Admission may be obtained by contacting: Office of Admis sions and R eco rds University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver , Color ado 80202 Telephone (303) 623-1181 A Colorado resident may also obtain this form from the office of his high school principal or counselor. 3. The application for admission must be c.ompleted in total and submitted to the above address pnor to th e stated application deadline for the term of enrollment desired. All applications for admission must be accom panied by a check or mon ey order in the a mount of $10. This application fee is nonrefundable. In the event the applicant is grant ed admission but is prevented from enrolling during the .te rm on the application, the application fee wtll be vahd for one full year ( 12 months) from the date of the t erm for which the applicant was applying. 4. The applicant must request that a high school tran script, including his rank-in-class, be mailed to the above address by his high school. 5. The applicant must take either the Americ an Col lege Test (ACT) or the S cho lastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board on one of the national testing dat es. The student must request that test scores be sent to the University of Colorado at Den ver (ACT code # 0533 , or SAT code # R-4875). If the applicant took one of these tests prior to his application for admission to the University of and did not designate the Denver Campus to rec etve a score report, he must request the testing agency to se nd the score to the Denver C a mpus. This is accomplished on a Requ est for Addition al Score Report form available at test centers or from the appropriate office listed below. Information regarding these tests may be obt aine d either from the applicant's high school counselor, the UCD Office of Admission s a nd Records , or from one of the following offices of the n a tional testing agencies: Registration Department (ACT) American College Testing Program P . O . Box 414 Iow a City, Iowa 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P.O . Box 1025 Berkeley , C a lifornia 94704 College Entra nce Ex amina tion Bo ar d (SAT) P . O . Box 592 Princeton, New Jersey 08540 All credentials pr ese nt ed for admi ssion become the propert y of the Universit y of Colorado and must remain on file. Wh en a complete application (application form, tran script of high school work completed, statement of rank-in class, required entrance test scores, recommendation, a nd the nonrefundable $10 apphcat10n fee) is received by the Office of Admissions and Re cords, a decision of admission eligib ilit y will be made, and the ap plicant will be notified . Admission of Transfer Students New transfer st ud e nts may apply for admission to the Colleges of Busines s and Administration, Engineer.ing a nd Applied Science , Music , and Undergraduate Stu.dtes . 1. Colorado R eside nt Applicants. * Colorado restdent applicants are divided into the following three categories: . a. Applicants who hold a collegtate record of more th a n 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) from an institution of university rank, h ave a 2 . 0 cumu l ative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended are assured admiss ion to UCD. Applicants who have com pleted less than 12 semester credits ( 18 credits) of collegia t e work acceptable to the Um versity of Colorado must meet requirements for admission as freshmen. b. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of at least 45 se mester credits (68 quarter credits) from a college , have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point avera&e (calculated on all work attempted), and are eli gible to return to all institutions previously attend ed also are assured admission to UCD. c. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of less than 45 se mester credits ( 68 quarter credits) from a college , h ave a 2 . 0 cu mul ative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be considered for admission on an individual basis . Primary factors affecting the a d mission decision in such cases are : (a) the UCD college or school to which admission is desired; (b) qu a lity of previous work attempted; (c) age, maturity , and noncollegiate achieve ment s; and (d) time since the last collegiate atten dance . 2. Nonresident Applicants.* Nonresidents must meet the general requirements stated above, and, in addition, must have a tran sfera ble gr a de-point average of 2.5 in order to be admitted to the College of Business and Ad ministration or the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The a bove general requirements are sufficient for admission as a nonresident to the Colleges of Music or Undergraduate Studies . Nonresident applicants are advised that the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado doe s not main t ai n residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the individu a l without dependence on University services. Applic ants should consult the appropriate college or sc hool section of this bulletin to determine specific en trance requirements. In th e event a transfer applicant to one of the profes sio n a l schools of the University has not completed all re quir ed coursework for that college or school, he may be admitte d to the College of Undergraduate Stud ies in one t See page 9 for definition of "resident" and "nonresident" classification.

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of the preprofessional programs pending completion of such work for admission to the desired professional school. Transfer applications may be obtained from: Offic e of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver , Colorado 80202 Telephone: ( 303) 623-1181 When to Apply Interested applicants who are currently enrolled in a collegiate institution should submit their applications for transfer admission after they have registered for the final term at the current institution. Evaluation of tran s fer credits will be based on an official transcript of record indicating work completed up to the last term of enroll ment and courses for which the student is currently en rolled. A final , official transcript of record will be re quired upon completion o f the final term . Credentials Required for Transfer Admission 1. A University of Colorado transfer application. 2. The application fee of $10 in check or money order. (This fee is nonrefundable.) 3. An official transcript of record from each collegiate institution attended previously . If the applicant is cur rently enrolled at a collegiate institution and is submit ting a transcript listing all courses except for the final term of enrollment, another official transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. 4. An official high school transcript. If the applicant is a GED graduate , a GED Certificate of High School Equivalency , GED test scores , and a transcript of any high school work completed must be submitted. Individ uals applying for admission to the University of Colo rado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Lan guage General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, "English as a Second Language." All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Transfer of College-Level Credit The Offic e of Admissions and Records and the various deans' offices cannot make an evaluation of credits from another collegiate institution or give specific degree ad visement until complete and official credentials are on file and the applicant has been admitted. In general, transfer credits from other accredited collegiate institu tions will be accepted insofar as they meet the degree, grade, and residence requirements of the student's chosen progr am of studies at the University. College-level credit may be transferred to the Uni versity of Colorado in the following instances: 1. When it has been earned at a college or uni versity of recognized standing, from Advanced Plac e ment Examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Educa tion. 2. When a grade of C or higher has been attained. 3. When the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. General Information I 5 The University of Colorado will accept up to 72 semester credits (or 108 quarter credits) of junior col lege work to apply toward the baccalaureate degree at the University of Colorado. No credit is allowed for vocational-technical courses. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. Readmission of Former Students 1 . Former students of the University of Colorado who have not attended anot her collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application prior to the deadline for the term they wish to attend. 2. Former s tud ents of the University of Colorado who have attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must sub mit a Former Student Application form to apply for re admission. In addition, a $10, nonrefundable applica tion fee must accompany the application if the student has t aken 12 semester or 18 quarter hours since his last attendance at the University of Colorado . The studen t must request that a n official transcr i pt of record from the institution (s) attended be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver. Consideration for readmission will be made after receipt of all the above listed credent ials . The University the right to deny readmission to former students whose total credentials reflect a n in ability to ass ume those obligations of performance an d behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions , processes, and functions as an educational institution . Intra-University Transfer Denv er Campus students wishing to change colleges or schools within the University of Colorado , or to change campuses within the University of Colorado system, must m ake application through the Office of Admissions and Reco rds, Denver Campus, Room 203. This application must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term for which they wish to register. Admission of Special Students Person s who wish to take University courses but do not plan to work for a degree from the University of Colorado (graduate or undergraduate) are referred to as special students. Special students enrolled during the academic year (fall and spring semesters) must be 21 years of age or older and must have a high school di ploma or the equivalent. To accommodate c;tudents who live in the Denver metropolitan area but who are attend ing other collegiate institutions and wish to take courses during the summer , the University does not require that special students be 21 years of age during the summer term. Certified school teachers with a baccalaureate degree who seek only a renewal of the certificate currently held and who do not require institutional endorsement or recommendation may qualify for the University wide special student classification outlined above. Person s holding a baccalaureate degree who seek teacher certification may qualify for the special student classification but must apply for and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program separately and meet all

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6 1 University of Colorado at Denver requirements for the School of Education. Applications for teacher education are considered once eac h year (deadline is Febru ary 1 for the following summer term and /or academic year). Information regarding such ap plication m ay be obtained from the School of Education office, Denver Campus , 892-111 7 , ext. 276 . Special students m ay take courses on a pass / fail basis; how ever, s uch credit will be counted as part of the total p ass / fail cr edi t a llowed by the various colleges a nd schools shou ld the student apply for and be ac cepted to degree status . Continuation as a specia l st ud ent is contingent up on the student maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2 . 0 or higher . Apply i ng Special Student Credits Toward Degree Special students may apply for admission to a n under graduate degree program by submitting the Special to Degree Application , complete academic credentials, a nd the application fee. Accepted degre e applicants m ay transfer a maximum of 12 semester credits taken as a special student to a n undergraduate degree program with the approval of the appropriate academic de an. Accep tance of credit toward degrees at the University changed in fall 1970 . Special s tudents enrolled prior to tha t d a te may transfer credit in accordance with provisions in effect betw ee n January 1969 and August 1970. Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree at this Univ ersity are encourage d to submit the complete Graduate Application and supporting credentials as soo n as possible . However, a department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the requirements of a master 's degree for courses taken either as a student at another recog nized graduate sc hool, as a special student at the Univer sity, or any combination thereof. In addition, the de partment may recommend to the graduate de a n the ac ceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter, or summer term for which the student has ap pli e d for admission to the Graduate School. CREDIT FOR NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Universi t y of Colorado at D enver studen t s may par ticipate in Army ROTC programs offered on the Boulder C a mpus. 1. The Basi c Course. This program is available to freshme n and sop homor es. Freshmen a re required to enroll for one hour of military science course work per week. Sophomores are required to enroll for two three hour milit ary science courses. 2 . Th e Advanced Course . This program is available to junior s and seniors who h ave completed the B asi c Course successfully or to stude nt s (including qu alified veterans) who have demonstrated outstanding academic qu alifications and are desirous of an Army career . Stu dents ad mitted to the Advanced Cours e receive $100 per month during the fall a nd spring semesters. Upon successful completion of th e Advanced Course a nd receipt of a baccalaureate degree , the student may be commissioned in the U.S. Army. S c holarships Schol arships covering tuition , books , laboratory fees , and a monthly subsistence allowance of $100 for each month of the academic year (fall and spring semesters) are availab l e to qualified students who are motiv ated tow ard a career in the U.S . Army. 1. Four-Year Scholarship. High school seniors may compete for Army ROTC Scholarships to pursue the four years normally required to complete a baccal aure ate d egree. To be eligi ble for this competit ion the stu dent must take the ACT or SAT not later than the De cember test dates of the senior year, and submit his ap plication for the ROTC scholarship before December 31. Applic ati on forms a nd in struc tion s may be obt aine d from the high school counselor or th e Army ROTC office , University of Colorado, Boulder, 80302. 2. Student s enrolled in Army ROTC may apply for scholarships to cover the rem a ining time required to complete th eir degree program . Applications and infor mation may be obtained from the ROTC instructor. Credit for Military Service and Schooling If copies of discharge, separation papers , and a DD Form 295 (Applic a tion for the Evaluation of Educa tional Experience During Milit ary S ervice) are submit ted to the Office of Admissions and R ecords at the time of application for admission or subsequently , an evalua tion will be made and credit awarded as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experi ences of the American Council on Educa tion to the extent that s uch credit is applicable to the d eg ree sought at this University . Credit will b e allowed for college courses satisfac torily completed through the U.S. Armed Forces In stit ut e , sub j ect to the usual rules involving credit of this nature . Credit for Advanced Placement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board Coll ege credit and advanced placement will be award ed to studen ts who present scores of 3 , 4 , or 5 on Ad vanced P lacement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Bo ar d. For detailed information contact the Offi ce of Admissions and Records. See page 7 of this section for more information. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) An exciting challenge with rewarding opportunities is available to incoming UCD students who can earn univer sity credit by exa min ation in subject areas in which they h ave excelled at college-level proficiency. In terested students are enco ur aged to t ake appropriate subject examinations provided in the College Level Examination Progr am (CLEP ) of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) testing service. Students who score at the 67th percentile or above in subjects ap proved by the University co ll ege or school from which they plan to be graduated will be granted advanced s t a nding and University credit. The cost per examination is $15. Student s who wish to challenge s ubj ect areas for credit are urged to examine carefully the list of approved examinations for the college or school to which they are app lying , or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of the lower division require-

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ments, in order to determine the applicability of such credit to specific graduation requirements. CLEP subject examinations are administered at UCD during the third week of each month (the subject examination on Monday and the general examination Tuesday) . CLEP subject examinations are also admin istered nationally during the third week of eac h month (students should check with the institutions for testing days). Arrangements to take these examinations must be made well in advance of the testing date . Colorado residents may obtain CLEP materials from the regional office by contacting: College Level Examination Program c / o College Entrance Examination Board 2142 South High Street Denver, Colorado 80210 Colorado residents may also obtain CLEP informa t4on from the several test centers thoughout t h e state, preferably from the center located nearest to their high school. In Colorado, testing centers are located at: Metropolitan State College, Denver Colorado State University, Fort Collins El Paso Community College , Colorado Springs Southern Colorado State College, Pueblo University of Denver , Denver Fort Lewis College, Durango University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Students living outside of Colorado may secure CLEP information and application forms by writing : Institutional Testing Department College Level Examination Program Box 1822 Princeton , New Jersey 08540 Students interested in obtaining advanced sta n ding and University credit through CLEP tests should consult the Office for Student Relations, the college or school to which they are applying for admission, or the profes sional school to which they expect to apply after com pletion of lower division undergraduate requirements for specific subject examinations acceptable to that college or school for the desired degree program. Advanc e d Standin g b y Examination Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good stand ing for work completed by private study or b y occupa tional experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A nonrefundable fee is charged for each examination taken. Advanced Placement Program The University is a cooperating member of the Ad vanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board, which provides able high school students, whiJe stiJl in high school, an opportunity to take work and then to be examined for credit on the college level. Advanced placement and college credit may be grant ed on the b asis of the Colleg e Entra nce Examination Board ' s Advanced Placement Test. For students who achieve scor e s of 3, 4, or 5 in the CEEB's Advanced Placement Examination, college credit and advanced G eneral I nformati o n / 7 placement will be granted . Students with scores below 3 may be consi d ered by the department concerned. Col lege credit granted will be treated as transfer credit with out a grade but will count toward graduation and other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate. Study Abroad Program The University of Colorado Study Abroad Program offers educational opportunities overseas in 14 countries for junior and senior college students. For information contact the Office of International Education, 914 Broadway, Bou l der, Colorado 80302, (telephone 443 2211, ext. 7741). For fall1975 programs call or write by January 10, 19 7 5. UNIVERSITY-WIDE GRADING SYSTEM Effective with the fall semester 1974, all colleges and schools of the University of Colorado will employ the same grading system . Grades awarded will be: A-4 grade points per credit hour; superior B-3 grade points per credit hour; good C-2 grade points per credit hour; fair D-1 grade point per credit h our; minimum passing F-0 grade points; failing The instructor is responsible for determining the re quirements for whatever grade is to be assigned. The cumulative grade-point average is computed by dividing the total number of credit points e a rned by the total number of hours attempted. In addition to the grades indicated above, the instruc tor may assign one of the following: 1 /F-lncomplete/ jailing : automatic conversion to F grade after one academic year if the course is not made up. 1 /W-lncomplete/ withdrawal: automatic conversion to W after one academic year if the course is not made up. !P-In progress (graduate students only) P-Pass H-Honors (given only in the Honors Program) NC-for students registered on an audit / no grade basis. Y -symbol used to indicate that an entire grade roster was not received by the time grades were pro cessed. W-Drop without discredit. Regulations Governing the Award or Accumulatio n of Additional Grades 1. Pass/Fail. Up to 16 semester credit hours of regu lar course work may be taken on a pass / fail basis and credited toward the bachelor ' s degree. No more than 6 semester credit hours of course work may be taken on a pass / fail basis in any given semester. The pass (P) grade is not included in the student's grade-point ave rage; the jail (F) grade is included. For additional in formation see the general information portion of each college or school section of this bulletin. 2 . Honors . Credit hours earned in honors courses with grades of H or P count toward the student ' s degree but are not included in the grade-point average calcula tion. 3. Withdrawal . A notation of withdrawal will be placed on the permanent record of any student who with draws with approval during any term. Students who

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8 I University of Colorado at Denver cease to attend classes and do not officially withdraw from the Univers it y will be s ubj ect to grades ofF in all course work for which they were enrolled during that term. REGISTRATION See Ac ademic Calend ar in this bulletin for dates . See the appropriate Sch e dule of Cours es for complete regis tration information for each semester or summer term . Note: There is a penalty fee for late registration. EXPENSES Educational expenses at UCD normally involve tui tion , fees, books, and required materials. The Denver C a mpus does not ma intai n residence facilities so all costs related to housing must b e arranged by the student at his own convenience. Students are advised tha t trans portation and parking costs should be considered in the determination of expenses . Tuition and Fees* All tuition an d fee charges are established by the Regents of the University of Colorado in accordance with appropriate legislation enacted ann ually by the Colorado General Assembly . A tuition schedule is pub lished prior to registrat ion for each term during the year. The student is advised to check with the Office of Admissions and R ecords for specific tuition and fee in formation for the term for which h e intends to apply . Tui tion for the Fall Semester 1974 Credit Hours o f Enrollm ent Re sidents 0 .0-3 . 0 ........ . .......... . ...... . . . ........... $ 45.00 3 .14.0 60 . 00 4 .15.0 . ......... . ...... .... ... .... ............ 75 . 00 5.1-6.0 . .... .... .... . ........... ............... 90 . 00 6.17.0 .......... . . . ... . . .... . ...... . . ......... 105.00 7.18.0 ..... . ............. .... . . ............... 120.00 8.1-9. 0 ... . . . . . . ... ...... . ... . . ..... ... ...... . . 135.00 9.1 or mor e .... . . ............ .............. . . 148.00 Nonresidents $108 . 00 144 . 00 180 . 00 216.00 594.50 594.50 594.50 594 . 50 1. A student activity fee will b e charged in addition to the above tuition as follows: Summe r term 1974 . ... . .. . . ......... . ...... .. ... . ....... ..... . $3 Fall semester 197 4 . . . . .. . . . . ......... . . ... ... . . . ... . . . . .. . . . .. 7 Spring semester 197 5 . . ... .. ....... ... . .... ... .. ... ... . ..... . 7 2. There is a on e-time nonrefundable matriculation fee of $15 for new degree students and $5 for new spe cial students to the University of Colorado. This fee will be assessed at the time of initia l registration. Charges then will not be m ade for adding or dropping cour ses or for transcript orders. If a specia l student is a dm itted to degree status, he will be assessed a $10 matricul ati on fee at the time of his first registration after the change has been made. 3 . Students certified by the Gradu ate School for en rollment for doctoral dissertation pay $72. 4. G raduate students who enroll for a comprehen sive exami n ation only will pay $45. Such students will be assessed regular tuition and fees if they need hours toward gradu a tion. 0The Board of Re ge nts of the Univ e rsity of C o l orado reserves the right to change tuition and fees a t any time. 5 . Stud e nts enrolled in a chemistry l a bor a tory course pay a $10 break age deposit. Assessment of Charges and Payment Regulations All tuition and fees are assessed during registratio n and must be paid at that time. Any st ud e nt who registers for courses is liable for payment of tuition and fees even though h e may drop out of school. A student with finan cial obligations to the University will not be permitted to regi ster for a n y subsequent semester or term, to be graduated, or to be liste d among those receiving a degree or credits. The only exceptions to this regulation are notes and / or oth er types of indebtedness m a turing af ter graduation . Arr angeme nt s may be m ade through the Finance Offic e at the tim e of regis tr ation to def er payment of a portion of tuition and fees after a minimum down pay ment or one-third of the total tuition , whichever is greater. Specific informa t ion regarding deferred pay ment will be found in the Schedule of Cours es which is publi s hed in advance of each term or semester. P ersonal checks will be accepted for any University obligation. Any student giving a check that is not ac ceptable to the b a nk may b e dropped immediately from the roll s of the University . The student should refer to the Schedule of Courses for charges imposed for late registration, schedule changes, and l ate payments. R efund policies and policie s related to addi ng and dropping co u rses and withdr a wing from the University will be found in the S chedule of Courses published prior to each semester or term. TRANSCRIPTS Transcripts of records should be ordered from the University of Color ado Transcript Section, R egent Hall 125, Bould er, Colorado 80302 , or from the Office of Admi ssi ons and R ecords, University of Colorado at Denver , 1100 14th Street, Denv er, Colorado 80202 . Transcripts are prepared only at the student's written re qu est. A student h a ving financial obligations to the University that are due an d unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Copies of transcript s from other institu tions cannot be furnished . WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY A student who leaves th e University without offi cially withdrawing will receive a grade of F in each course for which he is regi stered. Withdrawal forms may b e obtained from the office of the academic dean of the college or school in which the student is enrolle d . OTHER REGULATIONS Student s a re advised to refer to the Schedule of Cours es each semester for specific information regard ing course loads, adding or dropping classes , adjust ments in tuition as a result of dropped classes, etc. Where requirements differ from one academic area to another , the student is a dvised to abi de b y the regula tions stated by the college or school in which he is enrolled .

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CLASSIFICATION OF I N S TATE AND OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS* A student is initially classified as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for tuition purposes at the time an application a nd all support ing credentials have been received in th e Office of Admissions and Records . The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources . After the student's status is determined , it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary . The student who , due to subsequent events, b ecome s eligible for a chang e in classification, whether f rom out-of-state to in-state or the reverse , has the r es p on sibility of info rming th e tuition clas si fication officer , Office of Admissions and Records , in writing within 15 days aft e r such a change occurs. An uneman ci pated minor whose par ents move their domicile from Colo r ado to a location outside the state is consid e r ed an out-of-state student from the date of the parent s' r emoval from the sta te. He will be assessed nonresident tuition at the n ext registration. The student, or his par ents, is REQUIRED to send written notific a tion to the tuition classification officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. If an adult student or an em ancipat e d minor estab lishes domicile outside Colorado , he is to send written notific a tion within 15 days to the tuit i on classification officer. Petitioning for Classification Change Detailed instructions on the p ro cedur e to be follow e d , the . necess ary petition forms, and a copy of the appro priate Color a do statute governing tuition classification at state-supported institutions i n Color a do a re available from the tuit ion class ificati on officer , University of Colorado at Denver , Office of Adm issi ons and Records, Room 203 . Classification Notes 1. Petitions will not be acte d upon until an applic a tion for admission to th e Unive rsity and complete sup porting cr ede nti als have be e n received . 2 . Changes in classifica tion a re made effective at the time o f the s tudent 's next regist rati on. 3. A student who willfully gives wrong information to evade p ay ment of th e out-of-state tuition is subject to legal and disciplinary a ction . SERVICES FOR STUDENTS Services off ered by the Offic e for Stud e nt Relations are available to the student, eit her as a n individual or as part of an organization. The d ean for Student Rela tions is concerned with the total University experience of each s tudent. His associa tes a nd s t aff provide per sonalized assistance to the student i n educational, social, organizat iona l, a nd the b e h aviora l areas. Undergraduate colleg es and sch ool s conduct orientation progr ams for incoming st ud e nts befor e each se m este r begins , a nd academic a dvising throughout the academic year. Counseli n g Center The services of the counseling center are available by appointment to all s tud ents. Individual counseling, •Clas sificati o n s t anda rds confo r m t o s t a t e s t atutes and judicia l d e ci s i o ns and are applicable to aU of Colorado's state-supported coll e ge s and universities. General Informat ion / 9 group experiences , and student testing are provided by trained and q u alified counselors . Interviews are confi dential , and there is no fee for the testing or counseling . Financial Aid A large proportion of UC D students receive fina ncial assistance through grants , loans , or the Work-Study program. In add i tion , a large number of students find partor full-time employment in the comm u nity. Short term emergency loans also are available . Most financial aid is awarded on the basis of the st u dent 's financial need, wit h academic achievement a secondary consideration . For current information on deadlines, ap pl icati o ns, a n d t ypes of aid available the student should consult the Office of Financial Aid at UC D or his h igh school c oun selor. Job Opportunities P art-time job opportunities are listed in the Office of Fin a ncial Aid . C a ree r placement , af ter gradu a tion, is available t h rough the Boulder Campus Placement Center. Applications a nd further information a re avail able through the Office of Financial Aid. Office of Veterans Affairs All student veter a ns, whether new , transfer , or pre vio u s students, must notify the Office of Veteran s Affairs of intent t o enroll each semester. The office is responsible for assist ing veterans in being properly certi fied with the Veterans Administration R egional Office and in obtaining all VA benefits they are e ntitl e d to receive . The Office of Veterans Affairs also provides veterans with profe ssi on a l counseling services, tutorial ben efits, a reading a nd study skills program , employment referral services , and aid in obtaining emergency situation s hort term loans. Students From Other Countries Appropri a te immigation certifications a nd work per mits may be ob t ained throug h the Office for Student R elations. Counseling , ass ist ance wit h h ousing , and s pecial information is available from the foreign student adviser at UC D . Health Insurance Program Effective wit h the summer term 1974 and there a fter, student health insur a nce coverage through Blue Cross Blue Shield will be mandatory for all st u de nts c arr ying 6.1 credit hours or more. Student s m ay elect to waive this coverage by signing a waiver card and filing t his with registration m ateri als. If the waiver card is not filed upon registratio n , the health insurance assessment will be automatic. Cost to the student for th e fall a nd spring semesters has not been set. F u rther information regard ing this program m ay be obtained from the Office for St u dent R ela t ions , Room 602 . STUDENT ACTIVITIES Numerous student clubs and organiz a tions exis t to provide a variety of i nterests for students desiring e xtra curricular activities. The student newsp a per , The Fou rth Estate, is published weekly, and there is an active st u dent government.

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10 1 University of Colorado at Denver Students participate in dramatic and musical produc tions, reading programs , special seminars and work shops, intramural sports, and debat e . Lectures and programs are offe r ed throughout the academic year. Students are vit ally conce rn ed with current issues such as environme ntal action, politics , education for minority groups, and women's liber ati on , and student clubs for such issu es invite participation and ideas. Several honorary societies, fraternities, and profes sional associations h ave active student chapters at D enver, and UCD students also are eligible for mem bership in Boulder Campus organiz ati ons. ALUMNI PROGRAMS All graduates and for mer s tud ents of the University of Colorado are eligible for membership in the CU Alumni Association. The Colorado Alumnus news paper is mailed eleven times each year. Two Denver area al umni clubs (Denver East and Denver West) have been formed, and a wide range of activities is provided by these groups. Membership and further information is ava ilabl e through the alumni office on the Boulder Campus. FACILITIES The UCD Campu s compr i ses an eight-story tower and classroom building providing over 50 classrooms, 26 teaching l abora tories, fac ult y and administrative offices, an a uditorium , cafeteria, a nd st ud ent lounges. Work was completed in 1973 on an expansion proj ect which added 12 new classrooms a nd l a bo ratories on a third level in the classroo m building. Bookstore Textbooks and s up plies are available at the UCD bookstore, located on th e first floor of the Bromley Library building . The bookstore is open from 9 a . m . to 8:30 p .m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p .m. on Friday, and is closed Saturd ay, Sunday, and holidays. It also remains open on the first day o f registration. Students mu st present t heir validated ID card when paying for purch ases by check . Bank Amer icard and Master Charge credit cards are also accepted. library The Charles D. Bromley Library is loc a ted at Fourteenth and Lawrence Str eets , adjacent to the classroom building. Hours of service are from 8 a.m. to 10 p . m . Monday through Thursday, 8 a .m . to 5 p.m. on Friday, a nd 9 a.m . to 4 p.m. on S aturday. The library is closed o n Sunday. Special holi day and vacation hours are posted in the library . The libr a ry collection includes reserve books , refer ence materials, journa ls, microforms, records, and tapes. Microform equipment and listening facilities are provid ed. General reference service, interlibr a ry loans , and as sistance with individual library problems are available through the reference office on the second floor. UC D students also m ay use the Norlin Li br ary on the Boulder Campus, or any library in a Colorado state s upported institution of higher learning , for researc h materials not available in the Bromley Library by pres entation of the student's validated ID card. Books may be borrowed through interlibrary loan to minimize the inconvenience to studen ts who wish to u se orlin Library resources . Child Care Center A C h ild Care Center is available for u se by students who h ave young children to be cared for while attend ing classes or u sing the library. It is operated b y the UCD st udent government and a committee of interested parents. For information call 892-1117, ext. 395. Classroom Locations Most classes and laboratory sec tion s meet in the main UCD buildings. A few courses are scheduled at other facilities. Locations are designated in the Sched ule of Courses under Building Codes. Parking Parking is avai l able at ne arby commercial off-street l ots both day and eve ning , and st udent-op erated lots provid e parking at special rates. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Coop erative Education is a new progr am a t UCD. B ased on the precept that experience is often the most effective educator, this program is designed to provide students of so phomore standing or above with an op portunity for preprofessional employme nt. This is ac complished by placing st ud ents as employees with busin esses, age ncies , and institution s which are operating in a capacity re l ated to th e s tud ent's course work. The program is now ex panding its placement opportu nities. Normally students work full time for one semester an d then attend classes full time for the follow ing semester. How ever. half-tim e positions are also available. This program e n a bles st udent s in all disci pl ines to gain experience and income while attending college. I t is a lso possible for students in th e College of Undergr a duate Studi es to receive credit for current job experiences. T his allows students who already have jobs in th eir field of st udy to earn academic credit. Also, becaus e there is a scarcity of p aid positions in the liber al arts fields, s tudent s can obtain volunteer internships from the Cooperative Education office and receive both credit and valuable exper i ence for their efforts. Students interested in a ny of the se options can apply or obtain more information in Room 811 or by calling ext. 555. Students in the Colleg e of Undergraduate Studies should also refer to Cooperative Education in the Special Programs section of thi s bulletin. BUREAUS AND AGENCIES Bureau of Community Services The Bureau of Community Services provides assis t a nce to community groups, agencies , a nd org a niz a tions in planning an d developing progr ams to solve a v a riety of problems . Bure a u staff, with support from UCD fac ult y and graduate studen t s, conduct tr aining pro grams in the areas of leadership development , reso urc e mobiliz a tion , community p l anning , and community or g ani z a tion . In addition , consultation is provided to

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numerous groups engaged in community d eve lopment efforts. Division of Continuing Educatio n The Di vision of Continuing Education is responsible for noncredit programs , off-campus credit classes, cor respondence st udy, audiovisual services, continuation education, speech services, and community services in the D enver metropolitan area. These programs and resources of the University of Colorado are an integral part of the statewide coordinated program of off-c a mpus instruction under the guidelines established by the Colo rado Commission on Higher Education. The program provides opportunity for advancement in business , government, and the professions; offers lib eral education programs contributing to cultural, intellectual, and personal vitality; and presents pro grams designed to help solve social, community, and individual problems. Noncredit programs are open to all adults regardless of previous education or training. Some advanced courses require a background in a specific subject mat-General Inform a tion I 11 ter area. Except in certificate programs, no grade is awarded upon completion of a course . Off-campus credit offerings supplement the regular academic programs offered at UCD. Admission require ments and refund policies for off-campus instruction are identical with requirements for enrollment in UCD. Individuals who h ave never been enrolled on any campus of the University of Colorado usually are ad mitted to off-campu instruction as special students. Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Continuing Education Bulletin or other in formation may write or call the division office at UCD, 1100 14th Street, 892-1117, ext. 286. Speakers Bureau Faculty and administrative personnel are available for outside speaking engagements on a wide variety of subjects. This public service ac tivity helps to promote interaction between Denver Campus personnel and the urban community. Requests for speakers are handled through the UCD Office of Information Services, ext. 246.

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College of Undergraduate Studies HERBERT G. ELDRIDGE, Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Undergraduate Studies was estab lished, effective July 1, 1971, in order to respond directly to the needs of urban students in innovative ways . The responsibility of the College is to serve the higher educational needs of qualified university students in the Denver metropolitan area. Reflecting the varied objectives of the urban student, the instructional pro gram provides opportunities for general education in the arts and sciences both as an end in itself and as preparation for professional and graduate work. New programs in interdisciplinary studies particularly appro priate to the urban environment are being planned and implemented. Since many CUS students are employed full time during the day. numerous courses are offered in the evening . The College is organized into three divisions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences. Each division offers a wide variety of curricula including traditional undergraduate majors, interdisciplinary studies, and preprofessional programs. In order to broaden the student ' s perspectives the College requires 12 semester hours of course work in each of the areas represented by the three divisions. However, the student is given a wide selection of courses to satisfy each of the three area requirements and the other requirements for his degree. The College offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B .A.) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.). A student may complete a major in one of the following disciplines: anthropology, biology, chemistry, commu nication and theatre , distributed studies, economics, English, fine arts , French, geography, German, history, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, psy chology, sociology, and Spanish. Students also enroll in the College of Undergradua t e Studies to prepare themselves for admission to one of the professional schools of the University , which include the School of Dentistry, School of Education, School of Journalism , School of Law, School of Medicine , School of Nursing, and School of Pharmacy. Each professional school has specific requirements which must be followed if the student intends to pursue a career in on e of these fields. Interdisciplinary majors are currently being devel oped in each division of the College . These inclu de Urban Studies (Social Sciences) , Environmental Sci ence (Natural and Ph ysical Sciences) , Advanced Writ ing (Arts and Humanities), the Environment of the Arts (Arts and Humanities), and American Studies (Arts Humanities) . Some courses agplicable to these new maJors are already being offered , and others will be initiated in subsequent years. Interested students should contact the office of the appropriate divisional dean for information. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Freshmen The student must be a high school graduate and must present 15 units of acceptable secondary work. (The College of Undergraduate Studies does not specify particular units.) An applicant who has not graduated from high school must present satisfactory scores on the General Educational Development Test (GED) a nd a high school e qu ivalency certificate to be considered for admission . Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denv er who have com pleted the Spanish Language General Educa tional De velopment Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI , "English as a Second Language." High school is interpreted as grades 9, 10 , 11, a nd 12. Students shou ld refer to the General Information section of this bulletin for complete admission requirements. Transfer Students Students who have atten d ed another college or uni versity are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students as outlined in the G eneral Information section of this bulletin . Applicants (residents and nonresidents) will be con side r ed for admission provided a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better has been at tained on all work attempted at all institutions attended. If the applicant has been away from the collegi a te environment for more than three years , he will be considered on the basis of all factors available: high school record, test scores , original collegiate ad mission qualifications, college performance, and interim experiences that might suggest potential success in the College of Undergraduate Studies. A m aximum of 72 semeste r hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward a degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examina tion Board's Advanced Placement Tests. For students who h ave taken an advanced placement course in high school and who make scores of 3, 4 , or 5 in the CEEB's Advanced Placement Examination, advanced place ment as well as college credit will be granted . Students who make scores of 2 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade

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but will count toward graduation and the meeting of other s p ecific re quirements for which it may be ap pro priate. Collegelevel Examination Program (ClEP) Pro spective students who plan either to graduate from the College of Undergraduate Studies or to enroll in the Colleg e to fulfill lower division requirements for profession al sc hools may earn college-level credit for advanced standing in the following CLEP Subject Examinations scored at the 67th percentile and above: American Literature Analysis and Interpretation of Literature English Literature Americ an Government American History General P syc hology Introductory Economics Western Civilization Biology Gener al Chemistry Geology Introdu ctory Calcu lus For complete information about the CLEP program, st ud e nts should refer to the G eneral Information section of this bull etin. STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM The Univer sity of Color ado sponsors an active study abroa d progr am, which is open to students from all campuses of the University . Specific programs exist in Great Britain , France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Israel, Nigeria, Taiwan, and J apan. Less formal programs are availa ble in other Lati n American, Midd le Eas tern, and Asian nations. Full information may be obtained at the University 's Office of Internation al Education at Boulder or from Intern ati onal Education a dvisers on the Denv er Campus. ADVANCED STANDING BY EXAMINATION Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standi ng for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equiva lent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A non refundable fee is charged for each examination t ake n . The fee is assessed at the lowest resident tuition charge currently in effect for the Denver Campus. Arrange ments for the examinations are made through the Office of Admissions and R ecords. ACADEMIC ADVISING Student s in the College are expected to assume the res pon sibility for planning their academic programs in acc ord ance with College r ules and policies and m ajor re quir ements. To assist students with this pl an ning the College maintains an advising staff located in Room 804 of the Tower Building. Students are urged to consu lt with the staff of this office concerning individu a l academic problems. As soon as the student has determined his major, he must declare his intentions to his discipline a dviser. The discipline adviser will be responsible not only for the College of Undergraduate Studies 1 13 st ud e nt 's advisi ng but als o for the certification of the completion of his major program for gra du at io n. Students planning to earn a degree from one of the prof essional schools (Education, Journalism, Nursing, and Ph armacy) should see an adviser in that school. Eac h professional school has certain specific require ments. The Denver Campus also has a counseling service available through the Office for Student R elations to which a s tudent may go for assistance with probl ems of a vocational or personal nature. CREDIT FOR ARMY ROTC Student s in the College of Undergrad u ate Studies may participate in the Army ROTC program through the College of Arts a nd Sciences on the Boulder Campus. The College of Undergraduate Studies will accept a maximum of 12 hours of ROTC co u rse work tow ard the baccalaureate degree . For more informati on about the ROTC program, see the General Inform ati on section of this bullet in. ACADEMIC POliCIES Courses and Credits The University operates on th e semest e r system . T h e term "course" as used in this bulletin means a one semester course . Except for l aborato ry cours es, the c r edit-hour value assigned to a course is roughly eq uiv a lent to the number of hours p er week of class work involv ed in the course (thus a 3-semester-hour cou r se normally meets 3 hours per week) . The value of a co ur se in semes ter-hour credits is indicated by that part of th e course number which follow s the dash. Ex a mple : Chern. I 03-5. " Chern. 1 03" is the identifying depart ment number, and " 5 " indicates that the course is for 5 semester hours credit. Course Numbering System Course levels are designated as follows: 100 level, freshman; 200 l evel, sopho more ; 300 level, junior ; 400 lev el, senior; 500 level , graduate. Upper Division Credit Courses numbered 300 or a bove a nd all honors courses are awarded upper division credit. Student Classification Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned. Freshman classification , 0 to 29 semester credits; sop homore , 30 to 59 semester credits; junior, 60 to 89 credits; and senior, 90 to 120 credits . Course load Policy The normal course load is 12 to 18 hours. Studen t s registered for fewer than 12 hour s are regarded as part time students . Stud ents wishing to register for 20 hours or more must obtain ap proval from the dean. T hese totals incl ude a ll courses t ake n for credit in the Unive r sity, but do not include corresponde nce courses , non credit courses, and courses t aken at other institutions . To receive credit , the studen t must be officially registered for each course. Student s who hold or expec t to hold fullor part tim e employment while enrolled in the College must

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14 I University of Colorado at Denver register for course lo ads they can expect to complete without unusual difficulty. Recomm ended course loads are given below , but each student must weigh his own abilities and assess the demands of each course in de termining an app rop riate schedule. The College as sumes that all courses elected will be completed. Employed 20 ho urs per week-10 to 13 semester hours or 3 to 4 courses Employed 30 hours per week-8 to 11 semester hours or 3 courses Employed 40 hours per week-6 to 9 semester hours or 2 to 3 courses Independent Study With the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and divisional dean, students may register for independent study. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project (normally not to exceed 3 credits per semester) shall be arranged at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits taken on an independent st udy basis may apply to ward the bach elo r's degree. Credit for Courses in the Professional Schools and in Physical Education Students m ay count tow a rd the Bachelor of Arts degree as many as 24 credit hours of co ur se work for curricula lea ding to degrees other than the B.A . (Busi ness, Education , Engineering and Applied Science , En vironmental Design , Journalism , Music , Nursing, and Ph ar macy). Vocation al a nd technic al courses from a two-year progr a m may not be included. Activity courses in physic a l education, up to a maximum of 8 hours , will count tow a rd the 120 required for the degree. Correspondence Study Students in the College of Undergraduate Studies, with the approval of the de a n , may t ake work in corre spondence study offered by the University's Division of Continuing Education. A maximum of 30 hours of correspondence work may count toward the degree. Adding and Dropping Courses All changes of schedule must b e made by processing the official drop / add card. No change will be made in a student's schedule until all necessary signa tures have be e n entered on the drop / add card and the card has been returned to the Office of Admissions and R ecords. Restrictions on changes of schedule are noted below: Adding Courses. Courses may not be added after the second week of classes except under unusual cir cumstances. Dropping Courses. Students receive a grade of F in any course that they discontinue without officially dropping. Students will be allowed to drop during the first two weeks of the semester with no signatures re quired on the drop card. After the second week the instructor must certify that the student is passing if the course is to b e dropped witho ut discredit. After the tenth week of th e semester, courses may not be dropped unl ess th e re are circumstances clearly beyond the s tu dent's control (accident, illness , etc .) . The instructor a nd the de a n must approve the drop under these cir cumstances. Withdrawal When a student withdraws from the University , he must obtain the a pproval of the dean 's office (Room 804) and the Office of Admissions and Records. A notation of withdrawal is made on the permanent rec ord page. Students who l eave the University without officially withdrawing will receive grades of F for a ll course work. After the tenth week of the semester, a student will not be permitted to withdraw except for reasons clearly beyond his control. Attendance Regulations The matter of classroom attendance is left to the discretion of the instructor. It is the responsibility of the student to determine at the beginning of each semester his instructor 's policies on attendance. Students who do not attend the first class session in limited enrollment courses of 15 or less will lose their place in the class unless arrangements have been made with the instructor prior to the first class session. Repeating Courses A student who fails a course may repeat that course one time in order to demonstrate competence at a pass ing level. If a course failed is repeated , the original F will remain on the record, but will be excluded from the grade average. Pass/Fail Option All students who wish to register for a course on a pass / fail b asis m ay do so during regular registration proc e dures . Changes to or from a pass / fail b asis may be effected during the normal t wo-week drop-add per iod. After two weeks, it will not be possible for the student to change his registration unless approved by the dean of the College as a specific exception. The fol lowing restrictions should be noted on the use of the P / F option: 1. Not more th a n 16 semester hours of course work passed may be credited toward the 120 hours required for graduation . These 16 hours are in addition to those taken in honors , physical education, cooperative educa tion, and student teaching. 2. The use of the pass / fail option may be restricted in certain major programs. 3 . Courses taken on a pass / fail basis may not be included in the minimum of 30 hours of C or better required for the major. 4. Onl y 6 hours of course work may be P / F in any given se mester. 5. Grades of D and above convert to a P . The P grade is not included in the student's grade-point average. 6 . Grades of F equal a letter grade of F and will count in the grade-point average. 7. Transfer Students. No course may be t aken on a PI F basis by transfer studen ts graduating with only 30 semester hours completed at the University of Colorado. Grade-Point Average Requirements and Scholastic Suspension A minimum cumul a tive grade-po i nt average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) is required of all students in the College of Undergraduate Studies. If a student's GPA drops below 2.0 at the end of any semester (excluding summer term) the student will be required to achieve better than a

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2.0 in succeeding semesters, as described in the fol lowing sliding scale, or he will be suspended. The student must then continue to meet the sliding scale every semester until his grade-point average reaches 2.0. Schol a stic records of students will be reviewed as soon as possible after the close of each spring semester, and the student will be informed in writing if he is to be suspended . Hours Deficiency 1-10 11-20 21-30 over 30 Grade-Point Average in the Most Recent Seme s ter 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 The " Hours Deficiency" is the number of credit hour s of B work the student must earn to raise his GPA to 2.0 . Hours of deficiency may be computed as follows : multiply total number of hours by 2 to obtain the GPA points that would have been attained with a 2.0 average. Subtract from this figure the total grade points shown on the last grade slip . The difference is the hours of deficiency . In an effort to raise his grade-point average, a stu dent in the College may register for courses in the University of Colorado summer term and for corre spondence study through the University, irrespective of his academic status. Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado . However, grades earned in another col lege or school within the University of Colorado are used in determining the student ' s scholastic standing and his progress toward the degree. First Suspension. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term), after which the student will automati cally be readmitted to the College of Undergraduate Studies. The student will then be expected to meet the sliding scale (based on his CU record only) until his cumulative GP A reaches 2.0. Failure to do so will result in a second suspension . A student under a first suspension may be read mitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if he has demonstrated marked academic improve ment in one of the following ways: 1. By achieving a cumulative 2.5 average on all summer or correspondence work attempted at the University of Colorado since suspension. (A student must register for a minimum of 6 credits in the sum mer term or through correspondence work . ) 2. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to a 2.0 through correspondence or summer work at the University of Colorado. 3. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to a 2.0 at another institution. (The cumulative grade point average is defined as the grade-point average at the University of Colorado in combination with the work taken at all other institutions . ) Upon return to CU, however, the student retains his old grade-point average. (GPA from another institution does not trans fer back to CU.) Second Susp e nsion. A student suspended for a sec ond time will be readmitted only under unusual cir cumstances, and only by petition to the Committee on Academic Progress of the College of Undergraduate Studies. Each petition will be examined individually . College of Undergraduate Studies I 15 The committee will expect the student to show th a t his chanc e s for successfully completing his education in the College have be e n materially improved by f a ctors such as increased m a turity or a r e lief from s tr ess ful circumstances . The de a dline for petit i ons to th e Com mittee on Academic Progress for r eins t a tem e nt for a ny fall semester is Augus t 1. The d ea d line for petition s for reinstatement for any spring . semest e r is D ecembe r 1 . Students who complete 12 or mor e semes ter hour s a t another institution must apply for r e admi sion to the University of as transf e r s tud e nt s , r e g a rdl ess of their st a tus in the Univ e rsity of Color a do . They also must present a 2.0 cumul a tive gr a d e -point aver age on all collegiate work attempted (at the University of Colo rado a nd elsewhere) in order to be considered f or re admission. Committee on Academic Progress The Committee on Ac a demic Progres s (CAP) is responsible for the a dministration of the a c a d e mic policies of the Coll ege as e stablish e d by th e fac ulty. The committee constitut e s the bridge betwe e n the faculty in its legisl ativ e c a pacity a nd th e s tud e nt s upon whom the legislation comes to b ea r. CAP alone is empowered to gr a nt waivers of , e x e mption s from , a nd exceptions to the ac a demic policie s of th e College. One of the major re s ponsibilit ies o f th e committee is the handling of s uspension s a nd r e inst a t e m e nt of suspended s tudents . Th e norm a l p er iod of s u s p e n s ion is two regular semesters (one ac a demic y e ar , exclud ing summer term ) . However , s tud e nt s s u s p ende d a second time will be r e instated onl y under unu s u a l cir cumstances a nd onl y by p e tition to th e committ ee . The Committee on Ac a demic Pro g ress i s composed of five faculty member s a nd thr ee stud e nt m e mb e rs. Academic Ethics Students are expect e d to conduct the m selves in accordance with th e highest st a nd a rd s o f hon esty a nd integrity. Cheating , pl agia rism , ille gitim a t e po ssess ion and disposition of e x a min a tions, a lt e r a tion , forgery, or falsification of offic ia l r ec ords, a nd s imilar a ct s or th e intent to engage in s uch a cts a r e ground s for su s p e n s ion or expulsion from th e Univer s ity. In p a rticular , stud e nt s a r e a d v ised tha t pl agia rism consists of any act i nvolving th e off e ring of th e work to someone else as the s tud e nt ' s own . It is r ec om mended th a t stud e nts con s ult w ith their ins tru c tors as to the proper prep a r a t i on of r e ports, pap ers, e t c . , in order to avoid this a nd s imilar offe n ses. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION College Requirements The following four r e quir e ment s a pply to all B a chelor of Arts and B a ch e lor of Fine Art s s tudents : 1. Arts a nd Hum a nities-12 se mest e r hours. 2 . Natur a l and Physic a l Scie nces 12 semest e r hours . 3. Soci a l Sciences-12 semest e r hours. Lists of course s th a t will s atisfy the a bove area requirement s a r e a v aila ble in th e F a ll a nd S prin g Sch e dule s of Cour ses, in e a ch div i s ion a l office, a nd in the dean ' s office.

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16 I University of Colorado at Denver 4. Foreign Language. This requir e ment is satisfied by : a. Completion of a Level III high school course in any classical or modern foreign l a ngu a ge; or b. Completion of a third-semester course (nor mally 211, but in French , German, 201 or 211) in the College ; or c. Demonstration of third-semester proficiency by test. d. This requirement also may be satisfied by completion of Inte nsive German (12 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201 or 211, or by demonstr a tion of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who elect to continue a language studied before entering the College will be placed in courses appropriate to their level of preparation and will con tinue from the level indicated unt il the third-semester course has been pas sed. A student who enrolls in a course at a lower l evel than that in which he has been placed will not receive credit for the course. Students who may go on to do graduate work are advised to complete the fourth semester of a foreign language in preparation for language requirements of graduate schools. Foreign Language Placement . Plac eme nt of students in college-level foreign language cour ses is based on units of high school language study and on the verbal SAT score or English ACT score according to the fol lowing schedule: Hi g h S choo l Forei g n Language Verbal English Levels Approved Cour ses, Stron g l y Advised for the Fre s hman Year SAT Scor e ACT S c ore o r Units 600-800 200-599 600-800 200-599 600-800 200-599 600-800 200-599 25-36 4 or more Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below thirdyear (300level) courses . 0-24 4 or more Exempt fro m requirement. Recommended 300 level courses ; no credit allowed below fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses . 25-36 3 Exempt fro m requirement. Recommended 300 -level courses ; n o credit allowed below fourt h-semester (202 or 212 ) courses. 0 -24 3 Exempt from requirement. No cr edit allowed below fourth-s emester (202 or 212) courses. 25-36 2 Third semest er courses (201 or 211). 0-24 2 Second semester courses (102) . 25 -36 0-24 Second semest er course s (102). Beginning course ( 10 I). A student may enroll in a course at a lower level than that in which he is placed upon consultation with the appropriate faculty member. Howev er, he will not receive credit for any course tak en at a level lower than his placement. Exceptions to this policy can b e mad e only by the discipline adviser and will normally be considered only when there has been a lapse of five or mor e years since previous study of the language. There is a mple opportunity for language review by en rolling on a non credit basis in lower-level language courses upon con s ultation with th e adviser. Students may request a placement test to place them in a higher level course than that assigned, or to demon s trate proficiency sufficient to satisfy the college foreign language requirement. Students who do not wish to continue a language studied previously may begin a new language without pen a lty. However , students are strongly urged to begin or continue their college-level language study immedi ately upon enrollment in the College. Students also are urged to consult with the appropriate faculty member concerning any problems that might arise regarding foreign language study or the foreign language require ment. Note: Physical education is no longer required for completion of the bachelor's degree . However , a maxi mum of 8 hours of physical education credit will count toward the 120 hours re quired for the degree . Major Requirements A candidate for the degree B ac helor of Arts shall fulfill such re quir ements as may be stipulated for his major progr am. These requirements shall include at least 30 semes t er hours of work in the major area (as determined by his adviser) of C grade or higher , at least 16 hours of which shall be at the upper division level. The grade average in the major sh all be at least C . Not more than 48 semester hours in one discipline m ay be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. The student is responsible for knowing the re quirements for the major. The adviser shall be respon sible for determining when a student has satisfactorily completed the requirements for th e major and for so certifying to the dean of the College . For requirements of the of Fine Arts de gree, consult the fine arts section in the alpha betic al listings under the description of courses and programs . Upper Division Requirement Students m ust complete at least 45 hours of upper division work (courses numbered in the 300s and 400s) to be eligible for the bachelor 's degree. Any student may register for upper division courses providing he has satisfied the pr e requisites or has the approval of the discipline in which the course is offered. Courses transferred from a junior college carry lower division credit. Exceptions to this require ap proval of the dean of the College and the appropriate discipline representat ive, who may ask the student to validate upper division credit by taking an advanced sta nding examination. Total Credit-Hour and Grade-Point Requirement To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies , students must pass a t least 120 semester hours with an average of a t least 2.0 (C) in all courses attempted a t the University of Colorado. Residence Requirement A candidate for a degree from the College of Under graduate Studies must earn his l ast 30 hours in the

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University of Colorado and be enrolled as a degree student in the College of Undergraduate Studies. Senior Progress Report Upon completion of 80 semester hours of course work, each student sh ould request a Progress Report in the Office of the Dean to determine his status with respect to the above requirements. At the beginning of their last semester, students are required to file Diplom a Cards, showing the date when they intend to be graduated. Diplom a Cards are available in the College of Undergraduate Studies, Office of Admissions and Records, and at registration. During their senior year, students must clear all sched ule changes with the Degree Requirements section of the Office of the Dean. Graduation with Honors The Honors Program of the College is outlined in the Special Programs section of this bulle tin. In addition to graduation with honors, a student may be graduated with distinction if , prior to his final semester, he has taken at least 30 hours at the Uni versity of Colorado and if his cumulative grade-point average by the end of the semester, prior to his final semester's work toward the degree, is 3.5 or higher, both at the University of Colorado and in all collegiate work attempted. Summary Check List of Graduation Requirements The student alone is ultimately responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements. Questions concern ing them should be directed to the Office of the De an of the College of Undergraduate Studies . Upon com pletion of degree requirements (including the fulfill ment of a major) the student will be awarded the appropriate degree. General Requirements 1. 120 semester hours passed. 2. 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all Univer sity of Colorado work. 3. 45 hours of upper division work. 4 . The last 30 hours in residence in the College. Area Requ irements 1. Arts and Humanities : 12 hours. 2. Natural and Physical Sciences: 12 hours. 3. Social Sciences: 12 hours. 4. Foreign language: third-semester proficiency or completion of a level III high school foreign language course. Major Requirements 1. 30 to 48 hours in the major area. 2 . 30 hours of C-grade or better in the major area . 3. A 2.0 grade-point average in all major work. 4. 16 hours of upper division courses in the major, C-grade or higher. 5. Special requirements as stipulated by the major program. Note: Not more than 48 hours in any one discipline and not more than 24 hours outside the College can be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. Students may elect to satisfy their degree require ments according to the above requirements or accordCollege of Undergraduate Studies I 17 ing to those in effect when they first enrolled as a degree student in the College of Undergraduate Studies . Students planning to transfer to the Bould e r Campus are responsible for informing themsel ves of the degree requirements on that campus. Division of Arts and Humanities ROBLEY D. RHINE, Assistant Dean The Division of Arts and Humanities includes the disciplines of communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French , German , philosophy, Sp anish, and speech patholog y and audiology . Complete undergraduate ma jors are offered in communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French, Germ an, philosophy, and Sp a nish. Requirements for each major are explained befor e the course listings for the respective disciplines. Informa tion on preprofessional programs is given in that section of this bulletin. This division offers course work in several special programs including Comparative Literature, American Studies , and the Writing Program. The Writing Progr a m is designed to prepare professional writers in the tech niques and vocabularies of several varied fields such as fine arts, science, engineering, creative writing, bus iness , social sciences, and literature . Two cocurricular programs also are open to students: Theatre and Community Spe a king and Forensics. Students interested in majoring in any of th e disci plines or in participating in any of the specialized pro grams should request additional information from the divisional office or the discipline representative. Description of Courses and Programs For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of C ou rs es for day , time , a nd meeting place of classes . ARTS AND HUMANITIES A.H. 398-3. Cooperative Education. Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in super vised employment situations. Prer., sopho more standing an d 2.5 GPA COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE A major in communicat i on and theatre a t both the bachelor 's and master 's level may be completed on the Denver Campus . Students majoring in communic a tion and theatre must present a minimum of 40 semester hours (although the individual areas within communic atio n and theatre may require additional hours) including C.T. 202 a nd C.T . 400. The student must elect to pursue one of the several areas of emphasis within the communication and theatre field. Each area has its own requirements for graduation, and specific progr ams will be developed

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18 I University of Colorado at Denver in consultation with academic advisers to insure proper balance of courses within the major. Lists of required and suggested courses in each major area may be obtained from the divisional office. Communication and theatre majors planning to teach communication and theatre at the secondary level should acquaint themselves with the certification requirements of the North Central Accrediting Association. Each student pursuing a program in the School of Education must meet minimal standards of competence in oral commtmication. Additional information may be secured through the School of Education office. C.T . 40-0. Speech Clinic for Foreign Students . Group assistance for foreign students wishing to improve their spoken English. C. T . 41-0 . Reading Clinic for Foreign Students. Group assistance for foreign students wishing to improve speech and comprehen sion in reading English. C. T . 42 -0. Writing Laboratory for Foreign Students. Group assis tance for foreign students wishing to improve their wnting in English. C.T. 140 5 . Structure and Pronunciation of English for Foreign Stu dents . Practice in speaking and understanding spoken English. Structure, grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary. C. T . 141-3. Written for Foreign Students I . Beginning course in written English composition for foreign students . Oral and written work. C. T . 142-3 . Written Composition for Foreign Students II. Second semester course. Continued work on grammar, syntax , and spelling. Organization and development of material for longer connected discourse. C.T . 200 -3. Voice and Diction. Improvement of the normal speak ing voice, articulation, and pronunciation. C.T. 202 3 . Principles of Communication I. A lecture-discussion recitation approach to communication theory and its application in everyday comm unication . This course is intended to give students a point of view and certain basic knowledge that will help them become better communicators regardless of their fields of specializati on . C . T . 203-3 . Principles of Communication II. Further development of the principle s of c o mmunication. Specific topics such as argu mentation, source credibility, attitude , organization, language style, and mas s c ommunication will be expanded by both theo retical refinement and analysis of specific research studies. Prer., C.T. 202. C.T. 210 3 . Speechmaking. The theory and practice of developing ideas , s upporting materials, organization, style , delivery , and audience adaptation. C. T . 213-2 . Community Speaking and Intercollegiate Forensics I. Available for those students who wish to develop their under standing, appreciation, and skill by participation in the off-cam pus speaking and intercollegiate forensics program. C.T . 214 2 . Community Speaking and Intercollegiate Forensics II. Designed for students participating in the intercollegiate foren sic s program who have had some background in community speaking or intercollegiate forensics. Prer . , consent of instructor. C .T. 250-3 . Introduction to Oral Interpretation. Study and perfor mance of the narrative, lyric , and dramatic modes of literature. Not open to freshmen. C.T. 270-3 . Introduction to Theatre . A study of the theory and practice of theatrical art, historical and contemporary. Read ings, lectures, demonstrations, play-going , and participation in live productions. C . T . 273-2 . Stage Movement . ( Dance 242.) Analysis and practice of stage mo vement, including the study of basic techniques in gesture, mime , and pantomime as related to period drama, mod ern drama , and musical comedy. Emphasis is placed on develop ing an awareness of the use of the body as a means of expres sion. C . T . 276 -3. Stagecraft . Theory and practice . An introduction to stagecraft, including basic mechanical drawing, mechanics, light ing, and their application to the scenic arts. C.T . 308-3. Introduction to Phonet ics. C.T. 314 2 . Advanced Community Speaking and Intercollegiate Foren sics . Prer . , consent of instructor. C.T. 315 -3. Discussion . Theory and practice in group discussion processes , decision making , and participant and leader behavior combined with interpersonal laboratory. C.T. 320-3 . Argumentation . Theory of argumentation and debate applied to contemporary issues . Briefing and presenting argu ments. C. T . 330-3. Communication in Instruction. Principles of commu nication as applied to the teaching situation. Particular atten tion will be paid to verbal and nonverbal communication and the impact of perception, culture, social systems, and value and belief systems upon the communicative process. Laboratory experiences. Limited to education majors, or consent of the instructor. C. T. 349-variable credit . Problems in English as a Foreign Language . Study in problem areas in the field of English as a foreign lan guage . Work that is basically investigative in character. Prer . , consent of supervising instructor. C.T. 350-3 . Oral Interpretation of Literature : Poetry. Exploration of poetry through analysis and performance. Prer., C .T. 250. C.T. 360-3. Introduction to Broadcast ing . The evolution, organi zation , and function of broadcasting . Theoretical and practical understanding of program techniques . C. T. 361-3. Radio Programming and Production. Introduction to basic elements of radio including the audio console, microphone, turntables, tape recorders, tape editing , timing, and combo op eration . Emphasis on applying the basic principles and practices through professional production of live and taped radio pro grams, including news, weather, sports , documentaries , features, remotes, music programs , etc. Prer. , C . T. 360 . C. T . 362-3 . Television Production. Introduction to basic television production principles, practices , techniques, facilities, and equip ment , including cameras, audio equipment, lighting, films , video tape , graphics , sets, etc. The lab applies the principles through production and direction of television programs , including news weather-sports , interviews , documentaries , demonstrations , and a final program of the student's choice . Prer., C.T. 360 . C. T . 373-3 . Acting . Theory and pra ctic e to enable the student to improve his techniques and to utilize these techniques in creative acting. Formal and informal performance of scenes throughout t-he semester . C.T. 374 3 . Directing . A study of the director's function in the live theatre with particular emphasis on play analysis and the relationship of creative communication existing between the di rector and the product i on team. Readings , improvisations, and informal scenes. C.T. 378 -3. Block Theatre . Black playwrights through the Harlem renaissance to the present American Black Revolution. C.T. 399 -varia ble credit . Problems in Communication and Theatre. Study in problem areas in the field of communication and theatre . Work that is basically investigative in character. Prer., consent of supervising instructor . C. T . 400-3. Rhetorical and Aesthetic Dimensions of Communication. Tile study of communication as a process which integrates in strumental and con s umatory elements . Prer., C .T. 202, senior stan'ding in communication and theatre , or C.T . 202 and consent of instructor . C. T . 415-3 . Discussion and Conference Leadership . An examination of the psychology, philo s ophy, and methods of leadership in the discussion group. Prer. , C . T. 315. C. T . 420 -3. Persllasion . The theory of human motivation as it operates in individuals and groups. Analysis of persuasive ma terials and preparation of persuasive appeals. C. T . 421-3 . The Psychology of Communication . An examination of psychological factors affecting comprehension and retention of speech and formation of linguistic habits, set, attitude forma tion and change, perception, values, and meaning. Prer., C.T . 202 for majors. C.T . 422 -3. Information Exchange and Analysis . Consideration of the descriptions, models, proposed dimensions , and mathe matical treatments of the information exchange process. Prer . , consent of instructor. C. T . 423 -3. Group Communication Theory . Detailed analysis and observation of group processes from the viewpoint of modern information and communication theory. Prer., C.T. 315 or con sent of instructor. C . T . 426-3 . American Speeches . A critical analysis of the rhetorical methods of selected American speakers. C.T . 428-3 . Intercultural Communication . Exploration of the theory and practice of interpersonal communication between cultures.

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Particular emphasis upon oral and non-oral communication, perceptual orientation value and belief systems, and community styles . C.T. 429-3. Communication of Directed Change . Studies and theories of the communication of directed change; examination of the communication process underlying the diffusion of new ideas and practices . This course directs inquiry at application of theory in an urban milieu. Prer., C.T. 202 and 203. C . T . 430-2. Teaching of Communication and Theatre. Fundamental problems of the teacher of communication and theatre-textbooks, courses of study, methods, etc. Prer., 7 hours of com munication and theatre or consent of instructor. C . T . 4333 . Teaching With Group Methods. The study of group forces, potentials, and the teacher's role in creating effective learning groups. Designing, developing, and evaluating partici pative educational activities as alternatives to traditional teach ing methods . C.T. 435-3. Creative Dramatics. The study of creativity, its role and application in dramatics, and the manner in which creative dramatics assists in the growth and development of children and youth. C.T. 442-3 to 6 . Practice of Teaching English as a Foreign Language. Supervised practice in teaching audio-lingual classes, written composition, and reading. Prer. , C.T. 441 or c onsent of in structor. C . T . 450-3. Advanced Oral Interpretation. Exploration of prose forms; theory and analysis of fiction and nonfiction. Develop ment and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350. C.T. 4513 . Advanced Oral Interpretation'. Exploration of poetic forms; theory and analysis of modern poetry . Development and presentation of individua l and group programs. Prer. , C.T. 350. C . T . 452-3. Dramatic Interpretation . Analysis of dramatic litera ture . Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350. C . T . 4603 . Radio-TV Station Organization and Operation. Proce dures, organization, and problems of management and operation of radio and television broadcast stations . Prer., C.T. 360 or consent of instructor. C.T. 4653 to 4 . Television in Education. (Educ. 436.) Utilization of television at all levels of education. Theory and practice in defining needs , identifying alternative solutions, producing ma terials, and evaluating results. Fourth credit hour requires com prehensive project design. Prer., C.T. 360 or consent of in structor. C .T. 4713 . History of the Theatre I. Study of theatres, methods of presentation , actors, and acting from primitive times to 1700, emphasizing perception of contemporary theatre as a way of understanding and appreciating the place of theatre in histor ical contexts. C . T . 473-3. Advanced Acting. Research, analysis, and preparation and performance of roles in period and modern drama, empha sizing theories and techniques of historical and presentational styles. Prer., C . T. 373. C . T . 4753 . Playwriting: The Short Form. (Engl. 305 .) Play, radio , and television scripts. Prer., any course in drama or consent of instructor. C.T. 4783 . Drama Theory. Examination of critical and theoretical ideas from Aristotle to the present day. C.T. 4790 to 4 . Theatre Practice . Participation in University Theatre productions. Credit hours to be arranged by director of the theatre. Not more than 2 hours may be earned in any one semester or in the summer session. Prer. , consent of the director of the theatre. C . T . 481-3. History of the Theatre II. Continuation of C.T. 471. From 1700. C.T. 485-3. Playwriting: The Long Form. (Engl. 306.) Full-length plays, etc. Prer., consent of instructor. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE Students wishing to pursue graduate work in com parative literature should consult the Graduate School Bulletin. On the 400 level, students may read all texts in translation; however, reading knowledge in at least one foreign language is highly recommended. On the 500 College of Undergraduate Studies /19 and 600 levels , students must be able to read in two foreign languages or obtain the consent of the instructor. C .L. 410-6 . Background Readings in Classical, Medieval, and Renais sance Texts. C .L. 411-3. Basic Literary Concepts . C .L. 412-3. Literary Genres: Narrative Prose. C.L. 413-3. Literary Genres: Lyric Poetry. C .L. 414-3. Literary Genres: Verse Epic. C . L . 415-3. Literary Genres: Drama-Baroque . C .L. 435-3. Studies in the Novel: The Modern Novel. C.L. 4363 . Studies in the Drama: Contemporary European Dramalbsen to Brecht. C .L. 4373 . Studies in Poetry: The Lyric as Genre and Attitude. C .L. 473-3. f'hilosophy and Literature. (Phil. 473 . ) C .L. 487-3. International Literary Relations: The United States and the Hispanic World. ENGLISH A major in English at both the bachelor's and mas ter 's levels may be completed on the Denv er Campus. Students majoring in English must present a total of 36 hours in English of which 18 hours must be in upper division courses. None of the required 36 hours may be taken on a Pass / Fail basis . Engl. 100 and 101 do not apply tow ar d the major requirement. Engl. 275276-277 (Survey of English Literature), 9 hours ; Engl. 300 (Critical Writing), 3 hours ; 300-400 l evel American literature course, 3 hours; Engl. 497 (Topics in Ameri can and British Literature), or Engl. 498 (Major American and British Authors), 3 hours , are required courses . English majors interested in graduating with honors should confer with the honors adviser as soon as possible, but definitely no later than the beginning of the spring term of their junior year. Students who contemplate teaching should obtain in the School of Education sheets listing curriculum required for a teaching certificate an d sho uld consult the School of Education . which supervises the teacher tr ai ning program . Since fulfilling requirements for edu cation and English involves close scheduling , students should fulfill at least some of the college r e qu ireme nts during their freshman and sophomore years. English for foreign students and courses for pro spective teachers of English as a foreign language are listed under Communication and Theatre in this bulletin. For additional literature courses see Comparative Literature and Mexican Am eri c an Education Program . Note : A considerable amount of writing is required in all English courses and is graded on form as well as on content. Engl. 1003 . Exposition I. Basic composition; writing the mes , reading expo sit ory essays, and participating in student-teac her conferences. Engl. 101-3. Exposition II. Continuation of Engl. 100 with em phasis on writing a research paper. s,udents are urged to take Engl. 100 before 101, unless they have successfully com pleted a basic composition course. Engl. 110-3. Introduction to Literature . Reading and analysis of s hort stories and novels. Engl. 111-3. Introduction to Literature . Reading and analysis of plays . Engl. 112-3. Introduction to Literature. Reading and analysis of poetry. Engl. 120-3. Great Books. Close study of literary classics of West ern civilization : the Odyssey or Iliad , Greek drama, and seve ral

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20 I University of Colorado at Denver books of the Bible. Not open to students who have credit in Hum. 101, 102. Engl. 121-3. Great Books II. Close study of literary classics of Western civilization from Plato to the Renaissance: selected dialogues -of Plato, the A ene id, the Infern o, and a few works by other writers. Not open to students having credit in Hum. 101-102. Engl. 200-3. Advanced Expository Writing . Prer., completion of 24 hours of college credit. Engl. 206-3. Modern Grammatical Usage. Engl. 210-2 . Narration. Prer., completion of 24 hours of college credit. Engl. 222-3. Great Books Ill. Close study of several major works of the 17th , l8tb, and 19th centuries. Engl. 223-3. Great Books IV: Twentieth Century Literature. Close study of several majo r w orks of 20th century poetry, drama, and fiction. Engl. 232-3. Masterpieces of American Literature. (Formerly Engl. 132.) Close reading and analysis of American literary classics: novels, poems, plays, and essays of the 19th and 20th centuries. Engl. 233-3. Masterpieces of American Literature (Formerly Engl. 133.) Continuation of Engl. 232, but may be taken indepen dently of that course. Engl. 234-3. The American Writer and the Black Man. Close read ing and analysis of significant literary works by 19th and 20th century black or white American writers treating black Ameri cans: novels, poems, plays, and essays. Engl. 2353 . The American Writer and the Black Man. Continuation of Engl. 234 , but may be taken independently of that course. Engl. 238-3. Survey of Afro-American Literature. (BI. St. 232 . ) From the beginnings to 1914 . Engl. 239-3. Survey of Afro-American Literature. (Bl. St. 233.) From 1914 to 1960. Continuation of Engl. 238, but may be taken in dependently of that course. Engl. 250-3. Masterpieces of British Literature. (Formerly Engl. 170.) An intensive study of a small number of major works of British literature . Not open to English majors. Engl. 2SI-3 . Masterpieces of British Literature . (Formerly Engl. 171.) continuation of English 250, but may be taken inde pendently of that course. Not open to English majors. Engl. 275-3. Survey of English Literature. Chronological study of the greater figures and forces in the main stream of English literature from the beginning through the 16th century, includ ing Shakespeare. May not be taken by majors after Engl. 460, 461, or 470 . Engl. 276-3. Survey of English Literature. Continuation of Engl. 275. English literature of the 17th and 18th centuries. May not be taken after Engl. 450 , 451 , or 462 . Prer., Engl. 275. Engl. 2773 . Survey of English Literature . Continuation of Engl. 276 . English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. May not be taken after Engl. 441, 442, 444, or 445. Prer., Engl. 275 and 276. Engl. 297/397-3. Topics in Literature . Not open to freshmen . Note: Before taking any 300-level course in English, a student must have earned 24 semester hours of col lege credit. Engl. 300-3. Critical Writing . Practical criticism of novels, poems, and plays with emphasis on written work . Introduction to and practice in using various critical a ppro aches to works of litera ture. Prer., junior standing . Open to English majors only except by consen t of the instructor . Engl. 305-3. Playwriting : The Short Form. (C. T. 475 .) Plays, radio, and television scripts. Prer. , C.T. 240, 342, or any course in drama, or consent of the instructor. Not counted toward mini mum number of upper division hours for Englis h major. Engl. 306-3. Playwriting: The Long Form. (C.T. 485.) Full-length plays, etc. Prer., Engl. 305 or consent of the instructor . Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English majors. Engl. 308-3. Writing Workshop. The writing of short stories . Prer., Engl. 200 or 210, or consent of instructor . Engl. 309-3. Writing Workshop. Continuation of Engl. 308. Prer., Engl. 308. Engl. 310-3. Writing Workshop. The writing of poetry. Prer., Engl. 200 or 210 , or consent of instructor. Engl. 311-3. Writing Workshop. Continuation of Engl. 310. Engl. 3153 . Report Writing. (Formerly Engineering English 401.) Instruction and practice in various forms of reports, papers, and articles . Emphasis on style and editing. Prer., junior standing. Engl. 316-2. Study of Poetry. Reading of representative English and American poets with emphasis on form and prosody . Engl. 3303 . Twentieth Century American Literature. Reading course in American novelists , poets, and dramatists of the 20th cen tury. Primarily for nonmajors. Engl. 331-3. Whitman. Engl. 336-'3 . Black American Literature . Engl. 3383 . American Literature. (Formerly Engl. 430.) Chrono logical survey of the literature from Bradford to Whitman. Engl. 339-3. American Literature. (Formerly Engl. 431.) Chrono logical survey of the literature from Whitman to Faulkner. Continuation of Engl. 338. Engl. 366-3. Shakespeare . Development of Shakespeare as a dra matist to 1600. Engl. 367-3. Shakespeare . Shakespeare's art at maturity . Con tinuation of Engl. 366. Engl. 3693 . Milton". Milton's poetry and selected prose. Engl. 371-3. The Bible as Literature. Survey of literary achieve ments of the Hebrews , as represented by the King James Bible -The Old Testament. Engl. 373-3". Chaucer . A study of Chaucer' s major works with emphasis upon the Canterbury Tales. Reading in Middle English after a short introduction to the language. Engl. 297/397-3. Topics in Literature. Not open to freshmen. Note: Before taking any 400-level course in English, a st udent must have earned 36 semester hours of col lege credit. Engl. 400-3. Development of British Drama. From beginning through the Restoration . Engl. 4013 . Development of British Drama. From 1700 to the present. Engl. 402-3. American Drama. Famous American plays from be ginning to O'Neill. Engl. 4033 . American Drama. Famous American plays from O ' Neill to the present . Engl . 4043 . Contemporary Drama. Continental, British, and American drama since Ibsen. Engl. 410-3. Development of the English Novel. From beginning to 1830. Engl. 411-3. Development of the English Novel. From 1830 to 1914. Continuation of Eng l. 410. Engl. 4123 . Contemporary Chicano Literature. (M.Am. 412.) Engl. 418-3. Development of the American Novel. From beginning to 1900. Engl. 419-3. Development of the American Novel. Continuation of Engl. 418. From 1900 to present. Engl. 4203 . Twentieth Century Literature. The novel, with em phasis on new tendencies. Engl. 421-3. Twentieth Century Literature. English and American poetry. Engl. 422-3. British and Irish Literature of the Early 20th Century. Chronological survey, 1900-1925. Prer., senior standing. Engl. 423-3. British and Irish Literature of the Later 20th Century. Chronological survey, 1925-present. Prer., senior standing. Engl. 425-3. British and Irish Drama: 1900 to the Present. A survey of the English-Irish theatre since 1900. Engl. 432-3. American Poetry. From beginning through the 20th century. Engl. 4413 . The Early Romantics. Major emphasis on Blake, Cole ridge, and Wordsworth . Prer. for majors, Engl. 277. Engl. 442-3. The Later Romantics. Major emphasis on Keats, Shelley, and Byron. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277. Engl. 4443 . The Victorians. Main currents of Victorian thought in prose and poetry. 1830-1860. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277. Engl. 445-3. The Later Victorians. Continuation of Engl. 444. 18601900. Prer. for majors, Engl. 277. Engl. 450 -3. Restoration and 18th Century . From 1660 to 1740. Dryden, D efoe, Swift, Pope, Addison, and Steele and their contemporaries.

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Engl. 4513 . Restoration and 18th Century. From 1740-1800. Gray, Johnson, Goldsmith, Boswell, Cowper, Burns, and Blake and their contemporaries. Engl. 460-3. Elizabethan Poetry. Nondramatic poetry of Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare , and others. Prer. for majors, Engl. 275. Engl. 4613 . The Sixteenth Century. Selected prose and nondra matic poetry from Skelton and More through Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Prer . for majors, Engl. 275 . Engl. 462-3. The Seventeenth Century. Poetry and prose of Bacon, Donne, Jonson, their contemporaries and followers. Prer. for majors , Engl. 276. Engl. 470-3. Medieval Literature. Selections read in modern En glish, representative of the life and thought of the Middle Ages (up to 1500) . Prer. for majors, Engl. 27 5. Engl. 4802 . (Writing) Advanced Composition for Secondary School Teachers of English. (Educ . 482.) Emphasis on improving stu dents' ability to write expository and argumentative essays by means of careful criticism of students' writing. Extensive dis cussion of such matters as the content of secondary school composition courses and methods of criticizing and evaluating the writing of secondary school students. Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English major. Engl. 481-2. Literature for Adolescents . (Educ. 481.) The reading and evaluation of books suitable for junior and senior high school pupils. Attention is given to sources of information about books and criteria for selection, as well as to the actual writers. Not for graduate credit in English. Engl. 4822 . Teaching of English. (Educ. 452.) Required of all who wish recommendation as high school English teachers. Prer., senior standing, 20 hours in English (including Engl. 275, 276, 277, 338-339 , 481, and 484) are advised for prospective teach ers . Not for graduate credit in English. Engl. 4843 . English Grammar. Study of the English language and of the various grammars of English. Requir ed for candidates for teacher certification only . Engl. 485-3. History of the English Language. Outline of history of the language , including a brief survey of sound changes af fecting modern English, of history of grammatical forms, and of the vocabulary. Elementary knowledge of English grammar assumed. Engl. 486-3. Writing Topics. Individual papers based on upper division courses from each of the following three areas: Arts and Humanit ies, Natural and Physical Sciences , and Social Sci ences. For Writing Program majors only. Engl. 489-3. Semantics. Study of the meaning of words, their change of meaning, and the relationship between words and reality. Engl. 497-3. Topics in American and British Literature. Courses such as the following will be offered at regular intervals : Re gional Literature-the Frontier; Regional Literature-the South ; American Humor and Folklore; American Literary Crit icism; Satire ; Comedy; Tragedy. Prer., senior standing. Open to English majors only, except by permission of the instructor. Not for graduate credit. Engl. 4983 . Major American and British Authors. Intensive study of works of one major British or American author. Prer., senior standing . Open to English majors only , except by permission of the instructor. Not for graduate credit. Engl. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. FINE ARTS The Department of Fine Arts offers both a B.A. degree and a B.F.A. degree in painting, sculpture, print making, or design. The B.A. degree must include 40, but not more than 48, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. The B.F .A. degree must include 54, but not more than 72, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. Students wishing to apply for the B.F.A. degree must have a 2.0 average in all course work at the time of ap plication, which may not be earlier than the end of the junior year. Application forms are available in the divisional office . College of Undergraduate Studies I 21 The core curriculum for fine arts majors i ncludes 12 hours of Studio I (Fine Arts 100, 101, 102) , Fine Arts 180-181, Fine Arts 496 , an 6 hours of upper division art his tory . The recomm end e d program for the B .F.A . includes a t least two years in one cre a tive field (painting, printm a king , design , or sculpture ) plus 9 semester hours in dr awing. Stud ents who are candidates for the B.F.A. must take a minimum of 20 hour s while i n residence . The core curriculum is set up to facilitate a much as possibl e a variety of viewpoints and creative a p pro ac he s for the beginning st u dent. If this seems re strictive to an individual s tud ent because of prior experience, etc., discipline advisers are open to alter native possibilities that would acc omplish the same end. Studio I Courses For an orientation to studio practic e, including drawing a nd an exploration of twoa nd thre e-di men sional media, fine arts m a jor s are re quired to t a ke 12 hours of Studio I courses under four different in structors. Eith e r Fine Arts 100 , 101, or 102 can be re peated up to 6 hours. There are no prere qu isites for Studio I courses, but all 12 hours are prere quisites for most 300 a nd 400-level courses. Most upp er division studio courses , unless otherwise sta ted, can b e re p ea ted to the maximum credit of 6 hours. Students enrolled in 400-level cour ses will be asked to present work in progress to the UCD fine a rt s faculty before the end of each semester enrolled. This will enable communication with instructor s other tha n the one listed for th e specific course. Note: More specific descriptions of these courses will be available each sem ester at registration. Fine Arts 100 3 . Drawing. Exploration of drawing approaches and media . Fine Arts 1013 . Three Dimension'al Media. Prim arily exploration in three-dimen s ional form . Fine Arts 1023 . Two-Dimensional Media. P rimarily exploration in two-dimensional form: de sign and color. Life Drawing Fine Arts 3003 . First Year Life Drawing and Composition. Problems in drawing from lif e; exploring t h e pOssibilitie s in pictorial de sign and composition. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100level fine arts cour se. May be rep eate d to maximum credit of 6 hours. Fine Arts 4003 . Advanced Drawing. Proble m s in drawing with emphasi s on individual developm ent. P rer., 6 hours Fine Arts 300. May be repeated. Printmaking Fine Arts 3403 . First Year Printmaking . Introduction to i nta g lio and relief printing , including met a l engraving and etching, and woodcut. Prer. , 12 hour s of basic art courses or equivalent. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hour s credit . Fine Arts 4403 . Second Year Printmaking. Continued study and e x perimentation in inta g lio, r e lief printing media . Prer. , Fine Arts 340. M ay be repeated . Fine Arts 3423 . Silk Screen. (Serigraphy . ) Silk scree n tec hnique s as they relate to fine art prints, with p ossible practical a pplica tions to posters, brochures, and other projects requiring multi ple editions. Prer. , Fine Arts I 00 plus one more I 00-level fine arts course, or con s ent of instructor. May be repeated. Painting Fine Arts 3203 . First Year Paint ing. B asic investigation of the materials of the p ainter and their use in expressing the stu dent's

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22 I University of Colorado at Denver ideas. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. May be repeated. Fine Arts 420-3 . Second Year Painting . Expressive pictorial prob lems involving varied subject matter and painting media, with emphasis on individual development. Prer., Fine Arts 320 or equivalent. May be repeated. Sculpture Fine Arts 350-3 . Sculpture. Studies of the human figure in wax and casting them in bronze. Prer., Fine Arts 101. Fine Arts 3513 . Sculpture . Creative investigation of various sculp tural materials and concepts. Prer., Fine Arts 350. Fine Arts 450-3 . Advanced Sculpture. Work in large sculptural forms. Prer., Fine Arts 351. Fine Arts 451-3 . Advanced Sculpture. Individual sculptural themes. Prer. , Fine Arts 450. Design Fine Arts 212-2 . Lettering . A combined lecture and studio course dealing with calligraphic communication. Problems in historical and creative calligraphy. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or consent of instructor. May not be repeated. Fine Arts 315-3. First Year Photography I. Using lecture as an intro duction to history, technique, and concepts of photography as it relates to the fine arts. Emphasis on photography as a means to a formal and expressive end. Students must have access to a camera. Fine Arts majors only . Open upon consultation. Prer., 10 hours of basic art. Fine Arts 316 2 . Graphic Design. Problems in advertising illustra tion and television graphics design. Various media explored. Stress on individuality , critical judgment, and creativity. Prer. , Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or con sent of instructor. May not be repeated. Fine Arts 319-3 . First Year Phot<>graphy II. Emphasis on processes and critical evaluation of student's photographs. Prer. , Fine Arts 315. Fine Arts 415-3 . Second Year Photography I. Advanced work with photographs and refined technical processes. Prer., Fine Arts 319. Fine Arts 419-3 . Second Year Photograph y II. Continuation of Fine Arts 415. Fine Arts 4183 . Creativity and Problem Solving. Exploration of the process of problem s ol ving through the means fundmental to all artistic endeavors, i.e., making and doing. Prer., Fine Arts I 02 plus one more 100-level fine arts course. Open, with consent of instructor, to students in other disciplines. May be repeated. Art History Note: Not all art history courses are offered every year . Check current Schedule of Courses. Fine Arts 1803 . History of Art I (Survey). History of art of all ages, reflecting the various cultures of mankind from the prehistoric to the Renaissance. Fine Arts 1813. History of Art II (Survey). His tory of art of all ages, reflecting the various cultures of mankind from the Renaissance to the present. Fine Arts 470-3 . Primitive Art. (African and Pacific areas.) Nativ e arts of various African peoples as well as those of the major island groups of the Pacific area. Fine Arts 471-3 . PreColumbian Art . Architecture, sculpture, paint ing of the high cultures of Meso-American and the Andean area before the Spanish conquest. Fine Arts 472-3. North American Indian Art. Surv ey of major tribal styles of the North American continent. Fine Arts 476-3. PreClassical Art an d Archaeology . (Anthro. 427 and Gen. Classics 427.) Greece and Crete from the neolithic period to the end of the Mycenaean world. Fine Arts 477-3 . Classical Art and Archaeology . (Anthro. 428 and Gen. Classics 428.) Greek art and archaeology from the end of the Mycenaean world through the Hellenistic era. Fine Arts . 487-3. American Art. Study of American art and archi tecture from the Colonial period through the 19th century. Fine Arts 488-3 . American Art . Study of American art and archi tecture from the 19th century to the present. Fine Arts 489 3 . Ori gins of Modern Art I. History of European movements of the late 19th century from the French Revolu tion to Re alism. Fine Arts 490 -3. Origins of Modern Art II. History of European movement s of the late 19th century from Realism through Post Impressionism. Fine Arts 492 3 . Modern Art I. A survey of major trends in paint ing and sculpture from Post-Impress ionism through Dada ( 1884-1924). Fine Arts 4933 . Modern Art II. A survey of maj o r trends in p a int ing and sculpture from Surrealism to the present (1924-). Independent Study and Seminar Fine Arts 399, 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Indi vidual projects or studies assigned by the major prof essor. To be arranged. Fine Arts 494 3 . Seminar in German Literature and the Visual Arts. Interdisciplinary, team-taught course with German discipline. Fine Arts 496 3 . Art Seminar. For Fine Arts majors, undergradu ate and graduate. Course based on an exchange of ideas basic to the student's own creative work, and to contemporary philoso phies and tendencies in the field. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. Fine Arts 180-181, or consent of instruc tor. May be repeated once with consent of instructor. FRENCH Stud ents who have completed a Level III high school French course have automatically s a tisfied the college graduation requirement in foreign langu age. This re quirem ent may also be satisfied by completion of French 201 or 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied French in high school and who wish to con tinue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A stu dent may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed . For a complete statement of polic y on foreign language placement and credit, see the Coll ege of Undergraduate Studies Gen eral In format ion section of this bulletin. Stud ents majoring in French must complete 30 hours beyond the first year. Students presenting four years of high school French for admission must com plete 30 hours beyond the second yea r . Required courses are 211-212, 301-302, 311-312, 401-402 , plus 6 hours of literature courses at the 400 level. Note: For comparative literature, see that section. French 1015 . Beginning French I. French 1025 . Beginning French II. Prer., French 101. French 2013 . Second Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversation. Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French. French 202-3 . Second Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversation. Prer., French 201 or two years of high school French. French 211-3 . Second Year French Reading and Conversation I. Prer. , French 102 or two years of high school French. French 212-3 . Second Year French Reading and Conversation II. Prer., French 211 or three years of high school French. French 301-2 . French Phonetics and Pronunciation. Prer. , French 212 or equivalent. French 302 2 . Oral Practice . Prer., French 301 or consent of instructor. French 305-3 . French Composition. Prer., French 202 or 212 or equivalent. French 306 3 . French Composition . Prer., French 305 or consent of instructor. French 311-3 . Main Currents of French Literature. Prer., French 212 or consent of instructor. French 3123 . Main Currents of Literature. Prer., French 3 II or consent of instructor.

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French 4013 . Advanced Composition. Pre r. , Frenc h 305 or consent of instructor. French 402-3 . Advanced Composition . Prer., Frenc h 401 or consent of instruc tor. French 403-3 . Advanced Oral Practice. Prer., F renc h 301 and 302, or consent of instructor. French 420-2. French Civilization to 1789. Prer. , French 312 or 302, or consent of instructor. French 4212 . French Civilization from 1789 to Present Day. Prer., French 312 , 302 , or 420, or consent of instructor. French 436/ 536 -3. Eighteenth Century French Novel, Theatre , and Poetry . French 443/ 543-3 . Nineteenth Century French Novel. GERMAN Students who have completed a Level III high school German course have automatically satisfied the college requirem e nt in foreign langu age. This r e quirem e nt m ay als o be satisfied by completion of Intensive Germ an (12 credit hours in on e se mest er), by comple t ion of German 201 or 211, or by demonstration of equivalent profici e ncy by placem e nt test. Stud e nts who have studied G erman in high school a nd wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed . The German major must take 35 semester hou rs beyond first year proficiency. Not more than 12 semes t er hours of 200lev el courses and not more tha n 6 semester hour s of courses given in English translation may be t a ken for credit tow a rd the 35-hour min i mum. Requ ired courses for th e B.A. are German 301-302: Conversation , Gramm a r , Composit i on ; German 401402: Structur al Analysis, Composit i on , Stylistic s; G er man 423: G er man C ivilizati on; and Germ a n 495: Methods of Teaching G erma n (required of students who d esi re the recomm enda tion of the discip line rep resentative for secondary school te achin g posit ions). Native G erman speakers or students with advanc e d training may request p ermission to substitute more ad vanced Germ an courses to fulfill the 35-hour minimum. German 1014 , Sect . I. German 102-4, Sect . I. German 2114, Sect . 1. These three sections together comprise a 12-hour, one-semester course. Satisfactory completion of intensive German fulfills the foreign language requirement. German 1014 . Beginning German I. German 102-4 . Beginnin g German II. Prer., German 101 or one year of high school German. German 2014 . Advanced German I: Reading . Prer., German 102 or two years of high school German. German 2024 . Advanced German II: Reading . P rer., German 201 or three years of high school German. German 211-4. Advanced German I : Communication Skills. Prer., German 102 or two years of high school German .. German 212-4. Advanced German II: Communication Skills. Prer . , German 211 or three years of high school German. German 222 4 . Scientific German . Prer., German 201 or 211 , or upon consultation. German 301-3. Conversation and Grammar. Prer., German 212 o r consent o f instructor. German 302-3. Conversation and Composition . Prer., German 301 or consent of instructor . German 3113 . Die deutsche Novelle. Prer., German 212 or con sent of in s tructor. German 312-3 . Das deutsche Drama . Prer., G erman 212 or consent of in structor. German 333 3 . Deutsche Klassik. Prer., German 311 and 312, or consent o f instructor. College of Undergraduate Studies I 23 G erman 334 3 . Deutsche Romantik . Prer., German 311 and 312, or con ent of i n structor. Germa n 3813 . German literature in Translation I. German 3823 . German Liter ature in Translation II. German 4013 . Structural Analysis , Composition, and Stylistics I. Prer., German 302 or consent of instructor. German 4023 . Structural Analysis, Compositi on, and Stylistics II. Prer., German 40 1 or consent of instructor. German 4113 . Deutsche literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts . German 412 3 . Deutsche l ite ratur des 20. Jahrhunderts . German 4233 . German Civilization. (In translation.) German' 4363 . Die d eutsche lyrik . Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor. German 437 3 . Einfuhrung i n die deutsche Literaturgeschichte I. Prer., German 311 and 3 12 or consent of instructo r. German 438-3 . Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgesch i chte II. Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor. German 4943 . Semina r in Literature and the Visual Arts . Interdisci plinary, team-taught course wi th Fine Arts d i scip line. Germon 4953 . Methods of Teaching German . R e q u i red of stude nts who desire the recommendation of the discip l i n e represe n ta tive for secondary school teaching pos itions . For student teac hing in German, see Educ. 451 in the School of Education Bulletin. German 499-variable credit . Independent Study . PHILOSOPHY A program for the philosophy major must include a m i n imu m of five courses (15 hours) at the 300 level; a minimum of three courses (9 hours) at the 400 level ; and a minimum of one course (3 hours) at the 500 l evel. The balance of the courses for th e major may be taken at the discretion of th e student. The following courses are recommended (not re quired) for philosophy majors who are planni ng to do graduate work in philosophy : Symbolic Logic (Phil. 344); History of Philosophy (Phil. 300, 302, 402 , 403, 404); Ethics ( P hil. 315); Metaphysics ( Phil. 335); Epistemology (Phil. 336); Philo sophica l Method (Phil. 350); several courses concerned with a single philoso pher (e. g . • Phil. 580, 581 , 582 , etc.); and one course concerned with the relationship of philosophy to some other discipline (e.g., Philosophy of Scienc e, Philosophy of History, etc.) . General prerequisites (which may vary for some courses) are: 100-level-none; 200-level-3 hours; 300-level-6 hou rs; 400-level-9 hours ; and 500-l eve l -12 hours . The prerequisite may be waived with con sent of ins tructo r. Phil. 115-3. Ethics . Introductory study of majo r philosophies on the nature of the good of man, principles of evaluation, and moral choice . Phil. 1303 . Philosophy an d the Physical World . An introduction to philosophy through the consideration of topics and problems related to the phy s ical and biological sciences suc h as freedo m and determin ism; mind and body; artificial intelligence; sciences and ethics; current theories of the universe, space, time, matter, energy, causality, etc. Phil. 144-3. Introductor y Logic. Introductory study of definition, inform a l fallacies, and the principles and s t andards of correc t reasoning. Phil. 150-3. Cri t i cal R easonin g . An introduction to concept forma tion, variant forms of reasoning and argument, and criteria for their evaluation. Phil. 1603 . Philosophy and Religion. An introduction to philosophy through problems of religion, s uch as the existence of God, faith and reason, religiou s language, etc. Phil. 1703 . Philosoph y and the Arts . Consideration of phi lo sophic questions involved in the analysis and assessment of artistic ex periences and of the objects with which the arts, including the literary arts, are concerned.

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24 I University of Colorado at Denver Phil. 220-3 . Classical Social Theories . Introductory study of major philosophies of the past in relation to political , economic, and social issues. Phil. 221-3. Modern Social Theories. Present social issues, together with theoretical analyses by communist, fascist, and democratic thinkers. Phil. 224-3. Philosophical Aspects of Society . Systematic discussion and analysis of the philosophic ideas of community, freedom, political power , the nature and role of violence, etc. , together with the challenge of war, po verty, and racism to contemporary culture. Phil. 240-3. Introduction to Philosophy of Science . Examination of some major concepts and problems of scientific thought: ex planation, confirmation, causality, measurement, and theory construction. Phil. 260 -3. Oriental Religions. Phil. 290-3. A Philosophical Classic. Detailed study of one major philosophic text which illustrates a variety of types of philo sophical concerns . Emphasis on techniques for analysis, discussion, and assessment of philosophical argumentation. Such works as The Republic, Leviathan, and Treatise of Human Nature. Phil. 300-3 . Greek Philosophy. History of Pre-Socratic, Attic, and Hellenistic philosophy. No prer. Phil. 301-3. Medieval Philosophy. Phil. 302-3 . Modern Philosophy . History of philosophy from Des cartes through Kant. No prer. Phil. 315 -3. Ethi cal Theory . Selected problems in classical and contemporary ethical theory. Phil. 320-3. Social and Political Philosophy. A nonhi storical, sys tematic treatment of basi'c issues in social and political philos ophy, with reference to theories of being, knowledge , and human nature. Phil. 328-3 . Philosophy of Education . Phil. 335-3 . Metaphysics. Phil. 3363 . Epistemology . Phil. 344-3 . Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Phil. 350-3. Philosophical Method. An examination of major differ ing conceptions of the nature and goals of philosophical inquiry and endeavor. Phil. 3603 . Philosophy of Religion. Nature of religion and methods of studying it. Phil. 370-3 . Aesthetic Theory. Introduction to major theories of aesthetics and contt:mporary discussions of problems in aesthet ics; i.e., the nature of art, the problem of evaluations in art. Phil. 389-3 . Oriental Philosophy. No prer. Phil. 400-3. Nineteenth Century Continental Philosophy. Phil. 4013 . Nineteenth Century British Philosophy. Phil. 402-3. Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy. Phil. 403-3 . Twentieth Century Speculative and Idealistic Philosophy. Phil. 404-3 . Twentieth Century Phenomenology and Existentialism. Phil. 405-3 . Studies in Contemporary Philosophy. Phil. 410-3. American Philosophy . Phil. 424-3. Philosophical Problems and Contemporary Culture . Issues and controversies in contemporary culture, their relation to modem theories of society, and their manifestations in the arts, science and technology, education , religion , and ethics. No prer . , Phil. 426-3. Philosophy of Law. Consideration of various views o f the nature of law, its role in society, and its relation to other disciplines. Investigation of philo sophic commitments which underlie and affect legal conceptions and procedures. No prer. Phil. 427-3 . of History . Contemporary issues in critical and speculative theory of history, including the problems of methodology , explanation, values, and the relationship between history and social philosophy. Phil. 430-3 . Philosophy of Mind. Consideration of the problems in the philosophy of mind, including the mind-body problem, the problem of our kn o wledge of other minds , the compatibility of free will and determini s m , etc., and discussion of such concepts as action, intention, motive , desire, enjoyment, memory, imagi nation, dreaming, se lf-knowledge , etc. Phil. 443-3 . Logical Theory . Prer. , Phil. 144 or Phil. 344, or con sent of instructor. Phil. 444-3. Intermediate Symbolic ( Mathematical) Logic. Prer., Phil 344 or consent of ins tructor. Phil. 446-3 . Theories of Human Nature. Phil. 449-3. Philosophy of Language . Phil. 4733 . Philosophy and Literature . Phil. 4933 . Existentialist Philosophies . Phil. 496-3. Senior Major Colloquium . Phil. 499 3 . Independent Study . SPANISH Students w ho have completed a Level III high school Spanish course h ave automatically satisfied the coll ege gra du ation requirement in foreig n langu age. This re quirement may also be satisfie d by completion of Spanish 211 or by demonstration of equivalent pro ficiency by placement test. Students who have studied Spanish in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed accordi ng to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not re ceive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy o n foreign language placement and credit, see the College of Undergraduate Studies General Information section of this bulletin. A major in Spanish consists of the foll owing re quirements: 1. A total of 35 credit hours in Sp a nish courses (beyond Spanish 102), including the following minimum distribution: (a) at least 9 hours in upper division courses primarily devoted to language theory and practice (301-302, 401-402, 495); (b) at least 8 hours in upper division literature courses including at least one course treating Spanish Peninsular literature and one treating Spanish-American literature; (c) at least 12 hour s in co urse s numbered 400 or above. 2. A total of 6 hours in courses from one or more of the following areas: (a) courses in Latin Americ an st udie s (e.g. , history , political science, etc.), (b) courses in Mexican American Studies , (c) linguistics, and (d) upper division courses in another foreign language or co mpar ative literature. Stud ents who entered the University before fall 1969 may choose to complete the current major program or the progr am in effect at the time of their first registration. Stud ents planning to acquire certification for teaching at the secondary level should note that the School of Educaction will require Spanish 495 (Methods of Teach ing Sp anish) and that the 3 credit hours earned in that co urse will co unt toward the major and will be subject to the 48-hour maximum from one discipline allowed by the College of Undergraduate Studies for the B.A. degree. This means that students who begin the m a jor program with Spanish 101 and who intend to include secondary certifica tion in their B.A. program must include Spanish 495 in their electives in Spanis h . To be admitted to practice teaching of Spanish , majors mu s t take the language skills tests of the Modern Language Association Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students of Spanish and make satis f a ctory scores. Students must see an adviser prior to registration for their final semester. Failure to do so may result in a del a y of their graduation. Students considering enteri n g graduate school for an advanced degree in Spanish, either at the University of Color ado or at any other institution, should see an adviser as early as possible since admission to a graduate program will depend to a great extent on courses taken in the m a jor.

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It is strongly recommended that all majors include some study in a Spanish-speaking country in their major programs. Credit earned will normally count toward satisfaction of the major requirements, but the student should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to assure full transfer of credit. It should be noted that courses taken abroad a nd desig nated as Spanish will also be subject to the 48-hour maximum rule of the College of Undergr ad uate Studies . Students interested in study abroad should consult a member of the Spani sh faculty or Professor James Wolf , D enver Campus representative for the Interna tional Education Office. Note: For comparative literature courses, see that section . Spanish 101-5. Beginning Spanish I. Spanish 1025 . Beginnin " g Spanish II. Prer., Spanish 101 or placement. Spanish 205 3 . History of the Spanish Language in the Southwest . Spanish 2113 . Second Year Spanish I. Prer., Spanish 102 or placement. Spanish 212 3 . Second Year Spanish II. Prer., Spanish 211 or placement. Spanish 3013 . Pronunciatio -n', Diction, and Conversation. Prer., Spanish 212, 211 (with grade A or B), or equivalent. Spanish 302 3 . Conversation and Oral Composit ion. Prer., Spanish 301. Spanish 314 2 . Introduction to Literature. Prer., Spanish 212, 211 (with grade A), or equivalent. Spanish 3313 . Twentieth Century Spanish Literature. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently. Spanish 332 3 . Nin' eteenth Century Spanish Literature. Prer., Span ish 314 previously or concurrently. Spanish 333 3 . Spanish Literature: Middle Ages Through GoJden Age . Prer., Spanish 314 and 6 hours literature at 300 level. Spanish 334 3 . Twentieth Century Spanish American Novel and Essay. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently. Spanish 335 3 . Spanish-American Novel and Essay to 20th Century . Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently. Spanish 336 3 . Span ' ish-American Poetry and Short Story . Prer., Span ish 314 and 3 hours of literature at 300 lev el. Spanish 4013 . Advanced Rhetoric and Composition I. Prer., Spanish 302. Spanish 402 3 . Advanced Rhetoric and Composition II. Prer., Span ish 401. Spanish 414 2 . Gaucho Literature . Spanish 417 3 . Readings in Spanish Literature. Spanish 418-3 . Readings in Span ish-Ameri can Literature. Spanish 422-3 . Mexican Literature . Spanish 430 3 . Generation of 1898 . Spanish 4313 . Spanish-American Literature, Independence through Romanticism . Spanish 440 3 . Romanticism in' Spain . Spanish 441-3. Modernism . Spanish 450 3 . Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. Spanish 4513 . Contemporary Span ishAmerican Novel. Spanish 452-3 . Golden Age Drama . Spanish 453-3 . Golden Age Prose. Span 'ish 490 2 . Senior Seminar. Spanish 495 -3. Methods of Teaching Spanish. Spanish 499-1 to 3 . Independent Study . SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY NATALIE HEDBERG, Coord inator The B.A. degree in speech pathology and audiology is not available on the Denve r Campus. The following College of Undergraduate Studies I 25 courses are open to undergraduates: S.P .A. 440 , S.P.A. 472, and S . P .A. 499. For graduate level courses see Speech Pathology and Audiology in the Graduate School section of this bulletin. S . P , A . 440 2 . Introduction to Language and Learning Disabilities . An orientation to the field of the language and learning disorders as found in preschool, elementary, and secondary children. Diagnostic and remedial techniques and treatment programs will be surveyed. Films, case studies, guest speakers, and field trips will provide a comprehensive view of the field. S . P . A . 472 2 . Speech and language Development in' Children. The underlying processes in the development of speech and language, normal and atypical. S . P . A . 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Division of Natural and Physical Sciences PHYLLIS W. SCHULTZ, Assistant Dean The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences in cludes the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography , geology, mathematics , physical education, physics, and psychology. The division offers a wide variety of programs of study which include undergraduate majors within a discipline, interdisciplinary programs, and preprofes sional programs. It is possible to satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics, and psychology. The description of the program of each discipline incl udes the require ments for a major within that discipline. In conjunction with the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the division is developing an in ter disciplinary program with a major in environmental science . The program will offer several subject con centrations within both basic and applie d environmental science. Included within the basic approach will be concentrations in ecology, earth science, population studies, and physics-chemistry. Included within the applied will be concentra . tions in conservation of natural resources, systems analysis, and environ mental quality control. Students interested in this program will be advised of core course requirements, program advisers, and other specific details through the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences office as this information be comes available. Students enrolling in medical and health-related pre professional programs sho uld consult with the Medical Arts Committee of the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences a t the beginning of their preprofessional edu cation and at selected intervals thereafter. Appointments for advising must be made in the division office, Room 508. The Medical Arts Committee has two main func tions: ( 1) the counseling of students enrolled in various health-related programs : Child Health Associate pro gram, medical technology , physical therapy, preden tistry, predental hygiene, premedicine, prenursing, and preph a rmacy, and (2) evaluating eac h student's abilities and making recommendations to the appropriate pro-

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26 I University of Colorado at Denver fessional schools. R equirements for preprofessional pro gr a ms are listed in the Preprofessional Programs sec tion in this bulletin. Course options are available for the nonscience major . There are three sets of courses from which a student may satisfy the D ivision of Natural and Physical Sci ences' area requirement of 12 hours. Any combination of these courses will satisfy the requirement. Set I , Topics in Science-133-1, are modular co ur ses designed for, but not limited to, majors outsid e of the Natural and Phy sical Sci ences. Each module carries 1 semester hours of credit and is offered in a 1/ 3semester tim e block of five weeks, during which the course meets the equivalent time of three lectures a week. There are no prerequisites and each module is a self-contained unit designed to cover a given problem or topic in science in a unified way . It is recommended that a student take a single module during each five week period with a maximum of three per semester. The topics will change from semester to semes t er and from year to year. The Schedule of Courses for each semester will give the list of current topics offered. (For general descriptions , see Topics in Science entries under each disc i pline involved.) Set II courses are one or two semesters in length and have no formal prerequisites. These include both introductory survey courses and special topics courses and are also usually designed with the nonscience m a jor in mind . Set III includes all other Natural a nd Physica l Sci ence courses offered in the division. Although these courses are generally designed for the science major, they are open to students with the proper prerequisites. Description of Courses and Programs For information on scheduling of courses , consult the appropriate Schedule of Cour se s for day, time, a nd meeting place of classes. BIOLOGY A major in biology at both the bachelor's and mas ter 's levels m ay be completed on the D enver Campus . The undergr aduate major in biology is designed to b e as flexible as possible to allow each student, in consultation with a biology adviser, to build a program that meets his needs . Each student majoring in biology is required to take 17 hours of core biology courses: Bioi. 201, 202, Living Systems I an d II; Bioi. 341 , Principles of Ecology; Bioi. 383, General Gen etics; and Bioi. 361 , Cell Biology . A minimum total of 32 hours in biology is required. The additional 15 hours of courses are to be selected in consultation with a biology adviser. All majors are required to take chem i s try, physics , a nd mathematics in addition to the 32 hours in biology. It is advisable for the student to contact a biology adviser early in his academic career to plan his individual progr ams. Bioi. 133-1. Topics in Biology. Different five-week courses dealing with various topics in biolo gy . See Sch e dule of Courses for the particular topic s being offered. D esigned for non science majors to fulfill the natural science requirements . Bioi. 201-4. Living Systems I. (Psy ch. 201.) An interdisciplinary a pproa c h to the s tru cture and function of living sys tems-cells, organisms , a nd popul a tion s. Emphasis on the behavioral aspects and energy flow through each of the level s of organization anal yzed . Primarily intended for students m ajo ring in science. Bioi. 202-4 . Living Systems II. ( Psych . 202.) Continuation of Bioi. 20 l. Prer., Bioi. 201. Bioi. 3114 . Morphology of Nonvascular Plants. Lect. and lab. An evo lution ary s urvey of lower plant forms: algae, lichen s, and bryophytes . B asic prin ci ple s of evolution and ecology of lower plants a r e emphasized. Ex p eri men ta l lab projects are included in course. Prer . , Bioi. 201 and 202, or college botany. Bioi. 3135 . Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Three semester hours lecture credit and 2 seme ste r hours lab credit. Phylogeny of all chordate groups, the evolutionary progre ss ion of their organ sy terns , a nd th e ir recapitulation during ontogeny and in the adult forms. Di ssection of representative major vertebrate types. Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202 , or college z oology. Bioi. 3223 . Essentials of Animal Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit a nd 2 semester hours of lecture credit. An introduc tion to the essentials of animal ph ysio log y . Prer. , Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202; a year of general chemistry. Bioi. 325-4. Human Biology an d Pathogenesis I. A study of normal struct ure , function, ecology, and development of man as a biologically integrated whole, culmi n ating in a discussion of intrin sic a nd extrinsic bio-psycho-sociological factors which: (I) lead to the development of disease and (2) are used in re s ponse to threats of illness . Human beings vie wed as multi level ed open sys tem s subject to changing de velop mental and en v ironmental infl uences , and comprising various subsystems, whose interactions are responsible for or influence the meet ing of basic biologica l needs. Prer., Bioi. 101-102 or Bioi. 201-202; General Chemistry or consent of instructor. Bioi. 3264 . Human Biology and Pathogenesis II. Continuation of Bioi. 325 . Prer. , Bioi. 325. Bioi. 341-3 . Principles of Ecology. Principles pertaining to biologi cal communities; population interactions and relations with t he environment. Prer. , Bioi. 10 1 and 102 or Bioi. 20 I and 202 . Bioi. 361-3. Cell Biology. A survey of the interrelationships be tween cell struc ture a nd function . Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 20 1 and 202 . Bioi. 3833 . General Genetics. A survey course introducing molecu lar, clas sica l , developmental , and population genetics to the stu dent who bas a basic background in biology. Prer., Bioi. 101 a nd 102 or Bioi. 20 1 and 202. Bioi. 3842 . Lab in General Genetics. An experimental course designed to acquai nt s tudent s with technique s u s ed in the study of genetics. Independent study projects and general laboratory exercises are included. Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202 and Bioi. 383. Bioi. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Mon. (Psyc h. 395-3; Anthro. 395-3.) An interdi sci plinary approach to the natu re of man: his evolution, his biological makeup , his development as a socia l being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-discussion sections. Prer., one course in anthropology , biology, or psychology. Bioi. 4103 . Behavioral Genetics. ( P syc h. 410-3.) An interdiscipli n ary course designed for any upper divi s ion s tudent interested in the relationships between behavior and heredity . Prer., con se nt of instructor. Bioi. 412-3. Quantitative Gen etics . Survey of the principles of genetics of quantitative traits . Topics include gene frequencies . effects of mutation , migration , and selection; correlations among relativ es, herit abi lity , inbreeding , crossbreeding, and se lective breeding . Prer. , Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202 and Bioi. 383. Bioi. 4253 . Comparative Psychology. (Psych. 425-3 .) Behavior of a nimals. Similarities and differences between animals. Princi ples of behavior in a varie ty of species. Prer. , 6 hours of psy chology or consent of instructor. Bioi. 4274 . En vironmental Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 3 s emester hours of lecture credit. A co n s ideration of physiological adaptations of both plants and animals to s uch environment a l parameters as temperature, light, and water. Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202; a year of chem i s try and a course in physiology . Bioi. 4393 . Animal Societies . (Psych. 439 . ) The behavior of a ni mals in relation to one another. Relations withi n groups and

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between groups. Interaction between members of societies as determined by characteris tic s of the animal s and their environ ments. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and conse nt of instructor. Bioi. 441-4. Plant Ecology. Interactions of environmental factors upon plant communities . Emphasis on population dynamics and major ecosystems of North America. Field study centers on methods of vegetation ana l ysis. Prer., Bioi. I 01 and I 02 or Bioi. 201 and 202 . Bioi. 443-4 . Animal Ecology. The environment , the ecosystem, and the animals in them . Intra-and inter-species relations, com munities, migration , food chains, natural balance, effect of man and his population pressures . Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 20 I and 202, or college zoology and botany. Bioi. 447-3. Ecological Methods . Empirical facets of ecological st\.ldy. Emphasis upon hypothesis testing and sa mpling tech niques based on known environmental phenomena . Independent study of a field problem. Prer., Bioi. 341 or equivalent. Bioi. 4523 . Human Genetics . Ba sic principles of genetic phenom ena evident in all life, with emphasis on th ose principles opera tive in humans. Heredity of man' s normal and defective traits . Modes of inheritance , pedigree analysis, consanguinity, sex as sociated traits , c hromo omal aberrations, mutation s and causes, karyotyping, multiple births, gene linkage studies, histocompati bilities, and metabolic disorders. Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202. B ioi. 4614 . Vertebrate Embryology. Development stressing verte brate animals from fertilized egg through organ systems, with introduction to expe rim e ntal analysis. Prer., Bioi. 101 and 102 or Bioi. 201 and 202, or college zoology. Bioi. 499variable credit. Independent Study in Biology. Prer., open to seniors with consent of instructor. CHEMISTRY A major in chemistry at eithe r the bachelor's or master's levels may be completed on the D enver Campus. For graduation at the bachelor's level , students major ing in chemistry must pre sent credits in the following courses or their equivalents: Chern. 103, 106, 317, 335 , 336, 418, 451, 452 , 455; Phys. 111, 112, 114; Math. 140, 241, 242. In view of the current renumbering and reorganization of courses throughout the College , it is especially important that a student interested in the chemistry major consult a member of the chemistry faculty as his adviser. If this is done before the junior year, delays in graduation may thereby be avoided. Qualifi ed majors are strongly urged to participate in the Independent Study (Chern. 493) program. A chemistry adviser must be consulted before a Distribut ed Studies Program with chemistry as the pri mary field is undertaken. Such a program must include the following courses or their equivalent: Chern. 103, 106, 335, 336 (or 331, 332), 451. Thirty hours are re quired in chemistry. For further information, see the Di stributed Studies Program section of this bulletin. Students planning chemistry as a career should be familiar with the recommendations of the American Chemical Society for the professional training of chem ists. Among these recommendations are a reading knowledge of German or Russian, one semester of inorganic chemistry (Chern. 401), and two semesters of advanced work from the following courses: Chern. 501, 506 , 516, 517 * , 518*, 531, 532, and 559. Six hours of Chern . 493 will satisfy the special courses re quir ement. Further information regarding these recom mendations may be obtained from the advisers. Chem. 100-2. General Chemistry . Lecture and recitation only. For students with no previous chemistry or with inadequate back-•Labo ratory work is included. College of Undergraduate Studies I 27 ground in chemis try . This course is in preparation for Chern. 101 or Chern . 103. Prer., working knowledge of one year of high school algebra. Chem. 1015 . General Chemistry. Lect. and lab. A first course in principles of chem i stry in tended primarily for prenursing, physi cal education, physical therapy, and other stu dents wanting to fulfill curricu lum or natural science requirements. No previous knowledge of chemistry is required. Prer., working knowledge of one year of high school algebra. Chem. 102-5 . Gen eral Chemistry . Lect. and lab. Introduct ion to organic and biochemistry for prenur ing, physical education, phy sical therapy, and other students wanting such a course to satisfy curriculum or natural science requirements. Prer., Chern. I 01 or equivalent. Chem. 103-5. General Chemistry . Lect., rec., and lab. A first col l ege chemistry course for stude nt s with adequate high school chemistry . Prer., one year of high school chemistry or Chern. I 00 , and working knowledge of one year of high school algebra. Chem. 1065 . General Chemistry . Lect., rec ., and lab. Includes ionic equilibrium, types of bonding, transition metal chemistry, and some elementary quantitative analytical techniques. Prer., Chern. 103 or eq uivalen t. Chem. 133-1. Topics in Chemistry. Different 5-week course modules dealing with various topics in che mi stry. See current Sch e dule of Cour ses for particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscie nce majors to fulfill the natural science requirement. Chem. 3174 . Quantitative Analysis. Lect. and lab . Introduction to analytical chemis tr y with emphasis on classical wet methods. Prer., Chern. 106. Chem. 331-4 . Organic Chemistry . Two le ct. a nd one lab. per week. An introduction to the study of the structure, reactions, and propertie s of organic compound s including synthetic methods of preparation, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and structure elucidation by modern s pectroscopic methods. The laboratory program emphasizes modern techniques for the synthesis and identification of organic compoun ds. For nonchemistry majors, including premedical and predental students preparin g for appli cation to the University of Colorado Schools of Medicine or Dentistry. Open without petition to lower division students who have the prerequisite . Prer., Chern. 106 . Chem. 332-4. Organic Chemistry . Two l ect. and one lab . per week. Continuation of Chern . 331. Open without petition to lower divi s ion students who have the prerequisite. P rer., Chern. 331. Chem. 3355 . Organic Chemistry . Two lect. and two lab. per wk. R equired course for chemistry majors. Lecture is the same as Chern. 331 with a more extensive laboratory program. Open without pet i tion to lower division students who have the prereq uisite. Prer . , Chern. 106. Chem. 3365 . Organic Chemistry . Two lect. and two lab . per week. Continuation of Chern. 335 . Open without petition to lower division students who have th e prerequisite . Prer. , Chern. 335. Chem. 4013 . Modern Inorganic Chemistry. Lect. An introduction to inorganic che mi stry. Include atomic theory and bonding, particularly of transition metal complexes, and the chemistry of selected Iran ilion metal and main group ele ment s syste matized by physical principles. Prcr., Chern. 451 and concurrent regis tration in Chern. 452, or consent of instructor. Chem. 4184 . Instrumental Analysis. Lect . and Jab. Survey of the techniques of modern instrumenta l analytical chemistry. Em phasi s on relationships between techniques and their application to problems. Prer., Chern . 317 . Chem. 451-3. Physical Chemistry . Lect. Applications of thermo dynamics to chemistry. Includes study of the law s of thermo dynamics, thermochemistry, so lutions, electroc hemi stry, chem ical equilibria, and phase equilibria. Prer., Chern. 335, Phys. 111, 112, 114 , Math. 240, or equivalent courses. Chem. 452-3. Physical Chemistry . Continuation of Chern. 451, with emphasis on quantum mechanics, molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and additional topics of current interest. Prer. , Chern. 451. Chem. 455-3. Experimental Physical Chemistry. One lect. and two 3-hour labs. per wk. Instruction in the exper imental techniques of modern physical chemistry with emphasis on experiments illustrating the fundamental principles of chemical thermody namics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics, and chemical kinetics . For c hemi stry majors. Prer. , Chern. 451 or equivalent course in thermodynamics, Chern. 452 or e qui valent course in quantum mechanics. Chern. 452 may be taken concurrently .

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28 I Univers ity of Colorado at Denver Chern. 4813 . General B iochemi stry . Three l ect. p e r wk . Topics incl u de st ructure, conformation , a nd properties of proteins; e n zymes: mechan is m s a n d ki n e t ics; i n terme d ia ry meta boli s m ; K rebs cyc l e, carbohydrates, l i pid s; e n ergetics a nd m e tabolic control ; and an introduction to e l ect r on tran sport and photo synt h es is. P rer., o n e year of organic c h emistry . Chern. 4823 . G e neral B i o chemi stry. Cont inuation of Chern. 481. T o pics i n c lude macromo l ecules ; metabo lis m of nuclei c acids and nitro ge n -contai n ing compoun ds; bi o sy n t h es i s and function of macrom olecu l es incl udin g DNA, RNA, a n d p rote in s; b i o chemistry o f s ubcellular syste m s; a n d s p ec i al topi cs. Pre r. , Chern. 481. Chern. 4931 to 3 . Independent Study in Chemi stry . Cons ent of in s tructor re q uired. COMPUTER SCIENCE Stud en ts in the C o lle ge m a y e nr oll in cour s es in comput e r scie nce for College of Un d erg r a du a t e Studies cr edit. M athemat ics majors m ay select a n o p tion in co mput e r s c ience. C . S . 2013 . Introduction to Computer Science . (E. E . 2 0 1.) An elementary course in computer science c over i n g compute r programming m ethods . Fortran programmi ng, numeric a l a ppl ic a t i o ns , and non-nume r ical applicat ion s . P rer. , hi g h school algebra, trigonometry, a nd ge ometry. C . S . 3113 . Comput er Applicat ions in the Mathematical Sciences. An advanced Fortran course for sc i e n t i sts and e n g ine ers. A s pects of optimal programming wit h respect to variou s g o a l s and examination of g oa l s t h at are a pp ro p riate t o given contexts. P rer. , C . S . 201, A .Math. 232, Mat h . 313 , 3 1 9, or equivalent. C . S . 4013 . Introduct ion to Programming Languages and Processors . (E. E. 40 1.) A study of programm ing lan g u ag e s and digital p rocessors . Conceptu al aspects o f pro g r amming languages, translators, data structur es, hard wa r e orga n iza tion , and sys tem archi tecture. R elations h i p of lan g u age features to processor features. Prer., E. E. 20 I or C.S . 20 I . C . S . 4533 . Assembly Language Programming . (E.E. 453. ) A l a b orato ry course in prog r a m mi n g a t the mach i n e code le v el. Lec tures deal with the o r ganization of t h e m ac h ine , i t s effect o n the order code, and tec hn i q ues for p rog r amming in Assemb l y Lan guage . Primary emph as i s is on preparin g and running prog r a ms. Prer., C.S. 20 I , or co n sen t of inst ru c tor. C . S . 4593 . Compute r Organ ization. (E. E. 459.) This cour se i s concerned with computer arith met ic u n its, m emory sys tem s, contro l sys t e ms, and i n puto ut p u t s y ste m s. The emphasis is complete l y o n logic s tructure rather than e l ectronic circuitry. Prer., E . E . 257 or e q uiva l ent. GEOGRAPHY Stud ents m ajo rin g i n g e o gra ph y mu s t compl e te the followin g b asic c our ses o r t h e ir equiv a l e nts : Geog . 100 , 101, 1 9 9, 302, a nd 306. Distribut ed m a jors s e lecting geogr a ph y as a prim ary or sec ond ary s ubject s hould c on s ult w ith t h e di scip l i n e a dvi s er. G eog r ap h y co ur ses, tra d i t i on ally. h ave e mph as ized t h e man-e n viron m e nt r e l atio n s hip . S tude nt s int e rested i n e n v ironm enta l probl ems will find the nonr e gional courses of partic u la r value to their pr ogram. A number o f th ese co u rses i nvo lve fac ult y f r om other disciplines a nd prov i d e a ge n e r a l b ac kground on which more adva n ced work m ay be b ased. M a n a n d His Ph ysical E nvironm ent I , II, III is a se ries o f t hr ee c our s e s d esig n e d to provide a broad i ntr od u ction to t h e ph ysical envi r onme nt a nd evolution of th e e art h . T h ey m ay be t a ken c oncurr e ntly or in a n y ord er. G eog. 100 4 . Man and His Phy s i cal Environment I. ( Geol. 100 4 . ) A ge neral introduction to ele m e n ts of weath e r , phys ical clima t ology , a nd wor l d reg ion a l c l i mate c l ass ific a t io n . G eog. 1014 . Man and H i s Phy s i cal Environment II. (Geol. 1014.) Study of earth materials, features, an<;! p rocesses, and how they r e late to man. Geog. 102-4 . Man and His Physical Environment Ill. (Geol. 102-4.) Study of structure of the crust of the earth, history of the earth, and development of life forms throughout geologic time. Geog. 1993 . Introduction to Human Geography . A systematic introduction to the broad fie ld of man-land relationships. Emphasis is placed on the patterns and forms of man's changing use of the land. Geog. 200-3 . World Regional Geography . The cultural distributions of the world. The relationships of man and the landscape based on br oad divisions of cultural, ethni c , and geographic distributions in the world. Geog. 3013 . Economic Geography: Primary Activities . An introduction to rural land u s e patterns and agricultural production. Geog. 302 -3. Economic Geography : Secondary Activities. An introduction to location analys is of manufacturing activities . Geog. 305 3 . Cartography I . Techniques of mapping various dis tributions with emphasis on research and design. Geog. 306-3. Map and Air Photo Analysis. Introduction to the skills and reasoning ability needed to ana lyze and use maps and air photos as research tool s. Elementary field techniques are introduced on two ali-day Saturday field trips. Geog. 320 2 . Descriptive Meteorology . Nonmathematical description of the structure and composition of the earth' s atmosphere; heat balance, cloud formations, and wind circulation. Observational techniques, including weather map analysis and the meteorologi c al satellite program. Geog. 3613 . Geographic AnalysiS' of Issues in American Society. The geographic viewpoint , especially r e gional differentiation and sy stems models, applied to such socio-economic concerns as pollution, poverty, raci s m , v iolence , and political reorganization. Geog. 370 -3. Africa. A physical-cultur a l approach to an under standing of man-land relationships on the continent; changes in phys ical environment and cultural practices. Population and land-use problems. Geog. 3713 . Middle East . A physical, cultural, economic approach to the arid lands of the Middle East including Arab lands of the Sahara. Geog. 375-3. Far East . Regional survey of the physical and cultural features characterizing the geography of the Far East. Emphas is o n problems underlying future development and e conomic capabilities of South and East Asia. Geog. 400 3 . Climatology. Analysis of energy exchange, temperature, wind , pressure, and atmospheric humidity as elements and controls leading to an understanding of physical climatology. The Koeppe n , Thornthwaite, and other systems are evaluated and applied to a survey of regional climates. Prer. , Geog. 100 or equivalent. Geog. 4023 . Population Geography. Analysis of population dynamics , di s tributions, densities , and migration flows; spatial relationships between population trends and variables with social, economic, and environmental factors. Geog. 406-3 . Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photos. Interpretation of aerial photographs for research purposes. Emphasis on analysis of vegetation , land-forms, agriculture, and urban-indus trial patterns. Prer., Geog. 306 or consent of instructor. Geog. 407-3. Location Analysis of Human Activities . The study of spatial order in human use of the earth, emphasizing theories of locational structure and methods of analysis. Geog. 4103 . Urban Geography. An introduction to the horizontal and vertical characteris tics of urban settlements. Includes the origin of cities, basic definitions of urban areas, central place theory, economic bases of towns, classification of cities, and urban planning. Geog. 412-3 . Introductory Quantitative Methods in' Geography. The application of statistical and other quantitative techniques to geographically organized data, areal distributions , and the solution of geographic research problems. Geog. 414-3 . Transportation Geography. Concepts and theories leading to de scription and an of the relationships b e tween people, products, and transportation sy stems over space and time . Political, sociological , and environmental impacts of transportation facilities will be examined.. Geog. 420 3 . Microclimatology . Examination of microscale climatic patterns, with emphasis on the physical processes in the lowe s t layer of the atmosphere. The needs and responses of man, animals, and plants in the prairie, forest, and urban atmospheric environment will be examined, as will urban and regional planning implications of various microclimates. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 100 or consent of instructor.

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Geog. 430-3. Conservation Practice. Introduction to various aspects of resources, environment, and population. Emphasis on food production, water, soil, and climate. Geog. 4634 . Prin"ciples of Geomorphology. (Geol. 463.) Systematic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind, and marine processes and the landforms resulting therefrom. Prer., Geog . Geol. 101 or equivalent and elementary chemistry, or consent of instructor. Geog. 494-4. World Mineral Resources. (Geol. 494.) Nontechnical study of distribution, reserves, and uses of mineral resources. Geog. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Independent research pri marily for undergraduate major students. Prer., consent of de Partment . GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES Students majoring in the geological sciences must take the following courses within the discipline: Phys ical Geology (Geol. 207-208), Mineralogy (Geol. 301 ) • Structural Geology ( Geol. 312), and Field Ge ology ( Geol. 411). Introductory Paleonto logy, Stratog raphy, and Petrology (Geol. 341, 342, 323) are rec ommended. In addition, students must take the following courses in allied fields: Chern. 103, 106; Math. 140, 230; Phys . 111, 112, and 114 . A less mathematical option that does not require structural geology and field geology is available to students who do not plan a career in the geological sciences. Physical Geology ( Geol. 207. 208) and Mineralogy (Geol. 301) and Introductory Petrology (Geol. 323) are presently offered on the Denver Campus, as are the required courses in chemistry , physics, and mathe matics. Introductory Paleontology (Geol. 341) is of fered occasionally . Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411) must be taken on the Boulder Campus in order to complete a career-oriented major in the geological sciences. Alternatively, a stu dent may complete all the requirements for a distrib uted studies major and environmental sciences major, with emphasis in geology, on the Den ver Campus. Man and His Physical Environment I, II, III is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduction to the physical environment and evolution of the earth. They may be taken concurrently or in any order. Geol. 100-4. Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geog. 100-4.) A general introduction to elements of weather, physical climatol ogy , and world regional c limate classification. Geol. 101-4. Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geog. 101-4 . ) Study of earth materials, features, and processes, and how they relate to man. Includes Sunday field trips. Geol. 102-4. Man and His Physical Environment Ill. (Geog . 102-4.) Study of structure of the crust of the earth, history of the earth, and development of life forms throughout geologic time. In cludes Sunday field trips. Geol. 207-4, 208-4. Physical Geology an d Geophysics. General intro duction to geologic processes of the earth's surface and interior. Physical proper ties of the earth as a planet. Intended f or stu dents desiring major work in the geological sciences. Includes three Sunday field trips per semester. Prer., two years of high school sci ence or mathematics and scie nce . (Geol. 208-3 does not prerequire Geol. 207-3. Students may follow Geol. 101 with Geol. 208 if they wish additional work in geophysics and in ternal processes , or they may begin the 207-208 sequence with Geol. 208 if scheduling so requires .) Geol. 3014 . Mineralogy. Principles of mineralogy, including crystallography , crystal chemistry, and a systematic study of the more important nonsilicate and silicate minerals. Origins and occurrence s of minerals. P rer., physical geology and col lege-level chem istry, or consent of instructor. Geol. 3234 . Introductory Petrology. An introduction to the classi fication, di stributi on, and origin of igneous, metamorphic and College of Undergraduate Studies I 29 sedimentary rocks, including their identification in hard speci mens. Prer., physica l geology and mineralogy . Geol. 341-4. Introductory Paleontology. The study of fossils, includ ing a survey of the organic world and its history in the geologic past. Includes invertebrates , proti s ta , vertebrates and plants , an introduction to evolution and paleo e cology , and discussion of the uses of fossils in geologic correlation. Prer. , introductory geology or biology. Offered occasionally. . Geol. 425-3. Groundwater. Occurrence, mo v ement , and problems of pollution of subsurface water and the hydrologic properties of water-bearing materials. Prer. , Geol. 101 (Geog. 101) or conse nt of instructor. Geol. 4634 . Prin'ciples of Geomorphology. (Geog . 463-4 . ) Syste matic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind and marine processes , and the landforms resulting therefrom. Prer., elementary geology or equivalent and elementary chemistry, or consent of instructor. Offered occasionally. Geol. 4944 . World Mineral Resources. (Geog . 494-4 . ) Nonte ch nical study of distribution, reserves, and u ses of mineral re s ources. MATHEMATICS A major in mathematics can be completed by stu dents in the College of Undergraduate Studies by satis fying the following requirements, completing each of the required courses with a grade of C or better: I. At least 30 semester hours of mathematics courses. 2. At least 18 semester hours of mathematics courses number ed above 300 , approved by a dviser. 3 . Math. 140, 241. 242, 300, 313 , 314 . 4. Either Math. 431-432 or M a th . 321-422. Students who plan to do graduate work in mathematics should take Math. 431-432; students who wish to obtain a secondary teaching certificate are encour aged to complete Math . 321-422; student s planning to major in mathematics must see an adviser from that discipline . Students who choose the computer science option in the mathematics m a jor a r e requir e d to tak e the fol lowing courses, all with grades of C or bett e r: Math. 140, 241 , 242 C . S . 201 Math. 300, 314, 315 C . S . 302 or 303 Math. 431, 432 C.S. 453 Math. 443 C.S . 465 (E.E. 455 or Math. 481 E . E. 457) c.s. 501 c.s. 546 Variations in these courses must be approved by a mathematics adviser. At the graduate level , master ' s degr ees a re a v a ilable in mathematics , applied mathematics , and basic science (math. option) . The Department of Mathematics offers a Te a ching Internship Program which consists of three phases as follows: Phase 1. A junior-level student who is majoring in mathematics or applied mathematics , and who shows promise as a teacher, is s ponsored by a member of the full-time faculty of the department. A freshman level course is then assigned to the student , on an honorarium basis , with the underst a nding that the fac ulty member will attend all sessions of the course. The st udent will thus be acting as an intern and will be provided with a critique of his performance after each lecture. It is the interested student's ta s k to convince a faculty member that he or she should sponsor the

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30 I University of Colorado at Denver student. No faculty member is required to perform this function nor is any compensation afforded to the spon sor for so doing. Phase 2. After completion of one or two semesters of fully supervised classroom exposure, and upon the student's entry into the senior year of study, the faculty sponsor may recommend that the intern be accep t ed as an undergraduate teaching assistant. With approval of the mathematics faculty, the student will then be assigned broader responsibility for one (or at most , two) freshman courses, with the faculty sponsor exer cising such supervision as may appear appropriate under individual circumstances. Phase 3. Upon completion of a baccalaureate pro gram the intern hopefull y would be prepared to ac cept a graduate teaching assistantship in the depart ment, or in a related interdisciplinary area, as the next step in his or her professional career. No student may obtain more than 9 hours credit in mathematics cou r ses numbered below 140. Math. 101-3. College Algebra. A course intended for precalculus students who are not prepared to take Math. 140 directly . Topics covered include set concepts, functions including exponential and logarithmic, systems of equations and inequalities including elements o f matrices, and polynomials. Prer., 11h years of high school algebra, one year of plane geometry, and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class.* Moth. 1023 . College Trigonometry. A course intended for pre calculu s students who are not prepared to take Math . 140 di rectly . Includes trigonometric functions and their values and graphs , right angle trigonometry, identities and equations , in verse trigonometric functions, the law of sines and the law of cosines and applications, complex numbers, complex roots of equations , De Moivre's theorem and roots of complex num bers , and elements of complex algebra. Prer. , Jl/2 years of high school algebra, one year of plane geometry , and a satis factory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class. * Moth. 107-3. Algebra for Social Science and Business. Logic , set theory , permutations, combinations , probability, matrix alge bra . Does not prepare students for Math . 140. Prer. , one year high school algebra. Moth. 108-3. Polynomial Calculus . A one-seme ster course in the calculus. No knowledge of trigonometry or analytic geometry is pre s upposed . Intended especially for social scie nc e and business students and for the general liberal arts student . Those planning to take more than one semes t er of calculus s hould take Math. 140 instead of Math. 108. Prer. , 11h years high school algebra. Moth. 133-1. Topics in Mathematics . Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in mathematics. See cur rent Sch e dul e of Courses for the particula r topics being offered. D esigned for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science re quir ement. Math. 1403 . Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. Basic concepts from plane analytic geometry, elements of vector algebra; in tuitive introduction to limits , co ntinuity, differentiability, and integrability; elementary applications o f differentiation a nd inte gration. Repla ces Math . 130. Students with cre d it in Math. 108 will receive no credit for Math. 140. Math. 102 may be taken concurrently with Math. 140. Prer., Math. 101 and 102. Math. 241-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. The second of a three-semester se quence (Math. 140, 241, 242) in calculus . This course deals with inverse functions, trig and inverse trig functions, log, exponential, and hyperbolic trig functions. Also include s the Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus, Rolle's Theorem , the mean value theorems, method s of integration and polar coordinates. Prer., Math. 140. 0Students without plerequisites are advised (and with an unsatisfactory placement t est score will be directed) to consider enrollm en t in pre college courses D.C.E. 350, 351, 353, and 354, as needed, through the Division of Continuing Education. Moth. 242-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus Ill. The third of a three-semester seq uence (Math. 140 , 241, 242) . Thi s course deal s with infinite ser ies, the intermediate value theorems , L'Hospital's Rule and indeterminate forms; Taylor's and Mac laurin 's series, including series definitions of tran sce ndental functions. Prer., Math . 241 or consent of department. Math. 300-3. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics. The student learns to prove and critique proofs of theorem s by studyi ng elementary topics in abstract math ema tic s, including such ne cessary basics as logic , sets , functi ons, equivalence relations , etc. Prer., Math. 241 or consent of instructor . Math. 303-3. MathematicS' for Elementary Teachers I . De signed to help provide appropriate mathem atica l background to teac h K-6 mathematics. This is not a m e thods course but each topic is related to the elementary curriculum through concurrent examination of relevant text and laboratory materials as each topic is st udied . Topic s include sets, the concept of number, place value numeration and associated algorithms , the structure of the natural numbers, the integers, and the rational numbers . Applications and problem solving are included. Carries credit only for elementary education majors. Math . 304-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. Designed to meet objectives as described for Math. 303 above. Topics in clude intuitive and logical development of geometric ideas relevant to K-6 curriculum; mea s urement of length, area, volume, m ass, angle , temperature, and time ; stress is on the metric system; further study of the rational number sys tem; ap plications and problem solving. Carries credit only for ele mentary education majors. Prer. Math. 303 or consent of in structor. Math. 3143 . Introduction to Modern Algebra. Groups, rings, fields, polynom ials. Prer. , Math. 300. Math . 315-3. Introduction to Linear Algebra. Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices , determinants . Prer. , Math. 314. Math. 319-3. Applied Linear Algebra. Designed primarily for majors in applied science and engineering . Topics include matrix alg ebra , determinants, matrix inversion, rank and equiva lence of matrices, systems of linear equations , and matrix cal culus. Prer. , Math. 241 with grade of C or better. Math. 3213 . Higher Geometry I. Axiomatic systems . The founda tions of E uclidean and Lobachev skian geometries. Prer. , Math. 241 with grade of C or better. Math. 352-3. Computable Functions. Turing Computers, comput able functions, alterna te formulation s of computable functions, the halting problem and noncomputable functions. Church's thesis , universal machines , Godel' s incompleteness theorem, and unde cida ble theories. Prer. , college algebra or consent of instructor. Math. 383-3. Introduction to Statistics. Study of the elementary statistical measures . Introduction to statistical distributions, stat i stical inference, and hypothesis testi ng. Prer. , college alge br a or equivalent. Not for mathematic s majors . Moth. 403-3. Introduction to Topology. Metric s pace s and topologi cal spaces ; homotopy and homology in simplicial complexes. Pre r., Math 300 or consent of instructor. Math. 411-3. Theory of Numbers. Divisib ility, greatest common di visor, prime numbers , fundamental theorem of arithmetic, congruences and other topics. Prer. , Math. 300 or c onsent of instructor. Math. 412-3. Topics in Mathematics. Special topics in mathematics will be covered . Students s hould check the current Schedule of Courses to obtain the topics to be covered as well as the prereq uisites . With permi ssio n , this course may be taken for credit more than once . Moth. 422-3. Higher Geometry II. An introduction to the study of synthetfc projective geometry. The relation of the projective and affine planes. Coordinates in the projective plane . Prer., Math. 315 with grade of Cor better. Math. 426-3. Elementary Differential Geometry. Differential forms in Euclidean 3-space, vector fie lds, frame fields , Frenet formu las, calculus of differential forms on surfaces, geometry of sur faces, Gaussian curvature, second fundamental form. Prer., Math. 315, Math. 432 , or consent of instructor. Math. 4273 . Mathematical Tools f -or Urban Planning. Devel opment of t he fundamental techniques of applied quantitati ve methods . This course covers tho se topics required for the two subsequent quantitative methods courses, Math. 428 and Math. 429.

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Moth. 428-3. Mathematical Foun dations of Quantitative Methods I. Matrix algebra related to model building and linear and non linear programming leading to a study of the Theory of Games with applications in engineering and other applied areas such as planning, transportation and environmental problems. Prer., Math. 427 and consent of instructor . Moth. 429-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods II. Parametric and nonparametric statistics which treat statistics in a Decision Framework (includes introduction to Decision Theory). Bayesian Statistics and applications with exercises in probability representative of simple probabilistic models (e.g., Queueing, single-server models , etc . ) . Prer., Math. 427 or con sent of instructor. Moth. 431-3. Advanced Calculus I. Calculus of one variable, the real number system, continuity, differentiation, integration (possibly Riemann-Stieltjes). Prer. , Math. 241 and Math 300. Moth. 432-3. Advanced Calculus II. Sequences and series, conver gence, uniform convergence; Taylor's theorem; calculus of sev eral variables including continuity, differentiation a . nd integra tion; Picard's theorem in ordinary differential equations and Fourier series if time permits . Prer. , Math. 43 L Moth. 433-3 . Advanced Calculus Ill. Vector fields, implicit func tion theorem, inverse function theorem; Green 's, Stoke's, and divergence theorems; Taylor's theorem for functions of several variables; calculus on manifolds if time permits . Prer . , Math. 432 or consent of instructor, and Math. 313 or 319. Moth. 443-3. Ordinary Differential Equations. Elementary systemat ic introduction to linear nth order differential equations, includ ing equations with regular singular points. Existence, unique ness, and successive approximations of solutions for linear and nonlinear equations . Prer. , Math. 242. Moth . 444-3 . Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. Boundary value problems for the wave , heat, and Laplace equations; separation of variables method, eigenvalue problems, Fourier series, orthogonal systems. Prer., Math . 443. Moth. 445-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists I. Topics include complex algebra , Cauchy Riemann equations, Laurent expansions, theory of residues, complex integration , and intro duction to conformal mapping . Technique and applicability are stressed. Prer., ordinary differential equations. Moth . 446-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists II. A continuation of Math . 445, with coverage dependent partly on the interests of the class. Topics include Schwartz-Christofel transformations and thorough development of techniques of conformal mappings. Solution of boundary value problems will be emphasized . Prer., Math. 445. Moth . 447-3. Calculus of Variations for Engineers and Scientists. Techniques and applications of the powerful tools of the varia tional calculus will be developed and both classical and modern optimization problems will be attacked. Prer., ordinary and partial differential equations . 448-3. Laplace Transforms for Engineers and Scientists. Topics mclude the general methods, transforms of special functions, heaviside expansion theorems, transforms of periodic functions, convolution integrals , the inverse transforms, and solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prer., ordinary dif ferential equations . Moth. 449-3 . Tensor Analysis far Engin ' eers and Scientists. Review of vector concepts . Indicia! notation, oblique coordinates , gen eralized coordinates, summation conventions. Contravariant and covariant tensors. Tensor algebra and tensor calculus. The course is designed primarily to familiarize the professional with the foundations of this useful subject rather than to de velop detailed applications . Prer. , differential equations and matrix analysis . Moth . 451-3 . Introduction to Mathematical Logic . Sentential logic and first order logic. Completeness theorems . Prer., Math. 300 with a grade of Cor better. Moth. 453-3 . Boolean Algebras . Axioms, suba!gebras, ideals, direct and free products, free algebras , representation theorem, com pletions. Prer., Math. 314. Moth. 455-3. Set Theory. Axioms of set theory , algebra of sets, cardinal numbers, ordinal numbers, axiom of choice and con tinuum hypothesis. Prer., Math. 300. Moth. 457-3 . Theory of Equations . A study of the classical theory of equations, including such topics as higher degree polynomials and their zeroes , symmetric functions of polynomial coefficients; general solution of the cubic and quartic equations; resultants, and elementary graphical analysis . Prer., Math: 242. College of Undergraduate Studies I 31 Moth . 461-3 . Analog Computation and Simulation . (Same as E.E. 450.) Analog computing techniques includ ing time and ampli tude scaling, and programming of linear and nonlinear differ ential equations. Simulation of dynamic syste ms, iterative ana log computing . Laboratory work on an analog machine is re quired. Digital simulation languages are studied . Prer., ordinary differential equations and familiarity with Laplace transforms . Moth . 465-3 . Numerical Analysis I. Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations. Solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Interpolation, integration. Solution of ordinary differential equations . Least squares. Sources of error and error analysis . Computer implementation of num erica l methods . Matrix eigenvalue problems and s ummation of infinite series . Prer., E.E. 201 and Math. 315, or Math . 319. Moth. 466-3. Numerical Analysis II. Continuation of Math. 465. Prer . , Math. 465. Moth . 467-3 . Computer Techniques in Engin eering . ( Same as E . E . 455. ) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in eng ineer ing and science. Those methods suitable for sol ution by high speed digital computers are emphasized. Prer. , E.E. 20 I and Math. 443. Moth. 468-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists I. Tche bychev approximations, approximation by rational functions, linear and nonlinear, regression analysis , applications of inter polating polynomials , economic value, and cost analysis. Com parisons of estimation and approximation techniques, and other related topics. Prer., third-semester calculus and one course in statistics . Math. 469-3 . Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists II. A continuation of Math . 468. Selected topics will be developed extensively in accordance with the needs of the class. With th e consent of the department , students may register for this course more than once. Prer . , Math. 468 or consent of instructor . Math. 470 3 . Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics . (Educ . 455.) Problems in teaching math e matic s including ob jectives , sequence of topics, methods of presentation, materials, testing, and recent curricular developments. Prer., Math. 241. Carries credit only for students in secondar y education. Math . 472-3 . History of Mathematics. A h isto ry of the develop ment of mathematical techniques and ideas from early civiliza tion to the present including the interrel atio n s hip s of math an d sciences. Prer., Math. 241. Math . 481-3 . Introduction to Probability Theory . Axioms, combina torial analysis, independence and conditional probabil ity, dis crete and absolutely continuous distributions, expectation and distribution of functions of random variables , law s of large numbers, central limit theorems, simple Markov chains . Prer., Math. 241. Moth. 482-3. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics . Poin t and confidence interval estimation . Principles of maximum likeli hood , sufficiency, and completeness; test s of simple and com posite hypothesis, linear models, and multiple regre ssion anal ysis. Analysis of variance distribution free methods. Prer., Math. 481. Moth. 493-2, 494-2. Hon ors Seminar. Intended for cand idates for departmental honors and other superior students. Topic s covered vary from year to year. Student participation is stressed. Math . 495-1 to 5 . Workshop in Teaching Elementary Mathematics . Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered . Course content designed in consultation with group s of practicing teachers who desire cour ses to meet their specific need s . Stu dents may register for this course more than once with conse nt of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of depart ment . Math. 496 1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Middle School Mathematics . Variable credit depending upon specific t opics c overed . Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Stu dents may register for this course more than once with con s ent of appropriate departmental adviser . Prer. , consent of depart ment. Moth . 497-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Secondary Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs ; Student s may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser . Prer., consent of department. Math. 499-1 to 3 . Independent Study . Variable c redit depending upon the student's needs. This course is listed for the benefit of the advanced student who desires to pursue one or more

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32 I University of Colorado at Denver topics in considerable depth. Supervision of a full-time faculty member is necessary and the dean's office must concur. Stu dent s may register for thi s course more than once with depart mental approval. Prer. , consent of department. PHYSICAL EDUCATION A basic activity program in physical education is available for nonmajors . Although physical education credit is not required for completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree, a maximum of 8 hours of elective credit consisting of activity courses may be applied toward the graduation requirement of 120 hours. Activity classes 102 through 213 may be taken on an elective basis. One course may be taken each semester and a specific activity may be counted for credit only once. The student will have the option of being graded by letter grade or pass /fail. The b asic activity program is designed to offer stu dents a wide variety of recreational activities stressing sports that have lifetim e carry-over value. The discipline of physical education does not offer a major in physical education or recreation. However, a variety of courses are offered which are the equivalent of those given on the Boulder Campus for majors . It is possible over a four-year period to take the majority of the courses required for the major on the Denver Campus . An Urban Recreation Specialist program, designed to prepare people to work in urb an recreation centers, is being developed . The program is interdisciplinary in nature, and students from any discipline may enter the program if they have junior status and an interest in urb a n recreation. For information on the majors program, the grad uate program in Physical Education and R ecreation, and the Urban Recreation program, contact the disci pline representative on the Denv er Campus. P .E. 133-1. Topics in Physical Education. Different five-week course module s dealin g with various topics in physical education and recreation. See current S c hedule of Courses for the particular module s being offered . D esig ned for nonscience major s to fulfill the natural science requirement. P.E. 2932 . Personal Living. Maintenance and improvement of he a lth. P.E. 295-2. Community Health . Communicable diseases and their relations to public health . The germ theory of disease , infection and immunity, vaccines, toxoids, antitoxins, and hereditary de fects. An in vestiga tion of community health services . P.E. 296-2. First Aid. Kno wle dge and skills of emergency treat ment for common accidents and illnesses. Leads to the Ameri can Red Cross Standard and Advanced Certification. Rec. 3322. Wilderness Camping Practicum . Designed in three stages, providing opportunities for group and solo wilderness camping. Additional fee required . P.E. 3703 . Society and Sport. A study of the s ociological founda tions of physical education with emphasis upon the social struc ture of sports groups, the dynamics of sports groups, risk-takin!! in sp orts, and sports in their relationship to socialization of individuals and groups. P . E . 420-2. Organ ' ization and Administration of Physical Education. Poli c ies and pract ices used in the development of sound phy s ical education practices. Rec. 4312 . Program Planning in Recreation. To acquaint the stu dent with the basic principles in developing a well-rounded re creation program with specific objectives. Rec. 4352. Organization and Evaluation in Recreation . The study of organiz a tion al structures of the several types of recreat i onal services and evaluation te ch niques used to determine the effec tiveness of these structures as related to administration of pro grams , poli cies, and the public . Rec. 437-2. Management of Parks and Recreation Facilities. Lect., field work, and lab. experience in park and recreation adminis tration . Problems in management , finance, and evaluation of park and recreation facilities. Rec. 438-2. Maintenance of Park and Recreation Facilities . Lect., field work, and lab. experience in maintenance of parks and rec reation facilities. Problems in planning, scheduling, and per forming operations for public use. P . E . 446-2. Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries . Practical and theoretical study of massage, bandaging, treatment of sprains, bruises, strains , and wounds . PHYSICS R equired of all physics majors are Phys. 111, 112, 114, 213, 214, 215, two years of calculus , and one year of another science. Majors preparing for graduate study in physics should also take Phys. 317, 321 , 322, 331, 332, 341, 491, 492, and 495, and additional mathematics courses. Students not going to graduate school in physics or wishing an interdisciplinary physics major must consult an adviser for the suitable additional program. An acoustical option is currently being devel oped. Students should also be aware of the engineering physics . major available through the College of Engi neering and Applied Science. Sev eral new interdisciplinary programs involving physics are currently being considered, including en vironmental science, geophysical systems, and chem ical physics. Students interested in these programs should take the introductory calculus physics sequence as soon as possible, and consult an adviser for the latest status of these programs. Phys. 1054 . General Astronomy. The methods and results of mod ern astronomy (solar system, stars, galaxies , cosmology) at an elementary level. Phys. 1064 . General Astronomy. Continuation of Phy s. 105. Prer. , Phys , 105. Phys. 111-4. General Physics. First semester of 4-semester sequence for science and engineering students . Covers vectors, kinematics , dynamics, momentum of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, and i ntroduction to thermodynamics . Prer . , knowledge of algebra , geometry and trigonometry ; Coreq., calculus through derivatives and in. definite and definite integra l s of polynomials and trigonometric functions, as typically covered in Math. 140. Phys. 112-4. General Physics. Covers electricity and magnetism. Prer., Phys. Ill; Coreq., Math. 241. Phys. 114-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys . 112-4 . One 2-hour lab . per wk. Phys 133-1. Topics in Physics. D ifferent 5-week course modules dealing with variou s topics in physics . See current S c hedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement. Phys. 199-variable credit. Independent Study for Lower Division'. Phys. 201-5, 2025 . General Physics. Four demonstration lect. and one lab . per wk. Phys. 201: mechanics , heat, and s ound ; Phys. 202 : electricity, light, and modern physics . An elementary but thorough presentation of the fundamental facts and principles of phy $ ics . Majors in mathematics , chemistry, and others taking calculus are urged to take Phys. 111, 112 , 114 , 213, and 215 . Prer., years high schoo l algebra and satisfactory grade on mathematics placement te st. Phys. 2133 . General Physics. Covers wave motion, physical optics , and introduction to s pecial relativity , quantum theory , and atomic physics. Prer., Phys. 112 and 114. Phys. 214-3. Introductory Modern Physics. To be taken by physics major s and interested nonmajors. Introduces students to the nature of modern phy sics and provides majors with perspective on the frontiers of this field. Emphasis on concepts without mathematic a l developments. Include s relativity, atomic and nuclear physics, solid state and particle physics. Prer. , Phys. 213 .

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Phys. 21 5-l. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys. 213 . One 2-hour Jab. per wk. Phys. 307-3. Physical Environmental Problems. Current environ mental problems from the viewpoint of the physical sciences. Sources , effects, detection , and cont r ol of air, water , noise , radi ation, and metal pollutions. Factors affecting traffic movement and safety, and transportation alternatives which pro duce less pollution. Some lectures by outside experts. This course and Phys . 308 are designed as a complementary sequence but may be taken separately. Prer. , one year of college science or mathematics. Phys. 308-3. Energy. This course will examine the central role of energy in our environment. Topics will include the macroscopic flow of energy in the world, the conversion and degradation of energy, thermal pollution, and energy resources and consump tion . Energy will be examined as an environmental problem and for its utility in s olving problems . The implications of energy as a limit to population will be discussed . This course is designed to complement Phys . 307, but may be taken separately. Prer. , one year of college science or mathematics . Phys. 317-2, 318-2. Junior Laboratory. Contains experiments on data handling, electrical measurements, electronics, optics, vacuum techniques , heat and thermodynamics , mechanics , and modern physics. Emphasis will be on developing basic skills and on design of experiments. Each student will carry at least one project experiment each semester. Coreq., Phys. 321, 331, or consent of instructor. Phys. 321-3. Classical Mechanics on d Relativity. Topics covered include: Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, oscillations, Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations, central forces , and scatter ing. Analytical procedures employing the methods of vector analysis and calculus will be stressed. Prer. , Phys. 214 and A. Math. 232, or equivalent. Phys. 322-3. Classical Mechanics, Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics. Topics covered include: noninertial reference frames, rigid body motion, coupled oscillators, introduction to quantum mechanics, Bohr theory , simple s olutions to Schroedinger equation, and per turbation theory. Prer., Phys . 321. Phys. 331-3, 332-3. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism. Elements of mathematical theory of electricity and magnetism, including magnetostati 'cs, electrostatics , polarized media , direct and alter nating current theory, and introduction to electromagnetic fields and waves. Prer. for Phys. 332 : Phys. 33 1 ; Coreq. for Phys . 331: Phys . 321. Phys. 341-3. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics . Statistical mechanics applied to macroscopic physical systems; statistical thermodynamics, classical thermodynamic systems; applications to simple systems. The relationship of the statistical to the ther modynamic points of view is examined. Prer. , Phys. 213. Phys. 362-3. Sound, Music, and Noise. This course will consider the basic nature of sound waves , the musical scale , why musical instruments sound the way they do , the reproduction of sound, the ear and hearing , vocal communication, room acoustic s , noise pollution , and the s onic boom. No prer. Although this course is mainly descriptive , some high school algebra will be used. Phys. 363-1. Sound Laboratory. Laboratory course to accompany Phys. 362 as an option . Students will do an acoustical project on a subject of their own choice . Coreq . or prer., Phys . 362 or consent of instructor . Phys. 431-3. Introduction to Radiation and Health Physics. Designed to introduce students to the phy sics of ionizing radiation (nu clear emissions and X-rays) and their applications. Subje cts will include detection techniques , error analysis, half-life determina tions, instrument design and calibration , and a brief study of the chemical and biological eff ec ts. An integral laborator y is included. Prer. , Phys. 213 , 215, and two semesters o.f calculus , general chemistry , and general biology. Phys. 4414 . Sound Measurement and Noise C-ontrol. This course covers the basics of sou nd and hearing , the effects of noi se, various ways to measure and analyze s ound and noi se, and te ch niques for noise control. Two lect., two lab. per week. An addi tional lecture or field trip may be substituted for a lab occasion ally. Prer. , one year of physics, or Phy s . 362 and 363 and one year of calculus, or consent of in struc tor . Phys. 451-3. Light. Basic electromagnetic theory of light u s ing Maxwell's equations . Examples in geometrical optics ; exten siv e applications in phy sical optics including diffraction and pol ariza tion. Spectra , including Zeeman effect and fluorescence. R ecent advances in experimental techniques ; microwaves, opti c al masers, image converters, etc. Prer., Phys. 332. College of Undergraduate Studies I 33 Phys. 491-3, 492-3. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Topics include a qu antum me c hanical treatm e nt of th e one-el ect ron atom, atomic s hell str u cture, ato mic and molecular s pectroscopy, band the ory of so lid s, X r ays, nuclear prop erties, radio activity, and the prop erties of th e fundamental particles. Pre r., Phy s. 322 ' and 332. Phys. 4952 , 496-2. Senior Laboratory . Individual project laboratory with emph as i s on modern physical experiment a tion. Phys. 499-voriable credit . Independent Study for Upper Division. Stu dent s must check with a faculty memb ers before taking this course. PSYCHOLOGY Majors s hould include college algebra in their lower division schedules and enroll in M ath. 383 concurrently with P sych. 210. At least 30 semester hours and not more than 48 semester hours in psychology must be completed, with at least 16 hour s in upper division courses . No grade below C in required psychology courses is acceptable toward th e m a jor. Spe cific course requirements ar e as follows: Psych. 201-202 ; Psych . 210 or 211-212 ; at least one biotropic course , i ncluding Ps ych. 395 , 405 , 410 , 412, 416 , 420, 425 , 439; at least one sociotropic course, includin g P sych . 364 , 430 , 431, 440, 445 , 449 , 464, 466 , 471, 485, 493 ; at least one advanced laboratory course, in cluding P sych . 416, 420, 440 , and 485; and at least one integrative course, Ps ych. 451. Psych. 1003 . Introduction to Psychology. A one-sem ester survey course for nonm a jors. Covers such topics in psy c hology as per s onalit y , frustration and conflict, learning and memory, and the bi ologica l b ases of behavior . Psych. 133-1. Topics in Psychology. Different five-wee k cours e module s dealing with various topics in psychology. See current Sch edule of Cours es for the particular modules being offered. D esigned for nonscience majors to fulfill the n atura l science re quirement. Psych. 2014 . Living Systems I. ( Bioi. 20 1.) An interdisciplinary approach to the structure and function of living systems--ce lls, organisms, and popul ations. Emp h asis on the behavioral aspects of energy flow through each of the l evels of organization ana lyzed . Lect., lab. and rec. sections. Psych. 2024 . Living Systems II. (Bioi. 202.) A co ntinu ation of Psych. 201. Psych. 2104 . Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology. Re sea rch methods and analysis of data. Intended for those who plan to major in p s ychology. P rer.; P sych. 201-202 and college a l gebra; prer. or coreq . , Math . 383 ( Statistics) . Psych. 245-3. Psychology of Social Problems. An examination of s ocial p syc hological aspec t s of a varie ty of social issues and problems in contemporary s ociety. Includes s uch topics as poverty or minority status, prejudice, drug use, s tudent protest, a nd patterns of sexual behavior. Cons ideration of theory a nd re searc h relati ve to the topics as well as the definition of socia l behavior as a " problem ." Psych. 3002 . Honors Seminar. Curren t theoretical issues and problem s in psychol ogy. Prer., major in psychology and conse nt of instructor . Psych. 320 3 and 3213 . Human Behavior and Maturation Through the Life Span. Three hours Ject. p e r week . Analysi s of th e normal range of behav ior s found in each dev elop m e nt stage from birth through senescence. Psych. 340-3. Social Psychology of the Mexican American. Focuses on the rel ati on s hip between s ocio c ultur al factors and the per ce ptual , cognitive , and motivation a l development of the Mexican American. Prer. , 6 sem . hrs. o f psychology. Psych. 3643 . Child and Adolescent Psychology. Principle s of nor mal development and patterns of child-rearing. Prer. , 6 hrs . of p syc hology. Psych. 3953 . The Biosociol Development of Mon. (Bioi. 395-3, An thro . 395-3.) An interdi scip lin ary app ro ac h to the nature of m a n : his evolution, his biological m a keup , his development as a s ocial being , and his strategies for dealing wit h the c h alle nges of environment. Prer . , at least one course in anthropology, biol ogy, or psychology .

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34 I University of Colorado at Denver Psych. 400-2. Honors Seminar. Topic to be determined. Prer., major in psychology, senior standing, and consent of instructor. Psych. 405-3. Physiological Psychology. The morphological, neuro chemical, and physiological bases of behavior. Prer., Psych. 201, 202 and 6 additional hrs. of psychology . Psych. 410-3 . Behavioral Genetics . (Bioi. 410-3.) The inheritance of behavioral characteristics. Prer., consent of instructor. Psych. 414-3 . Psychology of Thinkin g . Covers main theories and re search findings in the area of cognition. Prer. , Psych. 201-202 and 6 additional hrs. of psychology. Psych. 416-4 . Psychology of Perception. The study of sensory pro cesses and of vari ables related to perception. Lect. and lab. Prer., Psych . 201, 202 and 210 or 211. Psych. 420 4 . Psychology of Learning. Conditions and applications of learning as found in experimental literature. Prer., Psych. 201,202 and 210 or 211. Psych. 4212 . Theories of Learning and Motivation . An advanced sur vey of past and present major theoretical formulations in learn ing and motivation . Prer., P sy ch. 420 and c o nsent of instructor. Psych. 425-3. Comparative Psychology. (Bioi. 425-3.) Similarities and differences between animals . Principles of behavior in a variety of species. Prer. , 6 hrs. of psychology or consent of instructor . Psych. 430-3. Abnormal Psychology. Borderline disorders as ex treme variations of the normal personality. Major functional and organic disorders. Theories of mental disorders and methods of p sychotherapy. Not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych . 431. Prer., Psych. 201-202 and upper division standing. Psych. 431-4. Psychopathology. Intensive analysis of the major theories of personality and behavior disorders. Open to majors only, and not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych . 430 . Prer. , Psych. 201-202, 6 additional hrs. of psycholo gy, and upper division standing. Psych. 433-3. Mental Hygiene. Psychological principles underlying the nature of mental and emotional health and a positive pro gram for preventi v e and remedial treatment. Prer., Psych. 430 or 431 or consent of instructor . Psych. 439-3 . Animal Societies. (Bioi. 439-3.) The behavior of animals in relation to one another. Relations within groups and between groups. Interaction between members of societies as determined by characteristics of the animals and their environ ments. Prer. , Psych . 201-202 , and consent of instructor. Psych. 4404 . Social Psychology. Psychological principles underly ing social behavior. Analysis of special topics such as attitude surveys, public opinion research , propaganda, intergroup rela tions. Prer. , Psych . 201-202 and 210 or 211-212. Psych. 445-3. Psychology of Personality . The physiological and psychological nature of personality. Individual differences . The development of personality. Prer., 16 sem. hrs. of psychology. Psych. 449-3. Cross-Cultural Psychology. The influence of culture and subculture on per s onality, including sex roles , patterns of child rearing, attitudes and values, and mental illness. Prer., 12 sem. hrs. of courses in psychology, sociology, and/or anthro pology in any combination. Psych. 4513 . History of Psychology. Development of psychological theories since 500 B . C . Schools of psychology and their ad herents. Readings of primary and secondary sources. Prer. , 16 sem. hrs. of psychology and senior standing. Psych. 4643 . Developmental Psychology. Principles and theories of child development . Prer. , P syc h . 201-202 and 210 or 211-212. Psych. 466-3 . Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Psychology of retarded, handicapped, and superior children. The relation of special traits to educational and s ocial needs . Prer., P sy ch. 201202 , a course in developmental or child psychology, and upper division standing. Psych. 4672 . Psychology of Mental Retardation . Ps yc hological prob lems of mental deficienc y. Concern with causes, identification characteristics, and treatment of the mentally retarded with an emphasis on research findings. Prer., Psych . 201-202 and 364 or 464 . Psych. 471-3. Survey of Clinical Psychology. Theories and practices relating to problems of ability and maladjustment. Diagnostic procedure s and treatment methods with children and adults. Prer., Psych . 201-202 and P sych. 431, or consent of instructor . Psych. 472-3 . Community Psychology. New approaches to prevent ing psychological distress detailed in terms of theory and prac tice . Special topics include "psychology in the streets , " the creation of alternative institutions, and methods of consultation in poverty areas. Prer. , at least 6 hrs . of psychology. Psych. 4854 . Principles of Psychological Testing . Principles under lying construc tion , vaildation, and use of tests of ability and personality. Prer., Psych. 210 or 211-212 . Psych. 493-3 . Industrial Psychology. Application of psychological principles and research findings to industrial problems, includ ing problems of management, employees, and consumers, and such special topics as advertising, methods of appraisal, and human engineering. Prer., 6 sem. hrs. of psychology and a statistics course . Psych. 494-3. Psychology of Sports. A survey of psychological con ditions affecting performance in athletics . Includes assessment of psychological demands of sports, assessment of the athlete, preparation of the athlete for coping with the psychological demands of sports. Prer., 9 se m. hrs. in psychology, Psych. 496-3. Performance Under Stress. Examines the processes which influence the effects of stress on performance in academ ic, vocational, and other interpersonal situations. Prer., Psych. 420. Psych. 499-1, 2, 3 . Independent Study. Prer., consent of instructor. Division of Social Sciences FREDERICKS. ALLEN, Assistant Dean Important new problems confront society . The social sciences are vitally c oncerned with these problems, examples of which are the population explosion, urban concentration, rapidly changing technology, the strains of race relations, and the thrust of once under-devel oped societies. To approach these and other contem porary problems, education in the social sciences must identify key concepts and emphasize the basic analytical processes by which knowledge of human behavior is assembled. Such educati on must also include explora tions among disciplines in the social sciences and be tween the social sciences and other disciplines. The Division of Social Sciences includes the fol lowing disciplines: anthropology, economics, history, political science, and sociology. The division offers courses in the various disciplines, in interdisciplinary studies, and in preprofessional studies. Students can satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in all the dis ciplines included in the division. The requirements for each major are explained b efore the course listings for the respective disciplines. Students should be aware of the possibilities for a distributed studies major in the social sciences. The most usual combinations are economics and sociology, and history and political science. See the Special Pro grams section of this bulletin for details on a distributed studies major. The division also has developed a major in urban studies. The program is designed to provide a broad educational experience for persons who are interested in careers related to the problem s of urban life. The major is appropriate for students inten ding to enter the fields of business, law. medicine, or public school teaching, to work in or with federal, state, or local agencies or volunteer and community action groups, or to enter graduate programs in the social sciences or environmental planning. Interested students should con tact the Division of Social Sciences office for informa-

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tio n co n cerning advise rs, r equireme n ts, courses c u rrently offered and proposed, and options involved in the progra m . For p reprofessional programs, see listings a n d re quireme nts in that section of this bulletin. Description of Courses and Programs For information on scheduling of courses, cons u l t the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time , and meeting place of classes. ANTHROPOLOGY Ma j ors in anthropology must take Anthro. 103 and 104, Pri n ciples of A nt hropology I and II, or demon strate knowledge of materials covered by these co u rses. Majors also must take Anthro. 201 and 202, I ntroduc tion to Ph ysical Anthropology I and II; Anthro . 407, H istory of Anthropology; and eithe r Anthro . . 280, Na t u re of Language; o r Anthro. 480, Anthropol o gical Linguistics; or Anthro . 481, Language and Culture. Anthro. 1033 . Princ i ples of Ant h ropology I. Physical anthropology and archaeology, Evolution of man; his physical and cu ltural development from his begi n nings through the rise of ea rl y civi lizatio n . I ncludes consideration of man as a biological organ ism, his o rigin and relati o nship with nonhuman and prehuman primates a n d deve lopmen t o f culture as an adaptive device. Anthro . 1043 . Pri nciples of Anth r opology II. Cult. ural-soc i al an thropo logy and linguistics . Study of man from the standpoint of the many a nd varied cultures he has manife s ted through time to the present. Survey o f relationships between environment, technology, social organ ization, language, and ideology . Nature of anthropology and its analysis of the similarities and differ ences in human cultural adaptations. Anthro . 2014 . ln' troduct ion to Physical Anth r o p o logy I. Theory of biological evolution; examination of man's organic structure, function, and behavior from an evolutionary-comparative per spective; analysis of fossil evidence of human evolution. Labor atory work emphasizing osteometry and osteology. Anthro. 202 -4 . I nt r oduction to Physical Anthropology II. O n -going human evolution with emp hasis on quantitative assessment of ge n etic variation in man. Anthro . 220 3 . Principle s of A r cha eology. Basic introduction to con cepts , techni q ues, and theory of archaeological excavation and interpretation. Two lect. , 1 two-hour lab. per week. Lec tures, demonstrations , and practical work. Anthro . 227 3 . The E volution of New W orld Cul t ure . Cultural evolu tion in the New World from the earliest hunting cultures through the rise of civilization as seen from the perspective of archaeological evidence and theory. Anthro . 240 3 . Pri nciples of Ethnology. Intensive survey o f con cepts, methods, and obj ectives in the comparative study of world cultures . Comparative analys is of selected ethnographic ma terials within a framework of sociocultural evolution and cul tural ec o logy . Introductory techniques of fieldwork, library re sea r c h , a n d report writ in g. Anthro . 2803 . The Nature of Language . Survey of langu a ges of the world and their h istorical relation s h ips . Introduction to l a n guage analysis. Study of theories o f the origin of l anguage, its rel at io nship to other f orms of communication, to cognition, a n d to systems of writing. Anthro . 3103 . Cultura l Plur alism. The cultural and social anthro pology of the plural ethnic and racial component of modern complex societies (nation-states). The focus will be on the forms and processes of sociocultural identity, its maintenance and change with national integration . Although comparative across nations , there will be an emphasis on U.S . society. Anthro . 395 -3. The B i o s ocio l Devel opme nt o f Mon. ( Bioi. 395-3 ; Psych . 395-3.) Interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution , his biological makeup, his development as a social College of Undergraduate Studies I 35 being, and his strategies for dealing with the challe n ges of en viro n ment. Lecture and demonstration-dis cussio n sessions. Prer., one course in anthropology, biology , or psycho l ogy. Anthro . 3993 . Unde rgradua te S e m i nar i n Anthropology. Directed investigation of a specific topic of current importa n ce. The topic may be within the subfields of anthropology or interdisci plinary with anthr opology . Prearranged topics will be an n o unced . Prer., consent of instructor. Anthro . 407 3 . History of A n thropology . Foundations and develo p ment of major concepts and approaches (theory a nd method) in the study of man and culture. Discussion of principal con tributors and their works to mid-20th century. Prer., anthro pology major or consent of instructor. A n thro . 4083 . R e c e nt T rends in Anthropology. Current directions in socio-cultural theory, method and technique as exemplified in the reported re earch and theoretical works of major anthro pologists from mid-20th century to the present. Prer., anthro pology major or consent of instructor. Anthro. 410 3 . Race and Mon. Concepts of human race: history, theory, and applications thereof . Biol ogical factors in the estab lishment and main tenance of human diversity. Arithro. 4113 . Human Pale ontol o gy. Detailed consideration of the fossil evidence for human evolution. History, description, inter pretat ion of key fossils, and review of current and co ntroversial issues. Anthro . 412 3 . Advanc e d Physical Anthrop ology. Introduction t o population genetics and its application to understanding prob lems of process in human evolution and the formatio n of races inman. Anthro . 4 1 4 3 . Pri matolog y . Survey of the Primate Order in evolu tion . Morphology and behavior from a comparative point of view, with emphasis on issues related to the origin and evolu tion of the most social member of this order. Anthro . 4163 . Ecology, Adapta tion and C ulture . Culture, culture change, and evolution from the perspective of human beh avioral adaptations to environmental variables. A genera l systems, multifactorial (sociocultural and biophysical) approach to cause and effect. Anthro . 417 3 . Human Ethology. Ethological princip l es and their application to anthropological inve stigatio ns. Methods and techniques of data collection. Practice in the asse ssment o f behavior in natural settings. Anthr o . 420-3. Nort h Ame r i can A r chaeology. Prehistoric and proto hi storic cultures of North America, excluding the American South west, emphasizing materials which form a basis for re gional cultural reconstructions. Anthr o . 4213 . Archaeo logy of t h e American Southwest. Prehistoric cultures of the southwestern U . S . and adjacent Mexico, their origins, characteristics, and interrelationships. Anthro . 422-3. Archaeo logy o f Mesoame r i ca. Prehist o ric and proto historic cultures of Mexico and n orthern Cen tral America, in cluding the Aztecs and the Maya. Anth r o . 4233 . Plains Archaeol o g y . Prehistoric and protohistoric cultures of the Great Plains , their origins, characteristics, and relationships . Ant hro. 4313 . Applied Cult u r a l Anthropolog y . Concepts, methods, and prob lems in the application of anthropology to community and institution organization, development and administration; exemplified through analysis and di sc u ss ion of U.S. and cross cultural case materials. Urban and medical problems as well as ethical i sues to be included. Anthro. 434 3 . Psycholog i cal Anthropology. A comparative study of the relation h ip between culture and social character and be twee n culture a n d individual per onality. Anthropological per spectives on the effects of various sociocultural context s o n individual experience. The relationship s of sociocultural situa tions to motives, values, cognition, per sonal adjustment, stress, and qualities of p e r sonal experience are empha ized . Anthro. 435 3 . Cult u r e Proc ess -Maintenance, Change, and Evolutiorl'. Theories and perspectives in the study of culture process . Analysis and discussion of ca e materials dealing with persis tence, innovation, s ituation s of culture contact and acculturation, directed change and resistance, and long -term sociocultural de velopment. An' thro. 436 3 . The American Indi an in C ontemporary S o ciety . Begin ning with the historical background on American Indian accu l turation and persistence , but emphasizing the pre ent-day rela tions between Indian communities and the dominant ociety, stressing conditions and events in Denver and the Southwest generally.

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36 I University of Colorado at Denver Anthro. 440-3. Comparative Social Organization . Principles in the comparative study of human s ocial systems , types of social structure, social control, sociocultural integration, and processe s of social change and societal development. Focus on the anal ysis of ethnographies . Prer., Anthro. 240 or 407, or consent of instructor. Anthro . 443-3. Economic Anthropology. Cross-cultural survey and comparison of economic syste ms. Economic structures and their functional relationships with oth e r social institutions in a range of societies from simple to complex. Anthro. 444-3. Urban Anthropology. An anthropological approach to the comparative study of factors influencing urbanization in different parts of the world along with the imp lic at ion s of en vironments, economy, values , and psychology of urban living in general. Cross cultural , but with emphasis on the modern western world. Anthro . 450-3. Family Dynamics. The course examines proce sses of change in values , roles, and relations involved in marriage and family structure, using contemporary cro s-cu ltural materials leading to understanding of such problems as genera tion gap and sex role change. Sp ec ial attentio n is given to changing structure of authority, economics , and the emotional components associated with marriage and family life of today's America. Anthro. 4813 . Language and Culture. The course explores the relationships between culture and language in the following contexts: language acquisition, language and individual, social dialects, language and education , l anguage and world view, the role of language in cultural interaction and social structure, planned language change including language problems in new nations and at the international level. Each course listed below will cover the major aspects of cultural and social anthropological interest relating to th e peoples and cultural systems within the are a s in dicated. Following a survey of the geographical affilia tions of the inhabitants , the culture-history of the area will be reviewed. The ways of lif e of the indigenous populations, their relations with each other and to other peoples, and the effects of culture cha nge will b e discussed. Anthro. 4523 . Ethnography of the American Southwest. Anthro. 4533 . Ethnography of Mexico and Central America. Anthr o . 4543 . Ethnography of Andean South America. Anthro . 4553 . Ethnography of the Plains Indians . An' thr o . 4703 . Ethnography of China, Japan, and Korea. Anthro . 4743 . Ethnography of ln' dia, Pakistan, and Ceylon. Anthro. 476-3. Ethnography of Southeast Asia. ECONOMICS Students majoring in economics must take a minimum of 30 and not more than 48 semester hours in econom ics, of which 22 must be in upper division courses. The following courses are required of all economics majors: Econ. 407-408; either Math . 107 -108 and Econ. 380, or Math. 140, 241, 242 (students planning to go to graduate school in economics should take the latter option) ; Econ. 381 and Computer Science 201 (Intro duction to Computing). Majors are urged to take Econ . 380 and 381 as soon as possible , an d prior to or in conjunction with Econ. 407 and 408. Students majoring in distributed studies may m ake eco nomics their primary area of concentration by tak ing 30 semester hours in economics. Required courses for this option are Econ . 407-408 and a course in statistics. For all courses numbered above 300 , the prerequi site, unless otherwise indicated, is Econ. 201 and 202, or Econ. 300. Introductory Courses Econ. 2013 . Principles of Economics I. Purpose is to teach funda m e ntal principles, to ope n the field of economics in the way most helpful to further and more detailed study of special prob lems, and to gi've those not intending to specialize in the subjec t an outline of the general principles of economics (macroeco nomics) . Open to qualified freshmen . Econ. 2023 . Principles of Ec-onomics II. Continuation of Econ. 201 (microecono mics). Prer., Eco n. 201. Econ. 2503 . Capitalism and Slavery I. His tory of the development of slavery as an American institution from 1619 to 1970. In cludes growth of the s.lave trade, development of the plantation system , stimulation of the American eco nomy by slavery , eco nomic implications of the Civil War, theoretical freeing of the s laves in 1863 , and the development of modern slavery in Amer ica from R econs truction to the p resent . Econ'. 2513 . Capitalism and Slavery II. Continuation of Econ . 250 . Econ. 3003 . Accelerated Principles of Economics. Condensation of Eco n . 201 an d 202. Intended for students who have taken Soc. Sci. 210 and 211. Ope n to seniors witho ut prerequisite. Not open to students who have taken Econ. 201 and 202. Econ. 379-3. Consumer Economics. Application of microeconomics to the problems of the ordinary consumer: budget management, purchases, interest, etc. Intended for nonmajors . Econ. 380-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Eco nomics I. Introduction to the u se of mathematics in economics research. Prer., Math. 107 and 108; Econ. 201 and 202. Econ. 381-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Eco nomics II. Introduction to statistical methods and their applica tion to quantitative economic research. Prer., Econ. 381 and 201 and 202 . Econ. 481-3. Introduction to Econometrics. The application of mathematical and statistical technique s to problems of economic theory . Emphasi is on principles rather than computational methods or mathematical rigor. Major topics include demand, production , and cost analysis. Prer., two semesters of calculus and one semester of statistics, or consent of instructor. Econ. 4823 . Introduction to Econometrics II. Continuation of Econ. 481. Prer., Econ. 481. Economic Theory and Thought General Courses Econ. 201 and 202. S ee Introductory Courses section . Econ. 3003 . See Introductory Courses section. Econ. 4033 . The Price System. Course in mic ro economics designed for teachers and other nonmajors. Production, price, and distri bution theory in a free-market system. Assumptions and condi tions of a free-market and other market structures. Econ. 4043 . Income, Employment, and Economic Activity . Course in macroeconomics designed for teachers and other nonmajors. Theory and applications of nation al income determination , the role of money in the economy, and econ omic growth. Policy problems in dealing with unemployment, inflation, growth, and our international balance of payments. Econ. 4073 . Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Production, price, and distribution theory. Study of value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market struct ures, with special reference to the contribution of modern economic theorists. Econ. 4083 . Intermediate Macroec -onomic Theory. National income and employment theory . Emphasis on national income analysis, contemporary theories of consumption, investment, and employ ment. Econ. 4093 . History of Economic Thought . Survey o f the develop ment of economic thought from ancient to modern times. Econ. 4103 . Radical Political Economy. An introduction to modern radical economics, emphasizing Marxian critiques of capitalism: Marx 's theory of capitalist development; contemporary analyses and empirical studies of monopoly capitalism and imperialism; Marxian views of the future of capitalism; mainstream critiques of radical political economics . Ec-on. 492variable credit . Special Economic Problems. (For majors in economics; others by consen t of instructor .) Design e d to give seniors a chance to evaluate critically some practical or theoret ical problem s under supervisio n , and to present re su lts of their thinking to fellow students a nd instructors for cr iti cal evaluation.

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Econ. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required. Fiscal and Monetary Theory and Policy; Public Finance Econ. 411-3. Monetary and Banking Systems. Survey of major monetary and financial institutions, such as commercial banks, Federal Re serve System, and savings institutions, and the struc ture of debt from the standpoint of how their operation affects the money supply and its circulation. Econ. 412-3. Monetary Theory and Policy. Theories of inflation and deflation and their effects upon economic growth and prosperity. Goals of monetary policy; problems involved in trying to achieve these goals ; survey of some recent monetary policies in action. Econ. 421-3. Public Finance I. Taxation, public expenditures, d ebts, and fiscal policy. Role of public finance in time s of peace and war. National , state, and local taxation, with some special attention to the state of Colorado. Econ. 422-3. Publi c Finance II. Continuation of Public Finance I. Either course may be taken separately. International Economics and Economic Development Econ. 441-3. lnternation 'al Trade and Finance. Theories of interre gional and international trade, private and public trade, world population and resources, tariffs , and commercial policy . Inter national economic organization. Econ'. 477-3. Economic Development-Theory and Problems I. Theoreti cal and empirical analysis of problems of economic develop ment in both underdeveloped and advanced countries. Econ. 47B-3. Economic Development-Theory and Problems II. Cur rent of economic development, with emphasis on ac celerating and maintaining growth . Econ. 487-3. Economic Development of Latin America. Current prob lems of economic development in Latin America. Econ. 489-3. The Economics of Africa and the Middle East. Current problems of development faced by African and Middle Eastern economies. Emphasis on case studies, regionalism, planning, and ramification of economic change . Economic History, Systems, and Institutions Econ'. 250 and 251. See Introductory Courses section. Econ. 451-3. Economic History of Europe. Evolution of industrial society with emphasis upon the growth and development of En glish indu stry and commerce. Econ. 4523 . Economic History of the United States . American eco nomic organization and in s titutions and their development from colonial times to the present. Econ. 471-3. Comparative Economic Systems. Critical study of so cialism , capitali s m , communism, cooperatives, and other pro posed economic systems. Human Resources Economics and Labor Economics Econ. 460-3. Introduction to Human Resources. Economics of in vestments in man, including the economics of poverty and the application of cost benefit analysis to s ocial welfare programs . Econ. 461-3. Labor Economics. Study of problems associated with determination of wages , hours, and working conditions in the American economy. History and analysis of economic effects of trade unionism and other social institutions, including agen cies of formal government which have been developed to pro mote equality of bargaining power between labor, management, and the public. Econ. 462-3. Economics of Collective Bargaining. Scientific analysis of processes by which labor and management democratically reach agreements; how differences between labor and manage ment are settled by means of grievance procedure and arbitra tion ; and overall economic effect of collective bargaining on goods produced by the national economy . Demonstrations, workshops , and lectures . Econ. 4633 . Income Security. Development of social insurance in various countries, with emphasis on the United States . Security in old age, unemployment, accident, sickness, and other income-College of Undergraduate Studies I 37 loss situations. Economic analysis of costs and risks of social security; types of carriers , problems of administration . Critical examination of recent American social security legislation . Econ. 464-3. Collective Bargaining, Labor Law, and Administration'. Study of social pressures that are shaped into labor policy ac ceptable to labor, management , and the general public by vari ous means of socia l control. Evol ution of a "c ommon law " of labor relations out o f free collective bargaining and arbitration . Prer. , senior status. Government and Business; Industrial Organization Econ'. 4563 . Economics of Agric ulture . Economic analysis of the agricultural sec tor and of problems and poli cies related to agri culture and other primary industries. Econ. 469-3. Government in the Economy. Analysis of the role of government in the economy, neo-classical microeconomic theory as a point of departure for understanding what a free market system can and cannot accomplish. Prer., Econ. 403 or equiva lent . Econ. 474-3. Economic Organization of American Industry. Structure and performance of some important American manufactur ing industries . Econ'. 476-3. Government Regulation of Business. Economic charac teristics of public utilities and analysi s of problems of regulation and control. Urban, Regional, and Environmental Economics Econ. 425-3. Urban Economics. Analy sis of the level, distri buti on, stability , and growth of income and employment in urban re gions. Urban pov e rty , housing , land u se, transportation, a nd local public services , with s pecial refer ence to economic effici ency and social progress. Econ. 4533 . Resource Economics. Application of econ omi c theory to resource-oriented industries . HISTORY Undergraduate students m a joring in history must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in hi s tory, 16 of which must be upp e r division . Not more than 45 hours i n the student's major area will count toward the 120-hour requirement. As of fall 1973, a student must have a cumul a tive grade-point average of 2 . 0 or better in the major to graduate. A history major m ay fulfill his lower division course requirements through any one of the following three options: 1. Hist. 101 and 102; 2. Any two 200-level courses in Anci ent , European, African , or Asian hist ory ; 3 . Eith e r Hist. 101 or 102 , plus one 200-level course in Ancient, European , African, or Asian history; Plus any one of the following three options: 4. Hist. 150 , plus either Soc. Sci. 210 or 211; 5 . Hist. 150 , plus any 200-lev e l c our se in Am e rican or Latin Americ a n history ; 6. Any two 200-level courses in American or Latin American history. Hist. 101-3. History of Western Civilization I. Contributions of Greek thought; Roman and Christian elements in early Euro pean civilization; rise of Islam; feud alis m ; c onfli c t of papacy and e mpir e; medi eva l l ea rning, lit e r atu re , and art; rise of d y na tic s tates ; the Ref o rmation ; the age of discovery ; th o ught and cul ture in the early modern period. Hist. 1023 . History of Western Civilization II. S c ientific revolution ; French a b s oluti s m and E ngli s h constitutionalism, theory, and prac tice ; rise of Russia and Pru s sia; th e E nli g htenment ; French Revolution and s pread Liberali s m and Nationalism; ev olu tion of an indu s trial soci ety ; Rom anticis m and Reali s m ; the unifi cation of Italy and Germany ; Imperialism; th e age of W o rld Wars; Total itarian i s m ; contempo rary European philo so phy, art and science.

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38 I University of Colorado at Denver Hist . 1503 . Introduction to United States History. Survey of Ameri can history from colonial times to the 1960s. Emphasis on the major forces and events that have shaped American society. Hist . 2153 . Afro-American H istory I. Major emphasis o n the eve nt s that have occurred in the life of the Afro-American from the time of his first landing in the U . S. to the present. Hist . 216-3. Afro-Ame rican History II. Continuat ion of Hist. 215. Hist. 250-3. Topics in American History. Topica l approach to American hi s t ory, s urvey ing the major forces t h at have affected the development of the United S tates and treating each topic as a compl ete unit. Suggested background : His t. 150. Hist. 258-3. History of Colorado. Hist. 2713 . History of the Modern For East I. An introduction to Asian civilization. Focus on Japan, China, and Southeast Asia in the 19th century . Hist . 2723 . History of the Modern For East II. Asia in world affairs. Focus on Japan, China, and Southeast Asia in the 20th century . H ist . 2813 . History of Latin America I. An introduction to Latin civilization in Amer ica. Focus on period before independence. Hist . 2823 . H istory of Latin America II. Latin America s ince inde pendence. Focus on Mexico , Brazil , and Argentina. Hist . 3843 . History of the Mexican Americans in Colorado . A his tory of th e Mexica n-Am erican experience in Colorado with emp h asis on 20th century urbanization, especially wit hin the Denver metropolitan area. Hist . 3953 . Problems in African History. Hist . 4053 . The Rocky Mountain West. Emphasis will be on growth and change in Colorado. His t 4063 . History of the Britis h Empire/ Commonwealth . Analysis of development , administration , and dis s olution of the empire. H ist. 4233 . Europe During the Ren' aissance . S ocial and intellectual hi st ory of Europe fro m the 14th to th e 16th centuries. Hist . 4243 . Europe During the Reformation . Social a nd intellectual history of Europe from the 16th to th e 18th ce nturi es. Hist . 4303 . France Since 1815. A topic al approac h to the evolu t io n of modern France. The topics are essent i ally politica l , economic, and cultural. Hist . 431-3 . Nineteenth Centur y Europe. Social and economic change in the political and intellectua l context betw een 1789 and 1914. Su ggested background, Hist. 102 . H ist . 4323 . Twentieth Century Eur-ope. Social and eco nom ic change in the political and intellectual context between 1914 and 1970. Suggested background, Hist. 102. Hist 4373 . International History of Europe in the 19th Century . The diplomatic process , major crises, le ading personalities , inter action between domestic and foreign policies , refiecti ' ons on causes and co n se quences of war. Su ggested background, Hist. 102 or 431. H i st . 4383 . lnternation'ol History of Europe in the 20th Centur y . In ternational organization and traditio n a l diplomacy . The Ver saille s se ttlement , the rise of re v isionist power s, ca u ses of World W a r II , wartime diplomacy , the Cold War, a nd decline of Europe's position in the world . Suggested background, Hist. 102 or 432. H ist . 4413 . History of Africa to 1840. Part I of a two-seme ster se quence introducing the student to political , economic , and cultural change in Africa. Hist . 4423 . History of Africa From 1840. Part II of a two-s e mester sequence introducing the student to poli tical, economic , and cu ltu ral c h a n ge in Africa. Hist . 445-3 . Social on' d Economi c Change in African History. An examination of change in African life. Emphasis on new direc tions in commerce, agricu l ture, lab o r, religion , famil y structure, a n d urbanization. His t . 446-3. History of Ireland. Anal ysis of the relationship be tween the E nglish and the Irish from th e Irish perspective . Hist . 4493 . The Gilded Age: U . S . History 1865-1900. A study of the evolution and growt h of major American institutions since t h e Civil War. Topics will include the rise of heavy indu stry, the growth of the city , emergence of " big politics," changes in re l igion , social thought, manners and morals, and many others. Hist . 4503 . A Political History of Africa . An a nalysis of the variety of political units in Africa and the ways in whic h they have changed . Hist . 4533 . Civi l War and Reconstruction . Focuses on eve nts lead ing to the outbreak of war , th e war itself a nd its impact on North and South , and the effort s to reconstruct Southern s ociety during the post -war period. Hist. 4543 . The Progressive Movement and Aft er , 1900-1929. Do mestic affair s a nd foreign policy . In domes tic affairs, emphasis on the Progres ive Movement and the re ac tion aga in s t it in the twenties. In foreign affairs, emphas i s on s lowl y increasing but reluctant parti cipation in world powe r politics . Hist . 4553 . Recent Americ a , 1929 to Present. Major trend s in U.S. hi story since the Great Crash, emphas izing th e cha n g in g role of the federal governme n t in total natio n a l lif e , and the de velopment of the s pirit of int e rnation a li s m in fo rei g n policy . Sug gested background , Hist. 454. Hist . 456-3. The Jackson ian Era. Stud y of a period of change and conflict. Emphasis on co nditions that produced s triking altera ti o ns In the socia l , p yc hological , and economic organization of the United State s, as well as viole n ce and war. Hist. 4603 . Mexi can America n Southwest . The hi tory of Mexican Americans from the origins of the Aztec Empire to modern times. Emphasis on the fusion of Spanis h and Indian cultures in Mex . ico and the Southwe t , the de velopmen t of Mexican Ameri can soc iety , a nd it s rel ations to American socie t y . Hist. 4633 . American Society and Thought to 1865. Analysis of social ideas to 1 865 , and the impact of these ide as on American society. Hi st . 4643 . American Society and Thought Since 1865. Analysis of s ocial ideas si nce 1865, and the impact of the se ideas on American society. Hist . 465-3. History of Ameri can Economi c Growth I. Study of En glish mercantili s m in the American Colonies and the develop ment of the early n ational economy in the 1850 . Hist. 4663 . History of American Economic Growth II. Study of in dustrialization during and si nce the Civil War, America 's role as a world economic power, the great depression of the 1930s, and internal development s sin ce 1945 . Hist . 4673 . Diplomatic History of the United State s to 1900. The d e velopment of American fo r eig n policy , emphasizing the evolu tion of the bas ic poli cy of i s olatio n from European affai rs and increa s ing involvement in t h e Pacifi c and East Asia . Hist. 4683 . Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1900. The conflict between isolationism and internationalism in American fo reign poli cy, ending in the triumph of the l atter. Suggested background , Hist. 467 . Hist. 4693 . The Old South and National Disunion. Early develop ment of the southern United States, the institution of slavery, and the sectio nal conflict leading to national disunion . Hist . 4703 . History of Urban America . Development o f the Amer ican city from colonial times to the present. The chief focus of the course will be upon major changes in the proces s of urbanization . Subjects will include town promotion, rise of heavy indu st rial cities, utopi a n towns, emergence of the city "boss ," urban transportation, and the future of American cities. Hist . 4733 . History of China . Deals with trad itional China cover ing a period from the " beginning " to the mid-19 t h century. Both descripti v e and interpretive approaches are employed, concentrating on those " factors " (intellectua l, social , polit i cal, technological , economic , e t a/. ) in volved in the de velopment of the Chinese civilization . In th e attempt to underst a nd the prob lem s and challenges confronting the Chinese, it is hoped that the course will provide an appreciation for the Chinese and Chinese hi story a nd their relationship to our own world . Hist . 4743 . History of China . A combination of descriptive ma teria l with a broad analytical base is applied to an investigation of the emergence and d evelopment of modern China. The aim of the course is to both sketc h and analyze the dimens ions of the " Chinese cri sis " c o mpounded of dyna tic and Imperia l col lap se, imperialist incursions, social , politica l , and intellectual r e-orientation, the plight of a p e opl e ravaged by poverty , op pression , and war, and the dramatic res haping of 20th-century China caught in the throes of national and s ocial rev olution. Hist. 4793 . United States Mili tary Histor y to 1900. Development of the milita ry and n ava l art of war in American his tory, in both its p e acetime and wartime aspects , from colon ial times to the end of the Spanish-American war. Emphasizing the increas ing influence of tec hnolo gy on warfare after 1850. Hist . 4803 . United States Military Histor y since 1900. American military and nava l history since the Spanis h -American War,

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presented as a continuing evolution in both war and peace and emphasizing the dominating influence of technology upon oper atio n s, organization, a nd pol icies. Hist. 4813 . Mexico and Central America Since Independence I. Study of soc iety, economics, and politics in the 19th century . Hist . 4823 . Mexico and Central America Since Independence II. Stud y of society , e c onomics, and politics in the 20th century. Hist . 4833 . Mexican American History . Study of Chicano history from origins of Aztec Empire to Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ( 1848). Hist. 4843 . Mexican American Southwest . History of Chicano experience in Southwest s ince 1848 to modern times. Hist . 487-3. History of Colonialism in Southern Africa. Analysis of European and Asian communities In Africa: their origins and development and their relations with the indigenous African population . Hist . 4893 . The Modern Near East , 1789 to the Present . Emphasis on the modernization of the re gion from Egypt throug h Per sia , Anatolia, and Arabia, not only in political terms, but also in terms of the economic, social , and intellectual changes which have transformed the Near Eas t in the la st century and a half . Hist . 492-3. The Second World War . Basicall y a military-political orientation , examining the grand strategy, diplomacy, and cam paigns of the war in some detail. Emph asizes the influence of technology upon the conflict. Hist. 494.3. Imperial Russia. The Old Regime , i ndu stria lization, and culture in the 19th century. Hist . 4953 . The Russian Revolution. Origin s of the re volutio nary mov ement, and Re volution of 1905, reform efforts, the impact of World War I, the Bolshevik victory in 1917 , the Civil Wars. Hist. 4963 . The Soviet Regime. Rise of Stalin , economic de velop ment 1928-1938 , impact of World War II, the Khrushchev era. Hist . 4983 . Senior Colloquium. R eadings and discussion of emin ent modern hi s torian s and their writings . Recommended but not required for senior history majors. Hist. 499vorioble credit . Independent Study. Consent of instructor required. POLITICAL SCIENCE Undergraduate major s must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours in political science, of which at least 21 semester hour s must be in upper division courses. Courses must be distributed among the pri mary fields as listed in this bulletin , i.e., American government and politics, comparative politics, interna tional relations , public administration, and political theory and public law . The major must include the following: Pol. Sci. 1 00, 110, 200, 440 , a nd 441; Econ. 201 and 202; and one upp e r division course in each of the primary fields of political science . In addition, it is strongly recommended that all majors enroll for Pol. Sci. 201, 202 (or the Pol. Sci. 211-212 sequence) and 445 . For all courses numbered 300 and above, the pre requisite, unless otherwise inclicated, is either the Pol. Sci. 100-110 sequence or consent of the instructor. American Government and Politics Poi.Sci. 100-3. Introduction to Political Science. Introduction to the st ud y of politics and the political system and its environ ment. Designed to familiarize the st ud e nt with the basic con cepts of political scie nc e, features of the political process, types of political institutions, and political behavior. Requir ed of all majors. Poi.Sci. 110-3. The American Political System. General introduction to the American political system with emphasis upon the interre lations among the various levels and branches of government, formal and informal in s titutions, processe s, and behavior. Re quired of all majors. Prer., Poi.Sci. 100 . Not open to those who have had Pol.Sci . 101 and /or 102. College of Undergraduate Studies I 39 Poi.Sci. 200-3 . Research in Contemporary Political Topics. Applica tion of basic political concepts to current political problems . Emphasis on the relationship between theories of political ac tion and empirical te sts of these theorie s . Prer., Pol. Sci . 100 . Poi.Sci. 2103 . Power in American Society . Who h as powe r in the United States ; how is power distributed and used; what are the sources of power and legitimacy; checks and potential checks on decisi' on making by the powerful ; consequences of power al l ocation and use for citizen well being ; c o ntinuity and change in the structure of power in America. Prer. , Poi.Sci. 110 or con se nt of instructor. Poi.Sci. 400 3 . Government Regulation of Business. Consideration of theory and pract ice of government relationship to business and profe ssional ac ti vity on both state and national levels. Analysis of selected regulatory programs and policies (S h erman Act, Clayton Act , Federal Trade Commission Act) and their impact on the con titutional sys tem . -Poi.Sci. 4023 . Legislatures and Legislation . Structure and organi zation of legislatures and process of statute lawmaking ; political forces and interest group s; problems o f representation and the public interest. Poi.Sci. 4033 . Political Parties and Pressure Groups. History and practice of party politics in the United Stat es. Nature, structure, organization , and functi ons of political parties and pressure gro up s. Analysis of pressure politics and political behavior. Pol. Sci. 404-3. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. Continuation of Pol. Sci. 403. Poi.Sci. 405.3. Public Opinion and Political Behavior. Theories of public opinion and propaganda; the formation, management, and measurement of political attitudes; behavior of men and groups in politics , e pecially Americans. Systematic conse quences of politi ca l attitudes. Poi.Sci. 4063 . State Government and Administration . Present-day national , state and interstate relations ; cons titutional develop ment; legislative , executive, and judicial processes and problems; administrative organization and reorganizati o n ; s tate finances; major state services; future of the states. Special attention to the government of Colorado. Poi.Sci. 4073 . Urban Politics . Examination of the structure of p o litical and soc ial influence in urban areas; selection of urban leadership; relationship of the political system to governmental and social institutions . Poi.Sci. 408-3. Municipal Government and Administration . Munici palitie s and their relations to t h e states and the national govern ment ; local politic s; forms of municipal gover nment ; application of ideas and tec hniq ues of public administration to management of municipal affairs; activities of cities , e . g., planning, public utilities, law enforcement, and fire protection . Poi.Sci. 409-3 . Comparative Metropolitan Systems. Comparative analysis o f the m ajor m e tropolitan systems in different countries ; the structural environment , deci ion making in the bureaucracies and political groupings , governmental interaction and communi cation . Poi.Sci. 4513 . Block Politics . Examination of black politics in the United St ates: the role of black interest groups, s tructure a nd functions of black political organization s , goals and political styles of black politicians , tre nd s and the future of black politics in the United States. See also Pol. Sci. 435 and 439 listed und er Public Administration. Comparative Politics Poi.Sci. 201-3 . Introduction to Comparative Politics I: Technological Societies. Comparison of legal-in s titutional features ; soc ial, eco nomic , and ideological forces; and patterns of recruitment and decision making; patterns of political-system maintenance and change. Empha is on persistent elements and postwar innova tions in Britain , France, Germany, and Ru s ia . Not open to those who have had Pol.Sci. 211 and /or 212. Pol. Sci. 202-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics II : Pretechnologi col Societies . Comparison of the basic political feature s of the economically developin g polities within the non-W estern world . The traditional political cult ur e , nationali s m, political integra tion, political structures, political groups in developing s ocieties , modes of political recruitment , th e s tyl e of development politics and political implications of planned s o c ioeconomic change ; evolution and revolution in the third world.

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40 I University of Colorado at Denver Poi.Sci. 410-3 . Advanced Comparative Politics._Western Europe. An intensive and comparative analysis of the political systems and processes of Western Europe. Emphasis on political culture and constitutionalism; executive-legislative relationships: elec toral systems; political parties and interest groups; administrative and judicial processes; and the impact of social changes on political institutions . Prer. , Poi.Sci. 201 or consent of instructor . Pol. Sci. 4113 . Advanced Comparative Politics-Third World . An intensive comparative examination of the political process in the non-Western world. Survey of different methodological ap proaches to the study of the non-Western political systems. The components of political development. Effective political units in a transitional society . Prevailing "sty l es" of political action, including the use of violence. Poi.Sci. 413-3 . Political Behavior and Political Systems in Latin America . Governments and politics of selected countries of Latin America. Politics and government in th eory a nd practice . Polit ical parties, movements, and conflicts. The relationships between political problems and phy sical and social envi ronments . Poi.Sci. 415-3 . Political Systems of the Middle East and North Africa . Comparative analysis of the major parameters of the political proce ss in the Middle East and North Africa. I s lamic political theory and its contemporary manifestation. The role of nation alism and the "quest for modernity" in the political develop ment of this region. Partie s and programmed modernization in transitional polities. Violent and non violent change . Poi.Sci. 4163 . Politics and Government of East Asia. Political and governmental changes within China, Japan, and Korea from the 19th century to the present. Primary emphasis on contemporary political systems and sociopolitical problem s . Poi.Sci. 418-3. Politics of Southeast Asia. Impact of the West on political theory and institutions in Burma , Thailand, Laos, Cam bodia, Vietnam , Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Con stitutions, political parties, movements, and conflicts . Influence of geographical, ec onomic , and social factors on the political systems in each country. Poi.Sci. 4193 . Political Systems of SubSaharan Africa. Analysis of major types of political systems in sub-Saharan Africa and in tensive case studies of selected countries exemplifying each type. Anticolonial movement, adoption and rejection of Western political institutions and values . Special political problems of multiracial and multicultural societies. Poi.Sci. 460-3. Politics of South Asia. Study of the political a nd administrative systems of India, P akistan, Ceylon, and Nepal. Impact of British rule on development of political institutions on the subcontinent as well as problems of political development at all levels . International Relations Poi.Sci. 421-3. International Politics . The system of national states, concepts of national interest, goals of foreign policies , conduct of diplomacy, and the bearing of these elements on the problem of peace . Presentation and evaluation o f the solutions that have been offered for the maintenance of peace. Great powers and regions of the earth in international politics today, and their roles in international tensions. Poi.Sci. 423-3. American Foreign Policy. Examination of the foun dations , assumptions, objectives, and methods of U.S. foreign policy. Special attention to the revolutionary international en vironment and to ada ptat ions thereto. Poi.Sci. 4283 . International Behavior. Pre sentation of alternate theoretical frameworks for the exp lanation of international proce sses. Theories of conflict behavior and socia l organization applied to problems of war and peace. Major emphasis on the role of systematic empirical resear ch in the development of theories of international behavior. Poi.Sci. 472-3 . Soviet and Chinese Foreign Policy. Foreign policies of the Soviet Union and of Communi s t China, including Sino Soviet conflict ; including the international Communist move ment , its ideological bases, impact on international politics, and its relations to domestic developments in the U.S . S.R. Poi.Sci. 4733 . The Middle East and World Affairs . Evolution and revolution in the Middle East. The character of nation alism in the area. Analysis of intraregional and international problems affecting the Middle East with special emphasis on the Arab Israeli imbroglio. Impact of major-power interventi on. Poi.Sci. 474-3. Sub-Saharan Africa in World Affairs . An examination of the international behavior of the new Africa. Includes preindependence antecedents and post-independence determinants , moti v es, techniques, a nd results of Afr i can s tate relations in the inter Afric a n and world-wide setting s . Impact of major-power intervention . Poi.Sci. 4753 . Africa in U .S. Foreign Policy. Examination of his toric a l b ac kground , a umption , obje c tives , methods, and results of U .S. policy toward b lack Africa. Special attention to areas under foreign or minority rule , ethnic factors , potency of eco nomic and political variables, a nd stresses between alliance policy and s ympathy for s elf determin a tion . Poi.Sci. 476-3. International Relations in the Far East. Develop ments and problem s in the modern-day relation s of China , Japan, Korea, Vietnam , and t h e We s tern powers . The Far East in world politics today . Poi.Sci. 4773 . Lati n Ameri ca in World Politics . Basic elements in Latin American international relations. United States-Latin American relations and policies . Foreign policy formulation in major Latin American republic. Public Administration Pol. Sci. 406 and 408 may be used by majors in political science to satisfy the requirement in the field of public administration . Poi.Sci. 432-3. Public Administration. Role of administration in government ; trend s in American public admini s tration; tech niques of management ; theories of public admini s tration . Poi.Sci. 435-3. Natural Resources: Policy an' d Administration. R e sources in the American e conomy; con side ration of constitution a l , political , and geogr a phic factor s in the development of re sources policy; organiza t ion, procedures, and programs for administration and dev e lopment of n a tural re s ources. Poi.Sci. 437-3. Public Financial Administration . Governmental fiscal policy , administrative organization for fis cal administration in governmental units , re v enue administr a t i on, budgeting , preaudit and postaudit, treasury management and debt administration, purchas ing , financial reporting. Economi c s ources of political corruption. Poi.Sci. 439-3. Notional Policies and Administration . Major policies and programs of th e n a tion a l governme nt and their admini s tra tion; the role of th e Pres ident and other administrators in for mulating public policy; problems of centralization and public accountability. Political Theory and Public Law Poi.Sci. 420-3 . Theories of Social and Political Change . Conserva tive, radical , and incremental approac hes to change. Rol e o f psycholo g ical and wciolog ical factors in political change. Com parative p e r s pectives on change. Self perpetuation processes of power sy s tem s and th e ir vulner a bilities. Requisite s of system maintenance a nd sys tem ch a nge. Selected case studies. Poi.Sci. 440-3. Early Political Thought . Main currents of p olitical thought in their historical s etting from Plato to the 17th cen tury , with a critical e valuation of thos e elements of continuing worth. P-oi.Sci. 4413 . Modern Political Thought. M ain current s of political thought in their historical s etting from 17th century to the present. Pol.Sci. 440 i s not a prerequi s ite for Pol.Sci. 441. Poi.Sci. 443-3. Jurisprudence . Origins of modern legal institutions and role of law in s ociety throughout the ages. Contrast be tween Anglo-Am e rican and l egal systems stemming from the Roman L a w . Law cases are s tudi e d onl y insofar as they mirror hi s toric a l a nd s ociolo g i ca l developments . Poi.Sci. 4453 . American Political Thought . His tory and develop m e nt of American political theories and ideas from colonial p e riod to present. Poi.Sci. 446-3. Administrative Law. General nature of administra tiv e l aw, typ es of admini stra tive a ction and enforcem e nt, anal y sis of rulemaking adjudic a tion , administrative due process, judicial review. Poi.Sci. 447-3. Constitutional Law I. Nature a nd scope of the fol lowing Ame rican con s titutional principles as developed by the U . S . Supreme Court: federali s m , juri s diction of the federal c o urts, separation of powers, the taxing power , and the com merce power. Case method.

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Poi.Sci. 449-3. American Judicial System. Examination of the prin cipal actors in the legal system: police , lawyer s , judges, citizen s . About half of the co ur se will be devoted to the study of judicial behavior, especi a lly at the Supreme Court level. Poi.Sci. 4903 . Revolution an' d Political Violence. Study, discussion , and evaluation of alternative frameworks for the analysis of revolution a nd political violence. The theoreti ca l material will be firmly couched in case situations s uch as Western , class , colonial, urban, international , hi s torical, racial , religious, and intergenerational violence . Development by the class of its own theoretical model. General Courses in Political Science Poi.Sci. 499-1 to 3 . Independent Study. Intended to give an oppor tunity for advanced students with good scholastic record s, and with appropriate courses completed , to pursue independently the study of some s ubject of special intere st to them . Subject s chosen and arrangement s made to suit the need s of each stu dent. Primarily for seniors. Prer., 15 semester hours in political science and consent of instructor. SOCIOLOGY Majors in sociology are required to comp lete 30 hours in sociology with a grade of C or better. Of the se courses , 16 must be upp er division. As no fixe d se quence of courses is prescribed , it is recommended and expected that students will select an a dviser from the sociology faculty to help them develop their progr ams. This is particul a rly important for those intending to do graduate work in sociology. Soc. 111-3. Introduction to Sociology. Sociolo gy as a scie nc e; m a n and culture; s o cial groups; s o cial i nsti t utions; socia l interaction s; social change. Soc. 1283 . Race and Minority Problems . Rac e and racism; fact s and myths about great populations , includin g psy c hological ; social, and cultural s ources of bia s and di s crimination . Soc. 129-3. The Negro in American Life and History. Examination of the myth and the reality of the Negro in America since the Colonial Period. Soc. 1913 . Contemporary Social Issues. Introductory con s ideration of some 30 current s ocial c ontrover sies, s u c h as democra cy, capitalism, race and ethnic groups , marriage, the family, crime, international tensions, and world order. Designe d to improve the studen t 's ability to understa nd current debate and to formu late opin ions for himself . Soc. 1923 . Contemporary Social Issues. Continuation of Soc. 191. Soc. 199variable credit . Independent Study in Sociology. Consent of instructor required . Soc. 2213 . Elementary Population Studies . Elements of demog r a phy , n ata lity , mortality, international and internal migration, population growth, population policy. Soc. 222-3. Human Ecology. Ecological organiz atio n and proce sses in urban , rural, and region al areas. Soc. 239-3. Mass Society. Study of the emergence of modern society. Emphasi s on the role o f masses and of se p arated and isolated indi v iduals who lack unifying values and purpo s es. Soc. 2463 . Introduction to Social Psychology. Surv ey of ihe follow ing varieties o f social p sych olo gy: p syc hoan alysis, symbolic in teractioni s m , culture and pers onality, structu r a l-functionalism , and psychological s ocial p syc hology . Topics treated on the introductory level. Soc. 2483 . Social Movements. Soci al bases a nd dev e lopment fea ture s of suc h modern , social, and politic al movements as com muni s m, socia lism, liberali sm, a nd conservatism. Soc. 2503 . Social Problems and Social Change . So c iolo g ical analysis of problems resulting from recent s ocial changes including o ccu p ational shif t s and the redefinition of work , adolescent roles and re sponses, the massification of education, publ ic responses to crime, d eli quen cy, and mental illness , race and minority rela tions, community disorganization , and the effects o f population growth and r e distribut ion on underdeveloped areas. Emphasis on the development of concept s and theoretical propositions f o r problem analy sis. College of Undergraduate Studies I 41 Soc. 2553 . Analysis of Modern Society. Examination of various oci o log i c al views of modern society includin g those of Lundberg , Richard son, Mills, Rie s m an, Goffman, Sorokin , Cohen, and others. Soc. 3153 . History of Sociologi cal Thought I. Major s o c i a l theorists from early times to date , incl uding Aristotl e, Pl at o , M ac hi ave lli, Comte , Spen cer. Soc. 316-3. History of Soci o l ogical Thought II. Continuation of Soc. 315. Prer., Soc. 315. Soc. 3173 . Statistics . Quantitative technique s used in analyzing s ocial phenomena. Prer., Math. 107 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor . Soc. 4093 . Undergraduate Research Practicum . Practical experience for undergraduates in application of principle s of research design and data processing to a s ocial resea rc h problem selected by the instructor. Soc. 4173 . Research Methods . Design of s o cia l research . Appli cation of s tatistical techniques and procedures to social phe nomena . Prer . , Soc . 317 or co nsent of instructor. Soc. 421-3. Advanced Population Studies . The soci'ological impor tance of population study . Advanced demo gra phic analysi s and population theory. Natality, mortality , p rob l e m s of population growth and international and intern al migrations , popul ation policy , and a s pects of population plann ing and control. Soc. 4243 . Migration. World migr ation patterns. Migration examined as an effect and as an influence. Planned and un planned migratio n . Soc. 4263 . Urban Sociology. The city in terms of its s oci al struc ture , resid e ntial and institutional p a tternings, p roc e sses of inter action, d em o g raphi c processes, and patterns of growth and change . Soc. 433-3. Communities. R eview and appraisal of community studies. Soc. 4433 . Technology and Modernization . D escripition and ana l ysis of changing social structure and s ocial relationships as a response to technological innovation and change . Soc. 4443 . Social Stratif i cation . Status, s ocial mobility , and class in selected s o c ieties ; elite s and leader shi p problem s . Soc. 4463 . Persons in Society. The self in s ociety-socialization , p rese nt at ion of self and identity, social types , roles , and ca reers in historical situations. Persons in theories of socia l organization and action . Soc. 4493 . Social Control. Informal and formal regulative pro cesses in s o c i a l beh avior, wit h referen ce to t ec hnique s and pro cesses of s ocial control , s u c h as prop aga nda , the poli tical order, a nd other institutions. Soc. 4513 . Social Inst i tutions . Organized syste m of pract ices and social role s developed about values . Machinery evolved to regu late the p rac tices and behavior-family, church, government, economy, recreation , education. Soc. 4533 . Social Change . Process of change in Western s o c iety and its effects on the individual, the family, and economic and p o litical institutions. Attention to extremist re spo nse t o ten s ions produ ced by rapid s o cial c h ange in America . Hi s tori ca l ana lysis of the cau es of W es t ern development as a context i n w hi c h to study t h e factors aiding and impedin g the modernization of the emerging nations. Soc. 4543 . Social Mobility. Status, occupational, a nd i ncome change examined from view point s of individu a l , organizati on, and socie ty as a wh ole. Mobility th eo ries propo s ed by Sorokin, Rogoff , Len ski, Svalastoga , Lip s et , and Duncan . Special atten tion to methods of analyzing change , comparative socia l mobil ity, and status equilibration . Soc. 4553 . Sociology of the Family. The family as a socia l in st itu tion. Historized d evelo pment and co ntempor ary cross-cultural analy sis with emphasis on the contemporary American family. Soc. 4583 . Contemporary American Social Movements. Examina tion o f contemporary social movements and bases of cleavage a nd conflict in contemporary America . R adical Ri g h t a nd New Left , civil rights , and s tudent activ i m stud i ed in the li g ht of contemporary s ocial facts and th eir hi s tori ca l roots. Soc. 4673 . Sociology of Education. Sociological s t udy of the tech niques of education. Cl ass room proc e du res, schoo l ad ministra t i on, educator s' roles, and reciproc a l relations o f school and community. Soc. 4703 . Sociology of Law. Con s ideration of t he formulation, interpretation , and l egit im acy of leg a l rule s within a c onte xt of social organization.

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42 I University of Colorado at Denver Soc. 4773 . The Sociology of Work. The analysis of work in a variety of organiza,tional settings with an emphasis on the changing meanings of work. Concern is a l so directed to the interrelationships of the work and the non -wo rk world. Soc. 478-3. Industrial Sociology. The way in which the factory and the community influence sociologica l aspects of industrial rela tions. Soc. 4793 . Large-Scale Organization . Analysis of sociological theories of bureaucracy and inquiry into bureaucratic develop ments in governmental, industrial, military, and welfare insti tutions. Soc. 4903 . Senior Seminar . Seminar for senior sociology majors considering important concepts , issues, and problems in sociology. Soc. 495-3. Criminology. Nature and causes of crime as a social phenomenon . Processes of making l aws, breaking laws, and reaction toward the breaking of laws. Cultural significance of the processes of determining the reactions of the community to offenders of the law; th eory of practice of punisliment; purposes, uniformity, and simi l arities of the kinds of di s position. Socio logical concepts are used in this area-culture, mores, institu tions, competition, conflict, social change, and social control. Soc 4963 . Juvenile Delinquency. Factors involved in delinquent behavior. Problems of adjustment of delinquents and factors in treatment and in post-treatment ad ju stment. Soc. 499-variable credit . Independent Study . Consent of instntctor required. SOCIAL SCIENCE These courses can satisfy, in part, the area require ment in the social sciences. Soc.Sci. 210-3. The Study of Man in Society I. An integrated intro duction to concepts an d methods of the social scie nc es as they apply to analysis of societal contexts and analyses of societies at g i ven points in time . Soc.Sci. 211-3 . The Study of Man in Society II. Continuation of Soc. Sci. 210. Emphasis on pro cesses in society-social and cultural change and evolution , industrialization , urbanization, and other dynami c institutions . Soc.Sci. 3203 . The Legal Process. Nature of l ega l rea soning and methods of legal d eve lopment. Reciprocal relations of law with political philoso phy and ethics. Materials drawn from both public and private l aw. Soc.Sci. 3213 . The American Indian an d Federal Law. In compari son with other citizens, what has been a nd is the leg al status of American Indian s? The objectives of this course are to survey a special status as set forth in Federal l aw, to identify its prob lems, costs and benefits to Native Americans , and to acquaint course participant s with applications and politics of the law through the study of actual case Soc.Sci. 324-3 . The Consumer and the Law. A study of the rights of the con s umer when dealing with corporations, unions , and government agencies. Soc.Sci. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto I. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the Black, di sa dvantaged com munity. Soc.Sci. 3263 . Pathology of the Ghetto II. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the Black, disadvantaged community . Soc.Sci. 3273 . Comparative Urban Cultures . Emphasis on historical background and social co ncern s of cultural and ethnic groups which constitute a city. Soc.Sci. 3293 . The Asian Americans . An inve s tigation of the historical , ocial , and psychological identity of the Asian Ameri cans and their communities in the United States. Soc.Sci. 3303 . Women in' a Changing World. Offers an understand ing of the hi s torical, econ omic, and soci o cultural background of women 's changing roles and functio n in th e contemporary world. The approach and m aterial to be used are multidisci plinary . The goal is to reach a balanced und erstanding throu gh analysis and di s cu ss ion based on objective information. Soc.Sci. 4023 . (Health Ad. 602. ) Economic and Political Determinants in a Health Care System. Designed to acquaint the st udent with the health care industry, in terms o f both the organization and delivery of health care services and the s ocioe conomic conse quences of tho se services. Soc.Sci. 4053 . Education and Culture in Historical Perspective . An analysi s of the inter act ion of culture a nd education in Western society since the R enai sance . Soc.Sci. 4103 . World Politics in the 1970s. A study of great power politics, the role of the Uni t ed Nations orga nization , and select cri sis situations in the contemporary period . Soc.Sci. 4113 . Business and Society. (B.Ad. 411.) Examination of the interrelationships betwee n bu s ine ss, society, and the environ ment. Topics will include perspectives on the s ocio -ec onomic business system, current public poli cy, issues and socia l re sponsibility, and ethics. Prer., Econ. 201-202, Poi.Sci. 110 , Soc . 111. Soc.Sci. 4203 . Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis. The course will focus on a contemporary problem confronting Metropolitan Denver. URBAN STUDIES MAJOR All students majoring in urban st ud ies will be ex pe cted to meet the following course requirements: 1. Soc. Sci . 210 a nd 211, The Study of Man in So ciety I and II. 2. Four of the following five upper divis ion courses : Urban Economics (Econ. 425); Urban History (Hist. 470); Urban Politics (Pol. Sci . 407); Urba n Anthro pology (Anthro. 444); and Urban So ciology (Soc . 426). 3. In addition, each s tudent must successfully com plete the Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis (Soc. Sci. 420). This cour se will focus upon the analysis of a single local urban problem from an interdisciplinary perspective . Extensive field work will further familiarize the student with the roles a nd techniques required in the analysis of urban problems and will serve to inte grate in a practical applied setting theories and sources of information developed in previous academic work . 4. This core program s pecifies 21 of the 30 hours cur rently required as the minimum in a given major for graduation. In addition to the required core courses, a student selecting this major will be required to take an additional12 hours according to one of the following options: Option I-concentration in a given discipline. (The student is required to t a ke an additional 12 hours in a given discipline, th e exact courses in this concentration to be specified by the disci pline concerned.) Option lJ -distributive option. (The student is re quired to take an additional 12 hours from a lis t of recommended courses, the actual course to be worked out in consultation with a faculty adviser.) Ethnic Programs Progr a m s for minority groups were established on the Denver Campus in 1969. Since then the quality and scope of these programs h ave expanded greatly. Courses are presently off ere d in Asian American, Black , Mexican American , and Native American Studies. Student organizations provide assistance with recruit ing , counseling, personal guidance , and tutoring ; finan cial help is availab l e through grants and the Work-Study Program. The Study Skills Center , located in the lib rary build ing, offers tutoring and help for students who are academically d e ficient.

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ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES A NDREW G. WILLI A MS, Direc tor Soc.Sci. 329-3. T h e A sian Ame r i cans. Will examine the experience of Asian Americans from a sociological perspective. Emphasis will be on an analysis of activities and problems. The history of the groups will be reviewed and the contemporary situation in their communities will also receive attention . Class will be struct u red around lecture / discussion, reading materi als, speak ers, films, and field trips. Students wiU have the opportunity to work on projects related to Asian American communities and peoples. Soc.Sci. 3303 . Topi c s on Asian Ameri cans. Course will examine specific topics on Asian Americans to be selected by the in structor and the students, studying in detail subjects related to the Asian American experience and communities . BLACK STUDIES CECI L E . GLENN , Director BI.St. 1015 . Swahili I. Beginning Swahili with emphasis on oral communication. Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, prac tice in reading and speaking. Language lab. and conversation session. (Taught at Metropolitan State College.) BI.St. 1025 . Swahili II. Intermediate Swahili with review of es sentials of grammar; detailed analysis of texts. Language lab. and conversation session. (Taught at Metropolitan S tate Col l ege.) BI.St. 112-3. Int r oduction to Block Stud ies. A course designed t o acquaint new students with the history , purpose, organization, and goal of the Black Education Program. BI.St. 1153 . Law and M inorities. D esigned to acquaint students with the legal system of American society, incl u di n g contracts, buying and selling, wills and inheritance , family re l ations, civil wrongs, and criminal law in order to develop a cooperative rela t i ons h ip between the law and minorities. BI.St. 1103 . B l ock Con t e mporar y Social Issues. D esigned t o expose the student to those areas of intellectual , social, cultural, eco nomic , political, and educational concerns relevant to the Afro American experience . Principally an introductory survey of pri mary issues currently affecting the black man. BI.St. 1603 . Economic History o f Africa. A study of t he black man in Africa before and after the coming of Europeans with em phasis on the economic aspect of Africa's historical develop ment. BI.St. 201 -3. Swahili I ll. Advanced S wahili with emp hasis on t h e deve l opment of spoken fluency and on reading of contemporary Swahili materials. Prer., Swahili I I. (Taught at Metropolitan S tate College.) BI.St. 2033 . Behavioral Analy s i s I. A psycho l ogy course wh i c h dea l s with the interrelationships between the black individual and his social environment. Social influences upon motivation, perception, and behavior . The development a n d c h ange of atti tudes and opinions in the ghetto . BI.St. 204-3. B ehavio ral Analysis II. Psychological analysis of small groups , social stratification , and mass phenomena such as riots. Continuation of BI.St. 203 . BI.St. 2 1 0 3 . Politi c s of C o nt e mporar y Africa I. S ystematic survey of m odern Africa with special emphasis on selected countries, both independent and nonindependent. Southern Africa: political im pacts of racial and religious problems , stressing recent develop ment in Rhodesia, South Africa, and the Portugu ese colonies of A n gola and Mozambique. BI.St. 2 1 5-3. Afro-Ameri can H i s t o r y I. Survey of t h e history of Afro-Americans. Study, interpretations, and analysis of major problems, issues, and trends affecting the black man from pre slavery to the present. BI.St. 2 1 6 3 . Afr o -American History II. Continuation of B l.St. 215. BI.St. 2203 . Black Social Movements. (Soc. 228.) D evelopmental paradigms for black social movements. Differential linear movements , theories of nationalism , integration, separatis m , rhetorical nationlism , and tyranny. BI.St. 2 21-3 . Black S o c ial T h eory. (Soc. 229 . ) Historical paradigms for black social movements. Strategies a n d tactics of racial o ppression, recurring ideo l ogy, Pan-Africanism, nationalism, College of Undergraduate Studies I 43 civ il rights, b l ack power, and ri o t movements . C o ntinuation o f BI.St. 220 . BI.St. 2233 . Religion of the Block Mon. Critical examination of the black family's utilization of religious beliefs and practices. BI.St. 2272 . ln'terr e lated Studies. An integrated study of the development of the b lack man i n the arts, h istory, literature, politics, economics , etc . BI.St. 2323 . Surve y o f Afro-American L i t er a t ure I. (Engl. 238.) Chronological study of Afro-American literature beginning with t h e 18th cen t ury . The Harlem Renaissa n ce, the depression writers , and writers from the 1940s to the present. BI.St. 2333 . Survey o f Afr o -Ame r i can L iterature II. (Engl. 239 . ) Con tinuatio n of Bl.St. 232. BI.St. 2503 . Capital ism and Slaver y I. (Econ. 250 . ) The develo p ment of slavery as an American in s titution from 1619 to 1970, the plantation system , the growth of the trade , the stimula tion of the American economy by slavery , the Civil War as an econo mic conflic t between th e industrialis t s of the North a n d t he agricultural ists of the Sout h . BI.St. 2513 . Capitalism and Slavery II. (Econ. 251.) P ost-Civil War to the p resent, trade un ions, legislation , the urban crisis, and "Black Cap italism." Continuation of Bl.St. 250. BI.St. 270-3. African -Ame r i can Art Histor y I. ( F ine Arts 270.) A study of black art in both Africa and the Americas; problems in depicti n g real life experiences of black people. BI.St. 2713 . African -Ame r i can Art H i s t ory II. (Fine Arts 271.) Continuation of B l.St. 270. BI.St. 2803 . Afro-Ameri can Music Histor y and Appre c iatio n I. A study of the history of black mu s ic . The African background and the i nfluences of Europe and the Carribbean . Emphasis on Afro-Amer ica n folk ml';ic. BI.St. 2813 . Afro-Ame r i can Music History a n d Appreciation II. Music since I 900-religious and secular. The development of jazz, modern rhythm, and blues today . Black musicians and their techn i cal development. Conti nuation of Bl.St. 280. BI.St. 3253 . Pathology of the Ghetto . ( Soc.Sci . 325 .) Des i g ned to analyze black ghetto frustration and despair as elements in urban crisis, with emphasis on possible solution s through various communit y agencies. BI.St. 3263 . (Soc.Sci. 326 . ) Continuation of Bl.St. 325. BI.St. 330 3 . Law and the Black Man. A twos eme s ter seminar which will place major emphasis on the law and legal institutions in A m erica . Particular emphasis will be p l aced on the legislative and judicia l functions in the stru ggle for civil rights. All major U.S . Supreme Court deci s ions, as well as significant legislative enactme nts, will be examined in depth. BI.St. 3703 . Culture , Racism, on d Alienat ion. Effects of racism on the individ u al per s onali t y of the recipie n t and the donor of practices evolving from participation in a racist culture. BI.St . 3903 . Modern Afri can L i terature I. (Engl. 390 . ) A survey of contemporary African literature. The main forces whic h have s h a p ed modern Afr ica n l iterature, a n d the crisis and con flicts of the African ma n and his culture i n co n tact with these forces as they are portrayed by the African writer. BI.St . 3913 . Modern African Lit e ratur e II. (Engl. 391.) Continua tion of B l.St. 390 . BI.St. 4123 . Civil R ight s and Fair Emplo y m e n t P r act i ces. Designed to give the student the necessary background to enter the field of civil rig h ts and equal employment o p p ortunities . Emphasis on Fair Empl oyment Practices procedures. Fie l d visits. BI.St. 4343 . Black A r t and Societ y I. (Fin e Arts 434.) A t wo semester seminar deali n g with black art in relationship to society. The influences of the black revolution , black culture, politica l t h ought , and integration . BI.St. 4353 . Black Art and Society II. (Fine Arts 435.) Con tin u a tion o f B I.St. 434. MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES N E REYDA LUNA BOTTO MS, Dire c to r M .AM. 100-3. ln'tr oduction t o Mexican American Stu dies . R equired of a ll incoming M . A.E. P . students. Course will rev i ew tech niques for studying language s, science, mathematics , and other areas. Systems of notetaking , research methods (including proper u e of library facilities), prepari n g for and taking exam inations, as well as b uildin g self-confidence will be discussed .

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44 I University of Colorado at Denver M.AM. 111-3. Introduction to Drama: Chicano Workshop . Designed to encourage and guide the development of student acting, di recting, and playwriting , wfth a concentration on the specia lized techniques and content of Teatro Campesino. M.AM. 112-3. Bilingual Skills. A basic language course in which students with a background of both Spanish and English can learn the similarities as well as the differences in the two lan guages. Oral as well as written exercises in Spanish . Readings in Southwest folklore. M.AM. 1273 . Contemporary Mexican American I. (Soc . 127.) An introductory soc iology course in which the basic terminology of the Chicano milieu is defined and a survey made of the Chicano movement from its early manifestations to the present. M .AM. 135-1. Beginning International Folk Donee, Spanish and Mexican . (P.E. 135.) Basic dances of Mexico and Spain: El Jarabe Tapatio ; La Bamba , jotas, and paso dobles . M.AM. 136-1. Advanced International Folk Donee, Spanish and Mexican. (P. E. 136.) An advanced course in the dances of Spain and Mexico including: jotas, paso dobles, zapateados, and huastecas, and jaranas. M .AM. 137-3. Con temporory Mexican American II. (Soc . 137.) Con tinuation of M .AM. 127. A more detailed breakdown of the many facets of the Chicano movement today. M.AM. 2053 . History of Spanish Language in the Southwest. (Span ish 205.) The Spanish s poken in the Southwest is compared to that spoken in other areas of the world . The course is the first and mo . t ba sic in the lin guis tic series in th e Spani sh department. Bas ic linguistic terminology i s introduced and ap pli ed in the analysis of Southwest Spanish. Field research will be expected of student. M .AM. 211-3. Contemporary Mexican Literature in Translation . Mexi can literature since World War I ha s been in the forefront of literary innovations directly reflecting the rapi'd progress and change s in the society. The purpose of the course is literary but serves also to dispel many false views of Mexico as a rural, traditionally conservative country. M .AM. 2123 . Contemporary Latin American Literature in' Transla tion. The approach is the same as in M .AM. 211. The best of th e contemporary L ati n American authors are studied: Borges, Fuentes, Rulfo, Carpentier, Cortazar , and others. M .AM. 2133 . History of Chicano Art . A s urvey of art, indigenous as well as that with Spanish and Mex ican influence. The focus on the Mexican American includes the fields of painting, sculp ture , and architecture . M .AM. 3003 . The Chicano Movement. A study of the ideas of the contemporary thinkers and leaders of today's Mexican American and the events which have shaped them . M .AM. 302-3. Methodology of Tutoring the Educationally Disadvan taged. A course designed to improve the tutorial skills of upper classmen, especially Chicanos, or tho se who expect to help minority students . Concentration on tutoring of ba s ic s kill s re qu ired for M.A.E.P . and Special Services tutors. M .AM. 310-3. Mexi can American Ethnic Relation's. (Same as Anthro. 310 .) The anthropology of North American s of Span ish , Spanish Indian , and Mexican National descent , ethno-his torical backgrounds, current interrelation s and social movements among rural and urban groups. Cultural patterns , identity main tenance, and the social forms and problems of national incor poration. M.AM. 311-3. Mexican Literature in Translation-Poetry . A survey of the masterpieces of Mexican poetry in English translations from Aztec poetry to modern day. M.AM. 312-3. Mexican Literature in Translation-Narrative. A survey of the mas terpieces of Mexican narrative works in English translations, from the Popol Yuh a Chilam Balam to the contemporary period . M .AM. 313-3. Arts of the Mexican Revolution. A study o f the art form s th a t developed during the years of the Mexican Re volution . Both plastic and letters included . M.AM. 3403 . Social Psychology and the Mexican Ameri can . (Psych . 34 0 .) Ex poses students to the research on Mexican Americans in the fields of intelli g ence and achievement, langu ag e and learning ability, attitud es , perception, personality , and motiva tion. M .AM. 369-3. Historical Geography of the Southwest. Regiona l st udy of m a n and c ulture in relation s hip to the environment. M .AM. 383-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado I. ( Hist. 38 3.) Re sea rchor iented se minar course in which the stu dent is expected to gather material on the subject from orig ina l s ources . M .AM. 3843 . History of Mexican American in Colorado II. (Hist. 384 . ) Continuation of M.AM. 383. M.AM. 399-3. History of the Mexican i n the Southwest . A survey of the his tory of the Southwestern r egio n of the U . S. from the in digenou s ori gins, through Spanish conquest and colonization and l a ter Anglo invasion. M .AM. 405-3. Intergroup Relations. (Soc. 405. ) A study of inter group (race) re l ati ons at the small group level. Includes anal ysis of a group that h as been stratified into a majority number of white students and a fixed number of minority st udents . M .AM. 412-3. Contemporary Chicano Literature-Poetry . (Engl. 412.) A study of the present poetry produced by Chicanos. M .AM. 4133 . Contemporary Chicano Literature-Short Story. (Engl. 413 . ) A study of the pre sent narrative literature produced by Chicanos. No political s lant is impo s ed. The lit erary value is emphasized. M .AM. 4303 . Chicano and the U . S . Social System. A s tudy of the Mexican American in hi s contact with the sy s tems of justi c e, education, politics and social se ts, primarily in the Southwe st. M.AM. 432-3. Education in' Multilingual Communities . ( Soc . 432.) A combi ned s ocial problem and s o ciolinguistic approach to educa tion in multilingu a l communities in the United St ates Southwe st. Topics considered will include hi s torical and contemporary trend s in sch ools' language policies and practices ; intrasc hool social a nd academic s tratification ; and consequences for student achievement , aspirations , and vocational choice and channeling. M .AM. 4593 . Mexican American in the Southwest . A study of the development of the social s tructu res of th e Mexican American in the Southw es t and the forces that have affected them. M .AM. 460-3. The Chicano Community and Community Organizat ion' s . (Soc. 460 . ) Examination of the origi ' n of th e terms "commun ity " a nd "barrio ." A comparative analysis of the internal bar rio s tructure a nd the l arge r society. Community organization a nd community de v elopment. Pos itive and negative role models / lead ers. Methods and technique s of community organi zation as rel ate d to La R aza. M .AM. 462-3. The New Chican ' o Movement . (Soc. 462.) A seminar i n which extensive field research is required of the students aimed a t di sc overing the current r ole of the Ch ica no in Ameri can society. N OTE: Spani s h 101 and 102 . Special M.A.E . P . sect ions are tau ght by a Chicano with a n und erstan ding of the particular probl e ms of th e bilingual st udent. NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES LINDA MASON, Director N.AM. 2503 . The American Indian Experience. An introduction to Native American literature and other expressive forms with emphasis on the aesthetic , linguistic , p sychological , and his toric a l properties , as well as the contemporary, social, and cul tural influence upon the native author and his material . N .AM. 3213 . The American Indian and Federal Low: A Survey of Legal Status and Problems. (Soc .Sci. 321.) A survey of the spec ial statu s of American Indians, as well as the problems, co s ts, and benefit s affecting various tribal groups and individuals as exemplified in a se lection of actual case studies . N .AM. 4363 . The American Indian in Contemporary Society. (An thro . 436.) Begins with the historical background on American Indian acculturation and per s i s tence, but emphasize s the pre sent day relations between Indian communiti es and the dominant society, stressing conditions and event s in Denver and the Southwest N .AM. North American Indian Art . (Fine Arts 472.) Survey of major tribal styles of the North American continent .

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Special Programs COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM DANIEL G UIM O N D , Coordinator The University of Colorado at Denver offers under graduates an opportunity to earn academic cred i t for approved work experience through the Cooperative Education Program. The College of Undergraduate Studies participates in this program. Students placed by the Co-op office in paid or volunteer assignments, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, may be eligible, subject to the guidelines below : 1 . The student should normally have reached the sophomore level of University work and must b e a de gree student in the College of Undergraduate Studies . 2. The participating student should have at least a 2.5 grade-point average. Stud e nts with GPAs in the 2.0 (C) to 2.4 range must obtain the approval of the d ea n in order to participate in the progr am . 3. Job experiences approved for credit should be pre professional in nature and should be gener all y related to the student's major area of study. Jobs of a routine nature, lacking experience relative to the undergraduate aca d emic curriculum, are no t suitable for University credit. 4. A job in which the learning possibilities and re sponsibilities of the student remain static will not be approved for more than one semester. In contrast, a job in which the learning opportunities and responsibil ities vary and increase may be e ligible for credit over a longer time span. 5. P rojects will be granted from 1 to 6 ho u rs of credit per semester, 3 being the normal credit for each proj ect. However, certain proj ects, such as full-time intensive internship, may be granted as much as 6 credits . 6 . Twelve semester hours will be the normal maxi mum number of credits that a student can earn in Cooperative Education. In some disciplines, Cooper ative Education hours may not count toward satisfying req u irements for the m a jor . Information and forms for placement and credit are availa bl e in R oom 811 or call ext. 555. DISTRIBUTED STUDIES PROGRAM St u dents working toward the B.A. degree may elect a major in a Distributed Studies Program in any one of the three divisions of the College. Requirements are a minimum of 60 semester hours in two or three s u bjects in which a discipline major program fo r the B.A. is offered. One o f these shall be designated the primary subject. D iscipline a d visers shall h ave the prerogative of designating acceptable secondary sub jects. A student's D istributed Studies Program shall be approved by a committee composed of an adviser in the student's primary subject and one in each of his secondary subjects. Primar y Subject. Minimum of 30 hours. (Not more than 30 hours will be required.) The grade-point aver age in the primary subject must be at least 2.0; 30 hours of work must carry grades of C or better; 12 hours must be in upper division courses in which College of Unde rgradua te Studies I 45 grades of C or b e tter have been earned. The adviser for the primary a re a may stipulate spec ific course re quirem e nts. Se conda r y Subje cts. Minimum of 30 hours distrib uted in one or two disciplines. A secondary subject shall consist of at le ast 12 hours in one discipline . Lan guage Courses. No first-year course in Englis h ( 100-101 ) or for eign language ( 1 01-102) may b e used in satisfac tion of the requirements of either a prim ary or a secondary subject. HONORS PROGRAM The Honors Progr am of the College of Undergrad uate Studies is designed for the student who likes to deal creatively with ideas and who desires to extend his educ a tion beyond the usual course requirements. The Honors Program also is responsible for deter mining which students merit the award of t he bache lor' s degree with honors: cum laude , magna cum laude , and s umma cum laude. These awards are mad e on the basis of special honor s work and not simply on the basis of grades. All honors courses are awarded upper division credit. A student may p articipa te in either discipline honors or gener a l honors, or both. To become a candidate for di scipli n e honors, the student must (1) have a 3 . 0 grade-point average; (2) complete special work such as seminars, or rese arc h projects required by his par ticular discipline; (3) take both the Undergraduate Pro gram Area Test (in Huma nities , Natural Science , and Social Science) and the Advanced Gra duate R ec ord Examination; and ( 4) take an oral exam ination given by a committee of faculty memb ers in his discipline and a member of the Honors Council. To become a candidate for general honors, the st ud e nt must ( 1) have a 3 . 0 grade-point average; (2) complete at least four general honor s courses; (3) take the Undergrad uate Progr a m Area Test; and ( 4) take oral and written honors exa min ations. Any qu alified student m ay enroll in honors courses without becoming a candidate for graduation with hon ors. There are no exa min a tions in the honors courses themselves; and no l ette r grades are awarded, only the marks H (Honors), P ( Pass), and F (Fail). D etailed information concerning the Honors Pro gram may be obtain ed from Dr. Fahrion, director , or in the Office of the Dean. Preprofessional P r ograms CHJLD HEALTH ASSOCIATE P ROGRAM The Child Health Associate Program at the Univer sity of Colorado Medic a l Center is a three year pro gram designed to tr ai n men and women in ambulator y pediatric care of infants, children, and adolesce n ts. The program emphasizes the medical a nd psycho-social aspects of health care. Grad u ates of the program re ceive a Bachelor of Science (Child Health Associate) d egree from the School of Medicine and are lic ense d to work in association with a physician in such se ttings as pr ivate physici ans' offices, neighborhood h eal th clinics, a nd public health facilities.

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46 I Uni v er s ity of Colorado at Denver Two years of college (60 semester or 90 quarter hours, including one year of b i ology; one year of chem istry; one year of psychology; and one year or 6 semes ter hours from one of the following areas-English, humanities, social sciences, or communication) are re quired. Courses in anthropology, organic chemistry, and / or Spanish are recommended. For further information write: Child Health Associate Program Box 2662 University of Colorado Medical Center 4200 East Ninth Avenue Denver, Colorado 80220 . or telephone 394-8272. At UCD , contact the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508. The Child Heal th Associate Program also has been approved to award a Master of Science degree in Child Health Associate for those students who meet the criteria for a dmitta n ce into the Graduate School. PREDENTAL HYGIENE In conjunction with the School of Dentistry, a degree program in dental hygiene is ava i lable at the University of Colorado. Dental hygiene enjoys an important role in the field of health science. The dental h ygienist is concerned with the prevention of dental disease and is the only member of the a uxiliary group in the dental profession who performs a service directly for a patient. The dental hygienist must satisfactorily complete a college program and pass the state board examination. After being licensed by the s t ate in whic h he or she wishes to practice, the dental h ygienist has many op portunities for employment in private dental offices, state and city health agencies, federal government agencies, public and priv ate schools, boards of educa tion, industrial dental clinics a n d hospi t als, and i n schools of dental hygiene as directors and teachers . Pre requisites. Two years of college (60 semester or 90 quarter hours , including English composition , 6 semester hours ; mathematics, 3 semester h ours ; psy chology , 3 semester hours ; philosophy, 3 semester hours ; speech, 3 semester hours; sociology. 3 semester hours ; general chemistry with laboratory, 8 semester hours ; and general biology with laboratory, 8 semester hours). For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508. PRE DENTISTRY The University of Colorado School of Dentistry admitted its first class in June 1973. The student planning to seek admission to the School of Dentistry should cons u lt the Heal th Sciences Committee, Room 508, concerning his program . A minimum of 90 semester hours of accredited college or u niversity work must be completed. While there is no prescribed curriculum, the following courses are re quired: Semesters General chemistry --------------------------------------------------2 Organic chemistry ------------------------------------------------------2 General biolog y ---------------------------------------------------------2 Physics -----------------------------------------------------------------------2 Calculus -----------------------------------------------------------------------1 Genetic s ----------------------------------------------------------------1 English -------------------------------------------------------------------2 Applications are due December 15 for the class starting the following June. TEACHER EDUCATION Students are referred to the School of Education of fice on the Denver Campus for detailed information concerning teacher education programs at all levels: elementary, secondary , and community college. Two avenues are open to students wishing to pre-pare themselves for careers in teaching . . 1. Elementary education majors and distributed studies majors preparing to teach at the secondary school level normally transfer from the College of Undergraduate Studies to the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year and continue on to receive the Bachelor of Science degree in Education. 2 . Students with a major program in the College of Undergraduate Studies who seek certification for teaching at the secondary school level remain in the College of Undergraduate Studies for the bachelor ' s degree, but take approximately 20 hours of profes sional education courses in the School of Education. Pre-Educa t ion Program Students pursuing elementary education or distrib uted studies majors for secondary school teachers should so indicate on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by faculty mem bers of the School of Edu cation on the Denver Campus. Application for transfer to the School of Education and for admission to the teacher education program should be made during the last semester of the sop h omore year. The minimum requirements for acceptance are: 1. Completion of at least 60 semester hours of acceptable college work with a grade-point average of 2.5 for all courses attempted, and 2 . 5 for all courses attempted at t h e University of Colorado; 2.5 in the major teaching field; 2 . 5 in the prerequisite sequence of education courses. No student will be recommended for a certification to teach in any field or subject in which th e grade-point average is less than 2.5. 2. Students planning to student teach at the secon dary school level will be held for general education requirements as follows: Semester Hours English -------------------------------------------------------------------------4-6 Physical education ---------------------------------------------------------2 Two 2-semester course combinations o f at least 12 semester hours credit each (i.e., fo u r semesters) in each of the following three fields: humanities , natural sciences, and social sciences. A total of at least 40 semester hours is required in general education. 3 . Elementary education majors a l so must take, during their first two years, M a th. 103, Bioi. 201, and Bioi. 202. Bachelor of Arts (in the College of Undergraduate Studi e s ) With Teacher Certification Students in the College of Undergraduate St u dies who intend to pursue a regular major curriculum in

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one of the disciplines or programs in the College, and who also desire secondary school teacher certification, must apply for and be accepted into the teacher educa tion program . The requirements for such ad mission are identical with those in 1 above. These students also must meet all requirements for a bachelor's degree in the College of Undergraduate Studies . Early planning is crucial for students intending to enter the teacher education program. Since the School of Education is initiating a new program at the secon dary level, students are urg ed to consult the school early and regul arly concerning new course requirements . Professional Preparation for College Teachers The School of Education offers counsel to pros pective college-level teachers and has a number of courses suitable to their needs. A program for the preparation of community college teachers is now available in some subject fields. PREJOURNAliSM Students are referred to the School of Journalism Bulletin for detailed information concerning requir e ments for the Bachelor of Science d egree in journalism , which is granted only on the Boulder Campus. Prejournalism students should so designate them selves on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by members o f the faculty of the School of Journalism (Boulder). Students normally transfer to the School of Journ al ism at the beg i nning of the junior year. Application for intra-University transfer must be filed not later th an 90 days prior to the term for which th e student wishes to register, or 60 days prior to preregi stra tion if the student participates in early registration. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.25 in prior work at the Uni versity of Colorado is required. PRELAW Students are referred to the School of Law Bullet in for details of the curriculum leading to the professional degree, Juris Doctor (J.D.), which is granted only on the Boulder Campus . The School of Law of the University of Colorado requires a bachelor's degree for admission, but does not stipulate courses that shall constitute a prel aw curriculum . The Law School Admission Test is required of all applicants for admission to the School of Law and should be taken as early as pos sible during the senior year in the College of Undergraduate Studies . Students are urged to consult the Admissions Office of the School of Law, Room 118 , Fleming Law Build ing, Boulder , Colorado 80302. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY This curriculum leading to a B . S . degree awarded by the School of Medicin e consists of six semesters of course work in the College of Undergraduate Studies followed by 12 months of clinical training at the unr versity of Colorado Medical Center in Denver. Normally, 94 semester hours of credit are earned in College of Undergraduate Studies 1 47 the Coll ege of Undergradu a te Studies and 40 semester hours of credit are allowed at the School of Medicine. To be eligible for ad mission to the clinical year at th e S chool of Medicine a student must have met all course requirement s prerequisite to clinical training as est a blished by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American Soc iety of Cli nical P a th ologists . These are a minimum of three years, 90 se mester hours , of collegi ate work with a minimum of 16 semester hours in chemistry and 16 semester hours in biologi cal sciences. A minimum of one semester of college mathematics is required an d a stro n g recom mend ation is made that physics be included in the course work taken. In additio n , the student must meet the course requirements of the University of Color a do in medic a l technology. The clinical tr aining period begins about June 15 of each year and continues for one calendar year. No s tudent s are admitted to the clinical program at any time other than in June. Stud ents must meet the grade-point requirements for gr aduation as outlined in the School of Medicine Bulletin . Curriculum for B.S. Degree in Medical Technology Courses fulfilling requirements as well as genera l electives are to be chosen in con s ult a tion with the s tudent' s adviser. 1. Six semesters of requirements to be taken in the College of Undergraduate Studies: BIOLOGY Semester Hours One full year of general biology (Bioi. 201-4 , 202-4) . It is strong l y recommended that the st udent take th e following : Animal Phy s iology (Bioi. 322 -3), Bio l ogy of Mi croorganisms (Bioi. 301-4), Pathogenic Microbiology ( Bioi. 436-4) 18 CHEMISTRY This should include one academic year of ge neral chemistry (ordin arily Chern. 103-5 and 106-5) and two semesters of organic chemistry (Chern . 331-4 and 332-4) -------------------18 MATHEMATICS Math. 107-3 , Algebra f or Soci a l Science and Bu s ine ss; Math. 108 3 , Pol ynomial Calculu s --------------------------------------------6 PHYSICS Principles of phy sics (Phys. 201-5 , 202 -5) ...... .... ............... 5 I 0 ELECTIVES (advi s ed , not required) It i s recommended that at least 8 credit hours be selected from ps yc h o logy or the soc i a l sciences. The remainder can be in biology, molecular biology, chemi s try , or mathe matics ----------------------------------------------------------------------------28 30 GENERAL CURRICULUM (advised , not required) Humanities __________________________________________________________________ -------6 Speech or communication -------------------------................ ... 3 Social scie nce s ----------------... ____________ _ ____________ .. __ . 6 Modern language -----------------------------------------------............ 3 -10 Physical education -----------------........ ....... ......... .. ..... 2 Total seme ster h ours 94-96 The courses i n biology, chemistry , a nd physics named above s hould include laboratory work. 2. One calendar year on the Medical Center cam pus in D enver. R equirements a re listed in the School of Medicine Bulletin . Forty semester hours of credit are allowed. For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.

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48 1 University of Colorado at Denver PREMEDICINE Students are referred to the School of Medicine Bulletin for information concerning ad missions policies of the School of Medicin e an d d etails of the curriculum le a ding to th e Doctor of M e dicine (M.D.) degree. There is no prescribed curriculum for the pre m e dic a l student, although certain courses are r e quir ed ( see below). Students intending to seek ad mission to the School of Medicine should fulfill all requirements for the bachelor's degree in the College of Undergr ad u a t e Studies, even though in certain cases s tud e nts m ay be admitted to a medical s chool without an undergr ad u a te degree . However, on all application and registration materials , premedical students should so de s ign a te themselves so that they may be advised by the Hea lth Sciences Com mittee, Room 508. Such students are urged to con sult regularly with their advise rs concerning choice of and requirements, applications, and evaluation for medical schools. In addition to an excellent overall aca d e mic record , premedical stude nts must present superio r work in the following courses: Semester H o urs General chemi stry ( 2 semesters) ----------------------------8-10 Organic chemistry (2 seme ters) ..................................... ... 8-10 Gene ra l biology or zoology (2 emesters) .............................. 8-10 Ph ysics includ ing laboratory (2 semesters) ................. ........... .... 8 Literat;.re (2 seme st ers) ........... ........ .................................... . ....... . 6 Analytic geometry a nd c a lculu s ( 2 semesters) ...................... ... 6 Genetic s ( 1 s emester) .... . .............................. ............... ... ..... .... .3 Beyond th ese specific courses how eve r , the School of M e dicin e stro ngly discourages premedicine students from t aki ng courses cov ering material to b e studied in medical school. R ather, the undergraduate years should provide a l iberal ed u ca tion as the foundation for technic al an d profe ssio nal post-graduate study. A student s hould choose a major from those fields that interest him mo s t ; it is not n ecessary that the major be in a technical or scientific area. PRENURSING Stud e nts are referred to the School of Nursing Bul l e tin for detail of th e curriculum l eading to th e d egree Bachelor of Science in nur sing. Pren ursing stude nts should s o designate themselv es on all application and registration materials so that a dvi ing may be obtained thro ugh the H ea lth Sciences Committ ee, Room 508 . The nursing progr a m is a 401-year curriculum in volving two years of prenursing studies i n the College of Undergr a du ate Studie followed by a 2\12-year program in the School of Nursing. Trans fer from the College of Undergraduate Studies to the School of Nursing is norm a lly made at the beginnin g of the junior year, but applications for admis sion to the upp er divi sion nursing program must be submitted a t l east six months prior to the start of the fall se mester. Prep rofe ssional requirements for admiss ion to the School of ur sing include th e completion of 60 semes ter hours w it h a grade ave rage of at least 2.0. The following course s a re required: ATURAL SCIENCES Biolo gy: One y ear general biology or zoology including lab oratory ( Bioi. 201-2 02 ) Chemistry: One year ge n eral chemi s try with l abor atory , in cluding inorganic and organic (Chern. 101-102) SOCIAL S CIENCES P ych o logy: One year of cour s e work in general psycholo.gy including content in the phy sio logical ba sis of behaviOr ( Psych . 100 in addition to Biol. / Psych. 201-202) Sociology: Two cour ses in general sociology (Soc. 111 and one other course or Soc. Sci. 210 and one other course. Soc. Sci. 211 will meet requirement) Cultural Anthropology : One course ( Anthro . 104) G ENERAL EDUCATION A D ELE CTIVES At lea s t two 2-seme ste r seque nc es i n two areas below : Communication and theatre History Economics Honors English literature M at hematics Ethnic stu dies Philosophy Fine arts Political Science Foreign language PRE PHARMACY Students are r eferred to the School of Pharmacy Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Pharmacy degree. All acade mic advising for prepharmacy s tudent s is conducted by faculty member s of the School of Phar m a cy. Students should contact the school office, Ekeley 274 (Boulder Campus), and arrang e to meet with advisers. Application for transfer to the School of Pharmacy must be filed no later than 90 d ays prior to the term for which the student wis h es to register , or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration. Prior to enrolling for professional courses in the School of Pharmacy, st ud ents must have completed the following courses and must h ave compiled a grade point average of 2.0 or higher: S e mest e r Hour s Inorganic chemistry-including qu a ntitative a nd qualit ative analy is --------------------------------------------10 Gener a l biology or zoology ----------------------------------8 College mathematics (al gebra and trigonometry) ........... .. ....... 5-6 Engli h compos i tfon, literature , or foreign l a nguage .......... . ........ 6 Principle s of economics -------------------------------------------6 Electives (nonprofessional) ................................ _________________ 8 PHYSICAl THERAPY The curriculum in physical ther a py at the University of Colorado is an accredited program app roved by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Physical Therapy Association. Upon successf ul completion of the program , students a re granted a Bachelor of Sci ence degree in physic a l therapy from the School of Medicine. The curriculum is composed of two phases of st udy : Phase One. Prephysical ther a py constitutes the first three years. In these years the stude nt fulfills his re quirem ents for Phase Two and acquires a lib eral univer sity ed uc a tion. Phase Two. Ph ysical therapy educa tion is acc om pli s hed during the final year. It is directed tow a rd principles a nd practice of phy sical therapy as a pro fes ional career. Ph ase Two is offered only at th e University of Colorado Medical Center in D enver.

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University Requirements for Graduation Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy must satisfy t h e following require ments: 1. Completion of Ph ase One to include 90 semester hour s ( 135 quarter hours). A minimum of 2 semester hou rs (3 quarter hours) must b e in upper division courses (courses numbered 300 or above). 2. Completion of Phase Two to include 57 quarter hours. O f the 57 hours, a grade of C or b etter is re quired in at least 40 hours and a C average must be maintained. 3. R esidence requirement requires 30 semester hours ( 45 quarter hours) at the University of Color a do. This requirement is automatically fulfilled during Phase Two. Selection of Students for Phase Two-Physical Therapy (Senior Year) 1. A maximum of 32 students is accepted. 2. Selection is made by a Selection Committee. 3 . S election is based on : a. Scholastic achievement of 3.0 (both in specific prerequisites and in cumulative grade-point average). b. Personal interview. c. Health status. d. State of residency. 4. Categories of students eligible to apply for se lection: a. Physical therapy majors in attendance at any of the University of Colorado ca mpu ses must apply by July 15 following their sophomore year. Selecti on will be made during the sum mer. (An eligible sophomore must have com pleted 60 semester hours . ) b. Other eligible candidates must apply by March 1 of their junior year and will be selected at the end of their j unio r year. (An eligible junior must hav e completed or be registered for his 90th semester hour or 135th qu arte r hour . ) Persons qualified for this selection are limited to those: ( 1) enrolled in other accredite d institutions in Colorado (2) residents of states participating in the WICHE program which do not have phys ical ther a py programs ( 3) Colorado residents attending schools in other states c. Applications will not be accepted from per sons who do not fall in the above categories. College of Undergraduate Studies 1 49 Specific Requirements-Phase One These requirements may be met only in an ac credited college or university and must b e completed before final acceptance into Ph ase Two . R equired Courses Minimum Credit Hours Biological Sciences -----------14 semester hrs. (21 quarter hrs.) General B iology Anatomy (human, preferred) Phy siol ogy (human, preferred) ( Prer., 1 year of chemistry) Humanities ----------------------12 semester hrs. (18 quarter hrs . ) Psychology ----------------------6 semester hrs. ( 9 quarter hrs.) Social Science ------------------6 semester hrs. ( 9 quarter hrs . ) Physi cal Education ------------3 semester hrs. ( 5 quarter hrs.) Kinesio l ogy Physical Education activity courses (1 year need not be for credit) Physical Sciences * Gener a l Physics __________________ _3 semest er hrs. (5 quarter hrs . ) (Reco mmended content to include mechanics , heat , electricity) *General Chemistry ___ _______________ 6 semester hrs. (9 quarter hrs.) Recommended Courses-Phase One The curriculum is designed to offer students the opportunity to elect several courses in their areas of special in tere st. Liste d below are courses related to physical therapy which would benefit a physical therapy major. B iol og y Embryol ogy Genetic s P sy ch olog y Child and Adolescent Psychology Phy sio l ogical P sychology Ps yc hology of the Exceptional Child Psychology of Mental Retardation Psychology of Learning Child Developmen t Physical Therapy Introduction to Physical Therapy (strongly recommended) Physica l Education Human Development and Movement Behavior Exercise Physiolog y Community Heal t h Developmental Physiology Other Courses Introduction to Statistics Anthropology Communication Skills First Aid For further information contact the Hea lth Sciences Committee , Room 508. • Any student anticipating further study in Graduat e Sch oo l should e nroll in general physi c s (on e full year t o include laboratory wor k), ge n eral che mistry ( to i nclude organic chemi s try ) , and m athemati cs.

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College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration DODDS I. BUCHANAN, Associate Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration of the Univ ersi ty of Colorado at Denver exists to serve today's ne ed for competent and responsible administrative and related professional personnel , for the continued educa tion of men and women already in such positions, and to further research and new thinking about administra tive problems. The problems of administration are common to many kinds of public and private endeavor, and the College of Business attempts to confront these problems as they pertain to the management of business enterprises. The major purpose of the College of Business is to provide young men and women with opportunities both for a liberal education and for professional training. They are given help in preparing not only for effective careers but also for satisfying living and constructive citizenship. The Graduate School of Business Administration offers graduate-level educa tion in business to persons with undergraduate degrees in business and other a cademic fields and prepares them for work in the broad spectrum of business enterprise. Organization Within the broad framework of policy established by the Regents of the University of Colorado, policy de cisions for th e College of Business are made by the Educational Poli cy Committee of the faculty under the chairm a nship of the dean and are subject to review by the faculty as a whole. The College's activ ities are administered by the as sociate dean on the Denver Campus , by the heads of its several instructional divisions , and by other faculty directors of particular programs . Student Organizations Opportunity for ass ociation with other College of Business students in varied ac tivities intended to stimu l ate professional interests and to give recognition to scholastic attai nment is provided by the following stu dent organizations: AIESEC-international business associati on Beta Alpha Psi-professional and honorary account ing fraternity B eta Gamma Sigma-honorary scholastic fraternity in bu siness B eta Sigma-professional business fraternity for women CSBA-Chicano business students association CUAMA-University of Colorado student chapter of the American Marketing Association Delta Phi Epsilon-honorary graduate fraternity in business education Delta Sigma Pi-professional business fraternity for men MBA Association-University of Colorado associa tion of master 's students in business Phi Chi Theta-professional business and economics fraternity for women Rho Epsilon-professional real estate fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon-professional and honorary man agement fraternity UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bach elor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives: 1. Understanding of the activities that constitute business enterprise and of the principles underlying administration of those activities . 2. Ability to think logically and analytically through the kinds of complex problems encountered by man agement. 3 . Facility in the arts of communication. 4. Comprehension of the human relationships in volved in an organization. 5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions. 6. Skill in the arts of le a rning that will help the stu dent continue self-education after leaving the campus. ACADEMIC POLICIES Each student in the College of Business is respon sible for knowing and complying with the academic requirements and regulations established for the College and for the student's classes. Upon admission to the College of Business . the student has th e responsibility for conferring with the associate dean or the student adviser in the College concerning his academic pro gram. Standards of Performance Each student is held to basic standards of perfor mance established for his classes in respect to attendance, active particip a tion in course work , promptness in com pletion of assignments, correct English usage both in writing and in speech, accuracy in calculations , and general quality of scholastic workmanship. Fulfillment of these fundamental responsibiHties must be recognized

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by a student as a requirement for continuance and as an essential condition for achievement of satisfactory aca demic standing. Only those who meet these standards should expect to be recommended for a degree. In general, examinations are required in all courses for all students, including graduating senio rs. To be in good standing, the student must have an overall grade-point average of not less than 2.0 (C) for all course work attempted . This includes both busi ness and nonbusiness courses and applies to work taken at all of the University campuses. When spring semester grades become available , the College of Business Committee on Academic Defi ciency will review the records of all students not meeting academic standards. Students below standard will be notified of ( 1) probationary status of one aca demic year or (2) suspension. To return from probationary status to good standing, the student must not only achieve a grade-point average of 2.0 or better for the academic year but als o bring his cumulative grade average on all courses attempted, and on all College of Business courses attempted, to a 2 . 0 level or above. To receive credit, all courses must be listed on the student's registration in the Office of Admissions and Records. Courses completed on the University of Colo rado D enver Campus are credited toward College of Business degree requirements exactly as the same courses taken on the Boulder Campus. Credits earned on the Denver Campus are applicable toward residence requirements only when earned after admission to the College of Business . Transfer Credit Credits in business subjects transferred from other institutions to the University of Colorado will be limited to the number of credit hours given for similar work in the regular offerings of the College of Business. In general, the College will limit transfer credit for busi ness courses taken at a lower division level, which it applies toward degree requirements, to such courses as the Colleg e offers at that level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is given by the appropriate division head. Transfer students must take 30 hours of degree requirements in residency . For a detailed expla nation of transfer credit, see the General Information section of this bulletin. Cooperation Education Credit Cooperative education courses must be approved by the Office of the Associate Dean . A maximum of 12 hours of nonclassroom sources of credit will be counted toward the B.S. degree in business, with not more than 3 hours of such credit per semester. Such courses will be administered in the same manner as Independent Study credit. Correspondence Credit Not more than 9 semester hours of credit in business courses taken through correspondence study at the University of Colorado or any other institution of high er learning will be counted toward the B . S . degree in College of Business and Administration I 51 business. All correspondence courses will be e'{.aluated by the Office of the Associate Dean to determine their acceptability. Credit by Examination Students who are able to offer substantial evidence of prior study of the subject matter of a given course may make application for an advanced standing exam ination. If performance on the examination is s atisfac tory, the student will be given credit for the course but will not receive a grade for the course. A student who has received a failing grade in a course may not take an advanced standing examination in the same course. Ar rangements are made through the Office of Admissions and Records. General College Level Examination credits (CLEP) are not acceptable under the present program (NBC / 120). Those students under the old program ( OBC / 128) may receive credit for certain General Examina tions . Students may use CLEP in lieu of B.Ad. 400 courses normally taken to establish proficiency for registration in graduate business courses . Students are responsible for checking with the Graduate Office of Business Administration for details and approval. ROTC Credit Students may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours credit in courses completed in the adva nced ROTC program on the Boulder Campus toward non business elective requirements and toward the 120 semester-hour total degree requirements for the B.S. degree in business. No credit toward degree require ments is granted for basic (freshman and sophomore) ROTC courses . Independent Study Credit Upper division undergraduate business students de siring to do work beyond regular bu s ines s or non business course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the students must have prior approval of the ass oci a te dean. Com plete information a nd request forms a re availa ble in the Offic e of the Associate Dean. A maximum of 12 semester hours of nonclassroom sources of credit may be applied toward a B .S. degree in business, with not more than 3 hours of such credit per semester . Adding and Dropping Courses 1. Students will be allowed to drop and add during the first two weeks of the semester with no signatures required on the Drop / Add form . 2 . After the second week, the instructor mu s t indicate either a drop "without credit" or failing. The dean's signature is not required. 3. After the tenth week, courses m ay not b e dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the stu dent's control (accident , illness , etc.) ; in a ddition to the instructor's certification (as in 2 above), the st udent 's dean must approve the drop.

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52 I University of Colorado at Denver Withdrawal A student leaving the University before th e end of th e semester sho uld secure a Withdrawal Form from the Office of the Associate Dean and follow th e in structions on the form . The completed form should be returned to the Office of Admissions and Records . Stu dents who attend classes will b e charged a n a pp ropriate amount or receive a refund according to a definite schedule published in the official Schedule of Courses each term. Registration for Business Courses A student may register for only those courses for which he has the stated prerequ i site training. If junior standing is required, the stu dent should h ave earned at least 60 semester hours of credit ; for senior standing, 90 semester hours. Scholastic Load The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate student in the College of Business is 15 semester hour s , with 19 hours the maximum except as indicated below. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Con tinuing Education , whether in clas ses or through corre spondence , are incl ud ed in the student's load. A student having a grade-point average of 3 . 0 or higher for the most recent semester in which h e com pleted at le ast 15 semester hours, with the approval of t he associate dean, may register for a load exceeding 19 semester hours. Pass/Fail A maximum of 16 hours of a combination of bu siness and / or nonbusines s course work may be taken on a pass / fail basis an d credited tow ard the bach elor's degree in bus iness. Transfer students are limit ed to 1 semester hour pass / fail for every 8 attemp te d at the University . For business majors, p ass / fail course s may not be included in " core " courses or in the area of emphasis. Advanced standing examinations will count toward the 16 hours of option. A maximum of 6 hours of pass / fail may be t aken in a ny one semester. Com plete information may be obtained from the Colleg e of Bu siness office. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Admission of Freshmen The College of Business and Administration expects entering freshmen to present 15 unit s of the following secondary course work: Units E n g l ish -----------------------------------------------------3 Mathem atics (c ollege preparatory) -------------------------------------2 Natural science (lab-science course) ------------------------------2 Social science (including history ) ------------------------------2 Electives (areas such as foreign l anguages, additio n al courses in English, mathematics, natur al or social sciences; may include up to 2 cre dits in business) 15 Pre fer red Admission. Students given first consider ation are those who rank in the upp er half of their high school graduating class, have a combined Schol astic Ap titud e Test (SAT) score of 1000 or above or a com posite American College Test (ACT) score of 23 or above, an d have comple t e d th e high school course units as r ec ommend e d by the a ppropriate college. Considered on an Individu al Basis. Students con sidered on an individual basi s are those who rank in the low e r half of their high school graduating class, a nd / or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23 , and s ho w vari a tions from th e high s c hool course unit '' expec t ations." Admission o f Transfer and Former Students Stud e nts who h ave a ttend ed ano ther college or uni versity are expected to meet th e gene r a l requirements for admission of transfer students to the University of Colorado (see Gener a l Information section). Former students who have attended another college or university and who have completed 12 or more se mester hours must reapply as tran sfe r students and must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work a ttempt e d t o be eligib le for readmission. A maximum of 72 semester hours t aken at junior colleges may be ap pli e d toward the bacc ala ureate de gree in the College of Business and Administration. Students who do not meet the prescrib e d require ments m ay petition the Office of Admissions and Rec ords for special consideration for entrance. Doubtful cases will be referred to the associate dean of the College. Intra-university Transfer Students seeking admission to the Colleg e of Busi ness an d Administration from another college or school of the University must formally ap ply at th e Office of Admissions and R ecor d s for intr auniversit y transfer. App li cation for ad mission to the College must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records at least 90 days prior to th e appropriate deadlines. Recommended Preparation for Study in Business Prospective students in business are encouraged to pursue a bro ad college prep ara t ory progr a m in high school, with particular emphasis on Engli s h, mathe matics, the social sciences, an d speech. A candidate for the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree normally enters as a freshman. During the first two years he acquires a bro a d b ack ground in m a the matics , communications, and the socia l and behavioral sciences. He will complete requir e d basic courses in each of the core areas of business st udy, for the most part during his junior year. The remainder of his degree program will consist of courses se l ec t ed to further his professional prep arat ion through more advance d work and electives. REQUIREMENTS FOR B.S. (BUSINESS) DEGREE The B ac helor of S cience (Business) degree is con ferred after completion of th ese requirements: Total Credits . Not fewer th an 120 acceptable se mester hour s of credit, of which at least 51 hours must be in nonbusiness courses (including 9 ho urs of upp e r division work) and at least 51 hou rs in business courses.

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The remammg 18 hours may be in either, or some combination of both. Resid ence . Completion of at l east one full academic year's work (normally 30 semester hours, usually in the senior year, after admission to the College of Busin ess and Administration, and to include the 12 hours in the area of emphasis). Courses completed on the Denv e r Campus after the candidate has been admitted to the College are acceptable toward this requirement. Grade Average. A scholastic grade average of at least 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree; an aver age of at least 2.0 for all business courses ; an average of at least 2.0 in the student's area of emphasis. Graduation with Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty of the College of Busin ess, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado while completing 30 hours as a business school stu dent will be graduated cum laude. Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado while completing 30 hours as a business school stu dent will be graduated magna cum laude. Courses. Completion of required courses in six groups: (A) Societal Studies , (B) Behavioral Studies, (C) Communications, (D) Information Systems , Qu an titative Methods , and Data Proc essing, (E) Business Processes, and (F) Electives. These requirements are summarized below. Required Courses Group A: Societal Studies The activities of a business enterprise are carried on within a complex economic-political-social-cultural environment. Understanding of that environment is in dispensable for socially responsible and successful en deavor. Required Areas Semester Hours Principle s of Political Science (Pol. Sci. 100) ............................ 3 American National Government (Pol. Sci . 110) ................. _ __ 3 Principles of Sociology _____________ ,, _______ ............... 3 Principles of Economics (Econ. 201 and 202) ....................... . 6 Business Law (B.Law 300) ......... _____ .... _ .. ____ ................... 3 Business and Government ( B.Ad . 410) or Business and Society (B.Ad. 411) ............................ _ .. ____ ...... 21 Group B: Behavioral Studies Management is concerned with the activities of peo ple and with their behav ior individually, in work groups, and as members of an organization. In this r