Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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Full Text


AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A7D1
Contents
GENERAL INFORMATION ................ 1
ACADEMIC CALENDAR .................. 1
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES .......................... 14
DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES . 20
DIVISION OF NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES ................ 28
DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES ..... 38
ETHNIC PROGRAMS.................. 48
SPECIAL PROGRAMS ................ 50
PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS......... 51
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION .. 56
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ............... 71
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE ................... 74
COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN.... 98
COLLEGE OF MUSIC ................. 103
GRADUATE SCHOOL....................106
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS..152
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS ...........162
FACULTY............................162
INDEX..............................168
This bulletin contains general information and course descriptions. Students should consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes as well as particular registration information.
University of Colorado Bulletin.
1200 University Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80302. Vol. LXXIV, No. 60, December 25, 1974,
General Series No. 1764. Published five times monthly by the University of Colorado.
Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado


Social Sciences, Division of, 38-47 Sociology: undergraduate, 45-46;
graduate, 150-151 Spanish: undergraduate, 27-28;
graduate, 151 Speakers bureau, 13 Special programs, 50-51 Special students, 6 Statistics, 70 Student activities, 12 Student Relations, Office for, 11 Student services, 11-12 Study abroad, 8 Study Skills Center, 11-12
Study skills, courses, 51 T
Teacher education, undergraduate, 52, 72
Transcripts, 10 Transfer students, 5 Tuition, 9
U
Urban Affairs, Master of, 156-158 Urban and Regional Planning-Community Development, Master of, 99-102
Urban Design, Master of Architecture in, 98-99, 101 Urban Studies major, 47
V
Veterans Affairs, 11 W
Withdrawals, 10 Women’s services, 12


University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Telephone: 892-1117 Second-Class Postage Paid at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado 80302


/
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER ACADEMIC CALENDAR
THE SUMMER TERM 1976 (8 week tens, 39 instructional days, 1 vacation day)
(Application deadline dates:
New Undergraduate students April 1, 1976
New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University Transfers May 1, 1976)
June 9-10, Wed., Thurs. June 14, Monday July 5, Monday
July 6, Tuesday Aug. 6, Friday Aug. 14, Saturday
Registration Classes begin
Independence Day holiday (no classes, all offices closed)
Classes resume Classes end
Commencement on the Boulder campus
THE FALL SEMESTER 1976 (15% week term, 77 Instructional days, 3 vacation days)
(Application deadline dates:
New Undergraduate students June 15, 1976
New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University Transfers July 15, 1976)
Aug. 17-19, Tues.-Thurs.
Aug. 23, Monday Sept. 6, Monday
Sept. 7, Tuesday
Nov. 25-28, Thurs.-Sunday
Nov. 29, Monday
Nov. 30, Dec. 1-2, Tues.-Thurs.
Dec. S, Wednesday
Registration Classes begin
Labor Day holiday (no classes, all offices closed)
Classes resume
Thanksgiving Day holidays (no classes, all offices closed Classes resume
Early registration for the Spring Semester, (students enrolled Fall Semester 1976, Denver campus only)
Classes end
THE SPRING SEMESTER 1977 (16 week term, 75 instructional days, 5 vacation days)
(Application deadline dates:
New Undergraduate students Oct. 1, 1976
New Graduate students (refer to specific department)
Former CU students, Special-to-Degree,
Inter-University Transfers Nov. 1, 1976)
Jan. 26-27, Wed., Thurs. Jan. 31, Monday March 19-27, Sat.-Sun. March 25, Friday March 28, Monday May 20, Friday
Registration
Classes begin
Spri ng break (no classes)
All offices closed Classes resume
Commencement on the Boulder campus


THE SUMMER TERM 1977 (10 week term, 49 instructional days, 1 vacation day)
(Application deadline dates:
New Undergraduate students April 1, 1977
New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University transfers May 1, 1977)
June 1-2, Wed.-Thurs. June 6, Monday July 4, Monday
July 5, Tuesday Aug. 12, Friday Aug. 13, Saturday
Registration Classes begin
Independence Day holiday (no classes, all offices closed)
Classes resume Classes end
Commencement on the Boulder campus
THE FALL SEMESTER 1977 (151! week term, 75 instructional days, 2 vacation days)
(Application deadline dates:
New Undergraduate students June 15, 1977
New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University transfers July 15, 1977)
Aug. 30,31, Sept. 1, Tues.-Thurs. Sept. 6, Tues.
Nov. 24-27, Thurs.-Sun.
Nov. 28, Monday Dec. 6-8, Tues.-Thurs.
Dec. 21, Wednesday
Registration Classes begin
Thanksgiving Day holidays (no classes, all offices closed)
Classes resume
Early registration for the Spring Semester 1978 (students enrolled Fall Semester 1976, Denver campus only)
Classes end
THE SPRING SEMESTER 1978 (15 week term, 75 instructional days, no vacation days)
(Application deadline dates:
New Undergraduate students Oct. 1, 1977
New Graduate students (refer to specific department)
Former CU students, Special-to-Degree,
Inter-University transfers Nov. 1, 1977)
Dec. 6-8, Tues.-Thurs. Jan. 4-5, Wed., Thurs. Jan. 9, Monday April 21, Friday May 26, Friday
Early registration Regular registration Classes begin Classes end
Commencement on the Boulder campus




General Information
DENVER CAMPUS ACADEMIC CALENDAR* ‘
DEADLINE DATES FOR APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION
The following dates will be applicable for the academic year 1975-76 at the University of Colorado at Denver. Interested applicants are advised that, because of limited space available for new students, all credentials required in the admission process must be on file with the Office of Admissions and Records prior to the deadline dates indicated below if consideration for admission is to be made for the term desired. Transfer applicants should take into account the time involved in having official transcripts sent from collegiate institutions attended previously and apply sufficiently in advance of the application deadline to insure that these documents are on file by the required date. Foreign students are advised that 120 days are usually required for credentials to arrive in this office from most international loca-
tions. Summer 1975 Fall 1975 Spring 1976
Undergraduate
New Freshman and Transfer Students May 21 Aug. 1 Dec. 12
Nursing (fall only) Mar. 1
Special Student to Degree Student Status Change May 21 July 15 Dec. 1
Graduate
Business Mar. 1 Mar. 1 Sept. 1
Environmental Design (fall only) Apr. 15
Public Administration Apr. 1 June 1 Nov. 15
Graduate School Apr. 15 July 1 Dec. 1
School of Education Mar. 1 Mar. 1 Sept. 1
Nursing (fall only) Jan. 15
Master’s Program in Psychology (fall only) Apr. 1
Special Student to Degree Student Status Change (see Graduate School dates above)
Special Students
Undergraduate and Graduate Levels May 21 Aug. 1 Dec. 19
Intrauniversity Transfers Apr. 14 July 1 Dec. 1
(Note: Prospective students are advised that slight variations in the calendar may exist on different campuses of the University. Specific information should be obtained from the campus to which the individual expects to apply.)
Fall Semester 1975
Students should obtain a copy of the Fall Semester 1975 Schedule of Courses for complete calendar information and instructions regarding registration.
Aug. 1 (Fri.)—Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the fall semester 1975
Aug. 26, 27, 28 (Tues., Wed., Thurs.)—Registration.! Sept. 1 (Mon.)—Labor Day holiday. All offices closed. Sept. 2 (Tues.)—Classes begin.
Sept. 2, 3 (Tues., Wed.)—Late registration. A late fee will be assessed all late registrants.t Nov. 27-29 (Thurs., Fri., Sat.)—Thanksgiving holiday.
No classes. All offices closed.
Dec. 1 (Mon.)—Classes resume.
Dec. 20 (Sat.)—Classes end.
Spring Semester 1976
Students should obtain a copy of the Spring Semester 1976 Schedule of Courses for complete calendar information and instructions regarding registration.
Dec. 2, 3, 4 (Tues., Wed., Thurs.)—EARLY REGISTRATION: students enrolled fall semester 1975 only.
Dec. 12 (Fri.)—Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the spring semester 1976.
Jan. 13, 14 (Tues., Wed.)—OPEN REGISTRATION. (New applications for admission will not be accepted or considered on the days of open registration.)! Jan. 19 (Mon.)—Classes begin.
Jan. 19, 20 (Mon., Tues.)—Late registration. A late fee will be assessed all late registrants.!
Mar. 22-27 (Mon.-Sat.)—Spring vacation. No classes. Mar. 27 (Fri.)—All offices closed.
*The University reserves the right to alter the academic calendar at any time. tNew applicants and returning former students should consult with the Office of Admissions and Records regarding anticipated changes in registration procedures and dates to insure correct information.
tBecause of limited space available, all late registrants may experience difficulty obtaining the schedule of classes desired. Interested new applicants and returning former students who do not meet the stated application deadline for a specific semester should seriously consider making application for the next succeeding semester or term


2/ University of Colorado at Denver
Mar. 29 (Mon.)—Classes resume.
May 18 (Tues.)—Classes end.
May 21 (Fri.)—Commencement in Boulder.
Summer Term 1976
May 21 (Fri.)—Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the summer term 1976.
June 9, 10 (Wed., Thurs.)—Registration.*
June 14 (Mon.)—Classes begin.
July 5 (Mon.) —Independence Day holiday. No classes.
All offices closed.
Aug. 6 (Fri.)—Classes end.
Aug. 14 (Sat.)—Commencement in Boulder.
THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER ... AN URBAN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
History
Beginning in 1912, courses were made available to residents of the Denver metropolitan area through the Extension Division of the University of Colorado in Boulder. Classes were held in scattered locations throughout the city until 1938, when they were gathered in one center. Increasing enrollment necessitated two moves to larger quarters, and the Denver Center came to its present location at 14th and Arapahoe Streets in 1957. In 1965, the Denver Center became a degree-granting institution, enabling students to complete full academic programs in Denver.
In January 1973, the Board of Regents adopted a resolution changing the names of the University’s centers because of an amendment to the Constitution of the State of Colorado which gave the centers legal status as separate branches of the University. The Denver Center was renamed the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD).
Location
UCD is situated at the hub of a tremendous growth area. The downtown campus is accessible to both city dwellers and suburban commuters from an eight-county area with an estimated population of 1,506,000. Located across Cherry Creek from the Auraria Urban Renewal Area, UCD will share facilities with Metropolitan State College and the Community College of Denver in the Auraria Higher Education Center complex while remaining a unique urban institution in itself. The campus is close to major business establishments and government offices in downtown Denver, as well as to civic and cultural centers.
Enrollment
UCD is one of the largest state-supported institutions of higher education in Colorado in terms of enrollment. The average number of students enrolled for credit is
‘New applicants and returning former students should consult with the Office of Admissions and Records regarding anticipated changes in registration procedures and dates to insure correct information.
about 8,000 during the fall and spring semesters and
4,000 during the summer term.
Academic Programs
Academic and public service programs are especially geared to the needs of the urban population and environment, as well as to traditional fields of study. Students may earn degrees in more than 50 undergraduate fields and some 20 graduate areas. These educational endeavors emphasize quality instruction, research, and professional training. Academic programs within the University are offered by colleges that admit freshmen, by professional schools that admit students who have completed at least two or three years of preprofessional study, and by the Graduate School. Colleges and schools on the Denver Campus include:
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Environmental Design
College of Music
Graduate School
Graduate School of Public Affairs
Accreditation and Memberships
The University of Colorado at Denver is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is a member of the Association of Urban Universities.
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is a member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. The School of Education is accredited by the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education and membership is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science has earned high accreditation ratings from the Engineers Council on Professional Development. The College of Environmental Design is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board and is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. The College of Music is a member of the National Association of Schools of Music.
The Graduate School of Public Affairs is a recognized member of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.
Year-Round Operation
Classes on the Denver Campus are scheduled six days a week, both day and evening. Students may begin studies in most degree fields at the start of any one of the academic terms of the year, which include a fall semester of 16 weeks, a spring semester of 16 weeks, and an 8-week (half-semester) summer term. More than half of the courses on the Denver Campus are offered during evening hours, permitting


General lnformation/3
students maximum flexibility in planning for both employment and educational goals.
Faculty
More than 180 highly qualified faculty members teach full time on the Denver Campus; 84 percent have earned doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban scene and responsive to the needs of the urban student.
Students
Strongly motivated people from all walks of life make up the student body. The diversity of interests, knowledge, occupations, backgrounds, and age stimulates a unique learning experience for these men and women. Ages range from 16 to 70. About 60 percent of the students enrolled are at the junior, senior, fifth year, graduate, or special student-with-baccalaureate-degree levels.
Prospectus
As an urban university, UCD has a fundamental commitment to meet the needs of the metropolitan Denver community; it seeks to keep pace with the needs of the present-day city-oriented student and at the same time plan for the demands of the future. Programs are continually being enlarged and expanded, as additional funds and space are made available, to offer students a broad scope of educational opportunities, whether the student is seeking a general education or has a desire to study in a highly specialized area.
UCD’s primary role is to provide graduate, professional, and upper division education, with undergraduate programs designed especially for those students who plan to undertake graduate work or professional study.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Colorado at Denver seeks to identify applicants who have a high probability of successful completion of an academic program. Admission decisions are based on evaluation of many criteria. Among the most important are:
1. Maturity, motivation, and potential for academic growth.
2. Ability to work in the academic environment of an urban, nonresidential campus.
3. Evidence of scholarly ability and accomplishment shown on national aptitude and achievement tests (ACT/SAT).
4. General level of previous academic performance.
An applicant who is granted admission to UCD must
reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal background acceptable to the University. The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors of proved academic ability may be admitted to UCD for courses which supplement their high school programs. Credits for University courses taken in this manner may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. Interested high school students may contact the Office of Admissions and Records for complete information and application instructions (telephone [303] 623-1181).
Admission of Freshmen (Those who have not had prior collegiate experience)
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Liberal Arts and Sciences.
1. General Requirements Applicable to Each College. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate as a result of the completion of the General Educational Development Test (GED). Applicants who present the High School Equivalency Certificate of the GED must score at or above the 60th percentile on each section of the test to be eligible for consideration for admission. Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.”
All applicants must present 75 units of acceptable secondary school credit. While the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences does not specify particular units, the College of Business and Administration, the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Music have the following requirements:
College of Business and Administration
English...........................................................
Mathematics (college preparatory) ................................
Natural sciences (laboratory type) ...............................
Social sciences (including history)...............................
Electives ........................................................
(Such as foreign languages and additional academic courses. May include up to 2 units in business areas.)
1
College of Engineering and Applied Science
English.....................................................
Algebra ....................................................
Geometry......................................1.............
(Trigonometry and solid geometry recommended.*)
Natural sciences............................................
(Physics and chemistry recommended.)
Social studies and humanities ..............................
(Foreign languages and additional units of English, history, and literature are included in the humanities.)
Electives ..................................................
1
*Beginning engineering students must be prepared to start analyte geometry-calculus. A student who does not have trigonometry should expect to attend at least one extra summer term.
cn cn ro ro —*roco cn o>ronoroc*>


4/ University of Colorado at Denver
College of Music
English................................................3
Theoretical music................................... 1
Physical science .,.................................
Social science ..................................... > 8
Foreign language ...................................
Mathematics........................................._
Additional high school academic units..................4
15
It is expected that all students will have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. In lieu of the personal audition, applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length on 7'/2 ips monaural) or a statement of excellence by a qualified teacher. Interested students should write to the College of Music, UCD, for audition or interview applications.
2. Colorado Resident Applicants.* Colorado resident applicants who meet the above general qualifications are divided into three categories:
a. Applicants who ranked in the upper one-half of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT) or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board are assured admission.
b. Applicants who ranked in the upper two-thirds of their high school graduating class and who have an ACT composite score from 18 to 22 or a combined score of 800 or higher on the SAT will be considered for admission on an individual basis. These applicants cannot be assured admission.
c. Applicants who ranked in the lower one-third of their high school graduating class, or who have a composite ACT score below 18 or a combined SAT score below 800 will be considered for admission on an individual basis by the Admissions Committee.
3. Nonresident Applicants.* Nonresident applicants must meet the general requirements stated above, and, in addition, must rank in the upper one-half of their high school graduating class and present an ACT composite score of 24 or higher or a combined SAT score of 1050 or higher to be considered for admission.
Nonresident applicants are advised that UCD does not maintain residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the individual without dependence on University services.
HOW TO APPLY FOR ADMISSION
1. Applicants may apply for the fall semester, the spring semester, or the summer term. A schedule of deadlines for the various semesters and terms is noted on page 1, and will be supplied with the application form. An application received after the stated deadline for one semester or term will be considered for the next semester or term if the applicant notifies the Office of Admissions and Records of his intention.
‘See page 10 for definition of “resident" and "nonresident" classification.
2. An Application for Admission may be obtained by contacting:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Telephone (303) 623-1181
A Colorado resident may also obtain this form from the office of his high school principal or counselor.
3. The application for admission must be completed in total and submitted to the above address prior to the stated application deadline for the term of enrollment desired. All applications for admission must be accompanied by a check or money order in the amount of $10. This application fee is nonrefundable.
In the event the applicant is granted admission but is prevented from enrolling during the term indicated on the application, the application fee will be valid for one full year (12 months) from the date of the term for which the applicant was applying; however, the applicant must notify the Office of Admissions of his intentions.
4. The applicant must request that a high school transcript, including his rank-in-class, be mailed to the above address by his high school.
5. The applicant must take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board on one of the national testing dates, or by arrangement with the UCD Testing Center. The student must requestthat test scores be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver (ACT code 0533, or SAT code R-4875).
If the applicant took one of these tests prior to his application for admission to the University of Colorado and did not designate the Denver Campus to receive a score report, he must request the testing agency to send the score to the Denver Campus. This is accomplished on a Request for Additional Score Report form available at test centers or from the appropriate office listed below.
Information regarding these tests may be obtained either from the applicant’s high school counselor, the UCD Office of Admissions and Records, or from one of the following offices of the national testing agencies:
Registration Department (ACT)
American College Testing Program
P.O. Box 414
Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
When a complete application (application form, transcript of high school work completed, statement of


General lnformation/5
rank-in-class, required entrance test scores, counselor recommendation, and the nonrefundable $10 application fee) is received by the Office of Admissions and Records, a decision of admission eligibility will be made, and the applicant will be notified.
Admission of Transfer Students
New transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Liberal Arts and Sciences.
1. Colorado Resident Applicants.* Colorado resident applicants are divided into the following three categories:
a. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of more than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) from an institution of university rank, have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended are assured admission to UCD. Applicants who have completed less than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) of collegiate work acceptable to the University of Colorado must meet requirements for admission as freshmen.
b. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of at least 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a college, have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended also are assured admission to UCD.
c. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of less than 45 semester credits (68 quarter hours) from a college, have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be considered for admission on an individual basis. Primary factors affecting the admission decision in such cases are: (a) the UCD college or school to which admission is desired; (b) quality of previous work attempted; (c) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (d) time since the last collegiate attendance.
2. Nonresident Applicants.* Nonresidents must meet the general requirements stated above, and, in addition, must have a transferable grade-point average of 2.5 in order to be admitted to the College of Business and Administration or the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The above general requirements are sufficient for admission as a nonresident to the Colleges of Music or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Nonresident applicants are advised that UCD does not maintain residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the individual without dependence on University services.
Applicants should consult the appropriate college or school section of this bulletin to determine specific entrance requirements.
'See page 10 for definition of “resident" and “nonresident" classification.
In the event a transfer applicant to one of the professional schools of the University has not completed all required course work for that college or school, he may be admitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in one of the preprofessional programs pending completion of such work for admission to the desired professional school.
Transfer applications may be obtained from:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Telephone: (303) 623-1181
WHEN TO APPLY
Interested applicants who are currently enrolled in a collegiate institution should submit their applications for transfer admission after they have registered for the final term at the current institution. Evaluation of transfer credits will be based on an official transcript of record indicating work completed up to the last term of enrollment and courses for which the student is currently enrolled. An official transcript of the student’s total record will then be required upon completion of the final term.
CREDENTIALS REQUIRED FOR TRANSFER ADMISSION
1. A University of Colorado transfer application.
2. The application fee of $10 in check or money order. (This fee is nonrefundable.)
3. An official transcript of record from each collegiate institution attended previously. If the applicant is currently enrolled at a collegiate institution and is submitting a transcript listing all courses except for the final term of enrollment, another official transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term.
4. An official high school transcript. If the applicant is a GED graduate, a GED Certificate of High School Equivalency, GED test scores, and a transcript of any high school work completed must be submitted. Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.”
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
The Office of Admissions and Records and the various deans’ offices cannot make an evaluation of credits from another collegiate institution or give specific degree advisement until complete and official credentials are on file and the applicant has been admitted. In general, transfer credits from other accredited collegiate institutions will be accepted insofar as they meet the degree, grade, and residence requirements of the student’s chosen program of studies at UCD.
College-level credit may be transferred to the


6/ University of Colorado at Denver
University of Colorado in the following instances:
1. When it has been earned at a college or university of recognized standing, from Advanced Placement Examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education.
2. When a grade of C or higher has been attained.
3. When the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution.
The University of Colorado will accept up to 72 semester credits (or 108 quarter credits) of junior college work to apply toward the baccalaureate degree at the University of Colorado. No credit is allowed for vocational-technical courses.
A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
Readmission of Former Students
1. Former students of the University of Colorado who have not attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application prior to the deadline for the term they wish to attend.
2. Former students of the University of Colorado who have attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application form to apply for readmission. In addition, a $10 nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application if the student has taken 12 semester or 18 quarter hours since his last attendance at the University of Colorado. The student must request that an official transcript of record from the institution(s) attended be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver. Consideration for readmission will be made after receipt of all the above listed credentials.
The University reserves the right to deny readmission to former students whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Intrauniversity Transfer
UCD students wishing to change colleges or schools within the University of Colorado, or to change campuses within the University of Colorado system, must make application through the Office of Admissions and Records, Denver Campus, Room 203. This application must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term for which they wish to register.
Admission of Special Students
Persons who wish to take University courses but who do not plan to work for a degree from the University of Colorado (graduate or undergraduate) are referred to as special students. Special students enrolled during
the academic year (fall and spring semesters) must be 21 years of age or older and must have a high school diploma or the equivalent. To accommodate students who live in the Denver metropolitan area but who are attending other collegiate institutions and wish to take courses during the summer, the University does not require that special students be 21 years of age during the summer term.
Certified school teachers with a baccalaureate degree who seek only a renewal of the certificate currently held and who do not require institutional endorsement or recommendation may qualify for the University-wide special student classification outlined above.
Persons holding a baccalaureate degree who seek teacher certification may qualify for the special student classification but must apply for and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program separately and meet all requirements of the School of Education. Applications for teacher education are considered once each year (deadline is February 1 for the following summer term and/or academic year). Information regarding such application may be obtained from the School of Education office, Denver Campus, 892-1117, ext. 276.
Special students may take courses on a pass/fail basis; however, such credit will be counted as part of the total pass/fail credit allowed by the various colleges and schools should the student apply and be accepted for degree status.
The student must maintain an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or higher to continue as a special student.
APPLYING SPECIAL STUDENT CREDITS TOWARD DEGREE
Special students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by submitting the Special to Degree Application, complete academic credentials, and the application fee. Accepted degree applicants may transfer a maximum of 12 semester credits taken as a special student to an undergraduate degree program with the approval of the appropriate academic dean. Acceptance of credit toward degrees at the University changed in fall 1970. Special students enrolled prior to that date may transfer credit in accordance with provisions in effect between January 1969 and August 1970.
Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree at this University are encouraged to submit the complete Graduate Application and supporting credentials as soon as possible. However, a department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a special student at the University, or any combination thereof. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter, or summer term for which the student has applied for admission to the Graduate School.


General lnformation/7
CREDIT FOR NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES
U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC)
University of Colorado at Denver students may participate in Air Force ROTC programs offered on the Boulder Campus.
Air Force ROTC offers two programs leading to a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon receipt of the baccalaureate degree. Graduate students may be commissioned upon the completion of 12 hours of the Professional Officers Course and a six-week summer training program.
1. Standard Four-Year Course. This program is in three parts: the General Military Course for lower division (freshman and sophomore) students, the Professional Officers Course for upper division students, and Corps Training, attended by all students. Completion of the General Military Course is a prerequisite for entry into the Professional Officers Course. Completion of a four-week summer training course is required prior to commissioning.
2. Modified Two-Year Program. This program is offered to full-time, regularly enrolled, degree candidates at both undergraduate and graduate levels who will have two years remaining at the University when they enroll. Selection is on a competitive basis. Applicants may apply directly to the Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies not later than February 1 of the spring semester immediately preceding the semester in which they desire to enroll in the program. Those selected for this program must complete a six-week field training program during the summer months as a prerequisite for enrolling in the Professional Officers Course the following fall or spring semester.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Most students participating in the program are eligible to compete for an Air Force ROTC College Scholarship. Students selected for this program are placed on a grant that includes payment of tuition, book costs, nonrefundable educational fees, and subsistence of $100 per month, tax-free. All cadets enrolled in the Professional Officers Course receive subsistence of $100 per month during the fall and spring semesters, whether or not they are on scholarship.
Credit will be allowed for ROTC courses toward fulfillment of the requirements for a degree provided the department accepting the credit considers the work to be of suitable educational value. For more information on Air Force ROTC, and registration for AFROTC courses, write to Air Force ROTC Det 105, Folsom Stadium, Gate 3, Room 227, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80302, or call 492-8351.
U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)
The Army ROTC program at the University of Colorado at Denver prepares students to become officers in the U.S. Army. Through this program qualified men and women have the opportunity to earn regular and reserve commissions while they are obtaining
their college degrees. No previous military or ROTC experience is required and financial assistance is provided in the junior and senior years.
The ROTC program offered by the Department of Military Science consists primarily of a general four-year course of study designed for freshman students. There is also available, however, a special two-year course of study in which sophomore students who have not taken the first two years of ROTC may qualify to enroll when they become juniors. Both courses of study include extensive classroom work and field experience in the areas of leadership and management.
For further information concerning the Army ROTC program at UCD, including cross-enrollment procedures for Metropolitan State College and University of Denver students, write to the Department of Military Science (Army ROTC), University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80302 or call 492-6497.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling
If copies of discharge, separation papers, and a DD Form 295 (Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service) are submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records at the time of application for admission or subsequently, an evaluation will be made and credit awarded as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that such credit is applicable to the degree sought at this University.
Credit will be allowed for college courses satisfactorily completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute, subject tothe usual rules involving credit of this nature.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
An exciting challenge with rewarding opportunities is available to incoming UCD students who can earn university credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) testing service. Students who score at the 67th percentile or above in subjects approved by the University college or school from which they plan to be graduated will be granted advanced standing and University credit. The cost per examination is $15.
Students who wish to challenge subject areas for credit are urged to examine caretuily the list of approved examinations for the college or school to which they are applying, or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of the lower division requirements, in order to determine the applicability of such credit to specific graduation requirements.
CLEP subject examinations are administered at UCD during the third week of each month (the subject examination on Monday and the general examination Tuesday). CLEP subject examinations are also administered nationally during the third week of each month (students should check with the institutions for testing days). Arrangements to take these examinations must be made well in advance of the testing date.


81 University of Colorado at Denver
Colorado residents may obtain CLEP materials from the regional office by contacting:
College Level Examination Program c/o College Entrance Examination Board 2142 South High Street Denver, Colorado 80210
Colorado residents may also obtain CLEP information from the several test centers throughout the state, preferably from the center located nearest to the student’s high school. In Colorado, testing centers are located at:
Metropolitan State College, Denver Colorado State University, Fort Collins El Paso Community College, Colorado Springs Southern Colorado State College, Pueblo University of Denver, Denver Fort Lewis College, Durango University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
Students living outside of Colorado may secure CLEP information and application forms by writing: Institutional Testing Department College Level Examination Program Box 1822
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
Students interested in obtaining advanced standing and University credit through CLEP tests should consult the Office for Student Relations, the college or school to which they are applying for admission, or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of lower division undergraduate requirements for specific subject examinations acceptable to that college or school for the desired degree program.
Advanced Standing by Examination
Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standing for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A nonrefundable fee is charged for each examination taken.
Advanced Placement Program
The University is a cooperating member of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board, which provides able high school students, while still in high school, an opportunity to take work and then to be examined for credit on the college level.
Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Test. For students who achieve scores of 3,4, or 5 in the CEEB’s Advanced Placement Examination, college credit and advanced placement will be granted. Students with scores below 3 may be considered by the department concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade but will count toward graduation and other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate.
Study Abroad Program
An important educational and cultural experience in the form of a study abroad program is available to all qualified University of Colorado students. The University strongly urges students to take advantage of this opportunity to study in a foreign university.
Interested students should be aware that some programs of study involve only one semester while others are for the entire academic year. Specific information regarding the length of each program may be obtained from the Office of International Education, Boulder Campus, telephone 492-7741. Opportunities for study abroad are currently available in the following countries: Costa Rica, England, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nigeria, Taiwan, Peru, Spain, and the United Arab Republic. Spring semester programs in Siena and Berlin providing intermediate-level Italian or German are also available. The program in Jalapa, Mexico, offers students the opportunity to study intensive Spanish during the fall or spring semesters, and advanced students can enter the University of Veracruz in the spring.
There are presently programs in Costa Rica, England, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nigeria, Taiwan, Peru, Spain, and the United Arab Republic. Spring semester programs in Siena and Berlin providing intermediate-level Italian or German are also available. The program in Jalapa, Mexico, offers students the opportunity to study intensive Spanish during the fall or spring semesters, and advanced students can enter the University of Veracruz in the spring.
The programs carry resident credit toward graduation from the University of Colorado. Information regarding these programs (academic requirements, language requirements, costs, etc.) is available from the Office of International Education. This office also has information on many other programs administered by other universities and agencies, issues International Student ID cards, helps with charter flights, and maintains a library. Interested students should contact their advisers and the Office of International Education early in their freshman or sophomore year in order to prepare for study abroad. UCD students also may obtain information in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Room 804, or from Professor James Wolf, UCD history department.
For further information contact the Office of International Education, 914 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80302 (telephone 492-7741), or Professor James Wolf, History Department, UCD.
UNIFORM GRADING SYSTEM
Grades awarded by all undergraduate colleges and schools of the University of Colorado are:
A—4 grade points per credit hour; superior B—3 grade points per credit hour; good C—2 grade points per credit hour; fair D—1 grade point per credit hour; minimum passing F—0 grade points; failing


General lnformation/9
The instructor is responsible for determining the requirements for whatever grade is to be assigned.
The cumulative grade-point average is computed by dividing the total number of credit points earned by the total number of hours attempted.
In addition to the grades indicated above, the instructor may assign one of the following:
IIF—Incomplete/failing: automatic conversion to F grade after one academic year if the course is not made up.
IIW—Incomplete/withdrawal: automatic conversion to W after one academic year if the course is not made up.
IP—In progress (graduate students only)
P—Pass
H—Honors (given only in the Honors Program)
NC—for students registered on an audit/no grade basis.
Y—symbol used to indicate that an entire grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
IM—Drop without discredit.
Regulations Governing the Award or Accumulation of Additional Grades
1. Pass /Fail. Up to 16 semester credit hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. No more than 6 semester credit hours of course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis in any given semester. The pass (P) grade is not included in the student’s grade-point average; the fail (F) grade is included. For additional information see the general information portion of each college or school section of this bulletin.
2. Honors. Credit hours earned in honors courses with grades of H or P count toward the student’s degree but are not included in the grade-point average calculation.
3. Withdrawal. A notation of withdrawal will be placed on the permanent record of any student who withdraws with approval during any term. Students who cease to attend classes and do not officially withdraw from the University will be subject to grades of F in all course work for which they were enrolled during that term.
EXPENSES
Educational expenses at UCD normally involve tuition, fees, books, and required materials. UCD does not maintain residence facilities. All costs related to housing must be arranged by the student at his own convenience. Transportation and parking costs should be considered in the determination of expenses.
Tuition and Fees*
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Regents of the University of Colorado in accordance with appropriate legislation enacted annually (usually late in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term during the year. The student should check with the Office of Admissions and Records for specific tuition and fee information for the term for which he intends to apply.
TUITION FOR 1974-75
The tuition schedule for 1974-75 is listed below as an approximation of the schedule that will be adopted for 1975-76. Students should anticipate a slightly higher tuition than is indicated here.
Credit Hours
of Enrollment Residents Nonresidents
0.0-3.0 .................$ 45.00 $108.00
3.1 -4.0 ................. 60.00 144.00
4.1 -5.0 ................. 75.00 180.00
5.1 - 6.0 ................ 90.00 216.00
6.1 - 7.0 ............... 105.00 594.50
7.1 - 8.0 ............... 120.00 594.50
8.1 - 9.0 ............... 135.00 594.50
9.1 or more ............. 148.00 594.50
1. A student activity fee will be charged in addition to the above tuition as follows:
Summer term 1975 ......................$3
Fall semester 1975 .................... 7
Spring semester 1976 .................. 7
2. There is a one-time nonrefundable matriculation fee of $15 for new degree students and $5 for new special students in the University of Colorado. This fee will be assessed at the time of initial registration. Charges then will not be made for adding or dropping courses or for transcript orders. If a special student is admitted to degree status, he will be assessed a $10 matriculation fee at the time of his first registration after the change has been made.
3. Students certified by the Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation pay $72.
4. Graduate students who enroll for a comprehensive examination only will pay $45. Such students will be assessed regular tuition and fees if they need hours toward graduation.
5. Students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course pay a $10 breakage deposit.
6. Students enrolled in the College of Music pay an $18 music facilities fee. This same $18 fee is charged to students enrolled in piano class, sound reinforcement and recording, and electronic music. No student is charged more than one $18 fee.
Assessment of Charges and Payment Regulations
All tuition and fees are assessed during registration and must be paid at that time. Any student who registers for courses is liable for payment of tuition and fees even though he may drop out of school. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent semester or
‘The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado resen/es the right to change tuition and fees at any time.


101 University of Colorado at Denver
term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credits. The only exceptions to this regulation are notes and other types of indebtedness maturing after graduation.
Arrangements may be made through the Finance Office at the time of registration to defer payment of a portion of tuition and fees after a minimum down payment or one-third of the total tuition, whichever is greater. Specific information regarding deferred payment will be found in the Schedule of Courses which is published in advance of each term or semester.
Personal checks will be accepted for any University obligation. Any student giving a check that is not acceptable to the bank may be dropped immediately from the rolls of the University.
The student should refer to the Schedule of Courses for charges imposed for late registration and late payments.
Refund policies and policies related to adding and dropping courses and withdrawing from the University will be found in the Schedule of Courses published prior to each semester or term.
REGISTRATION
See Academic Calendar in this bulletin for dates. See the appropriate Schedule of Courses for complete registration information for each semester or summer term.
Note: There is a penalty fee for late registration.
Inter-Institutional Registration Within the Auraria Higher Education Center
Because the University of Colorado at Denver is a full participant in the Auraria Higher Education Center, students who are approved by their college dean may enroll for courses being offered by either the Community College of Denver-Auraria Campus or Metropolitan State College. Courses completed under this arrangement will be indicated on the University of Colorado transcript and will be a part of the student’s degree program at the University.
TRANSCRIPTS
Transcripts of records should be ordered from the University of Colorado Transcript Section, Regent Administrative Center 125, Boulder, Colorado 80302, or from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. Transcripts are prepared only at the student's written request. A student having financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Copies of transcripts from other institutions cannot be furnished.
WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY
A student who leaves the University without officially withdrawing will receive a grade of F in each course for which he is registered. Withdrawal forms may be obtained from the office of the academic dean of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
OTHER REGULATIONS
Students are advised to refer to the Schedule of Courses each semester for specific information regarding course loads, adding or dropping classes, adjustments in tuition as a result of dropped classes, etc. Where requirements differ from one academic area to another, the student is advised to abide by the regulations stated by the college or school in which he is enrolled.
RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION FOR TUITION PURPOSES
A student is classified initially as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for tuition purposes at the time an application and all supporting credentials have been received in the Office of Admissions and Records. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. The requirements for establishing residency for tuition purposes are defined by law of the State of Colorado (Chapter 124, Article 18, Colorado Revised Statutes 1963, as amended). To be eligible for consideration for in-state status the applicant must be 21 years of age or older (or an emancipated minor as defined by law); must have been physically domiciled in the State of Colorado for 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the date of registration for the term in which in-state status is desired; and must be able to present proof of compliance with other mandatory laws of the state (valid motor vehicle operator’s license, valid motor vehicle registration, payment of state income tax, etc.).
After the student’s status is determined, it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary. Classification standards conform to state statutes and judicial decisions and are applicable to all of Colorado’s state-supported colleges and universities.
The student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse has the responsibility of informing the tuition classification officer, Office of Admissions and Records, in writing within 15 days after such a change occurs. An unemancipated minor whose parents move their domicile from Colorado to a location outside the state is considered an out-of-state student from the date of the parents’ removal from the state. He will be assessed nonresident tuition at the next registration. The student or his parent is required to send written notification to the tuition classification officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. If an adult student or an emancipated minor establishes domicile outside Colorado, he is to send written notification within 15 days to the tuition classification officer.
Petitioning for Classification Change
Any student who is 21 years of age or older, or an emancipated minor as defined by law, is qualified to change his domicile and his tuition classification status. Detailed instructions as to the procedure to follow, the necessary petition forms, and a copy of the appropriate Colorado statute governing tuition classification at state-supported institutions in Colorado are available


General Information 111
from the tuition classification officer, University of Colorado at Denver, Office of Admissions and Records, Room 203.
Classification Notes
1. Petitions will not be acted upon until an application for admission to the University and complete supporting credentials have been received.
2. Changes in classification are made effective at the time of the student’s next registration.
3. A student who willfully gives wrong information to evade payment of the out-of-state tuition is subject to legal and disciplinary action.
SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
Services offered by the Office for Student Relations are available to the student, either as an individual or as part of an organization. The dean for student relations is concerned with the total University experience of each student. His associates and staff provide personalized assistance to the student in educational, social, organizational, and the behavioral areas. Undergraduate colleges and schools conduct orientation programs for incoming students before each semester begins, and academic advising throughout the academic year.
Counseling Center
The services of the counseling center are available by appointment to all students. Personal and vocational counseling, group experiences, and student testing are provided by trained and qualified counselors. Interviews are confidential, and there is no fee for the testing or counseling.
Financial Aid
A large proportion of UCD students receive financial assistance through grants, loans, or the work-study program. In addition, a large number of students find part- or full-time employment in the community. Short-term emergency loans also are available.
Most financial aid is awarded on the basis of the student’s financial need, with academic achievement a secondary consideration. For current information on deadlines, applications, and types of aid available the student should consult the Office of Financial Aid at UCD or his high school counselor.
Job Opportunities
Part-time job opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid. Career placement, after graduation, is available through the Boulder Campus Placement Center. Applications and further information are available through the Office of Financial Aid.
Office of Veterans Affairs
All student veterans, whether new, transfer, or previous students, must notify the Office of Veterans Affairs of intent to enroll each semester. The office is responsible for assisting veterans in being properly certified with the Veterans Administration Regional Office and in obtaining all VA and state of Colorado benefits they are entitled to receive.
The Office of Veterans Affairs also provides veterans with professional counseling services, tutorial benefits, reading and study skills aid, employment referral services, and assistance in obtaining emergency situation short-term loans.
Services for Disabled Students
Special efforts are made at UCD to assist handicapped students in obtaining a university education to the fullest extent of their capabilities. A Services for Disabled Students Office is maintained to serve students who are in wheelchairs or otherwise partially disabled. Orientation to UCD, assistance in registering for classes, and dealing with other problem areas to facilitate a rewarding school experience are functions of this office. Students are provided tutorial and study skills services as needed. Special reserved parking spaces are available, and plans are underway to provide employment and housing assistance as needed in the future. A movement was undertaken to remove architectural barriers to the handicapped, and there now exist no major barriers to free movement of handicapped students through the buildings.
Students From Other Countries
Appropriate immigration certifications and work permits may be obtained through the Office for Student Relations. Counseling, assistance with housing, and special information is available from the foreign student adviser at UCD.
Health Insurance Program
Student health insurance coverage through Blue Cross-Blue Shield is mandatory for all students. Students may elect to waive this coverage by signing a waiver card and filing this with registration materials. If the waiver card is not filed upon registration, the health insurance assessment will be automatic. Cost to the student is $36.50 each semester. Further information regarding this program may be obtained from the Office for Student Relations, Room 602.
Study Skills Center
The Study Skills Center is a program which is centered upon the belief that all University students should have the opportunity to fully develop the skills necessary for their academic progress. Services are provided to meet students’ needs for general improvement of study habits and specific aid with particular subject areas.
Each semester the center offers three courses (St.Sk. 100, Developmental Composition; St.Sk. 101, Developmental Reading, and St.Sk. 102, College Preparatory Mathematics; see page 51) for which students may receive 1 semester hour of credit (pass or fail). Noncredit, five-week modular courses are also offered, such as Rapid Reading, in which students may accelerate reading speed, learn reading flexibility, and build word-grouping ability and comprehension. Study Skills mini-courses (noncredit) are offered in such areas as use of the library, listening and note taking, taking examinations, writing a term paper, time scheduling, and systematic approaches to study.


12/ University of Colorado at Denver
Tutorial assistance is available to students who need help in any subject area. The center also keeps a file for students wishing to participate in discussion groups prior to and during examination week.
The center has available a collection of books including a number by minority authors and about minorities, which may be utilized for research assignments, as well as for improvement of general knowledge.
The Study Skills Center is located on the fourth floor of the Bromley Library. It is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Women’s Services
Programs of special concern to women at UCD are offered through the Women’s Center. A cooperative student and faculty effort provides activities, counseling, and referral services.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Numerous student clubs and organizations exist to provide a variety of interests for students desiring extra-curricular activities. The student newspaper, The Fourth Estate, is published weekly, and there is an active student government.
Students participate in dramatic and musical productions, reading programs, special seminars and workshops, intramural sports, and debate. Lectures and programs are offered throughout the academic year.
Students are vitally concerned with current issues such as environmental action, politics, education for minority groups, and women’s liberation, and student clubs for such issues invite participation and ideas.
Several honorary societies, fraternities, and professional associations have active student chapters at Denver, and UCD students also are eligible for membership in Boulder Campus organizations.
ALUMNI PROGRAMS
All graduates and former students of the University of Colorado are eligible for membership in the CU Alumni Association. The Colorado Alumnus newspaper is mailed 11 times each year.
Two Denver area alumni clubs (Denver East and Denver West) have been formed, and a wide range of activities is provided by these groups. Membership and further information is available through the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at UCD or the alumni office on the Boulder Campus.
FACILITIES
The UCD Campus comprises an eight-story tower and classroom building providing over 50 classrooms, 26 teaching laboratories, faculty and administrative offices, an auditorium, cafeteria, and student lounges.
Work was completed in 1973 on an expansion project which added 12 new classrooms and laboratories on a third level in the Classroom Building.
Bookstore
Textbooks and supplies are available at the UCD bookstore, located on the first floor of the Bromley Library building. The bookstore is open from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Friday, and is closed Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. It also remains open during semester breaks from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday. Students must present their validated ID card when paying for purchases by check. BankAmericard and Master Charge credit cards are also accepted.
Library
The Charles D. Bromley Library is located at 14th and Lawrence Streets, adjacent to the Classroom Building. Hours of service are from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. The library is closed on Sunday. Special holiday and vacation hours are posted in the library.
The library collection includes reserve books, reference materials, journals, microforms, records, and tapes. Microform equipment and listening facilities are provided. General reference service, interlibrary loans, and assistance with individual library problems are available through the reference office on the second floor.
UCD students also may use the Norlin Library on the Boulder Campus, or any library in a Colorado state-supported institution of higher learning, for research materials not available in the Bromley Library by presentation of the student’s validated ID card. Books may be borrowed through interlibrary loan to minimize the inconvenience to students who wish to use Norlin Library resources.
Child Care Center
A Child Care Center is available for use by students who have young children to be cared for while attending classes or using the library. It is partially supported by the UCD student government. For information call 892-1117, ext. 395.
Classroom Locations
Most classes and laboratory sections meet in the main UCD buildings. A few courses are scheduled at other facilities. Locations are designated in the Schedule of Courses under Building Codes.
Parking
Parking is available at nearby commercial off-street lots both day and evening.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
Cooperative Education is a relatively new program at UCD. Based on the precept that experience is often the most effective educator, this program is designed to provide students of sophomore standing or above with an opportunity for preprofessional employment. This is accomplished by placing students as employees with businesses, agencies, and institutions which are operating in a capacity related to the student’s course work.
The program is now expanding its placement opportunities. Normally students work full time for one semester and then attend classes full time for the following semester. However, half-time positions are


General InformationH 3
also available. This program enables students in all disciplines to gain experience and income while attending college.
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may also receive credit for current job experiences. This permits students who already have jobs in their field of study to earn academic credit. Students also can obtain volunteer internships through the Cooperative Education Office and receive both credit and valuable experience for their efforts.
Students interested in any of these options can apply or obtain more information in Room 809 or by calling extension 555. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should also refer to Cooperative Education in the Special Programs section of this bulletin.
BUREAUS AND AGENCIES
Bureau of Community Services
The Bureau of Community Services provides assistance to community groups, agencies, and organizations in planning and developing programs to solve a variety of problems. Bureau staff, with support from UCD faculty and graduate students, conduct training programs in the areas of leadership development, resource mobilization, community planning, and community organization. In addition, consultation is provided to numerous groups engaged in community development efforts.
Division of Continuing Education
The Division of Continuing Education is responsible for noncredit programs, off-campus credit classes, correspondence study, audiovisual services, continuation education, and community services in the
Denver metropolitan area. These programs and resources of the University of Colorado are an integral part of the statewide coordinated program of off-campus instruction under guidelines established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
The program provides opportunity for advancement in business, government, and the professions; offers liberal education programs contributing to cultural, intellectual, and personal vitality; and presents programs designed to help solve social, community, and individual problems.
Noncredit programs are open to all adults regardless of previous education or training. Some advanced courses require a background in a specific subject matter area. Except in certificate programs, no grade is awarded upon completion of a course.
Off-campus credit offerings supplement the regular academic programs offered at UCD. Admission requirements and refund policies for off-campus instruction are identical with requirements for enrollment in UCD. Individuals who have never been enrolled on any campus of the University of Colorado usually are admitted to off-campus instruction as special students.
Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Continuing Education Bulletin or other information may write or call the division office at UCD, 1100 14th Street, 892-1117, ext. 286.
Speakers Bureau
Faculty and administrative personnel are available for outside speaking engagements on a wide variety of subjects. This public service activity helps to promote interaction between Denver Campus personnel and the urban community. Requests for speakers are handled through the UCD Office of Information Services, ext. 246.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
HERBERT G. ELDRIDGE, Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, originally established in 1971 as the College of Undergraduate Studies, was formed to serve the higher educational needs of qualified university students in the Denver metropolitan area. Reflecting the varied objectives of the urban student, the instructional program provides opportunities for general education in the arts and sciences both as an end in itself and as preparation for professional and graduate work. New programs in interdisciplinary studies particularly appropriate to the urban environment are being planned and implemented. Since many students are employed full time during the day, numerous courses are offered in the evening.
The College is organized into three divisions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences. Each division offers a wide variety of curricula including traditional undergraduate majors, interdisciplinary studies, and preprofessional programs. In order to broaden the student’s perspectives the College requires 12 semester hours of course work in each of the areas represented by the three divisions. However, the student is given a wide selection of courses to satisfy each of the three area requirements and the other requirements for his degree.
The College offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.). A student may complete a major in one of the following disciplines: anthropology, biology, chemistry, communication and theatre, distributed studies, economics, English, fine arts, French, geography, German, history, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology, and Spanish.
Students also enroll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to prepare themselves for admission to one of the professional schools of the University, which include the School of Dentistry, School of Education, School of Journalism, School of Law, School of Medicine, School of Nursing, and School of Pharmacy. Each professional school has specific requirements which must be followed if the student intends to pursue a career in one of these fields.
Interdisciplinary majors such as Urban Studies (Social Sciences) and the Writing Program (Arts and Humanities) are currently being developed in each division of the College. Courses applicable to these new majors already are being offered, and others will be initiated in subsequent years. Interested students should contact the office of the appropriate divisional dean for information.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Freshmen
The student must be a high school graduate and must present 15 units of acceptable secondary work. (The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences does not specify particular units.) An applicant who has not graduated from high school must present satisfactory scores on the General Educational Development Test (GED) and a high school equivalency certificate to be considered for admission. Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.” High school is interpreted as grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. Students should refer to the General Information section of this bulletin for complete admission requirements.
Transfer Students
Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students as outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin.
Applicants (residents and nonresidents) will be considered for admission provided a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better has been attained on all work attempted at all institutions attended. If the applicant has been away from the collegiate environment for more than three years, he will be considered on the basis of all factors available: high school record, test scores, original collegiate admission qualifications, college performance, and interim experiences that might suggest potential success in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. A maximum of 72 semester hours taken at junior colleges maybe applied toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Tests. For students who have taken an advanced placement course in high school and who make scores of 3, 4, or 5 in the CEEB’s Advanced Placement Examination, advanced placement as well as college credit will be granted. Students who make scores of 2 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade but will count toward


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graduation and the meeting of other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Prospective students who plan either to graduate from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or to enroll in the College to fulfill lower division requirements for professional schools may earn college-level credit for advanced standing in the following CLEP Subject Examinations scored at the 67th percentile and above:
American Literature
Analysis and Interpretation of Literature
English Literature
American Government
American History
General Psychology
Introductory Economics
Western Civilization
Biology
General Chemistry Geology
Introductory Calculus
For complete information about the CLEP program, students should refer to the General Information section of this bulletin.
STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM
The University of Colorado sponsors an active study abroad program, which is open to students from all campuses of the University. The program is described in the General Information section of this bulletin.
ADVANCED STANDING BY EXAMINATION
Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standing for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A nonrefundable fee is charged for each examination taken. The fee is assessed at the lowest resident tuition charge currently in effect for the Denver Campus. Arrangements for the examinations are made through the Office of Admissions and Records.
ACADEMIC ADVISING
Students in the College are expected to assume the responsibility for planning their academic programs in accordance with College rules and policies and major requirements.
To assist students with this planning the College maintains an advising staff located in Room 804 of the Tower Building. Students are urged to consult with the staff of this office concerning individual academic problems.
As soon as the student has determined his major, he must declare his intentions to his discipline adviser. The discipline adviser will be responsible not only for the student’s advising but also for the certification of the completion of his major program for graduation.
Students planning to earn a degree from one of the professional schools should see an adviser in that
school. Each professional school has certain specific requirements. Preprofessional health science students should see a member of the Health Sciences Committee early in their careers. Appointments should be made through the sciences secretary in Room 508.
The Denver Campus also has a counseling service available through the Office for Student Relations to which a student may go for assistance with problems of a vocational or personal nature.
CREDIT FOR ARMY ROTC
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may participate in the Army ROTC program through the College of Arts and Sciences on the Boulder Campus. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will accept a maximum of 12 hours of ROTC course work toward the baccalaureate degree. For more information about the ROTC program, see the General Information section of this bulletin.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Courses and Credits
The University operates on the semester system. The term “course” as used in this bulletin means a one-semester course. Except for laboratory courses, the credit-hour value assigned to a course is roughly equivalent to the number of hours per week of class work involved in the course (thus a 3-semester-hour course normally meets 3 hours per week). The value of a course in semester-hour credits is indicated by that part of the course number which follows the dash. Example: Chem. 103-5. “Chem. 103” is the identifying department number, and “5” indicates that the course is for 5 semester hours credit.
Course Numbering System
Course levels are designated as follows: 100 level, freshman; 200 level, sophomore; 300 level, junior; 400 level, senior; 500 level, graduate.
Upper Division Credit
Courses numbered 300 or above and all honors courses are awarded upper division credit.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned. Freshman classification, 0 to 29 semester credits; sophomore, 30 to 59 semester credits; junior, 60 to 89 credits; and senior, 90 to 120 credits.
Course Load Policy
The normal course load is 12 to 18 hours. Students registered for fewer than 12 hours are regarded as part-time students. Students wishing to register for 20 hours or more must obtain approval from the dean. These totals include all courses taken for credit in the University, but do not include correspondence courses, noncredit courses, and courses taken at other institutions. To receive credit, the student must be officially registered for each course.
Students who hold or expect to hold full- or part-time employment while enrolled in the College must register


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for course loads they can expect to complete without unusual difficulty. Recommended course loads are given below, but each student must weigh his own abilities and assess the demands of each course in determining an appropriate schedule. The College assumes that all courses elected will be completed.
Employed 20 hours per week—10 to 13 semester hours or 3 to 4 ■ courses
Employed 30 hours per week—8 to 11 semester hours or 3 courses Employed 40 hours per week—6 to 9 semester hours or 2 to 3 courses
Independent Study
With the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and divisional dean, students may register tor independent study. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project (normally not to exceed 3 credits per semester) shall be arranged at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits taken on an independent study basis may apply toward the bachelor’s degree.
Credit for Courses in the Professional Schools and in Physical Education
Students may count toward the Bachelor of Arts degree as many as 24 credit hours of course work for curricula leading to degrees other than the B.A. (Business, Engineering and Applied Science, Environmental Design, Journalism, Music, Nursing, and Pharmacy).College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students desiring secondary school certification will be allowed to take 32 hours in the certification program of the School of Education as part of their total required hours for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Vocational and technical courses from a two-year program may not be included. Activity courses in physical education, up to a maximum of 8 hours, will count toward the 120 required for the degree.
Correspondence Study
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, with the approval of the dean, may take work in correspondence study offered by the University’s Division of Continuing Education. A maximum of 30 hours of correspondence work may count toward the degree.
Adding and Dropping Courses
All changes of schedule must be made by processing the official drop/add card. No change will be made in a student’s schedule until all necessary signatures have been entered on the drop/add card and the card has been returned to the Office of Admissions and Records. Restrictions on changes of schedule are noted below:
Adding Courses. Courses may not be added after the second week of classes except under unusual circumstances.
Dropping Courses. Students receive a grade of F in any course that they discontinue without officially dropping. Students will be allowed to drop during the first two weeks of the semester with no signatures required on the drop card. After the second week the instructor must certify that the student is passing if the course is to be dropped without discredit. After the tenth week of the semester, courses may not be dropped
unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control (accident, illness, etc.). The instructor and the dean must approve the drop under these circumstances.
Withdrawal
When a student withdraws from the University, he must obtain the approval of the dean’s office (Room 804) and the Office of Admissions and Records. A notation of withdrawal is made on the permanent record page. Students who leave the University without officially withdrawing will receive grades of F for all course work. After the tenth week of the semester, a student will not be permitted to withdraw except for reasons clearly beyond his control.
Attendance Regulations
The matter of classroom attendance is left to the discretion of the instructor. It is the responsibility of the student to determine at the beginning of each semester his instructor’s policies on attendance.
Students who do not attend the first class session in limited enrollment courses of 15 or less will lose their place in the class unless arrangements have been made with the instructor prior to the first class session.
Incompletes
The following grade symbols may be assigned to indicate that work in a particular course was not completed at the end of the semester:
IIW-Incomplete/withdrawal. Automatic conversion to W after one academic year if the course is not made up. This grade is awarded when, for reasons acceptable to the instructor, sufficient information is unavailable to warrant a final grade, and when the student’s work indicates a potential passing grade.
1/F-lncomplete/failing. Automatic conversion to F grade after one academic year if the course is not made up. This grade is awarded under the same circumstances as above, except that the student’s work is of failing quality.
Pass/Fail Option
All students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis may do so during regular registration procedures. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be effected during the normal two-week drop-add period. After two weeks, it will not be possible for the student to change his registration unless approved by the dean of the College as a specific exception. The following restrictions should be noted on the use of the PIF option:
1. Not more than 16 semester hours of course work passed may be credited toward the 120 hours required for graduation. These 16 hours are in addition to those taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education, and certain Teacher Certification courses through the School of Education.
2. The use of the pass/fail option may be restricted in certain major programs.
3. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis may not be included in the minimum of 30 hours of C or better required for the major.


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4. Only 6 hours of course work may be P/F in any given semester.
5. Grades of D and above convert to aP. TheP grade is not included in the student’s grade-point average.
6. Grades of F equal a letter grade of F and will count in the grade-point average.
7. Transfer Students. No course may be taken on a P/F basis by transfer students graduating with only 30 semester hours completed at the University of Colorado.
Grade-Point Average Requirements and Scholastic Suspension
A minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0(C) is required of all students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. If a student’s GPA drops below 2.0 at the end of any semester (excluding summer term), the student will be required to achieve better than a 2.0 in a succeeding semester, as described in the following sliding scale, or he will be suspended. The student must then continue to meet the sliding scale every semester until his grade-point average reaches 2.0. Scholastic records of students will be reviewed as soon as possible after the close of each spring semester, and the student will be informed in writing if he is to be suspended.
Hours Deficiency 1-10 11-20 21-30 over 30
Grade-Point Average in the Most Recent Semester
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
The “Hours Deficiency” is the number of credit hours of B work the student must earn to raise his GPA to 2.0. Hours of deficiency may be computed as follows: multiply the total number of hours by 2 to obtain the GPA points that would have been attained with a 2.0 average. Subtract from this figure the total grade points shown on the last grade slip. The difference is the hours of deficiency.
In an effort to raise his grade-point average, a student in the College may register for courses in the University of Colorado summer term on any campus, for correspondence study through the University, and for off-campus credit courses offered through the UCD Division of Continuing Education, irrespective of his academic status.
Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. However, grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado are used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and his progress toward the degree.
First Suspension. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term), after which the student will automatically be readmitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The student will then be expected to meet the sliding scale (based on his CU record only) until his cumulative GPA reches 2.0. Failure to do so will result in a second suspension.
A student under a first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if
he has demonstrated marked academic improvement in one of the following ways:
1. By achieving a cumulative 2.5 average on all summer or correspondence work attempted at the University of Colorado since suspension. (A student must register for a minimum of 6 credits in the summer term on any campus or through correspondence work.)
2. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to
2.0 through correspondence or summer work at the University of Colorado.
3. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to
2.0 at another institution. (The cumulative grade-point average is defined as the grade-point average at the University of Colorado in combination with the work taken at all other institutions.) Upon return to the University, however, the student retains his previous grade-point average. (GPA from another institution does not transfer back to the University.)
Second Suspension. A student suspended for a second time will be readmitted only under unusual circumstances, and only by petition to the Committee on Academic Progress of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Each petition will be examined individually. The committee will expect the student to show that his chances for successfully completing his education in the College have been materially improved by factors such as increased maturity or a relief from stressful circumstances. The deadline for petitions to the Committee on Academic Progress for reinstatement for any fall semester is August 1. The deadline for petitions for reinstatement for any spring semester is December
1.
Students who complete 12 or more semester hours at another institution must apply for readmission to the University of Colorado as transfer students, regardless of their status in the University of Colorado. They also must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted (at the University of Colorado and elsewhere) in order to be considered for readmission.
Committee on Academic Progress
The Committee on Academic Progress (CAP) is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty. The committee constitutes the bridge between the faculty in its legislative capacity and the students upon whom the legislation comes to bear. CAP alone is empowered to grant waivers of, exemptions from, and exceptions to the academic policies of the College.
One of the major responsibilities of the committee is the handling of suspensions and reinstatement of suspended students. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term). However, students suspended a second time will be reinstated only under unusual circumstances and only by petition to the committee.
The Committee on Academic Progress is composea of five faculty members and three student members.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and


181 University of Colorado at Denver
integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the intent to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University.
In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with their instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc., in order to avoid this and similar offenses.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION College Requirements
The following four requirements apply to all Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts students:
1. Arts and Humanities—12 semester hours.
2. Natural and Physical Sciences—12 semester hours.
3. Social Sciences—12 semester hours.
Lists of courses that will satisfy the above area requirements are available in the Fall and Spring Schedule of Courses, in each divisional office, and in the dean’s office.
4. Foreign Language. This requirement is satisfied by:
a. Completion of a Level III high school course in any classical or modern foreign language; or
b. Completion of a third-semester course (normally 211, but in French, German, 201 or 211) in the College; or
c. Demonstration of third-semester proficiency by test.
d. This requirement also may be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (12 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201 or 211, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test.
Students who elect to continue a language studied before entering the College will be placed in courses appropriate to their level of preparation and will continue from the level indicated until the third-semester course has been passed. A student who enrolls in a course at a lower level than that in which he has been placed will not receive credit for the course.
Students who may go on to do graduate work are advised to complete the fourth semester of a foreign language in preparation for language requirements of graduate schools.
Foreign Language Placement. Placement of students in college-level foreign language courses is based on units of high school language study and on the verbal SAT score or English ACT score according to the following schedule:
Verbal SAT Score English ATC Score High School Foreign Language Approved Courses, Levels Strongly Advised for or Units the Freshman Year
600-800 25-36 4 or more Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below third-year (300-level) courses.
200-599 0-24 4 or more Exempt from requirement. Recommended 300-level courses; no credit allowed below fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses.
600-800 25-36 3 Exempt from requirement. Recommended 300-level courses; no credit allowed below fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses.
200-599 0-24 3 Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses.
600-800 25-36 2 Third semester courses (201 or 211).
200-599 0-24 2 Second semester courses (102). Second semester courses (102).
600-800 25-36 1
200-599 0-24 1 Beginning course (101).
A student may enroll in a course at a lower level than that in which he is placed upon consultation with the appropriate faculty member. However, he will not receive credit for any course taken at a level lower than his placement. Exceptions to this policy can be made only by the discipline adviser and will normally be considered only when there has been a lapse of five or more years since previous study of the language. There is ample opportunity for language review by enrolling on a noncredit basis in lower-level language courses upon consultation with the adviser.
Students may request a placement test to place them in a higher level course than that assigned, or to demonstrate proficiency sufficient to satisfy the college foreign language requirement.
Students who do not wish to continue a language studied previously may begin a new language without penalty. However, students are strongly urged to begin or continue their college-level language study immediately upon enrollment in the College. Students also are urged to consult with the appropriate faculty member concerning any problems that might arise regarding foreign language study or the foreign language requirement.
Note: Physical education is no longer required for completion of the bachelor’s degree. However, a maximum of 8 hours of physical education credit will count toward the 120 required for the degree.
Major Requirements
A candidate for the degree Bachelor of Arts shall fulfill such requirements as may be stipulated for his major program. These requirements shall include at least 30 semester hours of work in the major area (as determined by his adviser) of C grade or higher, at least 16 hours of which shall be at the upper division level. The grade average in the major shall be at least C. Not more than 48 semester hours in one discipline may be


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counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. The student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the major. The adviser shall be responsible for determining when a student has satisfactorily completed the requirements for the major and for so certifying to the dean of the College.
For requirements of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, consult the fine arts section in the alphabetical listings under the description of courses and programs.
Upper Division Requirement
Students must complete at least 45 hours of upper division work (courses numbered in the 300s and 400s) to be eligible for the bachelor’s degree. Any student may register for upper division courses providing he has satisfied the prerequisites or has the approval of the discipline in which the course is offered.
Courses transferred from a junior college carry lower division credit. Exceptions to this require approval of the dean of the College and the appropriate discipline representative, who may ask the student to validate upper division credit by taking an advanced standing examination.
Total Credit-Hour and Grade-Point Requirement
To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students must pass at least 120 semester hours with an average of at least 2.0 (C) in all courses attempted at the University of Colorado.
Residence Requirement
A candidate for a degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must earn his last 30 hours in the University of Colorado and must be enrolled as a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Senior Progress Report
Upon completion of 80 semester hours of course work, each student should request a Progress Report in the Office of the Dean to determine his status with respect to the above requirements.
At the beginning of their last semester, students are required to file Diploma Cards, showing the date when they intend to be graduated. Diploma Cards are available in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Office of Admissions and Records, and at registration. During their senior year, students must clear all schedule changes with the Degree Requirements section of the Office of the Dean.
Graduation with Honors
The Honors Program of the College is outlined in the Special Programs section of this bulletin. In addition to graduation with honors, a student may be graduated with distinction if, prior to his final semester, he has taken at least 30 hours at the University of Colorado and if his cumulative grade-point average by the end of the semester, prior to his final semester's work toward the degree, is 3.5 or higher, both at the University of Colorado and in all collegiate work attempted.
Summary Checklist of Graduation Requirements
The student alone is ultimately responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements. Questions concerning them should be directed to the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Upon completion of degree requirements (including the fulfillment of a major) the student will be awarded the appropriate degree.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
1. 120 semester hours passed.
2. 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all Univerity of Colorado work.
3. 45 hours of upper division work.
4. The last 30 hours in residence in the College.
AREA REQUIREMENTS
1. Arts and Humanities: 12 semester hours.
2. Natural and Physical Sciences: 12 semester hours.
3. Social Sciences: 12 semester hours.
4. Foreign language: third-semester proficiency in any one language or completion of a level III high school foreign language course.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
1. 30 to 48 hours in the major area.
2. 30 hours of C-grade or better in the major area.
3. A 2.0 grade-point average in all major work.
4. 16 hours of upper division courses in the major, C-grade or higher.
5. Special requirements as stipulated by the major program.
Note: Not more than 48 hours in any one discipline and not more than 24 hours outside the College can be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree.
Students may elect to satisfy their degree requirements according to the above requirements or according to those in effect when they first enrolled as a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Students planning to transfer to the Boulder Campus are responsible for informing themselves of the degree requirements on that campus.


201 University of Colorado at Denver
Division of
Arts and Humanities
ROBLEY D. RHINE, Assistant Dean
The Division of Arts and Humanities includes the disciplines of communication and theatre, communication disorders and speech science, English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, and Spanish. Complete undergraduate majors are offered in communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, and Spanish. Requirements for each major are explained before the course listings for the respective disciplines. Information on preprofessional programs is given in that section of this bulletin.
This division offers course work in several special programs including Comparative Literature, American Studies, and the Writing Program. The Writing Program is designed to prepare professional writers in the techniques and vocabularies of several varied fields such as fine arts, science, engineering, creative writing, business, social sciences, and literature. Two cocurricular programs also are open to students: Theatre and Community Speaking and Forensics.
Students interested in majoring in any of the disciplines or in participating in any of the specialized programs should request additional information from the divisional office or the discipline representative.
Description of Courses and Programs
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.
ARTS AND HUMANITIES
A.H. 398-3. Cooperative Education. Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations. Prer., sophomore standing and
2.5 GPA.
COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE
A major in communication and theatre at both the bachelor’s and master’s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus.
Students majoring in communication and theatre must present a minimum of 40 semester hours (although the individual areas within communication and theatre may require additional hours) including C.T. 202 and C.T. 400. The student must elect to pursue one of the several areas of emphasis within the communication and theatre field. Each area has its own requirements for graduation, and specific programs will be developed in consultation with academic advisers to insure proper balance of courses within the major. Lists of required and suggested courses in each major area may be obtained from the divisional office.
Communication and theatre majors planning to teach communication and theatre at the secondary level should acquaint themselves with the certification requirements of the North Central Accrediting Association.
Each student pursuing a program in the School of Education must meet minimal standards of competence in oral communication. Additional information may be obtained through the School of Education office.
C.T. 40-0. Speech Laboratory in English as a Second Language.
Group assistance for people for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their spoken English.
C.T. 41-0. Reading Laboratory in English as a Second Language.
Group assistance for people for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their speed and comprehension in readinq English.
C.T. 42-0. Writing Laboratory in English as a Second Language.
Group assistance for people for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their writing in English.
C.T. 140-5. Structure and Pronunciation of Standard English for Speakers of Other Languages. Practice in speaking and understanding spoken English, with attention to grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary as well as meaning and appropriateness.
C.T. 141-3. Written Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. Beginning course in written English composition for people for whom English is a second language. Oral and written work. C.T. 142-3. Written Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Second semester course. Continued work on grammar, syntax, spelling, and the mechanics of writing, but with greaterfocus on selection, development, and organization of material for longer connected discourse.
C.T. 200-3. Voice and Diction. Improvement of the normal speaking voice, articulation, and pronunciation.
C.T. 202-3. Principles of Communication I. A
lecture-discussion-recitation approach to communication theory and its application in everyday communication. This course is intended to give students a point of view and certain basic knowledge that will help them become better communicators regardless of their fields of specialization.
C.T. 203-3. Principles of Communication II. Further development of the principles of communication. Specific topics such as argumentation, source credibility, attitude, organization, language style, and mass communication will be expanded by both theoretical refinement and analysis of specific research studies. Prer., C.T. 202. C.T. 210-3. Speechmaking. The theory and practice of developing ideas, supporting materials, organization, style, delivery, and audience adaptation.
C.T. 250-3. Introduction to Oral Interpretation. Study and performance of the narrative, lyric, and dramatic modes of literature. Not open to freshmen.
C.T. 270-3. Introduction to Theatre. A study of the theory and practice of theatrical art, historical and contemporary. Readings, lectures, demonstrations, play-going, and participation in live productions.
C.T. 273-2. Stage Movement. (Dance 242.) Analysis and practice of stage movement, including the study of basic techniques in gesture, mime, and pantomime as related to period drama, modern drama, and musical comedy. Emphasis is placed on devetoping an awareness of the use of the body as a means of expression.
C.T. 276-3. Stagecraft. Theory and practice. An introduction to stagecraft, including basic mechanical drawing, mechanics, lighting, and their application to the scenic arts.
C.T. 308-3. Introduction to Phonetics. International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and some kinesics of American English, phonemes transcription in context.
C.T. 315-3. Discussion. Theory and practice in group discussion processes, decision making, and participant and leader behavior combined with interpersonal laboratory.


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C.T. 320-3. Argumentation. Theory of argumentation and debate applied to contemporary issues. Briefing and presenting arguments.
C.T. 349-variable credit. Problems in English as a Second Language. Study in problem areas. Work is basically investigative in character. Prer., consent of supervising instructor.
C.T. 350-3. Oral Interpretation of Literature: Poetry. Exploration of poetry through analysis and performance. Prer., C.T. 250.
C.T. 360-3. Introduction to Broadcasting and Film. Development, organization, controls, and functions of radio and television in America with a brief description of broadcasting in other countries; an introduction to structure, economics, and social influence of film, with a brief discussion of production techniques.
C.T. 361-3. Radio Programming and Production. Introduction to basic elements of radio including the audio console, microphone, turntables, tape recorders, tape editing, timing, and combo operation. Emphasis on applying the basic principles and practices through professional production of live and taped radio programs, including news, weather, sports, documentaries, features, remotes, music programs, etc. Prer., C.T. 360.
C.T. 362-3. Television Production. Introduction to basic television production principles, practices, techniques, facilities, and equipment, including cameras, audio equipment, lighting, films, video tape, graphics, sets, etc. The lab applies the principles through production and direction of television programs, including news-weather-sports, interviews, documentaries, demonstrations, and a final program of the student's choice. Prer., C.T. 360.
C.T. 373-3. Acting. Theory and practice to enable the student to improve his techniques and to utilize these techniques in creative acting. Formal and informal performance of scenes throughout the semester.
C.T. 374-3. Directing. A study of the director’s function in the live theatre with particular emphasis on play analysis and the relationship of creative communication existing between the director and the production team. Readings, improvisations, and informal scenes. C.T. 378-3. Black Theatre. Black playwrights through the Harlem renaissance to the present American Black Revolution.
C.T. 339/499-variable credit. Problems in Communication and Theatre. Study in problem areas in the field of communication and theatre. Work that is basically investigative in character. Prer., consent of supervising instructor.
C.T. 400-3. Rhetorical and Aesthetic Dimensions of Communication. The study of communication as a process which integrates instrumental and consumatory elements. Prer., C.T. 202, senior standing in communication and theatre, or C.T. 202 and consent of instructor.
C.T. 415-3. Group Communication Theory. Observation and analysis of group processes and leadership roles and functions from the viewpoint of modern communication theory. Prer., C.T. 315 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 416-3. Representative American Speeches. Study of American speeches and speakers as they interact with audiences and events. Rhetorical analysis of ideas, organization, supporting materials, motivation, style, and delivery as adapted by a speakerfor a particular audience and occasion.
C.T. 420-3. Seminar: Persuasion. Theory of motivation and how it changes as it operates in individual and groups. Consideration of attitudes, beliefs, values, credibility, message variables, ethics, and effects. Analysis of persuasive campaign.
C.T. 421-3. The Psychology of Communication. Examination of psychological factors affecting comprehension and retention of speech and formation of linguistic habits, set, attitude formation and change, perception, values, and meaning. Prer., C.T. 202 for majors. C.T. 422-3. Information Analysis. Study of the applications and misapplications of the mathematical theory of communication. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.T. 426-3. Communication and Conflict: Interpersonal and Intergroup. Study of the influence of communication on intrapersonal, interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup conflict situations. Includes field observations and analysis and training in intervention methods.
C.T. 427-3. Intercultural Communication. Examination of the philosophy, process, problems, and potentials unique to
communication across cultural boundaries. Implications for personal and social innovation. Comparative study of communication customs in selected research studies.
C.T. 428-3. Communication of Directed Change. Examination of the communication process underlying the diffusion of innovations. Provides a bridge between theory and application in the study of directed change.
C.T. 430-3. Teaching of Communication and Theatre.
Fundamental problems of the teacher of communication and theatre—textbooks, courses of study, methods, etc. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.T. 433-3. Teaching With Group Methods. The study of group forces, potentials, and the teacher’s role in creating effective learning groups. Designing, developing, and evaluating participative educational activities as alternatives to traditional teaching methods. C.T. 435-3. Creative Dramatics. The study of creativity, its role and application in dramatics, and the manner in which creative dramatics assists in the growth and development of children and youth.
C.T. 440-3. Structure of Today’s English With Linguistic View. An up-to-date exploration of the workings of the English language with attention to current linguistic science trends in language analysis and description. Of general concern to all teachers of English and of particular value to those interested in bilingual education or in the teaching of English as a second or foreign language.
C.T. 441-3. Teaching Standard English to Speakers of Other Languages or Dialects. Comprehensive overview of the principles and techniques necessary to a broad-based audiolingual-cognitive approach to language teaching. Course pays particular attention to the importance of oral work in leading the non-native speaker of English from first-stop language manipulation to full communication. Prer., C.T. 440 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 442-variable credit. Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language. Practical experience in situations appropriate to the student-teacher’s particular English-teaching interests: the bilingual, bicultural classroom; adult education for the non-English speaker; foreign student classes in English at the University of Colorado or other local institutions of higher learning; one-to-one tutorial work in ESL. Prer., C.T. 441 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 450-3. Advanced Oral Interpretation. Exploration of prose forms; theory and analysis of fiction and nonfiction. Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350.
C.T. 451-3. Advanced Oral Interpretation. Exploration of poetic forms; theory and analysis of modern poetry. Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350.
C.T. 452-3. Dramatic Interpretation. Analysis of dramatic literature. Development and presentation of individual and group programs. Prer., C.T. 350.
C.T. 460-3. Radio-TV Station Organization and Operation.
Procedures, organization, and problems of management and operation of radio and television broadcast stations. Prer., C.T. 360 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 465-3 to 4. Television in Education. (L.M. 507) Utilization of television at all levels of education. Theory and practice in defining needs, identifying alternative solutions, producing materials, and evaluating results. Fourth credit hour requires comprehensive project design. Prer., C.T. 360 or consent of instructor.
C.T. 471-3. History of the Theatre I. Study of theatres, methods of presentation, actors, and acting from primitive times to 1700, emphasizing perception of contemporary theatre as a way of understanding and appreciating the place of theatre in historical contexts.
C.T. 473-3. Advanced Acting. Research, analysis, and preparation and performance of roles in period and modern drama, emphasizing theories and techniques of historical and presentational styles. Prer., C.T. 373.
C.T. 475-3. Playwriting: The Short Form. (Engl. 305.) Play, radio, and television scripts. Prer., any course in drama or consent of instructor.
C.T. 478-3. Drama Theory. Examination of critical and theoretical ideas from Aristotle to the present day.
C.T. 479-0 to 4. Theatre Practice. Participation in University Theatre productions. Credit hours to be arranged by director of the theatre. Not


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more than 2 hours may be earned in any one semester or in the summer session. Prer., consent of the director of the theatre.
C.T. 481-3. History of the Theatre II. Continuation of C.T. 471. From 1700.
C.T. 485-3. Playwriting: The Long Form. (Engl. 306.) Full-length plays, etc. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.T. 499-variable credit. Problems in Communication and Theatre. Prer., consent of instructor.
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND SPEECH SCIENCE
NATALIE HEDBERG, Coordinator The B.A. degree in communication disorders and speech science is not available on the Denver Campus. The following courses are open to undergraduates: CDSS 401 and CDSS 435. For graduate-level courses see Communication Disorders and Speech Science in the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
CDSS 401-2. Speech and Language Development in Children.
Underlying processes in the development of speech and language, normal and typical.
CDSS 435-2. Introduction to Language and Learning Disabilities.
Orientation to the field of language and learning disorders found in preschool, elementary, and secondary school children. Diagnostic and remedial techniques and treatment programs will be surveyed. Films, case studies, guest speakers, and field trips will provide a comprehensive view of the field.
CDSS 499-1 to 3. Independent Study.
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
Students wishing to pursue graduate work in comparative literature should consult the Graduate School Bulletin.
On the 400 level, students may read all texts in translation; however, reading knowledge in at least one foreign language is highly recommended. On the 500 and 600 levels, students must be able to read in two foreign languages or obtain the consent of the instructor.
C.L. 410-6. Background Readings in Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Texts.
C.L. 411-3. Basic Literary Concepts.
C.L. 412-3. Literary Genres: Narrative Prose.
C.L. 413-3. Literary Genres: Lyric Poetry.
C.L. 414-3. Literary Genres: Verse Epic.
C.L. 415-3. Literary Genres: Drama—Baroque.
C.L. 435-3. Studies in the Novel: The Modern Novel.
C.L. 436-3. Studies in the Drama: Contemporary European Drama—Ibsen to Brecht.
C.L. 437-3. Studies in Poetry: The Lyric as Genre and Attitude. C.L. 446-3. Nineteenth- and Early 20th-Century Literature.
C.L. 447-3. Modern Literature.
C.L. 448-3. Contemporary Literature.
C.L. 466-3. Themes, Motifs, and Characters.
C.L. 473-3. Philosophy and Literature. (Phil. 473.)
C.L. 487-3. International Literary Relations: The United States and the Hispanic World.
ENGLISH
A major in English at both the bachelor’s and master’s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus.
Students majoring in English must present a total of 36 hours in English, excluding Engl. 100-101, of which
24 hours must be earned in upper division courses. None of the required 36 hours may be taken on a pass/ fail basis. Of the 24 hours required at the 300- or 400-level, at least 3 must be earned in a course dealing with English literature before 1800, at least 3 in a course dealing with English literature after 1800, and at least 3 in a course on American literature. Required courses: Engl. 250, 251,252 (Survey of English Literature — 9 hours); Engl. 300 (Critical Writing — 3 hours); Engl. 497 or 498 (Major Authors or Topics in Literature — 3 hours).
At least 12 hours of the major's upper or lower division work in English must be done at the Denver Campus in order to qualify for the B.A. in English.
English majors interested in graduating with honors should confer with the honors adviser as soon as possible, but definitely no later than the beginning of the spring term of their junior year.
Students who contemplate teaching should obtain in the School of Education sheets listing curriculum required for a teaching certificate and should consult the School of Education, which supervises the teacher-training program. Since fulfilling requirements for education and English involves close scheduling, students should fulfill at least some of the college requirements during their freshman and sophomore years.
English for foreign students and courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language are listed under Communication and Theatre in this bulletin.
For additional literature courses see Comparative Literature and Mexican American Education Program.
Note: A considerable amount of writing is required in all English courses and is graded on form as well as on content.
Engl. 100-3. Exposition I. Basic composition; writing themes, reading expository essays, and participating in student-teacher conferences.
Engl. 101-3. Exposition II. Continuation of Engl. 100 with emphasis on writing a research paper. Students are urged to take Engl. 100 before 101, unless they have successfully completed a basic composition course.
Engl. 120-3. Introduction to Fiction. Reading and analysis of short stories and novels.
Engl. 130-3. Introduction to Drama and Poetry. Reading and analysis of plays and poems.
Engl. 200-3. Advanced Composition. Prer., Engl. 100 and 101, or consent of instructor.
Engl. 206-3. Modern Grammatical Usages.
Engl. 215-3. Introduction to Creative Writing. Seminar.
Engl. 216-3. Study of Poetry. Reading of representative English and American poets with emphasis on form and prosody.
Engl. 250-3. Survey of English Literature I. Chronological study of the greater figures and forces in the mainstream of English literature from the beginning through the 16th century including Shakespeare. Engl. 250, 251, and 252 should be taken in sequence.
Engl. 251-3. Survey of English Literature II. Continuation of Engl.
250. English literature of the 17th and 18th centuries.
Engl. 252-3. Survey of English Literature III. Continuation of Engl.
251. English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Engl. 253-3. Masterpieces of British Literature. An intensive study of several major works of British literature.
Engl. 258-3. Great Books I. Close study of literary classics of Western civilization: the Odyssey or Iliad, Greek drama, and several books of the Bible.


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Engl. 259-3. Great Books II. Close study of literary classics of Western civilization from Plato to the Renaissance; selected dialogues of Plato, the Aeneid, the Inferno, and a few works by other writers.
Engl. 260-3. Great Books III. Close study of several major works of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.
Engl. 261-3. Great Books IV. Close study of several major works of 20th century poetry, drama, and fiction.
Engl. 265-3. Masterpieces of American Literature. Close reading and analysis of American literary classics: novels, poems, plays, and essays of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Engl. 273-3. The American Writer and the Black Man I. Continua-reading and analysis ot significant literary works by black or white American writers treating black Americans; novels, poems, plays, and essays.
Engl. 273-3. The American Writer and the Black Man II. Continuation of Engl. 272, but may be taken independently of that course. Engl. 274-3. Survey of Ethnic Literature. Same as Black Studies 274.
Engl. 290/390-3. Topics in Literature. Topics such as the following will be offered at regular intervals: science fiction, women in literature, opera as drama.
Note: Before taking any 300-level course in English, a student must have earned 24 semester hours of college credit.
Engl. 300-3. Critical Writing. Practical criticism of novels, poems, and plays, with emphasis on written work. Introduction to and practice in using various critical approaches to works of literature.
Engl. 302-3. Writing Workshop: Poetry. The writing of poetry. Seminar. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.
Engl. 305-3. Writing Workshop: Fiction. The writing of short stories. Seminar. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit. Prer., Engl. 215, or consent of instructor.
Engl. 315-3. Report Writing. Instruction and practice in various forms of reports, papers, and articles. Emphasis on style and editing. Engl. 318-3. Writing Topics. Individual papers based on upper division courses from each of the following three areas: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences. For writing program majors only. May be repeated for up to 9 hours credit.
Engl. 365-3. American Literature I. Chronological survey of the literature from its beginnings until the Civil War.
Engl. 366-3. American Literature II. Chronological survey of the literature from the Civil War to the present.
Engl. 376-3. Black Literature.
Engl. 394-3. The Bible as Literature. Survey of literary achievements of the ancient Hebrews and the early Christians. Engl. 395-3. Chaucer. A study of Chaucer's major works with emphasis upon the Canterbury Tales. Reading in Middle English after a short introduction to the language.
Engl. 397-3. Shakespeare. A survey of Shakespeare’s characteristic and major plays.
Engl. 398-3. Topics in Shakespeare. Focuses on particular topics and problems in the study of Shakespeare's plays.
Engl. 399-3. Milton. Milton’s poetry and selected prose.
Note: Before taking any 400-level course in English, a student must have earned 36 semester hours of college credit.
Engl. 413-3. Contemporary Chicano Literature. Same as M.AM. 413.
Engl. 420-3. Development of the English Novel I. From the beginnings to 1830.
Engl. 421-3. Development of the English Novel II. From 1830 to World War I. Continuation of Engl. 420.
Engl. 423-3. Development of the American Novel I. From the beginnings to 1900.
Engl. 424-3. Development of the American Novel II. From 1900 to the present. Continuation of Engl. 423.
Engl. 425-3. Twentieth-Century Fiction. The modern novel in an international perspective, with emphasis on new tendencies.
Engl. 430-3. Development of British Drama I. From the beginnings through the Restoration.
Engl. 431-3. Development of British Drama II. From 1700 to the present. Continuation of Engl. 430.
Engl. 435-3. American Drama. Survey of American drama, with emphasis on O'Neill and subsequent playwrights.
Engl. 436-3. Twentieth-Century Drama. Continental, British, and American drama since Ibsen.
Engl. 443-3. British and American Poetry of the 20th Century. Engl. 444-3. American Poetry. From the beginnings through the 20th century.
Engl. 446-3. Recent World Literature. Survey of important works and trends in poetry, drama, and fiction since World War II.
Engl. 450-3. Medieval Literature. Selections read in modern English, representative of the life and thought of the Middle Ages (up to 1500).
Engl. 452-3. The English Renaissance. Selected works from the 16th and 17th centuries.
Engl. 454-3. The Restoration and the Age of Johnson. Selected works from the period 1660-1800.
Engl. 456-3. English Romanticism. Major works of the chief English romantics: Blake, Wordsworth, poleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley. Engl. 458-3. The Victorian Age. Main currents of Victorian thought in prose and poetry, 1830-1890.
Engl. 460-3. Modern British and Irish Literature. Chronological survey of the period 1890 to World War II.
Engl. 480-2. Advanced Composition for Secondary School Teachers of English. Same as T.Ed. 445. Emphasis on improving students' ability to write expository and argumentative essays by means of careful criticism of students' writing. Extensive discussion of such matters as the content of secondary school composition courses and methods of criticizing and evaluating the writing of secondary school students. Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English major.
Engl. 481-2. Literature for Adolescents. Same as T.Ed. 444. The reading and evaluation of books suitable for junior and senior high school pupils. Attention is given to sources of information about books and criteria for selection, as well as to the actual writers.
Engl. 482-2. Teaching of English. Same as T.Ed. 452. Required of all who wish recommendation as high school English teachers.
Engl. 484-3. English Grammar. Study of the English language and of the various grammars of English. Required for candidates for teacher certification only.
Engl. 485-3. History of the English Language. Outline of history of the language, including a brief survey of sound changes affecting modern English and history of grammatical forms and vocabulary. Elementary knowledge of English grammar assumed.
Engl. 489-3. Semantics. Study of the meaning of words, their changes of meaning, and the relationship between words and reality.
Engl. 497-3. Topics in American and British Literature. Courses such as the following will be offered at regualr intervals: Regional Literature—the Frontier; Satire; Comedy; Tragedy. Open to English majors only, except with consent of the instructor.
Engl. 498-3. Major American and British Authors. Intensive study of works of one major British or American author. Open to English majors only, except with consent of the instructor.
Engl. 499-variable credit. Independent Study.
FINE ARTS
The Department of Fine Arts offers both a B.A. degree and a B.F.A. degree in painting, sculpture, print-making, or design. The B.A. degree must include 40, but not more than 48, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. The B.F.A. degree must include


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54, but not more than 72, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. Students wishing to apply for the B.F.A. degree must have a 2.0 average in all course work at the time of application, which may not be earlier than the end of the junior year. Application forms are available in the divisional office.
The core curriculum for fine arts majors includes 12 hours of Studio I (Fine Arts 100, 101, 102), Studio II (Fine Arts 202), Fine Arts 180-181, Fine Arts 496, and 6 hours of upper division art history. The recommended program for the B.F.A. includes at least two years in one creative field (painting, printmaking, design, or sculpture) plus 9 semester hours in drawing. Students who are candidates for the B.F.A. must take a minimum of 20 hours while in residence.
The core curriculum is set up to facilitate as much as possible a variety of viewpoints and creative approaches for the beginning student. If this seems restrictive to an individual student because of prior experience, etc., discipline advisers are open to alternative possibilities that would accomplish the same end.
Studio I and II Courses
For an orientation to studio practice, including drawing and an exploration of two- and three-dimensional media, fine arts majors are required to take 12 hours of Studio I and II courses under four different instructors. There are no prerequisites for Studio I and II courses, but all 12 hours are prerequisites for most 300- and 400-level courses. Students enrolled in 400-level courses will be asked to present work in progress to the UCD fine arts faculty before the end of each semester the student is enrolled. This will enable communication with instructors other than the one listed for the specific course.
Note: More specific descriptions of these courses will be available each semester at registration.
Fine Arts 100-3. Drawing. Exploration of drawing approaches and media.
Fine Arts 101-3. Three-Dimensional Media. Primarily exploration in three-dimensional form and materials.
Fine Arts 102-3. Two-Dimensional Media. Primarily exploration in composition and color.
Life Drawing
Fine Arts 300-3. First-Year Life Drawing and Composition.
Problems in drawing from life; exploring the possibilities in pictorial design and composition. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course. May be repeated to maximum credit of 6 hours.
Fine Arts 400-3. Advanced Drawing. Problems in drawing with emphasis on individual development. Prer., 6 hours Fine Arts 300. May be repeated.
Printmaking
Fine Arts 340-3. First-Year Printmaking. Introduction to intaglio and relief printing, including metal engraving and etching, and woodcut. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. Maybe repeated to maximum of 6 hours credit.
Fine Arts 440-3. Second-Year Printmaking. Continued study and experimentation in intaglio, relief printing media. Prer., Fine Arts 340. May be repeated.
Fine Arts 342-3. Silk Screen. (Serigraphy.) Silk screen techniques as they relate to fine art prints, with possible practical applications to
posters, brochures, and other projects requiring multiple editions. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or consent of instructor. May be repeated.
Painting
Fine Arts 320-3. First-Year Painting. Basic investigation of the materials of the painter and their use in expressing the student's ideas. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. May be repeated.
Fine Arts 420-3. Second-Year Painting. Expressive pictorial problems involving varied subject matter and painting media, with emphasis on individual development. Prer., Fine Arts 320 or equivalent. May be repeated.
Sculpture
Fine Arts 350-3. Sculpture. Studies of the human figure in wax and casting them in bronze. Prer., Fine Arts 101.
Fine Arts 351-3. Sculpture. Creative investigation of various sculptural materials and concepts. Prer., Fine Arts 350.
Fine Arts 450-3. Advanced Sculpture. Work in large sculptural forms. Prer., Fine Arts 351.
Fine Arts 451-3. Advanced Sculpture. Individual sculptural themes. Prer., Fine Arts 450.
Design
Fine Arts 202-3. Visual Studies. Studio course designed to introduce to the student the realm of visual thinking while solving the problem of making a visual statement.
Fine Arts 315-3. First-Year Photography I. Using lecture as an introduction to history, technique, and concepts of photography as it relates to the fine arts. Emphasis on photography as a means to a formal and expressive end. Students must have access to a camera. Fine Arts majors only. Open upon consultation. Prer., 10 hours of basic art.
Fine Arts 316-2. Graphic Design. Problems in advertising illustration and television graphics design. Various media explored. Stress on individuality, critical judgment, and creativity. Prer., Fine Arts 100 plus one more 100-level fine arts course, or consent of instructor. May not be repeated.
Fine Arts 319-3. First-Year Photography II. Emphasis on processes and critical evaluation of student's photographs. Prer., Fine Arts 315. Fine Arts 363-3. Film Making. Studio course designed to acquaint students with the basic visual and esthetic elements of film through actual shooting, editing, and discussion. All work is in 8 or super 8mm. with student's own or rented camera.
Fine Arts 402-3. Movement-Performance in Fine Art. Studio course designed to present the possibility of movement-performance to the fine arts/humanities student as a form for self-exploration and expression.
Fine Arts 415-3. Second-Year Photography I. Advanced work with photographs and refined technical processes. Prer., Fine Arts 319.
Fine Arts 419-3. Second-Year Photography II. Continuation of Fine Arts 415.
Fine Arts 418-3. Creativity and Problem Solving. Exploration of the process of problem solving through the means fundamental to all artistic endeavors, i.e., making and doing. Prer., Fine Arts 102 plus one more 100-level fine arts course. Open, with consent of instructor, to students in other disciplines. May be repeated.
Art History
Note: Not all art history courses are offered every year. Check current Schedule of Courses.
Fine Arts 180-3. History of Art I (Survey). History of art of all ages, reflecting the various cultures of mankind from the Renaissance to the present.
Fine Arts 181-3. History of Art II (Survey). History of art of all ages, reflecting the various cultures of mankind from the Renaissance to the present.


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Fine Arts 470-3. Primitive Art. (African and Pacific areas.) Native arts of various African peoples as well as those of the major island groups of the Pacific area.
Fine Arts 471-3. Pre-Columbian Art. Architecture, sculpture, painting of the high cultures of Meso-America and the Andean area before the Spanish conquest.
Fine Arts 472-3. North American Indian Art. Survey of major tribal styles of the North American continent.
Fine Arts 476-3. Pre-Classical Art and Archaeology. (Anthro. 427 and Gen. Classics 427.) Greece and Crete from the neolithic period to the end of the Mycenaean world.
Fine Arts 477-3. Classical Art and Archaeology. (Anthro. 428 anc Gen. Classics 428.) Greek art and archaeology from the end of the Mycenaean world through the Hellenistic era.
Fine Arts 487-3. American Art. Study of American art and architecture from the Colonial period through the 19th century.
Fine Arts 488-3. American Art. Study of American art and. architecture from the 19th century to the present.
Fine Arts 489-3. Origins of Modern Art I. History of European movements of the early 19th century from the French Revolution to Realism.
Fine Arts 490-3. Origins of Modern Art II. History of European movements of the late 19th century from Realism through Post-Impressionism.
Fine Arts 491-3. Modern Art I. A survey of major trends in painting and sculpture from Post-Impressionism through Dada (1884-1924).
Fine Arts 492-3. Modem Art II. A survey of major trends in painting and sculpture from Surrealism to the present (1924-).
Independent Study and Seminar
Fine Arts 399, 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Individual projects or studies assigned by the major professor. To be arranged.
Fine Arts 494-3. Seminar in Literature and the Visual Arts.
Interdisciplinary, team-taught course with another discipline.
Fine Arts 496-3. Art Seminar. For fine arts majors, undergraduate and graduate. Course based on an exchange of ideas basic to the student's own creative work, and to contemporary philosophies and tendencies in the field. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equivalent. Fine Arts 180-181, or consent of instructor. May be repeated once with consent of instructor.
FRENCH
Students who have completed a Level III high school French course have automatically satisfied the College graduation requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of French 201 or 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied French in high school and who wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student normally may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credit, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Genera! Information section of this bulletin.
Students majoring in French must complete 35 semester hours beyond the first year. Students presenting four years of high school French for admission must complete 30 hours beyond the second year. Required courses are French 211-212, 301 -302, 311-312, 401-402, plus 6 hours of literature courses at the 400 level.
Note: For comparative literature, see that section.
French 101-5. Beginning French I.
French 102-5. Beginning French II. Prer., French 101.
French 201-3. Second-Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversation. Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French.
French 202-3. Second-Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversation. Prer., French 201 or two years of high school French. French 211-3. Second-Year French Reading and Conversation I. Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French.
French 212-3. Second-Year French Reading and Conversation II. Prer., French 211 or three years of high school French.
French 301-2. French Phonetics and Pronunciation. Prer., French 212 or equivalent.
French 302-2. Oral Practice. Prer., French 301 or consent of instructor.
French 305-3. French Composition. Prer., French 202 or 212 or
equivalent.
French 306-3. French Composition. Prer., French 305 or consent of instructor.
French 311-3. Main Currents of French Literature. Prer., French 212 or consent of instructor.
French 312-3. Main Currents of French Literature. Prer., French 311 or consent of instructor.
French 401-3. Advanced Composition. Prer., French 305 or consent of instructor.
French 402-3. Advanced Composition. Prer., French 401 or consent of instructor.
French 403-3. Advanced Oral Practice. Prer., French 301 and 302, or consent of instructor.
French 420-2. French Civilization to 1789. Prer., French 312 or 302, or consent of instructor.
French 421-2. French Civilization from 1789 to Present Day.
Prer., French 312, 302, or 420, or consent of instructor.
French 436-3. Eighteenth-Century French Novel, Theatre, and Poetry.
French 443-3. Nineteenth-Century French Novel.
French 499-variable credit. Independent Study.
GERMAN
Students who have completed a Level III high school German course have automatically satisfied the college requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (12 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied German in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed.
The German major must take 35 semester hours beyond first year proficiency. Not more than 12 semester hours of 200-level courses and not more than 6 semester hours of courses given in English translation may be taken for credit toward the 35-hour minimum. Required courses for the B.A. are German 301-302: Advanced Conversation, Grammar, Composition; German 401-402: Structural Analysis, Composition, Stylistics; German 423: German Civilization; and German 495: Methods of Teaching German (required of students who desire the recommendation of the discipline representative for secondary school teaching positions). Native German speakers or students with advanced training may request permission to substitute


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more advanced German courses to fulfill the 35-hour minimum.
German 101 -4, Sect. I. German 102-4, Sect. I. German 201 -4, Sect.
I. These three sections together comprise a 12-hour, one-semester course. Satisfactory completion of Intensive German fulfills the foreign language requirement.
German 101-4. Beginning German I.
German 102-4. Beginning German II. Prer., German 101 or one
year of high school German.
German 201-4. Intermediate German I: Reading. Prer., German 102 or two years of high school German.
German 202-4. Intermediate German II: Reading. Prer., German 201 or three years of high school German.
German 222-4. Scientific German. Prer., German 201 or 211, or upon consultation.
German 301-3. Advanced Conversation and Grammar. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor.
German 302-3. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Prer., German 301 or consent of instructor.
German 311 -3. Die deutsche Novelle. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor.
German 312-3. Das deutsche Drama. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor.
German 333-3. Deutsche Klassik. Prer., German 311 and 312, or consent of instructor.
German 334-3. Deutsche Romantik. Prer., German 311 and 312, or
consent of instructor.
German 381-3. German Literature in Translation I.
German 382-3. German Literature in Translation II.
German 401-3. Structural Analysis, Composition, and Stylistics
I. Prer., German 302 or consent of instructor.
German 402-3. Structural Analysis, Composition, and Stylistics
II. Prer., German 401 or consent of instructor.
German 411-3. Deutsche Literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts. German 412-3. Deutsche Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts. German 423-3. German Civilization. (In translation.)
German 436-3. Die deutsche Lyrik. Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor.
German 437-3. Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgeschichte I.
Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor.
German 438-3. Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgeschichte II.
Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor.
German 494-3. Seminar in Literature and the Visual Arts.
Interdisciplinary, team-taught course with fine arts discipline. German 495-3. Methods of Teaching German. Required of students who desire the recommendation of the discipline representative for secondary school teaching positions. For student teaching in German, see Educ. 451 in the School of Education Bulletin.
German 499-variable credit. Independent Study.
PHILOSOPHY
A program for the philosophy major must include a minimum of five courses (15 hours) at the 300 level; a minimum of three courses (9 hours) at the 400 level; and a minimum of one course (3 hours) atthe 500 level. The balance of the courses for the major may be taken at the discretion of the student.
The following courses are recommended (not required) for philosophy majors who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy: Symbolic Logic (Phil. 344); History of Philosophy (Phil. 300, 302, 402, 403,
404); Ethics (Phil. 315); Metaphysics (Phil. 335); Epistemology (Phil. 336); Philosophical Method (Phil. 350); several courses concerned with a single philosopher (e.g., Phil. 580, 581, 582, etc.); and one course concerned with the relationship of philosophy to some other discipline (e.g., Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of History, etc.).
General prerequisites (which may vary for some courses) are: 100-level—none; 200-level—3 hours; 300-level—6 hours; 400-level—9 hours; and 500-level—12 hours. The prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor.
Phil. 115-3. Ethics. Introductory study of major philosophies on the nature of the good of man, principles of evaluation, and moral choice. Phil. 120-3. Philosophy and Society. Systematic discussion and analysis of the philosophic ideas of community, freedom, political power, the nature and role of violence, etc., together with the challenge of war, poverty, and racism to contemporary culture.
Phil. 130-3. Philosophy and the Physical World. An introduction to philosophy through the consideration of topics and problems related to the physical and biological sciences such as freedom and determinism; mind and body; artificial intelligence; sciences and ethics; current theories of the universe, space, time, matter, energy, causality, etc.
Phil. 144-3. Introductory Logic. Introductory study of definition, informal fallacies, and the principles and standards of correct reasoning.
Phil. 150-3. Critical Reasoning. An introduction to concept formation, variant forms of reasoning and argument, and criteria for their evaluation.
Phil. 160-3. Philosophy and Religion. An introduction to philosophy through problems of religion, such as the existence of God, faith and reason, religious language, etc.
Phil. 170-3. Philosophy and the Arts. Consideration of philosophic questions involved in the analysis and assessment of artistic experiences and of the objects with which the arts, including the literary arts, are concerned.
Phil. 220-3. Classical Social Theories. Introductory study of major philosophies of the past in relation to political, economic, and social issues.
Phil. 221-3. Modern Social Theories. Present social issues, together with theoretical analyses by communist, fascist, and democratic thinkers.
Phil. 240-3. Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Examination of some major concepts and problems of scientific thought: explanation, confirmation, causality, measurement, and theory construction.
Phil. 260-3. Oriental Religions.
Phil. 290-3. A Philosophical Classic. Detailed study of one major philosophic text which illustrates a variety of types of philosophical concerns. Emphasis on techniques for analysis, discussion, and assessment of philosophical argumentation. Such works as The Republic, Leviathan, and Treatise of Human Nature.
Phil. 300-3. Greek Philosophy. History of Pre-Socratic, Attic, and Hellenistic philosophy. No prer.
Phil. 301-3. Medieval Philosophy.
Phil. 302-3. Modern Philosophy. History of philosophy from Descartes through Kant. No prer.
Phil. 315-3. Ethical Theory. Selected problems in classical and contemporary ethical theory.
Phil. 320-3. Social and Political Philosophy. A nonhistorical. systematic treatment of basic issues in social and political philosophy, with reference to theories of being, knowledge, and human nature. Phil. 328-3. Philosophy of Education.
Phil. 335-3. Metaphysics.
Phil. 336-3. Epistemology.
Phil. 344-3. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.


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Phil. 350-3. Philosophical Method. An examination of major differing conceptions of the nature and goals of philosophical inquiry and endeavor.
Phil. 360-3. Philosophy of Religion. Nature of religion and methods of studying it.
Phil. 370-3. Aesthetic Theory. Introduction to major theories of aesthetics and contemporary discussions of problems in aesthetics; i.e., the nature of art, the problem of evaluations in art.
Phil. 389-3. Oriental Philosophy. No prer.
Phil. 400-3. Nineteenth-Century Continental Philosophy.
Phil. 401-3. Nineteenth-Century British Philosophy.
Phil. 402-3. Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy.
Phil. 403-3. Twentieth-Century Speculative and Idealistic Philosophy.
Phil. 404-3. Twentieth-Century Phenomenology and Existentialism.
Phil. 405-3. Studies in Contemporary Philosophy.
Phil. 410-3. American Philosophy.
Phil. 424-3. Philosophical Problems and Contemporary Culture.
Issues and controversies in contemporary culture, their relation to modern theories of society, and their manifestations in the arts, science and technology, education, religion, and ethics. No prer.
Phil. 426-3. Philosophy of Law. Consideration of various views of the nature of law, its role in society, and its relation to other disciplines. Investigation of philosophic commitments which underlie and affect legal conceptions and procedures. No prer.
Phil. 427-3. Philosophy of History. Contemporary issues in critical and speculative theory of history, including the problems of methodology, explanation, values, and the relationship between history and social philosophy.
Phil. 430-3. Philosophy of Mind. Consideration of the problems in the philosophy of mind, including the mind-body problem, the problem of our knowledge of other minds, the compatibility of free will and determinism, etc., and discussion of such concepts as action, intention, motive, desire, enjoyment, memory, imagination, dreaming, self-knowledge, etc.
Phil. 443-3. Logical Theory. Prer., Phil. 144 or Phil. 344, or consent of instructor.
Phil. 444-3. Intermediate Symbolic (Mathematical) Logic. Prer., Phil. 344 or consent of instructor.
Phil. 446-3. Theories of Human Nature.
Phil. 449-3. Philosophy of Language.
Phil. 473-3. Philosophy and Literature.
Phil. 493-3. Existentialist Philosophies.
Phil. 496-3. Senior Major Colloquium.
Phil. 499-3. Independent Study.
SPANISH
Students who have completed a Level III high school Spanish course have automatically satisfied the College graduation requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Spanish 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied Spanish in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credits, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Information section of this bulletin.
A major in Spanish consists of the following requirements:
1. A total of 35 credit hours in Spanish courses (beyond Spanish 102), including the following minimum distribution: (a) at least 9 hours in upper division courses primarily devoted to language theory and practice (301-302, 401-402, 495); (b) at least 8 hours in upper division literature courses including at least one course treating Spanish Peninsular literature and one treating Spanish-American literature; (c) at least 12 hours in courses numbered 400 or above.
2. A total of 6 hours in courses from one or more of the following areas: (a) courses in Latin American studies (e.g., history, political science, etc.), (b) courses in Mexican American Studies, (c) linguistics, and (d) upper division courses in another foreign language or comparative literature.
Students who entered the University before fall 1969 may choose to complete the current major program or the program in effect at the time of their first registration.
Students planning to acquire certification for teaching at the secondary level should note that the School of Education will require Spanish 495 (Methods of Teaching Spanish) and that the 3 credit hours earned in that course will count toward the major and will be subject to the 48-hour maximum from one discipline allowed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the B.A. degree. This means that students who begin the major program with Spanish 101 and who intend to include secondary certification in their B.A. program must include Spanish 495 in their electives in Spanish.
To be admitted to practice teaching of Spanish, majors must take the language skills tests of the Modern Language Association Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students of Spanish and make satisfactory scores.
Students must see an adviser prior to registration for their final semester. Failure to do so may result in a delay of their graduation. Students considering entering graduate school for an advanced degree in Spanish, either at the University of Colorado or at any other institution, should see an adviser as early as possible since admission to a graduate program will depend to a great extent on courses taken in the major.
It is strongly recommended that all majors include some study in a Spanish-speaking country in their major programs. Credit earned will normally count toward satisfaction of the major requirements, but the student should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to assure full transfer of credit. It should be noted that courses taken abroad and designated as Spanish will also be subject to the 48-hour maximum rule of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Students interested in study abroad should consult a member of the Spanish faculty or Professor James Wolf, Denver Campus representative for the International Education Office.
Note: For comparative literature courses, see that section.
Spanish 101-5. Beginning Spanish I.
Spanish 102-5. Beginning Spanish II. Prer., Spanish 101 or placement.
Spanish 211-3. Second-Year Spanish I. Prer., Spanish 102 or placement.


281 University of Colorado at Denver
Spanish 212-3. Second-Year Spanish II. Prer., Spanish 211 or placement.
Spanish 301-3. Pronunciation, Diction, and Conversation. Prer., Spanish 212, 211 (with grade A or 0), or equivalent.
Spanish 302-3. Conversation and Oral Composition. Prer., Spanish 301.
Spanish 303-3. History of the Spanish Language in the Southwest.
Spanish 304-3. Workshop in Southwestern Spanish.
Spanish 314-3. Introduction to Literature. Prer., Spanish 212,211 (with grade A), or equivalent.
Spanish 331-3. Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 332-3. Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 333-3. Spanish Literature: Middle Ages Through Golden Age. Prer., Spanish 314 and 6 hours of literature at the 300 level. Spanish 334-3. Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Novel and Essay. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 335-3. Spanish-American Novel and Essay to 20th Century. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently.
Spanish 336-3. Spanish-American Poetry and Short Story. Prer., Spanish 314 and 3 hours of literature at the 300 level.
Spanish 401/501-3. Advanced Rhetoric and Composition I. Prer., Spanish 302.
Spanish 402/502-3. Advanced Rhetoric and Composition II. Prer., Spanish 401.
Spanish 414/514-2. Gaucho Literature.
Spanish 417/517-3. Readings in Spanish Literature.
Spanish 418/518-3. Readings in Spanish-American Literature. Spanish 422/522-3. Mexican Literature.
Spanish 430/530-3. Generation of 1898.
Spanish 431/531-3. Spanish-American Literature: Independence Through Romanticism.
Spanish 432/532-3. Spanish Literature Since the Spanish Civil War.
Spanish 440/540-3. Romanticism in Spain.
Spanish 441/541-3. Modernism.
Spanish 450/550-3. Nineteenth-Century Spanish Novel.
Spanish 451/551-3. Contemporary Spanish-American Novel. Spanish 453/553-3. Golden Age Prose.
Spanish 462/562-3. Don Guijote.
Spanish 495/595-3. Methods of Teaching Spanish.
Spanish 499/599-1 to 3. Independent Study.
Spanish 533-3. Golden Age Drama.
Division of Natural and Physical Sciences
PHYLLIS W. SCHULTZ, Assistant Dean
The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences includes the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography, geology, mathematics, physical education, physics, and psychology.
The division offers a wide variety of programs of study which include undergraduate majors within a discipline, interdisciplinary programs, and preprofessional programs.
It is possible to satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics, and psychology. The description of the program of each discipline includes the requirements for a major within that discipline.
Students enrolling in medical and health-related preprofessional programs should consult with the Health Sciences Committee of the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences at the beginning of their preprofessional education and at selected intervals thereafter. Appointments for advising must be made in the division office, Room 508. The Health Sciences Committee has two main functions: (1) the counseling of students enrolled in various health-related programs: child health associate program, medical technology, physical therapy, predentistry, predental hygiene, premedicine, prenursing, and prepharmacy, and (2) evaluating each student’s abilities and making recommendations to the appropriate professional schools. Requirements for preprofessional programs are listed in the Preprofessional Programs section in this bulletin.
Course options are available for the nonscience major. There are three sets of courses from which a student may satisfy the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences’ area requirement of 12 semester hours. Any combination of these courses will satisfy the requirement.
Set I, Topics in Science—133-1, are modular courses designed for, but not limited to, majors outside of the natural and physical sciences. Each module carries 1 semester hour of credit and is offered in a 1 /3-semester time block of five weeks, during which the course meets the equivalent time of three lectures a week. There are no prerequisites and each module is a self-contained unit designed to cover a given problem or topic in science in a unified way. It is recommended that the student take a single module during each five-week period with a maximum of three per semester.
The topics will change from semester to semester and from year to year. The Schedule of Courses for each semester will give the list of current topics offered. (For general descriptions, see Topics in Science entries under each discipline involved.)
Set II courses are one or two semesters in length and have no formal prerequisites. These include both introductory survey courses and special topics courses and are also usually designed with the nonscience major in mind.
Set III includes all other natural and physical science courses offered in the division. Although these courses are generally designed for the science major, they are open to students with the proper prerequisites.
Description of Courses and Programs
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.


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BIOLOGY
A major in biology at both the bachelor’s and master’s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus.
The undergraduate major in biology is designed to be as flexible as possible to allow each student, in consultation with a biology adviser, to build a program that meets his needs. Each student majoring in biology is required to take 17 hours of core biology courses: Biol. 205,206 (General Biology I and II); Biol. 341 (Principles of Ecology); Biol. 383 (General Genetics); and Biol. 361 (Cell Biology). A minimum total of 32 hours in biology is required. The additional 15 hours of courses are to be selected in consultation with a biology adviser. All majors are required to take Chem. 103,106 (General Chemistry) and sufficient mathematics to prepare themselves to take Math. 140 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus I) in addition to the 32 hours in biology. It is advisable for the student to contact a biology adviser early in his academic career to plan his individual programs.
Biol. 133-1. Topics in Biology. Different five-week courses dealing with various topics in biology. See Schedule of Courses for the particular topics being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirements.
Biol. 205-4. General Biology I. Study of the structure and function of living systems—cells, organ systems organisms, and populations. Primarily intended for students majoring in science.
Biol. 206-4. General Biology II. Continuation of Biol. 205. Prer., Biol. 205.
Biol. 322-3. Essentials of Animal Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 2 semester hours of lecture credit. An introduction to the essentials of animal physiology. Prer., one year of general biology and one year of general chemistry.
Biol. 325-4. Human Biology and Pathogenesis I. A study of normal structure, function, ecology, and development of man as a biologically integrated whole, culminating in a discussion of intrinsic and extrinsic bio-psycho-sociological factors which: (1) lead to the development of disease and (2) are used in response to threats of illness. Human beings viewed as multi-leveled open systems subject to changing developmental and environmental influences, and comprising various subsystems, whose interactions are responsible for or influence the meeting of basic biological needs. Prer., one year of general biology, general chemistry or consent of instructor.
Biol. 326-4. Human Biology and Pathogenesis II. Continuation of Biol. 325. Prer., Biol. 325.
Biol. 341 -3. Principles of Ecology. Principles pertaining to biological communities, population interactions and relations with the environment. Prer., one year of general biology.
Biol. 361-3. Cell Biology. A survey of the interrelationships between cell structure and function. Prer., one year of general biology.
Biol. 383-3. General Genetics. A survey course introducing molecular, classical, developmental, and population genetics to the student who has a basic background in biology. Prer., one year of general biology.
Biol. 384-2. Laboratory in General Genetics. An experimental course designed to acquaint students with techniques used in the study of genetics. Independent study projects and general laboratory exercises are included. Prer., one year of general biology.
Biol. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. (Psych. 395-3; Anthro. 395-3.) An interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution, his biological makeup, his development as a social being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-discussion sections. Prer., one course in anthropology, biology, or psychology.
Biol. 410-3. Behavioral Genetics. (Psych. 410-3.) An interdisciplinary course designed for any upper division student interested in the relationships between behavior and heredity. Prer., consent of instructor.
Biol. 412-3. Quantitative Genetics. Survey of the principles of genetics of quantitative traits. Topics include gene frequencies, effects of mutation, migration, and selection; correlations among relatives, heritability, inbreeding, crossbreeding, and selective breeding. Prer., one year of general biology and Biol. 383.
Biol. 425-3. Comparative Psychology. (Psych. 425-3.) Behavior of animals. Similarities and differences among animals. Principles of behavior in a variety of species. Prer., 6 hours of psychology or consent of instructor.
Biol. 427-3. Environmental Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 3 semester hours of lecture credit. A consideration of physiological adaptations of both plants and animals to such environmental parameters as temperature, light, and water. Prer., one year of general biology, one year of chemistry and a course in physiology.
Biol. 438-3. Advanced Animal Behavior. (Psych. 438.) Comparison of behavior in a variety of species, with emphasis on social behavior and its evolution. Prer., Biol. 425 or consent of instructor.
Biol. 439-2. Laboratory in Animal Behavior. (Psych. 439.) Laboratory projects and field observations of the behavior of animals. Prer. or coreq., Biol. 438 and consent of instructor.
Biol. 441-4. Plant Ecology. Interactions of environmental factors upon plant communities. Emphasis on population dynamics and major ecosystems of North America. Field study centers on methods of vegetation analysis. Prer., one year of general biology.
Biol. 443-4. Animal Ecology. The environment, the ecosystem, and the animals in them. Intra- and inter-species relations, communities, migrations, food chains, natural balance, effect of man and his population pressures. Prer., one year of general biology, college zoology and botany.
Biol. 447-3. Ecological Methods. Empirical facets of ecological study. Emphasis upon hypothesis testing and sampling techniques based on known environmental phenomena. Independent study of a field problem. Prer., Biol. 341 or equivalent.
Biol. 452-3. Human Genetics. Basic principles of genetic phenomena evident in all life, with emphasis on those principles operative in humans. Heredity of man’s normal and defective traits. Modes of inheritance, pedigree analysis, consanguinity, sex associated traits, chromosomal aberrations, mutations and causes, karyotyping, multiple births, gene linkage studies, histocompatibilities, and metabolic disorders. Prer., one year of general biology. Biol. 461-4. Vertebrate Embryology. Development, stressing vertebrate animals from fertilized egg through organ systems, with introduction to experimental analysis. Prer., one year of general biology or college zoology.
Biol. 470-4. Biometry. An intensive course in intermediate statistics with an emphasis on experimental design and analysis. Topics include statistical design of repeated measures, extensive treatment of analysis of variance, correlation, regression, and nonparametric tests. Use of computer processing is introduced with some practice in computer work. Prer., one year of general biology, statistics, and two other biology courses.
Biol. 499-variable credit. Independent Study in Biology. Prer., open to seniors with consent of instructor.
CHEMISTRY
A major in chemistry at either the bachelor’s or master’s levels may be completed at the Denver Campus.
For graduation at the bachelor’s level, students majoring in chemistry must present credits in the following courses or their equivalents: Chem. 103, 106, 311, 341,342, 348, 349, 412, 413, 451,452, 455; Phys. 111, 112, 114; Math. 140, 241, 242. In view of the current renumbering and reorganization of courses throughout the College, it is especially important that a student interested in the chemistry major consult a member of the chemistry faculty as his adviser. If this is done before the junior year, delays in graduation may thereby be avoided. A copy of the chemistry major’s program may be obtained in Room 508.


30/ University of Colorado at Denver
Qualified majors are strongly urged to participate in the Independent Study (Chem. 493) program.
A chemistry adviser must be consulted before a Distributed Studies Program with chomistry as the primary field is undertaken. Such a program must include the following courses or their equivalent: Chem. 103, 106, 341,342 and either 343 and 344 or 348 and 349, 451. Thirty hours are required in chemistry. For further information, see the Distributed Studies Program section of this bulletin.
Students planning chemistry as a career should be familiar with the recommendations of the American Chemical Society for the professional training of chemists. Among these recommendations are a reading knowledge of German or Russian, one semester of inorganic chemistry (Chem. 401), and two semesters of advanced work from the following courses: Chem. 506, 511,512, 531,532, and 559. Six hours of Chem. 493 will satisfy the special courses requirement. Further information regarding these recommendations may be obtained from the advisers.
Students wishing to graduate with honors in chemistry should plan to do a minimum of two semesters (6 credit hours) of research (Chem. 493), ordinarily starting in the junior year. Additional requirements are listed under Honors Program in this bulletin.
Chem. 100-2. General Chemistry. Lect. For students with no previous chemistry or with inadequate background in chemistry. This course is in preparation for Chem. 103. Prer., working knowledge of one year of high school algebra.
Chem. 101-5. General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab. A first course in chemistry intended primarily for prenursing, physical education, physical therapy, and other students wanting to fulfill curriculum or natural science requirements. No previous knowledge of chemistry is required. Prer., working knowledge of one year of high school algebra. Chem. 102-5. General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab. Continuation of Chem. 101 with introduction to organic and biochemistry for prenursing, physical education, physical therapy, and other students wanting such a course to satisfy curriculum or natural science requirements. Prer., Chem. 101 or equivalent.
Chem. 103-5. General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab. A first college chemistry course for science majors, medical technologists, premedical, predental, and preveterinarian students. Prer., one year of high school chemistry or Chem. 100, and working knowledge of one year of high school algebra.
Chem. 106-5. General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab. Continuation of Chem. 103, including ionic equilibrium, types of bonding, transition metal chemistry, and some elementary quantitative analytical techniques. Prer., Chem. 103 or equivalent.
Chem. 133-1. Topics in Chemistry. Different 5-week course modules dealing with various topics in chemistry. See current Schedule of Courses for particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Chem. 311-4. Quantitative Analysis. Two hrs. lect. and 6 hrs. lab. per week. Theory and practice of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Introduction to separation techniques and instrumental methods of analysis. Prer., Chem. 106.
Chem. 341-3. Organic Chemistry I. A lecture course designed as an introduction to the study of structure, reactions, properties, and mechanisms of organic molecules. Chem. 343 lab. to be taken concurrently by nonmajors. Chem. 348 lab. to be taken concurrently only by majors. Prer., Chem. 103 and 106.
Chem. 342-3. Organic Chemistry II. A continuation of Chem. 341. A lecture course designed as an introduction to the study of structure, reactions, properties, and mechanisms of organic molecules. Chem. 344 lab. to be taken concurrently by nonmajors. Chem. 349 lab. to be taken only by majors. Prer., Chem. 341 and 343.
Chem. 343-1. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with Chem. 341 illustrating in a practical way the methods and principles of organic chemistry. Prer., Chem. 103 and 106; coreq., Chem. 341.
Chem. 344-1. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with Chem. 342 illustrating in a practical way the methods and principles of organic chemistry. Prer., Chem. 341 and 343; coreq., Chem. 342.
Chem. 348-2. Organic Chemistry Majors Recitation Laboratory
I. A recitation and laboratory for chemistry majors enrolled in Chem.
341. Prer., Chem. 103 and 106; coreq., Chem. 341.
Chem. 349-2. Organic Chemistry Majors Recitation Laboratory
II. A recitation and laboratory for chemistry majors enrolled in Chem.
342. Prer., Chem. 341 and 348; coreq., Chem. 342.
Chem. 395-3. History of Chemistry. Lect. The development of chemistry as a modern science. Principles, philosophies, and people of chemistry will be explored as well as the relationship of chemistry to other sciences. Prer., upperdass standing.
Chem. 401-3. Modern Inorganic Chemistry. Lect. An introduction to inorganic chemistry. Includes atomic theory and bonding, particularly of transition metal complexes, and the chsmistry of selected transition metal and main group elements. Prer., Chem. 452, or consent of instructor.
Chem. 412-3. Instrumental Analysis. Three hrs. lect. per week. Survey of instrumental methods of analysis. Emphasis on spectrophotometry, electrochemistry, chromatography, and radiochemical techniques. Includes chemical equilibria and chemical literature. Chemistry majors must take Chem. 413 concurrently. Prer., Chem. 311, Phys. 114, Chem. 342, or consent of instructor.
Chem. 413-1. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. Laboratory practice to accompany Chem. 412. Required of chemistry majors and open to other students in Chem. 412. Coreq., Chem. 412.
Chem. 451-3. Physical Chemistry. Lect. Applications of thermodynamics to chemistry. Includes study of the laws of thermodynamics, thermochemistry, solutions, electrochemistry, chemical equilibria, and kinetics. Prer., Chem. 332 or 336, Phys. 111,112,114, Math. 242. Chem. 452-3. Physical Chemistry. Continuation of Chem. 451, with emphasis on quantum mechanics, molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and additional topics of current interest. Prer., Chem. 451.
Chem. 455-3. Experimental Physical Chemistry. One lect. and two 3-hour labs, per wk. Instruction in the experimental techniques of modern physical chemistry with emphasis on experiments illustrating the fundamental principles of chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics, and chemical kinetics. For chemistry majors. Prer., Chem. 418; prer. or coreq., Chem. 452.
Chem. 481-3. General Biochemistry. Three lect. per wk. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of proteins; enzymes: mechanisms and kinetics; intermediary metabolism; Krebs cycle, carbohydrates, lipids; energetics and metabolic control; and an introduction to electron transport and photosynthesis. Prer., one year of organic chemistry.
Chem. 482-3. General Biochemistry. Continuation of Chem. 481. Topics include macromolecules; metabolism of nucleic acids and nitrogen-containing compounds; biosynthesis and function of macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and proteins; biochemistry of sub-cellular systems; and special topics. Prer., Chem. 481.
Chem. 493-1 to 3. Independent Study in Chemistry. Consent of instructor required.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ROLAND SWEET, Adviser
Students in the College may enroll in courses in computer science for College of Liberal Arts and Sciences credit. Mathematics majors may select an option in computer science.
C.S. 201-3. Introduction to Computer Science. (E.E. 201.) An elementary course in computer science covering computer program-


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 131
ming methods. Fortran programming, numerical applications, and non-numerical applications. Prer., hiqh school alqebra, triqonometry, and geometry.
C.S. 311-3. Computer Applications in Mathematical Sciences.
An advanced Fortran course for scientists and engineers. Aspects of optimal programming with respect to various goals and examination of goals that are appropriate to given contexts. Prer., C.S. 201 and Math. 140.
C.S. 401 -3. Introduction to Programming Languages and Processors. (E.E. 401.) A study of programming languages and digital processors. Conceptual aspects of programming languages, translators, data structures, hardware organization, and system architecture. Relationship of language features to processor features. Prer., E.E. 201 or C.S. 201.
C.S. 453-3. Assembly Language Programming. (E.E. 453.) A laboratory course in programming at the machine code level. Lectures deal with the organization of the machine, its effect on the order code, and techniques for programming in Assembly Language. Primary emphasis is on preparing and running programs. Prer., C.S. 201, or consent of instructor.
C.S. 459-3. Computer Organization. (E.E. 459.) This course is concerned with computer arithmetic units, memory systems, control systems, and input-output systems. The emphasis is completely on logic structure rather than electronic circuitry. Prer., E.E. 257 or equivalent.
C.S. 465-3. Numerical Analysis I. (Same as Math. 465.) Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations. Solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Interpolation, integration. Solution of ordinary differential equations. Least squares. Sources of error and error analysis. Computer implementation of numerical methods. Matrix eigenvalue problems and summation of infinite series. Prer., C.S. 201 and Math. 315, or Math. 319.
C.S. 466-3. Numerical Analysis II. (Same as Math. 466.) Continuation of C.S. 465. Prer., C.S. 465.
GEOGRAPHY
Students majoring in geography must complete the following basic courses or their equivalents: Geog. 100, 101, 199, 302, and 306. Distributed majors selecting geography as a primary or secondary subject should consult with the discipline adviser.
Geography courses traditionally have emphasized the man-environment relationship. Students interested in environmental problems will find the nonregional courses of particular value to their program. A number of these courses involve faculty from other disciplines and provide a general background on which more advanced work may be based.
Man and His Physical Environment I, II, III is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduction to the physical environment and evolution of the earth. They may be taken concurrently or in any order.
Geog. 100-4. Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geol. 100.) A general introduction to elements of weather, physical climatology, and world regional climate classification.
Geog. 101-4. Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geol. 101.) Study of earth materials, features, and processes, and how they relate to man.
Geog. 102-4. Man and His Physical Environment III. (Geol. 102.) Study of structure of the crust of the earth, history of the earth, and development of life forms throughout geologic time. Includes Sunday field trips.
Geog. 199-3. Introduction to Human Geography. A systematic introduction to the broad field of man-land relationships. Emphasis is placed on the patterns and forms of man's changing use of the land.
Geog. 200-3. World Regional Geography. The cultural distributions of the world. The relationships of man and the landscape based on broad divisions of cultural, ethnic, and geographic distributions in the world.
Geog. 305-3. Cartography I. Techniques of mapping various distributions with emphasis on research and design.
Geog. 306-3. Map and Air Photo Analysis. Introduction to the skills and reasoning ability needed to analyze and use maps and air photos as research tools. Elementary field techniques are introduced on two all-day Saturday field trips.
Geog. 320-2. Descriptive Meteorology. Nonmathematical description of the structure and composition of the earth’s atmosphere; heat balance, cloud formations, and wind circulation. Observational techniques, including weather map analysis and the meteorological satellite program.
Geog. 332-3. Introduction to Soils. An introductory survey of the chemical and physical composition of soils. Emphasis on structure, soil moisture, soil chemistry, and fertility. Laboratory analysis of mineral capacity, plant nutrients, and organic matter. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 101 or equivalent, Chem. 101 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Geog. 360-3. Economic Geography: Primary Activities. An
introduction to rural land use patterns and agricultural production.
Geog. 361-3. Economic Geography: Secondary Activities. An
introduction to location analysis of manufacturing activities.
Geog. 370-3. Geographic Analysis of Issues in American Society.
The geographic viewpoint, especially regional differentiation and systems models, applied to such socio-economic concerns as pollution, poverty, racism, violence, and political reorganization. Geog. 384-3. Middle East. A physical, cultural, economic approach to the arid lands of the Middle East including Arab lands of the Sahara. Geog. 385-3. Far East. Regional survey of the physical and cultural features characterizing the geography of the Far East. Emphasis on problems underlying future development and economic capabilities of South and East Asia.
Geog. 386-3. Africa. A physical-cultural approach to an understanding of man-land relationships on the continent; changes in physical environment and cultural practices. Population and land-use problems.
Geog. 387-3. Anglo-America. A regional survey of the physical, economic, and cultural features of the United States and Canada. Emphasis upon the urban, economic, demographic, and environmental problems in various regions of both countries.
Geog. 400-3. Introductory Quantitative Methods in Geography. The application of statistical and other quantitative techniques to geographically organized data, areal distributions, and the solution of geographic research problems.
Geog. 401-3. Methods of Regional Analysis. Examination of techniques for measuring regional economic structure and structural change. Application of shift-share, input-output, multiplier, and interaction models to regional geographic research. Consideration of issues and problems associated with application of these techniques to urban and regional analysis. Prer., Geog. 361 or consent of instructor.
Geog. 406-3. Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photos.
Interpretation of aerial photographs for research purposes. Emphasis on analysis of vegetation, land-forms, agriculture, and urban-industrial patterns. Prer., Geog. 306 or consent of instructor.
Geog. 420-3. Microclimatology. Examination of microscale climatic patterns, with emphasis on the physical processes in the lowest layer of the atmosphere. The needs and responses of man, animals, and plants in the prairie, forest, and urban atmospheric environment will be examined, as will urban and regional planning implications of various microclimates. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 100 or consent of instructor. Geog. 421-3. Climatology. Analysis of energy exchange, temperature, wind, pressure, and atmospheric humidity as elements and controls leading to an understanding of physical climatology. The Koeppen, Thornthwaite, and other systems are evaluated and applied to a survey of regional climates. Prer., Geog. 100 or equivalent. Geog. 431-4. Principles of Geomorphology. (Geol. 463.) Systematic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind, and marine processes and the landforms resulting therefrom. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 101 or equivalent and elementary chemistry, or consent of instructor.
Geog. 434-4. World Mineral Resources. (Geol. 494.) Nontechnical study of distribution, reserves, and uses of mineral resources.


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Geog. 441-3. Conservation Practice. Introduction to various aspects of resources, environment, and population. Emphasis on food production, water, soil, and climate.
Geog. 461-3. Urban Geography: Economic. An introduction to the horizontal and vertical characteristics of urban settlements. Includes the origin of cities, basic definitions of urban areas, central place theory, economic bases of towns, classification of cities, and urban planning.
Geog. 463-3. Transportation Geography. Concepts and theories leading to description and an understanding of the relationships between people, products, and transportation systems over space and time. Political, sociological, and environmental impacts of transportation facilities will be examined.
Geog. 465-3. Location Analysis of Human Activities. The study of spatial order in human use of the earth, emphasizing theories of locational structure and methods of analysis.
Geog. 473-3. Population Geography. Analysis of population dynamics, distributions, densities, and migration flows; spatial relationships between population trends and variables with social, economic, and environmental factors.
Geog. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Independent research primarily for undergraduate major students. Prer., consent of department.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Students majoring in the geological sciences must take the following courses within the discipline: Physical Geology (Geol. 207-208), Mineralogy (Geol. 301), Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411). Introductory Paleontology, Stratigraphy, and Petrology (Geol. 341,342,323) are recommended. In addition, students must take the following courses in allied fields: Chem. 103, 106; Math. 140, 241, 319 (or the equivalent Boulder Campus courses, Math. 130, 230); Phys. 111, 112, and 114. A less mathematical option that does not require structural geology and field geology is available to students who do not plan a career in the geological sciences.
Physical Geology (Geol. 207, 208) and Mineralogy (Geol. 301) and Introductory Petrology (Geol. 323) are presently offered on the Denver Campus, as are the required courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Introductory Paleontology (Geol. 341) is offered occasionally. Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411) must be taken on the Boulder Campus in order to complete a career-oriented major in the geological sciences. Alternatively, a student may complete all the requirements for a distributed studies major and environmental sciences major, with emphasis in geology, on the Denver Campus.
Man and His Physical Environment I, II, III is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduction to the physical environment and evolution of the earth. They may be taken concurrently or in any order.
Geol. 100-4. Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geog. 100.) A general introduction to elements of weather, physical climatology, and world regional climate classification.
Geol. 101-4. Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geog. 101.) Study of earth materials, features, and processes, and how they relate to man. Includes Sunday field trips.
Geol. 102-4. Man and His Physical Environment III. (Geog. 102.) Study of structure of the crust of the earth, history of the earth, and development of life forms throughout geologic time. Includes Sunday field trips.
Geol. 207-4, 208-4. Physical Geology and Geophysics. General introduction to geologic processes of the earth s surface and interior. Physical properties of the earth as a planet. Intended for students desiring major work in the geological sciences. Includes three Sunday field trips per semester. Prer., two years of high school science or mathematics and science. (Students may follow Geol. 101 with Geol. 208 if they wish additional work in geophysics and internal processes, orthey may begin the 207-208 sequence with Geol. 208, with consent of the instructor.)
Geol. 301-4. Mineralogy. Principles of mineralogy, including crystallography, crystal chemistry, and a systematic study of the more important nonsilicate and silicate minerals. Origins and occurrences of minerals. Prer., physical geology and college-level chemistry, or consent of instructor.
Geol. 323-4. Introductory Petrology. An introduction to the classification, distribution, and origin of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, including their identification in hand specimens. Prer., physical geology and mineralogy.
Geol. 341-4. Introductory Paleontology. The study of fossils, including a survey of the organic world and its history in the geologic past. Includes invertebrates, protista, vertebrates and plants, an introduction to evolution and paleoecology, and discussion of the uses of fossils in geologic correlation. Prer., introductory geology or biology. Offered occasionally.
Geol. 425-3. Groundwater. Occurrence, movement, and problems of pollution of subsurface water and the hydrologic properties of water-bearing materials. Prer., Geol. 101 (Geog. 101) or consent of instructor.
Geol. 463-4. Principles of Geomorphology. (Geog. 431.) Systematic study of weathering, mass-wasting, fluvial, wind and marine processes, and the landforms resulting therefrom. Prer., elementary geology or equivalent and elementary chemistry, or consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.
Geol. 494-4. World Mineral Resources. (Geog. 434.) Nontechnical study of distribution, reserves, and uses of mineral resources.
MATHEMATICS
A major in mathematics can be completed by students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences by satisfying all of the following requirements, completing each of the required courses with a grade of C or better:
1. At least 30 semester hours of mathematics courses.
2. At least 18 semester hours of mathematics courses numbered above 300, approved by adviser, and excluding Math. 383, 427, 428, 429, 495, 496 and 497.
3. Math. 140, 241,242, 300, 314, and 315.
4. Either Math. 431-432 or Math. 321-422.
Students who plan to do graduate work in
mathematics should take Math. 431-432; students who wish to obtain a secondary teaching certificate are encouraged to complete Math. 321-422; students planning to major in mathematics must see an adviser from that discipline.
Students who choose the computer science option in the mathematics major are required to take the following courses, all with grades of C or better:
Math. 140, 241, 242 Math. 300, 314, 315 Math. 431, 432 Math. 443 Math. 481
C.S. 201 C.S. 311 C.S. 401 C.S. 453
C.S. 465 (Math. 465) C.S. 546
Variations in these courses must be approved by a mathematics adviser.


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At the graduate level, master’s degrees are available in mathematics, applied mathematics, and basic science (mathematics option).
The Department of Mathematics offers a Teaching Internship Program which consists of three phases as follows:
Phase 1. A junior-level student who is majoring in mathematics or applied mathematics, and who shows promise as a teacher, is sponsored by a member of the full-time faculty of the department. A freshman-level course is then assigned to the student, on an honorarium basis, with the understanding that the faculty member will attend all sessions of the course. The student will thus be acting as an intern and will be provided with a critique of his performance after each lecture.
It is the interested student’s task to convince a faculty member that he or she should sponsor the student. No faculty member is required to perform this function nor is any compensation afforded to the sponsor for so doing.
Phase 2. After completion of one or two semesters of fully supervised classroom exposure, and upon the student’s entry into the senior year of study, the faculty sponsor may recommend that the intern be accepted as an undergraduate teaching assistant. With approval of the mathematics faculty, the student will then be assigned broader responsibility for one (or at most, two) freshman courses, with the faculty sponsor exercising such supervision as may appear appropriate under individual circumstances.
Phase 3. Upon completion of a baccalaureate program the intern hopefully would be prepared to accept a graduate teaching assistantship in the department, or in a related interdisciplinary area, as the next step in his or her professional career.
No student may earn more than 9 hours credit in mathematics courses numbered below 140.
Math. 101-3. College Algebra. A course intended for precalculus students who are not prepared to take Math. 140 directly. Topics covered include set concepts, functions including exponential and logarithmic, systems of equations and inequalities including elements of matrices, and polynomials. Prer., 1 Vi years of high school algebra, one year of plane geometry, and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class.*
Math. 102-3. College Trigonometry. A course intended for precalculus students who are not prepared to take Math. 140 directly. Includes trigonometric functions and their values and graphs, right angle trigonometry, identities and equations, inverse trigonometric functions, the law of sines and the law of cosines and applications, complex numbers, complex roots of equations, De Moivre’s theorem and roots of complex numbers, and elements of complex algebra. Prer., 11/2 years of high school algebra, one year of plane geometry, and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class.*
Math. 107-3. Algebra for Social Science and Business. Logic, set theory, permutations, combinations, probability, matrix algebra. Does not prepare students for Math. 140. Prer., one year high school algebra.
Math. 108-3. Polynomial Calculus. A one-semester course in the calculus. No knowledge of trigonometry or analytic geometry is presupposed. Intended especially for social science and business students and for the general liberal arts student. Those planning to take more than one semester of calculus should take Math. 140 instead of Math. 108. Prer., V/2 years high school algebra.
'Students without prerequisites are advised (and with an unsatisfactory placement test score will be directed) to consider enrollment in pre-college courses D.C.E. 350, 351, 353, and 354, as needed, through the Division of Continuing Education.
Math. 133-1. Topics in Mathematics. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in mathematics. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular topics being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Math. 140-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. Basic concepts from plane analytic geometry, elements of vector algebra; intuitive introduction to limits, continuity, differentiability, and integrability, elementary applications of differentiation and integration. Replaces Math. 130. Students with credit in Math. 108 will receive no credit for Math. 140. Math. 102 may be taken concurrently with Math. 140. Prer., Math. 101 and 102.
Math. 241-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. The second of a three-semester sequence (Math. 140, 241, 242) in calculus. This course deals with inverse functions, trig and inverse trig functions, log, exponential, and hyperbolic trig functions. Also includes the Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus, Rolle’s Theorem, the mean value theorems, methods of integration and polar coordinates. Prer., Math. 140.
Math. 242-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III. The third of a three-semester sequence (Math. 140, 241, 242). This course deals with infinite series, the intermediate value theorems, L’Hospital’s Rule and indeterminate forms; Taylor’s and Maclaurin’s series, including series definitions of transcendental functions. Prer., Math. 241 or consent of department.
Math. 300-3. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics. The student learns to prove and critique proofs of theorems by studying elementary topics in abstract mathematics, including such necessary basics as logic, sets, functions, equivalence relations, etc. Prer., Math. 241 or consent of instructor.
Math. 303-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. Designed to help provide appropriate mathematical background to teach K-6 mathematics. This is not a methods course but each topic is related to the elementary curriculum through concurrent examination of relevant text and laboratory materials as each topic is studied. Topics include sets, the concept of number, place value numeration and associated algorithms, the structure of the natural numbers, the integers, and the rational numbers. Applications and problem solving are included. Carries credit only for elementary education majors.
Math. 304-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. Designed to meet objectives as described for Math. 303 above. Topics include intuitive and logical development of geometric ideas relevant to K-6 curriculum; measurement of length, area, volume, mass, angle, temperature, and time; stress is on the metric system; further study of the rational number system; applications and problem solving. Carries credit only for elementary education majors. Prer., Math. 303 or consent of instructor.
Math. 314-3. Introduction to Modern Algebra. Groups, rings, fields, polynomials. Prer., Math. 300.
Math. 315-3. Introduction to Linear Algebra. Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, determinants. Prer., Math. 314. Students cannot receive credit for both Math. 315 and 319.
Math. 319-3. Applied Linear Algebra. Designed primarily for majors in applied science and engineering. Topics include matrix algebra, determinants, matrix inversion, rank and equivalence of matrices, systems of linear equations, and matrix calculus. Prer., Math. 241 with grade of C or better. Students cannot receive credit for both Math. 315 and 319.
Math. 321-3. Higher Geometry I. Axiomatic systems. The foundations of Euclidean and Lobachevskian geometries. Prer., Math. 241 with grade of C or better.
Math. 352-3. Computable Functions. Turing computers, computable functions, alternate formulations of computable functions, the halting problem and noncomputable functions. Church's thesis, universal machines, Godel’s incompleteness theorem, and undecidable theories. Prer., college algebra or consent of instructor.
Math. 383-3. Introduction to Statistics. Study of the elementary statistical measures. Introduction to statistical distributions, statistical inference, and hypothesis testing. Prer., college algebra or equivalent. Not for mathematics majors.


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’Math. 403-3. Introduction to Topology. Metric spaces and topological spaces; homotopy and homology in simplicial complexes. Prer., Math. 300 or consent of instructor.
'Math. 411-3. Theory of Numbers. Divisibility, greatest common divisor, prime numbers, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, congruences and other topics. Prer., Math. 300 or consent of instructor.
Math. 412-3. Topics in Mathematics. Special topics in mathematics will be covered. Students should check the current Schedule of Courses to obtain the topics to be covered as well as the prerequisites. With permission, this course may be taken for credit more than once. Math. 413-3, 414-3. Advanced Finite Mathematics I, II. Prer., one semester of calculus.
Math. 422-3. Higher Geometry II. An introduction to the study of synthetic projective geometry. The relation of the projective and affine planes. Coordinates in the projective plane. Prer., Math. 321.
Math. 426-3. Elementary Differential Geometry. Differential forms in Euclidean 3-space, vector fields, frame fields, Frenet formulas, calculus of differential forms on surfaces, geometry of surfaces, Gaussian curvature, second fundamental form. Prer., Math. 315, Math. 432, or consent of instructor.
Math. 427-3. Mathematical Tools for Urban Planning.
Development of the fundamental techniques of applied quantitative methods. This course covers those topics required for the two subsequent quantitative methods courses, Math. 428 and Math. 429. Math. 428-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods
I. Matrix algebra related to model building and linear and nonlinear programming leading to a study of the Theory of Games with applications in engineering and other applied areas such as planning, transportation and environmental problems. Prer., Math. 427 and consent of instructor.
Math. 429-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods
II. Parametric and nonparametric statistics which treat statistics in a Decision Framework (includes introduction to Decision Theory.) Bayesian Statistics and applications with exercises in probability representative of simple probabilistic models (e.g., Queueing, single-server models, etc.). Prer., Math. 427 or consent of instructor. Math. 431 -3. Advanced Calculus I. Calculus of one variable, the real number system, continuity, differentiation, integration (possibly Riemann-Stieltjes). Prer., Math. 241 and Math. 300.
Math. 432-3. Advanced Calculus II. Sequences and series, convergence, uniform convergence; Taylor's theorem; calculus of several variables including continuity, differentiation and integration; Picard’s theorem in ordinary differential equations and Fourier series if time permits. Prer., Math. 431.
Math. 433-3. Advanced Calculus III. Vector fields, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem; Green’s, Stokes’ and divergence theorems; Taylor’s theorem for functions of several variables; calculus on manifolds if time permits. Prer., Math. 432 or consent of instructor, and Math. 313 or 319.
Math. 437-3. Advanced Calculus for Engineers I. Vector analysis; vector calculus, including divergence, curl, Green’s theorem, Stokes’ theorem, and the divergence theorem. Tensor analysis. Prer., Math. 319.
Math. 438-3. Advanced Calculus for Engineers II. Fourier series, Laplace transforms, Gamma and Beta functions, Bessel’s functions, and other special functions. Prer., Math. 443.
Math. 443-3. Ordinary Differential Equations. Elementary systematic introduction to linear nth order differential equations, including equations with regular singular points. Existence, uniqueness, and successive approximations of solutions for linear and nonlinear equations. Prer., Math. 242.
Math. 445-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists I.
Topics include complex algebra, Cauchy-Riemann equations, Laurent expansions, theory of residues, complex integration, and introduction to conformal mapping. Technique and applicability are stressed. Prer., ordinary differential equations.
Math. 446-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists II. A
continuation of Math. 445, with coverage dependent partly on the interests of the class. Topics include Schwartz-Christofel transformations and thorough development of techniques of
conformal mappings. Solution of boundary value problems will be emphasized. Prer., Math. 445.
Math. 447-3. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations I.
Boundary value problems for the wave, heat, and Laplace equations; separation of variables method, eigenvalue problems, Fourier series, orthogonal systems. Prer., Math. 443.
Math. 448-3. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations II.
Continuation of Math. 447. Boundary value problems, initial value problems, eigenvalue problems in higher dimensions, Sturm-Liouville problems, Fourier and Laplace transform, approximation methods. Prer., Math. 447.
Math. 449-3. Tensor Analysis for Engineers and Scientists.
Review of vector concepts. Indicial notation, oblique coordinates, generalized coordinates, summation conventions. Contravariant and covariant tensors. Tensor algebra and tensor calculus. The course is designed primarily to familiarize the professional with the foundations of this useful subject rather than to develop detailed applications. Prer., differential equations and matrix analysis.
"Math. 451-3. Introduction to Mathematical Logic. Sentential logic and first order logic. Completeness theorems. Prer., Math. 300 with a grade of C or better.
*Math. 453-3. Boolean Algebra. Axioms, subalgebras, ideals, direct and free products, free algebras, representation theorem, completions. Prer., Math. 314.
•Math. 455-3. Set Theory. Axioms of set theory, algebra of sets, cardinal numbers, ordinal numbers, axiom of choice and continuum hypothesis. Prer., Math. 300.
Math. 456-3. Laplace Transforms for Engineers and Scientists.
Topics include the general methods, transforms of special functions, heaviside expansion theorems, transforms of periodic functbns, convolution integrals, the inverse transforms, and solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prer., ordinary differential equations.
Math. 457-3. Theory of Equations. A study of the classical theory of equations, including such topics as higher degree polynomials and their zeroes, symmetric functions of polynomial coefficients; general solution of the cubic and quartic equations; resultants, and elementary graphical analysis. Prer., Math. 242.
Math. 458-3. Calculus of Variations for Engineers and Scientists.
Techniques and applications of the powerful tools of the variational calculus will be developed and both classical and modern optim ization problems will be attacked. Prer., ordinary and partial differential equations.
Math. 461-3. Analog Computation and Simulation. (Same as E.E. 450.) Analog computing techniques including time and amplitude scaling, and programming of linear and nonlinear differential equations. Simulation of dynamic systems, iterative analog computing. Laboratory work on an analog machine is required. Digital simulation languages are studied. Prer., ordinary differential equations and familiarity with Laplace transforms.
Math. 465-3. Numerical Analysis I. (Same as C.S. 465.) Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations. Solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Interpolation, integration. Solution of ordinary differential equations. Least squares. Sources of error and error analysis. Computer implementation of numerical methods. Matrix eigenvalue problems and summation of infinite series. Prer., C.S. 201 and Math. 315, or Math. 319.
Math. 466-3. Numerical Analysis II. (Same as C.S. 466.) Continuation of Math. 465. Prer., Math. 465.
Math. 467-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering. (Same as E.E. 455.) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science. Those methods suitable for solution by high-speed digital computers are emphasized. Prer., E.E. 201 and Math. 443.
Math. 468-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists I.
Tchebychev approximations, approximation by rational functions, linear and nonlinear, regression analysis, applications of interpolating polynomials, economic value, and cost analysis. Comparisons of estimation and approximation techniques, and other related topics. Prer., third-semester calculus and one course in statistics.
'This is one of several courses offered alternately by UCD and Metropolitan State College. See appropriate Schedule of Courses.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciencesl35
Math. 469-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists II. A
continuation of Math. 468. Selected topics will be developed extensively in accordance with the needs of the class. With the consent of the department, students may register for this course more than once. Prer., Math. 468 or consent of instructor.
Math. 470-3. Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. (Educ. 455.) Problems in teaching mathematics including objectives, sequence of topics, methods of presentation, materials, testing, and recent curricular developments. Prer., Math. 241. Carries credit only for students in secondary education.
‘Math. 472-3. History of Mathematics. A history of the development of mathematical techniques and ideas from early civilization to the present, including the interrelationships of mathematics and sciences. Prer., Math. 140.
Math. 481-3. Introduction to Probability Theory. Axioms, combinatorial analysis, independence and conditional probability, discrete and absolutely continuous distributions, expectation and distribution of functions of random variables, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, simple Markov chains. Prer., Math. 241.
Math. 482-3. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Point and confidence interval estimation. Principles of maximum likelihood, sufficiency, and completeness; tests of simple and composite hypothesis, linear models and multiple regression analysis. Analysis of variance distribution free methods. Prer., Math. 481.
Math. 493-2, 494-2. Honors Seminar. Intended for candidates for departmental honors and other superior students. Topics covered vary from year to year. Student participation is stressed.
Math. 495-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Elementary Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department.
Math. 496-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Middle School Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department.
Math. 497-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Secondary Mathematics.
Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered. Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department.
Math. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Variable credit depending upon the student’s needs. This course is listed for the benefit of the advanced student who desires to pursue one or more topics in considerable depth. Supervision of a full-time faculty member is necessary, and the dean’s office must concur. Students may register for this course more than once with departmental approval. Prer., consent of department.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
A basic activity program in physical education is available for nonmajors. Although physical education credit is not required for completion of the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, a maximum of 8 hours of elective credit consisting of activity courses may be applied toward the graduation requirement of 120 hours. Activity classes 102 through 213 may be taken on an elective basis. One course may be taken each semester and a specific activity may be counted for credit only once. The student will have the option of being graded by letter grade or pass /fail.
’This is one of several courses offered alternately by UCD and Metropolitan State College. See appropriate Schedule of Courses.
The basic activity program is designed to offer students a wide variety of recreational activities stressing sports that have lifetime carry-over value.
The discipline of physical education does not offer a major in physical education or recreation. However, a variety of courses are offered which are the equivalent of those given on the Boulder Campus for majors. It is possible over a four-year period to take the majority of the courses required for the major on the Denver Campus.
For information on the majors program, and the graduate program in physical education and recreation, contact the discipline representative on the Denver Campus.
P.E. 133-1. Topics in Physical Education. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in physical education and recreation. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
P.E. 293-2. Personal Living. Maintenance and improvement of health.
P.E. 295-2. Community Health. Communicable diseases and their relations to public health. The germ theory of disease, infection and immunity, vaccines, toxoids antitoxins, and hereditary defects. An investigation of community health services.
P.E. 296-2. First Aid. Knowledge and skills of emergency treatment for common accidents and illnesses. Leads to the American Red Cross Advanced Certification.
Rec. 332-2. Wilderness Camping Practicum. Designed in three stages, providing opportunities for group and solo wilderness camping. Additional fee required.
P.E. 370-3. Society and Sport. A study of the sociological foundations of physical education with emphasis upon the social structure of sports groups, the dynamics of sports groups, risk-taking in sports, and sports in their relationship to socialization of individuals and groups.
P.E. 420-2. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. Policies and practices used in the development of sound physical education practices.
Rec. 431-2. Program Planning in Recreation. To acquaint the student with the basic principles in developing a well-rounded recreation program with specific objectives.
Rec. 435-2. Organization and Evaluation in Recreation. The study of organizational structures of the several types of recreational services and evaluation techniques used to determine the effectiveness of these structures as related to administration of programs, policies, and the public.
Rec. 437-2. Managementof Parks and Recreation Facilities. Lect., field work, and lab. experience in park and recreation administration. Problems in management, finance, and evaluation of park and recreation facilities.
Rec. 438-2. Maintenance of Park and Recreation Facilities. Lect., field work, and lab. experience in maintenance of parks and recreation facilities. Problems in planning, scheduling, and performing operations for public use.
PHYSICS
Required of all physics majors are Phys. 111, 112, 114, 213, 214, 215, two years of calculus, and one year of another science. Majors preparing for graduate study in physics should also take Phys. 317, 321, 322, 331,


361 University of Colorado at Denver
332, 341, 491, 492, and 495, and additional mathematics courses. Students not going to graduate school in physics or wishing an interdisciplinary physics major must consult an adviser for the suitable additional program. An acoustical option is currently being developed. Students should also be aware of the engineering physics major available through the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Several new interdisciplinary programs involving physics are currently being considered, including environmental science, geophysical systems, and chemical physics. Students interested in these programs should take the introductory calculus physics sequence as soon as possible, and consult an adviser for the latest status of these programs.
Two curriculum developments expected within a year are the addition of a two-semester sequence course, Physics for the Life Sciences (tentatively Phys. 251 and 252), and the extension of Phys. 362 (Sound, Music and Noise) to a two-semester sequence with the addition of Phys. 364.
Phys. 105-4. General Astronomy. The methods and results of modern astronomy (solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology) at an elementary level.
Phys. 106-4. General Astronomy. Continuation of Phys. 105. Prer., Phys. 105.
Phys. 111-4. General Physics. First semester of 4-semester sequence for science and engineering students. Covers vectors, kinematics, dynamics, momentum of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, and introduction to thermodynamics. Prer., knowledge of algebra, geometry and trigonometry; Coreq., calculus through derivatives and indefinite and definite integrals of polynomials and trigonometric functions, as typically covered in Math. 140.
Phys. 112-4. General Physics. Covers electricity and magnetism. Prer., Phys. 111; Coreq., Math. 241.
Phys. 114-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys. 112-4. One 2-hour lab. per wk.
Phys. 133-1. Topics in Physics. Different 5-week course modules dealing with various topics in physics. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Phys. 199-variable credit. Independent Study for Lower Division.
Phys. 201-5, 202-5. General Physics. Four demonstration lect. and one lab. per wk. Phys. 201: mechanics, heat, and sound; Phys. 202: electricity, light, and modern physics. An elementary but thorough presentation of the fundamental facts and principles of physics. Majors in mathematics, chemistry, and others taking calculus are urged to take Phys. 111,112,114,213, and 215. Prer., Vh years high school algebra and satisfactory grade on mathematics placement test.
Phys. 213-3. General Physics. Covers wave motion, physical optics, and introduction to special relativity, quantum theory, and atomic physics. Prer., Phys. 112 and 114.
Phys. 214-3. Introductory Modern Physics. To be taken by physics majors and interested nonmajors. Introduces students to the nature of modern physics and provides majors with perspective on the frontiers of this field. Emphasis on concepts without mathematical developments. Includes relativity, atomic and nuclear physics, solid state and particle physics. Prer., Phys. 213.
Phys. 215-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys. 213. One 2-hour lab. per wk.
Phys. 307-3. Physical Environmental Problems. Current environmental problems from the viewpoint of the physical sciences. Sources, effects, detection, and control of air, water, noise, radiation, and heavy metal pollutions. Factors affecting traffic movement and safety, and transportation alternatives which produce less pollution. Some lectures by outside experts. This course and Phys. 308 are
designed as a complementary sequence but may be taken separately. Prer., one year of college science or mathematics. Phys. 308-3. Energy. This course will examine the central role of energy in our environment. Topics will include the macroscopic flow of energy in the world, the conversion and degradation of energy, thermal pollution, and energy resources and consumption. Energy will be examined as an environmental problem and for its utility in solving problems. The implications of energy as a limit to population will be discussed. This course is designed to complement Phys. 307, but may be taken separately. Prer., one year of college science or mathematics.
Phys. 317-2, 318-2. Junior Laboratory. Contains experiments on data handling, electrical measurements, electronics, optics, vacuum techniques, heat and thermodynamics, mechanics, and modern physics. Emphasis will be on developing basic skills and on design of experiments. Each student will carry at least one project experiment each semester. Coreq., Phys. 321, 331, or consent of instructor. Phys. 321-3. Classical Mechanics and Relativity. Topics covered include: Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, oscillations, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, central forces, and scattering. Analytical procedures employing the methods of vector analysis and calculus will be stressed. Prer., Phys. 214 and A.Math. 232, or equivalent.
Phys. 322-3. Classical Mechanics, Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics. Topics covered include: noninertial reference frames, rigid body motion, coupled oscillators, introduction to quantum mechanics, Bohr theory, simple solutions to Schroedinger equation, and perturbation theory. Prer., Phys. 321.
Phys. 331-3, 332-3. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism.
Elements of mathematical theory of electricity and magnetism, including magnetostatics, electrostatics, polarized media, direct and alternating current theory, and introduction to electromaqnetic fields and waves. Prer., for Phys. 332: Phys. 331; Coreq. for Phys. 331: Phys. 321.
Phys. 341-3. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.
Statistical mechanics applied to macroscopic physical systems; statistical thermodynamics, classical thermodynamic systems; applications to simple systems. The relationship of the statistical to the thermodynamic points of view is examined. Prer., Phys.213.
Phys. 362-3. Sound, Music, and Noise. This course will consider the basic nature of sound waves, the musical scale, why musical instruments sound the way they do, the reproduction of sound, the ear and hearing, vocal communication, room acoustics, noise pollution, and the sonic boom. No prer. Although this course is mainly descriptive, some high school algebra will be used.
Phys. 363-1. Sound Laboratory. Laboratory course to accompany Phys. 362 as an option. Students will do an acoustical project on a subject of their own choice. Coreq. or prer., Phys. 362 or consent of instructor.
Phys. 390-3. Development of Physics from the 17th Century. This course examines the history and development of the important theories of physics from the time of Newton to the present day. The broad concepts and the people who originated them are stressed, rather than the mathematical details. Prer., Phys. 105.
Phys. 429-variable credit. Psychophysics Methods and Research. This course covers the methodology of psychophysics by involving students in actual research in perception, with occasional seminars on techniques and data analysis. Prer., Psych. 416 or Phys. 363 and 364, and a knowledge of statistical analysis.
Phys. 431-3. Introduction to Radiation and Health Physics.
Designed to introduce students to the physics of ionizing radiation (nuclear emissions and X-rays) and their applications. Subjects will include detection techniques, error analysis, half-life determinations, instrument design and calibration, and a brief study of the chemical and biological effects. An integral laboratory is included. Prer., Phys. 213, 215, and two semesters of calculus, general chemistry, and general biology.
Phys. 451-3. Light. Basic electromagnetic theory of light using Maxwell's equations. Examples in geometrical optics; extensive applications in physical optics including diffraction and polarization. Spectra, including Zeeman effect and fluorescence. Recent advances in experimental techniques; microwaves, optical masers, image converters, etc. Prer., Phys. 332.


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Phys. 465-3. Creative and Cultu ral Aspects of Physics. One of two
independent courses (with Phys. 466) dealing with the interplay between physics and culture. It examines the lives and works ot individual scientists and the relationship of physical theory to culture and creativity. Prer., upper division standing.
Phys. 466-3. Art, Science, and Technology. One of two independent courses (with Phys. 465) dealing with the interplay between physics and culture. It examines the relationship between physics and art, and the possibilities of art based on science and technology. Prer., upper division standing.
Phys. 491-3, 492-3. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Topics include a quantum mechanical treatment of the one-electron atom, atomic shell structure, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, band theory of solids, X-rays, nuclear properties, radioacitvity, and the properties of the fundamental particles. Prer., Phys. 322 and 332.
Phys. 495-2,496-2. Senior Laboratory. Individual project laboratory with emphasis on modern physical experimentation.
Phys. 499-variable credit. Independent Study for Upper Division.
Students must check with a faculty member before taking this course.
PSYCHOLOGY
Majors should include college algebra in their lower division schedules and enroll in Math. 383 concurrently with Psych. 210. At least 30 semester hours and not more than 48 semester hours in psychology must be completed, with at least 16 hours in upper division courses. No grade below C in required psychology courses is acceptable toward the major.
Specific course requirements are as follows: Psych. 201 -202 or 203-204 with lab; Psych. 210 or 211 -212; at least one biotropic course, including Psych. 395, 405, 410, 412, 416, 420, 425, 438, 439; at least one sociotropic course, including Psych. 364,430, 431,440,445, 449, 464, 466, 471, 485, 493; at least one advanced laboratory course, including Psych. 416, 420, 440, and 485; and at least one integrative course, Psych. 451.
Psych. 100-3. Introduction to Psychology. A one-semester survey course for nonmajors. Covers such topics in psychology as personality, frustration and conflict, learning and memory, and the biological bases of behavior.
Psych. 133-1. Topics in Psychology. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in psychology. See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement.
Psych. 203-3. General Psychology I. Introduction to the scientific study of behavior. Motivation, perception, learning and memory, maturation and development, and the physiological bases of behavior. Psychology majors must register concurrently for Psych. 206.
Psych. 204-3. General Psychology II. Continuation of Psych. 203, covering topics of individual differences and their assessment and experimental social psychology. Psychology majors must register concurrently for Psych. 207.
Psych. 205-3. Biological Bases of Behavior. An introduction to biopsychology, covering biological variables related to behavior. Prer., Psych. 203.
Psych. 206-1. General Psychology Laboratory I. To be taken concurrently with Psych. 203 by psychology majors.
Psych. 207-1. General Psychology Laboratory II. To be taken concurrently with Psych. 204 by psychology majors.
Psych. 210-4. Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology. Research methods and analysis of data. Intended for those who plan to major in psychology. Prer., Psych. 201 -202 or 203-204 and college algebra; prer. or coreq., Math. 383 (Statistics).
Psych. 245-3. Psychology of Social Problems. An examination of social psychological aspects of a variety of social issues and problems
in contemporary society. Includes such topics as poverty or minority status, prejudice, drug use, student protest, and patterns of sexual behavior. Consideration of theory and research relative to the topics as well as the definition of social behavior as a “problem."
Psych. 300-2. Honors Seminar. Current theoretical issues and problems in psychology. Prer., major in psychology and consent of instructor.
Psych. 320-3, 321-3. Human Behavior and Maturation Through the Life Span. Three hours lect. per week. Analysis of the normal range of behaviors found in each development stage from birth through senescence.
Psych. 340-3. Social Psychology of the Mexican American.
Focuses on the relationship between sociocultural factors and the perceptual, cognitive, and motivational development of the Mexican American. Prer., 6 sem. hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 364-3. Child Psychology. Principles of normal development and patterns of child-rearing. Prer., Psych. 100,201 -202, or 203-204.
Psych. 365-3. Adolescence and Youth. Principles of development in adolescence, including physical, cognitive, and social development. Prer., Psych. 203-204 or 6 hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. (Biol. 395, Anthro. 395.) An interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution, his biological makeup, his development as a social being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Prer., at least one course in anthropology, biology, or psychology. Psych. 400-2. Honors Seminar. Topic to be determined. Prer., major in psychology, senior standing, and consent of instructor.
Psych. 405-3. Physiological Psychology. The morphological, neuro-chemical, and physiological bases of behavior. Prer., Psych. 201 -202 or 203-204 and 6 additional hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 409-3. Hormones and Behavior. This course represents the application of endocrinological concepts and techniques to the problems of motivation and behavior. Prer., junior standing and at least one year of biology.
Psych. 410-3. Behavioral Genetics. (Biol. 410.) The inheritance of behavioral characteristics. Prer., consent of instructor.
Psych. 412-3. Quantitative Genetics. Survey of the principles of genetics of quantitative characteristics. Topics will include gene frequencies, effects of mutation, migration, and selection; correlations among relatives, heritability, inbreeding, cross-breeding, and selective breeding. Prer., consent of instructor.
Psych. 413-3. Drugs and the Nervous System. The physiological basis of drug action on the nervous system and behavior, with emphasis on the use of drugs as analytic tools in the study of behavior. This course is not concerned with the subjective, social, or legal consequences of drug use. Part I: chemical basis of conduction and transmission in the nervous system. Part II: pharmacology of sleep, pain, addiction, dependence, appetite, anxiety, learning, memory, and perception. Prer., Psych. 405.
Psych. 414-3. Cognitive Psychology. Introduction to the study of cognitive processes in man: the development of conceptual behavior, memory, and thinking. Prer., Psych. 201-202 or 203-204 and 6 additional hours in psychology, or consent of instructor.
Psych. 416-4. Psychology of Perception. The study of sensory processes and of variables related to perception. Lect. and lab. Prer., Psych. 201 -202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211.
Psych. 420-4. Psychology of Learning. Conditions and applications of learning as found in experimental literature. Prer., Psych. 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211.
Psych. 421-1. Theories of Learning and Motivation. An advanced survey of past and present major theoretical formulations in learning and motivation. Prer., Psych. 420 and consent of instructor.
Psych. 425-3. Comparative Psychology. (Biol. 425.) Similarities and differences among animals. Principles of behavior in a variety of species. Prer., 6 hrs. of psychology or consent of instructor.
Psych. 430-3. Abnormal Psychology. Borderline disorders as extreme variations of the normal personality. Major functional and organic disorders. Theories of mental disorders and methods of psychotherapy. Not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych. 431. Prer., Psych. 201-202, 203-204, or 100 and upper division standing.


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Psych. 431-4. Psychopathology. Intensive analysis of the major theories of personality and behavior disorders. Open to majors only, and not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych. 430. Prer., Psych. 201-202, or 203-204, 6 additional hrs. of psychology, and upper division standing.
Psych. 433-3. Mental Hygiene. Psychological principles underlying the nature of mental and emotional health and a positive program for preventive and remedial treatment. Prer., Psych. 430 or 431 or consent of instructor.
Psych. 438-3. Advanced Animal Behavior. (Biol. 438.) Comparison of behavior in a variety of species, with emphasis on social behavior and its evolution. Prer., Psych. 425 or consent of instructor. Psych. 439-2. Laboratory in Animal Behavior. (Biol. 439.) Laboratory projects and field observations of the behavior of animals. Prer. or coreq., Psych. 438 and consent of instructor.
Psych. 440-4. Social Psychology. Psychological principles underlying social behavior. Analysis of special topics such as attitude surveys, public opinion research, propaganda, intergroup relations. Prer., Psych. 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211-212.
Psych. 445-3. Psychology of Personality. The physiological and psychological nature of personality. Individual differences. The development of personality. Prer., 16 sem. hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 449-3. Cross-Cultural Psychology. The influence of culture and subculture on personality, including sex roles, patterns of child rearing, attitudes and values, and mental illness. Prer., 6 sem. hrs. of courses in psychology, sociology, and/or anthroplogy in any combination.
Psych. 451-3. History of Psychology. Development of psychological theories since 500 B.C. Schools of psychology and their adherents. Readings of primary and secondary sources. Prer., 16 sem. hrs. of psychology and senior standing.
Psych. 464-3. Developmental Psychology. Principles and theories of child development. Prer., Psych. 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211-212.
Psych. 466-3. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Psychology of retarded, handicapped, and superior children. The relation of special traits to educational and social needs. Prer., Psych. 201-202 or 203-204, a course in developmental or child psychology, and upper division standing.
Psych. 467-2. Psychology of Mental Retardation. Psychological problems of mental deficiency. Concern with causes, identification characteristics, and treatment of the mentally retarded with an emphasis on research findings. Prer., Psych. 201-202 or 203-204 and 364 or 464.
Psych. 471-3. Survey of Clinical Psychology. Theories and practices relating to problems of ability and maladjustment. Diagnostic procedures and treatment methods with children and adults. Prer., Psych. 201 -202 or 203-204 and Psych. 431, or consent of instructor. Psych. 472-3. Community Psychology. New approaches to preventing psychological distress detailed in terms of theory and practice. Special topics include “psychology in the streets,” the creation of alternative institutions, and methods of consultation in poverty areas. Prer., at least 6 hrs. of psychology.
Psych. 485-4. Principles of Psychological Testing. Principles underlying construction, validation, and use of tests of ability and personality. Prer., Psych. 210 or 211-212.
Psych. 493-3. Industrial Psychology. Application of psychological principles and research findings to industrial problems, including problems of management, employees, and consumers, and such special topics as advertising, methods of appraisal, and human engineering. Prer., 6 sem. hrs. of psychology and a statistics course.
Psych. 494-3. Psychology of Sports. A survey of psychological conditions affecting performance in athletics. Includes assessment of psychological demands of sports, assessment of the athlete, preparation of the athlete for coping with the psychological demands of sports. Prer., 9 sem. hrs. in psychology.
Psych. 496-3. Performance Under Stress. Examines the processes which influence the effects of stress on performance in academic, vocational, and other interpersonal situations. Prer., Psych. 420. Psych. 497-1. Workshop in Kinesthetic Methods for the Prevention and Remediation of Learning Disabilities. Survey of methods
for early detection and prevention-remediation of learning disabilities via older nonautomated and newer automated kinesthetic teaching methods, with “hands on” practice by participants. Prer., consent of instructor.
Psych. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Prer., consent of instructor.
Division of Social Sciences
FREDERICK S. ALLEN, Assistant Dean
In the last two decades the social sciences have included study of some of the most intractable problems of contemporary society: the population explosion, urban concentration, the impact of rapidly changing technology, the strains of race relations, and the thrust of developing societies. Students interested in such problems can come to grips with important concepts in the social sciences which will help orient their lives and even their careers. The social science disciplines also provide important bridges between thought and action and between values and problem solving techniques. In short, the social sciences may now be considered to be at the center of the academic constellation, giving inspiration and possibly direction to the entire enterprise of education.
The Division of Social Sciences includes the following disciplines: anthropology, economics, history, political science, and sociology. The division offers courses in the various disciplines, in interdisciplinary studies, and in preprofessional studies.
Students can satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in all the disciplines included in the division. The requirements of each major are explained before the course listings for the respective disciplines.
Students should be aware of the possibilities for a distributed studies major in the social sciences. The most usual combinations are economics and sociology, and history and political science. See the Special Programs section of this bulletin for details on a distributed studies major.
The division also has developed a major in urban studies. The program is designed to provide a broad educational experience for persons who are interested in careers related to the problems of urban life. The major is appropriate for students intending to enter the fields of business, law, medicine, or public school teaching, to work in or with federal, state, or local agencies or volunteer and community action groups, or to enter graduate programs in the social sciences or environmental planning. Interested students should contact the Division of Social Sciences office for information concerning advisers, requirements, courses currently offered and proposed, and options involved in the program.
For preprofessional programs, see listings and requirements in that section of this bulletin.


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Description of Courses and Programs
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.
ANTHROPOLOGY
Undergraduate students majoring in anthropology must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours with C or better grades. Sixteen of the 30 hours must be upper division. The maximum number of hours in the major is 48.
Majors in anthropology must take Anthro. 103 and 104 (Principles of Anthropology I and II) or demonstrate knowledge of materials covered by these courses. Majors also must take Anthro. 201 and 202 (Introduction to Physical Anthropology I and II); Anthro. 453 (History of Anthropology); and either Anthro. 280 (Nature of Language); Anthro. 480 (Anthropological Linguistics); or Anthro. 481 (Language and Culture).
Note: most 400-level courses do not have prerequisites.
Anthro. 103-3. Principles of Anthropology I. Physical anthropology and archaeology. Evolution of man; his physical and cultural development from his beginnings through the rise of early civilization. Includes consideration of man as a biological organism, his origin and relationship with nonhuman and prehuman primates and development of culture as an adaptive device.
Anthro. 104-3. Principles of Anthropology II. Cultural-social anthropology and linguistics. Study of man from the standpoint of the many and varied cultures he has manifested through time to the present. Survey of relationships between environment, technology, social organization, language, and ideology. Nature of anthropology and its analysis of the similarities and differences in human cultural adaptations.
Anthro. 201-4. Introduction to Physical Anthropology I. Theory of biological evolution; examination of man’s organic structure, function, and behavior from an evolutionary-comparative perspective; analysis of fossil evidence of human evolution. Laboratory work emphasizing osteometry and osteology.
Anthro. 202-4. Introduction to Physical Anthropology II. On-going human evolution with emphasis on quantitative assessment of genetic variation in man.
Anthro. 220-3. Principles of Archaeology. Basic Introduction to concepts, techniques, and theory of archaeological excavation and interpretation. Two lect., 1 two-hour lab. per week. Lectures, demonstrations, and practical work.
Anthro. 227-3. The Evolution of New World Culture. Cultural evolution in the New World from the earliest hunting cultures through the rise of civilization as seen from the perspective of archaeological evidence and theory.
Anthro. 240-3. Principles of Ethnology. Intensive survey of concepts, methods, and objectives in the comparative study of world cultures. Comparative analysis of selected ethnographic materials within a framework of sociocultural evolution and cultural ecology. Introductory techniques of fieldwork, library research, and report writing.
Anthro. 280-3. The Nature of Language. Survey of languages of the world and their historical relationships. Introduction to language analysis. Study of theories of the origin of language, its relationship to other forms of communication, to cognition, and to systems of writing.
Anthro. 310-3. Cultural Pluralism. The cultural and social anthropology of the plural ethnic and racial component of modern complex societies (nation-states). The focus will be on the forms and processes of sociocultural identity, its maintenance and change with national integration. Although comparative across nations, there will be an emphasis on U.S. society.
Anthro. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. (Biol. 395; Psych. 395.) Interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his
evolution, his biological makeup, his development as a social being, and his strategies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-discussion sessions. Prer., one course in anthropology, biology, or psychology.
Anthro. 399-3. Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology. Directed investigation of a specific topic of current importance. The topic may be within the subfields of anthropology or interdisciplinary with anthropology. Prearranged topics will be announced. Prer., consent of instructor.
Anthro. 408-3. Anthropological Genetics. A consideration of the data and theory of human genetics. Emphasis will be placed upon analytical techniques relating to a genetic analysis of the individual, family, and populations.
Anthro. 410-3. Race and Man. Concepts of human race: history, theory, and applications thereof. Biological factors in the establishment and maintenance of human diversity.
Anthro. 411-3. Human Paleontology. Detailed consideration of the fossil evidence for human evolution. History, description, interpretation of key fossils, and review of current and controversial issues.
Anthro. 412-3. Advanced Physical Anthropology. Introduction to population genetics and its application to understanding problems of process in human evolution and the formation of races in man. Anthro. 414-3. Primatology. Survey of the Primate Order in evolution. Morphology and behavior from a comparative point of view, with emphasis on issues related to the origin and evolution of the most social member of this order.
Anthro. 416-3. Ecology, Adaptation and Culture. Culture, culture change, and evolution from the perspective of human behavioral adaptations to environmental variables. A general systems, multifactorial (sociocultural and biophysical) approach to cause and effect.
Anthro. 417-3. Human Ethology. Ethological principles and their application to anthropological investigations. Methods and techniques of data collection. Practice in assessment of behavior in natural settings.
Anthro. 418-3. Group Processes—Sociobiology. Human and other animal behavior in groups. Social biological processes, structures, and systemic functions of groups in cross-specific evolutionary comparison.
Anthro. 421-3. Archaeology of the American Southwest. Prehistoric cultures of the southwestern U.S. and adjacent Mexico, their origins, characteristics, and interrelationships.
Anthro. 422-3. Archaeology of Mesoamerica. Prehistoric and protohistoric cultures of Mexico and northern Central America, including the Aztecs and the Maya.
Anthro. 430-3. Cultural Evolution. Review of various theories explaining the evolution of culture with particular attention to the Neolithic and Urban Revolutions.
Anthro. 435-2 to 6. Archaeological Field and Laboratory Research. Summer session only; Boulder Campus only. Students will participate in archaeological field research and conduct laboratory analysis of archaeological materials and data. Open only to University of Colorado anthropology majors. Prer., consent of instructor. Anthro. 439-3. Research Methods in Archaeology. Methods and theory of archaeology, emphasizing the interpretation of materials and data and the relationships of archaeology to other disciplines.
Anthro. 443-3. Economic Anthropology. Cross-cultural survey and comparison of economic systems. Economic structures and their functional relationships with other social institutions in a range of societies from simple to complex.
Anthro. 444-3. Urban Anthropology. An anthropological approach to the comparative study of factors influencing urbanization in different parts of the world along with the implications of environments, economy, values, and psychology of urban living in general. Cross-cultural, but with emphasis on the modern western world.
Anthro. 447-3. Ethnohistory. The use of documents and other external sources in the reconstruction of culture history.
Anthro. 448-3. Anthropology and Education. An anthropological focus on contemporary educational systems. Review of recent research in the anthropology of education as well as an introduction to


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teaching anthropology in the schools. Primarily for social studies teachers, education, and anthropology students. Prer., consent of instructor.
Anthro. 450-3. Family Dynamics. The course examines processes of change in values, roles, and relations involved in marriage and family structure, using contemporary cross-cultural materials leading to understanding of such problems as generation gap and sex role change. Special attention is given to changing structure of authority, economics, and the emotional components associated with marriage and family life of today’s America.
Anthro. 451-3. Applied Cultural Anthropology. Concepts, methods, and problems in the application of anthropology to community and institution organization, development and administration; exemplified through analysis and discussion of U.S. and cross-cultural case materials. Urban and medical problems as well as ethical issues to be included.
Anthro. 452-3. Seminar in Recent Anthropology. Current directions in sociocultural theory, method and technique as exemplified in the reported research and theoretical works of major anthropologists from mid-20th century to the present. Prer., anthropology major or consent of instructor.
Anthro. 453-3. History of Anthropology. Foundations and development of major concepts and approaches (theory and method) in the study of man and culture. Discussion of principal contributors and their works to mid-20th century. Prer., anthropology major or consent of instructor.
Anthro. 454-3. Psychological Anthropology. A comparative study of the relationship between culture and social character and between culture and individual personality. Anthropological perspectives on the effects of various sociocultural contexts on individual experience. The relationships of sociocultural situations to motives, values, cognition, personal adjustment, stress, and qualities of personal experience are emphasized.
Anthro. 455-3. Culture Process—Maintenance, Change, and Evolution. Theories and perspectives in the study of culture process. Analysis and discussion of case materials dealing with persistence, innovation, situations of culture contact and acculturation, directed change and resistance, and long-term sociocultural development. Anthro. 456-3. Contemporary American Indian Cultures. Beginning with the historical background on American Indian acculturation and persistence, but emphasizing the present-day relations between Indian communities and the dominant society, stressing conditions and events in Denver and the Southwest generally.
Anthro. 459-3. Comparative Social Organization. Principles in the comparative study of human social systems, types of social structure, social control, sociocultural integration, and processes of social change and societal development. Focus on the analysis of ethnographies. Prer., Anthro. 240,452,453, or consent of instructor.
WORLD ETHNOGRAPHY (ANTHRO. 462-476)
Each course listed below will cover the major aspects of cultural and social anthropological interest relating to the peoples and cultural systems within the areas indicated. Following a survey of the geographical affiliations of the inhabitants, the culture-history of the area will be reviewed. The ways of life of the indigenous populations, their relations with each other and to other peoples, and the effects of culture change will be discussed.
Anthro. 462-3. Ethnography of the American Southwest. Anthro. 463-3. Ethnography of Mexico and Central America. Anthro. 470-3. Ethnography of China, Japan, and Korea. Anthro. 474-3. Ethnography of India, Pakistan, and Ceylon. Anthro. 476-3. Ethnography of Southeast Asia.
Anthro. 480-3. Anthropological Linguistics. Boulder Campus only. Methods and results of scientific analysis of languages of nonliterate peoples.
Anthro. 481-3. Language and Culture. The course explores the relationships between culture and language in the following contexts;
language acquisition, language and individual, social dialects, language and education, language and world view, the role of language in cultural interaction and social structure, planned language change including language problems in new nations and at the international level.
Anthro. 499-variable credit. Guided Study. Directed individual study based in a specific subfield of anthropology. Consent of instructor required.
ECONOMICS
Students majoring in economics must meet the following requirements: at least 30, but not more than 48, semester hours in economics, of which 22 must be numbered 300 or higher; either (1) Math. 107-108 and Econ. 480 (formerly Econ. 380) or (2) Math. 140, 241, 242 (students planning to go to Graduate School in economics should take option 2); C.S. 201; Econ. 381, 407 and 408. Majors are urged to take Econ. 480 (formerly Econ. 380) and Econ. 381 as soon as possible.
Distributed Studies
Students majoring in distributed studies may make economics their primary area of concentration by taking 30 semester hours in economics. Required courses for this option are Econ. 407-408 and a course in statistics.
For all courses numbered above 300, the prerequisite, unless otherwise indicated, is Econ. 201 and 202, or Econ. 300.
Introductory Courses
Econ. 201-3. Principles of Economics I; Macroeconomics.
Purpose is to teach fundamental principles, to open the field of economics in the way most helpful to further and more detailed study of special problems, and to give those not intending to specialize in the subject an outline of the general principles of economics. Open to qualified freshmen.
Econ. 202-3. Principles of Economics II: Microeconomics.
Continuation of Econ. 201.
Econ. 250-3. Capitalism and Slavery I. History of the development of slavery as an American institution from 1619 to 1970. Includes growth of the slave trade, development of the plantation system, stimulation of the American economy by slavery, economic implications of the Civil War, theoretical freeing of the slaves in 1863, and the development of modern slavery in America from Reconstruction to the present.
Econ. 251-3. Capitalism and Slavery II. Continuation of Econ. 250. Econ. 300-3. Accelerated Principles of Economics. Condensation of Econ. 201 and 202. Intended for students who have taken Soc. Sci. 210 and 211 and others who want a one-semester introduction to economics. Open to seniors without prerequisite. Not open to students who have taken Econ. 201 and 202.
Econ. 379-3. Consumer Economics. Application of microeconomics to the problems of the ordinary consumer: budget management, purchases, interest, etc. Intended for nonmajors.
Econ. 381-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Economics II. Introduction to statistical methods and their application to quanitative economic research. Prer., Econ. 480 and 201 and 202. Econ. 480-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Economics I. Introduction to the use of mathematics in economics research. Prer., Math. 107 and 108; Econ. 201 and 202.
Econ. 481-3. Introduction to Econometrics. The application of mathematical and statistical techniques to problems of economic theory. Emphasis is on principles rather than computational methods or mathematical rigor. Major topics include demand, production, and cost analysis. Prer., two semesters of calculus and one semester of statistics, or consent of instructor.
Econ. 482-3. Introduction to Econometrics II. Continuation of Econ. 481. Prer., Econ. 481.


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Economic Theory and Thought General Courses
Econ. 201 and 202. See Introductory Courses section.
Econ. 300-3. See Introductory Courses section.
Econ. 403-3. The Price System. Course in microeconomics designed for teachers and other nonmajors. Production, price, and distribution theory in a free-market system. Assumptions and conditions of a free-market and other market structures.
Econ. 404-3. Income, Employment, and Economic Activit;.
Course in macroeconomics designed for teachers and other non-majors. Theory and applications of national income determination, the role of money in the economy, and economic growth. Policy problems in dealing with unemployment, inflation, growth, and our international balance of payments.
Econ. 407-3. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Production, price, and distribution theory. Study of value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market structures, with special reference to the contribution of modern economic theorists.
Econ. 408-3. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. National income and employment theory. Emphasis on national income analysis, contemporary theories of consumption, investment, and employment.
Econ. 409-3. History of Economic Thought. Survey of the development of economic thought from ancient to modern times.
Econ. 410-3. Radical Political Economy. An introduction to modern radical economics, emphasizing Marxian critiques of capitalism: Marx's theory of capitalist development; contemporary analyses and majors in economics; others by consent of instructor.) Designed to give seniors a chance to evaluate critically some practical or theoretical problems under supervision, and to present results of their thinking to fellow students and instructors for critical evaluation.
Econ. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required.
Fiscal and Monetary Theory and Policy;
Public Finance
Econ. 411-3. Monetary and Banking Systems. Survey of major monetary and financial institutions, such as commercial banks, Federal Reserve System, and savings institutions, and the structure of debt from the standpoint of how their operation affects the money supply and its circulation.
Econ. 412-3. Monetary Theory and Policy. Theories of inflation and deflation and their effects upon economic growth and prosperity. Goals of monetary policy; problems involved in trying to achieve these goals; survey of some recent monetary policies in action.
Econ. 421-3. Public Finance I. Taxation, public expenditures, debts, and fiscal policy. Role of public finance in times of peace and war. National, state, and local taxation, with some special attention to the state of Colorado.
Econ. 422-3. Public Finance II. Continuation of Public Finance I. Either course may be taken separately.
International Economics and Economic Development
Econ. 441-2. International Trade and Finance. Theories of interregional and international trade, private and public trade, world population and resources, tariffs, and commercial policy. International economic organization.
Econ. 477-3. Economic Development—Theory and Problems i.
Theoretical and empirical analysis of problems of economic development in both underdeveloped and advanced countries. Econ. 478-3. Economic Development—Theory and Problems II.
Current conditions of economic development, with emphasis on accelerating and maintaining growth.
Econ. 487-3. Economic Development of Latin America. Current problems of economic development in Latin America.
Econ. 489-3. The Economics of Africa and the Middle East.
Current problems of development faced by African and Middle
Eastern economies. Emphasis on case studies, regionalism, planning, and ramification of economic change.
Economic History, Systems, and Institutions
Econ. 250 and 251. See Introductory Courses section.
Econ. 451-3. Economic History of Europe. Evolution of industrial society with emphasis upon the growth and development of English industry and commerce.
Econ. 452-3. Economic History of the United States. American economic organization and institutions and their development from colonial times to the present.
Econ. 471-2. Comparative Economic Systems. Critical study of socialism, capitalism, communism, and other proposed economic systems, emphasizing comparative studies of communist economics.
Human Resources Economics and Labor Economics
Econ. 460-3. Introduction to Human Resources. Economics of investments in man, including the economics of poverty and the application of cost benefit analysis to social welfare programs.
Econ. 461-3. Labor Economics. Study of problems associated with determination of wages, hours, and working conditions in the American economy. History and analysis of economic effects of trade unionism and other social institutions, including agencies of formal government. Introduction to manpower studies.
Econ. 462-3. Economics of Collective Bargaining. Scientific analysis of processes by which labor and management democratically reach agreements; how differences between labor and management are settled by means of grievance procedure and arbitration; and overall economic effect of collective bargaining on goods produced by the national economy. Demonstrations, workshops, and lectures.
Econ. 463-3. Income Security. Development of social insurance in various countries, with emphasis on the United States. Security in old age, unemployment, accident, sickness, and other income-loss situations. Economic analysis of costs and risks of social security; types of carriers, problems of administration. Critical examination of recent American social security legislation.
Econ. 464-3. Collective Bargaining, Labor Law, and Administration. Study of social pressures that are shaped into labor policy acceptable to labor, management, and the general public by various means of social control. Evolution of a "common law" of labor relations out of free collective bargaining and arbitration. Prer., senior status.
Government and Business; Industrial Organization
Econ. 456-3. Economics of Agriculture. Economic analysis of the agricultural sector and of problems and policies related to agriculture and other primary industries.
Econ. 469-3. Government in the Economy. Analysis of the role of government in the economy, neo-classical microeconomic theory as a point of departure for understanding what a free market system can and cannot accomplish. Prer., Econ. 403 or equivalent.
Econ. 474-3. Industrial Organization. Structure and performance of some important American manufacturing industries.
Econ. 476-3. Government Regulation of Business. Economic characteristics of public utilities and analysis of problems of regulation and control.
Urban, Regional, and Environmental Economics
Econ. 425-3. Urban Economics. Analysis of the level, distribution, stability, and growth of income and employment in urban regions. Urban poverty, housing, land use, transportation, and local public services, with special reference to economic efficiency and social progress.
Econ. 427-3. Economics of Transportation. Survey of transportation in U.S. First part of course deals with development of intercity transportation via water, rail, highway, and air. Second part deals with the urban transportation problem, comparing private and public alternatives.
Econ. 453-3. Resource Economics. Application of economic theory to resource-oriented industries.


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HISTORY
Undergraduate students majoring in history must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in history, 16 of which must be upper division. Not more than 48 hours in the student’s major area will count toward the 120-hour requirement. As of fall 1973, a student must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or better in the major to graduate.
A history major may fulfill his lower division course requirements through any one of the following three options:
1. Hist. 101 and 102;
2. Any two 200-level courses in Ancient, European, African, or Asian history;
3. Either Hist. 101 or 102, plus one 200-level course in Ancient, European, African, or Asian history;
4. Hist. 150, plus either Soc. Sci. 210 or 211;
5. Hist. 150, plus any 200-level course in American or Latin American history;
6. Any two 200-level courses in American or Latin American history.
Hist. 101-3. History of Western Civilization I. Contributions of Greek thought; Roman and Christian elements in early European civilization; rise of Islam; feudalism; conflict of papacy and empire; medieval learning, literature, and art; rise of dynastic states; the Reformation; the age of discovery; thought and culture in the early modern period.
Hist. 102-3. History of Western Civilization II. Scientific revolution; French absolutism and English constitutionalism, theory, and practice; rise of Russia and Prussia; the Enlightenment; French Revolution and spread of Liberalism and Nationalism; evolution of an industrial society; Romanticism and Realism; the unification of Italy and Germany; Imperialism; the age of World Wars; Totalitarianism; contemporary European philosophy, art and science.
Hist. 150-3. Introduction to United States History. Survey of American history from colonial times to the 1960s. Emphasis on the major forces and events that have shaped American society.
Hist. 215-3. Afro-American History I. Major emphasis on the events that have occurred in the life of the Afro-American from the time of his first landing in the U.S. to the present.
Hist. 216-3. Afro-American History II. Continuation of Hist. 215. Hist. 250-3. Topics in American History. Topical approach to American history, surveying the major forces that have affected the development of the United States and treating each topic as a complete unit. Suggested background: Hist. 150.
Hist. 258-3. History of Colorado.
Hist. 271-3. History of the Modern Far East I. An introduction to Asian civilization. Focus on Japan, China, and Southeast Asia in the 19th century.
Hist. 272-3. History of the Modern Far East II. Asia in world affairs. Focus on Japan, China, and Southeast Asia in the 20th century. Hist. 281-3. History of Latin America I. An introduction to Latin civilization in America. Focus on period before independence.
Hist. 282-3. History of Latin America II. Latin America since Independence. Focus on Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.
Hist. 384-3. History of the Mexican Americans in Colorado. A
history of the Mexican American experience in Colorado with emphasis on 20th century urbanization, especially within the Denver metropolitan area.
Hist. 395-3. Problems in African History; The Novelist’s Perspective.
Hist. 405-3. The New South. 1876 to present. The South since the era of Reconstruction to the present.
Hist. 406-3. History of the British Empire/Commonwealth.
Analysis of development, administration, and dissolution of the empire.
Hist. 422-3. The Second World War. Basically a military-political orientation, examining the grand strategy, diplomacy, and campaigns of the war in some detail. Emphasizes the influence of technology upon the conflict.
Hist. 423-3. Europe During the Renaissance. Social and
intellectual history of Europe from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Hist. 424-3. Europe During the Reformation. Social and
intellectual history of Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries.
Hist. 430-3. France Since 1815. A topical approach to the evolution of modern France. The topics are essentially political, economic, and cultural.
Hist. 431-3. Nineteenth Century Europe. Social and economic change in the political and intellectural context between 1789 and 1914. Suggested background, Hist. 102.
Hist. 432-3. Twentieth Century Europe. Social and economic change in the political and intellectual context between 1914 and 1970. Suggested background, Hist. 102.
Hist. 437-3. International History of Europe in the 19th Century.
The diplomatic process, major crises, leading personalities, interaction between domestic and foreign policies, reflections on causes and consequences of war. Suggested background, Hist. 102 or 431.
Hist. 438-3. International History of Europe in the 20th Century.
International organization and traditional diplomacy. The Versailles settlement, the rise of revisionist powers, causes of World War II, wartime diplomacy, the Cold War, and decline of Europe's position in the world. Suggested background, Hist. 102 or 432.
Hist. 441-3. History of Africa to 1840. Part I of a two-semester sequence introducing the student to political, economic, and cultural change in Africa.
Hist. 442-3. History of Africa From 1840. Part II of a two-semester sequence introducing the student to political, economic, and cultural change in Africa.
Hist. 445-3. Social and Economic Change in African History. An
examination of change in African life. Emphasis on new directions in commerce, agriculture, labor, religion, family structure, and urbanization.
Hist. 446-3. History of Ireland. Analysis of the relationship between the English and the Irish from the Irish perspective.
Hist. 449-3. The Gilded Age: U.S. History 1865-1900. A study of the evolution and growth of major American institutions since the Civil War. Topics will include the rise of heavy industry, the growth of the city, emergence of “big politics," changes in religion, social thought, manners and morals, and many others.
Hist. 450-3. A Political History of Africa. An analysis of the variety of political units in Africa and the ways in which they have changed. Hist. 453-3. Civil War and Reconstruction. Focuses on events leading to the outbreak of war, the war itself and its impact on North and South, and the efforts to reconstruct Southern society during the post-war period.
Hist. 454-3. The Progressive Movement and After, 1900-1929.
Domestic affairs and foreign policy. In domestic affairs, emphasis on the Progressive Movement and the reaction against it in the twenties. In foreign affairs, emphasis on slowly increasing but reluctant participation in world power politics.
Hist. 456-3. The Jacksonian Era. Study of a period of change and conflict. Emphasis on conditions that produced striking alterations in the social, psychological, and economic organization of the United States, as well as violence and war.
Hist. 460-3. Mexican American Southwest. The history of Mexican Americans from the origins of the Aztec Empire to modern times. Emphasis on the fusion of Spanish and Indian cultures in Mexico and the Southwest, the development of Mexican American society, and its relations to American society.
Hist. 463-3. American Society and Thought to 1865. Analysis of social ideas since 1865, and the impact of these ideas on American society.
Hist. 464-3. American Society and Thought Since 1865. Analysis of social ideas since 1865, and the impact of these ideas on American society.


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Hist. 465-3. U.S. in Depression and War, 1929-1952. An examination in some detail of the main trends in both domestic and foreign affairs in U.S. history during this period. Emphasis upon the New Deal, World War II, and emergence of the Cold War. Suggested background, Hist. 454.
Hist. 466-3. The Age of Affluence and Anxiety: The U.S. Since 1948. Examination of major patterns in U.S. history since World War II, looked at from an historical perspective. Includes the U.S.-Communist international confrontation and the growth of an increasingly affluent but anxiety-ridden American society. Suggested background, Hist. 465.
Hist. 467-3. Diplomatic History of the United States to 1900. The
development of American foreign policy, emphasizing the evolution of the basic policy of isolation from European affairs and increasing involvement in the Pacific and East Asia.
Hist. 468-3. Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1900.
The conflict between isolationism and internationalism in American foreign policy, ending in the triumph of the latter. Suggested background, Hist. 467.
Hist. 470-3. History of Urban America. Development of the American city from colonial times to the present. The chief focus of the course will be upon major changes in the process of urbanization. Subjects will include town promotion, rise of heavy industrial cities, utopian towns, emergence of the city “boss,” urban transportation, and the future of American cities.
Hist. 473-3. History of Ch ina. Deals with traditional China covering a period from the “beginning” to the mid-19th century. Both descriptive and interpretive approaches are employed, concentrating on these “factors” (intellectual, social, political, technological, economic,ef a/.) involved in the development of the Chinese civilization. In the attempt to understand the problems and challenges confronting the Chinese, it is hoped that the course will provide an appreciation for the Chinese and Chinese history and their relationship to our own world. Hist. 474-3. History of China. A combination of descriptive material with a broad analytical base is applied to an investigation of the emergence and development of modern China. The aim of the course is to both sketch and analyze the dimensions of the “Chinese crisis” compounded of dynastic and Imperial collapse, imperialist incursions, social, political, and intellectual re-orientation, the plight of a people ravaged by poverty, oppression, and war, and the dramatic reshaping of 20th-century China caught in the throes of national and social revolution.
Hist. 476-3. History of Japan in the Modern Age.
Hist. 479-3. United States Military History to 1900. Development of the military and naval art of war in American history, in both its peacetime and wartime aspects, from colonial times to the end of the Spanish-American war. Emphasizing the increasing influence of technology on warfare after 1850.
Hist. 480-3. United States Military History Since 1900. American military and naval history since the Spanish-American War, presented as a continuing evolution in both war and peace and emphasizing the dominating influence of technology upon operations, organization, and policies.
Hist. 481-3. Mexico and Central America Since Independence I.
Study of society, economics, and politics in the 19th century.
Hist. 482-3. Mexico and Central America Since Independence II.
Study of society, economics, and politics in the 20th century.
Hist. 486-3. The Old South and National Disunion. Early development of the southern Untied States, the institution of slavery, and the sectional conflict leading to national disunion.
Hist. 487-3. History of Colonialism in Southern Africa. Analysis of European and Asian communities in Africa: their origins and development and their relations with the indigenous African population.
Hist. 489-3. The Modern Near East, 1789 to the Present. Emphasis on the modernization of the region from Egypt through Persia, Anatolia, and Arabia, not only in political terms, but also in terms of the economic, social, and intellectual changes which have transformed the Near East in the last century and a half.
Hist. 494-3. Imperial Russia. The Old Regime, industrialization, and culture in the 19th century.
Hist. 495-3. The Russian Revolution. Origins of the revolutionary movement, and Revolution of 1905, reform efforts, the impact of World War i, the Bolshevik victory in 1917, the Civil Wars.
Hist. 496-3. The Soviet Regime. Rise of Stalin, economic development 1928-1938, impact of World War II, the Khrushchev era.
Hist. 498-3. Senior Colloquium. Readings and discussion of eminent modern historians and their writings. Recommended but not required for senior history majors.
Hist. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours in political science, of which at least 21 semester hours must be in upper division courses. Courses must be distributed among the primary fields as listed in this bulletin, i.e., American government and politics, comparative politics, international relations, public administration, and political theory and public law. The major must include the following: Pol. Sci. 100, 110, 200, 440, and 441; Econ. 201 and 202; and one upper division course in each of the primary fields of political science except public administration. In addition, it is strongly recommended that all majors enroll for Pol. Sci. 202.
For all courses numbered 300 and above, the prerequisite, unless otherwise indicated, is either the Pol. Sci. 100-110 sequence or consent of the instructor.
American Government and Politics
Pol.Sci. 100-3. Introduction to Political Science. Introduction to the study of politics and the political system and its environment. Designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts of political science, features of the political process, types of political institutions, and political behavior. Required of all majors.
Pol.Sci. 110-3. The American Political System. General introduction to the American political system with emphasis upon the interrelations among the various levels and branches of government, formal and informal institutions, processes, and behavior. Required of all majors. Prer., Pol.Sci. 100. Not open to those who have had Pol.Sci. 101 and/or 102.
Pol.Sci. 200-3. Research in Contemporary Political Topics.
Application of basic political concepts to current political problems. Emphasis on the relationship between theories of political action and empirical tests of these theories. Prer., Pol.Sci. 100.
Pol.Sci. 210-3. Power in American Society. Who has power in the United States; how it is distributed and used; sources of power and legitimacy; checks and potential checks on decision making by the powerful; consequences of power allocation and use for citizen well-being; continuity and change in the structure of power in America. Prer., Pol.Sci. 110 or consent of instructor.
Pol.Sci. 400-3. Government Regulation of Business.
Consideration of theory and practice of government relationship to business and professional activity on both state and national levels. Analysis of selected regulatory programs and policies (Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federal Trade Commission Act) and thier impact on the constitutional system.
Pol.Sci. 402-3. Legislatures and Legislation. Structure and organization of legislatures and process of statute lawmaking; political forces and interest groups; problems of representation and the public interest.
Pol.Sci. 403-3. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. History and practice of party politics in the United States. Nature, structure,


44/ University of Colorado at Denver
organization, and functions of political parties and pressure groups. Analysis of pressure politics and political behavior.
Pol.Sci. 405-3. Public Opinion and Political Behavior. Theories of public opinion and propaganda; the formation, management, and measurement of political attitudes; behavior of men and groups in politics, especially Americans. Systematic consequences of political attitudes.
Pol.Sci. 406-3. State Government and Administration.
Present-day national, state and interstate relations; constitutional development; legislative, executive, and judicial processes and problems; administrative organization and reorganization; state finances; major state services; future of the states. Special attention to the government of Colorado.
Pol.Sci. 407-3. Urban Politics. Examination of the structure of political and social influence in urban areas; selection of urban leadership; relationship of the political system to governmental and social institutions.
Pol.Sci. 408-3. Municipal Government and Administration.
Municipalities and their relations to the states and the national government; local politics; forms of municipal government; application of ideas and techniques of public administration to management of municipal affairs; activities of cities, e.g., planning, public utilities, law enforcement, and tire protection.
Pol.Sci. 409-3. Comparative Metropolitan Systems. Comparative analysis of the major metropolitan systems in different countries; the structural environment, decision making in the bureaucracies and political groupings, governmental interaction and communication. Pol.Sci. 451-3. Black Politics. Examination of black politics in the United States: the role of black interest groups, structure and functions of black political organizations, goals and political styles of black politicians, trends and the future of black politics in the United States.
See also Pol. Sci. 435 and 439 listed under Public Administration.
Comparative Politics
Pol.Sci. 201-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics I: Technological Societies. Comparison of legal-institutional features; social, economic, and ideological forces; and patterns of recruitment and decision making; patterns of political-system maintenance and change.
Pol.Sci. 202-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics II: Pretechnological Societies. Comparison of the basic political features of the economically developing polities within the non-Western world. The traditional political culture, nationalism, political integration, political structures, political groups in developing societies, modes of political recruitment, the style of development politics and political implications of planned socioeconomic change; evolution and revolution in the third world.
Pol. Sci. 409-3. Comparative Metropolitan Systems. Comparative analysis of the major metropolitan systems in different countries; the structural environment, decision-making in the bureaucracies and political groupings, governmental interaction and communication.
Pol.Sci. 410-3. Advanced Comparative Politics—Western Europe. An intensive and comparative analysis of the political systems and processes of Western Europe. Emphasis on political culture and constitutionalism; executive-legislative relationships: electoral systems; political parties and interest groups; administrative and judicial processes; and the impact of social changes on political institutions. Prer., Pol. Sci. 201 or consent of instructor.
Pol.Sci. 411-3. Advanced Comparative Politics—Third World. An intensive comparative examination of the political process in the non-Western world. Survey of different methodological approaches to the study of the non-Western political systems. The components of political development. Effective political units in a transitional society. Prevailing "styles” of political action, including the use of violence. Pol.Sci. 413-3. Political Behavior and Political Systems in Latin America. Governments and politics of selected countries of Latin America. Politics and government in theory and practice. Political parties, movements, and conflicts. The relationships between political problems and physical and social environments.
Pol.Sci. 415-3. Political Systems of the Middle East and North Africa. Comparative analysis of the major parameters of the political process in the Middle East and North Africa. Islamic political theory and its contemporary manifestation. The role of nationalism and the “quest for modernity" in the political development of this region. Parties and programmed modernization in transitional polities. Violent and nonviolent change.
Pol.Sci. 416-3. Politics and Government of East Asia. Political and governmental changes within China, Japan, and Korea from the 19th century to the present. Primary emphasis on contemporary political systems and sociopolitical problems.
Pol.Sci. 418-3. Politics of Southeast Asia. Impact of the West on political theory and institutions in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Constitutions, political parties, movements, and conflicts. Influence of geographical, economic, and social factors on the political systems in each country. Pol.Sci. 419-3. Political Systems of Sub-Saharan Africa. Analysis of major types of political systems in sub-Saharan Africa and intensive case studies of selected countries exemplifying each type. Anticolonial movement, adoption and rejection of Western political institutions and values. Special political problems of multiracial and multicultural societies.
Pol.Sci. 460-3. Politics of South Asia. Study of the political and administrative systems of India, Pakistan, Ceylon, and Nepal. Impact of British rule on development of political institutions on subcontinent as well as problems of political development at all levels.
International Relations
Pol.Sci. 421-3. International Politics. The system of national states, concepts of national interest, goals of foreign policies, conduct of diplomacy, and the bearing of these elements on the problem of peace. Presentation and evaluation of the solutions that have been offered for the maintenance of peace. Great powers and regions of the earth in international politics today, and their roles in international tensions.
Pol.Sci. 423-3. American Foreign Policy. Examination of the foundations, assumptions, objectives, and methods of U.S. foreign policy. Special attention to the revolutionary international environment and to adaptations thereto.
Pol.Sci. 428-3. International Behavior. Presentation of alternate theoretical frameworks for the explanation of international processes. Theories of conflict behavior and social organization applied to problems of war and peace. Major emphasis on the role of systematic empirical research in the development of theories of international behavior.
Pol.Sci. 472-3. Soviet and Chinese Foreign Policy. Foreign policies of the Soviet Union and of Communist China, including Sino-Soviet conflict; including the international Communist movement, its ideological bases, impact on international politics, and its relations to domestic developments in the U.S.S.R.
Pol.Sci. 473-3. The Middle East and World Affairs. Evolution and revolution in the Middle East. The character of nationalism in the area. Analysis of intraregional and international problems affecting the Middle East with special emphasis on the Arab-lsraeli imbroglio. Impact of major-power intervention.
Pol. Sci. 474-3. Sub-Saharan Africa in World Affairs. An examination of the international behavior of the new Africa. Includes preindependence antecedents and post-independence determinants, motives, techniques, and results of African state relations in the inter-African and world-wide settings. Impact of major-power intervention. Pol.Sci. 475-3. Africa in U.S. Foreign Policy. Examination of historical background, assumptions, objectives, methods, and results of U.S. policy toward black Africa. Special attention to areas under foreign or minority rule, ethnic factors, potency of economic and political variables, and stresses between alliance policy and sympathy for self-determination.
Pol.Sci. 476-3. International Relations in the Far East.
Developments and problems in the modern-day relations of China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and the Western powers. The Far East in world politics today.
Pol.Sci. 477-3. Latin America in World Politics. Basic elements in Latin American international relations. United States-Latin American


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences/45
relations and policies. Foreign policy formulation in major Latin American republic.
Public Administration
Pol. Sci. 406 and 408 may be used by majors in political science to satisfy the requirement in the field of public administration.
Pol.Sci. 432-3. Public Administration. Role of administration in government; trends in American public administration; techniques of management; theories of public administration.
Pol.Sci. 435-3. Natural Resources: Policy and Administration.
Resources in the American economy; consideration of constitutional, political, and geographic factors in the development of resources policy; organization, procedures, and programs for administration and development of natural resources.
Pol.Sci. 437-3. Public Financial Administration. Governmental fiscal policy, administrative organization for fiscal administration in governmental units, revenue administration, budgeting, preaudit and postaudit, treasury management and debt administration, purchasing, financial reporting. Economic sources of political corruption.
Pol.Sci. 439-3. National Policies and Administration. Major policies and programs of the national government and their administration; the role of the President and other administrators in formulating public policy; problems of centralization and public accountability.
Political Theory and Public Law
Pol.Sci. 420-3. Theories of Social and Political Change.
Conservative, radical, and incremental approaches to change. Role of psychological and sociological factors in political change. Comparative perspectives on change. Self-perpetuation processes of power systems and their vulnerabilities. Requisites of system maintenance and system change. Selected case studies.
Pol.Sci. 440-3. Early Political Thought. Main currents of political thought in their historical setting from Plato to the 17th century, with a critical evaluation of those elements of continuing worth.
Pol.Sci. 441-3. Modern Political Thought. Main currents of political thought in their historical setting from 17th century to the present. Pol.Sci. 440 is not a prerequisite for Pol.Sci. 441.
Pol.Sci. 443-3. Jurisprudence. Origins of modern legal institutions and role of law in society throughout the ages. Contrast between Anglo-American and legal systems stemming from the Roman Law. Law cases are studied only insofar as they mirror historical and sociological developments.
Pol. Sci. 445-3. American Political Thought. History and development of American political theories and ideas from colonial period to present.
Pol.Sci. 446-3. Administrative Law. General nature of administrative law, types of administrative action and enforcement, analysis of rulemaking adjudication, administrative due process, judicial review.
Pol.Sci. 447-3. Constitutional Law I. Nature and scope of the following American constitutional principles as developed by the U.S. Supreme Court: federalism, jurisdiction of the federal courts, separation of powers, the taxing power, and the commerce power. Case method.
Pol. Sci. 449-3. American Judicial System. Examination of the principal actors in the legal system: police, lawyers, judges, citizens. About half of the course will be devoted to the study of judicial behavior, especially at the Supreme Court level.
Pol.Sci. 490-3. Revolution and Political Violence. Study, discussion, and evaluation of alternative frameworks for the analysis of revolution and political violence. The theoretical material will be firmly couched in case situations such as western, class, colonial, urban, international, historical, racial, religious, and intergenerational violence. Development by the class of its own theoretical model.
General Courses in Political Science
Pol.Sci. 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Intended to give an opportunity for advanced students with good scholastic records, and with appropriate courses completed, to pursue independently the study of some subject of special interest to them. Subjects chosen and arrangements made to suit the needs of each student. Primarily for seniors. Prer., 15 semester hours in political science and consent of instructor.
SOCIOLOGY
Majors in sociology are required to complete 30 hours in sociology with a grade of C or better. Of these hours, 16 must be upper division. Max num in the major is 48 hours. A maximum of 6 hours ot social science credit may be counted toward the major in sociology. As no fixed sequence of courses is prescribed, it is recommended and expected that students will select an adviser from the sociology faculty to help them develop their programs. This is particularly important for those intending to do graduate work in sociology.
Soc. 111-3. Introduction to Sociology. Sociology as a science; man and culture; social groups; social institutions; social interactions; social change.
Soc. 128-3. Race and Minority Problems. Race and racism; facts and myths about great populations, including psychological, social, and cultural sources of bias and discrimination.
Soc. 129-3. The Negro in American Life and History. Examination of the myth and the reality of the Negro in America since the colonial period.
Soc. 191-3. Contemporary Social Issues. Introductory consideration of some 30 current social controversies, such as democracy, capitalism, race and ethnic groups, marriage, the family, crime, international tensions, and world order. Designed to improve the student's ability to understand current debate and to formulate opinions for himself.
Soc. 192-3. Contemporary Social Issues. Continuation of Soc. 191.
Soc. 199-variable credit. Independent Study in Sociology.
Consent of instructor required.
Soc. 221-3. Elementary Population Studies. Elements of demography, natality, mortality, international and internal migration, population growth, population policy.
Soc. 222-3. Human Ecology. Ecological organization and processes in urban, rural, and regional areas.
Soc. 239-3. Mass Society. Study of the emergence of modern society. Emphasis on the role of masses and of separated and isolated individuals who lack unifying values and purposes.
Soc. 246-3. Introduction to Social Psychology. Survey of the following varieties of social psychology: psychoanalysis, symbolic interactionism, culture and personality, structural-functionalism, and psychological social psychology. Topics treated on the introductory level.
Soc. 248-3. Social Movements. Social bases and development features of such modern social and political movements as communism, socialism, liberalism, and conservatism.
Soc. 250-3. Social Problems and Social Change. Sociological analysis of problems resulting from recent social changes including occupational shifts and the redefinition of work, adolescent roles and responses, the massification of education, public responses to crime, deliquency, and mental illness, race and minority relations, community disorganization, and the effects of population growth and redistribution on underdeveloped areas. Emphasis on the development of concepts and theoretical propositions for problem analysis.
Soc. 255-3. Analysis of Modern Society. Examination of various sociological views of modern society including those of Lundberg, Richardson, Mills, Riesman, Goffman, Sorokin, Cohen, and others.


461 University of Colorado at Denver
Soc. 315-3. History of Sociological Thought I. Major social theorists from early times to date, including Aristotle, Plato, Machiavelli, Comte, Spencer.
Soc. 316-3. History of Sociological Thought II. Continuation of Soc. 315. Prer., Soc. 315.
Soc. 317-3. Statistics. Quantitative techniques used in analyzing social phenomena. Prer., Math. 107 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Soc. 409-3. Undergraduate Research Practicum. Practical experience for undergraduates in application of principles of research design and data processing to a social research problem selected by the instructor.
Soc. 417-3. Research Methods. Design of social research. Application of statistical techniques and procedures to social phenomena. Prer., Soc. 317 or consent of instructor.
Soc. 421-3. Advanced Population Studies. The sociological importance of population study. Advanced demographic analysis and population theory. Natality, mortality, problems of population growth and international and internal migrations, population policy, and aspects of population planning and control.
Soc. 424-3. Migration. World migration patterns. Migration examined as an effect and as an influence. Planned and unplanned migration.
Soc. 426-3. Urban Sociology. The city in terms of its social structure, residential and institutional patternings, processes of interaction, demographic processes, and patterns of growth and change.
Soc. 433-3. Communities. Review and appraisal of community studies.
Soc. 443-3. Technology and Modernization. Description and analysis of changing social structure and social relationships as a response to technological innovation and change.
Soc. 444-3. Social Stratification. Status, social mobility, and class in selected societies; elites and leadership problems.
Soc. 446-3. Persons in Society. The self in society—socialization, presentation of self and identity, social types, roles, and careers in historical situations. Persons in theories of social organization and action.
Soc. 449-3. Social Control. Informal and formal regulative processes in social behavior, with reference to techniques and processes of social control, such as propaganda, the political order, and other institutions.
Soc. 451-3. Social Institutions. Organized system of practices and social roles developed about values. Machinery evolved to regulate the practices and behavior of family, church, government, economy, recreation, education.
Soc. 453-3. Social Change. Process of change in Western society and its effects on the individual, the family, and economic and political institutions. Attention to extremist response to tensions produced by rapid social change in America. Historical analysis of the causes of Western development as a context in which to study the factors aiding and impeding the modernization of the emerging nations.
Soc. 454-3. Social Mobility. Status, occupational, and income change examined from viewpoints of individual, organization, and society as a whole. Mobility theories proposed by Sorokin, Rogoff, Lenski, Svalastoga, Lipset, and Duncan. Special attention to methods of analyzing change, comparative social mobility, and status equilibration.
Soc. 455-3. Sociology of the Family. The family as a social institution. Historized development and contemporary cross-cultural analysis with emphasis on the contemporary American family.
Soc. 458-3. Contemporary American Social Movements.
Examination of contemporary social movements and bases of cleavage and conflict in contemporary America. Radical Right and New Left, civil rights, and student activism studied in the light of contemporary social facts and their historical roots.
Soc. 467-3. Sociology of Education. Sociological study of the techniques of education. Classroom procedures, school administration, educators’ roles, and reciprocal relations of school and community.
Soc. 470-3. Sociology of Law. Consideration of the formulation, interpretation, and legitimacy of legal rules within a context of social organization.
Soc. 477-3. The Sociology of Work. The analysis of work in a variety of organizational settings with an emphasis on the changing meanings of work. Concern is also directed to the interrelationships of the work and the non-work world.
Soc. 478-3. Industrial Sociology. The way in which the factory and the community influence sociological aspects of industrial relations. Soc. 479-3. Large-Scale Organization. Analysis of sociological theories of bureaucracy and inquiry into bureaucratic developments in governmental, industrial, military, and welfare institutions.
Soc. 490-3. Senior Seminar. Seminar for senior sociology majors considering important concepts, issues, and problems in sociology.
Soc. 495-3. Criminology. Nature and causes of crime as a social phenomenon. Processes of making laws, breaking laws, and reaction toward the breaking of laws. Cultural significance of the processes of determining the reactions of the community to offenders of the law; theory of practice of punishment; purposes, uniformity, and similarities of the kinds of disposition. Sociological concepts are used in this area—culture, mores, institutions, competition, conflict, social change, and social control.
Soc. 496-3. Juvenile Delinquency. Factors involved in delinquent behavior. Problems of adjustment of delinquents and factors in treatment and in post-treatment adjustment.
Soc. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required.
Social Science
These courses can satisfy, in part, the area requirement in the social sciences.
Soc.Sci. 210-3. The Study of Man in Society I. An integrated introduction to concepts and methods of the social sciences as they apply to analysis of societal contexts and analyses of societies at given times.
Soc. Sci. 211-3. The Study of Man in Society II. Continuation of Soc.Sci. 210. Emphasis on processes in society—social and cultural change and evolution, industrialization, urbanization, and other dynamic institutions.
Soc.Sci. 305-3. Education and Culture in Historical Perspective.
An analysis of the interaction of culture and education in Western society since the Renaissance.
Soc. Sci. 320-3. The Legal Process. Nature of legal reasoning and metnoas or legal development. Reciprocal relations of law with political philosophy and ethics. Materials drawn from both public and private law.
Soc.Sci. 321-3. The American Indian and Federal Law. In
comparison with other citizens, what has been and is the legal status of American Indians? The objectives of this course are to survey a special status as set forth in Federal law, to identify its problems, costs and benefits to Native Americans, and to acquaint course participants with applications and politics of the law through the study of actual case materials.
Soc.Sci. 324-3. The Consumer and the Law. A study of the rights of the consumer when dealing with corporations, unions, and government agencies.
Soc.Sci. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto I. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the Black, disadvantaged community.
Soc. Sci. 326-3. Pathology of the Ghetto II. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the black, disadvantaged community-
Soc.Sci. 327-3. Comparative Urban Cultures. Emphasis on historical background and social concerns of diverse cultural and ethnic groups which constitute the modern American city.
Soc.Sci. 329-3. The Asian Americans. An investigation of the historical, social, and psychological identity of the Asian Americans and their communities in the United States.
Soc.Sci. 335-3. Women in a Changing World. Offers an understanding of the historical, economic, and sociocultural background of women's changing roles and function in the contemporary world. The approach and material to be used are multidisciplinary. The goal is to reach a balanced understanding through analysis and discussion based on objective information.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences/47
Soc. Sci. 398-variable credit. Cooperative Education. Designed experiences involving application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations. Prer., sophomore standing and 2.5 grade-point average.
Soc.Sci. 402-3. Economic and Political Determinants in a Health Care System. (Health Ad. 602.) Designed to acquaint the student with the health care industry, in terms of both the organization and delivery of health care services and the socioeconomic consequences of those services.
Soc.Sci. 410-3. Business and Government. (B.Ad. 410.) The study of government regulation of the business systems. Topics include regulation of business concentration, markets for labor, money, other resources and final products. Prer., Econ. 201-202, Pol.Sci. 110. Soc.Sci. 411-3. Business and Society. (B.Ad. 411.) Examination of the interrelations between business, society, and the environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socio-economic-business system, current public policy, issues and social responsibility, and ethics. Prer., Econ. 201-202, Pol.Sci. 110, Soc. 111.
Soc.Sci. 438-3. World Politics in the 1970s. A study of great power politics, the role of the United Nations organization, and select crisis situations in the contemporary period.
Soc.Sci. 450-3. Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis. The course will focus on a contemporary problem confronting Metropolitan Denver.
URBAN STUDIES MAJOR
All students majoring in urban studies will be expected to meet the following course requirements:
1. Soc. Sci. 210 and 211, The Study of Man in Society I and II.
2. Four of the following five upper division courses: Urban Economics (Econ. 425); Urban History (Hist. 470); Urban Politics (Pol. Sci. 407); Urban Anthropology (Anthro. 444); and Advanced Population Studies (Soc. 421).
3. Any two of the following six minority studies courses: The Chicano Community and Community Organization (M. AM. 360); Contemporary Mexican American I (M. AM. 127); Black Behavioral Analysis I or II (BI.ST. 203 or 204); Religion and the Black Man (Bl.St. 223); The Asian Americans (Soc. Sci. 329); and Undergraduate Seminar in American Indian Education (Soc. Sci. 391).
4. In addition, each student must successfully complete the Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis (Soc. Sci. 450). This course will focus upon the analysis of a single local urban problem from an interdisciplinary perspective. Extensive field work will further familiarize the student with the roles and techniques required in the analysis of urban problems and will serve to integrate in a practical applied setting theories and sources of information developed in previous academic work.
The above core program of required courses specifies a minimum of 27 of 42 units required for graduation with the urban studies major. Though a variety of options is available, the student will be permitted basically to choose 15 hours of electives from the following courses:
Anthropology
Anthro. 310-3. Cultural Pluralism
Anthro. 416-3. Ecology, Adaptation, and Culture
Anthro. 443-3. Economic Anthropology
Anthro. 451 -3. Applied Cultural Anthropology
Anthro. 456-3. Contemporary American Indian Cultures
Anthro. 459-3. Comparative Social Organization Anthro. 481-3. Language and Culture
Economics
Econ. 427-3. Transportation Economics Econ. 453-3. Resource Economics Econ. 460-3. Introduction to Human Resources Econ. 461-3. Labor Economics Econ. 463-3. Income Security
Econ. 492-variable credit. Special Economic Problems History
Hist. 465-3. History of American Economic Growth I Hist. 466-3. History of American Economic Growth II
Politiceil Science
Pol. Sci. 403-3. Political Parties and Pressure Groups I Pol. Sci. 408-3. Municipal Government and Administration Pol. Sci. 409-3. Comparative Metropolitan Systems Pol. Sci. 451-3. Black Politics
Sociology
Soc. 317-3. Statistics
Soc. 417-3. Research Methods
Soc. 424-3. Migration
Soc. 426-3. Urban Sociology
Soc. 433-3. Communities
Soc. 444-3. Stratification
Soc. 446-3. Persons in Society
Soc. 478-3. Industrial Organization
Soc. 479-3. Large Scale Organization
Soc. 495-3. Criminology
Soc. 496-3. Juvenile Delinquency
Communication and Theatre
C. T. 315-3. Discussion Group
C. T. 423-3. Group Communication Theory
Geography
Geog. 402-3. Geography and Populations Geog. 407-3. Location Analysis of Human Activities
Philosophy
Phil. 424-3. Philosophical Problems and Contemporary Culture Psychology
Psych. 440-3. Social Psychology Psych. 493-3. Industrial Psychology
Civil Engineering
C. E. 340-2. City Planning
C. E. 442-4. Municipal Design
C. E. 448-3. Introduction to Environmental Pollution
Black Studies
Bl. St. 115-3. Law and Minorities
Bl. St. 215-3 or 216-3. Afro-American History I or II
Bl. St. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto
Bl. St. 370-3. Culture, Racism, and Alienation
Bl. St. 412-3. Civil Rights
Mexican American Studies
M. AM. 300-3. The Chicano Movement
M. AM. 405-3. Intergroup Relations
Native American Studies
N. AM. 472-3. North American Indian Art
Social Science
Soc. Sci. 398-variable credit. Cooperative Education


481 University of Colorado at Denver
Ethnic Programs
Programs for minority groups were established on the Denver Campus in 1969. Since then the quality and scope of these programs have expanded greatly. Courses are presently offered in Asian American, Black, Mexican American, and Native American Studies.
Student organizations provide assistance with recruiting, counseling, personal guidance, and tutoring; financial help is available through grants and the Work-Study Program.
ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
ANDREW G. WILLIAMS, Director
Soc.Sci. 329-3. The Asian Americans. Examines the experience of Asian Americans from a sociological perspective. Emphasizes analysis of activities and problems. The history of the groups is reviewed and the contemporary situation in their communities receives attention. Class is structured around lecture/discussion, reading materials, speakers, films, and field trips. Students have the opportunity to work on projects related to Asian American communities and peoples.
Soc.Sci. 330-3. Topics on Asian Americans. Examines specific topics on Asian Americans to be selected by the instructor and the students. Detailed study of subjects related to the Asian American experience and communities.
BLACK STUDIES
CECIL E. GLENN, Director
Bl.St. 110-3. Black Contemporary Social Issues. Designed to expose the student to those areas of intellectual, social, cultural, economic, political, and educational concerns relevant to the Afro-American experience. Principally an introductory survey of primary issues currently affecting the black man.
Bl.St. 112-3. Introduction to Black Studies. A course designed to acquaint new students with the history, purpose, organization, and goal of the Black Education Program.
Bl.St. 115-3. Law and Minorities. Designed to acquaint students with the legal system of American society, including contracts, buying and selling, wills and inheritance, family relations, civil wrongs, and criminal law in order to develop a cooperative relationship between the law and minorities.
Bl.St. 160-3. Economic History of Africa. A study of the black man in Africa before and after the coming of Europeans with emphasis on the economic aspect of Africa’s historical development.
Bl.St. 201-3. Swahili III. Advanced Swahili with emphasis on the development of spoken fluency and on reading contemporary Swahili materials. Prer., Swahili II. (Taught at Metropolitan State College.) Bl.St. 203-3. Behavioral Analysis I. A psychology course which deals with the interrelationships between the black individual and his social environment. Social influences upon motivation, perception, and behavior. The development and change of attitudes and opinions in the ghetto.
Bl.St. 204-3. Behavioral Analysis II. Psychological analysis of small groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena such as riots. Continuation of Bl.St. 203.
Bl.St. 210-3. Politics of Contemporary Africa I. Systematic survey of modern Africa with special emphasis on selected countries, both independent and nonindependent. Southern Africa: political impacts of racial and religious problems, stressing recent development in Rhodesia, South Africa, and the Portuguese colonies of Angola and Mozambique.
Bl.St. 215-3. Afro-American History I. Survey of the history of Afro-Americans. Study, interpretations, and analysis of major problems, issues, and trends affecting the black man from pre-slavery to the present.
Bl.St. 216-3. Afro-American History II. Continuation of Bl.St. 215.
Bl.St. 220-3. Black Social Movements. (Soc. 228.) Developmental paradigms for bl ack social movements. Differential linear movements, theories of nationalism, integration, separatism, rhetorical nationalism, and tyranny.
Bl.St. 221-3. Black Social Theory. (Soc. 229.) Historical paradigms for black social movements. Strategies and tactics of racial oppression, recurring ideology, Pan-Africanism, nationalism, civil rights, black power, and riot movements. Continuation of Bl.St. 220.
Bl.St. 223-3. Religion of the Black Man. Critical examination of the black family’s utilization of religious beliefs and practices.
Bl.St. 227-2. Interrelated Studies. An integrated study of the development of the black man in the arts, history, literature, politics, economics, etc.
Bl.St. 250-3. Capitalism and Slavery I. (Econ. 250.) The development of slavery as an American institution from 1619 to 1970, the plantation system, the growth of the slave trade, the stimulation of the American economy by slavery, the Civil War as an economic conflict between the industrialists of the North and the agriculturalists of the South.
Bl.St. 251-3. Capitalism and Slavery II. (Econ. 251.) Post-Civil War to the present, trade unions, legislation, the urban crisis, and "Black Capitalism.” Continuation of Bl.St. 250.
Bl.St. 270-3. African-American Art History I. (Fine Arts 270.) A study of black art in both Africa and the Americas; problems in depicting real life experiences of black people.
Bl.St. 271-3. African-American Art History II. (Fine Arts 271.) Continuation of Bl.St. 270.
Bl.St. 272-3. The American Writer and the Black Man I. Close reading and analysis of significant literary works by black or white American writers treating black Americans: novels, poems, plays, and essays.
Bl.St. 273-3. The American Writer and the Black Man II. Continuation of Bl.St. 272 but may be taken independently of that course. Bl.St. 274-3. Survey of Ethnic Literature. (Engl. 274.) This course is designed study of various ethnic writers as to their contributions to literature from their own particular culture with reference to their perception of life through their literary efforts.
Bl.St. 274-3. Survey of Ethnic Literature. This course is designed study of various ethnic writers as to their contributions to literature from their own particular culture with reference to their perception of life through their literary efforts.
Bl.St. 280-3. Afro-American Music History and Appreciation I. A
study of the history of black music. The African background and the influences of Europe and the Carribbean. Emphasis on Afro-American folk music.
Bl.St. 281-3. Afro-American Music History and Appreciation II.
Music since 1900—religious and secular. The development of jazz, modern rhythm, and blues today. Black musicians and their technical development. Continuation of Bl.St. 280.
Bl.St. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto. (Soc.Sci. 325.) Designed to analyze black ghetto frustration and despair as elements in urban crisis, with emphasis on possible solutions through various community agencies.
Bl.St. 326-3. (Soc.Sci. 326.) Continuation of Bl.St. 325.
Bl.St. 330-3. Law and the Black Man. A two-semester seminar which will place major emphasis on the law and legal institutions in America. Particular emphasis will be placed on the legislative and judicial functions in the struggle for civil rights. All major and U.S. Supreme Court decisions, as well as significant legislative enactments, will be examined in depth.
Bl.St. 370-3. Culture, Racism, and Alienation. Effects of racism on the individual personality of the recipient and the donor of practices evolving from participation in a racist culture.
Bl.St. 390-3. Modern African Literature I. (Engl. 390.) A survey of contemporary African literature. The main forces which have shaped modem African literature, and the crisis and conflicts of the African man and his culture in contact with these forces as they are portrayed by the African writer.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciencesl49
Bl.St. 391-3. Modern African Literature II. (Engl. 391.) Continuation of Bl.St. 390.
Bl.St. 412-3. Civil Rights and Fair Employment Practices.
Designed to give the student the necessary background to enter the field of civil rights and equal employment opportunities. Emphasis on Fair Employment Practices procedures. Field visits.
Bl.St. 434-3. Black Art and Society I. (Fine Arts 434.) A two-semester seminar dealing with black art in relationship to society. The influences of the black revolution, black culture, political thought, and integration.
Bl.St. 435-3. Black Art and Society II. (Fine Arts 435.) Continuation of Bl.St. 434.
EOP/SPECIAL SERVICES
DANNY MARTINEZ, Director
The Educational Opportunity Program/Special Services Project is concerned with the academic success of low-income, educationally disadvantaged and physically handicapped students. It provides its participants with counseling, tutoring, special curriculum, and other services designed to remedy any deficiencies or problems which the students may have. Classes offered through Special Services are restricted to students participating in the project.
M.AM. 100-3. Writing and Study Skills. Review of techniques for studying languages, science, mathematics, and other areas. Systems of note-taking, research methods (including proper use of library facilities), preparing for and taking examinations, as well as building self-confidence will be discussed.
M.AM. 102-3. Beginning Algebra and Geometry. Review of basic mathematics, including fractions and signed numbers. Includes an introduction to basic algebra. The class terminates with an introduction to basic geometry.
M.AM. 103-3. Advanced Algebra and Geometry. Students review what they learned in the beginning class and advance to a thorough study of basic geometry. In addition, students acquire skills in the use of logarithms and the slide rule.
MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
NEREYDA LUNA BOTTOMS, Director
M.AM. 100-3. Introduction to Mexican American Studies.
Required of all incoming M.A.E.P. students. Course will reveiw techniques for studying languages, science, mathematics, and other areas. Systems of notetaking, research methods (including proper use of library facilities), preparing for and taking examinations, as well as building self-confidence will be discussed.
M.AM. 111-3. Introduction to Drama: Chicano Workshop.
Designed to encourage and guide the development of student acting, directing, and playwriting, with a concentration on the specialized techniques and content of Teatro Campesino.
M.AM. 112-3. Bilingual Skills. A basic language course in which students with a background of both Spanish and English can learn the similarities as well as the differences in the two languages. Oral as well as written exercises in Spanish. Readings in Southwest folklore.
M.AM. 127-3. Contemporary Mexican American I. (Soc. 127.) An introductory sociology course in which the basic terminology of the Chicano milieu is defined and a survey made of the Chicano movement from its early manifestations to the present.
M.AM. 135-1. Beginning International Folk Dance, Spanish and Mexican. (P.E. 135.) Basic dances of Mexico and Spain: El Jarabe Tapatio; La Bamba, jotas, and paso dobles.
M.AM. 136-1. Advanced International Folk Dance, Spanish and Mexican. (P.E. 136.) An advanced course in the dances of Spain and Mexico including: jotas, paso dobles, zapateados, and huastecas, and jaranas.
M.AM. 137-3. Contemporary Mexican American II. (Soc. 137.) Continuation of M.AM. 127. A more detailed breakdown of the many facets of the Chicano movement today.
M.AM. 211-3. Contemporary Mexican Literature in Translation.
Mexican literature since Worid War I has been in the forefront of literary innovations directly reflecting the rapid progress and changes in the society. The purpose of the course is literary but serves also to dispel many false views of Mexico as a rural, traditionally conservative country.
M.AM. 212-3. Contemporary Latin American Literature in Translation. The approach is the same as in M.AM. 211. The best of the contemporary Latin American authors are studied: Borges, Fuentes, Rulfo, Carpentier, Cortazar, and others.
M.AM. 213-3. History of Chicano Art. A survey of art, indigenous as well as that with Spanish and Mexican influence. The focus on the Mexican American includes the fields of painting, sculpture, and architecture.
M.AM. 300-3. The Chicano Movement. A study of the ideas of the contemporary thinkers and leaders of today s Mexican American and the events which have shaped them.
M.AM. 302-3. Methodology of Tutoring the Educationally Disadvantaged. A course designed to improve the tutorial skills of upper-classmen, especially Chicanos, or those who expect to help minority students. Concentration on tutoring of basic skills required for M.A.E.P. and Special Services tutors.
M.AM. 303-3. History of the Spanish Language in the Southwest.
The Spanish of the southwest is compared to that spoken in other areas of the world. The course is the first and most basic in the linguistic series in the Spanish discipline. Basic linguistic terminology is introduced and applied in the analysis of Southwest Spanish. Prer., Spanish 212 or equivalent.
M.AM. 304-3. Workshop in Southwest Spanish. A
research-oriented workshop designed to conduct an in-depth analysis of Southwest Spanish through field study. Basic fundamentals of field research will be introduced. Prer., M.AM. 303 or consent of instiuctor.
M.AM. 310-3. Mexican American Ethnic Relations. (Same as Anthro. 310.) The anthropology of North Americans of Spanish. Spanish-Indian, and Mexican national descent, ethnohistorical backgrounds, current interrelations and social movements among rural and urban groups. Cultural patterns, identity maintenance, and the social forms and problems of national incorporation.
M.AM. 311-3. Mexican Literature in Translation—Poetry. A survey of the masterpieces of Mexican poetry in English translations from Aztec poetry to modern day.
M.AM. 312-3. Mexican Literature in Translation—Narrative. A
survey of the masterpieces of Mexican narrative works in English translations, from the Popol Vuh a Chilam Balam to the contemporary period.
M.AM. 313-3. Arts of the Mexican Revolution. A study of the art
forms that developed during the years of the Mexican Revolution. Both plastic and letters included.
M.AM. 340-3. Social Psychology and the Mexican American.
(Psych. 340.) Exposes students to the research on Mexican Americans in the fields of intelligence and achievement, language and learning ability, attitudes, perception, personality, and motivation.
M.AM. 369-3. Historical Geography of the Southwest. Regional study of man and culture in relationship to the environment.
M.AM. 383-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado I. (Hist.
383. ) Research-oriented seminar course in which the student is expected to gather material on the subject from original sources. M.AM. 384-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado II. (Hist.
384. ) Continuation of M.AM. 383.
M.AM. 399-3. History of the Mexican in the Southwest. A survey of the history of the Southwestern region of the U.S. from the indigenous origins, through Spanish conquest and colonization and later Anglo invasion.
M.AM. 405-3. Intergroup Relations. (Soc. 405.) A study of intergroup (race) relations at the small group level. Includes analysis of a group that has been stratified into a majority number of white students and a fixed number of minority students.


501 University of Colorado at Denver
M.AM. 413-3. Contemporary Chlcano Literature. (Engl. 413.) A study of the present narrative literature produced by Chicanos. No political slant is imposed. The literary value is emphasized.
M.AM. 430-3. Chicano and the U.S. Social System. A study of the Mexican American in his contact with the systems of justice, education, politics and social sets, primarily in the Southwest. M.AM. 432-3. Education in Multilingual Communities. (Soc. 432.) A combined social problem and sociolinguistic approach to education in multilingual communities in the United States Southwest. Topics considered will include historical and contemporary trends in schools’ language policies and practices; intra-school social and academic stratification; and consequences for student achievement, aspirations, and vocational choice and channeling.
M.AM. 459-3. Mexican American in the Southwest. A study of the development of the social structures of the Mexican American in the Southwest and the forces that have affected them.
M.AM. 460-3. The Chicano Community and Community Organizations. (Soc. 460.) Examination of the origin of the terms "community" and "barrio.” A comparative analysis of the internal barrio structure and the larger society. Community organization and community development. Positive and negative role models/leaders. Methods and techniques of community organization as related to La Raza.
M. AM. 462-3. The New Chicano Movement. (Soc. 462.) A seminar in which extensive field research is required of the students aimed at discovering the current role of the Chicano in American society.
Note: Spanish 101 and 102 special M.A.E.P. sections are taught by a Chicano with an understanding of the particular problems of the bilingual student.
NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES
LINDA MASON, Director
N. AM. 250-3. The American Indian Experience. An introduction to Native American literature and other expressive forms with emphasis on the aesthetic, linguistic, psychological, and historical properties, as well as the contemporary, social, and cultural influence upon the native author and his material.
N.AM. 321-3. The American Indian and Federal Law: A Survey of Legal Status and Problems. (Soc.Sci. 321.) A survey of the special status of American Indians, as well as the problems, costs, and benefits affecting various tribal groups and individuals as exemplified in a selection of actual case studies.
N.AM. 391-3. Seminar in American Indian Education. (Soc.Sci. 391.) Study of the historical development of American Indian education and proposed solutions to selected problems in contemporary Indian education. Emphasis on alternative means as viewed by American Indians.
N.AM. 436-3. The American Indian in Contemporary Society.
(Anthro. 436.) Begins with the historical background on American Indian acculturation and persistence, but emphasizes the present day relations between Indian communities and the dominant society, stressing conditions and events in Denver and the Southwest generally.
N.AM. 472-3. North American Indian Art. (Fine Arts 472.) Survey of major tribal styles of the North American continent.
Special Programs
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
DANIEL GUIMOND, Coordinator
The University of Colorado at Denver offers undergraduates an opportunity to earn academic credit for approved work experience through the Cooperative Education Program. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences participates in this program, listing three
divisional courses; A.H. 398, N.P.S. 398, and S.Sc. 398. Students placed by the cooperative education office in paid or volunteer assignments, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, may be eligible, subject to the guidelines below;
1. The student should have reached the sophomore level of University work and must be a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
2. The participating student should have at least a 2.5 grade-point average. Students with GPAs in the 2.0 (C) to 2.4 range must obtain the approval of the dean in order to participate in the program.
3. Job experiences approved for credit should be preprofessional in nature and should be generally related to the student’s major area of study. Jobs of a routine nature, lacking experience relative to the undergraduate academic curriculum, are not suitable for University credit.
4. A job in which the learning possibilities and responsibilities of the student remain static will not be approved for more than one semester. In contrast, a job in which the learning opportunities and responsibilities vary and increase may be eligible for credit over a longer time span.
5. Projects will be granted from 1 to 6 hours of elective credit per semester, 3 being the normal credit for each project. However, certain projects, such as fulltime intensive internship, may be granted as much as 6 credits.
6. Twelve semester hours will be the normal maximum number of credits a student can earn in cooperative education. In some disciplines, cooperative education hours may count toward satisfying requirements for the major.
Information and forms for placement and credit are available in Room 809, or call ext. 555.
DISTRIBUTED STUDIES PROGRAM
Students working toward the B.A. degree may elect a major in a Distributed Studies Program in any one of the three divisions of the College. Requirements are a minimum of 60 semester hours in two or three subjects in which a discipline major program for the B.A. is offered. One of these shall be designated the primary subject. Discipline advisers shall have the prerogative of designating acceptable secondary subjects.
Primary Subject. Minimum of 30 hours. (Not more than 30 hours will be required.) The grade-point average in the primary subject must be at least 2.0; 30 hours of work must carry grades of C or better; 12 hours must be in upper division courses in which grades of C or better have been earned. The adviser for the primary area may stipulate specific course requirements.
Secondary Subjects. Minimum of 30 hours distributed in one or two disciplines. A secondary subject shall consist of at least 12 hours in one discipline.
Language Courses. No first-year course in English (100-101) or foreign language (101-102) may be used in satisfaction of the requirements of either a primary or a secondary subject.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 151
HONORS PROGRAM
The Honors Program of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is designed for the student who likes to deal creatively with ideas and who desires to extend his education beyond the usual course requirements.
The Honors Program also is responsible for determining which students merit the award of the bachelor’s degree with honors: cum laude, magna cum laude, andsumma cum laude. These awards are made on the basis of special honors work and not simply on the basis of grades. All honors courses are awarded upper division credit. .
A student may participate in either discipline honors or general honors, or both.To become a candidate for discipline honors, the student must (1) have a 3.0 grade-point average; (2) complete special work such as seminars or research projects required by his particular discipline; (3) take both the Undergraduate Program Area Test (in Humanities, Natural Science, and Social Science) and the Advanced Graduate Record Examination; and (4) take an oral examination given by a committee of faculty members in his discipline and a member of the Honors Council. To become a candidate for general honors, the student must (1) have a 3.0 grade-point average; (2) complete at least four general honors courses; (3) take the Undergraduate Program Area Test; and (4) take oral and written honors examinations.
Any qualified student may enroll in honors courses without becoming a candidate for graduation with honors. There are no examinations in the honors courses themselves; and no letter grades are awarded, only the marks H (Honors), P (Pass), and F (Fail).
Detailed information concerning the Honors Program may be obtained from Dr. Fahrion, director, or in the Office of the Dean.
STUDY SKILLS CENTER
KATHY R. JACKSON, Director
St.Sk. 100-1. Developmental Composition. Offered as an aid to
improving writing skills. Areas in which the student feels a need for growth are explored, and a concentrated program for improvement is then determined for each individual. The mechanics of writing as well as methods of research are reviewed as a general guide for composition growth.
St.Sk. 101-1. Developmental Composition. Offered as an aid to
improving writing skills. Areas in which the student feels a need for comprehension. Improvement of other related reading skills, such as skimming and scanning, critical reading, reading for the main idea, and significant facts also are offered.
St.Sk. 102-1. College Preparatory Mathematics. Offered as both a refresher course for those interested in brushing up previous algebra skills and an aid for students requiring specific help with any algebra course offered by the University.
Preprofessional Programs
CHILD HEALTH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM
The Child Health Associate Program at the University of Colorado Medical Center is a three-year program designed to train men and women in ambulatory pediatric care of infants, children, and adolescents. The program emphasizes the medical and psychosocial
aspects of health care. Graduates of the program receive a Bachelor of Science (Child Health Associate) degree from the School of Medicine and are licensed to work in association with a physician in such settings as private physicians’ offices, neighborhood health clinics, and public health facilities.
Two years of college (60 semester hours, including one year of biology [Biol. 205-206]; one year of chemistry [Chem. 101-102]; one year of psychology [Psych. 203-204]; and one year or 6 semester hours from one of the following areas—English, humanities, social sciences, or communication) are required.
Courses in anthropology, organic chemistry, and/or Spanish are recommended.
For further information write:
Child Health Associate Program Box 2662
University of Colorado Medical Center 4200 East Ninth Avenue Denver, Colorado 80220
or telephone 394-7965. At UCD, contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
The Child Health Associate Program also has been approved to award a Master of Science degree for those students who meet the criteria for admittance into the Graduate School.
PREDENTAL HYGIENE
In conjunction with the School of Dentistry, a B.S. degree program in dental hygiene is available at the University of Colorado.
Dental hygiene enjoys an important role in the field of health science. The dental hygienist is concerned with the prevention of dental disease and is the only member of the auxiliary group in the dental profession who performs a service directly for a patient.
The dental hygienist must satisfactorily complete a college program and pass the state board examination. After being licensed by the state in which he or she wishes to practice, the dental hygienist has many opportunities for employment in private dental offices, state and city health agencies, federal government agencies, public and private schools, industrial dental clinics and hospitals, and in schools of dental hygiene as directors and teachers.
Prerequisites. Two years of college (60 semester hours, including English composition, 6 semester hours; mathematics, 3 semester hours; psychology, 3 semester hours; philosophy, 3 semester hours; speech, 3 semester hours; sociology, 3 semester hours; general chemistry with laboratory [Chem. 101-102], 8 semester hours; and general biology with laboratory [Biol. 205-206], 8 semester hours).
For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
PREDENTISTRY
The University of Colorado School of Dentistry admitted its first class in June 1973.
The student planning to seek admission to the School of Dentistry should consult the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508, concerning his program. A minimum of 90 semester hours of accredited college or


52/ University of Colorado at Denver
university work must be completed. While there is no prescribed curriculum, the following courses are required:
Semesters
General chemistry (103-106) ...................................2
Organic chemistry (341 -343 and 342-344)......................2
General biology (205-206) .....................................2
Physics (201-202 or 111-112-114) ..............................2
Genetics (Biol. 383)...........................................1
English literature.............................................2
Mathematics ...................................................2
(Should include at least college-level algebra and trigonometry or equivalent through advanced placement. Although calculus is not required, it is urged as a valuable conceptual basis for physiological processes.)
One semester of English composition is recommended and will be required for the classes entering fall 1978 and later.
Applications are due December 15 for the class starting the following June.
TEACHER EDUCATION
Students are referred to the School of Education office on the Denver Campus for detailed information concerning teacher education programs at both elementary and secondary levels.
Two avenues are open to students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in teaching.
1. Elementary education majors and distributed studies majors preparing to teach at the secondary school level normally transfer from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year and continue on to receive the Bachelor of Science degree in education.
2. Students with a major program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who seek certification for teaching at the secondary school level remain in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the bachelor’s degree, but take approximately 32 hours of professional education work in the School of Education.
Pre-Education Program
Students pursuing elementary education or distributed studies majors for secondary school teachers should so indicate on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by faculty members of the School of Education. Application for transfer to the School of Education and for admission to the Teacher Education Program should be made during the last semester of the sophomore year. The minimum requirements for acceptance are:
1. Completion of at least 60 semester hours of acceptable college work with a grade-point average of 2.5 for all courses attempted, and 2.5 for all courses attempted at the University of Colorado: and 2.5 in the major teaching field. No student will be recommended for certification to teach in any field or subject in which the grade-point average is less than 2.5.
2. General education requirements for students planning to student teach at the secondary or elementary school level as follows:
a. General Education (with early counseling, a major part of general education, urban studies, and teaching field requirements can be combined):
Semester Hours
(1) 12 cumulative semester hours to be completed in each of the following three areas; sequences of course work not required:
Arts and Humanities.............................12
(In order to meet typical certification requirements in other states, students should take at least 6 semester hours of humanities in English language courses, e g., Engl. 100,
Exposition I; Engl. 101, Exposition II;
Engl. 480, Advanced Composition;
Engl. 484, English Grammar; Engl.
485, History of the English Lan-
guage)
Social Sciences...............................12
Natural and Physical Sciences..............12-16
(2) For elementary certification, the following work should be included as part of general education requirements:
Two courses in physical science with lab.
Two courses in biological science with lab.
Two courses in mathematics (Math.
303 and 304)
b. Urban Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences).9
Bachelor of Arts (in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) With Teacher Certification
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who intend to pursue a regular major curriculum in one of the disciplines or programs in the College, and who also desire secondary school teacher certification, must apply for and be accepted into the teacher education program. The requirements for such admission are identical with those in “a” above. These students also must meet all requirements for a bachelor’s degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Early planning is crucial for students intending to enter the teacher education program. Since the School of Education has initiated a new program at both the elementary and secondary levels, students are urged to consult the school early and regularly concerning new requirements.
Professional Preparation for College Teachers
The School of Education offers counseling to prospective college-level teachers and has a number of courses suitable to their needs. A program for the preparation of community college teachers is now available in some subject fields.
PREJOURNALISM
Students are referred to the School of Journalism Bulletin for detailed information concerning requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in journalism, which is granted only on the Boulder Campus.
Prejournalism students should so designate themselves on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by members of the faculty of the School of Journalism (Boulder).
Students normally transfer to the School of Journalism at the beginning of the junior year. Application for intra-University transfer must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term for which the student wishes to


College of Liberal Arts and Sciencesl53
register, or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.25 in prior work at the University of Colorado is required.
PRELAW
Students are referred to the School of Law Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the professional degree, Juris Doctor (J.D.), which is granted only on the Boulder Campus.
The School of Law of the University of Colorado requires a bachelor’s degree for admission, but does not stipulate courses that shall constitute a prelaw curriculum.
The Law School Admission Test is required of all applicants for admission to the School of Law and should be taken as early as possible during the senior year in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Students are urged to consult the Admissions Office of the School of Law, Room 118, Fleming Law Building, Boulder, Colorado 80302.
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
This curriculum leading to a B.S. degree in medical technology awarded by the School of Medicine consists of six semesters of course work in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences followed by 12 months of clinical training at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver.
Normally 94 semester hours of credit are earned in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and 40 semester hours of credit are allowed at the School of Medicine.
To be eligible for admission to the clinical year at the School of Medicine a student must have met all course requirements prerequisite to clinical training as established by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. In addition, the student must meet the course requirements of the University of Colorado in medical technology.
The clinical training period begins about June 15 of each year and continues for one calendar year. Applications must be received by February 1. No students are admitted to the clinical program at any time other than in June.
Students must meet the grade-point requirements for graduation as outlined in the School of Medicine Bulletin.
Curriculum for B.S. Degree in Medical Technology
Courses fulfilling requirements, as well as general electives, are to be chosen in consultation with the student’s adviser.
1. Six semesters of requirements to be taken in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (with a minimum science GPA of 2.75 on a scale of 4.0):
Specific Requirements Semester Hours
'Chemistry .................................... 16
Usually includes General Chemistry (Chem. 103-106) plus biochemistry or organic chemistry. Quantitative analysis and physical chemistry are recommended.
'Biology....................................... 16
Must include microbiology or bacteriology. Remaining credits are earned from general biology, physiology, genetics, anatomy, histology, or embryology.
Mathematics.............................................. 5-10
College algebra; familiarity with the principles of calculus is desirable.
'Physics ................................................ 5-10
General physics, dealing with mechanics, optics, pneumatics, hydraulics, weight and measurements.
General Curriculum (advised, not required)
English .................................................... 6
Speech or communications ................................... 3
Social sciences............................................. 6
Physical education ......................................... 2
Modern language (German, Russian, French, or Spanish ............................................... 3-10
Total semester hours 94-96
2. One calendar year on the Medical Center Campus in Denver. Requirements are listed in the School of Medicine Bulletin. Forty semester hours of credit are allowed.
For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
PREMEDICINE
Students are referred to the School of Medicine Bulletin for information concerning admissions policies of the School of Medicine and details of the curriculum leading to the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree.
There is no prescribed curriculum for the premedical student, although certain courses are required (see below). Students intending to seek admission to the School of Medicine should fulfill all requirements for the bachelor’s degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, even though in certain cases students may be admitted to a medical school without an undergraduate degree.
On all application and registration materials, premedical students should so designate themselves so that they may be advised by the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508. Such students are urged to consult regularly with their advisers concerning choice of courses and requirements, applications, and evaluation for medical schools.
In addition to an excellent overall academic record, premedical students must present superior work in the following courses:
Semesters
General chemistry (103-106) ...................................2
Organic chemistry (341 -343 and 342-344) ......................2
General biology or zoology (205-206) ..........................2
Physics, including lab. (201-202 or 111-112-114)...............2
Literature ....................................................2
Mathematics ...................................................2
(Should include at least college-level algebra and trigonometry or equivalent through advanced placement. Although calculus is not required, it is urged as a valuable conceptual basis for understanding rates of change in physiological processes.)
One semester of English composition is recommended and will be required for the classes entering fall 1978 and later.
Beyond these specific courses, however, the School of Medicine strongly discourages premedicine students from taking courses covering material to be studied in
'The courses in biology, chemistry, and physics named above should include laboratory work.


54/ University of Colorado at Denver
medical school. Rather, the undergraduate years should provide a liberal education as the foundation for technical and professional post-graduate study. A student should choose a major from those fields that interest him most; it is not necessary that the major be in a technical or scientific area.
PRENURSING
Students are referred to the School of Nursing Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in nursing.
Prenursing students should so designate themselves on all application and registration materials so that advising may be obtained through the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
The nursing program is a 41/2-year curriculum involving two years of prenursing studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences followed by a 21/2-year program in the School of Nursing. Transfer from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the School of Nursing is normally made at the beginning of the junior year, but applications for admission to the upper division nursing program must be submitted by March 1.
Preprofessional requirements for admission to the School of Nursing include the completion of 60 semester hours with a grade average of at least 2.0. The following courses are required:
NATURAL SCIENCES
Biology: One year general biology or zoology including laboratory (Biol. 205-206)
Chemistry: One year general chemistry with laboratory, including inorganic and organic (Chem. 101-102)
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Psychology: One year of course work in general psychology including content in the physiological basis of behavior (Psych. 203-204)
Sociology: Two courses in general sociology (Soc. 111 and one other course or Soc. Sci. 210 and one other course. Soc. Sci. 211 will meet requirement)
Cultural anthropology: One course (Anthro. 104)
GENERAL EDUCATION AND ELECTIVES
At least two two-semester sequences in two areas below:
Communication and theatre
Economics
English literature
Ethnic studies
Fine arts
Foreign language
PREPHARMACY
Students are referred to the School of Pharmacy Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Pharmacy degree.
All academic advising for prepharmacy students is conducted by faculty members of the School of Pharmacy. Students should contact the school office, Ekeley 274 (Boulder Campus), and arrange to meet with advisers. Advising may be obtained through the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508, Denver Campus.
Application for transfer to the School of Pharmacy must be filed no later than 90 days prior to the term for which the student wishes to register, or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration.
Prior to enrolling for professional courses in the School of Pharmacy, students must have completed the following courses and must have compiled a grade-point average of 2.0 or higher:
Semester Hours
Inorganic chemistry—including quantitative and
qualitative analysis (103-106).............................. 10
General biology or zoology (205-206)............................ 8
College mathematics, algebra and trigonometry (101-102) ......5-6
English composition, literature, or foreign language ......... 6
Physical education.............................................. 2
Organic chemistry (341 -343 and 342-344)........................ 8
General physics (201-202)...................................... 10
Principles of economics (201-202)............................... 6
Electives (nonprofessional)................................... 8
PHYSICAL THERAPY
The curriculum in physical therapy at the University of Colorado is an accredited program approved by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Physical Therapy Association. Upon successful completion of the program, students are granted a Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy from the School of Medicine. The curriculum is composed of two phases of study:
Phase One. Prephysical therapy constitutes the first three years. In these years the student fulfills his requirements for Phase Two and acquires a liberal university education.
Phase Two. Physical therapy education is accomplished during the final year. It is directed toward principles and practice of physical therapy as a professional career. Phase Two is offered only at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver.
University Requirements for Graduation
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy must satisfy the following requirements:
1. Completion of Phase One to include 90 semester hours. A minimum of 2 semester hours must be in upper division courses (courses numbered 300 or above).
2. Completion of Phase Two to include 57 quarter hours. Of the 57 hours, a grade of C or better is required in at least 40 hours and a C average must be maintained.
3. Residence requirement requires 30 semester hours at the University of Colorado. This requirement is automatically fulfilled during Phase Two.
Selection of Students for Phase Two-Physical Therapy (Senior Year)
1. A maximum of 32 students is accepted.
2. Selection is made by a Selection Committee.
3. Selection is based on:
a. Scholastic achievement of 3.0 (both in specific prerequisites and in cumulative grade-point average)
b. Personal interview
c. Health status
d. State of residency
History Honors Mathematics Philosophy Political science


College of Liberal Arts and Sciencesl55
4. Categories of students eligible to apply for selection:
a. Physical therapy majors in attendance at any of the University of Colorado campuses may apply by April 1 of their sophomore year. Selection will be made during the summer. (An eligible sophomore must be registered for his 60th semester hour.)
b. Other eligible candidates must apply by March 1 of their junior year and will be selected at the end of their junior year. (An eligible junior must have completed or be registered for his 90tn semester hour.) Persons qualified for this selection are limited to:
(1) those enrolled in other accredited institutions in Colorado
(2) residents of states participating in the WICHE program which do not have physical therapy programs
(3) Colorado residents attending schools in other states
(4) Colorado residents holding degrees who can meet the prerequisite requirements.
c. Applications will not be accepted from persons who do not fall in the above categories.
Specific Requirements—Phase One
These requirements may be met only in an accredited college or university and must be completed before final acceptance into Phase Two.
Required Courses Minimum Semester Hours
Biological Sciences ...............................14
General Biology Anatomy (human, preferred)
Physiology (human, preferred)
(Prer., 1 year of chemistry)
Humanities ................................................12
Psychology ................................................. 6
Social science ............................................. 6
Physical education:
Kinesiology ............................................. 2
Physical education activity courses (1 year need not be for credit)
Physical sciences
“General physics ........................................ 3
(Recommended content to include mechanics, heat, electricity)
•General chemistry....................................... 6
Recommended Courses—Phase One
The curriculum is designed to offer students the opportunity to elect several courses in their areas of special interest. Listed below are courses related to physical therapy which would benefit a physical therapy major.
Biology
Embryology
Genetics
Psychology
Child and Adolescent Psychology Physiological Psychology Psychology of the Exceptional Child Psychology of Mental Retardation Psychology of Learning Child Development
Physical Therapy
Introduction to Physical Therapy (strongly recommended) Physical Education
Human Development and Movement Behavior Exercise Physiology Community Health Developmental Physiology
Other Courses Introduction to Statistics Anthropology Communication Skills First Aid
For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
Any student anticipating further study in Graduate School should enroll in general physics (one full year to include laboratory work), general chemistry (to include organic chemistry), and mathematics.


College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
DODDS I. BUCHANAN, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration of the University of Colorado at Denver exist to serve today’s need for competent and responsible administrative and related professional personnel, for the continued education of men and women already in such positions, and to further research and new thinking about administrative problems.
The College of Business and Administration was admitted to membership in the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1938.
The problems of administration are common to many kinds of public and private endeavor, and the College of Business attempts to confront these problems as they pertain to the management of business enterprises.
The major purpose of the College of Business is to provide opportunities both for a liberal education and for professional training. Students are given help in preparing not only for effective careers but also for satisfying living and constructive citizenship.
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers graduate-level education in business to persons with undergraduate degrees in business and other academic fields and prepares them for work in the broad spectrum of business enterprise.
Organization
Within the broad framework of policy established by the Regents of the University of Colorado, policy decisions for the College of Business are made by the Educational Policy Committee of the faculty under the chairmanship of the dean and are subject to review by the faculty as a whole.
The College’s activities are administered by the associate dean on the Denver Campus, by the heads of its several instructional divisions, and by other faculty directors of particular programs.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interests and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations:
AIESEC—international business association
Beta Alpha Psi—professional and honorary accounting fraternity
Beta Gamma Sigma—honorary scholastic fraternity in business
Beta Sigma—professional business fraternity for women
CSBA—Chicano business students association
CUAMA—University of Colorado student chapter of the American Marketing Association
Delta Phi Epsilon—honorary graduate fraternity in business education
Delta Sigma Pi—national professional business fraternity for men
MBA Association—University of Colorado association of master’s students in business
Phi Chi Theta—national professional business and economics fraternity for women
Rho Epsilon—professional real estate fraternity
Sigma lota Epsilon—professional and honorary management fraternity
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. Understanding of the activities that constitute business enterprise and of the principles underlying administration of those activities.
2. Ability to think logically and analytically through the kinds of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. Comprehension of the human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the arts of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Each student in the College of Business is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic requirements and regulations established for the College and for the student’s classes. Upon admission to the College of Business, the student has the responsibility for conferring with the student adviser in the College concerning an academic program.
Standards of Performance
Students are held to basic standards of performance established for their classes in respect to attendance, active participation in course work, promptness in completion of assignments, correct English usage both in writing and in speech, accuracy in calculations, and general quality of scholastic workmanship. Fulfillment of


College of Business and Administration 157
these fundamental responsibilities must be recognized by students as a requirement for continuance and as an essential condition for achievement of satisfactory academic standing. Only those who meet these standards should expect to be recommended for a degree.
In general, examinations are required in all courses for all students, including graduating seniors.
To be in good standing, the student must have an overall grade-point average of not less than 2.0 (C) for all course work attempted and 2.0 (C) for all business courses attempted. This applies to work taken at all University campuses. Activity, physical education, and remedial course work is not included in the overall average.
When spring semester grades become available, the College of Business Committee on Academic Deficiency will review the records of all students not meeting academic standards. Students below standard will be notified of (1) probationary status or (2) suspension.
To return from probationary status to good standing, students must not only achieve a grade-point average of
2.0 or better for the academic year but also bring their cumulative grade average on all courses attempted, and on all College of Business courses attempted, to a
2.0 level or above.
To receive credit, all courses must be listed on the student’s registration in the Office of Admissions and Records. Courses completed on the University of Colorado Denver Campus are credited toward College of Business degree requirements exactly the same as courses taken on the Boulder Campus. Credits earned on the Denver Campus are applicable toward residence requirements only when earned after admission to the College of Business.
Transfer Credit
Credits in business subjects transferred from other institutions to the University of Colorado will be limited to the number of credit hours given for similar work in the regular offerings of the College of Business. In general, the College will limit transfer credit for business courses taken at a lower division level, which it applies toward degree requirements, to such courses as the College offers at that level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is given by the appropriate division head. Transfer students must take 30 hours of degree requirements in residency. For a detailed explanation of transfer credit, see the General Information section of this bulletin.
Nonclassroom Sources of Credit
A total of 6 hours of credit for business or nonbusiness courses in Experimental Studies or Independent Study programs will be accepted toward graduation. A maximum of 3 hours of this type of credit may be taken in any one semester.
Correspondence Credit
Not more than 9 semester hours of credit in business courses taken through correspondence study at the
Univesity of Colorado or any other institution of higher learning will be counted toward the B.S. degree in business. Required business courses and area of emphasis courses may not be taken by correspondence.
ROTC Credit
Students may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours of credit in courses completed in the advanced ROTC program toward nonbusiness elective requirements and toward the 120-semester-hour total degree requirements for the B.S. degree in business. No credit toward degree requirements is granted for basic (freshman and sophomore) ROTC courses.
For more detailed information, students should consult the ROTC adviser.
Independent Study Credit
Upper division undergraduate business students desiring to do work beyond regular business course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the students must have prior approval of the dean. Complete information and request forms are available in the Office of the Associate Dean.
To receive credit for nonbusiness independent study courses, students should obtain the dean’s approval prior to registering for the course. Further information and forms are available in the Office of the Associate Dean.
Study Abroad Credit
Transfer credit from study abroad programs is most appropriately applied as nonbusiness elective credit. Students are responsible for checking with the Office of the Associate Dean for details and approval.
Adding and Dropping Courses
See the General Information section of this bulletin for University-wide Drop/Add policies.
Withdrawal
A student leaving the University before the end of the semester should secure a Withdrawal Form from the Office of the Associate Dean and follow the instructions on the form. The completed form should be returned to the Office of Admissions and Records. Students who attend classes will be charged an appropriate amount or receive a refund according to a definite schedule published in the official Schedule of Courses each term.
Registration for Business Courses
Students may register for only those courses for which they have the stated prerequisite training. If junior standing is required, students should have earned at least 60 semester hours of credit; for senior standing, 90 semester hours.
Scholastic Load
The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate student in the College of Business is 15 semester hours, with 19 hours the maximum except as indicated below. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing


581 University of Colorado at Denver
Education, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s load.
Students having a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher for the most recent semester in which they completed at least 15 semester hours may register for a load exceeding 19 semester hours with the approval of the associate dean.
Pass/Fail
A maximum of 16 hours of a combination of business and/or nonbusiness course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree in business. Transfer students are limited to 1 semester hour of pass/fail for every 8 attempted at the University. For business majors, pass/fail courses may not be included in “core” courses or in the area of emphasis. Advanced standing and CLEP examinations will count toward the 16 hours of option.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Admission of Freshmen
The College of Business and Administration expects entering freshmen to present 15 units of the following secondary course work:
Units
English......................................................... 3
Mathematics (college preparatory) ............................... 2
Natural science (lab-science course)............................ 2
Social science (including history).............................. 2
Electives (areas such as foreign languages, additional courses in English, mathematics, natural or social sciences; may include up to 2 credits in business) ................. 6
15
Preferred Admission. Students given first consideration are those who rank in the upper half of their high school graduating class, have a combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of 1000 or above or a composite American College Test (ACT) score of 23 or above, and have completed the high school course units as recommended by the appropriate college.
Considered on an Individual Basis. Students considered on an individual basis are those who rank in the lower half of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and show variations from the high school course unit “expectations.”
Admission of Transfer and Former Students
Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students to the University of Colorado (see General Information section.)
Former students who have attended another college or university and who have completed 12 or more semester hours must reapply as transfer students and must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted to be eligible for readmission.
A maximum of 60 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the baccalaureate
degree in the College of Business and Administration.
Students who do not meet the prescribed requirements may petition the Office of Admissions and Records for special consideration for entrance. Doubtful cases will be referred to the associate dean of the College.
Intrauniversity Transfer
Students seeking admission to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University must formally apply at the Office of Admissions and Records for intrauniversity transfer. Application for admission to the College must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Records at least 90 days prior to the appropriate deadlines.
Recommended Preparation for Study in Business
Prospective students in business are encouraged to pursue a broad college preparatory program in high school, with particular emphasis on English, mathematics, the social sciences, and speech.
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree normally enter as freshmen. During the first two years they acquire a broad background in mathematics, communications, and the social and behavioral sciences. They will complete required basic courses in each of the core areas of business study, for the most part during their junior year. The remainder of their degree program will consist of courses selected to further their professional preparation through more advanced work and electives.
REQUIREMENTS FOR B.S. (BUSINESS) DEGREE
The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is conferred after completion of these requirements:
Total Credits. A minimum of 120 acceptable semester hours of credit, of which at least 51 hours must be in nonbusiness courses (including 9 hours of upper division work) and at least 51 hours in business courses. The remaining 18 hours may be in either, or some combination of both.
Residence. Completion of at least one full academic year’s work (normally 30 semester hours, usually in the senior year, after admission to the College of Business and Administration, and to include the 12 hours in the area of emphasis). Courses completed at any University of Colorado campus after the candidate has been admitted to the College are acceptable toward this requirement.
Grade Average. A scholastic grade-point average of at least 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree; an average of at least 2.0 for all business courses; an average of at least 2.0 in the student’s area of emphasis.
Graduation With Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty of the College of Business, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation.
Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado


College of Business and Administration 159
while completing 30 hours after admission to the College of Business and Administration will be graduated cum laude.
Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado while completing 30 hours after admission to the College of Business and Administration will be graduated magna cum laude.
Courses. Completion of required courses in six groups: (A) Societal Studies, (B) Behavioral Studies, (C) Communications, (D) Information Systems, Quantitative Methods, and Data Processing, (E) Business Processes, and (F) Electives. These requirements are summarized below.
Required Courses
GROUP A: SOCIETAL STUDIES
The activities of a business enterprise are carried on within a complex economic-political-social-cultural environment. Understanding of that environment is indispensable for socially responsible and successful endeavor.
Required Areas Semester Hours
Introduction to Political Science (Pol. Sci. 100)......... 3
American Political System (Pol. Sci. 110) ................ 3
Introduction to Sociology (Soc. 111)...................... 3
Principles of Economics (Econ. 201 and 202) .............. 6
Business Law (B.Law 300) ................................. 3
Business and Government (B.Ad. 410) or
Business and Society (B.Ad. 411) ...........................3
21
GROUP B. BEHAVIORAL STUDIES
Management is concerned with the activities of people and with their behavior individually, in work groups, and as members of an organization. In this regard the perceptions and methods of the behavioral sciences contribute increasingly to the understanding and effectiveness on the part of managers. In addition to courses in Group A which are both societal and behavioral, these behavioral studies are required:
Required Areas Semester Hours
General Psychology (Psych. 203 and 204) ........... 6
Introduction to Management
and Organization (Mgt. Org. 330) ..................3
9
GROUP C. COMMUNICATIONS
Probably no skills are more essential for effectiveness in management than those in communication, both oral and written. The business curriculum provides for further development of these skills in alternative ways, depending upon the student’s inclinations and present communication competency. Two courses selected from the following list are required (6 hours):
GROUP D: INFORMATION SYSTEMS, QUANTITATIVE METHODS, AND DATA PROCESSING
Management relies heavily upon information systems, mathematical and statistical tools of analysis, and increasingly sophisticated decision-making techniques. In respect to each of these, computers may play an important role. These courses are required:
Required Areas Semester Hours
Mathematics (Math.107 and 108) .............................. 6
Business Information and the Computer (B.Ad. 200)............ 3
Business Statistics (Stat. 200) ............................. 3
Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects (Acct. 200)..........3
15
GROUP E: BUSINESS PROCESSES This group of courses is devoted to study of the basic processes involved in any enterprise. Using this background, students pursue more advanced study in a field (area of emphasis) in which they have developed particular interest. In the area of emphais they develop facility in more complicated forms of analysis and further develop their qualifications for employment.
Required Areas Semester Hours
Basic Finance (Fin. 305).................................... 3
Operations Analysis (Mgt.Org. 300) ......................... 3
Principles of Marketing (Mk. 300) .......................... 3
Cases and Concepts in Business Policy (B.Ad. 450) or Management Game and Cases in Business Policy (B.Ad. 451) or
Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship
(B.Ad. 452) ........................................... 3
Area of emphasis (see description of the areas available)...12
24
GROUP F: ELECTIVES
Over one-third of the total hours required for the B.S. degree in business is in elective courses. These elective studies will almost certainly enhance the student’s professional qualifications. Excess hours in required areas may be used as electives. A maximum of 12 hours credit in advanced ROTC on the Boulder Campus may be applied toward nonbusiness elective requirements. A maximum of 6 hours credit for physical education theory courses also may be applied to nonbusiness electives. Physical education activity courses may not be counted toward a B.S. degree in business. In the allocation of elective hours, these requirements must be met:
Semester Hours
Business electives........................................... 9
Nonbusiness electives, at least 9 hours of which
must be in courses numbered 300 and above ................18
Free electives—either business or nonbusiness
or any combination .......................................J8
Total electives .............................................45
Required Areas
Semester Hours
Exposition (Engl. 100 or 101) .................
Introduction to Literature (Engl. 110 or 111 or 112)
Report Writing (Engl. 315) ....................
Principles of Communication (C.T. 202).........
Communication and Social Change (C.T. 210).....
Discussion (C.T. 315) .........................
Argumentation (C.T. 320) ......................
Persuasion (C.T. 420)..........................
> 6
6
Model Degree Program
FRESHMAN YEAR Semester Hours
’Communications ...................................... 6
College Algebra (Math. 107)........................... 3
College Calculus (Math. 108) ......................... 3
•Courses selected from the following: Engl. 100 or 101: Engl. 130, 200, 206, 215, Engl 256. 259, 260 or 261: C.T. 202, C T. 210: C.T. 3T5; C.T. 320, C.T. 420.


601 University of Colorado at Denver
Introduction to Political Science (Pol. Sci. 100).......... 3
American Political System (Pol. Sci. 110) ................. 3
Introduction to Sociology (Soc. 111)........................ 3
'Introduction to Business (B.Ad. 100)....................... 3
Nonbusiness electives ...................................... 6
Total semester hours .......................................30
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Principles of Economics (Econ. 201, 202)................... 6
General Psychology (Psych. 203 and 204) ................... 6
Business Information and the Computer (B.Ad. 200).......... 3
Business Statistics (Stat. 200)............................. 3
Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects (Acct. 200)....... 3
fNonbusiness electives...................................... 9
Total semester hours .......................................30
JUNIOR YEAR
Principles of Marketing (Mk. 300) .......................... 3
Basic Finance (Fin. 305).................................... 3
Introduction to Management and Organization
(Mgt.Org. 330) .......................................... 3
Operations Analysis (Mgt. Org. 300) ........................ 3
Business Law (B.Law 300) ................................... 3
tNonbusiness electives...................................... 3
Business electives.......................................... 3
Either business or nonbusiness electives...................._9
Total semester hours .......................................30
SENIOR YEAR
Business Policy (B.Ad. 450, 451, or 452).................... 3
Business and Government (B.Ad. 410) or
Business and Society (B.Ad. 411) ........................ 3
Area of emphasis requirements...............................12
Business electives ......................................... 3
Either business or nonbusiness electives...................._9
Total semester hours .......................................30
Graduation Check List
The student alone is responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements. Questions concerning graduation should be directed to the Office of the College of Business and Administration.
Graduation Requirements Semester Hours
Group A: Societal Studies........................... 21
Group B: Behavioral Studies ......................... 9
Group C: Communications.............................. 6
Group D: Information Systems, Quantitative Methods,
and Data Processing........................ 15
Group E: Business Processes ........................ 24
Group F: Electives ................................. 45
Total Hours.........................................120
Residence Requirement............................... 30
A Diploma Card must be filed with the Office of the College of Business and Administration at least 90 days prior to the desired graduation.
Area of Emphasis—Required Courses
Although one area of emphasis will be listed on the student’s official records, students so desiring may accomplish the effect of a dual area of emphasis by careful selection of courses. A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for the second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. *
*Applies as a business elective. It is recommended, but not required. fFor completion of the B.S. (Bus.) degree requirements, the student's program must include at least 9 semester hours in upper-division nonbusiness courses.
ACCOUNTING
Required: Acct. 214, 322, 323, 432, and one three-hour accounting elective.
COMPUTER-BASED INFORMATION SYSTEMS Required: C.S. 312; Mg.Sc. 445, 455; Stat. 490.
FINANCE
Required: Fin. 401, 402, 433, 455.
Recommended electives: Fin. 434, 440, 453, 454, 484.
MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION
Personnel and Industrial Relations Area Required: Mgt. Org. 434, 438.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 333, 335,337,440,444, 447, 450,452, 456; B.Ad. 452,470; O.Ad. 440; Econ. 461; Psy. 485, 487; Soc. 479.
Operations Management Area
Required (any two of the following three courses): Mgt.Org. 440,444, 447.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 335, 337,434,450,460; Acct. 432; B.Ad. 452,470; Mg.Sc. 445,455; Mk. 485; Stat. 470, 480, 484.
Organizational Behavior Area
Required (any two of the following three courses): Mgt.Org. 333,335, 337.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 434, 438, 444, 447, 450, 456, 460; B.Ad. 470.
Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship Area Required (anytwo of the following three courses): B.Ad. 470; Fin. 401; Mgt.Org. 438.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 333, 335, 434, 440, 447, 450, 452, 460; Acct. 322, 432; B.Ad. 452; Fin. 401, 402; Mk. 480; O.Ad. 440.
Transportation and Traffic Management Area Required (any two of the following three courses): Mgt.Org. 450, 452, 458.
Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org. 337, 434, 438, 440, 456, 460; Acct. 322, 432; B.Ad. 470; Mk. 470, 485;
O.Ad. 440, 441.
MARKETING
Required: Mk. 330, plus 9 additional semester hours of marketing beyond Mk. 300.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION Required: O.Ad. 300, 420, 421, 440, 441.
REAL ESTATE
Required R.Es. 300, R.Es. 430, 473, 401 or Fin. 454. Recommended electives (minimum 3 semester hours): Acct. 441; Ins. 484; Fin. 401, 402, 455; R.Es. 533; Arch. 420, 451; Arch.E. 240.
STATISTICS
Required (any four of the following six courses): Stat. 300, 470, 480, 482, 484, 490.
Recommended electives: Mgt.Org. 440, 444, 447; Mk. 300; Mg.Sc. 445, 455.
COMBINED PROGRAMS
Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Such combined programs have been arranged for engineering and business, pharmacy and business, environmental design and business, and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well.
The two programs of study proceed concurrently, terminating together with the award of two degrees.


College of Business and Administration 161
Generally, at least five years will be needed for such combined programs.
For students in combined programs, the requirements for the degree in business are as follows:
1. Completion of at least 48 semester credits in business and economics, to include Econ. 201 and 202 (6 semester hours), required courses in business (30 semester hours), and a business area of emphasis (12 semester hours).
2. Completion of at least 30 of these semester hours at the University of Colorado while concurrently enrolled in the College of Business.
3. Completion of nonbusiness requirements in mathematics, communications, and the social and behavioral sciences in a degree program approved in advance by the College of Business. In addition, for some courses and areas of emphasis, there are prerequisite requirements which must be met.
4. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business.
Shown below is the combined engineering-business program. For other combinations, students must consult with the associate dean of the College of Business.
The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows:
Courses Semester Hours
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics (Should be completed during the student’s sophomore or junior
year.) .................................................... 6
Acct. 220. Introductory Accounting ............................. 3
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer .............. 3
Stat. 200. Business Statistics ................................. 3
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing ............................... 3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance ........................................ 3
Mgt.Org. 300. Operations Analysis............................... 3
Mgt.Org. 330. Introduction to Management
and Organization........................................... 3
B.Law 300. Business Law......................................... 3
B.Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B.Ad. 411.
Business and Society ...................................... 3
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy (Cases and Concepts in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 451. (Management Games and Cases in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 452. (Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship) .................... 3
Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields:
accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, real estate, small business management, statistics, or transportation management. All work in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado College of Business.
Areas of Emphasis ................................ 12
48
GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The graduate programs leading to the Master of Business Administration degree are offered through the faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration. (Note: An application for admission to the Graduate School of Business Administration must be accompanied by a nonrefundable fee of $20 when the application is submitted.)
Graduate programs leading to the Doctor of Business Administration, Master of Science, and Master of Business Education are offered through the University of Colorado Graduate School. Master’s degree
programs in business are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business.
Requirements for Admission—Master’s Program
Admission to the graduate programs will be determined by the following criteria:
1. Applicant’s undergraduate academic record.
2. Letters of recommendation submitted from former teachers or employers.
3. The applicant’s scores on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business, which is required of all applicants. (This test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the country. For information and to make application for the test, write to the Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 966, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.)
In general, students failing to meet minimum standards are not admitted on provisional status. Under exceptional circumstances, a student may be admitted on a provisional status for a specified probationary term. At the end of the probationary period, the Business Graduate Committee will review the student’s performance and recommend to the dean whether the student should be admitted to regular degree status or dropped from the graduate program.
Only graduate students admitted as regular degree or provisional students and senior undergraduates in engineering who intend to pursue graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the 500-level “fundamentals” courses (which are specifically for degree candidates). Only graduate degree candidates will be permitted to register for the 600-level courses.
Students who were registered as special students before the fall semester 1970 may request that work completed as a special student be applied toward a graduate degree. Students registering as special students after the fall semester of 1970 can request that work taken as a special student be applied toward a degree only if they are admitted to the Graduate School during the term in which they are taking work as a special student.
Seniors in this University who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who need not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet their requirements for bachelor’s degrees, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the director of graduate studies.
Complete applications, including ATGSB scores, transcripts, and letters of reference, must be in the Office of Graduate Studies, Graduate School of Business Administration, not later than 60 days prior to the term for which admission is sought.
Requirements for Degrees—Master’s Programs
Students applying for the master’s degree programs in business do not need to have an undergraduate degree in business; however, they must acquire and adequate background preparation in:
Accounting Marketing
Business finance Operations analysis


621 University of Colorado at Denver
Business law Organizational behavior
Financial institutions Principles of economics
Management science Statistics
Statistics, management science, and operations analysis are not required for candidates for the Master of Business Education degree.
An undergraduate degree program in business administration usually provides the minimal necessary background in most of these fields. At the University of Colorado, a student who has had the following courses will be considered to have the minimal necessary background.
Acct. 200. Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects
Acct. 214. Introductory Accounting—Managerial Aspects
B.Law 300. Business Law
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics
Fin. 305. Basic Finance
Mgt.Org. 300. Operations Analysis
•Mgt.Org. 330. Introduction to Management and Organization Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing and one additional 3-hour marketing course approved by adviser.
Stat. 200. Business Statistics (note exception below)
Stat. 490. Business Operations Research
For students lacking such preparation, 3-credit graduate fundamentals courses are offered in each of the background fields: B.Ad. 501 (Acct.), B.Ad. 502 (Stat.), B.Ad. 503 (Mk.), B.Ad. 504 (Mgt.Org.), B.Ad. 505 (Fin.), B.Ad. 506 (Law), and B.Ad. 507 (Mg.Sc.). These fundamentals courses do not carry graduate business degree credit, nor may they be used to satisfy requirements for the bachelor’s degree in business. They are open only to graduate students admitted on a regular or provisional status, qualified nonbusiness senior undergraduates who intend to pursue graduate study in business, and special students who are applying for graduate admission.
All students entering the Master of Business Administration or Master of Science programs are required either to take B.Ad. 502 (Fundamentals of Business Statistics) or to pass satisfactorily a qualifying examination covering this subject matter. In addition, all M.B.A. students are required either to take B.Ad. 500 (Sources of Information and Research Methods) for no credit or to pass satisfactorily a qualifying examination covering this subject matter.
A student with a bachelor's degree in business normally can complete the requirements for the master’s degree in one calendar year. Students with no undergraduate work in business normally require two years.
Advising. An advisory committee is appointed for each Master of Science and Master of Business Education degree candidate. Students should initially meet with the graduate student adviser in the Office of Graduate Studies for the purpose of ascertaining their principal field of interest and the particular degree program they should follow. A chairman selected for *
*Students admitted to the M.B.A. degree program who need a background course in this area must take B.Ad. 504.
tStudents must be registered when they take this examination.
the student’s advisory committee then acts as the student's faculty adviser. Other committee members are appointed during the student’s first semester in residence. Master of Business Administration degree candidates should report to the head of the division of their area of emphasis for advising.
During the first term of residence, each student should prepare a degree plan. This plan with appropriate signatures should be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies.
Qualifying Examinations. Satisfactory performance on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business and admision into a master’s program with the status of a regular degree student will constitute the qualifying examination for graduate study.
Course Load. The normal course load for graduate students is 12 semester hours. Additional hours may be taken upon approval of the student’s adviser, subject to the general rules of the Graduate School.
Minimum Hours Required as Regular Degree or Provisional Student. A candidate for master’s degree in business must complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work after being admitted to the program. This requirement in no way changes the minimum of 30 semester hours needed for a degree.
Comprehensive Examination. Each candidate for a Master of Science or Master of Business Education degree is required to take a comprehensive-final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination is given near the end of the candidate’s last semester of residence.! Comprehensive examinations are given in November, April, and July. A comprehensive examination is not required for students pursuing the Master of Business Administration degree program.
Students must file an Application for Admission to Candidacy with the Office of Graduate Studies during the first month of the final term of their residency.
Minimum Grade-Point Average. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved in courses taken after the student’s admission to the graduate program. The student’s cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, he will be placed on academic probation and given one regular semester (summer terms excluded) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required average within the allotted time period will result in dismissal.
Work receiving the lowest passing grade, D, may not be counted toward a degree, nor may it be accepted for the removal of deficiencies.
To earn a grade of W (withdrawal) in a course, a graduate student must be earning a grade of C or better in that course.
An IP (in progress) grade shall be a valid grade only until the end of the regular semester (summer terms excluded) following that in which the grade of IP is given. By the end of that interval, the instructor concerned shall have turned in a final grade of A, B, C, D, F, or W. Except under unusual circumstances, if no reports are received from the instructor within the allotted time the IP shall be converted to an F.


College of Business and Administration 163
Time Limit. All work, including the comprehensive-final examination, should be completed within five years or six successive summers. Candidates for the master’s degree are expected to complete their work with reasonable continuity.*
Master of Business Administration
The Master of Business Administration program is devoted to the concepts, analytical tools, and communication skills required for competent and responsible administration. The administration of an enterprise is viewed in its entirety and within its social, political, and economic environment.
In addition to the general requirements for a master’s degree listed above, the candidate for the M.B.A. degree must complete the specific requirements of the M.B.A. curriculum (30 semester hours) as follows:
CORE REQUIREMENTS Semester Hours
a. Business and Its Environment
Business, Government, and Society (B.Ad. 610) ..........3
b. Analysis and Control
Business and Economic Analysis (B.Ad. 615)..............3
fAdministrative Controls (B.Ad. 620) ...................3
c. Human Factors
Organizational Behavior (B.Ad. 640) ....................3
d. Planning and Policy
Administrative Policy (B.Ad. 650).......................3
Area of Emphasis.............................................9
^Electives ................................................ 6
Total ................................................30
Areas of emphasis include accounting, finance, management science (shown below), marketing§, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, and transportation management.
Courses comprising the area of emphasis must be approved by the head of the division or his designated representative.
M.B.A. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM For students selecting management science as their area of emphasis, the M.B.A. program is as follows:
Stat. 580. Multiple Correlation and Regression Analysis..........3
Stat. 582. Sampling and Inference................................3
Stat. 584. Business Forecasting .................................3
Mgt.Org. 640. Operations Management .............................3
**E.D.E.E. 548. Applied Probability Models.......................3
**E.D.E.E. 545. Production Automation Systems....................3
"E.D.E.E. 595. Selected Topics................................1-6
B.Ad. 620. Administrative Controls................................3
No thesis is required in the M.B.A. program. In the total program there must be a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work at the 600 level. Independent study courses (499 or 699) are normally not acceptable for credit in the final 30 semester hours of the M.B.A. program.
Students may start their graduate programs at the beginning of the fall, spring, or summer terms.
Master of Science
The Master of Science degree affords opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and a related minor field.
MAJOR FIELDS
For detailed information concerning requirements and recommended programs for each of the major fields, students should consult the following professors:
Accounting.................................Professor Schattke
Finance........................................Professor Kolb
Management Science.........................Professor Jedamus
Marketing..................................Professor Cateora
Management and Organization....................Professor Reed
MINOR FIELDS
Fields available in the College of Business for selection as a minor are:
Accounting Business education Finance
Management science Marketing
Office administration Operations management Organizational behavior Transportation management
Policy Formulation and Administration (12 semester hours)
B.Ad. 610. Business, Government, and Society................3
B.Ad. 615. Business and Economic Analysis...................3
B.Ad. 640. Organizational Behavior...........................3
B.Ad. 650. Business Policy...................................3
Area of Emphasis (9 semester hours)
At least three courses from the following:
Mg.Sc. 615. Decision Analysis................................3
Mg.Sc. 625. Computer Oriented Decision Modeling.............3
Mg.Sc. 635. Mathematical Programming.........................3
Mg.Sc. 675. Seminar in Management Science...................3
Mg.Sc. 685. Advanced Topics in Management Science...........3
Electives (9 semester hours)
At least three courses from the following:
Stat. 570. Elements of Mathematical Statistics..............3 *
*Under unusual circumstances, students whose residence is interrupted for legitimate reasons, such as military service, may apply for an extension of time. tB.Ad. 620 may be waived if a student has had similar work in his graduate or undergraduate program. Waiver will be upon recommendation of faculty teaching the course(s) and approval of the director of graduate studies.
^Elective courses must be 500- or 600-level and cannot be taken in the area of emphasis.
§Requirements for an area of emphasis in marketing in the M. B.A. will consist of 9 hours as follows: Mk. 600 (Marketing Management), Mk. 605 (M.B.A. Seminar in Marketing), and one additional 3-hour marketing course at the 500 level or higher.
"With the approval of the head of the Management Science Division.
With the approval of the student’s adviser, minor fields may be chosen among other business subjects, from the social sciences, or from law. In exceptional cases, minors are permitted in other subject matter areas on recommendation of the Graduate Committee of the College of Business and Administration and with the approval of the dean of the Graduate School.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
The minimum requirements for the M.S. degree, after all undergraduate background deficiencies have been removed, are normally met by Plan I, shown below. Candidates may be permitted to fulfill the degree requirements under Plan II, upon approval in advance by their advisory committee.
Plan I. In this plan, the requirement is 30 semester hours of graduate credit including a thesis (4 to 6 hours credit) based upon original research by the candidate. A minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, including B.Ad. 630 (Business Research), is required of all candidates and, including the thesis, must be earned in a major field. A minimum of three courses, normally 9 semester


641 University of Colorado at Denver
hours but not fewer than 6, must be completed in a minor field.
Plan II. In this plan a minimum of 30 semester hours of course work must be completed in courses numbered at the 500 level or above. Requirements must be met in both a major and a minor field. No thesis is required.
Candidates for the M.S. degree, whether following Plan I or Plan II, may not receive credit for 600-level courses with B.Ad. prefix, except B.Ad. 630 (Business Research) and in some cases, B.Ad. 620 (Administrative Controls.)
For both Plan I and Plan II there will be written comprehensive examinations covering major and minor fields. The candidate’s committee may require an oral final comprehensive examination subsequent to the written examination.
Programs in Major Fields
ACCOUNTING
At the undergraduate level, most accounting majors take 24 or more semester hours, either to prepare themselves for the CPA exam or because most employment opportunities in professional accounting require a heavy major. For these students the M.B.A. program with an area of emphasis in accounting is recommended. With so many semester hours in accounting at the undergraduate level, the student is well prepared to enter the graduate level seminars in accounting.
The M.S. program is more suited for those students who have minimal background in accounting at the undergraduate level. Atthe minimum, B.Ad. 501 (Accounting) and Acct. 612, or their equivalents, are necessary prerequisites for the 500-level and 600-level accounting courses that constitute the major field of study in the M.S. program.
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Required Courses (15 hours) Semester Hours
Stat. 570. Elements of Mathematical Statistics............3
Mg.Sc. 625. Computer Oriented Decision Modeling...........3
Mg.Sc. 635. Mathematical Programming......................3
Mg.Sc. 675. Management Science Seminar....................3
Mgt.Org. 601. Organizational Behavior as a System.........3
The remaining 15 or more semester hours are to be selected, in consultation with the student’s adviser, with the following courses recommended:
B.Ad. 620. Administrative Controls.............................3
Mgt.Org. 640. Operations Management............................3
Mgt.Org. 647. Seminar in Operations Management Policy and
Administration .............................................3
Mgt.Org. 632. Behavior of Task Groups..........................3
Mk. 530. Quantitative Marketing Analysis.......................3
Mg.Sc. 685. Advanced Topics in Management Science..............3
Fin. 603. Seminar in Business Financial Policy.................3
Acct. 626. Seminar in Managerial Accounting....................3
If Plan I is to be followed, B.Ad. 630 (Business Research) is required as 3 of the remaining 15 or more semester hours, and Mg.Sc. 700 is substituted for Mg.Sc. 675.
ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR A student majoring in organizational behavior is required to demonstrate competency in the general area of organization theory and behavior, and in the applied areas of labor relations and personnel management. A minimum of 15 semester hours is to be selected, in consultation with the student’s adviser, from the following courses:
Courses Semester Hours
Mgt.Org. 601. Organizational Behavior as a System .............3
Mgt.Org. 602. Individual Behavior in Organizations.............3
Mgt.Org. 534. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice.............3
Mgt.Org. 632. Behavior of Task Groups..........................3
Mgt.Org. 634. Seminar in Industrial Relations..................3
Mgt.Org. 636. Behavior in Complex Organizations................3
The remaining 15 or more semester hours are to be selected, in consultation with the student’s adviser, with
the following courses recommended:
B.Ad. 620. Administrative Controls ...................... 3
Mgt. Org. 544. Sociotechnical Work Systems:
Synthesis and Design .............................. 3
Mgt. Org. 640. Operations Management..................... 3
Mg.Sc. 625. Computer-Oriented Decision Modeling ......... 3
If Plan I is to be followed, B.Ad. 630 and Org.B. 700 are required among the remaining 15 or more semester hours.
Master of Business Education
The Master of Business Education program provides preparation for careers in secondary school and college teaching of business subjects.
SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES For advanced work in business education, the candidate must possess a bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, from an approved institution, and also must present the following courses or their equivalents:
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics
Acct. 200. Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects
Fin. 305. Basic Finance
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing
B.Law 300. Business Law
Mgt.Org. 330. Introduction to Management and Organization Education courses—12 semester hours of credit.*
Deficiencies in accounting, finance, marketing, business law, and organizational behavior may be fulfilled by taking the fundamental courses in the respective areas: B.Ad. 501 (Acct.), B.Ad. 503 (Mk.), B.Ad. 504 (M&O), B.Ad. 505 (Fin.), B.Ad. 506 (Law).
BUSINESS EDUCATION MAJOR Courses from the subject-matter fields in business are included in the business education major. Also, certain courses in vocational guidance and educational statistics in the School of Education will receive business education credit. Students electing this degree may not receive credit toward degree requirements for 600-level courses with B.Ad. prefix, except B.Ad. 630 (Business Research).
‘Not a prerequisite for a degree with a community college teaching emphasis.


College of Business and Administration 165
A community college teaching emphasis in the Master of Business Education degree may be elected. Two plans are available. Plan I is designed primarily for those persons who have completed an undergraduate teacher education program in business. Plan II is designed for those students who have an undergraduate degree in business but who have not completed a teacher education program. (Plan II will not lead to teacher certification.) The program is distributed among three areas: 12-14 semester hours in professional business education courses; 6-8 hours in the field of higher education as offered in the School of Education; and 8-12 hours in a specific functional business area selected from accounting, finance, organizational behavior, management science, marketing, or office administration.
The minimum requirements for this degree, after all undergraduate deficiences have been removed, may be met according to one of the following plans:
Plan I. In this plan the requirement is 30 semester hours of graduate credit including a thesis (4 to 6 hours of credit) based upon original research by the candidate.
Plan II. In this plan a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit must be completed. Candidates pursuing this plan will not write a thesis but will be required to prepare an extended report. This plan is not a free option. Candidates intending to pursue this plan must first obtain the approval of their advisory committees through petition.
For both Plan I and Plan II there will be written comprehensive examinations. The candidate’s committee may require an oral final examination subsequent to the written examination.
Doctor of Business Administration
Students should refer to the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Bulletin for information regarding the Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.) program.
Description of Courses
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration offer courses in the subject areas shown below:
Accounting
Business Administration Business Education Business Law Finance Insurance
Management Science Marketing
Office Administration Operations Management Organizational Behavior Real Estate
Small Business Management Statistics
Transportation Management
Courses numbered from 100 to 299 are intended for lower division students.
Courses numbered from 300 to 399 are intended for upper division students. Sophomores in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also will be admitted if they are considered eligible by that college to register for upper division courses.
Courses numbered from 400 to 499 are intended for upper division students. Courses numbered from 500 to 599 are intended for graduate students. Courses numbered in the 600s and 700s are open only to graduate students.
For each course there is indicated the course prefix; the course number and, after the hyphen, the number of credits carried by the course; the course title and description; and, following, the course prerequisites.
Schedules of classes are issued before the start of each semester. These provide a complete list of offerings for the forthcoming semester, together with names of instructors, class hours, and room assignments.
ACCOUNTING
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
Acct. 200-3. Introductory Accounting—Financial Aspects. The
preparation and interpretation of the principal financial statements of the business enterprise, with emphasis on asset and liability valuation problems and the determination of net income. Prer., sophomore standing.
Acct. 214-3. Introductory Accounting—Managerial Aspects. The
analysis of cost behavior and the role of accounting in the planning and control of business enterprises, with emphasis on management decision-making uses of accounting information. Prer., Acct. 200. Accounting majors must take this course.
Acct. 322-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting. Intensive analysis of problems and theory of financial statements of condition and net income and other published financial statements of business organizations. Consideration of the role of professional accounting organizations in establishing generally acceptable accounting principles, especially the AICPA and AAA. Prer., Acct. 214.
Acct. 323-3. Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice I.
Continuation of Acct. 322. Prer., Acct. 322.
Acct. 424-3. Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice II.
Continuation of Acct. 323, with additional emphasis on theory and current problems. Prer., Acct. 323.
Acct. 425-3. Accounting Problems and Cases. In-depth analysis of contemporary accounting issues and problems, the development of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Prer., Acct. 322 and 323.
Acct. 432-3. Cost Accounting. Cost analysis of the manufacturing, marketing, and administrative function of business organizations, primarily for purposes of control and decision making. Prer., Acct. 214. Mgt.Org. 330, Stat. 200.
Acct. 441-3. Income Tax Accounting. Provisions and procedures of federal income tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and business organizations, including the management problems of tax planning and compliance. Prer., Acct. 214.
Acct. 442-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Continuation of Acct. 441, with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partnerships, corporations, and estates and trusts. Consideration also is given to federal estate and gift taxes. Prer., Acct. 441.
Acct. 454-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. The design and analysis of management information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers, computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process. Prer., 9 semester hours of accounting.
Acct. 462-3. Auditing Theory. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the American Institute of CPA’s reviewed. Prer., Acct. 323 or consent of instructor.
Acct. 480-3. Business and Governmental Budgeting and Control.
Development and operation of various budgets for planning and control of business and governmental activities. Includes the integration


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of program budgets, responsibility center budgets, and fund acount-ing in governmental accounting systems. Prer., Acct. 214 or consent of instructor.
GRADUATE COURSES
Acct. 524-3. Advanced Accounting Theory and Practice II.
Continuation of Acct. 323, with additional emphasis on financial accounting theory. Prer., Acct. 323 or 612.
Acct. 525-3. Accounting Problems and Cases. In-depth analysis of contemporary accounting issues and problems, the development of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Prer., Acct. 322 and 323 or 612. Acct. 532-3. Cost Accounting. Cost analysis of the manufacturing, marketing, and administrative functions of business organizations, primarily for purpose of control and decision making. Prer., Acct. 214, Mgt.Org. 330 or B.Ad. 501, 502 or 504, and Stat. 200.
Acct. 541-3. Income Tax Accounting. Provisions and procedures of federal income tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and business organizations, including the management problems of tax planning and compliance. Prer., Acct. 214 or consent of instructor. Acct. 542-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Continuation of Acct. 441, with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partnerships, corporations, and estates and trusts. Consideration is also given to federal estate and gift taxes. Prer., Acct. 441 or 541.
Acct. 554-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. The design and analysis of management information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers, computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process. Prer., 9 sem. hrs. of accounting.
Acct. 562-3. Auditing Theory. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the AICPA reviewed. Prer., Acct. 323 or 612.
Acct. 580-3. Business and Governmental Budgeting and Control. Development and operation of various budgets for planning and control of business and governmental activities. Includes the integration of program budgets, responsibility center budgets, and fund accounting in governmental accounting systems. Prer., Acct. 214 or B.Ad. 501.
Acct. 612-3. Financial Accounting Practice and Procedures.
Designed to be a graduate level treatment of substantially the same material covered in Acct. 322 and 323. Should not be taken by students who have taken Acct. 322 and 323 or their equivalent. Restricted to graduate students. Prer., B.Ad. 501 or equivalent.
Acct. 626-3. Seminar in Managerial Accounting. In-depth exploration of the broad professional field of managerial accounting, especially as related to organizational decision making, planning, and control. Development and current problems of the managerial accounting function analyzed. Prer., Acct. 432 or 532 and 454 or 554 or equivalents.
Acct. 627-3. Seminar in Income Determination. Critical analysis of problems and theory of measurement and reporting of periodic net income of business organizations. Net income models, research efforts, and role of professional accounting organizations. Current issues and problems given special attention. Prer., Acct. 323 or 612.
Acct. 628-3. Seminar in Accounting Theory. Nature and origin of accounting theory and the development of postulates, principles, and practices. Methodology appropriate to development and evaluation of accounting theory, with special emphasis on accepted research standards and procedures. Prer., Acct. 323 or 612.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
B.Ad. 100-3. Introduction to Business. Nature of business enterprise; role of business in our society; problems confronting business management. Career opportunities in business. Business students are advised to take this course during their freshman year. Not open to upper division students in the College of Business. Open only to freshmen and sophomores.
B.Ad. 200-3. Business Information and the Computer. A study of the sources and uses of business information. Includes computer
programming, data presentation, descriptive statistics, and interpretation of business, economic, and demographic data. Prer., Math. 108 or equivalent. Students should enroll in B.Ad. 200 and Stat. 200 in consecutive semesters.
B.Ad. 410-3. Business and Government. The study of government regulation of the business system. Topics include regulation of business concentration, markets for labor, money, other resources, and final products. Prer., Econ. 201 and 202. Completion of Pol.Sci. 110 is recommended before taking this course. Does not carry graduate credit for majors in business. If both B.Ad. 410 and 411 are taken, elective credit will be given for the latter to the business student.
B.Ad. 411-3. Business and Society. An examination of interrelationships between business, society, and the environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socio-economic-business system, current public policy issues, and social responsibilities and ethics. Prer., Econ. 201 and 202. Completion of Pol.Sci. 110 and Soc. 111 is recommended before taking this course. If Both B.Ad. 410 and 411 are taken, elective credit will be given for the latter to the business student.
B.Ad. 450-3. Cases and Concepts in Business Policy. Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, social-political, technological, and competition components of the external environment with the internal characteristics of the firm; and deriving through analysis the appropriate interaction between the firm and its environment to facilitate accomplishment of the firm's objectives. Extensive use of actual case studies from business supplemented by readings in business policy and strategy. Priority for enrollment will be given to business seniors in their final semester prior to graduation. Students should register for this course only after completion of all other core course requirements for the B.S. degree. Does not carry graduate credit. Prer., Fin. 305, Mk. 300, Mgt.Org. 300, Mgt.Org. 330, and Stat. 200.
GRADUATE COURSES
The following graduate fundamentals courses do not carry graduate business degree credit, nor may they be used to satisfy requirements for the bachelor’s degree in business. They are open only to graduate students admitted on a regular or provisional status. Qualified nonbusiness senior undergraduates who intend to pursue graduate study in business and special students who will be applying for graduate admission during the term in which they are enrolled for the course may be admitted with the written approval of the Office of Graduate Studies.
B.Ad. 500-noncredit. Sources of Information and Research Methods. The objective of this course is to provide the M B. A. student with the basic research techniques needed to locate, use, and evaluate secondary resource materials. The approach will be to emphasize techniques rather than actual titles. Open only to M B.A. graduate degree candidates.
B.Ad. 501-3. Fundamentals of Accounting. Provides basic understanding of accounting essential for graduate study of business. B.Ad. 502-3. Fundamentals of Business Statistics. Provides basic understanding of business statistics essential for graduate study of business.
B.Ad. 503-3. Fundamentals of Marketing. Provides basic understanding of marketing essential for graduate study of business. This course may be waived if the student has completed Mk. 300 and one additional 3-hour marketing course approved by an adviser. B.Ad. 504-3. Fundamentals of Management and Organization. Provides basic understanding of organization theory, personnel management, labor relations, and organizational behavior essential for graduate study in business.
B.Ad. 505-3. Fundamentals of Finance. Provides basic understanding of financial institutions and business finance essential for graduate study of business. Prer., B.Ad. 501 or equivalent. B.Ad. 506-3. Legal Environment of Business. Provides basic understanding of the private and public law essential for graduate study in business.


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B.Ad. 507-3. Fundamentals of Management Science. A survey of the analytical methods of management science operations research as applied to decision problems in business. A major objective of the course is to develop an understanding of the power and the limitations of mathematical-statistical models and to develop skills in problem formulation. Prer., B.Ad. 502 or equivalent.
The following graduate courses are open only to admitted graduate students. Students should have completed all of the fundamental requirements or be currently registered for them before enrolling in any of the 600-level courses.
B.Ad. 610-3. Business, Government, and Society. The interaction and interdependence of business and its executives with societal, governmental, and economic environments, including analytic elements such as the forecasting and analysis of business conditions. Explores the firm's and its executives' social and ethical responsibilities to various internal and external publics: employees, organized labor, stockholders, suppliers, customers, the financial community, and the general public. Considers the relationship between business and government at federal, state, and local levels, and the control and regulation of business activities by various statutes and by social pressures, and specifically includes the study of anti-trust policy. Considers the problems and opportunities of operating in the international environment. Prer., by course work or waiver, completion of at least half (12 hours) of the B.Ad. 500 series of fundamentals.
B.Ad. 615-3. Business and Economic Analysis. A presentation of the concepts, tools, and methods of economic analysis relevant to a broad cross-section of decisions within the business firm. Particular attention will be given to market demands and the interrelationships between price policy, costs, promotional outlays, operating rates and production schedules, capital budgets, and financing in the short and long run. Prer., B.Ad. 501, 502, and 505, or equivalents.
B.Ad. 620-3. Administrative Controls. Nature and techniques of control in modern managerial context. Intensive case analysis to study theory and application of control methods. Prer., B.Ad. 501, 502 and 505.
B.Ad. 630-3. Business Research. Nature, scope, and importance of business research and research methodology. Emphasizes sources of information, methods of presentation, methods of analysis, and interpretation of statistical data. Involves individual investigation and report writing on problems of current business interest.
B.Ad. 640-3. Organizational Behavior. Application of behavioral science concepts and research to management of organizations. Prer., B.Ad. 504 or equivalent.
B.Ad. 650-3. Business Policy. Emphasizes problem analysis and decision making at integrative-management level. Devoted to internal policy making. Considerable use of case method of instruction. Emphasis on integrated use of managerial accounting, statistics, and other tools of research, analysis, and control in making company-wide policy decisions. This course must be taken in the candidate’s final term of the program. B.Ad. 500-level fundamentals, by course completion or waiver, are firm prerequisites.
BUSINESS LAW
B.Law 300-3. Business Law. To understand the legal significance of business transactions as part of the decision-making process in business. Coverage of text and statutes includes: law and its enforcement and integration of the Uniform Commercial Code with the law of Contracts, Bailments, Warehousemen and Carriers, Documents of Title, Sales of Goods, and Commercial Paper. Prer., junior standing.
FINANCE
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
Fin. 305-3. Basic Finance. An introduction to finance and financial management of business. The course includes a study of the monetary system and other institutions comprising the money and capital
markets. It also includes a study of the financial manager’s role in business, with emphasis on the investment of capital in assets and on financing the asset requirements of business firms. Prer., Econ. 201 and 202, and Acct. 200.
Fin. 333-3. Investments. Study of the basic problems concerning the development and implementing a personal investment program. Includes analysis of investment risks, alternative investment media, designing and executing an investment program. Intended for business students not majoring in finance. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 355-3. Financial Markets. Discusses major operating characteristics and problems of money and capital markets, both national and international. Emphasizes the sources and availability of money and capital for financing business and the market structure for the employment of savings. Prer., Fin. 305.
Fin. 401-3. Business Finance I. Basic principles and practices governing management of capital in the business firm constitute the core of this course. Determinants of capital requirements, methods of obtaining capital, problems of internal financial management and methods of financial analysis. Financing the business corporation given primary emphasis. Prer., Fin. 305; Acct. 214.
Fin. 402-3. Business Finance II. Develops analytical and decision-making skills of students, in relation to a wide range of problems that commonly confront financial management. General problem areas include planning, control, and financing of current operations and longer term capital commitments; management of income; evaluation of income-producing property; and expansion of business through merger and consolidation. Case method of instruction. Prer., Fin. 401.
Fin. 433-3. Investment and Portfolio Management. Discusses investment problems and policies and the methodology for implementing them. Includes portfolio analysis, selection of investment media, and measurement of performance. Prer., Fin. 401 and 455; coreq., Fin. 402.
Fin. 434-3. Security Analysis. An application of the theories and methodology for the selection of investment media for implementing an investment portfolio. Prer., Fin. 402 and 433.
Fin. 440-3. International Financial Management. Considers international capital movements and balance of payments problems. Emphasizes special problems of international operations as they affect the financial functions. Reviews both public and private foreign and international institutions as well as the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., Fin. 305.
GRADUATE COURSES
Fin. 534-3. Security Analysis. An application of the theories and methodology for the selection of investment media for implementing an investment portfolio. Prer., Fin. 402 and 433, Fin. 602 and 633.
Fin. 540-3. International Financial Management. Considers international capital movements and balance of payments problems. Emphasizes special problems of international operations as they affect the financial functions. Reviews both public and private foreign and international institutions as well as the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., Fin. 305 or B.Ad. 505. Fin. 554-4. Mortgage Financing. Functions and practice of various real estate mortgage financing institutions. Embraces mortgage lending, servicing, and mortgage banking relative to all types and uses of real estate. Prer., Fin. 305 or B.Ad. 505.
Fin. 601-3. Problems and Policies in Financial Management I.
Emphasizes the planning and control responsibilities of financial management in relation to internal investment decisions and financing asset requirements. Analytical skills are developed in analyzing case studies covering a broad range of policies and problems. Specific topics include: management of working capital, capital position, short-term financing and intermediate and long-term financing, and designing the capital structure. Prer., B.Ad. 505 or equivalent.
Fin. 602-3. Problems and Policies in Financial Management II. A
continuation of Financial Management I. Specific topics include: long-term financing (hybrid securities and leasing), marketing securities, capital budgeting, dividend policy, valuation, external expansion or acquisitions, and capital structure adjustments. Prer., Fin. 601.


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Fin. 633-3. Investment Management and Analysis. Develops the theory of investment management and security values; portfolio management including the analysis of investment risks and constraints for both short- and long-run investment policies and objectives; the analysis and use of investment information; and the development and application of the tools for determining security values. Prer., Fin. 601; coreq., Fin. 602.
Fin. 655-3. Business Fluctuations and Monetary Policy.
Theoretical and empirical study of forces governing business fluctuations in the U.S., and the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies as major control vehicles. Attention is given to the analytical tools essential for understanding business indicators and the various policy alternatives to attain stated economic goals and objectives. Prer., B.Ad. 505.
INSURANCE
UNDERGRADUATE COURSE
Ins. 484-3. Principles of Insurance. Fundamental principles of insurance and their application to life, disability, property, and liability insurance. Provides the basic knowledge for intelligent solution of personal and business insurance problems as well as for further specialized study of insurance.
GRADUATE COURSE
Ins. 584-3. Principles of Insurance. Fundamental principles of insurance and their application in life, disability, property, and liability insurance. Provides the basic knowledge for intelligent solution of personal and business insurance problems as well as for further specialized study of insurance.
MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION
Operations Management
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
Mgt.Org. 300-3. Operations Analysis. An introduction to the application of analytical techniques in the design, implementation, and control of operational systems in manufacturing, service, public, and other organizations. Some topics which will be included are: inventory models, linear programming, forecasting, waiting line analysis, and quality control. Prer., Acct. 200; coreq., Stat. 200.
Mgt.Org. 440-3. Control Systems in Operations Management.
Study of management problems and procedures in controlling operations of organizations. Application of quantitative methods and evaluation techniques to such areas as cost control, inventory control, quality control, and production control. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300.
Mgt.Org. 444-3. Sociotechnical Work Systems: Synthesis and Design. A study of the relationships between people and the technical and physical environments in which they work. Includes consideration of the theory of and methods for analysis, measurement, and synthesis of work systems, and of organizational methods for stimulating innovation through work design. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300.
Mgt.Org. 447-3. Operations Management: Policy and Practice.
Study of operations management policy formulation and administration. Emphasis is on developing decision-making skills through the use of such learning techniques as case study, field research, and simulation. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300. Mgt.Org. 460-3. Purchasing and Materials Management. Study of the processes for acquiring and controlling materials, components, and services required for operations system management. Includes analysis of management alternatives in problems such as source selection, inventory control, value analysis, negotiation, and legal questions. Prer., Mgt.Org. 300.
GRADUATE COURSES
Mgt.Org. 540-3. Control Systems in Operations Management.
Study of management problems and procedures in controlling
operations of organizations. Application of quantitative methods and evaluation techniques to such areas as cost control, inventory control, quality control, and production control. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300 or B.Ad. 502 and 507.
Mgt.Org. 544-3. Sociotechnical Work Systems: Synthesis and Design. A study of the relationships between people and the technical and physical environments in which they work. Includes consideration of the theory of and methods for analysis, measurement, and synthesis of work systems, and of organizational methods for stimulating innovation through work design. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300 or B.Ad. 502 and 507.
Mgt.Org. 547-3. Operations Management: Policy and Practice.
Study of operations management policy formulation and administration. Emphasis is on developing decision-making skills through the use of such learning techniques as case study, field research, and simulation. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 300 or B.Ad. 502 and 507. Mgt.Org. 560-3. Purchasing and Materials Management. Study of the processes for acquiring and controlling materials, components, and services required for operations systems management. Includes analysis of management alternatives in problems such as source selection, inventory control, value analysis, negotiation, and legal questions. Prer., Mgt.Org. 300 or equivalent.
Mgt.Org. 640-3. Operations Management. Study of the strategies and techniques of formal analysis for the management of operations systems. Student develops skills in problem definition and means of implementing solutions in specific situations where technological, economic, and human factors must be considered. Prer., B.Ad. 504 and 507 or equivalent.
Mgt.Org. 647-3. Seminar In Operations Management Policy and Administration. Analysis of economic and strategic implications of alternative approaches to designing, controlling, and managing operations systems. Considers industry characteristics and economics, organizational processes, and market factors in operations management policy making and program implementation. Prer., B.Ad. 504 and 507 or equivalent.
Organizational Behavior
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
Mgt.Org. 330-3. Introduction to Management and Organization.
An introductory study of management fundamentals, organization theory, motivation, the behavioral aspects of individual cognitive processes, the behavior of small work groups, and leadership. Students are urged to complete Psych. 203 and 204 and Soc. 111 before taking this course
Mgt.Org. 333-3. The Individual and the Organization. Analysis of historical and contemporary models of the motivation of people in work organizations. Included is a study of human needs, perception, judgment, values, attitudes, learning, alienation, and their relationship to managerial styles, performance evaluation, and organizational development. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 335-3. Managing Task-Oriented Groups. Analysis of task-group behavior in work organizations. Includes study of the influences upon group performance of group formation, communication consensus, leadership, norms, change, conflict, and collaboration, and analysis of group member roles, group structure, and intergroup relationships. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 337-3. Managing Complete Organizations. Analysis of historical and contemporary models for differentiating, integrating, and adapting efforts of organizations, using the entire organization as the unit for analysis. The course examines the influence of environment and technology on the organization s internal structure and method of operation, considering goals, authority, decision making, communication, and control structures and processes. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 434-3. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice. Analysis of legal, political, social, and managerial aspects of collective bargaining and union-management relations. Includes study of conflict theory and strategies for conflict resolution. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330.
Mgt.Org. 438-3. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice. Study of problems in developing and applying specific personnel systems (organization, placement, growth, reward, maintenance) in modern organizations, and analysis of their impact on organizational effectiveness. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 330.


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GRADUATE COURSES
Mgt.Org. 534-3. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice. Analysis of legal, political, social, and managerial aspects of collective bargaining and union-management relations. Includes study of conflict theory and strategies for conflict resolution. Prer., Mgt.Org. 330 or B. Ad. 504. Mgt.Org. 538-3. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice. Study of problems in developing and applying specific personnel systems (organization, placement, growth, reward, maintenance) in modern organizations, and analysis of their impact on organizational effectiveness. Prer., Stat. 200 and Mgt.Org. 330 or B.Ad. 504.
Mgt.Org. 601-3. Organizational Behavior as a System. An
introductory study of task organizations concentrating upon individuals, groups, and complex formal organizations, their interrelationships and means of mutual adaptation in a systems context. Attention is given to applied analysis of the concepts introduced. Prer., B.Ad. 504 or equivalent.
Mgt.Org. 602-3. Individual Behavior in Organizations. Analysis of individual differences including issues such as perception, cognition, motivation, human judgment and problem solving, learning, achievement, emotions, value and attitude formation, abilities, alienation, and integrating the personality to organizations. Applications focus upon assessing individuals in an organization context. Prer., B.Ad. 640 or Mgt.Org. 601 or equivalent.
Mgt.Org. 632-3. Behavior of Task Groups. A study of interpersonal competence in organization. Topics include group information and development, interpersonal communication, leadership, interpersonal attraction, roles, power, conformity and normative behavior, group cohesiveness, performance, effectiveness, conflict, decision making, social exchange, equity, competition, interpersonal encounter, and intergroup processes. Prer., B.Ad. 640 or Mgt.Org. 601 or equivalent.
Mgt.Org. 634-3. Seminar in Industrial Relations. The application of theory and research integrating labor relations and personnel management into the total manpower system. Topics may include manpower research and policy, public policy, collective bargaining trends and patterns, integrating the organization’s manpower system, current issues. Emphasis on national and organizational manpower research and research designs. Prer., Mgt.Org. 434 or 534 and 438 or 538 or equivalent.
Mgt.Org. 636-3. Behavior in Complex Organizations. Analysis of behavior and interfaces required for total organizational functioning. Issues discussed include bureaucracy, technological influences, organizational socialization, structure, goals, environmental influences, adaptation, information, communication and control systems, lateral relationships, system integration, conflict resolution, change, organizational development, and organizational decision processes. Prer., B.Ad. 640 or Mgt.Org. 601 or equivalent.
Transportation Management
UNDERGRADUATE COURSE
Mgt.Org. 457-3. Urban Transportation. Analysis of the two aspects of urban transportation, freight and people. Issues in policy, modes, governmental actions and structure, investment and costs, and effect upon urban environment.
GRADUATE COURSE
Mgt.Org. 557-3. Urban Transportation. Analysis of the two aspects of urban transportation, freight and people. Issues in policy, modes, governmental actions and structure, investment and costs, and effect upon urban environment. Prer., graduate standing.
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Mg.Sc. 625-3. Computer Oriented Decision Modeling. Application of the methods of computer science to problems in industrial management. Emphasis is placed on simulation as a method for studying the behavior of dynamic systems and the use of optimization models for their control. Prer., B.Ad. 507 or equivalent.
Mg.Sc. 635-3. Mathematical Programming. A study of linear and nonlinear programming algorithms, both deterministic and chance-constrained, including linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, quadratic programming, and related techniques. Prer., B.Ad. 507 or equivalent.
Mg.Sc. 675-3. Seminar in Management Science. Application of operations research methods to problems of business and industry, with emphasis on the functional fields of marketing, financial management, and production. Prer., B.Ad. 507 or equivalent, plus 6 additional semester hours of Management Science or Statistics at the 400 level or higher.
MARKETING
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
Mk. 300-3. Principles of Marketing. Analytical survey of problems encountered by businessmen in distributing goods and services to markets. Takes a marketing-management approach in attacking problems related to product planning, channels of distribution, pricing, advertising, and personal selling. Emphasizes the role of the consumer in the marketing process and the social responsibility of the marketer.
Mk. 330-3. Marketing Research. Fundamental techniques. Practical experience in research methodology: planning an investigation, questionnaires, sampling, interpretation of results, report preparation. Research techniques for product analysis, motivation research, sales and distribution-costs analyses, and advertising research. Student will incur project expenses in this course. Prer., Mk. 300 and Stat. 200.
Mk. 340-3. Marketing Institutions and Retailing. A study of the macroeconomicfoundationsof marketing intermediaries, middlemen, and institutional alignments. Emphasis placed on the development and change of institutional structures and functions and the roles played by various participants in moving goods from origin to ultimate consumer, with particular focus on retailing functions and strategies. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 350-3. Principles of Advertising. Analysis of principles and practices in national and retail advertising from executive's point of view. Considers whether a firm should advertise; product and market analysis as planning phase of advertising program; media; survey of creation and production of advertisements; advertising budgets, copy testing, and organizaton. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 360-3. Industrial Marketing. Major activities involved in marketing of industrial goods. Analysis of industrial market structures; habits and motives of industrial purchasers; types of industrial products; pricing problems; distribution channels. Problems in selling to agencies of government. Oriented to engineers and others who may enter the fields of industrial selling or industrial marketing. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 420-3. Consumer Behavior. Survey of noteworthy contributions of the behavioral sciences to the understanding and prediction of consumer behavior. Contributions of various research techniques in the social sciences to the understanding of consumer purchasing and decision-making processes, with particular attention to formal and informal influence patterns. Survey of models of consumer purchasing behavior, brand loyalty, and product cycles. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 450-3. Advertising Management. Advertising problems from management point of view. Stimulating primary and selective demand; selection of media; building promotional programs; advertising appropriations and campaigns; evaluations of results; agency relations. Prer., Mk. 350.
Mk. 470-3. Sales Management. Problems involved in managing a sales force. Includes sales organizaton, operating a sales force (recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision, stimulation), sales planning (forecasting, budgeting, territories), sales analysis and control. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 480-3. Marketing Policies and Strategies. Detailed consideration of process of formulating and implementing marketing policies. Major emphasis on markets, distribution channels, and product analysis. Problem aproach utilized to develop student’s analytical ability and to integrate all major areas of marketing. Prer., Mk. 300.


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Mk. 485-3. Physical Distribution Management. Investigation and analysis of the logistics of distribution systems for firms engaged in manufacturing and marketing. Component parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting those alternatives which will attain the distribution goals of the firm. Prer., Mk. 300.
Mk. 490-3. International Marketing. Studies managerial marketing policies and practices of firms marketing their products and services in foreign countries. An analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in international marketing. Relates marketing activities to the market structure and marketing environments. Prer., Mk. 300 or consent of instructor.
GRADUATE COURSES
Mk. 520-3. Consumer Behavior. Survey of noteworthy contributions of the behavioral sciences to the understanding and prediction of consumer behavior. Contributions of various research techniques in the social sciences to the understanding of consumer purchasing and decision making processes, with particular attention to formal and informal influence patterns. Survey of models of consumer purchasing behavior, brand loyalty, and product cycles. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 503.
Mk. 530-3. Research Design and Experimental Methods in Marketing. An advanced course in marketing research. Stresses the design of marketing research projects and the application of statistical techniques as aids in managing marketing information: its collection, analysis, and interpretation. Techniques of experimental design and application of experimentation as a basis for decision-making in marketing. Design and management of a planned marketing information system. Cases and problems. Prer., Mk. 330.
Mk. 550-3. Advertising Management. Advertising problems from management point of view. Stimulating primary and selective demand; selection of media; building promotional programs; advertising appropriations and campaigns; evaluations of results; agency relations. Prer., Mk. 350.
Mk. 570-3. Sales Management. Problems involved in managing a sales force. Includes sales organization, operating a sales force (recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision, stimulation), sales planning (forecasting, budgeting, territories), sales analysis and control. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 503.
Mk. 575-3. Pricing and Price Policies. Appraisal of price theory and its limitations in actual business situations. A detailed study of the impact of demand, costs, and prices upon revenues and profits through the extensive use of actual case materials. Legal aspects of pricing decisions are studied intensively. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 503. Mk. 585-3. Physical Distribution Management. Investigation and analysis of the logistics of distribution systems for firms engaged in manufacturing and marketing. Component parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting those alternatives which will attain the distribution goals of the firm. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 503.
Mk. 590-3. International Marketing. Studies managerial marketing policies and practices of firms marketing their products and services in foreign countries. An analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in international marketing. Relates marketing activities to the market structure and marketing environment. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 503 or consent of instructor.
Mk. 600-3. Marketing Management. Analysis of marketing problems and policies requiring decisions by marketing executives. Integrates all areas of marketing management and relates the marketing activities of a firm to finance, production, and other major policy areas. Prer., Mk. 300 or B.Ad. 503.
Mk. 605-3. M.B.A. Seminar in Marketing. A comprehensive survey of current problems and issues in marketing from the perspective of the firm. An analysis of the firm’s process of adjustments to market changes. (Required of all M.B.A. students with an area of emphasis in marketing.) Prer., Mk. 600.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
UNDERGRADUATE COURSE
O.Ad. 440-3. Principles of Office Management. Analysis of principles and their application in the planning, organizing, and
controlling of office activities. Methods of developing office systems; importance as a preliminary step in office automation.
GRADUATE COURSE
O.Ad. 540-3. Principles of Office Management. Analysis of principles and their application in the planning, organizing, and controlling of office activities. Methods of developing office systems; importance as a preliminary step in office automation.
REAL ESTATE
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
R.Es. 300-3. Principles of Real Estate Practice. Activities in the current field of real estate practice. Prer., upper division standing.
R.Es. 401-3. Urban Land Economics. The nature of urban real estate and the market forces affecting its utilization. Prer., R.Es. 300. R.Es. 430-3. Real Estate Appraising. Methods of real estate appraising are studied and applied by a field problem in appraising. Prer., R.Es. 300.
R.Es. 473-3. Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions. Business and legal aspects. Estates in land, purchase and sales contracts, conveyances, mortgage and trust deed transactions, property taxes, landlord and tenant, wills and inheritance. Prer., B.Law 300 and R.Es. 300.
GRADUATE COURSES
R.Es. 501-3. Urban Land Economics. The nature of urban real estate and the market forces affecting its utilization. Prer., R.Es. 300.
R.Es. 530-3. Real Estate Appraising. Methods of real estate appraising are studied and applied by a field problem in appraising. Prer., R.Es. 300.
R.Es. 573-3. Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions. Business and legal aspects. Estates in land, purchase and sales contracts, conveyances, mortgage and trust deed transactions, property taxes, landlord and tenant, wills and inheritance. Prer., B.Law 300 or B.Ad. 506 and R.Es. 300.
STATISTICS
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
Stat. 200-3. Business Statistics. Application of statistical theory to the solution of business problems. Includes the study of probability, sampling distributions, statistical inference, and decision analysis. Prer., B.Ad. 200. Note: Students are encouraged to take Stat. 200 in the semester following completion of B.Ad. 200.
Stat. 300-3. Intermediate Statistics. Intermediate level consideration of problems associated with managerial decision making under uncertainty. Prer., Stat. 200.
Stat. 470-3. Elements of Mathematical Statistics. An examination of the mathematical properties of various statistical methods that are used in business research and in business decision making. Prer., Stat. 200.
Stat. 480-3. Multiple Correlation and Regression Analysis.
Application of correlation and regression to business problems, including linear, curvilinear, and multiple. Computer programming for correlation and regression analysis. Prer., one year of statistics or B.Ad. 502 or consent of instructor.
GRADUATE COURSES
Stat. 570-3. Elements of Mathematical Statistics. An examination of the mathematical properties of various statistical methods that are used in business research and in business decision making. Prer., Stat. 200 or B.Ad. 502.
Stat. 580-3. Multiple Correlation and Regression Analysis. Application of correlation and regression to business problems, including linear, curvilinear, and multiple. Computer programming for correlation and regression analysis. Prer., one year of statistics or B.Ad. 502 or consent of instructor.


School of Education
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The Denver Campus offers undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare teachers and other educational workers. The education of school personnel has long been a recognized responsibility of the University. No program of studies involves the coordination of more scholastic disciplines than does teacher education. None is more fundamental, more significant, more far-reaching, or more enduring in its impact on society.
The teacher education program, both undergraduate and graduate, is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Membership also is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education.
Students interested in pursuing a program of studies leading to initial teacher certification should consult the School of Education Office. Those desiring to pursue graduate programs or to take courses as graduate students should consult the Graduate School Bulletin.
All students wishing to take work in professional education are urged to seek advice from a faculty member of the School of Education to insure that requirements for both certification and the degree program sought are fully understood.
All application forms for School of Education programs are available in the School of Education Office, Room 706, ext. 276.
Undergraduate Programs
Students desiring to pursue degree and/or certification programs should contact the School of Education Office and become familiar with the requirements and other information provided. The first two years of college work are taken in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. However, all students are urged to consult appropriate School of Education advisers in their freshman and sophomore years if they plan to become teachers.
The Denver Campus has initiated a new program in undergraduate teacher preparation unique to its urban situation. Since transfer of credits for partial completion of the program is difficult, students entering the undergraduate program at both the elementary and secondary school levels are urged to plan completion of their professional education work on the Denver Campus.
This initial certification program is designed to prepare classroom teachers for one of two levels of certification: elementary or secondary. To foster a K-12 perspective, all program candidates will have school-based tutoring experiences in both elementary and secondary situations. Although the program is not designed to meet the requirements of certification simultaneously at both levels, it will facilitate such
certification if the candidate desires to invest additional time for the completion of necessary work in special methods courses, academic disciplines, and student teaching. A key feature of the program will be extensive experiences in both school and community agencies in addition to professional course work. Further information may be obtained from the School of Education Office, Room 706.
Undergraduate teacher certification programs are available on the Denver Campus in the following areas: elementary education; and secondary education in the fields of English, German, Spanish, mathematics, science, social studies, and speech.
A personal interview with one or more faculty members in the specific area of the student’s interest is mandatory prior to admission to the teacher education program.
Rehabilitation Services Program
The School of Education offers a two-year program in rehabilitation services to juniors and seniors, focusing strongly on the recruitment and training of minorities. Students entering the program must have completed 60 semester hours by September of the year for which application is made and should consult with the School of Education regarding entrance requirements. The program leads to a B.S. degree, but not a teaching certificate.
The program combines didactic and experiential facets of rehabilitation counseling. Trainees spend a minimum of two days per week working in settings such as drug and alcohol treatment centers, juvenile probation, and rehabilitation service agencies. The program requires 30 hours of core curriculum courses during the two years.
Application Deadlines
Application for admission to the Initial Certification Program will be accepted each year until July 31. All applicants who have been interviewed by the student adviser and a faculty member in the School of Education and accepted into the program by July 31 will be able to start professional education courses the following semester. Any student accepted for a particular fall semester must begin his professional work that semester. Reapplication will be required if enrollment is not accomplished for the semester the student is accepted.
All students in the Initial Certification Program (elementary and secondary) will be required to make application for student teaching no later than March 1 preceding the fall semester of student teaching.
Graduate Programs
Refer to the Graduate School section of this bulletin for information regarding graduate programs in education.


72/ University of Colorado at Denver
Description of Courses
The value of each course in semester hours is given as part of the identifying department number: for example, T.Ed. 306-3 identifies Foundations of American Education as a 3-semester-hour course.
Undergraduates preparing to teach are expected to follow the sequence and placement of courses outlined by the School of Education.
With some exceptions, chiefly in the curriculum for elementary majors, courses numbered from 400 to 499 are usually taken during the senior year.
Courses numbered from 500 to 599 are graduate courses and are open to qualified seniors only with the consent of the instructor and the associate dean. Courses numbered 600 and above are open only to graduate students.
Course prerequisites for undergraduate programs are indicated in the listing of courses that follows. Note also the statements in the Schedule of Courses available several weeks before the beginning of each semester. These provide a complete list of offerings and a statement of time and place. Not all courses are offered every year.
COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES These courses are open only to students who have been admitted to the teacher education program. Students interested in elementary or secondary undergraduate programs may obtain a copy of the program from the School of Education Office, Room 706.
For courses in the education series numbered 500 and above see the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
UNDERGRADUATE TEACHER EDUCATION
T.Ed. 306-3. Foundations of American Education. (Formerly Educ. 306.) A study of American education in its cultural setting and its nature, role, and function in society, including political, historical, philosophical, sociological, economic, religious, and other foundation aspects. Includes school-based tutorial experience.
T.Ed. 313-3. General Education Psychology. (Formerly Educ. 309.) An introduction to the applications of psychology to education. Designed for teachers-to-be; emphasis is on selected topics (objectives, motivation, retention and transfer and cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes, etc.). Special attention is given to problems of mentally retarded children and to slow learners.
T.Ed. 314-1 Communications; Human Relations and Group Processes I. (Formerly Educ. 313.) Examines the principles underlying effective inter- and intra-personal communication. The class will examine the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor aspects of human interaction. The emphasis will be on how to be helpful to another person who is experiencing problems.
T.Ed. 315-1. Communications: Human Relations and Group Processes II. (Formerly Educ. 314.) Examines various models of altering the behavior of others which is unacceptable to the teacher. Classroom management techniques as well as conflict reduction models will be presented.
T.Ed. 336-3. Teaching Reading in Urban Schools. (Formerly Educ. 429.) Designed to describe the reading process as it relates to and affects inner-city children. General topics include foundations of reading instruction K-12, current approaches for teaching reading, and materials for reading instruction.
T.Ed. 370-3. The City as a Cultural Laboratory I. (Formerly Educ. 370.) Develops a first-hand awareness and understanding of the nature and culture of a city and builds a better appreciation of the possibilities for human and environmental growth within. Acquaints
students with the educational resources and opportunities and further exploration and utilization of a city as a cultural laboratory for education. Weekly field experiences combined with a sem inar-workshop.
T.Ed. 371-1. The City as a Cultural Laboratory II. (Formerly Educ. 371.) Further field exploration of and activity within the city as a cultural-educational laboratory. Arranged as an independent study with the instructor.
T.Ed. 375-2. School-Based Group Tutorial. (Formerly Educ. 404.) Teaching experience in small groups in an elementary or secondary school setting.
T.Ed. 380-3. Elementary School Science Workshop. (Formerly Educ. 344.)
T.Ed. 402-2. The Elementary School Curriculum. (Formerly Educ. 400.) Principles, trends, problems, and practices.
T.Ed. 403-3. Foundations in Education for Mexican Americans.
(Formerly Educ. 417.) Surveys Mexican Americans in the United States to include the impact of Indo-Hispanic roots, socioeconomic education profiles, aspirations and conflicts, contemporary concerns, and suggestions for educational change.
T.Ed. 404-2. Educational Measurement. (Formerly Educ. 412.) Introduction to principles and practice of measurement and evaluation in public schools. Consideration of standardized tests and informal evaluation techniques; emphasis on construction and use of teacher-made tests.
T.Ed. 405-3. Adult Basic Education. (Formerly Educ. 410.) A basic course dealing with sociological and psychological factors that influence undereducated adults; teaching methods, instructional materials, and evaluative techniques useful in teaching adults; and the counseling of adults.
T.Ed. 414-3. Seminar in Urban Education. (Formerly Educ. 408.) Specific problems and characteristics of urban secondary schools and their relationship to the inner city, to poverty, to attitudes, to socioeconomic, and to ethnic backgrounds. Outside consultants from city and educational agencies will act as informants and resource people. (Restricted to participants in Urban Education Program.) T.Ed. 415-9. Basic Elementary Block. (Formerly Educ. 440.) Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction for elementary pupils, in language arts, mathematics, media, reading, science, social foundations, social studies, and special education.
T.Ed. 434-3. Language Arts for Urban Schools. (Formerly Educ. 437.) Adaptation of intact sense for listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Diagnosis for weaknesses in listening, speaking, and coordination and application of dramatic play, oracy procedures, sensory imagery, and creative expression. Preparation of cases, records, and application of differential instruction. (Elective at the undergraduate level.)
T.Ed. 435-2. Kindergarten Education. (Formerly Educ. 438.) History of the kindergarten. Characteristics of young children. Daily and weekly program and planning. Testing and evaluation, and parent-teacher cooperation.
T.Ed. 439-4. Senior Seminar in Elementary Education. (Formerly Educ. 497.) Accompanies the student teaching assignment and yields undergraduate credit only.
T.Ed. 440-1 to 2. Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching.
(Formerly Educ. 498.) Accompanies the student teaching assignment and yields undergraduate credit only.
T.Ed. 443-3. Teaching Reading in Content Areas at the Secondary Level. (Formerly Educ. 443.) Teaching techniques to improve reading skills in content fields. Current secondary school reading program.
T.Ed. 444-3. Literature for Adolescents. (Formerly Educ. 481.) Reading and evaluation of books for junior and senior high school pupils. Emphasis on modern literature.
T.Ed. 445-3. Advanced Composition for Secondary School English Teachers. (Formerly Educ. 482.) Emphasis on evaluation, criticism, and improvement of writing.
T.Ed. 446-1 to 3. Teaching the Learning-Disordered in the Regular Classroom. (Formerly Educ. 421.) Individualizing instruction for emotionally disturbed learning-disabled children in the


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regular classroom. Developing and applying competencies in diagnosis, programming, and remediation.
T.Ed. 447-2. Teachers, Materials, and Learning. (Formerly Educ. 427.) Provides elementary and preschool teachers and aides with an opportunity to become involved with a range of concrete materials in science, environmental studies, language arts, and music, and to consider the implications of their own learning for their work in school.
T.Ed. 452-3. Methods and Materials in English. (Formerly Educ. 452.) Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology. Secondary level.
T.Ed. 453-3. Methods and Materials in Social Studies. (Formerly Educ. 453.) Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology. Secondary level.
T.Ed. 454-3. Methods and Materials in Science. (Formerly Educ. 454.) Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related aspects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology. Secondary level.
T.Ed. 455-3. Methods and Materials in Mathematics. (Formerly Educ. 455.) Curriculum, materials, methods, evaluation, and related subjects of instruction. Integration of content and methodology. Secondary level.
T.Ed. 456-3. Children’s Literature. (Formerly Educ. 467.) Reading and evaluation of books for children, information about children's books, children’s interest in reading, important authors and illustrators, and problems in the guidance of reading.
T.Ed. 470-4 or 8. Student Teaching—Elementary School. (Formerly Educ. 450.) Kindergarten and grades one through six.
T.Ed. 471-4 or 8. Student Teaching—Secondary School.
(Formerly Educ. 451.) Student teacher attends a senior or junior high school in Denver metropolitan area.
T.Ed. 473-4. Elective Assignment—Elementary School. (Formerly Educ. 441.) This is the final experience in the elementary professional year. It involves a wide number of possibilities for the students, and arrangements are made on an individual student basis. Prer., admission to elementary professional year.
T.Ed. 481-3. Elementary School Mathematics Workshop.
(Formerly Educ. 346.)
T.Ed. 482-1 to 4. Workshop in Curricular and Instructional Development. (Formerly Educ. 406.) Consideration given to current trends in curriculum development and in organization for instruction. In-depth study of one or more specific plans for classroom procedure. T.Ed. 484-1 to 4. Workshop in the Application of Psychological Development to Education. (Formerly Educ. 484.) Principally for in-service education dealing with school-oriented application of psychological principles.
T.Ed. 430-1 to 6. Independent Study.
UNDERGRADUATE REHABILITATION SERVICES
R.S. 312-3. Introduction to Rehabilitation Services and Community Resources. (Formerly Educ. 374 and 473.) Introductory course to prepare students to explore careers In vocational rehabilitation, social work, employment counseling, probation and parole, and other helping professions. The historical and philosophical development of social welfare and rehabilitation systems will be investigated.
Also included will be a knowledge of what services are available in an urban setting; how to use these resources; and how to evaluate the effectiveness of the services.
R.S. 330-3. Rehabilitation Counseling and Interviewing Techniques. (Formerly Educ. 375 and 380.) Introduction to the theory and practice of rehabilitation counseling and to interviewing techniques as they specifically relate to the rehabilitation professions. Verbal and nonverbal communication skills will be presented and several theories and systems of counseling will be examined.
R.S. 331 -2. Theories of Personality. (Formerly Educ. 376.) An introduction to the major theories of personality. An overview of the nature of the theories, their scope, utility and history will be presented. Emphasis will be given to analytical, humanistic, and behavioral theories.
R.S. 333-3. Appraisal and Evaluation in Rehabilitation Services.
(Formerly Educ. 378.) Designed to acquaint students with the basic concepts of appraisal and evaluation as applied to the rehabilitation client. Students will be exposed to tests and evaluation procedures in the areas of aptitude, intelligence, vocational interest, personality, etc. Prer., T.Ed. 312.
R.S. 373-3. Seminar and Field Experience in Rehabilitation I.
(Formerly Educ. 373.) Experience is designed to provide practical training with social and rehabilitation services agencies. The agencies and the University provide on-the-job instruction and supervision to the student. Class time will be devoted to discussion of field experiences and professional role expectations.
R.S. 374-3. Seminar and Field Experience in Rehabilitation II.
(Formerly Educ. 377.) Experience is designed to provide practical training with social and rehabilitation service agencies. The agencies and the University provide on-the-job instruction and supervision to the student. Class time will be devoted to casework write-ups, presentations, and decision-making processes and procedures and to discussion of the field experiences and professional role expectations.
R.S. 420-3. Treatment Approaches to Drug Addiction and Alcoholism. (Formerly Educ. 471.) Designed to acquaint the student with theories of drug and alcoholism etiology and treatment approaches. Experiences will include lectures, reading materials, and field experiences in various treatment centers.
R.S. 437-3. Psychological Aspects of Physical and Mental Disabilities. (Formerly Educ. 379.) This course is designed to assist the student in becoming more aware of the sociological and psychological aspects of disability. Specific disability areas and adjustment to these conditions will be presented. Special emphasis will be placed on acquiring basic medical terminology. The effect of disabilities on individual occupational possibilities will be explored. Prer., R.S. 312.
R.S. 477-3. Seminar and Field Experience in Rehabilitation III.
(Formerly Educ. 469.) Provides practical training and instruction with social and rehabilitation services agencies. The agencies and the University provide on-the-job instruction and supervision to the student. Class time will be devoted to discussion of field experiences and professional role expectations. Prer., R.S. 373 and 374.
R.S. 478-3. Advanced Practicum in Rehabilitation. (Formerly Educ. 474.) Student will spend eight weeks full time with a social or rehabilitation service agency of his choice. This course is viewed as a preprofessional experience prior to securing a position in the rehabilitation services field. Supervision will be provided by the University and the agency. Prer., R.S. 477


College of Engineering and Applied Science
PAUL E. BARTLETT, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Engineering is the art and science by which the resources of nature are used for the benefit of man and the resources of society are used to preserve a wholesome global environment. The engineer has the primary duty to undertake research and study of the effects of present and prospective technology on man and his environment, to communicate his findings effectively to decision-making groups, and to implement decisions and designs which will shape tomorrow’s world. There will not be enough engineers to meet the anticipated need.
Engineering study and practice requires qualities such as initiative, energy, willingness to take responsibility, reliability, rigorous honesty, good judgment, and the ability to work and cooperate with others and to work through to the conclusion of an assignment. Obviously, the fundamentals of sound citizenship are a necessity in any profession.
Today the key decisions affecting the future of mankind are increasingly complex and technological or quantitative in nature. Engineers require a broad social orientation which will enable them to participate in the decision-making process.
The prospective engineering student should enjoy mathematics and also have a keen interest in science and its methods. Sound curiosity about the principles governing the behavior of forces and materials and the ability to visualize structures and machines are necessary prerequisites. The ability to express ideas in both written and spoken form is of primary importance.
Career of Service
Engineering offers wide opportunities for a professional career. Upon graduation, the young engineer normally enters employment that provides basic practical training in the field he has studied. Professional progress depends on hard work, initiative, and demonstrated capacity for increased responsibility.
More representation by women and minority groups is urgently needed in engineering today, because of the increasing role of the engineer in social decision making.
Few college graduates have employment opportunities equalling those of the engineer. The best estimates available indicate that the nation is not producing as many engineers as it will need. Many serious social problems require engineering answers. Most engineers are versatile men and women who can transfer as needed from one discipline to another and who progress readily into administration and management. The need is becoming especially acute for engineers capable of dealing with problems of pollution, ecological and urban planning, and of computer modeling.
Registered Professional Engineer
Currently, registration is required in all states for the legal right to practice professional engineering. Although there are variations in the state laws, graduation from an accredited curriculum in engineering, subscription to a code of ethics, and four years of qualifying experience are required. In addition, two days of examinations, covering the engineering sciences and the applicant’s practical experience, are required in most states. Those who cannot qualify for registration are expected to work under experienced registered professional engineers.
Educational Opportunities—Degrees
In all of the engineering fields leading to degrees, the student will have an unparalleled opportunity to study with many teachers who have national and international reputations.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science on the Denver Campus offers complete four-year courses leading to the B.S. degree in civil and environmental engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, and applied mathematics. Many of the courses leading to the B.S. degree in aerospace engineering sciences, architectural engineering, chemical engineering, engineering design and economic evaluation, mechanical engineering, and engineering physics are offered on the Denver Campus. Students who plan to complete a portion of their program on the Denver Campus and then transfer to the Boulder Campus for the remaining requirements are encouraged to obtain and familiarize themselves with the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin. It gives a comprehensive listing of all curricula, course descriptions, and programs offered by the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
The course requirements during the freshman year are essentially the same throughout the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
About two-thirds of the sophomore year is common to all, and the remainder of the courses begin to point to the various fields of engineering taught; however, real specialization begins in the junior year and carries on through the senior year. A fifth year of study leading to the master’s degree is strongly urged for students of more than usual ability who feel they can profit from additional study. Those in this category are likely to achieve greater ultimate success in the engineering profession.
At the University of Colorado, it is also possible for a student to obtain the bachelor’s degree in both engineering and business in five years plus one or two summer terms.


College of Engineering and Applied Sciencel75
Most departments offer varied programs in each of these degree fields—some of these amounting to joint degrees in computing and engineering, or with additional work two engineering degrees. Also, any of these degree programs can be modified for an excellent premedical program.
If subjects in the liberal arts courses, such as science and mathematics, and engineering subjects, such as graphics and certain specialized courses, have been elected, a graduate of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may obtain an engineering degree in four semesters.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science on the Denver Campus offers M.S. degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics, and the Master of Engineering. Graduate courses in other fields also are offered.
For information regarding courses and requirements leading to the degree Master of Engineering and Master of Science or to the Ph.D. degree, see the Graduate School Bulletin and the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
Undergraduate Research
Research is an important part of many, if not most, engineering careers. Recent years have seen a strong movement in the College of Engineering and Applied Science to include undergraduates in the type of research programs formerly restricted to graduate students. Undergraduates, including some freshmen, have helped to carry out valuable projects in pollution control, bioengineering, solid state electronics, and other fields, including systems analysis and many areas of computerization.
At the same time, instructional laboratories are moving from routine apparatus manipulation to placing major emphasis upon experimentation and original projects. Students and faculty alike have responded to this change with new zest, achieving in many cases socially or scientifically valuable results along with an enhanced understanding of research methods.
Summer Courses
Summer term courses are planned for regular students who must clear deficiencies, and transfer students. Courses also are offered for high school graduates who wish to enter as freshmen and those who need to remove subject deficiencies. For information about courses, students should write to the dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, UCD, for the Schedule of Summer Courses.
For many students there are several advantages in starting their college careers during the summer term. Some required freshman and sophomore courses are normally offered on the Denver Campus during the summer and are taught by the regular staff. Generally, the summer classes are smaller than regular academic-year classes, which means that students can get more individual attention. Beginning during the summer term gives the student a head start and enables him to take a lighter load during the fall semester, or to take additional courses to enrich his program.
Completing a few courses in the summer before their first regular semester also helps many students to make a more efficient transition from high school to college-level work.
Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds
Money contributed to the University Development Foundation for assistance to engineering students is deposited in appropriate accounts and used according to the restrictions imposed by the donors. Numerous industries match employee contributions. A list of companies contributing to scholarships and fellowships and different loan funds available can be obtained from the dean’s office.
Student Organizations
The following honorary engineering societies have active student chapters in the College of Engineering and Applied Science:
Alpha Chi Sigma, professional chemical fraternity Chi Epsilon, civil and architectural fraternity Eta Kappa Nu, electrical engineering society Phi Tau Sigma, society of mechanical engineers Sigma Tau, engineering society Tau Beta Pi, engineering society
Student chapters of the following professional societies are well established on the Boulder Campus and students on the Denver Campus are eligible for membership:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics American Institute of Chemical Engineers 'American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers 'Association for Computing Machinery Society of Manufacturing Engineers 'Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Society of Women Engineers and Architects
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
In order to enroll, the student must meet the admission requirements of the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the admission requirements described in the General Information section of this bulletin. Persons of sufficient maturity and experience who do not meet the prescribed requirements for admission may be admitted upon approval of the dean.
Women and minority students are encouraged to include the field of engineering in their educational plans, and are urged to contact an engineering adviser to find out what opportunities in engineering are available to them.
Beginning students in engineering should be prepared to start analytic geometry-calculus. No credit toward a degree will be given for algebra or trigonometry (courses will be offered to allow a student to make up deficiencies). Any student who questions the adequacy of his pre-college background in mathematics should
’Acitve chapter at the Denver Campus.


761 University of Colorado at Denver
see the applied mathematics coordinator for suggestions.
In order to be prepared for the type of mathematics courses that will be taught, the student must be competent in the basic ideas and skills of ordinary algebra, geometry, and plane trigonometry. These include such topics as the fundamental operations with algebraic expressions, exponents and radicals, fractions, simple factoring, solution of linear and quadratic equations, graphical representation, simple systems of equations, complex numbers, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and geometric progressions, logarithms, the trigonometric functions and their use in triangle solving and simple applications, and the standard theorems of geometry, including some solid geometry. It is estimated that it will usually take seven semesters to cover this material adequately in high school.
Transfer Students
Students transferring from other accredited collegiate institutions are admitted if they meet the requirements outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin and the freshman requirements for entering the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
In general, a resident of Colorado will be granted admission provided an overall grade-point average of
2.0 (C) or better has been attained (2.5 for nonresidents).
Transfer from within the University to the College of Engineering and Applied Science will be approved if one of the three following conditions is fulfilled:
1. Transfer may be effected at the end of the first semester in residence at the University of Colorado (without regard to grades earned here) provided the prior academic record fulfills the admission requirements of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
2. A transfer will be approved if the student has attained an overall grade average of 2.0 (C) in all work attempted at the University of Colorado.
3. Other transfers may be approved by the dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science (or his designee) after a formal petition has been submitted.
Transfer hours of credit may be accepted upon approval by the Office of Admissions and Records and the major department. The grade-point average of the student transferring from another institution does not transfer into the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Transfer credit hours must be evaluated by the major department before they may be applied to the student’s engineering degree requirements.
Advanced Placement
Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board’s advanced placement tests or by special examinations administered by the department involved. For students who have taken an advanced placement course in high school and who make scores of 4 or 5 in the CEEB’s Advanced Placement Examination, advanced placement as well as college credit will be granted. Students who make scores of 3 may
be considered for advanced placement and college credit by the department concerned. All placement and credit must be validated by satisfactory performance in subsequent course work, in accordance with the practices being followed in the transfer of credits from other colleges and universities. These stipulations concerning advanced placement may differ from those stated for other colleges and schools of the University.
College Level Examination (CLEP) Credit
Prospective students may earn college level credit through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations, provided that they score at the 66th percentile or above. The number of credits so earned must be within the limits of the number of elective hours of the individual department. Prospective students desiring recognition of such credit must request that scores be reported to the Office of Admissions, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. Notification that the credit has been approved will be returned. A list of subjects in which CLEP examination credit will be accepted may be obtained at the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The currently approved list includes 23 subjects in the fields of computing, business, science, mathematics, the humanities, and social sciences.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Freshman Year
Fundamentals taught in the freshman year are of prime importance in the more advanced classes, and every effort is made to register a beginning freshman in the proper courses. (Course requirements for freshmen are detailed within the curriculum given under each department.)
All freshmen are urged to consult their instructors whenever they need help in their assignments.
Course Load Policy
Full-time Students. Full-time undergraduate students should register for the regular work as outlined in the departmental curricula. Additional courses may be allowed when there is satisfactory evidence that these extra courses can be taken profitably and creditably. Permission to take more than 21 hours or fewer than 12 hours may be granted only after written petition to the associate dean. The petition must carry the approval of the departmental faculty adviser.
Employed Students. Suggested course loads for undergraduate students employed 10 or more hours per week are as follows:
Employed 40 or more hours per week—two courses (maximum of 9 semester hours).
Employed 30 to 39 hours per week—three courses (maximum of 12 semester hours).
Employed 20 to 29 hours per week—four courses (maximum of 15 semester hours).
Employed 10 to 19 hours per week—five courses (maximum of 18 semester hours).
Course Scheduling and Abbreviations
For information on scheduling of courses, write to the associate dean of the College of Engineering and


College of Engineering and Applied Sciencel77
Applied Science, Denver Campus, or consult the Schedule of Courses issued at the beginning of each semester.
The University reserves the right to cancel any listed course or to make a substitution in instructors. Courses for which there is insufficient enrollment may be cancelled by the College.
The 1-credit lecture-recitation period is 50 minutes long. A laboratory period includes two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field.
Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory or other work, it is understood that classes will consist of lectures and discussions. Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are as follows:
Calc.—Calculation Coreq.—Corequisite Hrs.—Hours Lab.—Laboratory
Lect.—Lecture Prer.—Prerequisite Rec.—Recitation Wk.—Week
The value of a course in semester-hour credits is indicated by that part of the course number which follows the dash. Example: Chem. 103-5. “Chem. 103” is the identifying department number, and “5” indicates that the course is for 5 semester hours credit.
Refer to the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin for the complete list of course descriptions.
Credits
Students may receive credit for only those courses for which they have officially registered. Exceptions to this are credits obtained through special examinations, correspondence courses, CLEP, and transfer credits from other institutions. Students who have had extensive experience in the work covered by any required course and feel they would be able to pass an examination over the course, may apply for such an examination. Credit will be allowed upon successful completion of the test. See General Information section for complete details.
Schedule Changes
All official changes of registration are made by processing the appropriate Change of Schedule Form. Courses may be added on or before the tenth day of each semester. After the second week, courses may be added only by special approval of the instructor and department offering the course. Courses may be dropped without penalty before the end of the second week of the semester. After the second week, but before the end of the tenth academic week, a student may drop a course without penalty if he is passing the course; otherwise a grade of F will be entered on his record. After the tenth academic week, a student may not drop a course except under circumstances clearly beyond his control. A student may not drop or add a course if in so doing he violates any other rule.
Repetition of Courses
A student may not register for credit in a course in which he already has received a grade of C or better. When a student takes a course for credit more than once, all grades are used in determining his grade-point
average. An F grade in the repetition of a required course necessitates a subsequent satisfactory completion of the course.
Sequence of Courses
Full-time students should complete the courses in the department in which they are registered according to the order shown in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin. (Part-time students may need to modify the order of courses with adviser approval.) Any course in which there is a failure or an unremoved incomplete should, upon the first recurrence of such course, take precedence over other courses; however, each student must be registered so that departmental requirements will be completed with the least possible delay.
Students who do not earn a grade of C or better in a course that is prerequisite to another, may not register for the succeeding course unless they have the permission of both the department and the instructor of the succeeding course.
Students may enroll for as much as 50 percent of their courses in work that is not a part of the prescribed curricula of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, provided they have at least a 2.0 grade average in all college work attempted. Exceptions to this policy may be made by petition and may be made for students taking the combined engineering-business program.
Withdrawal
A student may withdraw from the University without academic penalty before the end of the second week of the semester. After the end of the tenth week of the semester, a student will not be allowed to withdraw officially from the University except for circumstances clearly beyond his control. If the student interrupts his course of study, he may be required to take any preparatory courses that have been changed or added in his absence, or repeat any courses in which his preparation is thought to be weak.
Changing Departments
Students who wish to change to another department must apply for transfer by petition, and this petition must have the approval of both departments concerned and of the dean.
Class Standing
To be classified as a sophomore in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a student must have passed 30 semester hours; to be classified as a junior, 60 hours; and to be classified as a senior, 90 hours of credit. All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted at the University of Colorado.
Class Attendance
Successful work in the College of Engineering and Applied Science is dependent upon regular attendance in all classes. Students who are unavoidably absent should make arrangements with instructors to make up the work missed. Students who, for illness or other good


78/ University of Colorado at Denver
reason, miss a final examination must notify the instructor or the Office of the Dean no later than the end of the day on which the examination is given. Failure to do so will result in an F in the course.
Counseling
Freshman students are counseled by the associate dean’s office, and by representatives from each academic department. These representatives are readily available to assist students with academic, vocational, or personal concerns.
Students are assigned specific departmental advisers for academic planning and should consult with the departmental associate chairman or designated representative for assignment.
Scholastic Deficiency
To remain in good standing in the College of Engineering and Applied Science a student must maintain a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0. The student who fails to meet this requirement will be subject immediately to the authority of the Committee on Academic Progress. When semester grades become available, the committee will review all cases of scholastic deficiency and notify each student of its decision. At this time, the committee action may result in suspension, warning, or mandatory reduction of academic load and extracurricular activities. Any student suspended by the committee may, by petition, be granted a personal hearing before the committee during the fall registration period.
Pass/Fail Option
See the General Information section of this bulletin tor University of Colorado uniform grading system and pass/fail and drop/add procedures. Below are specific pass/fail regulations for the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
The primary purpose of offering courses in which the undergraduate may be graded pass or fail (P/F) rather than A, S, C, D, orF, is to encourage the undergraduate student to broaden his educational experience by electing challenging courses without serious risk that his academic record might be jeopardized.
A grade of P in a course means that the course hours may be counted toward the 136 credit hours required for graduation, but the course hours will not be used in the computation of the student’s grade-point average. A grade of F for a student enrolled P/F in a course will be recorded, and the credit hours of the course will be used in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average just as is done with a grade of F in a normal registration.
Pass/Fail Rules
A maximum of 16 pass/fail hours may be included in a student’s total program. A maximum of 6 may be taken in one semester, but it is recommended that not more than one course at a time be taken pass/fail. Courses that a student may elect to take pass/fail shall be designated by the student’s major department. If courses not so designated are taken, the earned grade will be recorded in place of the P or F grade. An engineering student who has not designated a major field will not be allowed the pass/fail option.
A transfer student may count toward graduation 1 credit hour of P/F courses for each 9 credit hours completed in the College; however, the maximum number of P/F hours counting toward graduation shall not exceed 16 credit hours, including courses taken in the Honors Program under the program’s P/F grading system.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure he has fulfilled all the requirements, to file his intended date of graduation in his departmental office at the close of his third year, to fill out a Diploma Card at registration at the beginning of his last year, and to keep his departmental adviser and the dean’s office informed of any changes in his plans throughout his last year.
In order to be eligible for one of the bachelor’s degrees in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a student, in addition to being in good standing in the University, must meet the following minimum requirements:
Courses. The satisfactory completion of the prescribed and elective work in any curriculum as determined by the appropriate department.
Hours. A minimum of 136 semester hours, of which the last 30 shall be earned after matriculation and admission as a degree student, is required for students in the four-year curricula; however, many students will need to present more than the minimum hours because of certain departmental requirements and because they may have enrolled in courses which do not carry full credit toward a degree. The hours required for students in the combined business and engineering program vary by departments; as a guide, 172 semester hours are considered a minimum, but most students follow a program which brings the total above this figure.
Grade Average. A minimum grade-point average of
2.0 (C) for all courses attempted.
Faculty Recommendation. The recommendation of the faculty of the department offering the degree and the recommendation of the faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Correspondence Courses. Correspondence courses must be completed before the beginning of the student’s final semester in school.
Simultaneous Conferring of Degrees. For combined business and engineering students, the degree B.S. in business and the degree B.S. in engineering must be conferred at the same commencement.
Commencement Exercises. Commencement exercises are held in May and August on the Boulder Campus. Students finishing in December may attend commencement the following May or receive diplomas by mail.
Graduation With Honors
Honors at graduation are conferred in recognition of high scholarship and professional attainments. Honors and special honors are recorded on diplomas and indicated on the commencement program.
Seniors with an average of 3.8 or above are usually graduated with special honors, and those with an average of 3.5 to 3.79 with honors. Grades earned


College of Engineering and Applied Science/79
during the semester of graduation will not be considered in the determination of honors.
Social-Humanistic Content of the Engineering Curriculum
The faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science recommends that 24 semester hours should be considered the minimum social-humanistic content of the degree-granting departments. (Up to 6 hours of English composition may be used to satisfy this requirement.)
A minimum of 6 hours of literature is required. Six hours of social-humanistic subjects should be taken in the junior year and 6 in the senior year. These subjects should be taken from the following categories, with not fewer than 6 hours from category two (2) below.
1. Literature (including foreign literature either in the original or in translation).
2. Economics, sociology, political science, history, and anthropology.
3. Fine arts and music (critical or historical).
Such courses as public speaking, elementary foreign
languages, technical writing, accounting, contracts, and management should be considered as technical and should be submitted for technical electives where applicable with departmental approval.
Qualified students will be permitted to take appropriate honors courses as substitutes for social-humanistic courses.
English for Engineering
Note: The English courses recommended for engineering students have new course numbers, effective summer 1975.
Engineering students may choose certain combinations of courses: (a) Engl. 258, 259, 260, 261 in sequence; or (b) Engl. 258, 259, and the two following introductory literature courses: Engl. 120 (Introduction to Fiction), Engl. 130 (Introduction to Drama and Poetry). Students who achieve a B average in two of the following English courses (120, 130, 258, and 259) may take immediately thereafter any literature courses listed by the Department of English. No social humanistic credit will be given for courses dealing with English as a foreign language. See English in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin for course descriptions.
COMBINED BUSINESS AND ENGINEERING CURRICULA
Undergraduates in the College of Engineering and Applied Science with career interests in administration may complete all of the requirements for both a B.S. degree in engineering and a B.S. degree in business by extending their study programs to five years, including one or two summer terms. The 48 semester credits required in the College of Business and Administration may be started in the second, third, or fourth year, depending upon the curricular plan for the particular field of engineering in which the student is enrolled.
It is also possible for qualified graduates (GPA: 2.75 or better) to complete the requirements for a master’s degree in business within one year after receiving the
baccalaureate degree in engineering. Before deciding upon the business option, a student should carefully consider, in consultation with departmental advisers, the relative advantages of the combined B.S. business-engineering curricula, the degree program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the M.S. degree program in the student’s own engineering discipline.
Combined business and engineering programs are available for students in aerospace engineering sciences, applied mathematics, architectural engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, engineering design and economic evaluation, engineering physics, and mechanical engineering.
The student taking a combined undergraduate program is not required to submit formal application for admission to the College of Business. He is permitted to enroll in business courses on the basis of a program approved by his adviser in the College of Engineering and Applied Science and by an assigned adviser from the College of Business.
Requirements for both the undergraduate business and engineering degrees must be completed concurrently. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business. Not fewer than 30 semester credits in business courses must be earned to establish residency credit. Courses offered by the College of Business may be used in lieu of electives required for undergraduate engineering degrees, subject to the approval of the individual department.
The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows:
Courses Semester Hours
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics......................6
(Should be completed during the student's sophomore or junior year.)
Acct. 200. Introductory Accounting .............................3
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer................3
Stat. 200. Business Statistics..................................3
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing................................3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance ........................................3
Mgt.Org. 300. Operations Analysis...............................3
Mgt.Org. 330. Introduction to Management and
Organization.................................................3
B.Law 300. Business Law.........................................3
B.Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B.Ad. 411.
Business and Society.........................................3
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy (Cases and Concepts in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 451 (Management Game and Cases in Business Policy); or B.Ad. 452 (Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship) ...................................3
Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields: accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, or transportation management. All course work in the area of emphasis must be taken in the University of Colorado College of Business and Administration ....................................12
48
The student should note that for some courses, and for some areas of emphasis, there are prerequisite requirements which must be met. Since some of the courses may be taken as engineering electives, it is


80/ University of Colorado at Denver
possible to obtain the two degrees in as few as 166 semester hours; however, most students will require more.
JOINT ENGINEERING DEGREES
A student may obtain two engineering degrees by meeting the requirements and obtaining the approval of both departments concerned. Thirty hours of elective or required subjects in addition to the largest minimum number required by either of the two departments must be completed.
PREMEDICINE OPTION
A professional school in a field such as medicine requires a student to have a college education prior to pursuing its professional courses. In practically all cases, medical students are university graduates, although occasionally a student may enter medical school after three years of university training. A student can prepare for medical school either in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The desirability of obtaining an engineering education prior to undertaking a study of medicine is increasing continually, as medicine itself is evolving. A great deal of additional equipment, much of it electronic, is being developed to assist the medical practitioner in his treatment of patients. Bioengineering, engineering systems analysis, probability, and communication theory are highly applicable to medical problems. Also, improved communication techniques are allowing the storage and retrieval of information not previously available to the medical doctor. An advanced knowledge of basic mathematics and computing techniques, along with increased understanding of physical chemistry, are improving the scientific base upon which medical knowledge rests. It is therefore desirable that the medical practitioner and researcher in the future be well equipped with the tools which engineering can offer.
An engineering background with a premedicine option is a valuable combination for admission to medical school.
There are two equally important goals for the student who plans to enter medical school. The first is acquisition of the knowledge and vocabulary necessary to proceed with the courses at medical school. The second is to become an educated and well-balanced man or woman.
Concerning the first goal, it is clear that without some knowledge of the basic sciences and the ability to formulate thoughts, the student will be unable to profit from the courses at medical school. To provide at least a minimum of the necessary knowledge, the additional courses listed below are prescribed and must be completed with superior grades. General overall requirements for entry into most medical schools are given. Students can meet these requirements by careful substitution of electives in the engineering curriculum. In some cases where additional hours may be required, interested students should consult with the departmental chairman.
General chemistry (103-106) ...... 2 sem. (8-10 sem. hrs.)
Organic chemistry (331-332).......2 sem. (8-10 sem. hrs.)
General biology (201-202)............ 2 sem. (8 sem. hrs.)
Genetics.............................1 sem. (3 sem. hrs.)
English composition..................1 sem. (3 sem. hrs.)
The second goal, becoming a well-educated, well-balanced man or woman, is of particular importance. The student entering medical school is confronted with a mass of new knowledge and techniques. These fully occupy his or her time and give little opportunity for the pursuit of the broader aspects of education.
Three features of the university education are stressed here. The first is the possession of an active critical mind—a mind which can discern problems, find out what is known about them, and draw relevant and unprejudiced conclusions from this knowledge. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of chosen subjects and a true understanding of the problems presented and the solutions that have been advanced. Study of courses that will be taken at medical school is strongly discouraged.
Second, a student must acquire understanding of mankind. This is particularly important for the physician whose life is spent in caring for people and whose effectiveness is increased in proportion to the degree of this understanding. The study of man involves a vast number of intellectual disciplines—from anthropology to the arts; from psychology to world history; from political economy to the study or religion—and is properly the study of a lifetime. The student must obtain the foundations of such a study at his university. Present-day developments in the field of medicine suggest that far more people with an engineering background should continue their education and enter the practice of medicine. Whatever the person decides to study, he must be aware of the importance of this study for future effectiveness as a human being.
Finally, a student should carry away from the university a scholarly enthusiasm. Intellectual curiosity and ardent pursuit of truth are prime requisites for knowledge. Without these, neither the individual practice of medicine nor the general understanding of medical science can progress farther.
The School of Medicine requires no set courses for the second and third features of the univeristy education beyond those required by the student’s college or university, but it stresses their great importance.
To complete this program in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, it is strongly recommended that the student follow a full four-year college course (with the equivalent of at least 136 semester hours) and take a B.S. degree. It would be possible for a student who applied himself with unusual vigor to prepare for medical school in three years. In such cases, a minimum of 15 semester hours should be devoted to a major field of learning, instead of the 30 hours required for the four-year student. This student, of course, will not receive a degree in the premedical field. The study and practice of medicine require persistent hard effort, and so should the premedical education.
The Admissions Committee of the School of Medicine welcomes inquiries and visits from prospective


College of Engineering and Applied Science 181
students, particularly at the time of their first interest in medicine as their chosen profession.
Students desiring to enter a premedical program should consult the representative of the department involved. At the Denver Campus, premedical advising is available through the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508.
GRADUATE STUDY IN ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering and Applied Science on the Denver Campus offers M.S. degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics. Graduate courses in other fields are also offered.
For information regarding courses and requirements leading to the degrees Master of Engineering and Master of Science or to the Ph.D. degree, see the Graduate School Bulletin and the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
Education for Employed Professional Engineers
Continuing education for employed engineers grows more important each year. Therefore, the College puts great emphasis upon making graduate courses readily available through night and televised courses. A new degree, the Master of Engineering, permits graduate students more flexibility in defining specialized interdisciplinary fields that meet their professional needs. This degree has standards fully equivalent to those of the Master of Science degree.
Concurrent B.S. and M.S. Degree Program in Engineering
Students who plan to continue in the Graduate School after completion of the requirements of the B.S. degree may make application for admission to the concurrent degree program through their department early in the second semester of their junior year (after completion of at least 84 semester hours). Requirements are the same as for the two degrees taken separately: 136 credit hours for the B.S. degree and 24 hours plus thesis (Plan I) or 30 credit hours (Plan II) for the M.S. degree. Social-humanistic requirements must be completed within the first 136 credit hours. A 3.0 grade-point average for all work attempted through the first six semesters (at least 96 credit hours) and written recommendations from at least two departmental faculty members are required.
The purpose of the concurrent degree program is to allow the student who qualifies for graduate study and expects to continue for an advanced degree to plan his graduate program from the beginning of the senior year rather than from the first year of graduate study. The student can then reach the degree of proficiency required to begin research at an earlier time, and can make better and fuller use of courses offered in alternate years.
The student will choose or be assigned a faculty adviser to help him develop the program best suited to his particular interests. Those in the program will be encouraged to pursue independent study on research problems or in areas of specialization where no formal courses are offered. A liberal substitution policy will be
followed for courses normally required in the last year of the undergraduate curriculum. The program selected must be planned so that the student may qualify for the B.S. degree after completing the credit-hour requirements for the degree if the student so elects, or if the student’s grade-point average falls below the 3.0 required to remain in the program. In this case, all hours completed with a passing grade while in the program will count toward fulfilling the normal requirements for the B.S. degree. There will be no credit given toward a graduate degree for courses applied to the B.S. degree requirements; however, students are still eligible to apply for admission to the Graduate School under the rules set forth in the Graduate School Bulletin. Normally, however, the student will apply for admission to the Graduate School when at least 130 of the 136 credit hours required for the B.S. degree have been completed, and will be awarded the B.S. and M.S. degrees simultaneously upon meeting the requirements set forth for the concurrent degree program.
Graduate Work in Business
Undergraduates in engineering who intend to pursue graduate study in business may complete some of the business background requirements as electives in their undergraduate programs. Seniors in engineering who have such intentions and appear likely to qualify for admission to graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the graduate fundamentals courses which are designed to provide qualified students with needed background preparation in business.
Major Departments
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING SCIENCES
The primary objective of the aerospace engineering sciences curriculum is to provide sound general training in subjects fundamental to the practice of and research in this branch of engineering sciences. The major part of the first three years is devoted to the study of mathematics, physics, mechanics, chemistry, and the humanities. The fourth year is devoted to the professional courses in the fields of physics of fluids (fluid dynamics); propulsion and energy conversion; flight dynamics, control, and guidance; space system analysis; materials and structural mechanics; space environment; and bio-engineering.
Planning of graduate study for students having sufficient ability and interest should begin by the start of the junior year. Such a plan should consider the foreign language requirements of appropriate graduate schools, and an advanced mathematics program included in technical electives consisting of Math. 431-432 and Math. 481 or 443.
Technical Electives
The minimum total number of semester hours for the B.S. degree is 136. Students who wish to combine the business and aerospace engineering sciences curricula are advised to consider obtaining the B.S. degree in aerospace and the M.S. degree in business rather than a combined B.S. degree. Business courses may not be


821 University of Colorado at Denver
substituted for technical electives in the aerospace curriculum.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete aerospace engineering sciences program is not available on the Denver Campus. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan on transferring to the Boulder Campus at the start of the junior year. The complete curriculum degree requirements, ana descriptions of courses may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.
‘Curriculum for B.S. (Aerospace Engineering Sciences)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ..............3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ..............................4
tEngl. 258. Great Books I...................................3
tSocial-humanistic elective ...............................,_6
16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ..............................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics .........................1
tEngl. 259. Great Books II...................................3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I.....................2
tSocial-humanistic elective ..............................J3
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ............3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........................3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I ..........................3
tEngl. 260. Great Books III................................3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics ..............................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics .........................1
tSocial-humanistic elective ..............................^3
19
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations.................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing........................3
C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II .........................3
tEngl. 261. Great Books IV ..................................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics..................................3
§Chem. 202. General Chemistry ...............................4
19
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
CHARLES I. SHERRILL, Coordinator
The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences offers all courses in mathematics, both required and elective, for undergraduate and graduate students in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Three curricula leading to the degree B.S. (A.Math.) in the College are offered. In Option I, the student takes a minor in a specific engineering department, satisfying an adviser from that department. In Option II, the student takes a distributed engineering minor including a solid grounding in mechanics or particles and continua, electronics, and materials. (This option is intended for the above-average student.) Option III is a joint mathematics-computer science program.
Math. 300 is not a required course for the major. However, students who have done A work in calculus have reported that Math. 300 has proved to be very
helpful in subsequent mathematics courses. Therefore, such students are strongly advised to take Math. 300.
Modern industrial and scientific research is so dependent on advanced mathematical concepts that applied mathematicians are needed today by almost all concerns which are engaged in such research.
The undergraduate curriculum is designed to give training in mathematics and in engineering and science. The use of numerical methods and electronic computers is included.
Nontechnical electives should be broadening and have cultural value. Courses in the humanities and the social sciences are required. Students interested in research should take a foreign language as early as possible. Under all circumstances, a student must plan a complete program and obtain the approval of a departmental adviser at the beginning of the sophomore year.
Description of Courses
Refer to the mathematics section of this bulletin on page 32 for complete descriptions of all mathematics courses.
#Curriculum for B.S. (A.Math.)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .............3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics .............................4
tEngl. 258. Great Books I.................................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.......................3
Approved elective........................................J3
16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ............3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I ...................2
tEngl. 259. Great Books II................................3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics .............................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics.........................1
Approved elective........................................_2
15
SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ............3
tEngl. 260. Great Books III...............................3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics .............................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics ........................1
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics.................................3
Approved elective........................................_3
16
Spring Semester
tEngl. 261. Great Books IV ...............................3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry .............................5
Approved electives ......................................^9
17
JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........................3
Math. 431. Advanced Calculus I............................3
Approved electives ......................................12
18
'The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
if The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. The student must take a minimum of 18 hours in approved elective engineering courses excluding chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses.
tFor other options in English, see the English listings in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin.
tStudents may take electives pass If ail subject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
§Or Chem 103, General Chemistry.


College of Engineering and Applied Sciencel83
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations..................3
Math. 481. Introduction to Probability Theory...............3
Approved electives.........................................12
18
SENIOR YEAR
Fall Semester
Approved electives.........................................18
Spring Semester
Approved electives ........................................18
Requirements under each option are as follows:
OPTION I Semester Hours
Minor in a specific engineering department..............18-30
Technical electives.....................................15-22
Other electives ........................................11-30
t Required social-humanistic electives ..................... 12
(Electives must include Math. 432.)
OPTION II
Distributed engineering minor.............................18-30
(A minimal program would consist of the following courses: Aero. 304, Aero. 311, C.E. 212, C.E. 213, E.E. 303, M.E. 301, or their equivalents. Each of
these courses is for 3 hours credit.)
Technical electives..........................................15-22
Other electives .............................................11-30
{Required social-humanistic electives ........................... 12
(Electives must include Math. 432.)
OPTION III
Specific courses required under Option III:
E.E. 257 ...................................................... 3
E.E. 357 (C.S. 311) .........................._............ 3
Aero. 546 (C.S. 546) .......................................... 3
E.E. 453 (C.S. 453) ........................................... 3
E.E. 459 (C.S. 459) ........................................... 3
E.E. 555 (C.S. 555) ........................................... 3
E.E. 450 (Math. 461) .......................................... 3
Math. 465 ..................................................... 3
Math. 466 ..................................................... 3
Technical electives.......................................... 6-22
Other electives .............................................11-30
{Required social-humanistic electives ........................... 12
Bachelor of Science Degree in Applied Mathematics
The B.S. degree in applied mathematics requires the completion of a minimum of 136 credit hours of course work with an average grade of C or better (a 2.0 grade-point average) and a grade of C or better in all mathematics courses. Course work in the social studies-humanities area must be approved by the student’s adviser. Work in certain other areas may be acceptable toward the social studies-humanities requirement, but must first be approved by the student’s adviser. Of the 12 hours required in the social-humanistic area in addition to the literature courses, at least 6 hours must be in courses at the 300 level or higher.
Note: Neither Math. 101 nor Math. 102 count toward the B.S. (A.Math) degree.
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
JOHN R. MAYS, Coordinator
The architectural engineering curriculum is devised and administered by the joint efforts of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the College
tStudents may take electives PassIFail subject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
of Engineering and Applied Science and the College of Environmental Design. The purpose of the program is to prepare a student for a career in the building industry and for research at the graduate level on building-related topics. The building industry is the largest single industry in the United States and includes many diverse skills and fields of knowledge. This course of study fulfills the academic requirements for registration as a professional engineer.
The architectural engineering curriculum is recommended for those wishing to specialize within the building industry in engineering design, construction and contracting, or sales engineering. The architectural engineering student may select any one of three areas of specialization offered: construction engineering, environmental engineering, or structural engineering.
Specialization in construction is for students planning a career in contracting and building construction. This program offers courses in construction management, planning and scheduling techniques, cost accounting, estimating and pricing, and in building materials and construction methods.
Those students interested in environmental design may concentrate their efforts in the fields of illumination and building electrical systems design; heating-venti-lating-air conditioning systems design; sanitation and water supply; or acoustics. A broad range of courses is available covering these subjects.
The third area of specialization is for those who are interested in the design of structural systems for buildings. Courses available are structural analysis, indeterminate structures, and steel, concrete, and timber design, among others.
The five-year course leading to the combined degree in architectural engineering and business offers opportunity for complementing the architectural engineering background with study in one of the major areas of business administration, such as personnel and business management, marketing, and finance.
The freshman year in architectural engineering is similar to that for all engineering students. In the sophomore year, the student is introduced to the functions of the specialty divisions within the building industry and is provided a basis for understanding architecture and the relationship and contribution of architectural engineering to architecture. In addition, there is more advanced work in mathematics and physics. The junior year is devoted largely to the engineering sciences with a continuation of those courses fundamental to understanding architecture and building. The last year is devoted to engineering analysis, design, or construction of buildings, the field of specialization being determined by the student’s choice of his technical electives. In the senior year, 6 hours of social-humanistic courses are required as nontechnical electives.
The junior, senior, and fifth years of the combined curriculum in architectural engineering and business are devoted to pursuit of the full requirements for the architectural engineering degrees, as well as the course work necessary to a specific major study area within the College of Business and Administration.


841 University of Colorado at Denver
Transfer to Boulder
The complete architectural engineering program is not available on the Denver Campus. Students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus to complete the requirements.
^Curriculum for B.S. (Arch.E.)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ................3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I......................2
tEngl. 258. Great Books I...................................3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ...............................4
C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil and Environmental
Engineering...............................................2
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ...............3
tEngl. 259. Great Books II..................................3
E.D.E.E. 102. Fundamentals of Design II.....................2
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ................................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics ...........................1
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.........................13
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ...............3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ..........................3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics ................................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics ...........................1
tEngl. 260. Great Books III.................................3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I ...........................3
Specialty requirement (structures and construction majors)
take C.E. 221; environmental majors take Arch.E. 362) ...3
19
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations...................3
tCh.E. 210. Chemical and Physical Properties of Materials...4
Arch.E. 240. Building Materials and Construction ...........3
C.E. 312. Mechanics of Materials............................3
t Engl. 261. Great Books IV.................................^3
16
JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester
C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II ..........................3
C.E. 316. Materials Testing Laboratory (not required
of environmental majors)..................................1
Arch.E. 330. Basic Structural Analysis and Design
(structures majors substitute C.E. 350).................3-4
Arch.E. 354. Illumination I..................................3
Arch. 320. Architectural Appreciation and Design............3
Specialty requirement (structures and environmental
majors—E.E. 303, 343; construction—Acct. 212)...........3-4
16-18
Spring Semester
Arch.E. 363. Environmental Acoustics.........................3
Arch. 321. Architectural Appreciation and Design............3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics....................................3
Technical elective...........................................3
Specialty requirement (structures—C.E. 331, M.E. 362; environmental—M.E. 362, technical elective, 3;
construction—Acct. 214, B.L. 300)........................J5
18
'The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
tFor other English options, see the English department listings in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin.
XChemistry 103-5 may be substituted for Ch.E. 210-4, in which case the technical elective requirement is reduced by 1 credit hour.
SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester
Arch.E. 441. Construction Costs, Estimating, Pricing...........3
Arch. 470. History/Philosophy..................................3
Arch.E. 362. Mechanical Systems for Building (environmental majors substitute technical elective)...................3
Sociohumanistic elective (construction majors required
to take Econ. 201) .........................................3
Specialty requirement (structures—C.E. 456, 457; environmental—technical elective; construction—
E.D.E.E. 351, Engr.Sci. elective) ........................545
17- 18
Spring Semester
Arch.E. 470. Applied Structural Design (construction
majors substitute Arch.E. 446) .............................3
Arch. 471. History/Philosophy..................................3
Technical elective.............................................6
Sociohumanistic elective (construction majors required to
take Econ. 202) ............................................3
Specialty requirement (structures—C.E. 458, technical elective; environmental-technical elective; constuc-tion—C.E. 497) ............................................. 3-4
18- 19
Courses Available for Specialization
Upon consultation with his adviser, the student must select courses applicable to his areas of interest and specialization. The areas of specialization are construction engineering, environmental engineering, and structural engineering. In addition to the courses listed below, other courses, not listed, may be proposed by a student and approved by his adviser if they are found to be applicable.
Arch.E. 330-4. Basic Structural Analysis and Design
Arch.E. 446-3. Constr. Planning and Scheduling
Arch.E. 455-3. Illumination II
Arch.E. 457-3. Building Electrical Systems Design
Arch.E. 458-3. Building Electrical Systems Design II
Arch.E. 470-3. Applied Structural Design
Acct. 200-3. Introduction to Accounting-Financial Aspects
Acct. 214-3. Introduction to Accounting-Managerial Aspects
B.Ad. 410-3. Business and Government
B. L. 300-3. Business Law
C. E. 221-3. Plane Surveying
C.E. 332-3. Applied Fluid Mechanics
C.E. 350-3. Structural Analysis
C.E. 380-3. Soils and Foundations Engineering
C.E. 453-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering
C.E. 456-2. Design of Timber Structures
C.E. 457-3. Design of Steel Structures
C.E. 458-3. Reinforced Concrete Design
C.E. 459-3. Applied Structural Design
C.E. 481-2. Intermediate Soils Engineering
C.E. 497-3. Engineering Economy
Econ. 201-3. Principles of Economics I
Econ. 202-3. Principles of Economics II
E.E. 313-3. Electromagnetic Fields I
E.E. 316-3. Energy Conversion I
E.E. 354-2. Power Lab I
E.E. 381-3. Introduction to Probability Theory
E.E. 451-2. Power Lab II
E.E. 452-2. Power Systems Lab
E.E. 471-2. Power Transmission Laboratory I
E.E. 472-2. Power Transmission Laboratory II
Engl. 315-3. Report Writing
Fin. 305-3. Basic Finance
Fin. 401-3. Business Finance
M.E. 314-2. Measurements I
M.E. 316-2. Measurements II
M.E. 371-3. Systems Analysis I
M.E. 372-3. Systems Analysis II
M.E. 421-3. Air Conditioning


College of Engineering and Applied Sciencel85
M.E. 424-3. Refrigeration
M.E. 442-3. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
Mk. 300-3. Principles of Marketing
R.Es. 300-3. Principles of Real Estate Practice
Arch.E. 240-3. Building Materials and Construction. A study of construction methods and techniques including foundations and structural framing concepts, and particularly materials, components and systems applications in building construction.
Arch.E. 330-4. Basic Structural Analysis and Design. First principles of structural analysis and the design of structural components of concrete, steel, or timber. Prer., C.E. 312.
Arch.E. 350-3. Environmental Systems III. Analysis and application of the methods of construction and the controlling of the planned environment. A study of structural, mechanical, electrical and illumination, acoustical, and construction technologies and their effect upon the design process. Prer., E.S. 251.
Arch.E. 351-3. Environmental Systems IV. Continuation of Arch.E. 350 (Environmental Systems III). Prer., Arch.E. 350.
Arch.E. 354-3. Illumination I. A study of the fundamentals of illumination and the application of these principles to the illumination of buildings. Prer., E.Phys. 112 or Phys. 202.
Arch.E. 362-3. Mechanical Systems for Buildings. Fundamentals of heating and air conditioning systems and environmental controls in buildings. Prer., Phys. 202 or E.Phys. 112.
Arch.E. 363-3. Introduction to Acoustics and Noise. (Aero. 363.) Engineering and physiological foundations of acoustics. Individual and social response to sound. Environmental noise problems. Engineering and legal control of noise. Prer., junior standing or consent of instructor.
Arch.E. 400-1 to 6. Independent Study.
Arch.E. 441-3. Construction Costs, Estimating, and Prices.
Introduction to building construction cost accounting and controls, analysis of direct and indirect cost fundamentals and collecting systems, methods engineering and value engineering. Also included is a study of the types of estimates, quantity take-off techniques and pricing applications, and the preparation of a detailed estimate for a building project including all cost analyses, a complete quantity survey, development of unit prices, and the final assembly of the bid proposal. Prer., Arch.E. 240, senior standing, or consent of instructor.
Arch.E. 446-3. Construction Planning and Scheduling. A
comprehensive study of construction management including the contractor's role in pre-construction activities; the construction contract; bonds and insurance; purchasing and subcontracts; contractor’s central office and job organization; plant, tools, and equipment; methods engineering; value engineering; labor relations and hiring; and the particular application of CPM/PERT techniques to the planning, scheduling, and control of a construction project. Prer., Arch.E. 240 and 441, senior standing, or consent of instructor.
Arch.E. 457-3. Building Electrical Systems Design I. Design of the secondary electrical distribution systems for buildings. Application of the N.E.C. Prer., E.E. 214 or 303.
Arch.E. 458-3. Building Electrical Systems Design II. Three lect.-rec. periods per wk. Analysis and design of electrical systems for special equipment in commercial building such as motor controllers, elevators, sound and signal systems. Prer., Arch.E. 457.
Arch.E. 470-3. Applied Structural Design. (C.E. 459.) One lect.-rec. and two computation periods per wk. Lectures on professional engineering practice. Individual design problems involving the use of timber, concrete, steel, and other materials. Prer., C.E. 457 or 458.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
WILLIAM C. HUGHES, Coordinator
Meeting the crisis in oil and energy, depolluting the water and air, producing new and better materials to replace those that are limited or scarce—these are jobs in which one will find the chemical engineer.
Chemical plants (including refineries and gasification plants) convert natural resources into industrial and consumer products. Among their products are many that often are not identified with chemical engineering —oils, metals, glass, plastic, rubber, paints, soaps and detergents, foods, beverages, synthetic and natural fibers, nuclear and exotic fuels, medicines, and many others.
The department is very much interested in research directed toward ecologically sound development of chemical processes. It is also working hard on energy problems and is stressing problems of energy conversion in its instructional program.
Many essentials of life originate in chemical engineering. Recycling of wastes and resources is not a new idea in chemical engineering but a long-standing principle. Since the earth now is perceived as a self-renewing system, intelligent generalization of the recycle theory to the entire cycle of natural resources is a challenge and opportunity for chemical engineers. Cleaning up pollution from chemical plants and from most other sources is largely a chemical engineering problem. The chemical engineer efficiently uses and conserves natural resources to create valuable end products and to preserve environmental values.
Thus, chemical engineering continually changes and progresses. The Department of Chemical Engineering therefore helps students to prepare to be immediately valuable to industry and eventually to lead future developments in industry and research. Whether they plan to go into industry or on to graduate work, students are urged to watch, understand, and enjoy the sparkle and interplay of new ideas and new technologies.
Chemical engineering is an ideal premedical course, and a special premedical and bioengineering program is offered. Paralleling the technical courses are studies in literature, social sciences, and humanities.
Each student is offered the opportunity for close and careful counseling by the faculty and by other members of the University community. Several students each year plan programs that will qualify them not only as chemical engineers but also for professional training in medical, law, or business schools or for graduate work in systems engineering or computing science. (The department has its own analog computer and a process-control computer built around a standard digital minicomputer.) In chemical engineering, students may choose combined five-year programs leading to double degrees with chemical engineering and such diverse fields as business, philosophy, or Asian studies. The department believes that, since no two students are alike, no two programs should be alike either.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete chemical engineering program is not available on the Denver Campus. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus at the start of their junior year. The complete curriculum, degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.


861 University of Colorado at Denver
*Curriculum for B.S. (Ch.E.)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fail Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ..............3
tChem. 103. General Chemistry...............................5
tEngl. 258. Great Books I...................................3
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I ...................2
#Ch.E. 201. Introduction to Computing........................ 2
15
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............3
tChem. 106. General Chemistry................................5
tEngl. 259. Great Books II...................................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.......................^3
14
SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ............3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ..............................4
tEngl. 260. Great Books III..................................3
Chem. 331. Organic Chemistry...............................4
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........................^3
17
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations.................3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ..............................4
tEngl. 261. Great Books IV ..................................3
Chem. 332. Organic Chemistry...............................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics .........................1
Ch.E. 212. Chemical Engineering Material and Energy Balances.........................................3
18
CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
JOHN R. MAYS, Associate Chairman
Civil and environmental engineering covers the broadest field of engineering generally studied in American universities today. Civil and environmental engineering offers an interesting and highly challenging career to the student interested in the design and construction of buildings, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures; in transportation systems including highways, canals, pipe lines, airports, rapid transit lines, railroads, and harbor facilities; in the transmission of water and the control of rivers; in the development of water resources for urban use, industry, and land reclamation; in the control of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment; in the construction and contracting industry; and in general in the rapidly expanding problems concerned with man’s physical environment and the growth of cities. Furthermore, civil-and-environmental-engineer-ing-educated students frequently find very rewarding employment in other fields: for example, in aerospace structures, electric power generation, city planning, the process industries, industrial engineering, business management and law or medicine (after appropriate education in law or medical school). The breadth of the civil and environmental engineering undergraduate program provides an excellent educational background for may fields of endeavor.
The curriculum is designed to give the student, besides a good background in the humanities, a broad
knowledge of the basic engineering sciences of chemistry, mathematics (including differential equations), physics, mechanics (including fluid mechanics and soil mechanics), electrical engineering, and thermodynamics. A minimum of 24 semester hours is allocated to the subject area of social-humanistic studies. These hours may be devoted to literature, the social sciences, or to selected courses in engineering which emphasize the impact of engineering on people and their problems.
Specialized training is achieved through certain required courses followed by advanced technical courses which may be elected in the senior year. Random selection of these technical electives is not advisable and in general is not allowed, the objective being to permit a graduate to enter the engineering profession with a firm groundwork in fundamental engineering science and sufficient knowledge in specialized fields to cope intelligently with the technical problems of present-day expanded civil and environmental engineering.
A five-year program has been arranged for those students who wish to pursue the combined curriculum for the civil engineering and business degrees.
A student interested in a premedical option should consult with an adviser and the department chairman at the earliest possible time in order to make proper plans for an acceptable program. See Premedical Option.
*Curriculum for B.S. (C.E.)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .............3
fEngl. 258. Great Books I..................................3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ............................4
C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil and Environmental
Engineering.............................................2
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I................... 2
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing..........................3
$Engl. 259. Great Books II.....................................3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ................................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics ............................. 1
14
SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ...........3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra .......................3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics .............................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics.........................1
fEngl. 260. Great Books III.................................3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I ........................3
C.E. 221. Plane Surveying..............................J3 *
19
* The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. tQualified students may take Chem. 107 and Chem. 108.
XFor other English options, see the English listing in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin.
#Or C.E. 130 or E.E. 130.


College of Engineering and Applied Sciencel87
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations...................3
'Engl. 261. Great Books IV.....................................3
Chem. 103/202. General chemistry (or Chem.E. 210) ..........5-4
C.E. 312. Mechanics of Materials .............,.............3
tCivil and environmental engineering elective ................^3
17-16
JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester
C.E. 213. Analytical Mechanics II ...........................3
C.E. 331. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics........................3
C.E. 350. Structural Analysis ...............................3
#E.E. 303. Electircal Circuits I...............................3
tEngineering science elective..................................3
Social-humanistic elective...................................3
C.E. 316. Materials testing laboratory.......................1
19
Spring Semester
C.E. 332. Applied Fluid Mechanics............................3
C.E. 341. Sanitary Engineering I ............................4
C.E. 360. Transportation Engineering.........................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics....................................3
C.E. 380. Soils and Foundations Engineering..................3
Social-humanistic elective...................................3
19
SENIOR YEAR
Fall Semester
Geol. 497. Geology for Engineers ..........................4
C.E. 458. Reinforced Concrete Design.......................3
tCivil and environmental engineeering elective...............3
Social-humanistic elective.................................3
tEngineering science elective................................5
18
Spring Semester
C.E. 499. Senior Seminar ..................................1
C.E. 457. Design of Steel Structures.......................3
tCivil and environmental engineering electives...............7
tEngineering science elective..............................2-3
Social-humanistic elective.................................3
16-17
C.E. 130-2. Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering.
A survey of the broad subject area of civil, environmental, and architectural engineering designed to assist the student in selecting his subject area specialty.
C.E. 212-3. Analytical Mechanics I. A vector treatment of force systems and their resultants: equilibrium of frames and machines, including internal forces and three-dimensional configurations; static friction; properties of surfaces, including first and second moments; hydrostatics; minimum potential energy and stability. Prer. or coreq., Math. 242.
C.E. 213-3. Analytical Mechanics II. A vector treatment of dynamics of particles and rigid bodies including rectilinear translation, central-force, free and forced vibration, and general motion of particles, kinematics of rigid bodies; the inertia tensor; Euler’s equations of motion; energy and momentum methods for particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. Prer., C.E. 212.
C.E. 221-3. Plane Surveying. Observation, analysis, and presentation of basic linear, angular, area, and volume field measurements common to civil engineering endeavor. Prer., Math. 140.
C.E. 222-3. Engineering Measurements. Elementary principles of measurements; methodology, instrumentation, and analysis of data. Prer., C.E. 221.
'For other English options, see the English listing in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin.
tEngineering science electives shall be taken from the list of courses approved by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
tCivil and Environmental engineering electives shall be chosen to form an integrated program subject to the approval ot the department.
#E.E. 213 may be substituted for E.E. 303.
C.E. 312-3. Mechanics of Materials. Mechanical properties of materials; stresses and strains in members subjected to tension, compression, and shear; flexural and shearing stresses in beams; deflections of beams, column analysis, principal stresses, static equivalent load, fatigue. Prer., C.E. 212.
C.E. 316-1. Materials Testing Laboratory. One 3-hour lab. per wk. Lab. emphasizing mechanical properties of commonly used structural materials, such as steel, aluminum, timber, and concrete, and the testing and research techniques necessary to obtain these properties. Prer. or coreq., C.E. 312.
C.E. 331-3. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics. Basic principles of fluid mechanics. Fluid properties, hydrostatics, fluid flow concepts, including continuity, energy momentum, boundary-layer theory, and flow in closed conduits. Prer. or coreq., C.E. 213.
C.E. 332-3. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Application of principles of fluid mechanics and dimensional analysis to problems in open channel flow, pipe systems, hydraulic machinery, fluid flow measurement, and hydraulic models. Includes laboratory demonstrations and experiments. Prer., C.E. 331.
C.E. 340-2. City Planning. Essential principles of city planning, with particular emphasis on the contribution that can be made by civil engineers. Includes detailed discussion of land use, land use boundaries, transportation, street systems, public buildings, parks and recreation, utility design, and zoning. Prer., junior standing. C.E. 341-4. Sanitary Engineering I. Elements of hydrology, public water supplies, and sewerage. Elements of hydrology include rainfall-runoff relationships, stream discharge, and ground water. Public water supplies include the study of rates of consumption, quality, source of supplies, methods of treatment and disinfection. Sewerage includes collection, treatment, and disposal of wastes: study of characteristics of sewage; design and operation of storm and sanitary sewers. Prer. or coreq., C.E. 331.
C.E. 350-3. Structural Analysis. First principles of structural analysis applied to statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Prer., C.E. 312.
C.E. 360-3. Transportation Engineering. Introduction to the technology, operating characteristics and relative merits of highway, airway, waterway, railroad, pipeline, and conveyor transportation systems. Evaluation of urban transportation systems. Recent transportation system innovations. Prer., junior standing or consent of instructor.
C.E. 380-3. Soils and Foundations Engineering. Introduction to physical and mechanical properties of soils; seepage, consolidation, shear strength, bearing capacity, lateral earth pressures, stability, and pile behavior, with preliminary analysis of structures affected by soil properties. Prer., C.E. 312 and 331. The latter may be taken concurrently.
C.E. 400-1 to 6. Independent Study.
C.E. 442-4. Municipal Design Projects. Analysis and design of municipal public works, including: street systems; drainage and flood control systems; water collection, treatment, and distribution systems; sewage collection and treatment systems. The interplay between these systems and their correlation with land characteristics and use. Prer., C.E. 340, 341, and 360.
C.E. 449-3. Introduction to Environmental Pollution. A
multidisciplinary examination of the problems of environmental pollution. The course focuses particularly on the chemical, social, biological, economic, and engineering aspects of environmental pollution: composition and sources; health and social costs; methods of reduction and control. Open to any nonengineering or engineering student having at least junior standing. Prer., upper division standing.
C.E. 451-3. Matrix Structural Analysis. Finite element analysis of skeletal structures. Systematic formulation of stiffness and flexibility methods for analysis of skeletal structures. Application of modern computational tools to structural analysis. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 453-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering. (E.D.E.E. 453, E.E. 455.) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science. Those methodssuitablefor solution by high speed digital computers are emphasized. Prer., E.E. 201, Math. 319, and Math. 443 or equivalent.
C.E. 456-2. Design of Timber Structures. Design of floor systems, beams, columns, and trusses. Design of joints; glued laminated construction. Prer., C.E. 350.


88/ University of Colorado at Denver
C.E. 457-3. Design of Steel Structures. Methods used in design of structural steel members and their connections. Introduction to plastic design of steel frames. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 458-3. Reinforced Concrete Design. Ultimate strength methods for design of reinforced concrete structures. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 460-3. Highway Engineering. Evaluation of alternate highway routes. Discussion of highway drainage, finance, maintenance, pavement design, traffic operations, and principles of economic analysis. Impact of the highway on the environment. Prer., C.E. 360 and 380.
C.E. 481-2. Intermediate Soils Engineering. Continuation of C.E. 380 into selected topics in soils engineering. Grain size, consistency and plasticity, properties governing pavement design, permeability and seepage, stress distribution, settlement analysis, stabilization of soils. Prer., C.E. 380.
C.E. 495-1 to 6. Special Topics. This category is intended for special topics which students may wish to pursue on their own initiative, with guidance from a professor who agrees to limited consultation on the work and to award credit when the project is completed.
C.E. 497-3. Engineering Economy. Application of economic and financial principles to engineering alternatives. Calculation of annual costs, present worth, and prospective rates of return on investment. Depreciation and replacement studies. Economic aspects of public works. Preparation of engineering reports on economy studies. Prer., senior standing.
C.E. 498-2. Engineering Contracts. Laws met by the practicing engineer, types of contracts, specification writing, laws on contracts, agency, partnership, sales, and property, with primary emphasis on rights and duties of the engineer. Prer., senior standing in civil or architectural engineering.
ELECTIVES FOR QUALIFIED UNDERGRADUATES The following graduate courses are open to qualified undergraduates to meet the requirements for technical or professional electives. Description of courses primarily for graduates may be found in the Graduate School section of this bulletin and in the Graduate School Bulletin.
C.E. 511-3. Introduction to Structural Dynamics. Introduction to the dynamic response of structural systems, both linear and nonlinear. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.E. 512-3. Intermediate Mechanics of Materials. Intermediate-level course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. Plane stress and strain; stress-strain relations, with emphasis on elastic and inelastic behavior of members and theories of failure. Discussion of basic methods of structural mechanics with applications to unsym-metric and curved beams, thick-walled pressure vessels, torsion of members of noncircular sections, and other selected problems in stress analysis. Prer., C.E. 312 and differential equations.
C.E. 533-3. Applied Hydrology. Engineering applications of principles of hydrology. Hydrologic cycle, rainfall and runoff, groundwater, storm frequency and duration studies, stream hydrography, flood frequency, and flood routing. Prer., consent of instructor.
C.E. 551-3. Matrix Structural Analysis. Finite element analysis of skeletal structures. Systematic formulation of stiffness and flexibility methods for analysis of skeletal structures. Application of modern computational tools to structural analysis. Differs from C.E. 451 by the addition of individual student projects. Prer., C.E. 350.
C.E. 553-3. Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering. Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of civil engineering problems with emphasis on obtaining solutions with high-speed electronic computers. Applies methods to all types of civil engineering problems. Prer., senior or graduate standing.
C.E. 562-3. Urban Transportation Planning. Definition of the urban transportation problem, sociology of urban regions, history of urban growth, models of urban growth, population forecasts, land use surveys and planning, trip generation, characteristics, distribution, and assignment, modal split, system evaluation, CBD transportation planning. Prer., consent of instructor.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
W. THOMAS CATHEY, Associate Chairman
The professional possibilities in electrical engineering include teaching and research in a university; research in development of new electrical or electronic devices, instruments, or products; production and quality-control of electrical products for private industry or government; and sales or management for a private firm or branch of government. More specific ways in which modern electrical engineering graduates may use their talents include the following:
1. They might emphasize their logic circuit and computer software training, in which case they would be occupied with the design of electronic computers and with their application to data handling and to the solution of engineering problems.
2. If they choose communication theory, the work might involve signal processing of data from biological, seismic, or space probe experiments; or they could work in the design of classical systems such as a radiotelephone link. Their knowledge of communication theory would provide a solid base to study such diverse fields as propagation of information in biological systems or the design of high-speed data links between computers.
3. New opportunities are developing in the area of system modeling for urban and environmental problems and in instrumentation for pollution measurement.
4. Many graduating engineers are interested in electrical devices—in the conversion of the latest scientific discoveries into useful tools or instruments. Engineers now working with lasers exemplify this aspect of the profession.
5. They might choose to go into biomedical electronics. In this field they would be working closely with the medical profession in the design of better measuring instruments, or in the design of more sophisticated prosthetic devices.
6. Alternatively, graduates might be interested in continuing their training in electromagnetic fields. This work would then lead to the study of how radio waves propagate from one point to another on the earth, or perhaps between man-made satellites.
What should the student expect in an electrical engineering course of study at the University of Colorado? A sound background based on the time-tested principles of physics, chemistry, and mathematics forms the core of his lower division work. An early, intensive training in the theory and laboratory application of electrical circuits is followed by more fundamentals in electronic circuits, electromagnetic and transmission theory, electrical machines and transformers, heat, and mechanics. Many students find an opportunity to put their knowledge to work with jobs in industry or research projects being conducted at the University. The student may also elect courses from a wide varity of subject matter to fit his particular interests. Throughout his entire course of study, he reinforces his understanding of the theory in well-equipped laboratories.


College of Engineering and Applied Sciencel89
Students are encouraged to develop interests outside of their electrical engineering specialty, thus providing themselves with a well-rounded background and a sense of awareness and responsibility for their later role in society. They are urged to attend meetings of their student professional society, where practicing engineers from many engineering specialties speak of their experiences.
The curriculum is arranged so that transfer students may join the program without appreciable loss of time or credit. For example, a transfer student who has completed the mathematics and physics of the freshman and sophomore years and who has a total of about 68 credit hours acceptable to the department could obtain the degree in four semesters.
The areas of specialization that electrical engineering students may enter upon graduation are so numerous it is impossible for the undergraduate training to cover them in detail. Intense specialization may be left to possible additional training graduates may receive when they assume positions with industrial firms, or acquired by specialization in a research field through graduate work beyond the bachelor’s degree. Students who have earned a B average or better in their undergraduate work and who have elected courses in their senior year that strengthen particularly their mathematical background may decide to take additional graduate work. The curriculum in electrical engineering is designed to make it possible for the graduating senior with high scholarship to finish a master’s degree in electrical engineering in about one additional full year of work at any of the nation’s major universities.
Curriculum for B.S. (E.E.)
In the standard curriculum the student has considerable freedom in the senior electives. The student may select these electives to provide a good foundation in several of the seven electrical engineering areas listed: communications, digital electronics, fields, materials, power, and systems. Some of these electives may be courses in other branches of engineering or in other colleges. Those students primarily interested in taking courses in the digital or computer area may do so in this curriculum or in the joint E.E. and computer degree option discussed below. If they do not care to take all the courses required in the latter curriculum or if they are not strong in mathematics, they may prefer to use the standard curriculum to specialize in computers.
Combined Business Option
Students wishing to take the combined engineering-business program should not start this program until their fourth year, with the exception of electing Econ. 201 and 202 for two of their social-humanistic electives. Students with a B average may wish to consider obtaining a master’s degree in business administration. For both of these programs, students should refer to the College of Engineering and Applied Science introductory section of this bulletin.
Premedical Option
A program has been developed which permits the student to satisfy the entrance requirements for medical
school, such as those of the University of Colorado, while earning a B.S. in electrical engineering.
There are several possible ways of satisfying the medical school requirements of genetics, plus 6 or 8 hours each of biology and organic chemistry.
Students interested in this program should inquire at the departmental office as early as possible, preferably before taking Chem. 103, 202, or equivalent.
Curriculum for B.S. (E.E. and C.S.)
The joint degree in electrical engineering and computer science is a comprehensive program covering both hardware and software aspects of computer system design. This program is administered in cooperation with the Department of Computer Science. It is directed to students whose major interests are in the computer itself and in a broad range of applications. The program leads to a B.S. (E.E. and C.S.) and can be extended for one year to obtain either an M.S. in computer science or an M.S. in electrical engineering.
A student need not make a decision to enter this program until the second semester of the sophomore year. The details of the program are listed in the section following the normal curriculum. The purpose of the changes is to add to the mathematics background in such a way as to provide a basis for graduate work in computer-related fields and to permit inclusion of courses in scientific application of computers, logic structure of computers, and assembly language programming. The student also will obtain actual operating experience with the departmental computers. Should students leave the program in favor of returning to the standard curriculum, they will need to satisfy the departmental requirements of mechanics and E.E. 354, which have been waived in the E.E. computer option curriculum. For other computer-related programs, see the Graduate School Bulletin.
*Curriculum for B.S. (E.E.)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ...............3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ..............................4
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I.....................2
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modern
Electrical Engineering....................................2
tSocial-humanistic elective ................................J3
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ..............3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ..............................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics .........................1
tE.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.........................3
tSocial-humanistic elective ...............................: 6
17 *
*The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
+Of the 24 hours of required social-humanistic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in English and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area, tFor some students, the material in these courses may be a repetition of material covered in high school or through practical experience. If this seems to be the case, the student should request waiver of the course from his adviser prior to or during thefirstweekofthesemester in which he is registered for the course.


901 University of Colorado at Denver
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III .............3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics ...............................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics ..........................1
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I ...............................4
tE.E. 253. Circuits Lab. I .................................1
tSocial-humanistic elective ................................3
E.E. 257. Logic Circuits..................................._3
18
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III .............3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics ...............................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics...........................1
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I ...............................4
tE.E. 253. Circuits Lab. I ..................................1
tSocial-humanistic electives ...............................3
tE.E. 257. Logic Circuits..................................^3
18
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Ordinary Differential Equations.....................3
§Chem. 202. General Chemistry ...................................4
E.E. 214. Circuit Analysis II ................................4
E.E. 254. Circuits Lab. II.....................................1
Math. 319 Applied Linear Algebra ..............................3
tSocial-humanistic elective .....................................3
18
JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester
E.E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I.........................3
E.E. 321. Electronics I.....................................3
E.E. 361. Electronics Lab. I ................................2
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics....................................3
E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability Theory.................3
tSocial-humanistic elective ..................................^3
17
Spring Semester
E.E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields II.........................3
E.E. 322. Electronics II....................................3
E.E. 316. Energy Conversion I ..............................3
E.E. 354. Power Laboratory I................................2
E.E. 362. Electronics Lab. II ..............................2
#C.E. 313. Applied Mechanics.................................3
tSocial-humanistic elective..................................._3
19
SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester
//Electives ..................................................14
tSocial-humanistic elective .................................._3
17
Spring Semester
//Electives .................................................. 16
Spring Semester
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra .........................3
E.E. 214. Circuit Analysis II ..............................4
E.E. 254. Circuits Lab. II ................................1
E.E. 453. Assembly Language Programming.....................3
§Chem. 202. General Chemistry ................................4
tSocial-humanistic elective...................................3
18
JUNIOR YEAR
Fall Semester
E.E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I...........................3
E.E. 321. Electronics I......................................3
E.E. 361. Electronics Lab. I ...............................2
E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability or
Math. 481. Introduction to Probability ......................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics.................................. 3
E.E. 458. Logic Laboratory ..................................1
tSocial-humanistic elective ................................. 3
18
Spring Semester E.E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields
E.E. 322. Electronics II.........
E.E. 362. Electronics Lab. II ...
E.E. 316. Energy Conversion I ... ••Math. 300. Intro. Abstract Math .. E.E. 459. Computer Organization E.E. 460. Computer Laboratory ..
.3 .3 . 2 .3 .3 .3 . 1 18
*Curriculum for B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ..............3
E.Phys. 111. General Physics ..............................4
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I....................2
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modern
Electrical Engineering....................................2
tSocial-humanistic electives .............................. 3
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ..............3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ............................ 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics .........................1
tE.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.........................3
tSocial-humanistic electives ................................6
17
*The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136.
t Of the 24 hours of required social-human is tic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in English and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area. tFor some students, the material in these courses may be a repetition of material covered in high school or through practical experience. If this seems to be the case, the studentshould request waiver of the course from his adviser prior to or during the first week of the semester in which he is registered for the course.
**Or equivalent math substitution with approval of adviser.
§Or Chem. 103, General Chemistry.
#The mechanics requirement may be satisfied by the 3-hour course, C.E. 313, orthe6-hour sequences of either C.E. 212 and C.E. 213, or E.Phys, 221 and E.Phys. 332. Students who first take E.E. 313 may, with permission, take only C.E. 213.
//The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation. Usually thesecourses will be taken in electrical engineering, mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his undergraduate adviser.
Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas. Communications (C), Digital (D), Electronics (E), Fields (F), Materials (M), Power (P), and Systems (S). Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, butin order to insure a minimum breadth of studies, every student's program must include at least 12 semester hours of E.E. theory courses in at least 3 areas, and must include a minimum of 3 laboratory courses in 3 areas. These distribution requirements could be met throuqh E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3), shown in each area, only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3) course may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements.
The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work sh ould certainly take additional mathematics. Some preliminary consulting with a department graduate adviser is desirable.
Some students, after satisfying their minimum E.E. requirements, may wish to use some of their remaining elective hours in areas other than E.E., Math., or Physics. With the approval of their adviser, they can take additional courses in other departments of the University. One restriction on these electives is that there may be no performance courses such as in music or physical education.


College of Engineering and Applied Science 191
SENIOR YEAR
Fall Semester
E.E. 401. Introduction to Programming Language
and Processors...............................................3
E.E. 422. Electronics III....................................3
tSocial-humanistic elective ....................................6
tElectives .....................................................6
18
Spring Semester
E.E. 559. Advanced Computer Architecture.....................3
***Math. 465. Numerical Analysis ...............................3
tSocial-humanistic elective ....................................3
tElectives....................................................._6
15
E.E. 130-2. Problems and Methods of Modern Electrical Engineering. Application of mathematical techniques to the solution of a variety of problems from electrical engineering and related fields. Translation of engineering problems into mathematical models, and the engineering interrelation of the mathematical results. Approximation techniques. Series expansions and transcendental functions in engineering problems. Problems will include optimization techniques, feedback, resonance, etc. Coreq., Math. 140.
E.E. 200-1 to 3. Independent Study. An opportunity for students to do independent, creative work. Prer., consent of instructor.
E.E. 201-3. Introduction to Computing. (C.S. 201.) An elementary course in computing, covering computer programming methods, FORTRAN programming, numerical applications, and non-numerical applications.
E.E. 213-4. Circuit Analysis I. Transient solution of circuits by classical and Laplace transform techniques. Steady-state sinusoidal solutions by means of phasors. Prer. or coreq., Math. 242.
E.E. 214-4. Circuit Analysis II. Additional steady-state solutions, polyphase circuits, Fourier series. Pulses, impulses. Mechanical analogs. Prer., E.E. 213
E.E. 253-1. Circuits Laboratory I. Electric circuits and measurements; cathode-ray oscilloscope; electrical instruments, transients in circuits involving resistance, inductance, and capacitance; and resistance measurements. Coreq., E.E. 213.
E.E. 254-1. Circuits Laboratory II. Impedance measurements, resonance, Fourier series, polyphase measurements, magnetic measurements, introduction to analog computer. Prer., E.E. 253; prer. or coreq., E.E. 214.
E.E. 257-3. Logic Circuits. The design of combinatorial and sequential switching circuits. Includes a study of Boolean algebra, minimization techniques, circuit analysis and synthesis, state transition tables, and race conditions.
E.E. 300-1 to 3. Independent Study. An opportunity for students to do independent, creative work. Prer., consent of instructor.
(Of the 24 hours of required social-humanistic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in English and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area, he purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation. Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering, mathematics, and physics at the 300,400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his undergraduate adviser.
Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas: Communication (C), Digital (D), Electronics (E), Fields (F), Materials (M), Power (P), and Systems (S). Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies, every student's program must include at least 12 semester hours of E.E. theory courses in at least 3 areas, and must in elude a minimum of 3 laboratory courses in 3 areas. These distribution requirements could be met through E.E. 400(1 to 3), and E.E. 500(1 to 3), shown in each area, only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400(1 to 3), and E.E. 500(1 to 3) course may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements.
The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work should certainly take additional mathematics. Some preliminary consulting with a department graduate adviser is desirable.
Some students, after satisfying their minimum E.E. requirements, may wish to use some of their remaining elective hours in areas other than E.E., Math., or Physics. With the approval of their adviser, they can take additional courses in other departments of the University. One restriction on these electives is that there may be no performance courses such as in music or physical education.
’"E E 455, Computer Techniques in Engineering, may be substituted.
E.E. 313-3. Electromagnetic Fields I. Maxwell’s equations postulated for free space and developed for material regions; boundary conditions. Uniform plane waves. Static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields. Poynting’s power theorem; reflection and transmission of uniform plane waves in layered media. Theory of hollow waveguides and two-conductor transmission lines. Smith chart; inpedance matching. Elements of antenna theory. Prer., Math. 242 and E.Phys. 112.
E.E. 314-3. Electromagnetic Fields II. Continuation of E.E. 313. Prer., E.E. 313.
E.E. 316-3. Energy Conversion I. Theory of transformers. Singly excited transducers. Energy relations in rotating machines. Basic rotating energy converters. Prer., E.E. 214 and 313.
E.E. 321-3. Electronics I. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices and vacuum tubes; audio, video, and radio-frequency circuit applications. Prer., E.E. 213.
E.E. 322-3. Electronics II. Continuation of E.E. 321. Prer., E.E. 214 and 321.
E.E. 354-2. Power Laboratory I. Basic electro-mechanical energy conversion concepts as applied to the synchronous machine, induction machine, and d.c. machine; armature windings; the transformer. Prer., E.E. 254; prer. or coreq., E.E. 316.
E.E. 357-3. Computer Applications in the Mathematical Sciences.
An advanced FORTRAN programming course for scientists and engineers. Emphasis on the use of computer as computational tools in engineering and in science. Programming of typical mathematical applications. Prer., E.E. 201 or C.S. 201 or equivalent; coreq., Math. 443 and Math. 313 or 319, or equivalent.
E.E. 361-2. Electronics Laboratory I. Experimental investigations of the characteristics of semiconductor devices and their applications. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 321.
E.E. 362-2. Electronics Laboratory II. Continuation of E.E. 361. Prer., E.E. 361; prer. or coreq., E.E. 322.
E.E. 381-3. Introduction to Probability Theory. Basic concepts, conditional and total probability, repeated independent trials, continuous distributions, functions and moments of random variables, Central Limit Theorem, characteristic functions. Prer., Math. 242.
E.E. 400-1 to 3. Independent Study. An opportunity for students to do independent, creative work. Prer., consent of instructor.
E.E. 401-3. (D) Introduction to Programming Languages and Processors. (C.S. 401.) A study of programming languages and digital processors. Conceptual aspects of programming languages, translators, data structures, hardware organization and system architecture. Relationship of language features to processor features. Prer., E.E. 201.
E.E. 413-3. (S) Control Systems Analysis. (Ch.E. 557.) Linear analysis and analog simulation of electrical, chemical, hydraulic and mechanical systems using block diagrams and signal flow graphs. Comparison of open and closed loop configurations. Stability studies using Nyquist, Bode, and root locus methods. Effects of simple networks on system response. Introduction of state variable techniques and digital computer solutions. Prer., senior standing with background of Laplace transforms.
E.E. 415-3. (S) Nonlinear Control Systems. The analysis and design of nonlinear feedback control systems; types and characteristics of equilibrium states; limit cycle phenomena; the behavior of nonlinearities such as hysteresis, saturation, and dead zone; phase space, describing function analysis. Lyapunov and Popov stability will be introduced. Prer., E.E. 413.
E.E. 416-4. (P) Energy Conversion II. General theory of electrical machines based on matrix analysis and Lagrange’s equations of motion. Holonomic and nonholonomic machines, transformation theory; synchronous, induction, and d.c. machines. Prer., E.E. 313 and 316.
E.E. 421-3. (S) Linear System Theory. Characterization of linear systems by impulse response, convolution, transfer function. Linear differential equations and linear difference equations as models. Applications to circuits, biological systems, etc. Transform methods including Fourier series and transforms. Laplace transforms and z transforms.
E.E. 422-3. (E) Electronics III. Application of electronic and other devices in wave shaping, wave generation, switching and digital systems. Prer., E.E. 257 and 322.


921 University of Colorado at Denver
E.E. 424-3. (C) Communication Theory. Introduction to principles of modern communication theory and signal processing. Random processes will be introduced and used to compare the noise performance of AM, FM, and various digital modulation systems. Definition of information and channel capacity. Introduction to error correcting codes and further topics in modern communication theory. Prer., E.E. 381 and 421.
E.E. 432-3. (M) Introduction to Quantum Electronics (Lasers).
Introduction to lasers and other quantum electronic devices and to the general quantum principles that govern their operation. No background in the mathematical formalism of quantum theory is required. Discussion of various laser types, applications. Prer., E.E. 302 or equivalent and 314.
E.E. 450-3. (S) Analog Computer Simulation. (Math. 461.) Analog computing techniques including time and amplitude scaling, programming of linear and nonlinear differential equations. Applications of these techniques to simulate dynamic systems including an introduction to iterative analog computing. Some laboratory work on an analog computer and with digital simulation languages will be required. Prer., A.Math. 232 or Math. 443 and background in basic Laplace transform and matrix operations.
*E.E. 451-2. (P) Power Laboratory II. Experimental investigations of the design and operating characteristics of synchronous machines, induction machines, transformers, power rectifiers, and single-phase machines. Prer., E.E. 316 and 354.
*E.E. 452-2. (P) Power Systems Laboratory. A continuation of E.E. 451 with emphasis on interactions and dynamic systems; special types of electric power equipment; transient phenomena. Prer., E.E. 354.
E.E. 453-3. (D) Assembly Language Programming. (C.S. 453.) A laboratory course in programming at the machine language level. Lectures will deal with the organization of the machine, its effect on the order code, and techniques for programming in assembly language. Primary emphasis will be on preparing and running programs. Prer., E.E. 201 or consent of instructor.
E.E. 454-2. Controls Laboratory. Introductory experiments on response of control components; open- and closed-loop response of servosystems; simulation of systems on analog computers; design of compensating networks. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 413 or consent of instructor.
E.E. 455-3. (D) Computer Techniques in Engineering. (E.D.E.E. 453, C.E. 453.) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science. Those methods suitable for solution by high speed digital computers are emphasized. Prer. E.E. or C.S. 201 and A.Math. 232 or Math. 443.
E.E. 458-1. (D) Logic Circuits Laboratory. Concerned with the actual wiring of electronic logic circuits and with investigation of the properties and characteristics of those circuits. Circuits will be built from solid state gates and memory elements. Circuits of the type used in digital computers, data processing systems, control systems, and communication systems will be studied. Prer., E.E. 257.
E.E. 459-3. (D) Computer Organization. (C.S. 459.) This course is concerned with computer arithmetic units, memory systems, control systems, and input-output systems. The emphasis is completely on logic structure rather than electronic circuitry. Prer., E.E. 257, or equivalent.
E.E. 460-1. (D) Computer Laboratory. This course will provide laboratory experience both with digital computer subsystems and with complete computer systems. The student will construct small subsystems and work with acutal subsystems of a full digital computer. Prer., E.E. 257, 458, or equivalent. Prer. or coreq., E.E. 459.
E.E. 463-2. (F) Transmission Laboratory. Experiments with transmission line and waveguide systems, slotted line, bolometer power bridge, cavity frequency meter, and crystal detector. The artificial line, time-domain reflectometer, directional coupler, hybrid tee, stub impedance matching, antenna patterns, microwave superheterodyne receiver. Transmission at low frequencies, including 60 Hz. Prer., E.E. 314. *
*Taught in Boulder only.
E.E. 464-3. (F) Electro-Optics Laboratory. Lasers, light emitters, detectors, polarization effects upon reflection and refraction. Diffraction, antenna simulation, interference, imaging, spatial filtering. Optical modulation, detection. Longer projects are selected from holography, pattern recognition, optical communications, acousto-optical effects. Prer., E.E. 314. E.E. 413 or 421 suggested.
E.E. 465-2. (C) Communications Laboratory. Laboratory experiments demonstrating and verifying material taught in E.E. 424. Extensive use is made of spectrum analysis to study signals and signal processing in filters, samplers, modulators, converters, and detectors. Topics include AM, FM, PM, and noise. Prer. or coreq. E.E 424.
E.E. 491-499-1 to 3. Special Topics. Credit and subject matter to be arranged. Prer., variable.
ELECTIVES FOR QUALIFIED UNDERGRADUATES Most 500-level graduate courses are open to qualified undergraduates to meet the requirements for technical or professional electives. Description of these courses and courses primarily for graduates may be found in the Graduate School section of this bulletin and in the Graduate School Bulletin.
To register for 500-level courses, a student must have a B average or consent of instructor.
ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION
Engineers in today’s world of rapidly expanding technology are expected not only to be competent planners and designers of technical devices and systems, but also significant contributors to the betterment of their environment in the social and humanistic sense as well. It is no longer sufficient to build more powerful machines, more useful devices, and more effective controlling systems if the total effect is to deplete man’s resources, damage his environment, or contribute to the destruction of his economic welfare. To be effective in his modern role, the engineer, of course, must have a solid background in the natural sciences and mathematics, the engineering sciences, modern economic theory and practice, and current thought in the social sciences and humanities. He also must have opportunities to develop his judgment in the proper application of this background to contemporary problems.
The curriculum in the Department of Engineering Design and Economic Evaluation therefore stresses the importance of educational techniques which furnish opportunities to study in reasonable depth the sciences and mathematics as useful analytical tools. It also encourages the expansion of the individual’s concepts of the problems of the society in which he serves, and furnishes many opportunities to develop his own abilities as a thoughtful and responsible contributor to the solution of these problems.
Starting in the freshman year and continuing throughout the curriculum, graphical, mathematical, numerical (computer), and physical models are used, first to teach known principles, and ultimately as tools in themselves for the effective conceptualization of new problems. Finding a possible solution to a problem is not enough; sound judgment must be applied in reaching an optimum solution. Many engineering problems are non-numerical in character, and the engineer must learn


College of Engineering and Applied Science/93
to manage problems having elements of great uncertainty.
Graduates in engineering design and economic evaluation are primarily concerned with the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of men, materials, and equipment. Assignments such as operations management, design for engineering or manufacturing, and consulting in industry and small business are typical. Many other types of opportunities are offered to graduates of this program.
If a student’s interests and abilities lead him into graduate studies and research, the department offers opportunities to pursue feasibility evaluation, quantitative economic analysis and planning, product design and development, systems design, industrial engineering, and operations research. A logical and recent development in the graduate activities of this department is biomechanics. Research in biomechanics is leading to a better understanding of the mechanical functions of living organisms, including man, from an engineer’s point of view. This understanding, when joined with physiology and medicine, promises to contribute heavily to man’s knowledge of himself and his environment.
Entry into the E.D.E.E. program at all levels is intentionally made as flexible as possible. Lengthy chains of prerequisites have been avoided as well as the traditional insistence on certain rigid patterns of courses. Wherever possible, students are admitted to advanced courses on the basis of their intellectual maturity rather than on set prerequisites. Individuals are encouraged to discuss their objectives with the department’s advising staff and to develop a course plan which best meets their aspirations.
Transfer to Boulder
The complete program in Engineering Design and Economic Evaluation is not available on the Denver Campus. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus at the start of their junior year. The complete curriculum, degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the College of Engineering and Applied Science Bulletin.
*Curriculum for B.S. (E.D.E.E.)
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ...............3
Phys. 111. General Physics.................................4
E.D.E.E. 101. Fundamentals of Design I.....................2
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing........................3
tE.D.E.E. 130. Introduction to Engineered Systems...........2
14
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ..............3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics ..............................4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics .........................1
“Social-humanistic elective..................................3
E.D.E.E. 203. Fundamentals of Design III...................3
^Technical elective..........................................3
17
SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III ..............3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ..........................3
§E.Phys. 213. General Physics..................................3
#C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I .............................3
“Social-humanistic elective....................................3
E.D.E.E. 221. Product Definition............................^3
18
Spring Semester
Math. 443. Differential Equations............................3
#C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I .............................3
E.D.E.E. 222. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design.........3
E.D.E.E. 331. Engineering Materials .........................3
°Econ. 201. Principles of Economics I..........................3
**Ch.E. 210. Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter.......4
19
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CLYDE ZAIDINS, Coordinator
The purpose of the curriculum outlined by the Department of Physics and Astrophysics is to give the student a thorough, fundamental training in physics and in the applications of physics. The courses are broad in scope, and the curriculum provides many electives so that a student may supplement his general training in physics by work in other fields.
During the freshman and sophomore years the work is general, yet a thorough training in mathematics and fundamental methods and principles of the physical sciences is stressed. This leads to an appreciation of related fields and their application to engineering practice.
During the junior and senior years the work in physics is amplified to conform to the versatility of the physicist’s profession. This leads to a comprehensive knowledge of the various branches of physics such as nuclear physics, atomic physics, electronics, thermodynamics, mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. Individual initiative and resourcefulness are stressed. This general knowledge of the diverse fields of physics is intended to give the student the ability to deal with industrial problems that cannot be solved by a standardized procedure in a specialized field. The training prepares the student for a career in physics where there are many and varied opportunities in development work and industrial research. It is also basic for graduate work in physics and specialized training in research.
It is recommended that students preparing for Graduate School prepare for its foreign language requirement in their undergraduate curriculum.
'The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. tOr any 130 course in engineering.
tA minimum of three elective courses must be taken from E.D.E.E. offerings §Or Chem. 103-5, Biol. 101-3, MCDB 105-4, or Ch.b. 210-4. ocSocial-humanistic electives must include a minimum of two literature courses.
#Or M.E. 281, 282.
* * *Or any approved chemistry course of 3 or more hours.
°Or any approved social-humanistic elective; Econ. 201, 202 required for E.D.E.E. and business.


Full Text

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0 c University of Colorado Bulletin

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U18701 9581649 Contents GENERAL INFORMATION .............. . ................. .. ACADEMIC CALENDAR ......... . . .... . ................. . .... . COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES .... ..... . . . ........ . .............. . ........ . ........... 14 DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES ......... 20 DIVISION OF NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES . . .... ... ........ ........ . . ...... 28 DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES ... ............ ... 38 ETHNIC PROGRAMS ...... ............. .... ........... . . ... 48 SPECIAL PROGRAMS ... ... ......... .... .................. 50 PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS ..... . ...... .... . 51 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION.. 56 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION .. . ... . .... ... . ... . . . . . .... .. . . ... 71 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE ............ .... .......................... 74 COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ........ 98 COLLEGE OF MUSIC . ................. . . ..... ............... . . 103 GRADUATE SCHOOL ...... . ....................... . ........ ... 106 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS ... . . 152 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS ....................... . .... 162 FACULTY ... ........................................ . .................. 162 INDEX ..... ..... . . . ....... . ..... . . ...... ............. . .... . .............. 168 This bulletin contains general information and course descriptions. Students should consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day , time, and meeting place of classes as well as particular registration information. University of Colorado Bulletin . 1200 University Avenue , Boulder , Colorado 80302 . Vol. LXXIV , No. 60 , December 25 , 1974 , General Series No. 1764 . Published five times monthly by the University of Colorado. Second class postage paid at Boulder , Colorado

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Social Sciences, Division of , 38-47 Sociology : undergraduate , 45 46; graduate , 150-151 Spanish: undergraduate , 27-28 ; graduate , 151 Speakers bureau , 13 Special programs , 50-51 Special students, 6 Statistics , 70 Student activities , 12 Student Relations, Office for , 11 Student services , 11-12 Study abroad , 8 Study Skills Center, 1 1-12 Study skills , courses , 51 T Teacher education, undergraduate, 52 , 72 Transcr i pts , 10 Transfer students , 5 Tuition, 9 u Urban Affairs , Master of, 156-158 Urban and Regional PlanningCommunity Development , Master of , 99-102 Urban Design , Master of Architecture in, 98-99 , 101 Urban Studies maJOr, 47 v Veterans Affa1rs. 11 w Withdrawals , 1 0 Women ' s services , 12

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University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Telephone: 892-1117 Second-Class Postage Paid at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado 80302

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER ACADEHIC CALENDAR THE TERM 1976 (8 week term, 39 instructional 1 vacation day) (Application deadline dates: New Undergradu3te students April 1, 1976 New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University Transfers May 1, 1976) June 9-10, lJed., Thurs. June 14, Honday July 5, Honday July 6, Tuesday Aug. 6, Friday Aug. 14, Saturday. Registration Classes begin Independence Day holiday (no classes, all offices closed) Classes resume Classes end Commencement on the Boulder campus THE FALL 1976 week term, 77 instructional days, 3 vacation days) (Application deadline dates: New Undergraduate students June 15, 1976 New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University Transfers July 15, 1976) Aug. li-19, Tues.-1nurs. Aug. 23, ' Sept. 6, Monday Sept. 7, Tuesday 25-28, Thurs.-Sunday Nov. 29, Monday Nov. 30, Dec. 1-2, Tues.-Thurs. Dec. S, Wednesday Registration Classes begin Labor Day holiday (no classes, all offices closed) Classes resume Thanksgiving Day holidays (no classes, all offices closed Classes resume Early registration for the Spring Semester, (students enrolled Fall Semester 1976, Denver campus only) Classes end ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THE SPRING Sil!ESTER 1977 (16 week term, 75 instructional days, 5 vacation days) .(Application deadline dates: New Undergraduate students Oct. 1, 1976 New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University Transfers Nov. 1, 1976) Jan. 26-27, Wed., Thurs. Jan. 31, Monday 19-27, Ha rch 25, Friday Hardt 2 8, Non day Hay 20, Friday Registration Ciasses begin Spring break {no classes} All offices closed Classes resume Commencement on the Boulder campus .

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.I .. . .:: . THE SUMMER TERM 1977 (10 week term, 49 instructional days, 1 vacation day) June June July July Aug. Aug. (Application deadline dates: New Undergraduate students April 1, 1977 New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University transfers May 1, 1977) 1-2, Wed.-Thurs. Registration 6, Monday Classes begin 4, Monday Independence Day holiday (no classes, all offices closed) 5, Tuesday Classes resume 12, Friday Classes end 13, Saturday Commencement on the Boulder campus THE FALL SEMESTER 1977 week term, 75 instructional days, 2 vacation days) (Application deadline dates: New Undergraduate students June 15, 1977 New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University transfers July 15, 1977) Aug. 30,31,-Sept. 1, Tues.-Thurs. Sept. 6, Tues. Nov. 24-27, Thurs.-Sun. Nov. 28, Monday Dec. 6-8, Tues • -Thu.rs • Dec. 21, Wednesday Registration Classes begin Thanksgiving Day holidays (no classes, all offices closed) Classes resume for the Spring Semester 1 978 (students enrolled Fall Semester 1976, Denver campus only) Classes end THE SPRING SEMESTER 1978 (15 week term, 75 instructional days, no vacation days) (Application deadline dates: New Undergraduate students Oct. 1, 1977 New Graduate students (refer to specific department) Former CU students, Special-to-Degree, Inter-University transfers Nov. 1, 1977) Dec. 6-8, Tues.-Thurs. Jan. 4-5, Thurs. Jan. 9, Monday April 21, Friday May 26, Friday Early registration Regular registration Classes begin Classes end Commencement on the Boulder campus

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. ....

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General Information DENVER CAMPUS ACADEMIC CALENDAR* • DEADLINE DATES FOR APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION The following dates will be applicable for the academic year 1975-76 at the University of Colorado at Denver. Interested applicants are advised that , because of limited space available for new students , all credentials required in the admission process must be on file with the Office of Admissions and Records prior to the deadline dates i nd icated be l ow if consideration tor admission is to be made for the term desired . Transfer appl i cants should t ake i nto account the time involved in hav i ng off i cial transcripts sent from collegiate inst i tutions attended previously and app l y sufficiently in advance of the application deadl ine to i nsure that these documents are on file by the required date . Fore ign students are advised that 120 days are usuall y required for credentials to arrive i n t h i s off ice from most i nternat i onal loca tions . Undergradu ate New F r eshman and Transfe r Students Nurs ing ( fall only ) Spec ial Student to Degree Student Stat u s Ch a nge Graduate Bus i ness Environmental Design (fall on l y ) Public Adm i nistration Graduate School Schoo l o f Educat i on Nurs ing ( fall only ) Master ' s Program in Psycho l ogy (fall only) Spec i a l Student to Degree Student Status Change (see Graduate School dates above ) Special Students Undergraduate and Gr a duate Leve l s lntrauniversity Transfers Summer 1975 May 21 May 21 Ma r . 1 Apr . 1 Apr . 15 Mar . 1 May 21 Apr . 14 Fall 1975 Aug . 1 Mar. 1 Ju l y 15 Mar. 1 Apr . 15 June 1 Ju l y 1 Mat . 1 Jan . 15 Apr . 1 Aug. 1 July 1 Spring 1976 Dec . 1 2 Dec . 1 Sept. 1 Nov . 15 Dec . 1 Sept. 1 Dec . 19 Dec . 1 ( Note : Prospective students are adv i sed that slight variations in the calendar may exist on d i fferent campuses of the Univers i ty . Specific i nformation shou l d be obta i ned from the campus to which the indiv i dual expects to apply . ) Fall Semester 1975 Students should obtain a copy of the Fall Semester 1975 Schedule of Courses tor complete cal endar information and instructions regarding registration . Aug. 1 (Fri.)-Application deadl i ne . All required credentials must be on file for cons i deration tor the fall semester 1975. Aug. 26 , 27 , 28 (Tues., Wed., Thurs.)-Registration .:j: Sept. 1 (Mon.) Labor Day holiday . All offices c l osed . Sept. 2 (Tues .)-Ciasses begin. Sept. 2 , 3 ( Tues., Wed . )-Late reg i st r ation. A la t e f ee will be assessed all l ate registrants . t Nov . 27-29 (Thurs. , Fr i., Sat.)Thanksgiving hol i day . No classes . All offices closed . Dec . 1 ( Mon.)-Giasses resume . Dec . 20 (Sat.)-Gi asses end . Spring Semester 1976 Students should obtain a copy of the Spring Semester 1976 Schedule of Courses tor complete calendar information and instructions regarding registration. Dec. 2 , 3 , 4 (Tues. , Wed., Thurs.)-EARLY REGISTRATION : students enr olled fall semester 1975 only. Dec. 12 (Fri.)-Appli cation deadline . All requ i red credentials must be on file tor consideration for the spring semester 1976 . Jan. 13, 14 (Tues. , Wed.)-OPEN REGISTRATION. (New applications for admission w ill not be accepted or considered on the days of open registrat ion.):j: Jan . 19 (Mon.)-Giasses begin. Jan . 19 , 20 (Mon., Tues.)-Late registration . A late fee will be assessed all late registrants . t Mar. 22-27 (Mon . -Sat.)-Spring vacation . No classes. Mar. 27 (Fri.)-AII offices closed. 'The Univers i ty reserves the right to afte r the aca demic calendar at
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2 / University of Colorado at Denver Mar. 29 (Mon.)-Ciasses resume. May 18 (Tues .)-Ciasses end . May 21 (Fri.)-Gommencement in Bouldr;r. Summer Term 1976 May 21 (Fri.)-Application deadline. All required credentials must be on file for consideration for the summer term 1976 . June 9 , 10 (Wed., Thurs.)-Registration.* June 14 (Mon.)-Ciasses begin . July 5 (Mon.)-lndependence Day holiday. No classes . All offices closed . Aug . 6 (Fri.)-Ciasses end. Aug . 14 (Sat.)-Gommencement in Boulder. THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER ... AN URBAN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS History Beginning in 1912 , courses were made available to residents of the Denver metropolitan area through the Extension Division of the University of Colorado in Boulder . Classes were held in scattered locations throughout the city until1938, when they were gathered in one center . Increasing enrollment necessitated two moves to larger quarters , and the Denver Center came to its present location at 14th and Arapahoe Streets in 1957. In 1965, the Denver Center became a degree-granting institution, enabling students to complete full academic programs in Denver. In January 1973 , the Board of Regents adopted a resolution changing the names of the University ' s centers because of an amendment to the Constitution of the State of Colorado which gave the centers legal status as separate branches of the University . The Denver Center was renamed the University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) . Location UCD is situated at the hub of a tremendous growth area . The downtown campus is accessible to both city dwellers and suburban commuters from an eight-county area with an est i mated population of 1 , 506 , 000 . Located across Cherry Creek from the Aurar i a Urban Renewal Area , UCD will share facilities with Metropolitan State College and the Community College of Denver in the Aurar i a Higher Education Center complex while re maining a unique urban institution in itself. The campus is close to major business establishments and govern ment offices in downtown Denver , as well as to civic and cultural centers. Enrollment UCD is one of the largest state-supported institutions of higher education in Colorado in terms of enrollment. The average number of students enrolled for credit is "Ne w applicants and returning former students should consult with the Office of Ad miss io ns and Records regarding antic ipated chan ge s i n reg is tration procedures and dates to i nsure correct information . about 8 , 000 during the fall and spring semesters and 4 , 000 during the summer term . Academic Programs Academic and public service programs are especially geared to the needs of the urban population and environment, as well as to traditional fields of study. Students may earn degrees in more than 50 undergraduate fields and some 20 graduate areas . These educational endeavors emphasize quality instruction, research , and professional training. Academic programs within the University are offered by colleges that admit freshmen , by professional schools that admit students who have completed at least two or three years of preprofessional study , and by the Graduate School. Colleges and schools on the Denver Campus include: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Environmental Design College of Music Graduate School Graduate School of Public Affairs Accreditation and Memberships The University of Colorado at Denver is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is a member of the Association of Urban Universities . The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is a member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. The School of Education is accredited by the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education and membership is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education. The College of Engineering and Applied Science has earned high accreditation ratings from the Engineers Council on Profess i onal Development. The College of Environmental Design is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board and is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture . The College of Music is a member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Graduate School of Public Affairs is a recognized member of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. Year-Round Operation Classes on the Denver Campus are scheduled six days a week , both day and evening . Students may begin stud i es in most degree fields at the start of any one of the academic terms of the year , which include a fall semester of 16 weeks , a spring semester of 16 weeks , and an 8-week (half-semester) summer term . More than half of the courses on the Denver Campus are offered during evening hours , permitting

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students maximum flex i b ili ty i n plann i ng for bo t h employment and educa t ional goals . Faculty More than 180 hig h ly q ual i f ied faculty members teach f ull time on the Denver Campus ; 84 percent have earned doctoral degre e s . The faculty i s alert to the challenges of the urban scene and respons ive to the needs of the urban student. Students Strongly motiva ted people from all walks of life make up the student bod y. The diversi ty of interests, knowledge, occupatio ns , backgrounds, and age stimulates a unique learning experience for these men and wome n . Age s ra n ge from 16 to 70 . About 60 percent of t he students enr olled are at the junior , senior , fifth year, graduate, or special student-withbaccalaureate -deg ree l e v els . Prospectus As an urban univers i ty , UCD has a fundamental commitment to meet the needs of the metropolitan Denver community ; it seeks to keep pace with the needs of the present-day city-or i ented student and at the same time plan for the demands of the future. Programs are continually be ing enlarged and expanded , as additional funds and space are made available , to offer students a broad scope of educational opportunities , whether the student is seeking a general education or has a desire to study in a highly spec i alized area . UCD ' s primary role is to provide graduate, professional , and upper division education , with undergraduate programs designed especially for those students who plan to undertake graduate work or professional study . REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION The University of Colorado at Denvc seeks to identify applicants who have a high probability of successful completi on of an academic program. Admission decisions are based on evaluation of many criteria. Among the most important are: 1 . Maturity , motivation , and potential for academic growth. 2 . Ability to work in the academic environment of an urban, nonresidential campus . 3 . Evidence of scholarly ability and accomplishment shown on national aptitude and achievement tests (ACT / SAT). 4 . General level of previous academic performance. An applicant who is granted admission to UCD must reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal background acceptable to the University. The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes , and functions as an educational institution. Generallnformat ion/ 3 High School Concurrent Enrollment High school juniors and seniors of proved academic ability may be admitted to UCD for courses which supplement their high school programs. Cred its fo r University courses taken in this manner may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. Inter e sted h i gh school students may contact the Office of Admissions and Records for complete information a n d application instruct i ons (telephone [ 303 ] 623-1181). Admission of Freshmen (Those who have not had prior collegiate experience) New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration , Eng i neer ing and Applied Science , Music , and Liberal Arts and Sciences. 1 . General Requirements Applicable to Each College. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate as a result of the completion of the General Educational Development Test (GED) . Applicants who present the High School Equivalency Certificate o f the GED must score at or above the 60th percentile on each section of the test to be eligible for considerat ion for admission . Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Develop ment Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test Vi, " English as a Second Language ." All applicants must present 15 units of acceptable secondary school credit. While the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences does not specify particular units , the College of Business and Administration , the College of Engineering and Applied Science , and the College of Music have the following requirements : College of Bus i ness and Adm i nistration English ...... ..... ............ . ................... ..... ......... ..................... .............. 3 Mathemat i cs ( college preparatory ) .... ............................................ 2 Natural sciences (laboratory type) .... ..... .... ............. . ..... ............ ..... 2 Social sciences (including history) .... ................................. ... ....... . . 2 Electives ..................................................... .... . . .............................. 6 ( Such as foreign languages and add i tional academ i c courses . May include up to 2 units in business areas . ) College of Engineering and Applied Sc i ence 15 English . . . .............. . . . ....... .... ......... ... ...... . . . .... . . ..... .......... . ........ . ........ . 3 Algebra ..... . . ....... ..... . . .... ...... . ................. ......... . ......... . ...................... 2 Geometry ............ . ..... .............. ....................... .......... . . ............. . ....... 1 (Trigonometry and solid geometry recommended:) Natural sciences . . . ...... . ............. ..... . .............. .............. . . ..... . ............ 2 (Physics and chemistry recommended . ) Social studies and humanit ies ...... . ........................... ...... ... . . ..... . . ... 2 ( Fore ign languages and additional un its of English , h i s t ory , and literature are included in the humanities . ) Electives ........... . . . . . . ..... . . ......... ............. ..... . .... . ................. . ..... . ........ 5 15 'Begi nn ing engineering students must be prepared to start analytic geometry -calculus . A student who does not have trigonometry should expect to attend at/east one extr a s ummer term.

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4 / University of Colorado at Denver College of Mu sic English .......... . ..... ........................ . .... . . .................... . ........................ 3 Physical sc i ence ................................................ ...................... . Social sc i ence ..... .......... ............ .............................. ............... ... 8 Theoretical music .................................... ............. ..................... } Foreign language . ............................. ...... .............................. . . .. Mathemat ics ................................ ........ ................. ... ................. . Add i t i onal high sc hool academ i c uni ts ......... ................... ........ ...... .:._ 15 It is e x pected that all students will have had previous expe rienc e i n an applied music area. Two years of piano tra i n i ng are recommended . The College of Music requires an audition of all entenng freshmen and undergraduate transfer students . In lieu of the personal aud1t1on, applicants may su bstitute tape r ecordings (about 10 minutes in on ?Y2 i ps monau r al) or a s tat ement of excel l ence by a qualified teacher . Interested students should write to the College of Music , UCD , f or audition or interview ap plications . 2 . Colorado Resident Applicants . • Colorado resi dent applicants who meet the above general qual i fica tions are divided into three categories : a . Applicants who ranked in the upper one-half of their h i gh school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT) or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Apt i tude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board are assured admission . b. Applicants who ranked in the upper two-thirds of their high school graduating class and who have an ACT composite score from 18 to 22 or a combined score of 800 or higher on the SAT will be considered for admission on an individual basis . These applicants cannot be assured admission. c . Applicants who ranked in the lower one third of their high school graduating class , or who have a composite ACT score below 18 or a combined SAT score below 800 will be considered for admission on an individual basis by the Admissions Committee . 3. Nonresident Applicants. • Nonresident appl icants must meet the general requirements stated above , and , in addition , must rank in the upper one-half of their high school graduating class and present an ACT composite score of 24 or higher or a combined SAT score of 1050 or higher to be considered for admission. Nonresident applicants are advised that UCD does not maintain residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area, but must be obtained by the indi vidual without dependence on University services . HOW TO APPLY FOR ADMISSION 1. Applicants may apply for the fall semester , the spring semester , or the summer term . A schedule of deadlines for the various semesters and terms is noted on page 1 , and will be supplied with the application form . An application received after the stated deadltne for one semester or term will be considered for the next semes ter or term if the applicant notifies the Office of Ad missions and Records of his intention . 'Se e page 10 for definition of " resident " and " nonresidenr classificatio n . 2 . An Appl i cation for Admiss ion may be obtained by contacting : Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver , Colorado 80202 Telephone (303) 623 -1181 A Colorado resident may also obtain this form from the office of his high school principal or counselor . 3 . The application for admission must be in total and submitted to the above address pnor to the stated application deadline for the term of enrollment desired. All applications for admission must be accompanied by a check or money order in the amount of $10 . This application fee is . In the event the applicant is granted adm1ss1on but IS prevented from enrolling during the ind!cated on the application , the application fee w1ll be val1d for o_ne full year (12 months) from the date of the term for the applicant was applying; t_he_ appl _1cant must notify the Office of Admiss i ons of hts 1ntent1ons. 4 . The applicant must request that a high school transcript , including his rank-in-class , be mailed to the above address by his high school. 5 . The applicant must take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board one of the national testing dates , or by arrangement w1th the UCD Testing Center . The student must request that test scores be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver (ACT code 0533 , or SAT code R-4875) . If the applicant took one of these tests prior to his application for adm i ssion to the University of Colorado and did not designate the Denver Campus to receive a score report , he must request the testing agency to send the score to the Denver Campus. This is accomplished on a Request for Additional Score Report form available at test centers or from the appropriate office listed below . Information regarding these tests may be obtained either from the applicant's high school counselor , the UCD Office of Admissions and Records , or from one of the following offices of the nationa l testing agencies : Registration Department (ACT) American College Testing Program P.O . Box 414 Iowa City , Iowa 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P .O. Box 1025 Berkeley , California 94704 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P.O. Box 592 Princeton , New Jersey 08540 All credentials presented for admission become th. e property of the University of Colorado and must rem am on file. When a complete application (application form , transcript of high school work completed, statement of

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rank-in-class , required entrance test scores , counselor recommendati on , and the nonrefundable $10 application fee) is received by the Office of Admissions and Records , a decision of admission eli gibility will be made , and the applicant will be notified. Admission of Transfer Students New transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration , Engineering and Applied Science , Music , and Liberal Arts and Sciences. 1 . Colorado Resident Applicants.* Colorado resident applicants are divided into the following three categories : a. Applicants who hold a collegiate record of more than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) from an institution of university rank , have a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average or higher (calculated on all work attempted), and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended are assured admission to UCD . Applicants who have completed less than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) of collegiate work acceptable to the University of Colorado must meet requirements for adm i ss ion as freshmen. b . Applicants who hold a collegiate record of at least 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a college , have a 2 . 0 cumulative grade-point average (calculated on all work attempted) , and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended also are assured admission to UCD. c . Applicants who hold a collegiate record of less than 45 semester cred i ts (68 quarter hours) from a college , have a 2 . 0 cumulative gradepoint average or higher (calculated on all work attempted) , and are eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be considered for admission on an individual basis . Primary factors affecting the admission decision in such cases are : (a) the UCD college or school to which admission is desired ; (b) quality of prev i ous work attempted ; (c) age , maturity , and noncollegiate achievements; and (d) time since the last collegiate attendance . 2. Nonresident Applicants.* Nonresidents must meet the general requirements stated above , and , in addition, must have a transferable grade-point average of 2 . 5 in order to be admitted to the College of Business and Administration or the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The above general requirements are sufficient for admission as a nonresident to the Colleges of Music or Liberal Arts and Sciences. Nonresident applicants are advised that UCD does not maintain residence facilities. Housing is available in the Denver metropolitan area , but must be obtained by the individual without dependence on University services . Applicants should consult the appropriate college or school section of this bulletin to determine specific entrance requirements. see page 10 lor definition of resident" " and nonresident"' classification . Generallnformation / 5 In the event a transfer applicant to one of the professional schools of the University has not completed all required course work for that college or school, he may be admitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in one of the preprofessional programs pending completion of such work for admission to the desired professional school. Transfer applications may be obtained from: Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver , Colorado 80202 Telephone: (303) 623 -1181 WHEN TO APPLY Interested applicants who are currently enrolled i n a collegiate institution should submit their applications for transfer admission after they have registered for the final term at the current institution . Evaluation oftransfer credits w ill be based on an official transcript of record indicating work completed up to the last term of enrollment and courses for which the student is currently enrolled . An official transcript of the student's total record will then be required upon completion of the f i nal term . CREDENTIALS REQUIRED FOR TRANSFER ADMISSION 1 . A University of Colorado transfer application. 2. The application fee of $10 in check or money order . (This fee is nonrefundable . ) 3 . An official transcript of record from each collegiate institution attended previously. If the applicant is currently enrolled at a collegiate institution and is submitting a transcript listing all courses except for the final term of enrollment, another official transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. 4 . An official high school transcript. If the applicant is a GED graduate, a GED Certificate of High School Equivalency , GED test scores , and a transcript of any high school work completed must be submitted . Individuals applying for admission to the University of Colorado at Denver who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, " English as a Second Language. " All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file . TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT The Office of Admissions and Records and the various deans ' offices cannot make an evaluation of credits from another collegiate institution or give specific degree advisement until complete and official credentials are on file and the applicant has been admitted . In general, transfer credits from other accredited collegiate institutions will be accepted insofar as they meet the degree, grade , and residence requirements of the student ' s chosen program of studies at UCD. College-level credit may be transferred to the

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6 / University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado in the follow ing instances : 1 . When it has been earned at a college or university of recognized standing , from Advanced Placement Examinations , or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education. 2 . When a grade of C or higher has been attained . 3. When the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. The University of Colorado will accept up to 72 semester credits (or 108 quarter credits) of junior college work to apply toward the baccalaureate degree at the University of Colorado. No credit is allowed for vocational-technical courses. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. Readmission of Former Students 1 . Former students of the University of Colorado who have not attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application prior to the deadline for the term they wish to attend . 2. Former students of the University of Colorado who have attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University of Colorado must submit a Former Student Application form to apply for readmission . In addition , a $10 nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application if the student has taken 12 semester or 18 quarter hours since his last attendance at the University of Colorado . The student must request that an official transcript of record from the institution(s) attended be sent to the University of Colorado at Denver . Consideration for readmission will be made after receipt of all the above listed credentials . The University reserves the right to deny readmission to former students whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions , processes, and functions as an educational institution . lntrauniversity Transfer UCD students wishing to change colleges or schools within the University of Colorado, or to change campuses within the University of Colorado system, must make application through the Office of Admissions and Records , Denver Campus, Room 203. This application must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term for which they wish to register . Admission of Special Students Persons who wish to take University courses but who do not plan to work for a degree from the University of Colorado (graduate or undergraduate) are referred to as special students . Special students enrolled during the academic year (fall and spring semesters) must be 21 years of age or older and must have a high school diploma or the equivalent. To accommodate students who live in the Denver metropolitan area but who are attending other collegiate institutions and wish to take courses during the summer , the University does not require that special students be 21 years of age during the summer term . Certif i ed school teachers with a baccalaureate degree who seek only a renewal of the certificate currently he ld and who do not require institutional endorsement or recommendation may qualify for the University-wide special student classification outlined above . Persons holding a baccalaureate deg ree who seek teacher certification may quality for the special student classification but must apply for and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program separately and meet all requirements of the School of Education . Applications for teacher education are considered once ea ch year (deadline is February 1 for the follo wing summer term and/or academic year). Infor mation regarding such application may be obtained from the School of Education office, Denver Campus, 892-1117 , ext. 276. Special students may take courses on a pass/fail basis; however, such credit will be counted as part of the total pass /fail credit allowed by the various colleges and schools should the student apply and be accepted for degree status. The student must maintain an overall grade-point average of 2 . 0 or higher to continue as a special student . APPLYING SPECIAL STUDENT CREDITS TOWARD DEGREE Special students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by submitting the Special to Degree Application , complete academic credentials, and the application fee. Accepted degree applicants may transfer a maximum of 12 semester credits taken as a special student to an undergraduate degree program with the approval of the appropriate academic dean. Acceptance of credit toward degrees at the University changed in fall 1970. Special students enrolled prior to that date may transfer credit in accordance with provisions in effect between January 1969 and August 1970 . Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree at this University are encouraged to submit the complete Graduate Application and supporting credentials as soon as possible. However, a department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the requirements of a master ' s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a special student at the University, or any combination thereof. In addition , the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter , or summer term for which the student has applied for admission to the Graduate School.

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CREDIT FOR NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps {AFROTC) University of Colorado at Denver s t udents may participate in Air Force ROTC p r ograms offered on the Boulder Campus . Air Force ROTC offers two programs leading to a commission in the U .S. Air Force upon r eceipt of the baccalaureate degree. Graduate stude n ts may be commissioned upon the completion of 12 hours of the Professional Officers Course and a six week summer train ing program. 1 . Standard Four-Year Course . This program is in three parts : th e General Military Co u rse for lower d i vision (freshman and sophomore) students , the Professional Officers Course for upper division students, and Corps Train ing, atte n ded by all students . Completion o f the General M ilitary Course is a prerequisite for entry into the Professional Officers Course. Completion of a four week summer training course is required prior to commissioni n g . 2 . Modified Two-Year P r ogram . This program is offered to ful lt i me , regularly enrolled, degree candidates at both undergraduate and graduate levels who will have two years remaining at the University when they enroll . Select ion is on a compet i tive basis. Applicants may apply directly to the Professor of Air Force Aerospace Studies not la t er than February 1 of the spring semester immediately preceding the semester in which they des ir e to enroll in the program. Those selected for th i s program must complete a six-week f i eld training program during the summer months as a prerequisite for enrolli ng in the Professional Officers Course the following fall or spring semester . SCHOLARSHIPS Most students participating in the program are eligible to compete for an Air Force ROTC College Scholarship . Students selected for this program are placed on a grant that includes payment of tuition, book costs, nonrefundable educational fees , and subsistence of $100 per month , tax free . All cadets enrolled in the Professional Officers Course receive subsistence of $1 00 per month during the fall and spring semesters , whether or not they are on scholarship . Credit will be allowed for ROTC courses toward fulfillment of the requirements for a degree provided the department accepting the cred i t considers the work to be of suitable educational value . For more information on Air Force ROTC, and registration for AFROTC courses , write to Air Force ROTC Det 1 05, Folsom Stadium , Gate 3 , Room 227 , University of Colorado , Boulder , Colorado 80302 , or call 492-8351 . U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps {ROTC) The Army ROTC program at the University of Colorado at Denver prepares students to become offi cers in the U . S . Army. Through this program qualified men and women have the opportunity to earn regular and reserve commissions while they are obtaining General Information / ? their college degrees . No previous military or ROTC experience is required and financ ial assistance i s provided in the junior and senior years . The ROTC program offered by the Department of Military Sc i ence consists primarily of a general four year course of study designed for freshman students . There i s also available , however , a special two year course of study in which sophomore students who have not taken the first two years of ROTC may qualify to enroll when they become juniors. Both courses of study i nclude extensive classroom work and f i eld experience in the areas of leadership and management. For further information concerning the Army ROTC program at UCD , including cross-enrollment procedures for Metropolitan State College and University of Denver students , wr i te to the Department of M i litary Science (Army ROTC) , University of Colorado, Boulder , Colorado 80302 or call 492-6497 . Credit for Military Service and Schooling If copies of discharge , separation papers , and a DD Form 295 (Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service ) are submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records at the time of application for admission or subsequently, an evaluation will be made and credit awarded as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that such credit is applicable to the degree sought at this University . Cred i t will be allowed for college courses satisfactorily completed through the U . S . Armed Forces Institute , subject to the usual rules involving credit of this nature . College-Level Examination Program {CLEP) An exciting challenge with rewarding opportunities is available to incoming UCD students who can earn university credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency . Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) testing service . Students who score at the 67th percentile or above in subjects approved by the University college or school from which they plan to be graduated will be granted advanced standi ng and University credit. The cost per examination is $15. Students who wish to challenge subject areas for credit are urged to examine carefully the list of approved examinations for the college or school to which they are applying , or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of the lower division requirements, in order to determine the applicability of such credit to specific graduation requirements . CLEP subject examinations are admin i stered at UCD during the third week of each month (the subject examination on Monday and the general examination Tuesday). CLEP subject examinations are also administered nationally during the third week of each month (students should check with the institutions for testing days) . Arrangements to take these examinations must be made well in advance of the testing date .

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8 / University of Colorado at Denver Colorado residents may obtain CLEP mater i als from the regional office by contacting : College Level Examination Program c / o College Entrance Examination Board 2142 South High Street Denver , Colorado 80210 Colorado residents may also obtain CLEP information from the several test centers throughout the state , preferably from the center located nearest to the student's high school. In Colorado , testing centers are located at: Metropol i tan State College , Denver Colorado State University, Fort Collins El Paso Community College , Colorado Springs Southern Colorado State College, Pueblo University of Denver, Denver Fort Lewis College , Durango University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Students liv ing outside of Colorado may secure CLEP information and application forms by writing : Institutional Testing Department College Level Examination Program Box 1822 Princeton, New Jersey 08540 Students interested in obtaining advanced standing and University creditthrough CLEP tests should consult the Office for Student Relations, the college or school to which they are applying for admission, or the professional school to which they expect to apply after completion of lower division undergraduate requirements for specific subject examinations acceptable to that college or school for the desired degree program . Advanced Standing by Examination Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standing for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado . A nonrefundable fee is charged for each examination taken . Advanced Placement Program The University is a cooperating member of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board, which provides able high school students , while still in high school, an opportunity to take work and then to be examined for credit on the college level. Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board ' s Advanced Placement Test. For students who achieve scores of 3, 4 , or 5 in the CEEB ' s Advanced Placement Examination, college credit and advanced placement will be granted. Students with scores below 3 may be considered by the department concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade but will count toward graduation and other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate. Study Abroad Program An important educational and cultural experience in the form of a study abroad program is available to all qualified University of Colorado students. The University strongly urges students to take advantage of this opportunity to study in a foreign university . Interested students should be aware that some pro grams of study involve only one semester while others are for the entire academic year . Specific information r egarding the length of each program may be obta i ned from the Office of International Education , Boulder Campus , telephone 492-7741 . Opportunities for study abroad are currently ava i lable in the following countries: Costa Rica, England , France , Germany , Israel , Italy , Japan , Mexico , N i geria , Taiwan , Peru, Spain , and the Uni ted Arab Republic . Spring semester programs in Siena and Berlin providing i ntermediate level Ital i an or German are also available. The program in Jalapa , Mexico, offers students the oppor tunity to study intensive Spanish during the fall or spr ing semesters , and advanced students can enter the University of Veracruz in the spring. There are presently programs in Costa Rica , England , France , Germany, Israel , Italy, Japan , Mex ico, Nigeria , Taiwan , Peru , Spain , and the United Arab Republic . Spring semester programs in Siena and Berlin providing i ntermediate-level Italian or German are also available . The program in Jalapa , Mexico, offers students the opportunity to study intensive Spanish during the fall or spring semesters , and advanced students can enter the University of Veracruz in the spring. The programs carry resident credit toward graduation from the University of Colorado. Information regarding these programs (academic requirements , language requirements, costs , etc.) is available from the Office of International Education . This office also has information on many other programs administered by other universities and agencies , issues International Student ID cards, helps with charter flights, and maintains a library. Interested students should contact their advisers and the Office of International Education early in their freshman or sophomore year in order to prepare for study abroad . UCD students also may obtain information in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Room 804 , or from Professor James Wolf, UCD history department. For further information contact the Office of International Education, 914 Broadway , Boulder, Colorado 80302 (telephone 492-77 41 ), or Professor James Wolf , History Department , UCD . UNIFORM GRADING SYSTEM Grades awarded by all undergraduate colleges and schools of the University of Colorado are: A-4 grade points per credit hour ; superior B-3 grade points per credit hour; good C-2 grade points per credit hour; fair 0-1 grade point per credit hour; minimum passing F-(J grade points ; failing

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The instructor is responsible tor determining the requirements for whatever grade is to be assigned . The cumulative grade-point average is computed by dividing the total number of credit points earned by the total number of hours attempted . In addit i on to the grades indicated above, the instruct or may assign one of the following : 1 / F--Incomplete / fai/ing : automatic conversion to F grade after one academic year if the course is not made up . 1 / W--Incomp/ete / withdrawal : automatic conversion to W after one academic year if the course is not made up . /P-In progress (graduate students only) P-Pass H-Honors (given only in the Honors Program) NC-tor students registered on an audiVno grade basis . Y -symbol used to indicate that an entire grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed . W-Drop without discredit. Regulations Governing the Award or Accumulation of Additional Grades 1 . Pass / Fail . Up to 16 semester credit hours of regular course work may be taken o n a pass / tail basis and credited toward the bachelor ' s degree . No more than 6 semester credit hours of course work may be taken on a pass / tail basis in any given semester. The pass (P) grade is not i ncluded in the student's grade-point average ; the fail (F) grade is included. For additional informati on see the general information portion of each college or school section of this bulletin . 2 . Honors . Credit hours earned in honors courses with grades of H or P count toward the student's degree but are not included in the grade-point average calculation. 3 . Withdrawal . A notation of withdrawal will be placed on the permanent record of any student who withdraws with approval during any term . Students who cease to attend classes and do not officially withdraw from the University will be subject to grades of F in all course work for which they were enrolled during that term. EXPENSES Educat ional expenses at UCD normally involve tuition , fees , books , and required materials. UCD does not maintain residence facilities. All costs related to housing must be arranged by the student at his own convenience . Transportation and parking costs should be considered in the determination of expenses. Tuition and Fees • All tuition and fee charges are established by the Regents of the University of Colorado in accordance with appropriate legislation enacted annually (usually late in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly . A tuition schedule is published prior to registration tor each term during the year . The student should check with the Office of Admissions and Records for specific tuition and fee information for the term for which he intends to apply . Genera//nformation / 9 TUITION FOR 1974-75 The tuition schedule for 197 4 -75 is listed below as an approximation of the schedule that will be adopted for 1975-76. Students should anticipate a slightly higher tuition than is indicated here. Credit Hours of Enrollment Residents 0 . 0 3 . 0 . ............. . ....... .... .... $ 45 . 00 3 . 1 4 . 0 60. 00 4.1 5 . 0 . . .............. . . . ..... . ..... 75 . 00 5 . 1 6 . 0 ......... . .... . . . . . .......... . 90. 00 6 .1-7. 0 .............. . ............... 105 . 00 7 . 1 -8.0 ...... ....... ................. 120 . 00 8 . 1 9 . 0 ........ .... .................. 135 . 00 9 . 1 or more ......................... 148 .00 Nonresidents $108 . 00 144 . 00 180 .00 216 . 00 594.50 594. 50 594. 50 594. 50 1 . A student activity fee will be charged in addition to the above tuition as follows: Summer term 1975 .................................... $3 Fall semester 1975 ........... ... ...................... 7 Spring semester 1976 ......... ........ ........ ....... 7 2 . There is a one-time nonrefundable matr i culation fee of $15 for new degree students and $5 for new special students in the University of Colorado. This fee will be assessed at the time of initial registration. Charges then will not be made for adding or dropping courses or for transcript orders . If a special student is admitted to degree status , he will be assessed a $10 matriculation fee at the time of his first registration after the change has been made . 3 . Students certified by the Graduate School tor enrollment for doctoral dissertation pay $72 . 4 . Graduate students who enroll for a comprehensive examination only will pay $45 . Such students will be assessed regular tuition and fees if they need hours toward graduation. 5. Students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course pay a $10 breakage deposit. 6. Students enrolled in the College of Music pay an $18 music facilities fee. This same $18 fee is charged to students enrolled in piano class, sound reinforcement and recording, and electronic music . No student is charged more than one $18 fee . Assessment of Charges and Payment Regulations All tuition and fees are assessed during registration and must be paid at that time . Any student who registers for courses is liable for payment of tuition and tees even though he may drop out of school. A student with financial obligations to the Univ ersity will not be permitted to register for any subsequent semester or 'The Board of Regents of the Univers i ty of Colorado reserves ttJe right to change tuition and fees at a ny t ime.

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10/ Univers i ty of Colorado at Denver term , to be graduated , or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credits . The only exceptions to this regulation are notes and other types of indeb t edness maturing after graduat ion. Arrangements may be made through the Finance Office at the t i me of registration to defer payment of a port i on o f t u i t i on and fees after a m i nimum down payment or one-third of the total tuition , whichever is greater. Specific information regarding deferred payment will be found in the Schedule of Courses which is published i n advance of each term or semester . Personal checks will be accepted for any University obligation . Any student giving a check that is not acceptable to the bank may be dropped immediately from the rolls of the Uni versity . The student should refer to the Schedule of Courses for charges imposed for late registration and late payments . Refund policies and policies related t o adding and dropping courses and withdrawing from the University will be found in the Schedule of Courses published prior to each semester or term . REGISTRATION See Academic Calendar in this bulletin for dates . See the appropriate Schedule of Courses for complete registration information for each semester or summer term . Note : There i s a penalty fee fo r late registrat ion. Inter-Institutional Registration Within the Auraria Higher Education Center Because the Univers i ty of Colorado at Denver i s a full participant in the Aurar i a Higher Education Center , students who are approved by their college dean may enroll for courses being offered by e i ther the Community College of Denver -Aur aria Campus or Metropolitan State College. Courses completed under this arrangement will be indicated on the University of Colorado transcript and will be a part of the student's degree program at the University . TRANSCRIPTS Transcripts of records should be ordered from the University of Colorado Transcript Section , Regent Adm i nistrative Center 125 , Boulder , Colorado 80302 , or from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Colorado at Denver , 1100 14th Street, Denver , Colorado 80202 . Transcripts are prepared only at the student's written request. A student having financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Copies of transcripts from other institutions cannot be furnished. WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY A student who leaves the University without officially withdrawing will receive a grade ofF in each course for which he is registered . Withdrawal forms may be obtained from the office of the academic dean of the college or school in which the student i s enrolled . OTHER REGULATIONS Students are advised to refer to the Schedule of Courses each semester for specific information regarding course loads , add ing or dropping classes , adjustments in tuition as a result of dropped classes , etc . Where requirements differ from one academic area to another , the student is adv i sed to abi de by the regulations stated by the college or school in which he is enrolled. RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION FOR TUITION PURPOSES A student is classified initially as an in-state or out-of-state registrant for tuition purposes at the time an application and all supporting c r edentials have been received in the Office of Admissions and Records. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. The requirements for establishing residency for tuition purposes are defined by law of the State of Colorado (Chapter 124, Art i cle 18, Colorado Revised Statutes 1963 , as amended) . To be eligible for consideration for instate status the applicant must be 21 years of age or older (or an emancipated minor as defined by law) ; must have been physically domiciled i n the State of Colorado for 12 consecutive months i mmediately preceding the date of reg i strat ion for the term in which in-state status is desired ; and must be able to present proof of compliance with other mandatory laws of the state (valid motor veh i cle operator ' s license , valid motor vehicle registration , payment of state income tax , etc . ) . After the student's status is determined , it remains unchanged in the absence of sati sfactory ev i dence to the contrary. Classif i cation standards conform to state statutes and judicial decisions and are applicable to all of Colorado ' s state-supported colleges and universities . The student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classificat ion whether from out of-state to in-state or the reverse has the responsibil i ty of informing the tuition classification officer, Office of Admissions and Records , in writing within 15 days after such a change occurs. An unemancipated m i nor whose parents move their domicile from Colorado to a location outside the state is considered an out-of-state student from the date of the parents ' removal from the state . He will be assessed nonresident tuition at the next registration. The student or his parent is required to send written notification to the tuition classification officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. If an adult student or an emancipated minor establishes domicile outside Colorado , he is to send written notification within 15 days to the tuition classification officer. Petitioning for Classification Change Any student who is 21 years of age or older , or an emancipated minor as defined by law, is qual i fied to change his domicile and his tuition classification status . Detailed instructions as to the procedure to follow , the necessary petition forms, and a copy of the appropriate Colorado statute governing tuition classification at state-supported institutions in Colorado are available

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from the tuition classification officer , University of Colorado at Denver , Office of Admissions and Records , Room 203 . Classification Notes 1 . Petit i ons will not be acted upon until an application for admission to the University and complete supporting credentials have been received . 2 . Changes in classification are made effective at the time of the student's next registration . 3. A student who willfully gives wrong information to evade payment of the out-of-state tuition is subject to legal and disciplinary action. SERVICES FOR STUDENTS Services offered by the Office for Student Relations are available to the student , either as an individual or as part of an organization . The dean for student relations is concerned with the total University experience of each student. His associates and staff provide personalized assistance to the student in educational , social, organizational, and the behavioral areas . Under graduate colleges and schools conduct orientation programs for i ncoming students before each semester begins , and academic advising throughout the aca demic year . Counseling Center The services ofthe counseling center are available by appointment to all students . Personal and vocational counseling , group experiences , and student testing are provided by trained and qualified counselors . Interviews are confidential , and there is no fee for the testing or counseling . Financial Aid A large proportion of UCD students receive financial assistance through grants , loans, or the work-study program. In addition, a large number of students find part-or full-time employment in the community. Short-term emergency loans also are available . Most financial aid is awarded on the basis of the student's financial need , with academic achievement a secondary consideration . For current information on deadlines, applications, and types of aid available the student should consult the Office of Financial Aid at UCD or his high school counselor . Job O p portunities Part-time job opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid. Career placement , after graduation , is available through the Boulder Campus Placement Center. Applications and further information are available through the Office of Financial Aid . Office of Veterans Affairs All student veterans, whether new , transfer , or previous students, must notify the Office of Veterans Affairs of intent to enroll each semester . The office is responsible for assisting veterans in being properly certified with the Veterans Administration Regional Office and in obtaining all VA and state of Colorado benef i t s they are entit le d t o r ece iv e . Genera//nformati on/11 The Office of Veterans Affairs also provides veterans with professional counseling services , tutorial benefits , reading and study skills aid, employment referral services , and assistance in obtaining emergency situation short-term loans . Services for Disabled Students Special efforts are made at UCb to assist handicapped students in obtai ning a university education to the fullest extent of the i r capabil i t ies. A Services for Disabled Students Office is maintained to serve students who are i n wheelchairs or otherwise partially disabled . Orientation to UCD , assistance in registering for classes , and dealing with other problem areas to facil i tate a rewarding school experience are functions of this office . Students are provided tutorial and study skills services as needed . Special reserved park ing spaces are ava i lable , and plans are underway to prov i de employment and housing assistance as needed i n the future . A movement was undertaken to remove architectural barriers to the handicapped , and there now exist no major barr i ers to free move ment of handicapped students through the bui ldings . Students From Other Countries Appropriate immigration certifications and work permits may be obtained through the Office for Student Relations. Counseling , assistance with housing , and special information is available from the foreign student adviser at UCD . Health Insurance Program Student health insurance coverage through Blue Cross-Blue Shield is mandatory for all students. Students may elect to wa ive this coverage by s i gn ing a waiver card and filing this with registration materials . If the waiver card is not filed upon registration, the health insurance assessment will be automatic. Cost to the student is $36.50 each semester. Further information regarding this program may be obtained from the Office for Student Relations , Room 602 . Study Skills Center The Study Skills Center is a program which is cen tered upon the belief that all University students should have the opportunity to fully develop the skills neces sary for their academ i c progress. Services are provided to meet students ' needs for general improvement of study habits and specific aid with particular subject areas . Each semester the center offers three courses (St.Sk . 100 , Developmental Composition ; St.Sk . 101, Develop mental Reading, and St.Sk. 102 , College Preparatory Mathematics ; see page 51) for which students may receive 1 semester hour of credit (pass or fail) . Noncredit , five-week modular courses are also offered , such as Rapid Reading, in which students may accel erate reading speed , learn reading flexibility, and build word-grouping ability and comprehension . Study Skills mini-courses (noncredit) are offered in such areas as use of the library , l i stening and note taking , taking examinations , writing a term paper , time scheduling , a n d system atic approa c hes to s tudy.

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12/ University of Colorado at Denver Tutorial assistance is available to students who need help in any subject area. The center also keeps a file for students wishing to part icipate in discussion groups prior to and during examination week . The center has available a collection of books in cluding a number by minority authors and about minori ties , which may be utilized for research assignments , as well as for improvement of general knowledge . The Study Skills Center is located on the fourth floor of the Bromley Library. It is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p . m . Monday through Friday . Women's Services Programs of special concern to women at UCD are offered through the Women ' s Center . A cooperative student and faculty effort provides activities, counseling , and referral STUDENT ACTIVITIES Numerous student clubs and organizations exist to provide a variety of interests for students desiring extra-curricular activities. The student newspaper, The Fourth Estate , is published weekly , and there is an active student government. Students participate in dramatic and musical productions , reading programs , special seminars and workshops, intramural sports , and debate . Lectures and programs are offered throughout the academic year. Students are vitally concerned with current issues such as environmental action , politics, education for minority groups , and women ' s liberation , and student clubs for such issues invite participation and ideas. Several honorary societies, fraternities, and professional associations have active student chapters at Denver , and UCD students also are eligible for membership in Boulder Campus organizations . ALUMNI PROGRAMS All graduates and former students of the University of Colorado are eligible for membership in the CU Alumni Association . The Colorado Alumnus newspaper is mailed 11 times each year. Two Denver area alumni clubs (Denver East and Denver West) have been formed , and a wide range of activities is provided by these groups . Membership and further information is available through the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at UCD or the alumni office on the Boulder Campus . FACILITIES The UCD Campus comprises an eight-story tower and classroom building providing over 50 classrooms , 26 teaching laboratories , faculty and administrative offices , an auditorium , cafeteria , and student lounges. Work was completed in 1973 on an expansion project which added 12 new classrooms and l aboratories on a third level in the Classroom Building . Bookstore Textbooks and supplies are available at the UCD bookstore , located on the first floor of the Bromley Library building . The bookstore is open from 9 a .m. to 8:30p. m., Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, and is closed Saturday, Sunday, and holidays . It also remains open during semester breaks from 9 a.m . to 6 p . m . Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m . to 1 p . m . Friday. Students must present their validated ID card when paying for purchases by check . BankAmericard and Master Charge credit cards are also accepted. Library The Charles D. Bromley Library is located at 14th and Lawrence Streets, adjacent to the Classroom Building . Hours of service are from 8 a . m . to 10 p . m . Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday , and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. The library is closed on Sunday . Special holiday and vacation hours are posted in the library. The library collection includes reserve books , reference materials , journa ls , microforms, records , and tapes . Microform equipment and listening facilities are provided . General reference service, interlibrary loans , and assistance with individual library problems are available through the reference office on the second floor . UCD students also may use the Norlin Library on the Boulder Campus, or any library in a Colorado state-supported instituti on of higher learning , for research materials not available in the Bromley Library by presentation of the student's validated ID card. Books may be borrowed through interlibrary loan to minimize the inconvenience to students who wish to use Norlin Library resources . Child Care Center A Child Care Center is available for use by students who have young children to be cared for while attending classes or using the library . It is partially supported by the UCD student government. For information call 892-1117 , ext. 395. Classroom Locations Most classes and laboratory sections meet in the main UCD buildings . A few courses are scheduled at other facilities . Locations are designated in the Schedule of Courses under Building Codes. Parking Parking is available at nearby commercial off-street lots both day and evening. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Cooperative Education is a relatively new program at UCD. Based on the precept that experience is often the most effective educator , this program is designed to provide students of sophomore standing or above with an opportunity for preprofessional employment. This is accomplished by placing students as employees with businesses , agencies, and institutions which are operating in a capacity related to the student ' s course work. The program is now expanding its placement opportunities. Normally students work full time for one semester and then attend classes full time for the following semester. However, half-time positions are

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also available . This program enables students in all disciplines to gain experience and income while attending college. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may also receive credit for current job experiences. This permits students who already have jobs in their field of study to earn academic credit. Students also can obt .ain volunteer internships through the Cooperat1ve Education Office and receive both credit and valuable experience for their efforts . Students inter ested in any of these options can apply or obtain more information in Room 809 or by calling extension 555 . Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should also refer to Cooperative Education in the Special Programs section of this bulletin . BUREAUS AND AGENCIES Bureau of Community Services The Bureau of Community Services provides assistance to community groups , agencies , and organizations in planning and developing programs to solve a variety of problems . Bureau staff , with support from UCD faculty and graduate students , conduct training programs in the areas of leadership development, resource mobilization, community planning , and community organization . In addition , consultation is provided to numerous groups engaged in community development efforts . Division of Continuing Education The Division of Continuing Education is responsible for noncredit programs , off-campus credit classes , correspondence study, audiovisual services, continuation education, and community services in the General Information /13 Denver metropolitan area . These programs and resources of the University of Colorado are an integral part of the statewide coordinated program of off-campus instruction under guidel i nes established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education . The program provides opportunity for advancement in business , government , and the professions ; offers liberal education programs contributing to cultural , intellectual, and personal vital ity; and presents programs designed to help solve social, community , and individual problems . . Noncredit programs are open to all adults regardless of prev i ous educat ion or training . Some advanced courses require a background in a specific subject matter area . Except in certificate programs , no grade is awarded upon completion of a course . Off-campus credit offerings supplement the regular academic programs offered at UCD. Adm issi on requirements and refund policies for off-campus instruction are identical with requirements for enrollment in UCD . Individuals who have never been enrolled on any campus of the University of Colorado usually are admitted to off-campus instruction as special students . Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Continuing Education Bulletin or other information may write or call the division office at UCD , 11 00 14th Street, 892-1117, ext. 286 . Speakers Bureau Faculty and administrative personnel are available for outside speaking engagements on a wide var i ety of subjects . This public service activity helps to promote interaction between Denver Campus personnel and the urban community. Requests for speakers are handled through the UCD Off i ce of Information Services , ext. 246 .

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College of Liberal Arts and Sciences HERBERT G . ELDRIDGE , Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences , originally established i n 1971 as the College of Undergraduate Studies , was formed to serve the higher educational needs of qualified uni versity students in the Denver metropol i tan area . Reflecting the var ied objectives of the urban student , the i nstructional program provides opportunities for genera l educat ion in the a rt s and sciences both as an end in itself and as preparation for professional and graduate work . New programs in i nterdisciplinary stud ies particularly appropriate to the urban environment are be i ng planned and implemented. Since many students are employed full time during the day , numerous co u rses are offered i n evening . The College is organized into three divisions : Arts and Humanities , Natural and Physical Sc i ences , and Social Sciences. Each division offers a w ide variety of curricula including traditional undergraduate majors, interdisciplinary studies , and preprofessional programs . In order to broaden the studen t' s perspect i ves the College requires 12 semester hours of course work in each of the areas represented by the three d i v i sions. However , the student is given a wide selection of courses to sat i sfy each of the three area requirements and the other requirements for his degree . The College offers the following degrees : Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (B. F.A.). A student may complete a major in one ofthe following disciplines : anthropology , biology , chemistry, communication and theatre , distributed studies , economics , English , fine arts , French, geography, German , h istory, mathematics , philosophy , physics , political science , psychology , sociology , and Spanish . Students also enroll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to prepare themselves for admission to one of the professional schools of the University , which include the School of Dentistry , School of Education , School of Journalism , School of Law , School of Medicine , School of Nursing , and School of Pharmacy . Each professional school has specific requirements which must be followed if the student intends to pursue a career in one of these fields . Interdisciplinary majors such as Urban Studies (Social Sciences) and the Writing Program (Arts and Humanities) are currently being developed in each division of the College . Courses applicable to these new majors already are being offered , and others will be init i ated in subsequent years . Interested students should contact the office of the appropriate d i v i sional dean for information . REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Freshmen The student must be a high schoo l graduate and must p r esent 15 units o f acceptable secondary work . (The College of Liberal Arts and Sc i ences does not spec ify part i cular units.) An a pplican t who has not gradua ted from high school must present satisfactory scores on the General Educat i onal Development Test ( GED ) and a high school equi valency ce rti f i cate to be considered for admission . Individuals apply ing for admission to the University of Colo rado at Denve r who have completed t he Spanish Language General Educational Development Test (GED) must also submit scores from Test VI, " English as a Second Language ." High school is i nterpreted as grades 9, 10 , 1 1 , and 12. Students should refer to the General Information section of this bulletin for complete admission requirements . Transfer Students Students who have attended another college or universi ty are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students as outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin . Applicants (residents and nonresidents) will be considered for admission provided a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better has been attained on all work attempted at all institutions attended . If the appl i cant has been away from the collegiate environment for more than three years , he will be considered on the basis of all factors available : high school record , test scores , orig i nal collegiate admiss ion qualifications, college performance, and interim experiences that might suggest potential success in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . A maximum of 72 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sc i ences . ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM Advanced placement and college credit may be granted on the basis of the College Entrance Examination Board ' s Advanced Placement Tests . For students who have taken an advanced placement course in high school and who make scores of 3 , 4, or 5 in the CEEB ' s Advanced Placement Examination , advanced placement as well as college credit will be granted. Students who make scores of 2 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. College credit granted will be treated as transfer credit without a grade but will count toward

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graduation and the meeting of other specific requirements for which it may be appropriate. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Prospective students who plan either to graduate from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or to enroll in the College . to fulfill lower division requirements for professional schools may earn college-level credit for advanced standing in the following CLEP Subject Examinations scored at the 67th percent i le and above : American Literature Analysis and Interpretation of Literature English Literature American Government American History General Psychology Introductory Economics Western Civilization Biology General Chemistry Geology Introductory Calculus For complete information about the CLEP program , students should refer to the General Information section of this bulletin . STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM The Univers i ty of Colorado sponsors an active study abroad program, which is open to students from all campuses of the University. The program is described in the General Information section of this bulletin . ADVANCED STANDING BY EXAMINATION Examinations for advanced standing credit may be granted to a student in degree status and in good standing for work completed by private study or by occupational experience if such credit is equivalent to courses offered by the University of Colorado. A nonrefundable fee is charged for each examination taken . The fee is assessed at the lowest resident tuition charge currently in effect for the Denver Campus. Arrangements for the examinations are made through the Office of Admissions and Records . ACADEMIC ADVISING Students in the College are expected to assume the responsibility for planning their academic programs in accordance with College rules and policies and major requirements. To assist students with this planning the College maintains an advising staff l ocated in Room 804 of the Tower Build ing. Students are urged to consult with the staff of this office concerning individual academic problems. As soon as the student has determined his major, he must declare his intentions to his discipline adviser . The discipline adviser will be responsible not only for the student's advising but also for the certification of the completion of his major program for graduation. Students planning to earn a degree from one of the professional schools should see an adviser in that College of Uberal Arts and Sciences /15 school. Each professional school has certain specific requirements . Preprofessional health science students should see a member of the Health Sciences Committee early in their careers . Appo i ntments should be made through the sciences secretary in Room 508 . The Denver Campus also has a counseling service available through the Office for Student Relations to which a student may go for assistance with problems of a vocational or personal nature . CREDIT FOR ARMY ROTC Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may participate in the Army ROTC program through the College of Arts and Sciences on the Boulder Campus . The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will accept a maximum of 12 hours of ROTC course work toward the baccalaureate degree. For more information about the ROTC program , see the General Information sect i on of this bulletin . ACADEMIC POLICIES Courses and Credits The University operates on the semester system . The term " course " as used in this bulletin means a one-semester course. Except for laboratory courses, the credit-hour value assigneq to a course is roughly equivalent to the number of hours per week of class work involved in the course (thus a 3-semester hour course normally meets 3 hours per week) . The value of a course in semester-hour credits is indicated by that part of the course number which follows the dash . Example: Chern. 103-5. " Chern. 1 03 " is the identifying department number , and " 5 " indicates that the course is for 5 semester hours credit. Course Numbering System Course levels are designated as follows : 100 level, freshman ; 200 level , sophomore ; 300 level , junior ; 400 level , senior; 500 level , graduate . Upper Division Credit Courses numbered 300 or above and all honors courses are awarded upper division credit. Student Classification Students are classified according to the number of semester hours of credit earned. Freshman classification, 0 to 29 semester credits ; sophomore , 30 to 59 semester credits ; junior , 60 to 89 credits ; and senior , 90 to 120 credits . Course Load Policy The normal course load is 12 to 18 hours . Students registered for fewer than 12 hours are regarded as part -time students. Students wishing to register for 20 hours or more must obtain approval from the dean. These totals include all courses taken for credit in the University, but do not incl ude correspondence courses , noncredit courses, and courses taken at other institutions . To receive credit, the student must be officially registered for each course . Students who hold or expect to hold fullor part-time employment while enrolled in the College must register

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16/ University of Colorado at Denver for course loads they can expect to complete without unusual difficulty . Recommended course loads are given below , but each student must weigh his own abilities and assess the demands of each course in determining an appropriate schedule . The College assumes that all courses elected will be completed . Employed 20 hours per week-1 0 to 13 semester hours or 3 to 4 courses Employed 30 hours per week-8 to 11 semester hours or 3 cours es Employed 40 hours per week-6 to 9 semester hours or 2 to 3 courses Independent Study With the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and divisional dean, students may register tor independent study. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project (normally not to exceed 3 credits per semester) shall be arranged at the time of registration . A maximum of 12 credits taken on an independent study bas i s may apply toward the bachelor ' s degree. Credit for Courses in the Professional Schools and in Physical Education Students may count toward the Bachelor of Arts degree as many as 24 credit hours of course work for curricula leading to degrees other than the B .A. (Business, Engineering and Applied Science, Environmental Design , Journalism , Music , Nursing , and Pharmacy) . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students desiring secondary school certification will be allowed to take 32 hours i n the certification program of the School of Education as part of their total required hours for the Bachelor of Arts degree . Vocational and technical courses from a two-year program may not be included. Act ivity courses in physical education , up to a maximum of 8 hours , will count toward the 120 required for the degree. Correspondence Study Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences , with the approval of the dean , may take work in correspondence study offered by the University ' s Division of Continuing Education . A maximum of 30 hours of correspondence work may count toward the degree. Adding and Dropping Courses All changes of schedule must be made by processing the official drop/add card . No change will be made in a student's schedule until all necessary signatures have been entered on the drop / add card and the card has been returned to the Office of Admissions and Records. Restrictions on changes of schedule are noted below: Adding Courses . Courses may not be added after the second week of classes except under unusual circumstances . Dropping Courses . Students receive a grade ofF in any course that they discontinue without officially dropping . Students will be allowed to drop during the first two weeks of the semester with no signatures required on the drop card . After the second week the instructor must certify that the student is passing if the course is to be dropped without discredit. After the tenth week of the semester, courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student's control (accident, illness , etc .). The i nstructor and the dean must approve the drop under these circumstances. Withdrawal When a student withdraws from the University , he must obtain the approval of the dean ' s office (Room 804} and the Office of Admi ssions and Records. A notation of w i thdrawal is made on the permanent record page . Students who leave the Univers it y without officially withdrawing will receive grades of F for all course work . After the tenth week of the semester , a student will not be permitted to withdraw except for reasons clearly beyond his control. Attendance Regulations Tl1e matter of classroom attendance is left to the discretion of the instructor. It is the responsibility of the student to determine at the beginn i ng of each semester his instructor ' s policies on attendance. Students who do not attend the first class session in limited enrollment courses of 15 or less will lose their place in the class unless arrangements have been made with the instructor prior to the first class session . lncompletes The following grade symbols may be assigned to indicate that work in a particular course was not completed at the end of the semester : 1 / W-Incomplete / withdrawa/ . Automatic conversion to W after one academic year if the course is not made up . This grade is awarded when , for reasons acceptable to the instructor , sufficient information is unavailable to warrant a final grade , and when the student's work indicates a potential passing grade. 1 / F-Incomplete / failing . Automatic conversion to F grade after one academic year if the course i s not made up . This grade is awarded under the same circumstances as above, except that the student's work is of failing quality . Pass/Fail Option All students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis may do so during regular registration procedures . Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be effected during the normal two-week drop-add period. After two weeks, it will not be possible for the student to change his registration unless approved by the dean of the College as a specific exception. The following restrictions should be noted on the use of the P / F option: 1 . Not more than 16 semester hours of course work passed may be credited toward the 120 hours required for graduation. These 16 hours are in addition to those taken in honors , physical education, cooperative education, and certain Teacher Certification courses through the School of Education . 2 . The use of the pass/fail option may be restricted in certain major programs. 3. Courses taken on a pass / fail basis may not be included in the minimum of 30 hours of C or better required for the major .

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4. Only 6 hours of course work may be P / F in any given semester. 5 . GradesofO and aP. TheP grade is not included in the student's grade-point average. 6. Grades of F equal a letter grade of F and will count in the grade-point average . 7. Transfer Students . No course may be taken on a P ! F basis by transfer students graduating with only 30 semester hours completed at the University of Colorado. Grade-Point Average Requirements and Scholastic Suspension A minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2 . 0 (C) is required of all students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. If a student's GPA drops below 2.0 at the end of any semester (excluding summer term), the student will be required to achieve better than a 2 . 0 in a succeeding semester, as described in the following sliding scale , or he will be suspended . The student must then continue to meet the sliding scale every semester until his grade-point average reaches 2.0. Scholastic records of students will be reviewed as soon as possible after the close of each spring semester, and the student will be informed in writing if he is to be suspended. Hours Deficiency 1-10 1120 21-30 over 30 Grade Point Average i n the Most Recent Semester 2 . 2 2 . 3 2.4 2 . 5 The " Hours Deficiency " is the number of credit hours of B work the student must earn to raise his GPA to 2 . 0 . Hours of deficiency may be computed as follows : multiply the total number of hours by 2 to obtain the G PA points that would have been attained with a 2.0 average . Subtract from this figure the total grade points shown on the last grade slip. The difference is the hours of deficiency. In an effort to raise his grade-point average , a student in the College may register for courses in the University of Colorado summer term on any campus , for corre spondence study through the University , and for off campus credit courses offered through the UCD Division of Continuing Education, irrespective of his academic status . Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. However , grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado are used in determining the student's scholastic standing and his progress toward the degree . First Suspension. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year , excluding summer term) , after which the student will automatically be readmitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . The student will then be expected to meet the sliding scale (based on his CU record only) until his cumulative GPA reches 2 . 0 . Failure to do so will result in a second suspension. A student under a first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 17 he has demonstrated marked academic improvement in one of the following ways: 1. By achieving a cumulative 2.5 average on all summer or correspondence work attempted at the University of Colorado since suspension . (A student must register for a minimum of 6 credits in the summer term on any campus or through correspondence work . ) 2 . By raising the cumulative grade point average to 2 . 0 through correspondence or summer work at the University of Colorado . 3 . By raising the cumulative grade-point average to 2 . 0 at another institution. (The cumulative grade-point average is defined as the grade-point average at the University of Colorado in combination with the work taken at all other institutions.) Upon return to the University , however, the student retains his previous grade-point average . (GPA from another institution does not transfer back to the University . ) Second Suspension. A student suspended for a second time will be readmitted only under unusual circumstances, and only by petition to the Committee on Academic Progress of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Each petition will be examined individually. The committee will expect the student to show that his chances for successfully completing his education in the College have been materially improved by factors such as increased maturity or a relief from stressful circumstances . The deadline for petitions to the Committee on Academic Progress for reinstatement for any fall semester is August 1 . The deadline for petitions for reinstatement for any spring semester is December 1 . Students who complete 12 or more semester hours at another institution must apply for readmission to the University of Colorado as transfer students, regardless of their status in the University of Colorado . They also must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted (at the University of Colorado and elsewhere) in order to be considered for readmission . Committee on Academic Progress The Committee on Academic Progress (CAP) is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty. The committee constitutes the bridge between the faculty in its legislative capacity and the students upon whom the legislation comes to bear . CAP alone is empowered to grant waivers of , exemptions from, and exceptions to the academic policies of the College . One of the major responsibilities of the committee is the handling of suspensions and reinstatement of suspended students. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term). However , students suspended a second time will be reinstated only under unusual circum stances and only by petition to the committee . The Committee on Academic Progress is composea of five faculty members and three student members . Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and

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18/ University of Colorado at Denver integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery , or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the intent to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. In particular , students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student's own. It is recommended that students consult with their instructors as to the proper preparation of reports , papers , etc., in order to avoid this and similar offenses. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION College Requirements The following four requirements apply to all Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts students: 1 . Arts and Humanities-12 semester hours. 2. Natural and Physical Sciences-12 semester hours . 3 . Social Sciences-12 semester hours. Lists of courses that will satisfy the above area requirements are available in the Fall and Spring Schedule of Courses , in each divisional office , and in the dean ' s office . 4 . Foreign Language . This requirement is satisfied by: a . Completion of a Level Ill high school course in any classical or modern foreign language ; or b . Completion of a third-semester course (nor mally 211, but iri French , German, 201 or 211) in the College ; or c . Demonstration of third-semester proficiency by test. d. This requirement also may be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (12 credit hours in one semester) , by completion of German 201 or 211, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who elect to continue a language studied before entering the College will be placed in courses appropriate to their level of preparation and will continue from the level indicated until the third-semester course has been passed. A student who enrolls in a course at a lower level than that in which he has been placed will not receive credit for the course. Students who may go on to do graduate work are advised to complete the fourth semester of a foreign language in preparation for language requirements of graduate schools. Foreign Language Placement. Placement of students in college-level foreign language courses is based on units of high school language study and on the verbal SAT score or English ACT score according to the following schedule: High School Foreign English Language Approved Courses , Verbal Levels Strongly Advised for SAT Score ATC Score or Units the Freshman Year 600-800 25-36 4 or more Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below third-year (300-level) courses. 200-599 0-24 4 or more Exempt from requirement. Recommended 300-level courses ; no credit allowed below fourth-semester 600-800 25-36 3 (202 or 212) courses. Exempt from requirement. Recommended 300-level courses; no credit allowed below fourth -seme ster 200-599 0-24 (202 or 212) courses . 3 Exempt from requirement. No credit allowed below 600-800 25-36 2 fourth-semester (202 or 212) courses . Third semester courses 200-599 0-24 2 (201 or 211 ) . Second semester courses 600-800 (102). 25-36 Second semester courses 200-599 0-24 (102) . Beginning course (1 01 ) . A student may enroll in a course at a lower level than that in which he is placed upon consultation with the appropriate faculty member. However, he will not receive credit for any course taken at a level lower than his placement. Exceptions to this policy can be made only by the discipline adviser and will normally be considered only when there has been a lapse of five or more years since previous study of the language . There is ample opportunity for language review by enrolling on a noncredit basis in lower-level language courses upon consultation with the adviser. Students may request a placement test to place them in a higher level course than that assigned , or to demonstrate proficiency sufficient to satisfy the college foreign language requirement. Students who do not wish to continue a language studied previously may begin a new language without penalty . However, students are strongly urged to begin or continue their college-level language study immediately upon enrollment in the College. Students also are urged to consult with the appropriate faculty member concerning any problems that might arise regarding foreign language study or the foreign language requirement. Note : Physical education is no longer required for completion of the bachelor ' s degree. However, a maximum of 8 hours of physical education credit will count toward the 120 required for the degree. Major Requirements A candidate for the degree Bachelor of Arts shall fulfill such requirements as may be stipulated for his major program . These requirements shall include at least 30 semester hours of work in the major area (as determined by his adviser) ofC grade or higher, at least 16 hours of which shall be at the upper division level. The grade average in the major shall be at least C . Not more than 48 semester hours in one discipline may be

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counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. The student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the major . The adviser shall be responsible for determining when a student has satisfactorily completed the requirements for the major and for so certifying to the dean of the College. For requirements of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree , consult the fine arts section in the alphabetical listings under the description of courses and programs . Upper Division Requirement Students must complete at least 45 hours of upper division work (courses numbered in the 300s and ' 400s) to be eligible for the bachelor ' s degree . Any student may register for upper division courses providing he has satisfied the prerequisites or has the approval of the discipline in which the course is offered. Courses transferred from a junior college carry lower division credit. Exceptions to this require approval of the dean of the College and the appropriate discipline representative , who may ask the student to validate upper division credit by taking an advanced standing examination. Total Credit-Hour and Grade-Point Requirement To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students must pass at least 120 semester hours with an average of at least 2.0 (C) in all courses attempted at the University of Colorado . Residence Requirement A candidate for a degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must earn his last 30 hours in the University of Colorado and must be enrolled as a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . Senior Progress Report Upon completion of 80 semester hours of course work, each student should request a Progress Report in the Office of the Dean to determine his status with respect to the above requirements. At the beginning of their last semester, students are required to file Diploma Cards , showing the date when they intend to be graduated. Diploma Cards are available in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Office of Admissions and Records, and at registration . During their senior year, students must clear all schedule changes with the Degree Requirements section of the Office of the Dean. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences/19 Graduation with Honors The Honors Program of the Collerge is outlined in the Special Programs section of this bulletin. In addition to graduation with honors , a student may be graduated with distinction if, prior to his final semester, he has taken at least 30 hours at the University of Colorado and if his cumulative grade-point average by the end of the semester , prior to his final semester ' s work toward the degree, is 3 . 5 or higher , both at the University of Colorado and in all collegiate work attempted . Summary Checklist of Graduation Requirements The student alone is ultimately responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements . Questions concerning them should be directed to the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Upon completion of degree requirements (including the fulfillment of a major) the student will be awarded the appropriate degree . GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1 . 120 semester hours passed . 2. 2 . 0 cumulative grade-point average on all Univerity of Colorado work . 3. 45 hours of upper division work. 4. The last 30 hours in residence in the College. AREA REQUIREMENTS 1 . Arts and Humanities : 12 semester hours . 2. Natural and Physical Sciences : 12 semester hours . 3. Social Sciences: 12 semester hours. 4. Foreign language: third-semester proficiency in any one language or completion of a level Ill high school foreign language course . MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 1. 30 to 48 hours in the major area. 2 . 30 hours of C-grade or better in the major area. 3 . A 2.0 grade-point average in all major work . '4. 16 hours of upper division courses in the major, C-grade or higher . 5. Special requirements as stipulated by the major program. Note : Not more than 48 hours in any one discipline and not more than 24 hours outside the College can be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree . Students may elect to satisfy their degree requirements according to the above requirements or according to those in effect when they first enrolled as a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students planning to transfer to the Boulder Campus are responsible for informing themselves of the degree requirements on that campus .

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20 / University of Colorado at Denver Division of Arts and Humanities ROBLEY D . RHINE, Assistant Dean The Division of Arts and Humanities includes the disciplines of communication and theatre, communi cation disorders and speech science, English, fine arts , French, German , philosophy , and Spanish. Complete undergraduate majors are offered in communication and theatre, English, fine arts , French , German , philos ophy , and Spanish . Requirements for each major are explained . before the course listings for the respective disciplines . Information on preprofessional programs is given in that section of this bulletin. This division offers course work in several special programs including Comparative Literature, American Studies, and the Writing Program. The Writing Program is designed to prepare professional writers in the techniques and vocabularies of several varied fields such as fine arts, science , engineering, creative writing , business, social sciences, and literature. Two cocurricular programs also are open to students: Theatre and Community Speaking and Forensics . Students interested in majoring in any of the disciplines or in participating in any of the specialized programs should request additional information from the divisional office or the discipline representative. Description of Courses and Programs For information on scheduling of courses , consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time , and meeting place of classes . ARTS AND HUMANITIES A.H. 398-3. Cooperative Education. Designed expe rien ces involv ing application of specific , relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations. Prer . , sophomore stand ing and 2.5 GPA . COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE A major in communication and theatre at both the bachelor ' s and master ' s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus. Students majoring in communication and theatre must present a minimum of 40 semester hours (although the individual areas within communication and theatre may require additional hours) including C.T. 202 and C . T . 400 . The student must elect to pursue one of the several areas of emphasis within the communication and theatre field. Each area has its own requirements for graduation, and specific programs will be developed in consultation with academic advisers to insure proper balance of courses within the major . Lists of required and suggested courses in each major area may be obtained from the divisional office. Communication and theatre majors planning to teach communication and theatre at the secondary level should acquaint themselves with the certification requirements of the North Central Accrediting Association. Each student pursuing a program in the School of Education must meet minimal standards of competence in oral communication. Additional information may be obtained through the School of Education office . C.T . 4Q-O. Speech Laboratory in English as a Second Language. Group assistance for people for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their spoken English. C.T. 41-0. Reading Laboratory in English as a Second Language. Group assistance for people for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their speed and comprehension in reading English. C.T . 42-0. Writing Laboratory in English as a Second Language. Group assistance for people for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their writing in English . C.T. 140-5. Structure and Pronunciat i on of Standard English for Speakers of Other Languages. Practice in speaking and under standing spoken English , with attention to grammar , pronunciation , and vocabulary as well as meaning and appropriateness . C.T. 141-3. Written Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. Beginning course in written English composition for people for whom English is a second language . Oral and written work . C.T . 142-3. Written Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Second semester course . Continued work on grammar , syntax, spelling , and the mechanics of writing , but with greater focus on selection , development , and organization of material for long e r connected discourse . C.T. 200-3. Voice and Diction. Improvement of the normal speaking voice , articulation , and pronunciation . C.T . 202-3 . Principles of Communication I. A lecture-discussion-recitation approach to communication theory and its application in everyday communication . This course is intended to give students a point of v i ew and certain basic knowledge that will help them become better communicators regard less of their f i elds of specialization . C . T. 203-3. Principles of Communication II. Further development of the principles of communication. Specific topics such as argumentation, source credibility , attitude , organizat ion, language style , and mass communication will be expanded by both theoretical refinement and analysis of specific research studies . Prer . , C.T. 202. C.T. 21 Q-3. Speechmaking. The theory and practice of developing ideas, supporting materials , organ ization , style, delivery , and audience adaptation . C.T. 250. Introduction to Oral Interpretation. Study and performance of the narrative , l yric , and dramatic modes of literature . Not open to freshmen. C.T . 270. Introduction to Theatre. ,IJ.. study of the theory and practice of theatrical art , historical and contemporary . Readings , lectures, demonstrations , play-going , and participation in live productions . C.T. 273-2. Stage Movement. (Dance 242 . ) Analysis and practice of stage movement , including the study of basic techniques in gesture, mime , and pantomime as related to period drama, modern drama , and musical comedy. Emphasis i s placed on developing an awareness of the use of the body as a means of expression . C.T. 276-3. Stagecraft Theory and practice. An introduction to stagecraft , including basic mechanical drawing , mechanics , lighting , and their application to the scenic arts . C.T. 308 . 1ntroduction to Phonetics. International Phonetic Alpha bet ( IPA) and some kinesics of American English, phonemes tran scription in context. C.T. 315 . Discussion. Theory and practice in group discussion processes, decision making, and participant and leader behavior combined with interpersonal laboratory .

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C.T. 320-3. Argumentation. Theory of argumentation and debate applied to contemporary issues . Briefing and presenting arguments . C.T. 349-variable credit. Problems in English as a Second Language. Study in problem areas . Work is bas ically invest igative in character. Prer., consent of supervising instructor. C.T . 350-3. Oral Interpretati on of Literature: Poetry . Exploration of poetry through analysis and performance . Prer., C .T. 250 . C . T . 360-3. Introd uc tion to Broadcast ing and Film . Development , organization, controls , and functions of radio and television in America with a brief description of broadcasting in other countries ; an introduction to structure , economics , and social influence of film , with a brief discussion of production techniques . C.T . 361-3. Radio Programm i ng and Production. Introduction to basic elements of radio including the audio console , microphone, turntables , tape recorders , tape editing , timing , and combo operation . Emphasis on applying the basic principles and practices through professional production of live and taped radio programs, inc luding news , weather , sports , documentaries , features , remotes , music programs, etc . Prer., C . T . 360 . C.T. 362 3 . Television Production . Introduction to basic television production princ iples , practices, techniques , facilities, and equipment , incl uding cameras, audio equipment , lighting , films, video tape , graphics, sets , etc . The lab applies the principles through product ion and direction of television programs , including news-weather-sports, interviews, documentaries , demonstrations , and a f i nal program of the student's choice . Prer., C.T . 360 . C.T. 373-3. Acting. Theory and practice to enable the student to improve his techniques and to utilize these techniques in creative acting. Formal and informal performance of scenes throughout the semester . C.T . 374-3. Directing . A study of the director ' s function in the live theatre with particular emphasis on play analysis and the relationship of creative communication existing between the director and the production team . Readings, improvisati ons , and informal sce nes . C .T. 378-3 . Black Theatre. Black playwrights through the Harlem renaissance to the present Ame rican Blac k Revolut i on . C.T. 339 / 499 -variable credit. Problems in Communication and Theat r e . Study in problem areas in the field of communication and theatre . Work that is basically investigative in character . Prer. , consent of supervising instructor. C . T. 400-3. Rhetorical and Aesthetic Dimensions of Communication. The study of communication as a process which integrates instrumental and consumatory elements . Prer. , C.T. 202 , senior standing in communication and theatre , or C . T . 202 and consent of instructor. C . T. 415-3 . Group Communication Theory . Observation and analysis of group processes and leadersh i p roles and functions from the viewpoint of modern communication theory . Prer., C . T . 315 or consent of instructor . C.T. 416-3 . Representative American Speeches. Study of American speeches and speakers as they interact with audiences and eve nt s . Rhetor i cal analysis of ideas, organization , supporting materials , motivation , style , and delivery as adapted by a speaker for a particular audience and occasion . C.T. 420-3 . Seminar: Persuasion. Theory of motivation and how it changes as it operates in individual and groups . Consideration o f atti tudes , beliefs , values, credibility, message variables , ethics , and effects . Analysis of persuasive campaign . C.T. 421-3 . The Psychology of Communication . Examination of psycholog i cal factors affecting comprehens i on and retention of s peech and formation of linguistic habits , set , attitude f ormat i on and change , perception , values , and meaning. Prer . , C . T . 202 for majors . C.T. 422-3 . Information Analysis. Study o f the applications and misapplications of the mathematical theory of communication . P rer . , consent of instructor . C.T. 426 3 . Communication and Conflict : Interpersonal and Inter group. Study of the influence of communication on intrapersonal , interpe rsonal , intragr oup , and intergroup conflict situations . Includes field observ ations and analysis and training in i ntervention methods . C . T. 427-3 . Intercultural Communication. Examination of the philosophy, process, problems, and potenti als unique to College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /21 communication across cultural boundaries . Implications for personal and social innovation. Comparat ive study of communication customs in selected research studies. C.T . 428-3. Communication of Directed Change . Examination of the communication process underlying the diffusion of innovations . Provides a bridge between theory and application i n the study of directed change . C.T . 430-3. Teaching of Communication and Theatre. Fundamental problems of the t eacher of communication and theatre-textbooks, courses of study, methods , etc . Prer., consent of i nstructor . C.T. 433-3 . Teaching With Group Methods. The study of group forces , potentials , and the teacher ' s role in crea ting effective learning groups . Des i gning , developing , and evaluating part i cipative educational activities as alternatives to trad itional teaching methods . C . T. Creative Dramatics. The study of creativity , its role and application in dramatics , and the manner in which creative dramatics assists in the growth and development of children and youth . C.T . 440-3. Structure ofToday ' s English With Linguistic View. An up-to-date exploration of the workings of the English language with attention to current linguistic science trends in language analysis and description . Of general concern to all teachers of English and of particular value to those interested in bilingua l education or in the teaching of English as a second or foreign lang uage . C.T . 441-3. Teaching Standard English to Speakers of Other Languages or Dialects. Comprehensive overview of the principles and techniques necessary to a broad-based audiolingual-cognitive approach to language teaching. Course pays particular attention to the importance of oral work in leading the non-native speaker of English from first-stop language manipulation to full communication . Prer . , C .T. 440 or consent of instructor . C.T. 442-variable credit. Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language. Practical experience in situations appropriate to the student-teacher ' s part icular English -teaching interests : the bilingua l , bicultural classroom ; adult educat ion for the non-English speaker ; fore i gn student classes in English at the University of Colorado or other local institutions of higher learning; one-to-one tutorial work in ESL. Prer., C.T . 441 or consent of instructor . C.T. 450-3. Advanced Oral Interpretation. Exploration of prose forms ; theory and analysis of fiction and nonfiction . Development and presentation of indiv i dual and group programs . Prer., C . T . 350 . C .T. 451-3 . Advanced Oral Interpretation. Explorat i on of poetic forms; theory and analysis of modern poetry . Development and presentation of individual and group programs . Prer., C.T . 350 . C.T . 452-3. Dramatic Interpretation . Analysis of dramatic literature. Deve lopment and presentation of individual and group programs . Prer . , C . T . 350 . C . T. 460 -3. Radio -TV Station Organization and Ope rati on . Procedures , organization , and problems of management and operation of radio and television broadcast stations . Prer . , C . T . 360 or consent of inst ructor. C . T . 465-3 to 4 . Television in Education . (L.M . 507) Utilization of television at all levels of educatio n . Theory and practice in defining needs, identifyin g alternative solutions , producing mater ials , and eva l uating results . Fourth credit hour req uires compre hens ive project design . Prer., C . T . 360 or consent of inst ructor . C .T. 471-3 . History of the Theatre I. Study of theatres , methods of presentation , actors, and acting from primi t ive times to 1700, emphasizing perception of cont empo rary theatre as a way of understanding and apprec iating the place of theatre in historical contexts . C .T . 473-3. Advanced Acting . Research , analysis, and preparation and performance of roles in period and modern drama, emphasi z i n g theories and techniques of historical and presentational s ty les . Prer., C . T . 373 . C.T. 475-3. Playwriting: The Short Form. (Engl. 3 05 . ) Play , radio , and television scripts . Prer., any course in drama or consent of instructor . C.T. 478-3. Drama Theory. Examination of critical and theoretical ideas from A ristotle to the present day . C.T. 479-0 to 4 . Theatre Practice. Part icipation in Univers ity Theatre productions . Credit hours to be arranged by director of the theatre . Not

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22/ University of Colorado at Denver more than 2 hours may be earned in any one semester or in the summer sess i on. Prer . , consent of the d i rector of the theat r e . C . T. 481-3. History of the Theatre II. Cont i nuation of C.T . 471. From 1700 . C.T . 485-3. Playwriting: The Long Form. ( Engl. 306.) Full-length plays , etc . Prer., consent of instructor. C.T . 499-variable credit. Problems in Communication and Theatre. Prer., consent of instructor . COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND SPEECH SCIENCE NATALIE HEDBERG, Coordinator The B.A. degree in communication disorders and speech science is not available on the Denver Campus . The following courses are open to undergraduates: CDSS 401 and CDSS 435. For graduate-level courses see Communication Disorders and Speech Science in the Graduate School section of this bulletin. CDSS 401-2. Speech and Language Development in Children. Underlying processes in the development of speech and language , normal and typical. CDSS 435-2.1ntroduction to Language and Learning Disabilities. Orientation to the field of language and learning disorders found in preschool , elementary , and secondary school children. Diagnostic and remedia l techniques and t reatment programs will be surveyed . Films , case studies , guest speakers , and f i eld trips will provide a comprehensive view of the fiel d . CDSS 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE Students wishing to pursue graduate work in comparative literature should consult the Graduate School Bulletin. On the 400 level, students may read all texts in translation ; however , reading knowledge in at least one foreign language is highly recommended. On the 500 and 600 levels, students must be able to read in two foreign languages or obtain the consent of the instructor . C.L. 410-6. Background Readings in Classical, Medieval , and Renaissance Texts. C . L. 411-3. Basic Literary Concepts. C.L. 412-3. Literary Genres : Narrative Prose. C.L. 413-3. Literary Genres: Lyric Poetry. C.L. 414-3. Literary Genres: Verse Epic. C.L. 415-3. Literary Genres : Drama-Baroque. C.L. 435-3. Studies in the Novel: The Modern Novel. C.L. 436-3. Studies in the Drama: Contemporary European Drama-lbsen to Brecht. C.L. 437-3. Studies in Poetry: The Lyric as Genre and Attitude. C.L. 446-3. Nineteenthand Early 20th-Century Literature. C.L. 447-3. Modern Literature. C.L. 448-3. Contemporary Literature. C.L. 466-3. Themes, Motifs, and Characters. C.L. 473-3. Philosophy and Literature. (Phil. 473.) C.L. 487-3. International Literary Relations: The United States and the Hispanic World. ENGLISH A major in English at both the bachelor ' s and master's levels may be completed on the Denver Campus. Students majoring in English must present a total of 36 hours in English, excluding Engl. 100-101, of which 24 hours must be earned in upper division courses . None of the required 36 hours may be taken on a pass / fail basis . Of the 24 hours required at the 300or 400level , at least 3 must be earned i n a course dealing with English literature before 1800 , at least 3 in a course dealing with English literature after 1800 , and at least 3 in a course on American literature . Required courses : Engl. 250 , 251, 252 (Survey of English Literature -9 hours) ; Engl. 300 (Critical Writing-3 hours) ; Engl. 497 or 498 (Major Authors or Topics in Literature -3 hours) . At least 12 hours of the major ' s upper or lower divi sion work in English must be done at the Denver Campus i n order to qualify for the B.A. in English . English majors interested in graduating with honors should confer with the honors adviser as soon as possible , but definitely no later than the beginning of the spring term of their junior year . Students who contemplate teaching should obtain in the School of Education sheets listing curriculum required for a teaching certificate and should consult the School of Education, which supervises the teacher-training program. Since fulfilling requirements for education and English involves close scheduling, students should fulfill at least some of the college requirements during their freshman and sophomore years. English for foreign students and courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language are listed under Communication and Theatre in this bulletin. For additional literature courses see Comparative Literature and Mexican American Education Program . Note: A considerable amount of writing is required in all English courses and is graded on form as well as on content. Engl. 100-3 . Exposition I. Basic composition; wr i ting themes , reading expository essays , and partic i pating in student-teacher conferences . Engl. 101-3. Exposition II. Continuation of Engl . 100 with emphasis on writing a research paper . Students are urged to take Engl. 100 before 101, unless they have successfully completed a basic composition course . Engl. 120-3. Introduction to Fiction. Reading and analysis of short stories and novels . Engl. 130-3. Introduction to Drama and Poetry. Reading and analysis of plays and poems . Engl. 200-3. Advanced Composition. Prer., Engl. 100 and 101, or consent of instructor. Engl. 206-3. Modern Grammatical Usages. Engl. 215-3. Introduction to Creative Writing. Seminar. Engl. 216-3. Study of Poetry. Reading of representative English and American poets with emphasis on form and prosody. Engl. 250-3. Survey of English Literature I. Chronological study of the greater figures and forces in the mainstream of English literature from the beginning through the 16th century including Shakespeare . Engl. 250 , 251, and 252 should be taken i n sequence . Engl. 251-3. Survey of English Literature II. Continuation of Engl. 250. English literature of the 17th and 18th centuries . Engl. 252-3. Survey of English Literature Ill. Continuation of Engl. 251. English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Engl. 253-3. Masterpieces of British Literature. An intensive study of several major works of British literature . Engl. 258-3. Great Books I. Close study of literary classics of Wesiern civilization : the Odyssey or Iliad , Greek drama , and several books of the Bible.

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Engl. 259. Great Books II. Close study of literary classics of Western civilizat ion from Plato to the Renaissance ; selected dialogues of Plato , the Aeneid , the Inferno , and a few works by other writers . Engl. 260.3. Great Books Ill. Close study of several major works of the 17th, 18th , and 19th centuries . Engl. 261-3 . Great Books IV. Close study of severa l major works of 20th century poetry , drama , and fiction. Engl. 265-3. Masterpieces of American Literature. Close reading and analysis of American literary classics : novels , poems , plays , and essays of the 19th and 20th centuries . Engl. 273-3. The American Writer and the Black Man I. Continua reading and ana1ys1s ot Signifi cant literary works by black or white American writers treating black Americans : novels , poems , plays , and essays . Engl. 273-3. The American Writer and the Black Man II. Continua tion of Engl. 272 , but may be taken i ndependently of that course. Engl. 274-3. Survey of Ethnic Literature. Same as Black Studies 274 . Engl. 290 /390-3 . Topics in Literature. Topics such as the following will be offered at regular intervals : science fiction , women in literature , opera as drama. Note: Before taking any 300-level course in English , a student must have earned 24 semester hours of college credit. Engl . 300-3 . Critical Writing. Practical criticism of novels, poems , and plays , with emphasis on written work . Introduction to and practice i n using various critical approaches to works of literature . Engl . 302-3 . Writing Workshop: Poetry. The writing of poetry . Seminar . May be repeated for up to 6 hours cred it. Engl. 305-3 . Writing Workshop: Fiction. The writing of short stor i es . Seminar. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit. Prer., Engl. 215 , or consent of instructor . Engl. 315-3. Report Writing. Instruction and pract ice in var i ous forms of reports , papers , and articles . Emphasis on style and editing . Engl. 318-3. Writing Topics. Individual papers based on upper division courses from each of the following three areas : Arts and Humanities , Natural and Physical Sciences , and Social Sciences . For writing program majors only . May be repeated for up to 9 hours credit. Engl. 365-3 . American Literature I. Chronological survey of the literature from its beginnings until the Civil War . Engl . 366-3 . American Literature II. Chronolog i cal survey of the literature from the C i vil War to the present. Engl. 376-3 . Black Literature. Engl. 394 -3. The Bible as Literature. Survey of literary achievements of the ancient Hebrews and the early Christians . Engl. 395-3 . Chaucer. A study of Chaucer's major works with emphasis upon the Canterbury Tales . Reading in Middle English after a short introduction to the language . Engl. 397-3 . Shakespeare. A survey of Shakespeare ' s characteris tic and major plays . Engl . 398-3. Topics in Shakespeare . Focuses on particular topics and problems in the study of Shakespeare ' s plays . Engl. 399-3. Milton . Milton ' s poetry and selected prose . Note: Before taking any 400-level course in English , a student must have earned 36 semester hours of college credit. Engl. 413-3. Contemporary Chicano Literature. Same as M .AM. 413 . Engl. 420-3. Development of the English Novel I. From the beginnings to 1830 . Engl. 421-3. Development of the English Novel II. From 1830 to World War I. Continuation of Engl. 420 . Engl. 423-3. Development of the American Novel I. From the beginnings to 1900. Engl. 424-3. Development of the American Novel II. From 1900 to the present. Continuation of Engl. 423 . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /23 Engl. 425-3. Twentieth-Century Fiction. The modern novel in an international perspective, w ith emphasis on new tendencies . Engl. 430-3. Development of British Drama I. From the beginnings through the Restoration . Engl. 431-3. Development of British Drama II. From 1700 to the present. Continuation of Engl. 430 . Engl. 435-3. American Drama . Survey of Amer i can drama , with emphasis on O ' Neill and subsequent playwrights . Engl. 436-3. Twentieth-Century Drama. Continental , British , and American drama since Ibsen . Engl. 443-3. British and American Poetry of the 20th Century . Engl. 444-3. American Poetry . From the beginnings through the 20th century . Engl. 446-3. Recent World Literature. Survey of important works and trends in poetry, drama , and fiction since World War II. Engl. 450-3. Medieval Literature. Selections read in modern English, representative of the life and thought of the Middle Ages (up to 1500) . Engl. 452-3. The English Renaissance. Selected works from the 16th and 17th centuries . Engl. 454-3 . The Restoration and the Age of Johnson. Selected works from the period 1660-1800 . Engl. 456-3. English Romanticism. Major works of the chief English romantics : Blake, Wordsworth, 9oleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley . Engl. 458-3 . The Victorian Age. Main currents of Victorian thought in prose and poetry , 1830-1890 . Engl. 460.3 . Modern British and Irish Literature. Chronological survey of the period 1890 to World War II. Engl. 480-2. Advanced Composition for Secondary School Teachers of English. Same as T.Ed . 445 . Emphasis on improving students ' ability to write expoSitory and argumentative essays by means of careful criticism of students ' wr i ting . Extensive discussion of such matters as the content of secondary school composition courses and methods of criticizing and evaluating the writing of secondary school students . Not counted toward minimum number of upper division hours for English major. Engl. 481-2 . Literature for Adolescents . Same as T .Ed. 444 . The reading and evaluation of books suitable for junior and senior high school pupils . Attent ion is given to sources of information about books and criteria for selection , as well as to the actual writers . Engl. 482-2. Teaching of English. Same as T .Ed. 452 . Required of all who wish recommendation as high school English teachers . Engl. 484-3. English Grammar. Study of the English language and of the various grammars of English. Required for candidates for teacher certification only . Engl. 485-3 . History of the English Language. Outline of history of the language , including a brief survey of sound changes affecting modern English and history of grammatical forms and vocabulary . Elementary knowledge of English grammar assumed . Engl. 489-3 . Semantics. Study of the meaning of words , their changes of meaning , and the relationship between words and reality . Engl. 497-3. Topics in American and British Literature. Courses such as the following will be offered at regualr intervals : Regional Literature-the Frontier ; Satire ; Comedy ; Tragedy . Open to English majors only , except with consent of the instructor . Engl. 498-3 . Major American and British Authors. Intensive study of works of one major Brit ish or American author . Open to English majors only , except with consent of the instructor . Engl. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. FINE ARTS The Department of Fine Arts offers both a B .A. degree and a B . F . A . degree in painting , sculpture, print-making , or design. The B.A. degree must i nclude 40, but not more than 48 , hours in fine arts , 24 of which must be in upper division courses. The B.F . A. degree must include

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24 / University of Colorado at Denver 54, but not more than 72, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. Students wishing to apply for the B.F.A. degree must have a 2.0 average in all course work at the time of application , which may not be earlier than the end of the junior year. Application forms are available in the divisional office. The core curriculum for fine arts majors includes 12 hours of Studio I (Fine Arts 100, 101, 1 02), Studio II (Fine Arts 202) , Fine Arts 180-181, Fine Arts 496, and 6 hours of upper division art history. The recommended program for the B.F.A. includes at least two years in one creative field (painting, printmaking, design, or sculpture) plus 9 semester hours in drawing. Students who are candidates for the B .F.A. must take a minimum of 20 hours while in residence. The core curriculum is set up to facilitate as much as possible a variety of viewpoints and creative approaches for the beginning student. If this seems restrictive to an individual student because of prior experience, etc., discipline advisers are open to alternative possibilities that would accomplish the same end. Studio I and II Courses For an orientation to studio practice , including draw ing and an exploration of twoand three-dimensional media , fine arts majors are required to take 12 hours of Studio I and II courses under four different instructors . There are no prerequisites for Studio I and II courses , but all 12 hours are prerequisites for most 300and 400-level courses . Students enrolled in 400-level courses will be asked to present work in progress to the UCD fine arts faculty before the end of each semester the student is enrolled . This will enable communication with instructors other than the one listed for the specific course. Note : More specific descriptions of these courses will be available each semester at registration. Fine Arts 100-3. Drawing. Exploration of drawing approaches and media. Fine Arts 101-3 . Three-Dimensional Media. Primarily exploration in three-dimensional form and materials . Fine Arts 102-3. Two-Dimensional Media. Primarily exploration in composition and color. Life Drawing Fine Arts 300-3. First-Year Life Drawing and Composition. Problems in drawing from l ife; exploring the possibilities in pictorial design and composition . Prer . , Fine Arts 1 00 plus one more 1 00-level fine arts course . May be repeated to maximum credit of 6 hours . Fine Arts 400-3. Advanced Drawing. Problems in drawing with emphasis on individual development. Prer . , 6 hours Fine Arts 300 . May be repeated . Printmaking Fine Arts 340-3. First-Year Printmaking. Introduction to intaglio and relief pr i nting , including metal engraving and etching , and woodcut. Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equ i valent. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours credit. Fine Arts 440-3. Second-Year Printmaking. Continued study and exper i mentat i on i n i ntaglio , relief pri nting medi a . P r er . , Fine Arts 340 . May be repeated . Fine Arts 342-3 . Silk Screen . ( Serigraphy . ) S ilk screen techn i ques as they rel ate to fine art prints , with possible pract i cal applications to posters , brochu r es , and other projects requiring mul t i ple edi tions . Prer. , F ine Arts 100 p l us one more 1 00 level fine art s course , o r consent of instructor . May be repeated . Painting Fine Arts 320 -3. First-Year Painting. Basic investigation of the mater i als of the pai nter and their use in expressing the student ' s ideas . Prer., 12 hours of basic art courses or equ i valent. May be repeated . Fine Arts 420-3. Second-Year Painting. Expressive pictor i al problems involving var ied subject matter and painting media , with emphasis on individual development . Prer . , Fine Arts 320 or equivalent. May be repeated . Sculpture Fine Arts 350-3. Sculpture. Studies of the human figu r e in wax and cast ing them i n bronze . Prer., Fine Arts 101. Fine Arts 351-3. Sculpture. Creat ive investigat ion of various sculptural materials and concepts . Prer., Fine Arts 350 . Fine Arts 450-3. Advanced Sculpture. Work in large sculptural fonns . Prer . , Fine Arts 351. Fine Arts 451-3. Advanced Sculpture. Ind i vidual sculptura l themes . Prer. , Fine Arts 450 . Design Fine Arts 202-3 . Visual Studies. S tudi o course designed t o i ntroduce to the student the realm of v i sual thi nking while solv ing the problem of making a visual statement. Fine Arts 315-3. First-Year Photography I. Using l ecture as an introduction to history , techn i que , and concepts of photography as it relates to the fine arts . Emphasis on photography as a means to a formal and expressive end . Students must have access t o a camera . Fine Arts majors only . Open upon consultat i on . Prer., 10 hours of basic art . Fine Arts 316-2. Graphic Design. Problems in advert i sing illustration and telev i s ion graphics design . Various media explored . Stress on i ndiv i duality , cr i tical judgment , and creat i v i ty . Prer., F ine Arts 100 plus one more 1 00-level fine arts course , or consent of instructor . May not be repeated . Fine Arts 319-3. FirstYear Photography II. Emphasis on processes and c r i tical evaluation of stu dent ' s photog r aphs . Prer . , F ine Arts 315 . Fine Arts 363 -3. Film Making. Studio course designed to acquaint students w ith the bas i c v i sua l and esthet i c elements of f il m through actual shooting , editing , and discussion . A ll work is in 8 or super 8mm . with student ' s own or rented camera . Fine Arts 402-3. Movement-Performance in Fine Art. Studio course des i gned to present the possib i lity of movement-performance to the fine arts / humanit i es student as a f orm for self-exploration and expression . Fine Arts 415-3. Second-Year Photography I. Advanced work with photographs and refined techn i cal processes . Prer., F ine Arts 319 . Fine Arts 419-3. Second-Year Photography II. Cont i nuation of F ine Arts 415 . Fine Arts 418-3. Creativity and Problem Solving. Exploration of the p r ocess of problem solv ing through the means fundamental to all art i stic endeavors , i.e., making and doing. Prer., Fine Arts 102 plus one more 1 00-level fine arts course . Open , with consent of instructor , to students in other disciplines . May be repeated . Art History Note : Not all art history courses are offered every year. Check current Schedule of Courses. Fine Arts 180-3. History of Art I (Survey). H i story of art of all ages , reflecting the v a r i ous cul tures of mank ind from the Rena i s s a nce to the present. Fine Arts 181-3. History of Art II (Survey). H i story of art of all ages , r ef l ecting the v arious cul t ures o f mank ind from the Rena issan ce to the present.

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Fine Arts 470.3. Primitive Art. (African and Pacific areas.) Native arts of various Afr ican peoples as well as those of the major island groups of the Pacif i c area. Fine Arts 471-3. Pre-Columbian Art. Arch itecture, sculpture, painting of the high cultures of Meso-America and the Andean area before the Spanish conquest. Fine Arts 472-3. North American Indian Art. Survey of major tribal styles of the North American continent. Fine Arts 476-3. Pre-Classical Art and Archaeology. (Anthro . 427 and Gen . Classics 427.) Greece and Crete from the neolithic period to the end of the Mycenaean world . Fine Arts 477-3. Classical Art and Archaeology. (Anthro . 428 anc. Gen. Classics 428 . ) Greek art and archaeology from the end of the Mycenaean world through the Hellen istic era . Fine Arts 487-3. American Art. Study of American art and architecture from the Colonial per iod through the 19th century . Fine Arts 488-3 . American Art. Study of American art and architecture from the 19th century to the present. Fine Arts 489-3. Origins of Modem Art I . History of European movements of the early 19th century from the French Revolution to Realism . Fine Arts 490-3 . Origins of Modern Art II. History of European movements of the late 19th century from Realism through Post Impressionism . Fine Arts 491-3 . Modern Art I. A survey of major trends in painting and sculpture from Post-Impressionism through Dada (1884). Fine Arts 492-3. Modem Art II. A survey of major trends in painting and sculpture from Surrealism to the present (1924-) . Independent Study and Seminar Fine Arts 399, 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Individual projects or studies assigned by the major professor . To be arranged . Fine Arts 494-3. Seminar in Literature and the Visual Arts. Interdisciplinary , team-taught course with another discipline . Fine Arts 496-3 . Art Seminar . For fine arts majors , undergraduate and graduate . Course based on an exchange of ideas basic to the student's own creative work , and to contemporary philosophies and tendencies in the field . Prer., 12 hours of bas i c art courses or equivalent. Fine Arts 180-181 , or consent of instruc tor . May be repeated once with consent of instructor. FRENCH Students who have completed a Level Ill high school French course have automatically satisfied the College graduation requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of French 201 or 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied French in high school and who wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score . A student normally may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credit, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Information section of this bulletin. Students majoring in French must complete 35 semester hours beyond the first year. Students pre senting four years of high school French for admission must complete 30 hours beyond the second year . Re quired courses are French 211-212, 301-302, 311-312 , 401-402 , plus 6 hours of literature courses at the 400 level. Note : For comparative literature , see that section . College of Uberal Arts and Sciences / 25 French 101-5. Beginning French I. French 102-5 . Beginning French II. Prer. , French 101. French 201-3. Second-Year Oral Grammar Review and Conversa tion. Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French . French 202-3. SecondYear Oral Grammar Review and Conversation. Prer., French 201 or two years of high school French . French 211-3. Second-Year French Reading and Conversation I. Prer., French 102 or two years of high school French . French 212-3 . Second-Year French Reading and Conversation II. Prer., French 211 or three years of high school French . French 301-2. French Phonetics and Pronunciation. Prer., French 212 or equivalent. French 302-2. Oral Practice. Prer . , French 301 or consent of i nstructor . French 305-3. French Composition. Prer. , French 202 or 212 or equivalent . French 306-3 . French Composition. Prer., French 305 or consent of inst ructor . French 311-3. Main Currents of French Literature. Prer., French 212 or consent of instructor . French 312 -3. Main Currents of French Literature. Prer. , French 311 or consent of instructor . French 401-3. Advanced Composition. Prer . . French 305 or consent of instructor. French 402-3. Advanced Composition. Prer ., French 401 or consent of instru ctor . French 403-3. Advanced Oral Practice . Prer., French 301 and 302 , or consent of instructor . French 420.2. French Civilization to 1789 . Prer., French 312 or 302 , or consent of instructor . French 421-2. French Civilization from 1789 to Present Day . Prer., French 312 , 302 , or 420 , or consent of instructor . French 436-3. Eighteenth-Century French Novel , Theatre , and Poetry. French 443-3 . Nineteenth-Century French Novel. French 499-variable credit . Independent Study. GERMAN Students who have completed a Levell II high school German course have automatically satisfied the college requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (12 credit hours in one semester) , by completion of German 201, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied German in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. The German major must take 35 semester hours beyond first year proficiency. Not more than 12 semester hours of 200-level courses and not more than 6 semester hours of courses given in English translation may be taken for credit toward the 35-hour minimum . Required courses for the B.A. are German 301-302: Advanced Conversation , Grammar, Composition ; German 401-402 _ : Structural Analysis, Composition, Stylistics ; German 423 : German Civilization ; and German 495: Methods ofTeaching German (required of students who desire the recommendation of the discipline representative for secondary school teaching positions) . Native German speakers or students with advanced training may request permission to substitute

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26/ University of Colorado at Denver more advanced German courses to fulfill the 35-hour minimum. German 101-4, Sect. I. German 102-4, Sect. I. German 201-4, Sect. I. These three sections together comprise a 12 hour, one semester course . Satisfactory completion of Intens i ve German fulfills the foreign language requirement. German 101-4 . Beginning German I. German 102-4. Beginning German II. Prer., German 101 or one year of high school German . German 201-4. Intermediate German 1: Reading. Prer., German 102 or two years of high school German . German 202-4. Intermediate German II: Reading. Prer. , German 201 or three years of high school German . German 222-4. Scientific German. Prer., German 201 or 211, or upon consultation . German 301-3. Advanced Conversation and Grammar. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor. German 302-3. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Prer., German 301 or consent of instructor . German 311-3. Diedeutsche Novelle. Pre r., German 212orconsent of instructor . German 312-3. Das deutsche Drama. Prer., German 212 or consent of instructor . German 333-3. Deutsche Klassik. Prer., German 311 and 312 , or consent of instructor . German 334-3. Deutsche Romantik . Prer., German 311 and 312 , or consent of instructor . German 381-3. German Literature in Translation I. German 382-3. German Literature in Translation II. German 401-3. Structural Analysis, Composition , and Stylistics I. Prer., German 302 or consent of instructor . German 402-3. Structural Analysis, Composition, and Stylistics II. Prer. , German 401 or consent of instructor . German 411-3. Deutsche Literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts. German 412-3. Deutsche Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts. German 423-3. German Civilization. (In translation.) German 436-3 . Die deutsche Lyrlk. Prer. , German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor . German 437-3. Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgeschichte I. Prer. , German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor . German 438-3. Einfuhrung in die deutsche Literaturgeschichte II. Prer., German 311 and 312 or consent of instructor . German 494-3. Seminar in Literature and the Visual Arts. Interdisciplinary , team-taught course with fine arts discipline. German 495-3. Methods of Teaching German . Required of students who desire the recommendation of the discipline representative for secondary school teaching positions. For student teaching in German , see Educ . 451 in the School of Education Bulletin. ' German 499-variable credit. Independent Study. PHILOSOPHY A program for the philosophy major must include a minimum of five courses (15 hours) at the 300 level; a minimum of three courses (9 hours) at the 400 level; and a minimum of one course (3 hours) at the 500 level. The balance of the courses for the major may be taken at the discretion of the student. The following courses are recommended (not required) for philosophy majors who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy: Symbolic Logic (Phil. 344); History of Philosophy (Phil. 300 , 302, 402 , 403, 404) ; Ethics (Phil. 315); Metaphysics (Phil. 335); Epistemology (Phil. 336); Philosophical Method (Phil. 350) ; several courses concerned with a single philosopher (e.g., Phil. 580, 581, 582, etc.); and one course concerned with the relationship of philosophy to some other discipline (e.g., Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of History , etc.) . General prerequisites (which may vary for some courses) are: 1 00-level-none; 200-level-3 hours ; 300-level-6 hours; 400-level-9 hours; and 500-level-12 hours . The prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor. Phil. 115-3. Ethics. Introductory study of major philosophies on the nature of the good of man, principles of evaluation, and moral choice . Phil. 12Q-3. Philosophy and Society . Systematic discussion and analysis of the philosophic ideas of commu n ity , freedom , political power , the nature and role of violence , etc., together with the chal lenge of war , poverty , and racism to contemporary culture . Phil. 130-3. Philosophy and the Physical World. An introduction to philosophy through the consideration of topics and problems related to the physical and b i ological sciences such as freedom and determinism ; mind and body; artificial intelligence ; sciences and ethics ; current theories of the universe , space, time , matter , energy , causality , etc . Phil. 144-3. Introductory Logic. Introductory study of definition , i nformal fallacies , and the principles and standards of correct reasoning . Phil. 150-3. Critical Reasoning. An introduction to concept formation , variant forms of reasoning and argument , and criteria for their evaluation. Phil. 160-3. Philosophy and Religion . An introduction to philosophy through problems of religion , such as the existence of God , faith and reason, religious language , etc . Phil. 170-3. Philosophy and the Arts . Consideration of philosophic questions involved in the analys i s and assessment of artistic experiences and of the objects with which the arts , including the literary arts , are concerned. Phil. 22Q-3. Classical Social Theories. Introductory study of major philosophies of the past in relation to polit i cal , economic , and social issues . Phil. 221-3. Modern Social Theories. Present social issues , together w ith theoretical analyses by communist , fascist, and democratic thinkers. Phil . 24Q-3. Introduction to Philosophy of Science . Examination of some major concepts and problems of scientific thought: ex planation , confirmation, causa lity , measurement , and theory con struct ion. Phil. 260-3 . Oriental Religions . . Phil. 290-3. A Philosophical Classic. Detailed study of one major philosophic text which illustrates a variety of types of philosophical concerns. Emphasis on tech niques for analysis, discussion, and assessment of philosophical argumentation . Such works as The Republic , Leviathan, and Treatise of Human Nature . Phil. 300-3. Greek Philosophy. History of Pre-Socratic , Attic, and Hellenistic philosophy . No prer . Phil. 301-3. Medieval Philosophy. Phil. 302-3. Modern Philosophy. History of philosophy from Descartes through Kant. No prer . Phil. 315-3. Ethical Theory. Selected problems in classical and contemporary ethical theory . Phil. 320-3. Social and Political Philosophy. A nonhistorical, systematic treatment of basic issues in social and political philosophy , with reference to theories of being , knowledge , and human nature. Phil. 328-3. Philosophy of Education . Phil. 335-3. Metaphysics. Phil. 336-3. Epistemology. Phil. 344-3. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.

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Phil. 350-3 . Philosophical Method. An e xamin a tion of ma j o r d iffering concept i ons o f the n a tur e a n d g oa l s o f philosophical i nq uir y and endeavor . Phil. 360-3. Philosophy of Religion . Nat ure o f r e lig i o n and m et ho ds o f studying it. Phil. 370-3 . Aesthetic Theory . Introduction to major theories o f aest h etics and con temporary d i scussions of prob l ems i n aesthetic s ; i.e., the nature o f art , the problem of evaluat i ons i n art . Phil. 389-3 . Oriental Philosophy. N o prer . Phil. 400-3 . Nineteenth-Century Continental Philosophy. Phil . 401-3 . Nineteenth-Century British Philosophy. Phil. 402-3. Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy. Phil. 403-3. Twentieth-Century Speculative and Idealistic Phi losophy. Phil. 404-3. Twentieth-Century Phenomenology and Existen tialism. Phil. 405-3. Studies in Contemporary Philosophy. Phil. 410-3. American Philosophy. Phil . 424-3 . Philosophical Problems and Contemporary Culture . Issues and cont r oversies in contemporary culture , their relation to modern theor ies of society , and their manifestat i o n s i n the arts , science and t echnology , educat ion, reli g ion, and ethics. No prer . Phil. 426-3. Philosophy of Law . Cons i derat ion of various v i ews o f the nature of l aw , i ts rol e i n soc i ety , and its relat ion to other disc i plines . Investigation of philosophic comm i tments which underlie and affect l egal concept i ons and procedu res. No prer . Phil. 427-3. Philosophy of History . Contemporary issues in cr i t i cal and speculative theory of history , i nclud i ng the problems of methodology , explanation , values , and the rel at i onsh i p between history and soc ial philosophy . Phil. 430-3. Philosophy of Mind . Cons i derat ion of the problems in the phi losophy of m ind, including t he m indbody p r oblem , the problem of our knowledge of other minds , the compatibility of free will and determinism , etc., and d i scussion of such concepts as act i on , i ntent ion, mot ive, des ire, enjoyme n t , memory , imagi nat ion, dream ing, self knowledge , etc . Phil. 443-3 . Logical Theory. Prer . , Phil. 144 or P hil. 344 , or consent of instructor . Phil. 444-3 . Intermediate Symbolic (Mathematical) Logic. P r e r., Phil. 344 or consent of instructor . Phil. 446-3. Theories of Human Nature. Phil. 449-3. Philosophy of Language . Phil. 473-3. Philosophy and Literature. Phil. 493-3. Existentialist Philosophies. Phil. 496-3. Senior Major Colloquium. Phil. 499-3 . Independent Study. SP A NISH Students who have completed a Level Ill high school Spanish course have automatically satisfied the Col lege graduation requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Spanish 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied Spanish in high school and wish to continue with the language w ill be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credits, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Information section of this bulletin. A major in Spanish consists of the following require ments : College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 27 1. A total o f 35 c r edit hours i n Spanish courses ( beyond Span ish 1 02), i nc luding the fo ll owing min i mum distribution: (a ) at least 9 hours in upper division courses primarily devoted to language theory and pract i ce (301302 , 401-402 , 495) ; (b) at least 8 hours i n upper d i vis i on literature courses i ncluding at least one course treating Spanish Pen i nsular literature and one treating Span i sh Amer i can l i terature ; (c) at least 12 hours in courses numbered 400 or above . 2 . A total of 6 hours in courses from one or more of the follow i ng areas : (a ) courses i n Latin Amer i can studies (e . g., h i story , political science , etc . ) , (b) courses in Mexican American Studies , (c ) linguistics , and (d) upper division courses in another foreign language or comparative literature . Students who entered the University before fall 1969 may choose to complete the current major program or the program in effect at the time of their first registrat i on . Students planning to acquire cert i fication for teaching at the secondary level should note that the School of Educati on ' will require Spanish 495 (Methods of Teaching Spanish) and that the 3 c r edit hours earned in that course will count toward the major and will be subject to the 48-hour maximum from one discipline allowed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the B . A . degree. This means that students who begin the major program with Spanish 101 and who intend to include secondary certification in their B . A . program must include Spanish 495 in their electives in Spanish . To be admitted to practice teaching of Spanish , majors must take the language skills tests of the Modern Language Association Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students of Spanish and make satisfactory scores . Students must see an adviser prior to registration for their final semester . Failure to do so may result in a delay of their graduation . Students considering entering graduate school for an advanced degree in Spanish , either at the University of Colorado or at any other institution , should see an adviser as early as possible since admission to a graduate program will depend to a great extent on courses taken in the major . It is strongly recommended that all majors include some study in a Spanish-speaking country in their major programs . Credit earned will normally count toward satisfaction of the major requirements, but the student should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to assure full transfer of credit. It should be noted that courses taken abroad and designated as Spanish will also be subject to the 48-hour maximum rule of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in study abroad should consult a member of the Spanish faculty or Professor James Wolf, Denver Campus representative for the International Education Office. Note: For comparative literature courses, see that section. Spanish 101-5. Beginning Spanish I. Spanish 102-5. Beginning Spanish II. Prer. , Span ish 101 or place ment. Spanish 211-3. Second-Year Spanish I. Prer., Spanish 102 or placement.

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28/ University of Colorado at Denver Spanish 212-3. Second-Year Spanish II. Prer . , Spanish 211 or placement. Spanish 301-3. Pronunciation, Diction, and Conversation . Prer., Spanish 212 , 211 (with grade A or 8), or equivalent. Spanish 302-3. Conversation and Oral Composition. Prer., Span ish 301 . Spanish 303-3. History of the Spanish Language in the Southwest. Spanish 304-3. Workshop in Southwestern Spanish. Spanish 314-3. Introduction to Literature. Prer., Spanish 212, 211 (with grade A) , or equivalent. Spanish 331-3. Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature . Prer. , Spanish 314 previously or concurrently . Spanish 332-3. Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature . Prer., Spanish 314 previous l y or concurrently . Spanish 333-3 . Spanish Literature: Middle Ages Through Golden Age. Prer., Spanish 314 and 6 hours of literature at the 300 level. Spanish 334-3 . Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Novel and Essay. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrent l y . Spanish 335-3. Spanish-American Novel and Essay to 20th Century. Prer., Spanish 314 previously or concurrently . Spanish 336-3. Spanish-American Poetry and Short Story . Prer., Spanish 314 and 3 hours of literature at the 300 level. Spanish 401/501-3. Advanced Rhetoric and Composition I . Prer., Spanish 302 . Spanish 402/502-3. Advanced Rhetoric and Composition II. Prer., Spanish 401. Spanish 414 / 514-2. Gaucho Literature. Spanish 417/517-3 . Readings in Spanish Literature. Spanish 418 / 518-3. Readings in Spanish-American Literature. Spanish 422 / 522-3. Mexican Literature. Spanish 430/530-3. Generation of 1898. Spanish 431 / 531-3. Spanish-American Literature: Independence Through Romanticism. Spanish 432/532-3. Spanish Literature Since the Spanish Civil War . Spanish 440 / 540-3. Romanticism in Spain. Spanish 441/541-3. Modernism . Spanish 450 / 550-3. Nineteenth-Century Spanish Novel. Spanish 451 / 551-3 . Contemporary Spanish-American Novel. Spanish 453 / 553-3. Golden Age Prose. Spanish 462/562-3. Don Quijote. Spanish 495/595-3. Methods of Teaching Spanish. Spanish 499/599-1 to 3. independent Study. Spanish 533-3. Golden Age Drama. Division of Natural and Physical Sciences PHYLLIS W . SCHULTZ , Assistant Dean The Division of Natural and Physical Sc iences includes the following disciplines: biology, chemistry , geog_raphy, geology, mathematics , physical education , phys1cs, and psychology. . d i vision offers a wide variety of programs of study wh1ch mclude undergraduate majors within a discipl ine, interdisciplinary programs , and preprofessional programs. It is possible to satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geography , mathematics , physics , and psychology. The description of the program of each discipline includes the requirements for a major within that discipline. Students enrolling in medical and health-related preprofessional programs should consult with the Health Sc i ences Committee of the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences at the beginning of their preprofessional education and at selected intervals thereafter . Appointments for advising must be made in the division office , Room 508 . The Health Sciences Committee has two main functions : (1) the counseling of students enrolled in various health-related programs: child health associate program , medical technology , physical therapy , predentistry , predental hygiene , premedicine , prenursing, and prepharmacy , and (2) evaluating each student' s abilities and making recommendations to the appropriate professional schools. Requirements for preprofessional programs are listed in the Preprofessional Programs section in this bulletin. Course options are available for the nonscience major. There are three sets of courses from which a student may satisfy the Division of Natural and Physical Sciences ' area r equirement of 12 semester hours . Any combination of these courses will satisfy the require ment. Set I , Topics in Science-133-1 , are modular courses designed for, but not limited to, majors outside of the natural and physical sciences. Each module carries 1 semester hour of credit and is offered in a 1 / 3-semester time block of five weeks, during which the course meets the equivalent time of three lectures a week . There are no prerequisites and each module is a self-contained unit designed to cover a given problem or topic in science in a unified way. It is recommended that the student take a single module during each five-week period with a maximum of three per semester. The topics will change from semester to semester and from year to year. The Schedule of Courses for each semester will give the list of current topics offered. (For general descriptions, see Topics in Science entries under each discipline invol ved.) Set II courses are one or two semesters in length and have no formal prerequisites . These include both intro ductory survey courses and special topics courses and are also usually designed with the nonscience major in mind. Set Ill includes all other natura l and phys ical science courses offered in the division. Although these courses are generally designed for the science major , they are open to students with the proper prerequisites. Description of Courses and Programs For information on scheduling of courses , consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day , time, and meeting place of classes.

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BIOLOGY A major in biology at both the bachelor ' s and master ' s levels may be completed on the Denver Campus. The undergraduate major in biology is designed to be as flexible as possible to allow each student, in consultation w i th a biology adviser, to build a program that meets his needs. Each student majoring in biology is required to take 17 hours of core biology courses: Bioi. 205,206 (General Biology I and II); Bioi. 341 (Prin ciples of Ecology) ; Bioi. 383 (General Genetics) ; and Bioi. 361 (Cell Biology). A minimum total of 32 hours in biology is required. The additional 15 hours of courses are to be selected in consultation with a biology adviser. All majors are required to take Chem . 103 , 106 (General Chemistry) and sufficient mathematics to prepare them selves to take Math . 140 (Analytic Geometry and Calc ulus I) in addition to the 32 hours in biology. It is advisable for the student to contact a biology adviser early in his academic career to plan his individual programs. Bioi. 133-1. Topics in Biology. Different five-week courses dealing with various topics in biology . See Schedule of Courses for the particular topics being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural sc i ence requirements . Bioi. 205-4. General Biology I. Study of the structure and function of living systems---<:ells , organ systems . organisms , and populations . Primarily intended for students majoring in science . Bioi. 206-4. General Biology II. Cont i nuation of B ioi. 205 . P rer., Bioi. 205. Bioi. 322-3. Essentials of Animal Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 2 semester hour s of lecture credit. An introduction to the essential s of animal phys i ology . Prer., one year of general biology and one year of general chemistry . Bioi. 325-4. Human Biology and Pathogenesis I. A study of normal structure , funct ion, ecology , and development of man as a biologically i ntegrated whole , culminating in a discuss ion of i ntrinsic and extrins ic biD-psycho -s ocio l ogical factors which : (1) lead to the development of d i sease and ( 2 ) are used i n response to threats of illness . Human be i ngs viewed as multi-leveled open systems subject to changing developmental and environmental i nfluences , and comprising various subsystems , whose i nteractions are responsible for or influence the meeting of bas i c biological needs . Prer., one year of general biology , general chemistry or c onsent of ins tructor. Bioi. 326-4 . Human Biology and Pathogenesis II. Continuation of Bioi. 325. Prer., Bioi. 325 . Bioi. 341-3. Principles of Ecology. Principles perta i ning to biological c ommunit ies, population interact ions and relations w ith the environ ment. Prer., one year of general b i ology . Bioi. 361-3. Cell Biology. A survey o f the interrelationships between cell structure and funct ion. P rer., one year of general bio l ogy . Bioi. 383-3. General Genetics. A survey course i ntroducing molecular , classical , developmental, and population genetics to the student who has a basic background in biology . Prer., one year of general biology. Bioi. 384-2. Laboratory in General Genetics. An experimental course designed to acquaint students w it h techniques used i n the study of genetics . Independent study projects and general laboratory exercises are included . Prer., one year of general biology. Bioi. 395-3. The Biosocial Development of Man. ( Psych . 395-3 ; Anthro . 395-3 . ) An interdisciplinary approach to the nature of man: his evolution , his biological makeup, his development as a social being , and his strateg ies for dealing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-discussion sections . Prer., one course in anthropology , biology , or psychology . Bioi. 410-3. Behavioral Genetics. (Psych . 410 3.) An i nterdis ciplinary course designed for any upper division student interested in the r e lationships between behav i or and heredity . Prer., consent of instructor . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 29 Bioi. 412-3. Quantitative Genetics. Survey of the pri nciples of genetics of quantitative tra i ts . Top ics include gene frequenc i es , effects of mutation , migration , and select ion; correlations among relat i ves , heritability , inbreed ing , crossbreeding , and selective breeding . P rer., one year of general b i o l ogy and Bioi. 383 . Bioi. 425-3. Comparative Psychology . (Psych . 425-3 . ) Behav ior of animals . S i milarities and differences among animals. P rinciples o f behavior in a variety of spec ies. Prer . , 6 hours of psychology or consent of i nstructor . Bioi. 427-3 . Environmental Physiology. One semester hour of lab credit and 3 semester hours of lecture credit. A consideration of physiological adaptations of both plants and animals to such environmental parameters as t emperature , light , and wate r . Prer. , one year of general biology , one year of chemistry and a course in physiology . Bioi. 438-3. Advanced Animal Behavior. ( Psych . 438 . ) Comparison of behav i or in a variety of spec ies, with emphasis on social behavior and i ts evolution . Prer., B ioi. 425 or consent of i nstructor . Bioi. 439-2. Laboratory in Animal Behavior . ( Psych . 439 . ) Labora tory projects and field observations of the behavior of animal s . Prer . or coreq., Bioi. 438 and consent of instructor . Bioi. 441-4 . Plant Ecology. Interactions of environmental fac tors upon plant communit ies. Emphasis on popu la t ion dynam ics and major ecosystems of North America . F ield study centers on methods of vegeta tion analysis . Prer. , one year of general biology . Bioi. 443-4. Animal Ecology. The environment , the ecosystem , and the animals in the m . Intra and inter-species relations, communities , migrations , food chains , natural balance , effect of man and his population pressures . Prer., one year of general biology , college zoology and botany . Bioi. 447-3 . Ecological Methods. Emp irical facets of ecologica l study . Emphas i s upon hypothesis testing and sampling techniques based on known environmental phenomena . Independent study of a field problem . Prer . , Bioi. 341 or equivalent. Bioi. 452-3 . Human Genetics. Basic principles of genetic phenomena evident in all life , w ith emphas i s on those princi ples operative i n humans . Heredity of man ' s normal and defect ive t r aits . Modes of inheritance , pedigree analysis , consanguinity , sex associated traits , chromosomal aberrations , mutat i ons and causes , karyotyping , multiple b irt hs , gene linkage studies , h i stocompat i bil ities , and metabolic disorders . Prer., one year of general b i o l ogy . Bioi. 461-4. Vertebrate Embryology. Development , stressing vertebrate animals from fertilized egg through organ systems, with introduction to exper i mental analysis . Prer. , one year of general b i ol ogy or college zoology . Bioi. 470-4 . Biometry. An intensive course in intermediate statistics with an emphasis on experimental design and analysiS . Top1cs incl ude statistical design of repeated measures, extensive of analysis of variance , correlation , regression, and nonparametnc tests. Use of computer processing is i ntroduced w ith some practice in computer work . Prer., one year of genera l b i ology , statistics , and two other b i ology courses . Bioi . 499-variable credit. Independent Study In Biology. Prer., open to seniors with consent of instructor . CHEMISTRY A major in chemistry at either the bachelor ' s or mas ter's levels may be completed at the Denver Campus . For graduation at the bachelor ' s level, students majoring in chemistry must present cred its in the follow ing courses or their equivalents: Chem . 103, 106 , 311, 341 ; 342 , 348 , 349, 412 , 413 , 451, 452 , 455 ; Phys . 111, 112 , 114 ; Math . 140 , 241, 242. In view of the current renumbering and reorganization of courses throughout the College , it is especially important that a student interested in the chemistry major consult a member of the chemistry faculty as his adviser . If this is done be fore the junior year , delays in graduation may thereby be avoided. A copy of the chemistry major ' s program may be obtained in Room 508 .

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30 / University of Colorado at Denver Qualified majors are strongly urged to participate in the Independent Study (Chem . 493) program. A chemistry adviser must be consulted before a Distributed Studies Program with chemistry as the primary field is undertaken . Such a program must include the following courses or their equivalent: Chem . 1 03 , 1 06 , 341, 342 and either 343 and 344 or 348 and 349 , 451. Thirty hours are required in chemistry . For further information , see the Distributed Stud ies Pro gram section of this bulletin . Students planning chemistry as a career should be familiar with the recommendations of the American Chemical Society for the professional training of chem ists . Among these recommendations are a reading knowledge of German or Russian, one semester of inorganic chemistry (Chem. 401 ), and two semesters of advanced work from the fo llow ing courses: Chem. 506 , 511, 512 , 531, 532 , and 559. Six hours of Chem . 493 will satisfy the special courses require ment. Further i nformation regarding these recommendations may be obta ined from the advisers. Students wishing to graduate w ith honors in chemis try should plan to do a minimum of two semesters (6 cred it hours) of research (Chem. 493) , ordinar ily start ing in the junior year . Additional requirements are listed under Honors Program i n this bulletin. Chern. 100-2. General Chemistry. Lect . For students with no prev ious chemistry or with inadequate background in chemistry . This course is in preparation for Chem . 103. P rer., working knowledge of one year of high sch ool algebra . Chern. 101-5. General Chemistry. Lect. , rec., and lab . A first course in chemistry intended p rimarily for prenurs ing, physical education , physical therapy , and other students wanting to fu lf ill cur riculum or natural science requirements . No previous knowledge of chem i stry is required . P r e r ., working knowledge of one year of high schoo l algebra. Chern. 102-5 . General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab . Co ntin uation of Chem . 101 w ith i ntroduct i on to organic and biochem istry for prenurs ing, phys ical education , physical therapy , and other stu dents wa nting such a course to satisfy curriculum or natura l sc i ence requirements. Prer., Chem . 101 or equivalent. Chern. 103-5 . General Chemistry. Lect., rec., and lab . A first college chemistry course for science majors , medical techno lo g ists , premedical, predental, and preveterinarian students . Prer., one year of high school chemistry or Chem . 1 00, and working knowledge of one year of high schoo l algebra . Chern. 106-5. General Chemistry. Lect. , rec . , and lab . Cont inua tion of Chem . 103 , including i onic equilibrium , types of bonding , transition metal chemistry , and s ome elementary quantitative analytical techniques . Prer., Chem . 103 or equivalent. Chern. 133-1. Topics in Chemistry. D i fferent 5 wee k course modules dealing with various top i cs in chemistry. See current Schedule of Courses for particular modules be ing offered . Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural sc ience requirement. Chern. 311-4. Quantitative Analysis. Two hrs . lect. and 6 hrs . lab . per wee k . Theory and practice of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Introd uction to separation techniques and instrumental methods of analysis. Prer., Chem . 106 . Chern. 341-3. Organic Chemistry I. A lect ure course d esigned as an introduction to the study of structure, react i ons, properties , and mechan isms of organic molecu l es . Chem . 34 3 lab . to be taken con currently by nonmajors . Chem . 348 lab . to be taken concurrently only by ma jors . Prer., Chem . 103 and 106. Chern . 342-3. Organic Chemistry II. A cont i nuation of Chem . 341. A lecture course designed as an int roduction to the st udy of structure , reactions , properties , and mechanisms of organic molecules . Chem . 344 lab . to be taken concurrently by nonmajors . Chem . 349 lab . to be t aken only by majors . Prer., Chem . 341 and 343. J Chern. 343-1. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. A labo ratory course to be taken concur r ently with Chem . 341 i llustrating in a practica l way the methods and princ i ples of organ i c chemistry . Prer., Chem . 103 and 106 ; coreq., Chem . 341. Chern . 344-1. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. A l aboratory course to be taken concurrently with Chem . 342 illustrating in a prac tica l way the methods and pr i n ciples of organic chem i stry . Prer. , Chem . 341 and 343 ; coreq., Chem . 342 . Chern. 348-2. Organic Chemistry Majors Recitation Laboratory I. A recitation and laboratory for chemistry majors enrolled in Chem . 341. Prer., Chem . 103 and 1 06; coreq., Chem . 341. Chern . 349-2 . Organic Chemistry Majors Recitation Laboratory II. A recitation and laboratory for chemistry majors enrolled in Chem. 342. Prer. , Chem . 341 and 348; coreq., Chem . 342 . Chern. 395-3. History of Chemistry. Lect. The development of chemistry as a modern science. Principles , philosophies , and people of chemistry will be explored as well as the relationship of chemistry to other sciences . Prer., upperclass standing. Chern. 401-3. Modern Inorganic Chemistry. Lect. An introduction to inorganic chemistry . Includes atomic theory and bonding , particularly of transition metal complexes , and the chsmistry of selected transition metal and main group elements . Prer., Chem . 452 , or consent of instructor. Chern. 412-3. Instrumental Analysis. Three hrs . lect. per week . Survey of instrumental methods of analysis . Emphasis on spectro photometry , electrochemistry, chromatography , and radiochemical techniques. Includes chem i cal equilibria and chemical literature . Chemistry majors must take Chem . 413 concurrently . Prer., Chem . 311, Phys. 114 , Chem. 342 , or consent of i nstructor . Chern. 413-1.1nstrumental Analysis Laboratory . Laboratory prac tice to accompany Chem . 412. Required of chemistry majors and open to other students i n Chem . 412. Coreq., Chem . 412. Chern . 451-3. Physical Chemistry. Lect. Applications of thermo dynamics to chem i stry . Includes study of the l aws of thermodynamics , thermochemistry , solutions , electrochemistry, chemical equilibria, and kinetics . Prer., Chem . 332 or 336 , Phys. 111, 112 , 1 14, Math. 242 . Chern. 452-3 . Physical Chemistry. Continuation of Chem . 451, with emphasis on quantum mechanics , molecular s t ructure , spectros copy , statistical mechanics , and additional topics of current interest. Prer., Chem . 451. Chern . 455-3. Experimental Physical Chemistry. One lect. and two 3-hour labs . per wk . Instruction in the experimental techniques of modern physical chemistry with emphasis on experiments illustrating the fundamental principles of chem ical thermod ynam ics, quantum chemistry , statistical mechan i cs , and chem ica l kinetics . For chemistry majors . Prer . , Chem. 418 ; prer . or coreq. , Chem . 452 . Chern. 481-3 . General Biochemistry. Three lect. per wk . Topics include structure , conformation, and propert i es of prote ins; enzymes : mechanisms and kinetics ; i ntermediary metabolism ; Krebs cycle , carbohydrates , lipids ; energetics and metabolic control ; and an intro duction to elect ron transport and p hotosynthesis . Pre r., one year of organic chemistry. Chern. 482-3. General Biochemistry. Continuation of Chem. 481. Topics include macromolecules ; metabo lism of nuc leic acids and nitrogen-containing compounds; biosynthes i s and funct ion of macro molecules i n cludin g DNA , RNA , and p roteins ; biochem istry of sub cellular systems ; and spec ial topics . Prer., Chem. 48 1 . Chern . 493-1 to 3 . Independent Study in Chemistry. Consent of instruct or r equired. COMPUTER SCIENCE ROLAND SWEET , Adviser Students in the College may enroll in courses in com puter science for College of Liberal Arts and Sciences credit. Mathematics majors may select an option in computer sci ence . C . S. 201-3 . Introduction to Computer Science. (E.E. 201. ) An elementary course in computer science covering computer program -

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ming methods . Fortran programm ing, numerical applications , and non-numerical applications . Prer., h igh school algebra , trigonometry , and geometry . C.S. 311-3. Computer Applications in Mathematical Sciences. An advanced Fortran course for scient i sts and eng i neers. Aspects of optimal programming with respect to various goals and examina tion of goals that are appropriate to given contexts . Prer., C . S . 201 and Math . 140 . C.S . 401-3.1ntroduction to Programming Languages and Proces sors. (E.E. 401. ) A study of programming languages and digita l processors . Conceptual aspects of p r ogramming languages , trans lators , data structures , hardware organ i zation , and system arch i tecture . Relationship of language fea t ures to processor features . Prer., E . E . 201 or C . S . 201. C.S. 453-3. Assembly Language Programming. (E. E . 453 . ) A lab oratory course i n programming at the mach ine code level. Lectures dea l with the o r ganization of the machine , its effect on the order code , and techniques for programming i n Assembly Language . Primary emphasis is on prepar ing and runn ing programs . Prer., C.S. 201, o r consent of instructor . C.S. 459-3. Computer Organization. (E.E. 459.) Th i s course is concprned with computer arithmetic units, memory systems , control systems , and input-output systems . The emphas i s i s completely on logic s tructure rather than electronic circu i try . Prer. , E.E. 257 o r equivalent. C.S. 465-3. Numerical Analysis I. (Same as Math. 465 . ) Solution of algebra i c and transcendental equat i ons . Solutions of linear and non l i near systems of equat i ons . Interpo l ation , i ntegration . Solution of ordi nary differential equations . Least squares . Sources of error and error analys i s . Computer implementat ion of numerical methods. Matrix eigenvalue problems and summation of infinite series . Prer., C . S . 201 and Math . 315 , or Math. 319 . C.S. 466-3. Numerical Analysis II. (Same as Math . 466 . ) Continua tion of C . S . 465 . Prer., C.S . 465 . GEOGRAPHY Students majoring in geography must complete the following basic courses or their equivalents: Geog . 100 , 101, 199 , 302 , and 306 . Distributed majors selecting geography as a primary or secondary subject should consult with the discipline adviser. Geography courses traditionally have emphasized the man-env ir onment relationship . Students interested in environmental problems will find the nonregional courses of particular value to their program. A number of these courses involve faculty from other disciplines and provide a general background on which more ad vanced work may be based . Man and His Physical Environment I, II, Ill is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduc tion to the physical env iron ment and evolution of the earth . They may be taken concurrently or in any order . Geog . 100-4 . Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geol. 100 . ) A general introduction to elements of weather, physical climatology , and world regional climate classification. Geog. 101-4 . Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geol. 101. ) Study of earth materials , features , and processes , and how they relate to man. Geog. 102-4 . Man and His Physical Environment Ill. (Geol. 102 . ) Study of structure of the crust of the earth , history of the earth , and development of life forms throughout geologic time . Includes Sunday field trips. Geog. 199-3 . Introduction to Human Geography. A systematic introd uct ion to the broad field of man-land relationships . Emphasis is placed on the patterns and forms of man ' s changing use of the land . Geog . 200-3 . World Regional Geography. The cultural distributions of the world . The relationships of man and the landscape based on broad divisions of cultural , ethnic, and geographic distributions in the world . College of Uberal Arts and Sciences /31 Geog. 305-3. Cartography I. Techniques of mapping var i ous distributions with emphasis on research and design . Geog. 306-3. Map and Air Photo Analysis. Introduction to the skills and reasoning ability needed to analyze and use maps and air photos as research tools . Elementary field techniques are introduced on two all-day Saturday field trips . Geog. 320-2. Descriptive Meteorology. Nonmathematical descrip tion of the structure and compos i tion of the earth ' s atmosphere ; heat balance , cloud formations , and wind c i rculation . Observationa l tech niques , including weather map analys i s and the meteorolog i cal satellite program . Geog. 332-3. Introduction to Soils. An i ntroductory suNey of the chemical and physical composition of soils . Emphasis on structure , soil moisture , soil chemistry , and fertility . Laboratory analys i s of mineral capacity, plant nutrients , and organic matter. Prer., Geog.-Geol. 101 or equivalent , Chern . 101 or equivalent , or consent of instructor . Geog. 360-3. Economic Geography: Primary Activities. An introduction to rural land use patterns and agricultural production . Geog. 361-3. Economic Geography: Secondary Activities. An introduction to location analysis of manufacturing activities . ' Geog. 370-3. Geographic Analysis of Issues in American Society. The geographic viewpoint , especially regional differentiation and systems models , applied to such socio economic concerns as pollution , poverty , racism , violence , and political reorganization . Geog. 384-3. Middle East. A physical , cultural , economic approach to the arid lands of the Middle East including Arab lands of the Sahara . Geog. 385-3. Far East. Regional suNey of the physical and cultural features characterizing the geography of the Far East. Emphasis on problems underlying future development and economic capabilities of South and East Asia . Geog. 386-3. Africa. A physical cultural approach to an understanding of man-land relationships on the continent ; changes in physical environment and cultural practices. Population and land-use problems . Geog. 387-3. Anglo-America. A regional suNey of the physical , econom i c , and cultural features of the United States and Canada . Emphasis upon the urban , economic , demographic , and environ mental problems in various regions of both countries . Geog. 400-3. Introductory Quantitative Methods in Geography. The application of statistical and other quantitative techniques to geographically organized data, areal distributions , and the solution of geographic research problems . Geog. 401-3. Methods of Regional Analysis. Examination of techniques for measuring regional economic structure and structural change . Application of shift share, input-output , multiplier , and interaction models to regional geographic research . Consideration of issues and problems associated with application of these techniques to urban and regional analysis. Prer., Geog . 361 or consent of i nstructor. Geog . 406-3 . Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photos. Interpretation of aerial photographs for research purposes . Emphasis on analysis of vegetation , land-forms, agriculture, and urban-industrial patterns. Prer. , Geog . 306 or consent of instructor . Geog. 420-3 . Microclimatology. Examination of microscale climatic patterns, with emphasis on the physical processes in the lowest layer of the atmosphere . The needs and responses of man, animals, and plants in the prairie, forest, and urban atmospheric environment will be examined, as will urban and regional planning implications of various microclimates . Prer., Geog . -Geol. 100 or consent of instructor. Geog. 421-3. Climatology. Analysis of energy exchange , temperature, wind, pressure, and atmospheric humidity as elements and controls le ading to an understanding of physical climatology . The Koeppen, Thornthwaite, and other systems are evaluated and applied to a suNey o f regional climates. Prer., Geog . 100 or equivalent. Geog. 431-4. Principles of Geomorphology. (Geol. 463 . ) Systematic study of weathering , mass-wasting, fluvial , wind , and marine processes and the landforms resulting therefrom . Prer. , Geog . -Geol. 101 or equivalent and elementary chemistry , or consent of instruc tor . Geog. 434-4. World Mineral Resources. (Geol. 494 . ) Nontechnical study of distribution , reseNes , and uses of mineral resources .

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32 / University of Colorado at Denver Geog. 441-3. Conservation Practice. introduction to various aspects of resources , environment , and population . Emphasis on food production, water, soil , and climate. Geog . 461-3. Urban Geography: Economic. An introduction to the horizonta l and vertical character isti cs of urban settlements . Includes the origin of cities , basic definitions of urban areas, central place theory , economic bases of towns , classif i cat ion of cities , and urban planning . Geog. 463-3. Transportation Geography. Concepts and theories leading to descr i ption and an understanding of the relat i onships between people , products , and transportation systems over space and time . Political, sociological , and env i ronmental impacts of transportation facilities w ill be examined . Geog. 465-3. Location Analysis of Human Activities. The study of spatial order in human use of the earth , emphasizing theories of locational structure and methods of analys i s . Geog. 473-3. Population Geography. Analysis of population dynam i cs , distributions , densities , and m i gration flows ; spatial relationships between population trends and variables with social , economic , and environmental factors . Geog. 499-1 to 3 . Independent Study. Independent research pr i mar ily for undergraduate major students . Prer . , consent of department. GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES Students majoring in the geological sciences must take the following courses within the discipline: Physical Geology (Geol. 207-208), Mineralogy (Geol. 301 ) , Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411) . Introductory Paleontology , Stratigraphy, and Petrology (Geol. 341, 342, 323) are recommended. In addition, students must take the following courses in allied fields : Chem . 103 , 106; Math. 140 , 241, 319 (or the equivalent Boulder Campus courses , Math. 130, 230); Phys . 111, 112, and 114. A less mathematical option that does not require structural geology and field geology is available to students who do not plan a career in the geological sciences. Physical Geology (Geol. 207, 208) and Mineralogy (Geol. 301) and Introductory Petrology (Geol. 323) are presently offered on the Denver Campus, as are the required courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Introductory Paleontology (Geol. 341) is offered occasionally . Structural Geology (Geol. 312), and Field Geology (Geol. 411) must be taken on the Boulder Campus in order to complete a career-oriented major in the geological sciences. Alternatively , a student may complete all the requirements for a distributed studies major and environmental sciences major, with emphasis in geology, on the Denver Campus. Man and His Physical Environment I, II, Ill is a series of three courses designed to provide a broad introduction to the physical environment and evolution of the earth . They may be taken concurrently or in any order. Geol. 100-4. Man and His Physical Environment I. (Geog . 100 . ) A general introduction to elements of weather , physical climatology , and world regional climate classification . Geol. 101-4. Man and His Physical Environment II. (Geog . 1 01. ) Study of earth materials , features, and processes , and how they relate to man. Includes Sunday field trips . Geol. 102-4. Man and His Physical Environment Ill . (Geog . 102 . ) Study of structure of the crust of the earth , history of the earth , and development of life forms throughout geologic time . Includes Sunday field tr ips. Geol. 207-4, 208-4. Physical Geology and Geophysics. Genera l i ntroduction to geologic processes of the earth ' s surface and interior . Physical properties of the earth as a planet. Intended for students desiring major work in the geological sciences . Includes three Sunday field tr ips per semeste r . Prer., two yea r s of high school sc i ence or mathemat i cs and sc i ence . ( Students may follow Geol. 1 01 with Geol . 208 if they w ish addit i onal work in geophys i cs and internal processes , or they may begin the 207 208 sequence with Geol. 208 , w ith consent of the instructor . ) Geol. 301-4. Mineralogy. Principles of minera l ogy , i ncluding crystallography , crysta l chemistry , and a systematic study of the more i mportant nonsilicate and sil i cate minerals. Origins and occurrences of minerals . Prer., phys i ca l geology and college-leve l chemistry, or consent of instructor . Geol. 323-4. Introductory Petrology. An introduction to the classification , d i strib u tion , and orig i n of i gneous, metamorphic and sedimentary r ocks , i nclud ing their identificat ion in hand specimens . Prer., physical geology and mineralogy . Geol. 341-4 . Introductory Paleontology. The study of fossils , including a survey of the organic world and its history in the geologic past. Includes invertebrates , protista , vertebrates and plants , an i ntroduct ion to evolution and paleoecology , and discuss ion of the uses of fossils in geologic correlation . P r e r., i ntroductory geology or b i ology . Offered occas i onally . Geol. 425-3. Groundwater. Occurrence , movement, and problems of pollution of subsurface water and the h ydrologic properties of water bearing materials . P r er., Geol. 101 ( Geog . 101) or consent of instructor. Geol. 463-4 . Principles of Geomorphology. ( Geog . 431.) Systematic study of weathering , mass wasting , fluvia l , wind and marine processes , and the landforms r esulting the r efrom . Prer., elementary geology or equivalent and e l ementary chem i stry , or consent of i nstructor . Offered occasionally . Geol. 494-4 . World Mineral Resources . ( Geog . 434 . ) Nontechn i ca l s tudy o f d i str i bution , r eserves , and uses of m i nera l r e s ources . MATHEMATICS A major in mathematics can be completed by students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences by satisfying all of the following requirements , completing each of the required courses with a qrade ofC or better: 1. At least 30 semester hours of mathematics courses . 2 . At least 18 semester hours of mathematics courses numbered above 300 , approved by adviser , and excluding Math . 383 , 427 , 428 , 429, 495 , 496 and 497 . 3 . Math. 140,241,242,300,314, and 315. 4. Either Math . 431-432 or Math. 321-422 . Students who plan to do graduate work in mathematics should take Math. 431-432; students who wish to obtain a secondary teaching certificate are encouraged to complete Math. 321-422; students planning to major in mathematics must see an adviser from that discipline . Students who choose the computer science option in the mathematics major are required to take the following courses , all with grades of C or better: Math. 140 , 241, 242 Math. 300 , 314 , 315 Math. 431, 432 Math. 443 Math. 481 C.S . 201 c . s . 311 c . s . 401 C .S. 453 C . S . 465 (Math . 465) c . s . 546 Variations in these courses must be approved by a mathematics adviser .

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At the graduate level , master ' s degrees are available in mathematics , applied mathematics , and basic sci ence (mathematics opt i on) . The Department of Mathematics offers a Teaching Internship Program which consists of three phases as follows : Phase 1 . A junior-level student who is majoring in mathematics or applied mathematics , and who shows promise as a teacher , is sponsored by a member of the full-time faculty of the department. A freshman-level course is then assigned to the student , on an hono rarium basis , with the understanding that the faculty member will attend all sessions of the course. The stu dent will thus be acting as an intern and will be provided with a critique of his performance after each lecture . It is the interested student's task to convince a faculty member that he or she should sponsor the student. No faculty member is required to perform this function nor is any compensation afforded to the sponsor for so doing. Phase 2 . After completion of one or two semesters of fully supervised classroom exposure, and upon the student's entry into the senior year of study , the faculty sponsor may recommend that the intern be accepted as an undergraduate teaching assistant. With approval of the mathematics faculty, the student will then be as signed broader responsibility for one (or at most , two) freshman courses, with the faculty sponsor exercising such supervision as may appear appropriate under in dividual circumstances. Phase 3 . Upon completion of a baccalaureate pro gram the intern hopefully would be prepared to accept a graduate teaching assistantship in the department , or in a related interdisciplinary area, as the next step in his or her professional career. ' No student may earn more than 9 hours credit in mathematics courses numbered below 140. Math . 101-3. College Algebra. A course inten ded for precalculus students who are not prepared to take Math . 140 d ir ectly . Topics covered indude set concepts , functions includin g exponent ial and logarithmic , systems of equations and inequalities including elements of matrices , and polynomia ls . Prer., 1V2 years of high school algebra , one year of plane geometry, and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meeting of class : Math . 102-3 . College Trigonometry. A course intended for precal culus students who are not prepared to take Math . 140 directly . Includes trigonometric functions and their values and graphs , r i ght angle trigonometry , ident i ties and equations , i nverse trigonometric functions , the law of sines and the law of cosines and applications , complex numbers , comple x roots of equations, De Moi vre ' s theorem and roots of complex numbers , and elements of complex algebra . Prer. , 1112 years of high school algebra , one year of plane geometry , and a satisfactory score on the placement test to be given at the first meet ing of class: Math. 107-3. Algebra for Social Science and Business . Logic , set theory , permutations , combinations , probability , matrix algebra . Does not prepare students for Math . 140 . Prer . , one year high school algebra . Math . 108-3. Polynomial Calculus . A one-semester course in the calcu lus . No knowledge of trigonometry or analytic geometry is pre supposed . Intended especially for social science and business stu dents and for the general liberal arts student. Those planning to take more tha n one semester of calculus should take Math. 140 instead of Math . 1 08 . Prer., 1 V2 years high school algebra . 'Students w ithout prerequisites are advised (and w ith an unsatisfac t ory plac e m e n t t e st sc ore w ill be dir ected) to consider enrollment in pre-college courses D . C .E. 350 , 351, 353, a n d 354, as needed , t hrou g h t he Divis i on o f C o n tinuing E ducatio n . College of Uberal Arts and Sciences/33 Math . 133-1 . Topics in Mathematics. D iff erent five-week course modules dealing with various topics in mathematics . See current Schedule of Courses for the particular topics being offered . Designed for n onsc i ence ma jors to fulfill the natura l science requ ir ement. Math. 140-3. Analy1ic Geometry and Calculus I. Basic concepts from plane analytic geometry , elements of vector algebra ; i ntuitive introduction to limits, continuity , different i ability , and integrabili ty , elem ent ary applications of differentiation and integration . Replaces Math . 130 . Students with credit in Mat h . 1 08 w ill rece ive no credit for Math . 140. Math . 102 may be taken concurrently with Math . 140 . Prer., Math . 101 and 102. Math. 241-3. Analy1ic Geometry and Calculus II. The second of a three-semester sequence ( Math . 140 , 241, 242) i n cal culus. This course deals with i nverse functions , trig and inverse trig functions , log , exponential , and hyperbolic trig functions . Also inclu des the Fundamental Theore m of the Calcu lus , Rolle ' s Theorem , the mean value theorems , met hods of integration and polar coordinates . Prer . , Math . 140 . Math . 242-3. Analytic Geometry and Calculus Ill. The third of a three-semester sequence ( Math . 140 , 241, 242) . This course deals with infinite series , the intermed iate value theorems , L ' Hosp i tal ' s Rule and indeterminate forms ; Taylor ' s and Maclaurin ' s series, i ncluding series definitions of transcendental functions . Prer., Math . 241 or consent of department. Math. 300-3. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics. The student learns to prove and critique proofs of theorems by studying elementary topics i n abstract mathemat ics , i ncluding such necessary basics as logic , sets , functions , equiva lence relat i ons , etc . Prer., Math . 241 or consent of instructor . Math. 303-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. Designed to help p rovi de appropr iat e mathematical background to teach K 6 mathematics . This is not a methods course but each topic is related to the elementary curriculum through con curr ent examination of relevant text and la boratory ma terials as each topic is studied . Topics include sets , the concept of number , place value numeration and associated algorithms , the structure of the natural numbers , the i ntegers , and the rati onal numbers. Applicat ions and problem solving are included . Carries credit only for elementary education majors . Math. 304-3. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 11. Designed to meet object i ves as described for Math . 303 above . Topics i nclude intui t ive ano l ogical development of geom etric i deas relevant to K-6 curriculum ; meas urem ent of length , ar ea , volume , mass , angle , temperature, and time ; stress is on the metric system ; further study of the rational number system ; applications and problem solving . Carries cre d it only for elementary educat ion majors . Prer., Math. 303 or con sent of instructor . Math. 314-3.1ntroduction to Modern Algebra. Groups , rings , fields , polynomials . Prer . , Math . 300 . Math. 315-3. Introduction to Linear Algebra. Systems of linear equations, vector spaces , matr i ces , determinants . Prer., Math . 314 . Students cannot receive credit for both Math . 315 and 319 . Math. 319-3. Applied Linear Algebra . Designed primar ily for majors i n appl ied science and engineering . Topics include matrix algebra , determinants , matrix i nversion , rank and equivalence of matrices , systems of linear equat i ons , and matrix cal culus . Prer., Math . 241 w ith grade of C or better . Students cannot receive credit for both Math . 315 and 319 . Math. 321-3. Higher Geometry I. Ax iomati c systems. The foundations of Euclidean and Lobachevsk ian geometr ies. Prer., Math . 241 with grade of C or better. Math. 352-3 . Computable Functions. Turing computers, computable funct ions, alternate formulations of computable functions, the halt i ng problem and noncomputable functions . Church ' s thes i s , universal machines , Godel ' s i ncompleteness theorem, and undecidable theor ies. Prer., college algebra or consent of instructor . Math. 383-3 . Introduction to Statistics. Study of the elementary statistical measures . Introduction to statistical distributions , statistical in ference , and hypothesis testing . Prer., college algebra or equivalent. Not for mathematics majors .

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34/ University of Colorado at Denver *Math. 403-3. Introduction to Topology. Met ric spaces and topo logical spaces ; homotopy and homology in simplicial complexes . Prer., Math . 300 o r consent of i nstructor. * Math. 411-3. Theory of Numbers. Divisibility , gre a te st common divisor, prime numbers, fundamental theorem of ar it hmetic, cong rue nces and other topics . Prer., Math . 300 or consent of instructor . Math. 412-3. Topics in Mathematics. Special topics in mathematics will be covered. Students should check the current Schedule of Courses to obtain the topics to be covered as well as the prerequisites . With permission , this course may be taken for credit more than once . Math. 413-3, 414-3. Advanced Finite Mathematics I, II. Prer., one semester of calculus . Math. 422-3. Higher Geometry II. An i ntroduction to the study of synthetic projective geometry. The relation of the project ive and affine planes . Coordinates in the projective plane . Prer . , Math . 321. Math. 426-3. Elementary Differential Geometry. Different ial forms in Euclidean 3 -s pace , vector fields , frame fields, Frenet formulas , calculus of differential forms on surfaces , geometry of surfaces , Gaussian curvature , second fundamental form . Prer., Math . 315 , Math . 432, or consent of instru ctor . Math. 427-3. Mathematical Tools for Urban Planning. Development of the fundamental techniques of applied quantitative methods . This course covers those topics required for the two subsequent quantitative methods courses, Math . 428 and Ma th. 429 . Math. 428-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods I. Matrix algebra related to model building and linear and nonlinear programming leading to a study of the Theory of Games with applications in engineering and other applied areas such as planning, transportation and environmental problems . Prer . , Math . 427 and consent of i nstructor . Math . 429-3. Mathematical Foundations of Quantitative Methods II. Parametric and nonparametric statistics which treat stat i stics in a Dec isi on Framework (includes introduction to Decision Theory . ) Bayesian Statistics and applications w it h exercises in probability representat i ve o f s i mple probabilistic models (e. g., Queueing , single-server models , etc . ) . Prer., Math . 427 or consent of instructor . Math. 431-3. Advanced Calculus I. Calculus of one variable , the real number system , continu it y , differentiation , i ntegration (possibly Riemann-Stieltjes) . Prer., Math . 241 and Math . 300 . Math. 432-3. Advanced Calculus II. Sequences and series , convergence , uniform convergence ; Taylor ' s theorem ; calculus ot several variables including continuity , different iatio n and integration; Picard ' s theorem in ordinary differential equat i ons and Fourier series if time permits . Prer., Math . 431. Math. 433-3. Advanced Calculus Ill. Vector fields, implicit function theorem , inverse function theorem ; Green ' s , Stokes ' and divergence theorems ; Taylor ' s theorem for functions of several variables ; calculus on manifolds if time permits. Prer., Math . 432 or consent of instructor , and Math . 313 or 319 . Math . 437-3. Advanced Calculus for Engineers I. Vector analysis ; vector calculus, including divergence , curl , Green ' s theorem , Stokes ' theorem , and the d iverg ence theorem . Tensor analysis . Prer., Math . 319 . Math. 438-3. Advanced Calculus for Engineers II. Fourier series, Laplace transforms, Gamma and Beta functions , Bessel ' s functions, and other special functions . Prer., Math . 443. Math. 443-3. Ordinary Differential Equations. Elementary systematic introduction to linear nth order differential equations , including equations with regular singular points . Existence , uniqueness, and successive approximations of solutions for linear and nonlinear equat ions . Prer., Math. 242 . Math. 445-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists I. Topics inc lude complex algebra , Cauchy -Riemann equations , Laurent expansions , theory of residues , complex integration, and introduction to conformal mapping . Technique and applicability are stressed . Prer. , ordinary differential equations . Math. 446-3. Complex Variables for Engineers and Scientists II. A continuation of Math . 445 , with coverage dependent partly on the interests of the class. Topics include Schwartz-Christofel transformations and thorough development of techniques of conformal mappings . Solution of boundary value problems will be emphasized . Prer., Math . 445 . Math. 447-3. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations I. Boundary value problems for the wave, heat, and Laplace equations ; separation of variables method , eigenvalue problems , Fourier series , orthogonal systems . Prer., Math . 443 . Math. 448-3. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations II. Continuation of Math . 447. Boundary value problems , i nitial value problems , e igenvalue problems in higher dimensions , Sturm-Liouville problems , Fou rier and Laplace transform , approximat i on methods . Prer. , Math . 447 . Math. 449-3. Tensor Analysis for Engineers and Scientists. Review of vector concepts . Indicia! notation, oblique coordinates , generalized coordinat es , summation conventions . Contravariant and covariant tensors . Tensor algebra and tensor calculus . The course is designed primarily to familiarize the professional the foundations of this useful subject rather than to develop detailed applications . Prer., different ia l equations and matrix analysis . * Math. 451-3.1ntroduction to Mathematical logic. Sentential logic and first order logic . Completeness theorems. Prer., Math . 300 with a grade of C or better . * Math. 453 -3. Boolean Algebra. Axioms , subalgebras , ideals, direct and free products , free algebras , representation theorem , comp le tions. Prer., Math . 314 . * Math. 455-3. Set Theory. Axioms of set theory , algebra of sets , card i nal numbers , ordinal numbers, axiom of choice and continuum hypothesis. Prer., Math . 300 . Math. 456-3. Laplace Transforms for Engineers and Scientists. Topics include the general methods , transforms of special functions , heaviside expansion theorems, transforms of per i odic functions , convolution integrals, the i nverse transforms , and so luti ons of ordinary and partial different ial equations . Prer., ord inary differential equations . Math. 457-3. Theory of Equations. A study of the class i cal theory of equations, including such top i cs as higher degree polynomials and their zeroes, symmetric funct i ons of polynomial coeff ici ents ; gene ral solution of the cubic and quartic equations ; resultants , and elementary graphical analysis . Prer. , Math. 242. Math. 458-3 . Calculus of Variations for Engineers and Scientists. Techniques and applications of the powerful tools of the variational calculus will be developed and both classical and modern optimizat i on problems will be attacked . Prer. , ordinary and partial differential equations . Math. 461-3. Analog Computation and Simulation. (Same as E . E . 450.) Analog computing techniques including time and amplitude scaling , and programming of linear and nonlinear d iff erential equations. Simulation of dynamic systems, iterativ e analog computing. Laboratory work on an analog machine is required . Digital simulation languages are stud i ed . P rer. , ordinary differential equations and familiarity with Laplace transforms. Math. 465-3. Numerical Analysis I. (Same as C . S . 465.) Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations . Solutions of linear and non linear systems of equations . Interpolation , i ntegrat ion. Solution of ordinary different ial equations. Least squares . Sources of error and erro r analysis . Computer implementation of numerical methods . Ma trix eigenvalue problems and summation of i nfinite ser ies. Prer. , C . S . 201 and Math . 315 , or Math . 319 . Math. 466-3. Numerical Analysis II. (Same as C . S . 466 . ) Continua tion of Math . 465 . Prer., Math . 465 . Math. 467-3. Computer Techniques in Engineering. (Same as E . E . 455 . ) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in engineering and science . Those methods suitable for solution by high-speed dig ital computers are emphasized . Prer., E . E . 201 and Math . 443 . Math. 468-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists I. Tchebychev approximations, approximation by rational functions , linear and nonlinear , regression analysis , applications of interpolating polynomials , economic value , and cost analysis. Comparisons of estimation and approximation techniques , and other related topics . Prer., th i rd-semester calculus and one course in statistics . "This is one of several courses offered alternately by UCD and Metropolitan State College . See appropriate Schedule of Courses.

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Math. 469-3. Estimation Theory for Engineers and Scientists II. A continuation of Math. 468. Selected topics w ill be developed extensively in accordance with the needs of the class . With the consent of the department, students may register for this course more than once . Prer., Math . 468 or consent of instruct or. Math. 470-3. Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics . (Educ. 455. ) Problems in teaching mathematics incl uding objectives , sequence of topics, methods of presentation , materia l s , testing , and recent curricular developments . Prer. , Math . 241 . Carrie s credit only for students in secondary education . Math . 472-3 : History Mathematics. A history of the devefopment of mathematical techn1ques and ideas from early civilization to the present , including the interrelationships of mathematics and sciences . Prer . , Math . 140. Math. 481-3. Introduction to Probability Theory. Ax ioms, combinatorial analysis, independence and conditional probab ility, discrete and absolutely continuous distributions , expectation and distribution of functions of random variables , laws of large numbers , central limit theorems, simple Markov chains . Prer. , Math . 241 . Math . 482-3. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Point and confidence interval estimation. Principles of maximum likelihood , sufficiency , and completeness; tests of simple and composite hypothesis , linear models and multiple regression analysis . Analysis of variance distribution free methods . Prer., Math . 481 . Math . 493-2, 494-2. Hon o rs Seminar . Intended for candidates for departmental honors and other superior students. Topics covered vary from year to year. Student participation is stressed. Math. 495-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Elementary Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered . Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs. Students may register for this course more than once with consent of appropriate departmental adviser . Prer., consent of department. Math. 496-1 to 5. Workshop in Teaching Middle School Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered . Course content designed in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs . Students may register f or this course more than once with consent of app ropriate departmental adviser . Prer., consent of department. Math. 497-1 to 5 . Workshop in T each ing Secondary Mathematics. Variable credit depending upon specific topics covered . Course content des igned in consultation with groups of practicing teachers who desire courses to meet their specific needs . Students may registe r for this course more than once with conse nt of appropriate departmental adviser. Prer., consent of department. Math. 499-1 to 3 . Independent Study . Var iable credit depending upon the student's needs . This course is listed for the benefit of the advanced student who desires to pursue one or more top i cs in con sider able depth . Supervision of a full-time faculty member is necessary , and the dean ' s office must concur . Students may register for this course more than once with departmental approval. Prer. , consent of department. PHYSICAL EDUCATION A basic activity program in physical education i s available for nonmajo r s . Although physical education credit is not required for completion of the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts degree , a maximum of 8 hours of elective credit consisting of activity courses may be applied toward the graduat ion requirement of 120 hours . Activity classes 102 through 213 may be taken on an elective basis . One course may be taken each semester and a specific act i vity may be counted f or credit only once. The student w ill have the opt ion of being graded by letter grade or pass / fail. 'This is one of several courses offered anernately by UCD and Metropolitan State College . See appropr iate Schedule of Courses . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /35 The basic activity program i s designed to offer students a wide variety of recreational activities stressing sports that have lifetime carry-over value. The discipline of physical education does not offer a major in physical education or recreation. However , a variety of courses are offered which are the equivalent of those given on the Boulder Campus for majors . It is possible over a four-year period to take the majority of the courses required for the major on the Denver Campus. For information on the majors program , and the grad uate program in physical education and recreation , contact the discipline representative on the Denver Campus . P.E. 133-1. Topics in Physical Education. Different five week course modules dealing with various topics i n physical education and recreation . See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement. P . E . 293-2. Personal Livin g . Maintenance and improvement of health . P.E. 295-2. Community Health. Communicable diseases and their relations to public health . The germ theory of disease , infection and immunity , vaccines , toxoids antitoxins , and hereditary defects . An investi gat ion of community health services. P.E. 296-2. First Aid . Knowledge and sk ills of emergency treatment for common accidents and ill nesses . Leads to the Amer ican Red Cross Advanced Certification . Rec. 332-2. Wilderness Camping Practlcum. Designed in three stages , providing opportunities for group and solo wilderness camping . Add iti onal fee required. P.E. 370-3. Society and Sport. A study of the socio lo gical foundations of physical education with emphasis upon the social structure of sports groups , the dynamics of sports groups , risk-taking in sports , and sports in their relationship to soci'alization of individuals and groups . P.E. 420-2. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. Policies and practices used in the development of sound physical education practices . Rec. 431-2. Program Planning in Recreation . To acquaint the student with the basic pr i nciples in developing a well -r ounded recreation program with specific objectives . Rec. 4352. Organization and Evaluation in Recreation . The study of organizational structures of the several types of recreational services and evaluati on techniqu e s used to determine the effectiveness of these structures as related to admin is tration of programs , polic ies, and the public . Rec. 437-2 . Management of Parks and Recreation Facilities . Lect. , field work, and lab . experience in park and recreation administration . Problems i n management , finance, and evaluation of park and recreation facilities. Rec. 438-2 . Maintenance of Park and Recreation Facilities. Lect. , field work , and la b . experience in maintenance o f parks and recreation facilities . Problems in planning , s c heduling, and performing operations for public use. PHYSICS Required of all physics majors are Phys. 111, 112 , 114 , 213 , 214 , 215 , two years of calculus , and one year of another science . Majors preparing for graduate study in physics should c;1lso take Phys . 317, 321, 322 , 331,

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36 / University of Colorado at Denv er 332 , 341, 491, 492 , and 495 , and additional mathematics courses. Students not going to graduate school in physics or wishing an interdiscip l i nary physics major must consu l t an adviser for the suitable additional program . An acoustical option is currently being developed . Students should also be aware of the eng ine ering physics major available through the Col lege of Engineering and Applied Science. Several new interdisciplinary programs involving physics are currently being considered, i ncluding environmental science , geophysical s ystems, and chemical physics. Students interested in these programs should take the intr oduc tory calc ulu s physics sequence as soon as possible, and consul t an adviser for the latest status of these prog rams . Two curriculum developments expected within a year are the addition of a two-semester sequence course , Physics for the Life Sciences (tent ativ ely Phys . 251 and 252), and the extension of Phys . 362 (Sound, Music and Noise) to a two-semester sequence with the addition of Phys. 364 . Phys. 105-4 . General Astronomy. The methods and results of modern astronomy (solar system, stars, galaxies , cosmology) at an elementary level. Phys. 106-4. General Astronomy. Continuation of Phys . 105 . Prer . , Phys . 105. Phys. 111-4. General Physics. F i rst semester of 4-semester sequ ence for science and engineering students . Covers vectors, kinematics, dynamics , momentum of particle s and r igid bod ies, work and energy, gravitation, simple harmonic motion , and introduction to thermodynamics . Prer., knowledge of algebra , geome try and trigonometry; Coreq., calculus through derivatives and indef inite and def . inite inte grals of polynomials and trigonometric functions , as typ1cally covered in Math . 140 . Phys . 112-4. General Physics. Covers electr i city and magnetism . Prer., Phys. 111; Coreq., Math . 241. Phys. 114-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following Phys. 112 4 . One 2-hour lab. per wk . Phys. 133-1. Topics in Physics . Different 5 week course modules dealing with various topics in physics . See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modules being offered. Des igned for nonsc i ence majors to fulfill the natural science requirement. Phys . 199-variable credit. Independent Study for Lower Division. Phys. 201-5, 202-5. General Physics . Four demons tration lect. and one lab . per wk. Phys . 201 : mechanics, heat , and sound ; Phys . 202 : light , and modern physics . An elementary but thorough pr esentation of the fundamental facts and principles of physics. Majors in mathematics , chemistry, and o thers taking ca lculus are urged to take Phys . 111, 112 , 114 , 213 , and 215 . Prer., 1 Y2 years high school algebra and satisfactory grade on mathematics placement test. Phys. 213 -3. General Physics. Covers wav e motion, phys ical optics , and introduction to special relativity, quantum theory, and atomic phys i cs . Prer. , Phys . 112 and 114. Phys. 214-3.1ntroductory Modern Physics . To be taken by physics major s and inte r ested nonmajors . Introd uce s students to the nature o f modern physics and provides majors with per spective on the frontiers of this field . Emphasis on concepts without mathemat i cal developments . Includes relativity , atomic and nuclear physics , solid state and particle physics . Prer., Phys . 213. Phys. 215-1. Experimental Physics. To be taken concurrently with or following P hys. 213 . One 2-hour lab . per wk. Phys. 307-3 . Physical Environmental Problems. Current enviro nmental problems from the viewpoint of the physical sciences . Sources , effects , d etect ion, and control of air , water, noise , radiation , and heavy metal pollutions . Factors affecting traffic movemen t and safety , and transportation alternatives which produce less pollution . Some lectures by outside e xperts. This course and Phys. 308 are designed as a complementa ry sequence but may be taken separately . Prer. , one year of college science or mathematics . Phys. 308-3. Energy. Thi s course will examine the central role of energy in our environment. Topics will include t h e macroscopic flow of energy in the world , the conve r sion and degradation of energy , thermal pollution, and energy resources and consumption . Energy will be examined as an env i ronmental problem and for its utility in solving problems . The implications of energy as a limit to population will be discussed. This course is designed to compleme nt Phys. 307, but may be taken separately. Prer., one year of college science or mathematics . Phys. 317-2 , 318-2. Junior Laboratory. Contains experiments on data handling, electrical measurements , electron ics , optics , vacuum techniques , heat and thermodynamics , mechanics , and modern physics. Emphasis will be on de v eloping bas i c ski lls and on design of experiments . Each student will carry at least one project experiment each semester. Coreq., Phys . 321, 331, or consen t of instr uctor . Phys . 321-3 . Classical Mechanics and Relativity. Topics covered include : Newtonian mechanics, spec i al relativity , oscillations , Lagrange ' s and Hamilton ' s equations, central forces , and scattering . Analytical procedures employing the methods of vector analysis and calculus will be stressed . Prer. , Phys. 214 and A.Math . 232 , or equivalent. Phys . 322-3. Classical Mechanics , Relativity , and Quantum Mechanics. Topics covered include : noninertial reference frames , rigid body mot ion , coupled oscillators , intro duct ion to quantum mechanics , Bohr theory , si mple solutions to Schroedinger equation , and perturbation theory . Prer., Phys . 321. Phys . 331-3 , 332-3 . Principles of E lectricity and Magnetism. Elements of mathematical theory of electricity and magnetism , including magnetostatics , electrostatics, polarized med i a , direct and alternating current theory , and introduct ion to electromaanetic fields and waves . Prer., for Phys . 332: Phys . 331; Coreq . for Phys. 331: Phys . 321. Phys. 341-3. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. Statistical mechanics applied to macroscopic physical systems ; stat i stical thermodynamics , classical thermo dynam i c systems ; applications to simple systems. The relationship of the statistical to the thermodynamic points of view is examined . Prer., Phy s.213. Phys. 362-3. Sound , Music , and Noise. Th i s course w ill consider the basic nat ure of sound waves , the musical scale, why musical instruments sound the way they do, the reproduction of sound , the ear and hearing, vocal commun i cation , room acoustics , noise pollution , and the sonic boom . No prer . Although this course is mainly descriptive , some high school algebra w ill be used . Phys . 363-1 . Sound Laboratory . Laboratory course to accompany Phys . 362 as an option . Students w ill do an acoustical project on a subject of their own choice . Coreq . or prer., Phys . 362 or consent of inst ructor . Phys. 390-3. Development of Physics from the 17th Century. This course examines the history and dev elopm ent of the i mportant theories of phys ics from the time of Newton to the present day . The broad concepts and the peop l e who or i g i nated them are stressed , rather than the mathematical details . Prer., Phys. 105. Phys. 429-variable credit. Psychophysics Methods and Re search . Thi s course covers the methodology of psyc hophysics by involving students in actual research in perception, with occasi onal seminars on techniques and data analysis . Prer., P sych . 416 or Phys . 363 and 364 , and a knowledge of statistical analysis . Phys. 431-3. Introduction to Radiat ion and Health Physics. Designed to introduce students to the physics of ioniz ing radiation (nuclear emissions and X -rays) and their applications . Sub jects will include detection techniques , error analysis , hal f life det erminations , instrument design and calibration , and a brief st udy of the chemical and biological effects . An i ntegral laboratory is i ncluded . Prer. , Phys. 213 , 215 , and two semesters of ca lcu lus , general chem i stry , and general biology . Phys . 451-3 . Light. Bas ic electromagnetic theory of light using Maxwell' s equations . Examples in geometrical opt i cs ; extensive applications in phys i cal optics including diffraction and polarization . Spectra, inclu d ing Zeeman effect and fluorescence. Recent advances in experim ental techniques ; microwaves , optical masers , i mage converters , etc . P rer., Phys . 332.

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Phys. 465-3. Creative and Cultural Aspects of Physics. One of two independent courses (with Phys . 466) dealing with the interplay between physics and culture . It examines the lives and works of individual scientists and the relationship of physical theory to culture and creativity . Prer . , upper division standing . Phys. 466-3 . Art, Science, and Technology. One of two independent courses (with Phys . 465) dealing with the inter play between physics and culture. It examines the relationship between physics and art , and the possibilit ies of art based on science and technology . Prer., upper division standing. Phys. 491-3,492-3. Atomic and Nuclear Phys ics. Topics include a quantum mechanical treatment of the one electron atom , atomic shell structure , atomic and molecular spectroscopy , band theory of solids, X-rays , nuclear properties , radioacitvity , and the properties of the fundamental particles . Prer., Phys . 322 and 332 . Phys. 495-2, 496-2. Senior Laboratory. Individual project laboratory with emphasis on modern physical experimentation . Phys. 499-variable credit. Independent Study for Upper Division . Students must check with a faculty member before taking this course . PSYCHOLOGY Majors should include college algebra in their lower division schedules and enroll in Math. 383 concurrently with Psych. 210 . At least 30 semester hours and not more than 48 semester hours in psychology must be completed , with at least 16 hours in upper division courses . No grade below C in required psychology courses is acceptable toward the major. Specific course requirements are as follows : Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 with lab; Psych . 210 or 211-212; at least one biotropic course, including Psych . 395 , 405, 410 , 412, 416 , 420, 425 , 438, 439 ; at least one socio tropic course , including Psych . 364 , 430 , 431, 440 , 445 , 449, 464, 466, 471, 485 , 493; at least one advanced lab o ratory course, including Psych . 416, 420 , 440, and 485; and at least one integrative course , Psych. 451. Psych. 100-3.1ntroductlon to Psychology. A one-semester survey course for nonmajors . Covers such topics in psychology as personality, frustration and conflict , learning and memory , and the biological bases of behavior . Psych. 133. Topics in Psychology. Different five-week course modules dealing with various topics in psychology . See current Schedule of Courses for the particular modu les being offered . Designed for nonscience majors to fulfill the natural science requirement. Psych. 203-3. General Psychology I. Introduction to the scientific study of behavior. Motivation , perception , learning and memory , maturation and development , and the physiological bases of behavior . Psychology majors must register concurrently for Psych . 206 . Psych. 204-3. General Psychology II. Continuation of Psych . 203 , cov er ing topics of indi vidual differences and their assessment and experimental social psychology . Psycho logy majors must register concurrently for Psych. 207 . Psych. 205-3 . Biological Bases of Behavior . An intr oductio n t o biopsychology , cover ing biological variables related to behavior . Prer., Psych . 203. Psych. 206 . General Psychology Laboratory I . To be taken concurrently w it h P sych. 203 by psychology majors . Psych. 207-1. General Psychology Laboratory II. To be taken concurrently with Psych . 204 by psychology majors . Psych. 21G-4.1ntroductlon to Research Methods in Psychology. Research methods and analysis of data . Intended for thos e who p lan to major in psychology . Prer . , Psych . 201-202 o r 203-204 and college algebra ; prer . or coreq. , Math . 383 ( Stat istic s ) . Psych. 245-3 . Psychology of Social Problems. An examination of social psycho logical aspects of a variety of social issues and problems College of Uberal Arts and Sciences / 37 in contemporary society . Includes such topics as pov e rty or minority status, prejudice , drug use , student protest , and patterns of sexual behavior . Consideration of theory and research relative to the topics as well as the definition of social behavior as a " problem ." Psych. 300.2. Honors Seminar . Current theoretical issues and problems in psychology . Prer . , major in psychology and consent of inst ructor . Psych. 320-3, 321-3. Human Behavior and Maturation Through the Life Span . Three hours lect. per week . Analysis of the normal range of behaviors found in each development stage from birth through senescence . Psych. 340-3. Social Psychology of the Mexican American. Focuses on the relationship between sociocultural factors and the perceptual , cognitive , and motivational development of the Mexican American. Prer . , 6 sem . hrs . of psychology . Psych. 364-3. Child Psychology. Principles of normal development and patterns of child rearing . Prer., Psych . 100, 201-202 , or 203 -204. Psych . 365-3 . Adolescence and Youth. Princi ples of development in adolescence , including physical , cogn i t ive, and social develop ment. Prer., Psych . 203-204 or 6 hrs . of psychology . Psych. 395-3 . The Biosoci al Development of Man . (Bioi. 395 , Anthro . 395 . ) An interdisciplinary approach to the na ture of man: his evolution , his biological makeup , his development as a social being, and his strategies for dealing w ith the challenges of environment. Prer., at least one course i n anthropology , biology , or psychology . Psych. 40()..2. Honors Sem inar. Topic to be determined. Prer., major in psychology , senior standing, and consent of instructor. Psych. 405. Physiological Psychology. The morphological , neuro-chem i cal , and physiological bases of behavior . Prer. , Psych . 201-202 or 203 204 and 6 additional hrs . of Psych. 409-3. Hormones and Behavior. Thi s course represents the application of endocrinological concepts and techniques to the problems of motivation and behavior . Prer., junior standing and at least one year of biology . Psych. 41 o-3. Behav i oral Genetics. (Bioi. 41 0 . ) The inheritance of behavioral characteristics . Prer., consent of instructor. Psych. 412-3. Quantitative Genetics. Survey of the principles of genetics of quantitative characteristics . Topics will include gene frequencies , effects of mutation, migration, and selection ; correlations among relatives , heritab ili ty , i nbreeding , cross-breeding , and selective breeding. Prer., consent of instructor . Psych. 413. D rugs and the Nervous System. The physiological basis of drug action on the nervous system and behavior , with emphasis on the use of drugs as analytic tools i n the study of behavior . This course is not concerned with the subjective, social , or legal consequences of drug use . Part 1 : chemical basis of conduction and transm i ssion in the nervous system . Part II: pharmacology of sleep , pain , addiction , dependence , appetite , anxiety, learning , memory , and perception . Prer., Psych . 405 . Psych. 414-3. Cogn itive Psychology. Introd u ction to the study of cognitive processes in man: the development of conceptual behavior , memory , and thinking . Prer., Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and 6 additional hours in psychology , or consent of instructor . Psych. 416-4. Psychology of Percept ion. The study of sensory processes and of variables related to perception . Lect. and lab . Prer., Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211. Psych . 42()..4. Psychology of Learning . Conditions and applications of learning as found in exper imental literature . P rer., Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211. Psych. 421 . Theories of Learning and Motivation . An advanced survey of past and present major theoret ical formulations in learning and m ot ivation. Prer., Psych . 420 and consent of instructor . Psych. 425 . Comparative Psychology. (Bioi. 425 . ) Similarities and differences among animals . Principles of behavior in a variety of species. Prer., 6 hrs . of psychology or consent of instructor . Psych. 430 3. Abnormal Psychology. Borderline disorders as extreme variations of the normal personal i ty . Major functional and o rga nic disorders . Theories of mental disorders and me thods of psychotherapy . Not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych . 431. Prer., Psych . 201-202 , 203-204 , or 1 00 and upper division s tan d ing .

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38 / University of Colorado at Denver Psych. 431-4. Psychopathology. Intensive analysis of the major theories of personality and behavior disorders . Open to majors only , and not open for credit to those who have credit for Psych . 430 . Prer., Psych . 201-202 , or 203-204 , 6 additional hrs . of !JSychology , and upper division standing . Psych. 433-3 . Mental Hygiene. Psychological principles underlying the nature of mental and emotional health and a positive program for preventive and remedial treatment. Prer., Psych . 430 or 431 or con sent of instructor. Psych. 438-3 . Advanced Animal Behav i or. ( Bioi. 438.) Compari son of behavior in a variety of species , with emphasis on socia l be havior and its evolution . Prer., Psych . 425 or consent of instructor. Psych. 439-2 . Laboratory in Animal Behavior. ( Bioi. 439 . ) Labora tory projects and field observat i ons of the behavior of ani mals . Prer. or coreq . , Psych . 438 and consent of instructor. Psych. 440-4. Social Psychology. Psychological principles underly ing social behavior. Analysis of special topics such as attitude sur veys , public opinion research, propaganda , i ntergroup relations. Prer., Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211-212 . Psych . 445-3 . Psychology of Personality. The physiological and psychological nature of personality. Individual differences . The de velopment of personality. Prer., 16 sem. hrs . of psychology . Psych. 449-3. Cross-Cultural Psychology. The inf luence of culture and subculture on personality , including sex roles , patterns of child rear i ng , attitudes and values , and mental illness . Prer., 6 sem . hrs . of courses in psychology , soc i ology. and/or anthrop log y in any combina tion . Psych. 451-3. History of Psychology. Development of psychologi cal theories since 500 B . C . Schools of psychology and their adher ents . Readings of primary and secondary sources. Prer., 16 sem. hrs . of psychology and senior standing . Psych. 464-3 . Developmental Psychology. Pr inci ples and theories of child development. Prer. , Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and 210 or 211-212. Psych. 466-3. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Psychology of retarded , handicapped , and superior children . The relation of special tra its to educational and social needs. Prer., Psych . 201-202 or 203 204 , a course in developmental or child psychology, and upper division standing . Psych. 467-2. Psychology of Mental Retardation. Psychological problems of mental deficiency . Concern with causes, identification characteristics , and treatment of the mentally retarded with an empha sis on research findings . Prer., Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and 364 or 464 . Psych. 471-3. Survey of Clinical Psychology. Theories and prac tices relating to problems of ability and maladjustment. Diagnostic procedures and treatment methods with children and adults . Prer. , Psych . 201-202 or 203-204 and Psych. 431, or consent of instructor . Psych. 472-3. Community Psychology. New approaches to pre venting psychological distress detailed in terms of theory and practice. Special topics include " psychology in the streets ," the creation of alternative institutions, and methods of consultation in poverty areas . Prer. , at least 6 hrs . of psychology . Psych. 485-4. Principles of Psychological Testing. Principles un derlying construction , validation , and use of tests of ability and per sonality . Prer., Psych. 210 or 211-212. Psych. 493-3. Industrial Psychology. Application of psychological principles and research findings to industrial problems , including prob lems of management , employees, and consumers , and such special topics as advertising , methods of appraisal , and human engineering . Prer., 6 sem . hrs . of psychology and a statistics course . Psych. 494-3. Psychology of Sports. A survey of psychological conditions affecting performance in athletics . Includes assessment of psychological demands of sports , assessment of the athlete , prepara tion of the athlete for coping with the psycholog ical demands of sports. Prer., 9 sem. hrs . in psychology . Psych. 496-3. Performance Under Stress. Examines the processes which i nfluence the effects of stress on performance in academic, vocational, and other interpersonal situations. Prer., Psych . 420 . Psych. 497-1. Workshop In Kinesthetic Methods for the Preven tion and Remediation of Learning Disabilities. Survey of methods for early detection and prevention-remediation of learning disabilities via older nonautomated and newer automated kinesthetic teaching methods, with " hands on " practice by participants . Prer., consent of instructor . Psych. 499-1 to 3 . Independent Study. Prer., consent of instructor . Division of Social Sciences FREDERICK S. ALLEN , Assistant Dean In the last two decades the social sciences have included study of some of the most intractable problems of contemporary society: the population explosion , urban concentration, the impact of rapidly changing technology, the strains of race relations, and the thrust of developing societies. Students interested in such problems can come to grips with important concepts in the social sciences which will help orient their lives and even their careers . The social . science disciplines also provide Important bndges between thought and action and between values and problem solving techniques. In short, the social sciences may now be considered to be at the center of the academic constellation , giving inspi ration and possibly direction to the entire enterprise of education. The Division of Social Sciences includes the following disciplines: anthropology, economics, history, political science , and sociology . The division offers courses in the various disciplines, in interdisciplinary studies , and in preprofessional studies. Students can satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree on the Denver Campus in all the disci plines included in the division. The requirements of each major are explained before the course listings for the respective disciplines. Students should be aware of the possibilities for a distributed studies major in the social sciences. The most usual combinations are economics and sociology , and history and political science . See the Special Pro grams section of this bulletin for details on a distributed studies major. The division also has developed a major in urban studies. The program is designed to provide a broad educational experience for persons who are interested in careers related to the problems of urban life. The major is appropriate for students intending to enter the fields of business, law , medicine, or public school teach ing, to work in or with federal, state, or local agencies or volunteer and community action groups, or to enter graduate programs in the social sciences or environ mental planning . Interested students should contact the Division of Social Sciences office for information con cerning advisers, requirements, courses currently of fered and proposed, and options involved in the pro gram. For preprofessional programs , see listings and re quirements in that section of this bulletin.

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Description of Courses and Programs For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes . ANTHROPOLOGY Undergraduate students majoring in anthropology must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours with C or better grades. Sixteen of the 30 hours must be upper division. The maximum number of hours in the major is 48. Majors in anthropology must take Anthro. 1 03 and 104 (Principles of Anthropology I and II) or demonstrate knowledge of materials covered by these courses . Majors also must take Anthro . 201 and 202 (Introduction to Physica l Anthropology I and II); Anthro. 453 (History of Anthropology) ; and either Anthro. 280 (Nature of Language); Anthro . 480 (Anthropological Linguistics); or Anthro . 481 (Language and Culture) . Note : most 400-level courses do not have prerequi sites. Anthro. 103-3 . Principles of Anthropology I. Physical anthropology and archaeology . Evolution of man ; his physical and cultural develo pme nt from his beginnings through the rise of early civilization . Includes consideration of man as a biological organism, his origin and relationsh ip with nonhuman and prehuman primates and development of culture as an adaptive device . Anthro. 104-3 . Principles of Anthropology II. Cultural-social anthropology and linguistics . Study of man from the standpoint of the many and var ied cultures he has manifested through time to the present. Survey of relationships between environment, technology, social organization , lan guage , and ideology. Nature of anthropology and its analysis of the similarities and differences in human cultural adaptations . Anthro. 201-4.1ntroduction to Physical Anthropology I. Theory of biological evolution ; examination of man' s organic structure , function , and behavior from an evolutionary -c omparative perspect ive; analysis of fossil evidence of human evolution . Laboratory work emphasizing osteometry and osteology . Anthro. 202-4.1ntroduction to Physical Anthropology II. On-go ing human evolution with emphasis on quantitative assessment of genetic var iation in man. Anthro. 220 . Pr in ciples of Archaeology. Basic Introduction to concepts , techniques , and theory of archaeological excavation and inte rpreta tion . Two lect. , 1 two-hour lab . per week . Lectures , demonstrations , and practical work . Anthro. 227-3. The Evolution of New World Culture. Cultural evolution in the New World from the earliest hunting cultures through the rise of c i vilization as seen from the perspective of archaeological evidence and theory . Anthro. 240 -3. Principles of Ethnology. Intensiv e survey of concepts , methods , and objectives in the comparative study of world cultures . Comparative analysis of selected ethnographic mater i als w ithin a framework of sociocultural evolution and cultural eco l ogy . Introductory techniques of fieldwork, library re search , and report writ ing . Anthro. 280-3. The Nature of Language . Survey of language s of the world and their historical relationships . Introduction to language analysis . Study of theories of the or igin of la nguage , its relationship to othe r forms of communication , to cognit ion, and to systems of writing . Anthro. 310-3. Cultural Pluralism. The cultural and soc ial anthropology of the plural ethnic and racial component of modern complex s oc ieties (nation-s ta tes). The focus w ill be on the forms and processes of sociocultural i dentity , its maintenance and change w it . h nat i onal integr at ion. Although comparat ive across nations , there will be an emphasis on U . S . society . Anthro . 395-3 . The Biosocial Development of Man . ( B ioi. 395 ; Psych . 395 . ) Interdisc i plinary approach to the nature of man : his College of Lib era l Arts and Sciences / 39 evolution , his biological makeup , his development as a social being , and his strategies for deal ing with the challenges of environment. Lecture and demonstration-d isc ussion sessions. Prer., one course in anthropol o gy, biology , or psychology . Anthro. 399. Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology. Directed inv estigat ion of a specific topic of current importance. The top ic may be within the subfields of anthropology or interdisciplinary with anthropology . Prearranged topics will be announced . Prer., consent of instruct or . Anthro. 408-3. Anthropological Genet ics. A consideration of the data and theory of human genetics . Emphasis will be placed upon analytical techni ques relating to a genetic analysis of the individual , family , and populations . Anthro. 410-3. Race and Man. Concepts of human race : history, theory, and applications thereof. B iologi cal factors in the establishment and maintenance of human diversity . Anthro. 411. Human Paleontology. Detailed consideration of the fossil evidence for human evolution . History, descr i ption , interpretation of key fossils , and review of curr ent and controversial issues . Anthro. 412-3. Advanced Physical Anth ropology. Introduct ion to populat ion genetics and its application to understanding problems 9! process in human evolut ion and the formation of races in man. Anthro. 414-3. Primatology. Survey of the Primate Order in evolution . Morphology and behavior from a comparative po int of view , with emphasis on issues related to the origin and evolution of the most social member of this order. Anthro. 416-3 . Ecology, Adaptation and Culture. Culture , culture change , and evolution from the perspective of human behavioral adaptations to environmenta l variables . A general systems , multifactorial (soci ocultural and biophysical) approach to cause and effect. Anthro. 417-3. Human Ethology. Ethological principles and their application to anthropological investigations. Method s and techniques of data collection . Practice in assessment of behav ior in natural settings . Anthro. 418-3. Group Processes-Sociobiology. Human and other animal behavior in groups . Social biological processes , structures , and systemic functions of groups in cross specific evolutionary compar i son . Anthro . 421-3. Archaeology of the American Southwest. Pre historic cultures of the southwestern U . S . and adjacent Mexico , their origins , characteristics , and interrelat i onships . Anthro. 422-3. Archaeology of Mesoamerica . Preh istoric and protohistoric cultures of Mexico and northern Central America , i nclud ing the Aztecs and the Maya . Anthro. 430-3. Cultural Evolution. Review of various theories ex plaining the evolution of culture with particular attention to the Neolithic and Urban Revo luti ons . Anthro. 435-2 to 6. Archaeolog i cal Field and Laboratory Re search. Summer session only ; Boulder Campus only . Students will part icipate in archaeo l ogical field research and conduct laboratory analysis of archaeological materials and data. Open only to Univer sity of Col orado anthropology majors . P rer., consent of instructor . Anthro. 439-3 . Research Methods in Archaeology. Methods and theory of archaeology, emphasizing the interpretation of materials and data and the relationships of archaeology to other disciplines. Anthro. 443-3. Economic Anthropology. Cross-cultural survey and comparison of economic systems . Economic stru ctures and their functional relationships with other social instituti ons in a range of societies from simple to complex . Anthro. 444-3. Urban Anthropology. An anthropological approach to the comparative study of factors influencing urbanization in different parts of the world along with the imp lica t i ons of env ir onments , economy , values , and psychology of urban living in general. Cross-cultural, but w ith emphasis on the modern western world . Anthro. 447-3. Ethnoh i story. The use of documents and other external sources in the reconstruction of culture history . Anthro. 448-3. Anthropology and Education . An anthropological focus on contemporary educational systems. Review of r ecent re search in the anthropology of educat ion as well as an i ntroduct ion to

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40 / University of Colorado at Denver teaching anthropology i n the schools. Pr i marily for soc ial studies teachers , education , and anthropology students. Prer . , consent of i nst r uctor. Anthro. 450-3. Family Dynamics. The course examines processes of change i n va l ues , roles , and relations involved in marr i age and family structure , using contemporary cross-cultural materials leading to understanding of such problems as generation gap and sex role change . Specia l attention is g iven to changing structure of authority, economics, and the emotional components associated with marriage and family l ife of t oday ' s Amer ica. Anthro. 451-3. Applied Cultural Anthropology. Concepts , methods , and problems i n the appl i cat i on of anthropology to community and institution organization, development and ad minist r ation ; e x emplif ied through analys i s and discuss ion of U . S . and cross-cultural case materials . Urban and medica l problems as well as ethical issues to be included. Anthro. 452-3 . Seminar in Recent Anthropology, Current directions in sociocultural theory , method and technique as exemplif ied i n the reported resea rch and theoretical works of major anthropolog i sts from mid 20th century to the present . Prer . , anthropology major or consent of i nstructor . Anthro. 453-3. History of Anthropology. Foundat i ons and development of major concepts and approaches (theory and method) in the study of man and culture . Discussion of principal contributors and the i r works to mid-20th century . Prer. , anthropology major or consent of i nst r uctor . Anthro. 454-3 . Psychological Anthropology. A comparative study of the relat i onship between culture and social character and between culture and individual personality. Anthropological perspectives on the effect s of various sociocultu r a l contexts on indi vidual e x per i ence . The relati onships of sociocultu ral situat i ons to motives , values , cogn i tion , personal adjustment , stress , and qualities of personal exper i ence are emphasized . Anthro. 455-3. Culture Process-Maintenance, Change , and Evolution . Theor ies and perspect i ves in the study of culture process . Ana lysi s and discussion of case materials dealing with pers i stence , innovat ion, situat i ons of culture contact and acculturation , d i rected change and resistance , and long term sociocultural development. Anthro. 456-3. Contemporary American Indian Cultures . Begi n ning w ith the histor i cal background on Amer i can Indian acculturation and per sistence , but emphasiz ing the p r esent day rel ations between Indian communit ies and the dom i nant soc i ety , stressing cond i t i ons and events in Denver and the Southwest generally . Anthro. 459-3. Comparative Social Organization. Princ i p les i n the comparative study of human social systems , types of social structure , soc i a l control, sociocultural i ntegration , and processes of soc i al change and societal development. Focus on the analysis of ethnog r aphies . Prer . , Anthro . 240 , 452 , 453 , or consent of inst r uctor . WORLD ETHNOGRAPHY (ANTHRO . 462-476) Each course listed below will cover the major aspects of cultural and social anthropological interest relating to the peoples and cultural systems within the areas indicated. Following a survey of the geographical affiliations of the inhabitants, the culture-history of the area will be reviewed . The ways of life of the indigenous populations, their relations with each other and to other peoples , and the effects of culture change will be discussed. Anthro. 462-3. Ethnography of the American Southwest. Anthro . 463-3. Ethnography of Mexico and Central America. Anthro. 470-3. Ethnography of China, Japan, and Korea. Anthro. 474-3 . Ethnography of India, Pakistan, and Ceylon. Anthro. 476-3. Ethnography of Southeast Asia. Anthro. 480-3. Anthropological Linguistics. Boulder Campus only . Methods and results of analysis of languages of nonliterate peoples . Anthro. 481-3. Language and Culture. The course explo res the relat i onsh i ps between culture and language i n the following contexts : language acquisition , language and i ndividual , soc ial dialects , language and education , language and world view , the role of language in cultural interaction and social structure , planned language change including language problems in new nations and at the international level. Anthro. 499-variable credit. Guided Study. Dir ected individual study based in a specific subfieid of anthropology . Consent of i nstructor required . ECONOMICS Students majoring in economics must meet the following requirements: at least 30, but not more than 48, semester hours in economics , of which 22 must be numbered 300 or higher; either (1) Math. 107-108 and Econ. 480 (formerly Econ . 380) or (2) Math . 140, 241, 242 (students planning to go to Graduate School in economics should take option 2); C.S . 201; Econ. 381, 407 and 408. Majors are urged to take Econ. 480 (formerly Econ . 380) and Econ. 381 as soon as possible . Distributed Studies Students majoring in distributed studies may make economics their primary area of concentration by taking 30 semester hours i n economics. Required courses for this option are Econ . 407-408 and a course in statistics. For all courses numbered above 300 , the prerequisite , unless otherwise indicated, is Econ. 201 and 202 , or Econ . 300 . Introductory Courses Econ. 201-3. Principles of Economics 1: Macroeconomics. Purpose i s to teach fundamenta l princ i p les, to open the f ield of econom ics in the way most helpful to further and more detailed study of spec ial problems , and to give those not intending to specialize in the subject an outline of the general principles of econom ics. Open to qualified freshmen . Econ. 202-3. Principles of Economics II: Microeconomics. Continuation of Econ . 201. Econ. 250-3 . Capitalism and Slavery I. H i story of the development of slavery as an Amer i can institution from 1619 to 1970 . Includes growth of the slave trade , development of the plantation system , sti mulation of the American economy by slavery , economic implications of the Civil War , theoretical freeing of the slaves in 1863 , and the development of modern slavery in Amer i ca from Reconstruction to the present. Econ. 251-3 . Capitalism and Slavery II. Continuation of Econ . 250 . Econ. 300-3 . Accelerated Principles of Economics. Condensation of Econ . 201 and 202 . Intended for students who have taken Soc. Sci. 210 and 211 and others who want a one-semester introduction to economics . Open to sen i ors without prerequisite . Not open to students who have taken Econ . 201 and 202 . Econ. 379-3. Consumer Economics. Application of m i croeconomics to the problems of the ordinary consumer : budget management , purchases , i nterest , etc . Intended for nonmajors . Econ. 381-3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Economics ll.lntroduction to statistical methods and their application to quanitative econom i c research . Prer., Econ. 480 and 201 and 202 . Econ. 480.3. Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Economics I. Introduction to the use of mathematics in economics . research . Prer., Math . 107 and 1 08; Econ. 201 and 202. Econ. 481-3. Introduction to Econometrics. The application of mathematical and statistical techniques to problems of economic theory . Emphasis is on principles rather than computational methods or mathematical r i gor . Major topics include demand , production , and cost analysis . Prer. , two semesters of calculus and one semester of statistics , or consent of instructor . Econ. 482-3 . Introduction to Econometrics II. Continuation of Econ . 481. Prer . , Econ . 481.

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Economic Theory and Thought General Courses Econ. 201 and 202 . See Introductory Courses section . Econ. 300-3. See Introductory Courses section . Econ. 403-3 . The Price System . Course in microeconomics designed for teachers and other nonmajors . Production , price , and distribution theory in a free-market system . Assumptions and conditions of a free-market and other market structures . Econ . 404-3. Income, Employment , and Economic Activit /. Course in macroeconomics designed for teachers and other non majors . Theory and applications of national income determinat ion, the role of money in the economy , and economic growth . Policy prob l ems in dealing w ith unemployment , inflation, growth , and our i nter national balance of payments . Econ. 407-3. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Production , price , and distribution theory . Study of value and distribution theories under conditions of varying market structures, with spec ial reference to the contribution of modern economic theorists . Econ. 408-3. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory . National in come and . employment theory . Emphasis on national i ncome analy sis, contemporary theories of consumption , i nvestment , and employ ment. Econ. 409-3. History of Economic Thought. Survey of the develop ment of economic thought from ancient to modern times . Econ . 410-3. Radical Political Economy . An i ntroduction to modern radical economics , emphasizing Marx ian critiques of capitalism : Marx ' s theory of capitalist development ; contemporary analyses and majors in economics ; others by consent of instructor . ) Designed to give seniors a chance to evaluate critically some practical or theoretical problems under supervision , and to present results of their thinking to fellow students and instructors for critical evaluation. Econ. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructo r required. Fiscal and Monetary Theory and Policy; Public Finance Econ . 411-3. Monetary and Banking Systems . Survey of major monetary and financial institutions , such as commercial banks , Federal Reserve System , and savings i nstitutions , and the structure of debt from the standpoint of how their operation affects the money supply and its circulation . Econ. 412-3. Monetary Theory and Policy. T heories of inf lat ion and deflation and their effects upon economic growth and prosper ity. Goals of monetary policy ; problems inv olved in trying to achieve these goals ; survey of some recent monetary policies in act i on . Econ. 421-3. Public Finance I. Taxat i on , public expend itures, debts , and fiscal policy. Role of public finance i n times of peace and war . National , state , and local taxation , w it h some spec ial attention to the state of Colorado . Econ. 422-3. Public Finance II. Continuation of Public Finance I. Either course may be taken separately . International Economics and Economic Development Econ. 441-2. International Trade and Finance . Theories of i nterregional and international trade, private and public trade , world population and resources , tariffs , and commercial policy . Internat i ona l economic organization . Econ. 477-3. Economic Development-Theory and Problems I. Theoretical and empirical analysis of problems of economic development in both underdeveloped and advanced countries. Econ. 478-3. Economic Development-Theory and Problems II. Current conditions of economic development, with emphasis on accelerating and maintaining growth . Econ . 487-3. Economic Development of Latin America. Current problems of economic development i n Latin Amer ica. Econ. 489-3. The Economics of Africa and the Middle East. Current problems of development faced by African and M i ddle College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /41 Eastern economies . Emphas i s on case studies , regionalism , p lan ning , and ramification of economic change . Economic History, Systems, and Institutions Econ. 250 and 251. See Introductory Courses section . Econ . 451-3. Economic History of Europe . Evolution of indus trial society with emphasis upon the growth and development of English industry and commerce . Econ. 452-3 . Economic History of the United States . American economic organization and institutions and their development from colonial times to the present. Econ . 471-2. Comparative Economic Systems . Cr i t ical study of socialism, capitalism, communism , and other proposed economic systems, emphas i z ing comparative studies of communist econom ics . Human Resources Economics and Labor Economics Econ. 460-3. Introduction to Human Resources. Econom ics of investments in man, including the economics of poverty and the application of cost benefit analysis to social welfare programs . Econ. 461-3 . Labor Economics. Study of problems associated w ith determination of wages , hours, and work i ng conditions i n the American economy . History and analysis of economic effects of trade uni onism and other social i nstitutions , including agenc ies of formal government. Introduction to manpower studies . Econ. 462-3. Economics of Collective Bargaining. Scientific analysis of processes by which labor and management democratically reach agreements ; how differences between labor and management are settled by means of grievance procedure and arbitrat i on ; and overall economic effect of collective bargain ing on goods produced by the national economy. Demonstrations, workshops , and lectures . Econ. 463-3. Income Security. Development of social insurance i n various countries , w it h emphas i s on the United States . Security in old age , unemployment , accident , sickness , and other income -loss situations . Economic ana l ysis of costs and r i sks of social security ; types of carriers , problems of administration . Critical examination of recent Amer i can social security legislation . Econ. 464-3. Collective Bargaining, Labor Law , and Administration. Study of social pressures that are shaped into labor policy acceptable to labor , management , and the general public by various means of social control. Evolution of a " common law " of labor relations out of free collective bargaining and arbitration. Prer., senior status. Government and Business; Industrial Organization Econ. 456-3. Economics of Agriculture. Economic analysis of the agricultural sector and of problems and policies related to agriculture and otner pnmary industnes . Econ. 469-3 . Government in the Economy . Analysis of the role of government in the economy , neo-classical microeconomic theory as a point of departure for understanding wha t a free market system can and cannot accomplish . Prer . , Econ . 403 or equivalent. Econ. 474-3. Industrial Organization. Structure and performance of some imp ortant Amer ican manufacturing industries . Econ . 476-3. Government Regulation of Business. Economic characteristics of public utilities and analysis of problems of regulation and control. Urban, Regional, and Environmental Economics Econ. 425-3. Urban Economics. Analysis of the level , distribution , stability , and growth of inc ome and employment i n urban regions. Urban poverty , housing , land use, transportation , and local public services , with special reference to economic eff icien cy and social progress. Econ. 427-3. Economics of Transportation. Survey of transportation in U .S. First part of course deals with development of intercity transportation via water , rail , highway , and air . Second part deals with the urban transportation problem , comparing private and public alternatives . Econ. 453 -3. Resource Economics. Appl i cation of economic theory t o resource or i ented i ndustries .

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42 / University of Colorado at Denver HISTORY Undergraduate students majoring in history must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in history , 16 of which must be upper division. Not more than 48 hours in the student's major area will count toward the 120-hour requirement. As of fall 1973 , a student must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2 . 0 or better in the major to graduate . A history major may fulfill his lower division course requirements through any one of the following three options: 1. Hist.101 and 102; 2 . Any two 200-level courses in Ancient, European, African , or Asian history ; 3 . Either Hist. 101 or 1 02 , plus one 200-level course in Ancient, European, African , or Asian history ; 4. Hist. 150 , plus either Soc. Sci. 210 or 211; 5 . Hist. 150 , plus any 200-level course in American or Latin American history ; 6 . Any two 200-level courses in American or Latin American history . Hist. 101-3. History of Western Civilization I. Contributions of Greek thought ; Roman and Christian elements in early European civilization; rise of Islam; feudalism; conflict of papacy and empire ; medieval learning, literature , and art ; rise of dynastic states ; the Reformation; the age of discovery ; thought and culture in the early modern period . Hist. 102-3 . History of Western Civilization II. Scientific revolution ; French absolutism and English constitut i onalism , theory , and pract i ce ; rise of Russia and Prussia ; the Enlightenment ; French Revolution and spread of Liberalism and Nat ionalism; evolution of an industr ial society ; Romantic ism and Realism ; the unification of Italy and Germany ; Imperialism ; the age of Wortd Wars ; Total itarianism; contemporary European philosophy , art and science . Hist. 15Q-3. Introduction to United States History. Survey of Ameri can history from colonial times to the 1960s . Emphasis on the major forces and events that have shaped Amer ican society . Hist. 215-3 . Afro-American History I. Major emphasis on the events that have occurred in the life of the Afro-American from the time of his first landing in the U . S . to the present. Hist. 216-3. Afro-American History II. Continuation of Hist. 215 . Hlst. 250-3. Topics in American History. Topical approach to Amer ican history , surveying the major forces that have affected the development of the United States and treating each topic as a complete unit. Suggested background : Hist. 150. Hist. 258-3 . History of Colorado. Hist. 271-3 . History of the Modern Far East I. An introduction to Asian civilization . Focus on Japan , China , and Southeast Asia in the 19th century. Hi st. 272-3 . History of the Modern Far East II. Asia in world affairs . Focus on Japan , China , and Southeast Asia i n the 20th century . Hist . 281-3. History of Latin America I. An introduction to Latin civilizat ion in Amer i ca . Focus on period before independence . Hist. 282-3 . History of Latin America II. Latin Amer ica since Independence . Focus on Mexico, Brazil , and Argentina . Hist. 384-3 . History of the Mexican Americans in Colorado. A history of the Mexican American experience in Colorado with emphasis on 20th century urbanization , especially within the Denver metropolitan area . Hist. 395-3. Problems in African History: The Novelist's Perspective. Hist. 405-3. The New South. 1876 to present. The South since the era of Reconstruction to the present. Hist. 406-3. History of the British Empire / Commonwealth. Analysis of development , administration , and dissolution of the empire . Hist. 422-3. The Second World War. Basically a military polit ical orientation , examining the grand strategy , diplomacy , and campaigns of the war i n some detail. Emphasizes the influence of technology upon the conflict. Hist. 423-3. Europe During the Renaissance. Social and i ntellectual history of Europe from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Hist. 424-3. Europe During the Reformation. Soc ial and intell ectual history of Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries . Hist. 43Q-3. France Since 1815 . A top i cal approach to the evolution of modern France . The topics are essentially political , economic , and cultural . Hist. 431-3. Nineteenth Century Europe. Social and economic change in the political and intellectural context between 1789 and 1914 . Suggested background , Hist. 102 . Hist. 432-3. Twentieth Century Europe. Social and economic change i n the political and inte llectual context between 1914 and 1970 . Suggested background , Hist. 102 . Hist. 437-3. International History of Europe in the 19th Century. The diplomatic process , major crises , leading personalities , i nteraction between domestic and foreign policies , reflections on causes and consequences of war . Suggested background , Hist. 102 or 431. Hist. 438-3. International History of Europe in the 20th Century. International organization and traditional diplomacy . The Versailles settlement , the rise of revis i onist powers , causes of World War II, wartime diplomacy , the Cold War , and decline of Europe ' s position in the wort d . Suggested background , Hist. 1 02 or 432. Hist. 441-3. History of Africa to 1840. Part I of a two semester sequence introducing the student to political , econom i c , and cultural change i n Africa . Hlst. 442-3. History of Africa From 1840. Part II of a two-semester sequence introducing the studen t to political , economic , and cultural change in Africa . Hist. 445-3. Social and Economic Change in African History. An exam i nation of change in African life . Emphasis on new d ir ections in commerce , agriculture , labor, religion , family structure , and urbanization . Hist. 446-3. History of Ireland. Analysis of the relationship between the English and the Irish from the Irish perspective . Hist. 449-3. The Gilded Age: U.S. History 1865-1900. A study of the evolution and growth of major Amer ican instit utions since the Civil War . Topics will include the rise of heavy industr y , the growth of the city , emergence of "big politics, " changes in religion, social thought , manners and morals , and many others . Hist. 45Q-3. A Political History of Africa. An analysis of the variety of pol i tical units in Africa and the ways in which they have changed . Hist. 453-3. Civil War and Reconstruction. Focuses on events leading to the outbreak of war , the war itself and its impact on North and South, and the efforts to reconstruct Southern society during the post-war period . Hist. 454-3. The Progressive Movement and After, 190Q-1929. Domestic affairs and foreign policy. In domestic affairs , emphasis on the Progressive Movement and the react ion against it in the twenties. In foreign affairs , emphasis on slowly increasing but reluctant participation in wortd power politics . Hist. 456-3. The Jacksonian Era . Study of a period of change and conflict. Emphasis on cond itions that produced striking alterations in the social , psychological , and economic organization of the United States , as well as violence and war . Hi st. 460-3. Mexican American Southwest. The history of Mexican Americans from the origins of the Aztec Empire to modern times . Emphasis on the fusion of Spanish and Indian cultures in Mexico and the Southwest , the development of Mexican American society , and its relations to American society. Hist. 463-3. American Society and Thought to 1865. Analysis of social ideas since 1865 , and the impact of these ideas on American society . Hist. 464-3. American Society and Thought Since 1865 . Analysis of social ideas since 1865 , and the impact of these ideas on American society .

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Hist. 465-3. U .S. in Depression and War, 1929-1952. An examina t ion i n some detail of the ma i n t rends i n both domestic and foreign aff a irs i n U . S . hist ory du r ing thi s per iod. Emphas i s upon the New Deal , Wor l d War II, and eme r g e nce o f the Cold War . Sugges ted background , H ist. 454. Hist. 466-3. The Age of Affluence and Anxiety: The U.S . Since 1948 . Examination of major patterns i n U . S . h i s t ory si nce World War II, l ooked a t f rom an histor i ca l pe r spective . Includes the U . S . Communist i nternat iona l confront a t ion and the growth of an increa s i ngly affluent but anxiety ridden Amer i can soc i ety . Suggested back ground , Hist. 465 . Hi st. 467-3. Diplomatic History of the United States to 1900. The development of Amer i can foreign policy , emphasizing the evolution of the basic policy of i solation from European affairs and inc r easing involvement i n the Pacific and East Asia . Hist. 468-3. Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1900. The conflict between isolationism and internationalism in American foreign policy , end i ng in the tr i umph of the latter . Suggested background , H ist. 467 . Hist. 470-3. History of Urban America. Development of the American city from colonial times to the present. The chief focus of the course will be upon major changes i n the process of urbanizat ion. Subjects will i nclude town promot ion, r ise of heavy industrial c i t ies, utopian towns, emergence of the city " boss ," urban transportat ion, and the future of American cities . Hist. 473-3. History of China. Deals with traditional China covering a per iod from the " beg i nning " to the m i d 19th century . Both descript ive and interpretive approaches are employed , concentrat ing on these " factors " (intellectual , social , political , technological , economic , eta/. ) i nvolved in the development of the Chinese civilizat ion. In the attempt to understand the problems and challenges confront ing the Chinese , it is hoped that the course w ill . p rovi de an app reci at ion tor the Chi nese and Chinese history and the i r relationsh i p to our own world . Hist. 474-3. History of China. A combination of desc r iptive mater i al with a broad analytical base is applied to an i nvestigation of the emergence and development of modern China . The aim of the course is to both sketch and analyze the d i mensions of the " Chinese crisis " compounded of dynastic and Imperial collapse , imper i alist i ncursions , social , political , and intellectua l re-orientation , the plight of a peop l e rav aged by po v erty , oppression , a n d war, and the dramat i c reshap ing of 20th-century China caught in the throes of national and soc ial revolution . Hist. 476-3 . History of Japan in the Modern Age. Hist. 479-3. United States Military History to 1900 . Development of the m i litary and naval art of war in American history , in both i ts peacetime and wart i me aspects , from colon ial t i mes to the end of the Spanish-Amer i can war . Emphas i zing the i ncreas ing influence of technology on warfare after 1850 . Hist. 480..3. United States Military History Since 1900. Amer i can military and naval history since the Spanish-American War , presented as a continu ing evolution in both war and peace and emphasizing the dominating i nfluence of technology upon operations , organization , and policies . Hist. 481-3. Mexico and Central America Since Independence I. Study of soc i ety , economics , and politics i n the 19th century . Hist . 482-3. Mexico and Central America Since Independence II. Study of soc i ety , economics , and polit ics in the 20th century . Hist. 486-3 . The Old South and National Disunion. Early development of the southern Untied States , the institution of slavery , and the sect i onal conflict lead ing to national disunion . Hi st. 487-3. History of Colonialism in Southern Africa. Analysis of European and Asian communities in Africa : their origins and development and their relat i ons with the i nd i genous African population . Hist. 489-3. The Modern Near East, 1789 to the Present. Emphasis on the modernization of the region from Egypt through Persia , Anatolia , and Arab i a, not only in poli t i cal terms , but also in terms of the economic , soc i al , and i ntellectual changes whiCh have transformed the Near East in the last c entury and a half . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /43 Hist. 494-3. Imperial Russia . The Old Regime, industrializat ion, and culture i n the 19th century . Hist. 495-3. The Russian Revolution. Orig i ns of the revolutionary movement , and Revolut ion of 1905 , reform efforts, the impact of World War I , the Bolshev i k victory in 1917 , the Civil Wars . Hlst. 496-3. The Soviet Regime. Rise of Stalin , econom i c development 1928 1938 , i mpact of World War II, the Khrushchev era . Hist. 498-3. Senior Colloquium. Read i ngs and discussion of eminent modern historians and their writings . Recommended but not requ ired for senior history majors . Hist. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor required . POLITICAL SCIENCE Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours in political science , of which at least 21 semester hours must be in upper division courses . Courses must be distributed among the primary fields as listed in this bulletin , i.e. , American government and politics , comparative politics , international relations, public administration , and political theory and public law. The major must include the following: Pol. Sci. 100 , 11 0 , 200 , 440 , and 441; Econ . 201 and 202 ; and one upper division course in each of the primary fie l ds of political science except public administration . In addi tion , it is strongly recommended that all majors enroll for Pol. Sci. 202 . For all courses numbered 300 and above, the prerequisite , unless otherwise indicated , is either the Pol. Sci. 100-110 sequence or consent of the instructor. American Government and Politics Poi.Sci. 100-3. Introduction to Political Science . Introduct ion to the study of politics and the political system and its env i ronment. Designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts of political science , features of the polit i cal process , types of political institutions , and political behavior . Required of all majors . Poi.Sci. 110-3. The American Political System. General introduct ion to the American polit i cal system with emphasis upon the interrelat i ons among the various levels and branches of government , formal and informal institutions , processes , and behavior. Required of all majors . Prer., Poi.Sci. 100 . Not open to those who have had Pol. Sci. 101 and / or 102 . Poi.Sci. 200-3. Research in Contemporary Political Topics. Application of basic political concepts to current political problems . Emphasis on the relationship between theories of political action and empirical tests of these theor ies. Prer., Pol. Sci. 100 . Poi.Sci. 210..3. Power in American Society. Who has power in the United States ; how it is distributed and used ; sources of power and legitimacy ; checks and potential checks on decision making by the powerful ; consequences of power allocation and use for citizen well-being ; continuity and change in the structure of power i n America . Prer . , Poi.Sci. 110 or consent of instructor . Poi.Sci. 400-3. Government Regulation of Business. Consideration of theory and practice of government relationship to business and professional activity on both state and national levels . Analysis of selected regulatory programs and poli cies (Sherman Act , Clayton Act , Federal Trade Commission Act) and thier impact on the constitut i onal system . Poi.Sci. 402-3. legislatures and legislation. Structure and organization of legislatures and process of statute lawmaking ; political forces and interest groups ; problems of representation and the public interest. Poi.Sci. 403-3. Political Parties and Pressure Groups. History and practice of party politics in the United States . Nature , structure ,

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44/ University of Colorado at Denver o rganization, and functions of political partie s and pressure groups . Analysis of pressu r e politics and political behavior . Poi.Sci. Public Opinion and Political Behavior. TheoriftS of public op1n1on and propaganda; the formation , ma nage ment, and measurement of political attitudes ; behavior of men and groups in politiCS, especially Americans. Systematic consequences of political attitudes . Poi.Sci. 406-3. State Government and Administration. Present-day national, state and interstate relations; constitutional development ; legislative, executive , and judicial processes and problems ; a . dministrative organization and reorganization; state finances ; major state services; future of the states . Special attention to the government of Colorado . Poi.Sci. 407-3. Urban Politics. Examination of the structure of political and social influence in urban areas selection of urban leadership ; r elat ionship of the political system to governmental and social institutions . Poi.Sci. 408-3 . Municipal Government and Administration. Mun icipalities and their relations to the states and the national government ; local politics ; forms of municipa l government ; application of Ideas and techniques of public administrat ion to management of mun1c1pal affairs ; act i vities of cities , e .g., planning , public utilities , law enforcement , and t1re protection . Poi.Sci. 409-3 . Metropolitan Systems. Comparat ive analysiS of the major metropolitan systems in different countries the structural environment , decision making in the bureaucracies 'and political groupings, governmental interaction and communication . Poi.Sci . 451-3. Black Politics. Examinat ion of black politics in the Un1ted States : the role of black interest groups , structure and functions of b lack political organizations, goals and political styles of black polit1c1ans, trends and the future of black politics in the United States . See also Pol. Sci. 435 and 439 listed under Public Administration. Comparative Politics Poi.Sci. 201-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics I: Technological Societies. Comparison of legali nstitutional features ; social , economic , and ideological forces; and patterns of recruitment and decision making ; patterns of political-system maintenance and change . Poi.Sci. 202-3. Introduction to Comparative Politics II: Pretechnological Societies . Comparison of the basic pol i tical features of the economically developing polities w ithin the nonWestern world . The traditional politica l culture , nationalism , political integration , political structures, political groups in developing societies , modes of political recr uitment , the style of development politics and po litical implica t ions of planned socioec onomic chanoe : evolut ion and revolution in the third world . Pol. Sci. 409-3. Comparative Metropolitan Systems. Compa rative analysis of the major metropolitan systems in different countr ies; the structural environment , decision-making in the bureaucracies and polit ical gro upings, governmental interaction and communication . Poi.Sci. 410-3. Advanced Comparative Politics-Western Europe. An i ntensive and comparative analys is of the political systems and processes of Western Europe . Emphasis on political culture and constitutionalism ; execu _ tive-legislative relat ionships : electoral systems ; polit1cal part1es and 1nterest groups; administrative and jUdiCial processes ; and the impact of soc ial changes on political Institutions . Prer . , Pol. Sci. 201 or consent of instructor. Poi.Sci. 411-3. Advanced Comparative Politics-Third World. An intensive comparative examination of the political process in the non Western world . Survey of different methodological app r oaches to the . study of the non-Western political systems . The components of polit1cal development. Effective political units in a transitiona l society . Preva iling "sty les " of political action, including the use of violence. Poi.Sci. 413-3. Political Behavior and Political Systems in Latin America. Governments and politics of selected countries of Latin America . Politics and government in theory and practice . Polit i cal part1es, movements , and conflicts . The relationships between political problems and physical and social environments . Poi.Sci. 415-3. Political Systems of the Middle East and North Africa. Compa rative analysis of the major parameters of the politica l process in the Middle East and North Afr ic a . Islamic political theory and its contemporary manifestation . The rol e of nat i onal is m and the for modernity " in the politica l development of this region . Part1es and programmed modernization in transitional polities. Violent and nonviolent change . Poi.Sci. 416-3 . Politics and Government of East Asia. Political and governmental changes w ithi n China , Japan , and Korea from the 19th century to the present. P rimary emphasis on contemporary political systems and sociopolitical problems . Poi.Sci. 418-3. Politics of Southeast Asia. impact of the West on political theory and institutions i n Burma , Thailand , Laos , Cambodia , Vietnam , M(:llaysia , Indonesia, and the Philippines . Constitutions , political parties , movements , and conflicts . Influence of geographical , econom1c, and social factors on the political systems in each country . Poi.Sci. 419-3. Political Systems of Sub-Saharan Africa. Analysis of major types of political systems in sub-Saharan Africa and intensive case studies of selected countries exemplifying each type . movement, adoption and rejection of Western political Institutions and values. Spec ial political problems of multiracial and multicultural societies . Poi.Sci. 460-3. Politics of South Asia . Study of the political and admi . nistrative systems of India, Pak istan , Ceylon , and Nepal. Impact of Bnt1sh rule on development of polit ica l instit utions on subcontinent as well as problems of political development at all levels . International Relations Poi.Sci. 421-3. International Politics. The system of national states concepts of national interest, goals of foreign policies , conduct of diplomacy , and the bearing of these elements on the problem of peace . Presentat ion and evaluation of the solutions that have been offered for the of peace. Great powers and regions of the earth 1n mternat1onal polit 1 cs today , and their r oles i n international tensions . Poi.Sci. 423-3. American Foreign Policy. Examinat ion of the foundations •. assumptions , objectives , and methods of U . S . foreign policy . Special attention to the revolutionary international environment and to adaptations thereto. Poi.Sci. 428-3. International Behavior . Presentation of alternate frameworks for the explanation of international processes . Theones of conflict behav1or and social organization applied to of war and peace . Major emphasis on the role of systematic emp1ncal research m the development of theories of internati ona l behavior . Poi.Sci. 472-3 . Soviet and Chinese Foreign Policy. Foreign P<;>lic1es of the Sov1et and of Communist China , inclu ding Smo Sov1et conflict; mcludmg the Interna tional Communist movement , its ideolo gical bases, impac t on int ernatio nal politics , and 1 ts relations to domestic devel opment s in the U . S.S. R . Poi.Sci. 473-3. The Middle East and World Affairs. Evolution and revolution in the Middle East. The character of nationalism in the area. of and international problems affecting the Middle East w1th special emphas1s on the Arab -Israeli imbroglio . Impact of major-power intervent ion . Pol. Sci. 474 -3. Sub-Saharan Africa in World Affairs . An examina tion of the international behavi or of the new Africa . Includes pre Independence antecedents and post-independe nce dete r mina nts mot i ves , techniques , and results of African state relation s in the i nter : African and world-wide settings. Impac t of majorpower interve ntion . Poi . Sci. 475-3 . Africa in U.S. Foreign Policy. Examination of h1stoncal background , assumptions , objectives , methods , and results of U . S . policy toward black Africa . Special attention to areas under or rule , ethnic factors , potency of economic and political vanables , and stresses between alliance policy and sympathy for self-determination . Poi.Sci. 476-3. International Relations in the Far East. Developments and problems in the modern-day relations of China Japan, Korea , Vietnam , and the Western powers . The Far East world politics today . Poi.Sci. 477-3. Latin America in World Politics. Bas ic elements in Latin American i nternational relations. United States-Latin American

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relations and policies . Foreign policy formulation in major Latin American republic . Public Administration Pol. Sci. 406 and 408 may be used by majors in political science to satisfy the requirement in the field of public administration. Poi.Sci. 432-3. Public Administration. Role of administration in government ; trends in American public administrat ion; techniques of management ; theories of public administration . Poi.Sci . 435-3 . Natural Resources: Policy and Administration. Resources in the American economy; considerat i on of constitutional, political , and geographic factors in the development of resources policy ; organizat ion, procedures , and programs for administration and development of natural resources . Poi.Sci. 437-3 . Public Financial Administration. Governmental fiscal policy , administrative organization for fiscal administration i n governmental units, revenue administration, budgeting , preaudit and postaudit, treasury management and debt administration, purchasing , financial reporting . Economic sources of political corruption . Poi.Sci. 439-3. National Policies and Administration. Major policies and programs of the national government and their administration ; the role of the President and other administrators in formulating public policy ; problems of centralization and public accountability . Political Theory and Public Law Poi.Sci. 420-3. Theories of Social and Political Change. Conservative , radical , and incremental approaches to change . Role of psychological and sociolog i cal factors i n political change . Comparative perspectives on change . Self-perpetuat i on processes of power systems and their vulnerabilities . Requisites of system maintenance and system change . Selected case studies . Poi.Sci. 440.3 . Early Political Thought. Main currents of political thought in the i r historical setting from Plato to the 17th century , with a critical evaluation of those elements of continuing worth . Poi.Sci. 441-3. Modern Political Thought. Main currents of political thought in their historical setting from 17th century to the present. Poi.Sci. 440 is not a prerequisite for Poi.Sci . 441. Poi.Sci. 443-3 . Jurisprudence. Or igi ns of modern legal ins t i tutions and role of law in society throughout the ages . Contrast between Anglo-American and legal systems stemming from the Roman Law . Law cases are studied only insofar as they mirror historical and sociological developments . Pol. Sci. 445-3 . American Political Thought. History and develop ment of American political theories and ideas from colonial period to present. Poi.Sci. 446-3. Administrative Law. General nature of administrative law , types of administrative act ion and enforcement , analysis of rulemaking adjudication , administrative due process , judicial review . Poi.Sci. 447-3. Constitutional Law I. Nature and scope of the following American constitutional principles as developed by the U . S . Supreme Court : federalism, jurisdiction of the federal courts , separation of powers , the taxing power, and the commerce power . Case method . Pol. Sci. 449-3. American Judicial System. Examination of the principal actors in the legal system : police , lawyers, judges, Citizens . About half of the course will be devoted to the study of judicial behavior , especially at the Supreme Court level. Poi.Sci . 490-3. Revolution and Political Violence. Study , dis cussion , and evaluation of alternative frameworks for the analysis of revolution and political violence . The theoretical material will be f irmly couched in case situations such as western , class , colonial , urban, international, historical , racial , religious , and intergenerational violence . Development by the class of its own theoretical model. College of Uberal Arts and Sciences / 45 General Courses in Political Science Poi.Sci . 499-1 to 3. Independent Study. Intended to give an oppor tunity for advanced students with good scholastic records , and w ith appropriate courses completed , to pursue i ndependently the study of some subject of special interest to them. Subjects chosen and ar rangements made to suit the needs of each student. Primarily for seniors . Prer., 15 semester hours in political science and consent of instructor. SOCIOLOGY Majors in sociology are requir<.'d to complete 30 hours in sociology with a grade of C or better. Of these hours , 16 must be upper division. Max . .,u m in the major is 48 hours . A maximum of 6 hours ot social science credit may be counted toward the major in sociology . As no fixed sequence of courses is prescribed, it is rec ommended and expected that students will select an adviser from the sociology faculty to help them develop their programs. This is particularly important for those intending to do graduate work in sociology. Soc. 111-3.1ntroduction to Sociology. Sociology as a science ; man and culture ; social groups ; social institutions ; social interactions ; social change . Soc. 128-3. Race and Minority Problems. Race and racism ; facts and myths about great populations, including psychological , social , and cultural sources of bias and discrimination . Soc. 129-3. The Negro in American Life and History. Examination of the myth and the reality of the Negro in America since the colonial period . Soc. 191-3. Contemporary Social Issues. Introductory consideration ot some 30 current social controversies , such as democracy , capitalism , race and ethnic groups , marr i age , the family , crime , international tensions , and world order. Designed to improve the student's ability to understand current debate and to formulate opin iqns for himself. Soc. 192-3. Contemporary Social Issues. Continuation of Soc . 191. Soc. 199-variable credit. Independent Study in Sociology. Consent of ins tructor required . Soc. 221-3. Elementary Population Studies. Elements of demography , natality , mortality , international and internal migration, population growth , population policy . Soc. 222-3. Human Ecology. Ecological organization and processes in urban , rural , and regional areas. Soc. 239-3. Mass Society. Study of the emergence of modern society . Emphasis on the role of masses and of separated and isolated i ndividuals who lack unifying values and purposes . Soc. 246-3. Introduction to Social Psychology. Survey of the following varieties of social psychology : psychoanalysis , symbolic i nteractionism , culture and personality , structural-functionalism , and psychological social psychology . Topics treated on the introductory level. Soc. 248-3 . Social Movements. Social bases and development features of such modern soc ial and po litical movements as commu nism , socialism , liberalism , and conservatism . Soc. 250-3. Social Problems and Social Change. Sociological analysis of problems resulting from recent social changes including occupational shifts and the redefinition of work , adolescent roles and responses , the massification of education , public responses to crime , deliquency, and mental illness, race and minority relations, community disorganization , and the effects of population growth and redistribution on underdeveloped areas. Emphasis on the development of concepts and theoretical propositions for problem analysis. Soc. 255-3. Analysis of Modern Society. Examination of various sociological views of modern society in cluding those of Lundberg, Richardson, Mills, Riesman , Gottman , Sorokin , Cohen , and others .

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46 / University of Colorado at Denver Soc. 315-3. History of Sociological Thought I. Major social theor i sts from early times to date , i nclud i ng Aristotle , Plato , Mach i avelli, Comte , Spencer. Soc. 316-3. History of Sociological Thought II. Continuation of Soc . 315. Prer., Soc . 315. Soc . 317-3. Statistics. Quantitative techniques used in ana l yzing social phenomena . Prer . , Math . 1 07 or its equ i valent , or consent of instructor. Soc. 409-3. Undergraduate Research Practicum. Pract i cal exper i ence for undergraduates in application of principles of research design and data processing to a social research problem sel ected by the instructor . Soc. 417-3. Research Methods. Design of social research . Application of stat i stical techn i ques and procedures to social phenomena . Prer . , Soc . 317 or consent of instructor . Soc. 421-3. Advanced Population Studies. The sociological importance of population study . Advanced demographic analysis and population theory . Natality , mortality, problems of population growth and international and internal migrations , population policy , and aspects of population planning and control. Soc. 424-3. Migration. World migration patterns . Migration examined as an effect and as an influence . Planned and unplanned m i gration . Soc. 426-3. Urban Sociology. The city in terms of its social structure , residential and i nstitutional patternings , processes of interaction , demographic processes, and patterns of growth and change . Soc . 433-3. Communities. Review and appraisal of community studies . Soc. 443-3. Technology and Modernization. Description and analysis of changing social structure and social relationsh i ps as a response to technological innovat ion and change . Soc. 444-3. Social Stratification. Status , soc i al mobility , and class in selected societies ; elites and leadership problems . Soc. 446-3. Persons in Society. The self in soc i ety-socialization , presentat ion of self and identity , social types , roles , and careers in historical situations . Persons in theories of social organization and action . Soc. 449-3. Social Control. Informal and formal r egulative processes in social behavior , with reference to techniques and processes of social control , such as propaganda , the polit i cal order , and other i nstitutions . Soc. 451-3. Social Institutions. Organized system of pract i ces and socia l roles developed about values. Machinery evolved to regulate the practices and behavior of family , church , government , economy , recreat ion, educat ion. Soc. 453-3. Social Change. Process of change in Western society and its effects on the individual , the family , and economic and pol i t i cal institut i ons. Attention to extremist response to tensions produced by rapid social change in America . Historical analysis of the causes of Western development as a context in which to study the factors aiding and i mpeding the modernization of the emerging nations . Soc. 454-3. Social Mobility. Status , occupational, and i ncome change examined from viewpoints of individual , organization , and society as a whole . Mobil i ty theories proposed by Sorokin , Rogoff , Lenski , Svalastoga , Upset , and Duncan . Special attention to methods of analyzing change , comparative social mobility, and status equilibration . Soc. 455-3. Sociology of the Family. The family as a social institut !on . . Historized development and contemporary cross-cultural analys t s wtth emphasis on the contemporary American family . Soc. 458-3. Contemporary American Social Movements. Examination of contemporary social movements and bases of cleavage an. d . conflict i n contemporary America . Radical Right and New Left , ctvtl nghts , and student activism studied in the light of contemporary soctal facts and their historical roots . Soc. 467-3. Sociology of Education. Sociological study of the tech .niques of education . Classroom procedures, school admtntstratton, educators ' roles , and reciprocal relations of school and community . Soc. 47Q-3. Sociology of Law. Consideration of the formulation interpretation , and legitimacy of legal rules with i n a context of socia l organization. Soc. 477-3. The Sociology of Work. The analysis of work in a variety of organizat i onal sett i ngs with an emphasis on the changing meanings of work . Concern is also d i rected to the i nterrelationsh i ps of the work and the non-work world . Soc. 478-3. Industrial Sociology. The way i n which the factory and the commun i ty influence sociological aspects of industrial relations . Soc. 479-3 . Large-Scale Organization . Analysis o f sociological theories of bureaucracy and inquiry into bureaucratic developments in governmental , industrial , m i litary, and welfare institutions . Soc. 490-3. Senior Seminar. Seminar for senior sociology majors consider ing important concepts , issues , and problems i n sociology . Soc. 495-3. Criminology. Nature and causes of crime as a social phenomenon. Processes of making laws , breaking laws , and reaction t oward the breaking of laws. Cultural signif i cance of the processes of determ i ning the reactions of the community to offenders of the law ; theory of practice of pun i shment ; purposes, uniformity , and similarities of the kinds of disposition . Sociological concepts are used i n th i s area-cultur e , mores , i nstitutions , competition , confl ict, socia l change , and social control. Soc. 496-3. Juvenile Delinquency. Factors involved in delinquent behavior . Problems of a djustment of delinquents and factors in treatment and i n post treatment adjustment. Soc. 499-variable credit. Independent Study. Consent of instructor requ ired. Social Science These courses can satisfy, in part, the area requirement in the social sciences . Soc.Sci. 210-3. The Study of Man in Society I. An integrated i ntroduct ion to concepts and methods of the social sciences as they apply to analysis of societal contexts and analyses of societies at g iven times . Soc . Sci. 211-3. The Study of Man in Society II. Cont i nuation of Soc .Sci. 210 . Emphasis on processes in soc iety-social and cultura l change and evolution , industrialization , urbanization , and other dynamic i nst i tutions . Soc.Sci. 305-3. Education and Culture in Historical Perspective. An analysis of the i nteraction of culture and education in Western society since the Renaissance . Soc. Sci. 320-3 . The Legal Process. Nature of legal reason ing and metnoas 01 legal aevelop.nent. Reciprocal relations of law with political philosophy and ethics . Materials drawn from both public and private law . Soc.Sci. 321-3. The American Indian and Federal Law. In comparison with other citizens , what has been and is the l egal status of American Indians? The objectives of this course are to survey a special status as set forth i n Federal law , to identify its problems , costs and benefits to Native Americans , and to acqua i nt course participants with applications and politics of the law through the study of actual case mater i als . Soc. Sci. 324-3. The Consumer and the Law. A study of the rights of the consumer when dea li ng with corporations, un i ons , and government agencies . Soc.Sci. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto I. Major emphasis on social and institutional ills found in the Black , disadvantaged community . Soc . Sci. 326-3. Pathology of the Ghetto II. Major emphasis on soc ial and inst i tutional ills found in the black , disadvantaged communi ty. Soc.Sci. 327-3. Comparative Urban Cultures. Emphasis on h i storical background and social concerns of diverse cultural and ethnic groups which constitute the modern American c i ty . Soc.Sci. 329-3. The Asian Americans. An investigation of the historical, social, and psychological identity of the Asian Americans and their communities in the United States . Soc.Sci. 335-3. Women in a Changing World. Offers an understanding of the historical, economic , and sociocultural background of women ' s changing roles and function in the contemporary world . The approach and material to be used are mult i disciplinary . The goal i s to reach a balanced understanding through analysis and discussion based on objective information.

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Soc. Sci. 398-variable credit. Cooperative Education. Designed experiences inv olv ing application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised employment situations . Prer., sophomore standing and 2 . 5 grade-point average . Soc. Sci. 402-3. Economic and Political Determinants in a Health Care System. (Healt h Ad. 602 . ) Designed to acquaint the student with the health care industry , in terms of both the organization and de livery of health care services and the socioeconom i c consequences of those services . Soc.Sci. 410-3 . Business and Government. (B . Ad . 410 . ) The study of government regulation of the business systems . Top ics include regulation of business concentration, markets for labor, money, other resources and final products . Prer., Econ . 201-2 02 , Poi.Sci. 110 . Soc.Sci. 411-3. Business and Society. (B . Ad . 411. ) Exam i nat ion of the interrelations between business , society , and the environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socio-economic-business sys tem, current public policy , is sues and social responsibility , and ethics . Prer., Econ . 201-202 , Poi.Sci. 110 , Soc . 111. Soc.Sci. 438-3. Wor1d Politics in the 1970s. A study of great power politics, the role of the United Nations organizat ion, and select crisis situations in the contemporary period . Soc.Scl. 450.3. Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis. The course will focus on a contemporary problem confronting Metropolitan Den ver . URBAN STUDIES MAJOR All students majoring in urban studies will be ex pected to meet the following course requirements : 1 . Soc. Sci. 210 and 211, The Study of Man in Society I and II. 2. Four of the following five upper division courses : Urban Economics (Econ . 425) ; Urban History (Hist. 470); Urban Politics (Pol. Sci. 407); Urban Anthropology (Anthro. 444) ; and Advanced Population Studies (Soc. 421). 3.Any two of the following six minority studies courses : The Chicano Community and Community Or ganization (M. AM. 360); Contemporary Mexican Ameri can I (M. AM. 127); Black Behavioral Analysis I or II (BI.ST. 203 or 204); Religion and the Black Man (BI.St. 223); The Asian Americans (Soc. Sci. 329) ; and Under graduate Seminar in American Indian Education (Soc. Sci. 391). 4 . In addition, each student must successfully com plete the Seminar in Urban Problem Analysis (Soc. Sci. 450). This course will focus upon the analysis of a single local urban problem from an interdisciplinary perspec. tive . Extensive field work will further familiarize the stu dent with the roles and techniques required in the analysis of urban problems and will serve to integrate in a practical applied setting theories and sources of in formation developed in previous academic work. The above core program of required courses speci fies a minimum of 27 of 42 units required for graduation with the urban studies major. Though a variety of op tions is available, the student will be permitted basically to choose 15 hours of electives from the following courses: Anthropology Anthro. 310-3 . Cultural Pluralism Anthro . 416-3 . Ecology, Adaptation , and Culture Anthro . 443 3 . Economic Anthropology Anthro . 451-3 . Applied Cultural Anthropology Anthro . 456-3 . Contemporary American Indian Cultures College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 47 Anthro . 459-3 . Comparative Social Organ ization Anthro . 481-3 . Language and Culture Economics Econ . 427-3 . Transportation Economics Econ . 453-3 . Resource Economics Econ . 460-3 . Introduction to Human Resources Econ. 461-3 . Labor Economics Econ . 463-3. Income Security Econ. 492-variable credit. Special Econom ic Problems History H ist. 465-3 . History of American Econom ic Growth I Hist. 466-3 . History of American Econom i c Growth II Political Science Pol. Sci. 403-3 . Political Parties and Pressure Groups I Pol. Sci. 408-3 . Municipal Government and Administration Pol. Sci. 409-3. Comparative Metropolitan Systems Pol. Sci. 451-3 . Black Politics Sociology Soc. 317-3 . Statist ics Soc . 417-3 . Research Methods Soc. 424-3. Migration Soc . 426 3 . Urban Sociology Soc . 433-3. Commun ities Soc . 444-3 . Stratification Soc . 446-3. Persons in Society Soc . 478-3 . Industrial Organization Soc . 479-3. Large Scale Organization Soc . 495-3. Criminology Soc . 496-3 . Juvenile Delinquency Communication and Theatre C . T . 315-3 . Discussion Group C . T . 423-3. Group Communication Theory Geography Geog. 402-3 . Geography and Populations Geog . 407-3. Location Analysis of Human Activities Philosophy Phil. 424-3 . Philosoph i cal Problems and Contemporary Culture Psychology Psych . 440-3 . Social Psychology Psych . 493-3 . Industrial Psychology Civil Engineering C . E . 340-2 . City Plann in g C . E. 442-4 . Municipal Des i gn C. E . 448-3 . Introduction to Environmental Pollution Black Studies Bl. St. 115-3. Law and Minorities Bl. St. 215 3 or 216-3. Afro American History I or II Bl. St. 325-3 . Pathology of the Ghetto Bl. St. 370-3. Culture , Racism, and Alienation Bl. St. 412-3 . Civil Rights Mexican American Stud ies M . AM. 300-3 . The Chicano Movement M. AM . 405-3 . Intergroup Relations Native American Studies N . AM . 472-3 . North American Indian Art Social Science Soc . Sci. 398-variable credit. Cooperative Education

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48/ University of Colorado at Denver Ethnic Programs Programs for minority groups were established on the Denver Campus in 1969. Since then the quality and scope of these programs have expanded greatly . Courses are presently offered in Asian American , Black , Mexican American , and Native American Studies. Student organizations provide assistance with recruiting, counseling, personal guidance , and tutoring; financial help is available through grants and the Work-Study Program . ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES ANDREW G . WILLIAMS , Director Soc . Sci. 329-3. The Asian Americans. Examines the experience of Asian Americans from a sociological perspective. Emphas izes analysis of activities and problems . The history of the groups is reviewed and the contemporary situation in their communities receives attention . Class is structured around lecture / discussion , reading materials, speakers, films, and field trips . Students have the opportunity to work on projects related to Asian American communities and peoples . Soc.Sci. 330-3. Topics on Asian Americans. Examines specific topics on Asian Americans to be selected by the instructor and the students . Detailed study of subjects related to the Asian American experience and communities . BLACK STUDIES CECIL E. GLENN , Director BI.St. 110-3. Black Contemporary Social Issues. Designed to expose the student to those areas of intellectual, social , cultural, economic, political, and educational concerns relevant to the Afro -American experience . Principally an introductory survey of primary issues currently affecting the black man. BI.St. 112-3. Introduction to Black Studies. A course des igne d to acquaint new students with the history, purpose , organization , and goal of the Black Education Program . BI.St. 115-3. Law and Minorities. Designed to acquaint students with the legal system of American society, including contracts , buying and selling , wills and i nheritance , family relations, civil wrongs , and criminal law in order to develop a cooperative relationship between the law and minorities . BI. St. 160-3 . Economic History of Africa. A study of the blackman in Africa before and after the coming of Europeans with emphasis on the economic aspect of Africa ' s historical development. BI.St. 201-3. Swahili Ill. Advanced Swahili with emphasis on the development of spoken fluency and on reading contemporary Swahili materials . Prer . , Swahili II. (Taught at Metropolitan State College.) BI.St. 203-3. Behavioral Analysis I . A psychology course which deals with the i nterrelationships between the black individual and his social environment. Social influences upon motivation , percept ion, and behavior . The development and change of attitudes and opinions in the ghetto . Bi.St. 204-3. Behavioral Analysis II. Psychological analysis of small groups , social stratification , and mass phenomena such as riots. Continuation of BI.St. 203 . BI.St. 210-3. Politics of Contemporary Africa I. Systematic survey of modern Africa with special emphasis on selected countries , both independent and nonindependent. Southern Africa : political i mpacts of racial and religious problems , stressing recent development in Rhodesia, South Africa , and the Portuguese colonies of Ango la and Mozambique . BI.St. 215-3. Afro-American History I. Survey of the h i story of Afro -Am ericans . Study , inter pretations , and analysis of major problems , issues , and trends affecting the black man from pre -slavery to the present. BI.St. 216-3. Afro-American History II. Continuation of BI.St. 215 . BI.St. 220-3. Black Social Movements. (Soc. 228.) Developmental paradigms for bi ack social movements . Differential linear movements, theories of nationalism, integration, separatism, rhetorical nationalism, and tyranny . BI.St. 221-3. Black Social Theory. (Soc. 229.) Historical paradigms for black social movements . Strategies and tactics of racial recurring ideol ogy , Pan-Africanism, nationalism, civil r:ghts, black power , and riot movements. Continuation of Bi.St. 220 . BI.St. 223-3. Religion of the Black Man. Critical examination of the black family ' s utilization of religious beliefs and prac tices . BI.St. 227-2. Interrelated Studies. An integrated study of the development of the black man in the arts, history, literature , politics , economics, etc . BI.St. 250-3. Capitalism and Slavery I. (Econ . 250 . ) The development of slavery as an American in stitution from 1619 to 1970 , the plantation system, the growth of the slave trade, the stimulation of the American economy by slavery, the Civil War as an economic conflict between the industrialists of the North and the agriculturalists of the South . BI. St. 251-3 . Capitalism and Slavery II. ( Econ . 251.) Post-Civil War to the present , trade unions, legislation , the urban crisis , and " Black Capitalism. " Continuation of BI.St. 250 . BI.St. 270-3. African-American Art History I. (Fine Arts 270 . ) A study of black art in both Africa and the Americas; problems in depict ing real life experiences of black people . BI.St. 271-3. African-American Art History 11. (Fine Arts 271.) Continuation of BI.St. 270 . BI.St. 272-3 . The American Writer and the Black Man I. Close read ing and analysis of significant literary works by black or white Ameri can writers treating black Americans : novels , poems , plays, and essays . BI.St. 273-3. The American Writer and the Black Man II. Continua tion of BI.St. 272 but may be taken independently of that course . BI.St. 274-3. Survey of Ethnic Literature. (Engl. 274 . ) This course is designed study of var ious ethnic writers as to their contributions to literature from their own particular culture with reference to their per ception of life through their literary efforts . BI.St. 274-3. Survey of Ethnic Literature. This course is designed study of various ethnic writers as to their contributions to literature from their own particular culture with reference to their perception of life through the ir literary efforts. BI.St. 280-3. Afro-American Music History and Appreciation I. A study of the history of black music. The African background and the influenc es of Europe and the Carribbean. Emphasis on Afro-American folk music . BI.St. 281-3. Afro-American Music History and Appreciation II. Music since 1900-religious and secular. The development of jazz , modern rhythm , and blues today. Black musicians and their technical development. Continuation of BI.St. 280 . BI.St. 325-3. Pathology of the Ghetto . ( Soc.Sci . 325.) Designed to analyze black ghetto frustration and despair as elements in urban crisis , with emphasis on possible solutions through various community agencies . BI.St. 326-3 . (Soc.Sci. 326 . ) Continuation of BI.St. 325 . BI. St. 330-3. Law and the Black Man. A two-semester seminar which will place major emphasis on the law and legal institutions in America . Particular emphasis will be placed on the legislative and judicial functions in the struggle for civil rights. All major and U .S. Supreme Court decisions , as well as significant legislative enactments , will be examined in depth . BI.St. 370-3. Culture, Racism, and Alienation. Effects of racism on the individual personality of the recipient and the donor of practices evolving from participation in a racist culture . BI.St. 390-3. Modem African Literature I. (Engl. 390.) A survey of contemporary African literature. The ma i n forces which have shaped modem African literature, and the crisis and conflicts of the African man and his culture in contact with these forces as they are portrayed by the African writer.

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BI.St. 391-3. Modem African Literature II. (Engl. 391 . ) Continuation of BI.St. 390. BI.St. 412-3 . Civil Rights and Fair Employment Practices . Designed to give the student the necessary background to enter the field of civil rights and equal employment opportunities . Emphasis on Fair Employment Practices procedures . Field visits . BI.St. 434-3. Black Art and Society I. (F i ne Arts 434.) A two-semester seminar dealing with black art in r elationship to society . The Influences of the black revolution , black culture , political thought , and 1ntegrat1on. BI.St. 435-3 . Black Art and Society II. (Fine Arts 435 . ) Continuation of BI.St. 434 . EOP/SPECIAL SERVICES DANNY MARTINEZ, Director The Educational Opportunity Program / Special Ser vices Project is concerned with the academic success of low-income, educationally disadvantaged and physically handicapped students. It prov ides its participants with counsel ing, tutoring , special curriculum, and other services designed to remedy any deficiencies or prob lems which the students may have . Classes offe red through Special Services are restricted to students participating in the project. M.AM. 100-3 . Writing and Study Skills. Review of techniques for studying languages, science , mathematics, and other areas. Systems of note-taking , research methods (including proper use of library facilities) , preparing for and taking examinations , as well as building self-confidence will be discussed . M .AM. 102-3. Beginning Algebra and Geometry . Review of basic mathematics , i ncluding fractions and signed numbers . Includes an introduction to basic algebra . T he class terminates with an i ntroduction to basic geometry . M . AM. 103-3 . Advanced Algebra and Geometry . Students review what they learned in the beginn ing class and advance to a thorough study of basic geometry. In addition, students acquire skills in the use of logarithms and the slide rule . MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES NEREYDA LUNA BOTTOMS , Director M . AM . 100-3. Introduction to Mexican American Studies. Required of all incoming M.A.E . P . students . Course will reveiw techniques for studying la nguages , science , mathematics, and other areas . Systems of notetaking , research methods (including proper use of library facilities) , preparing for and taking examinations, as well as building self-confidence will be discussed . M.AM. 111-3. Introduction to Drama: Chicano Workshop. Designed to encourage and guide the development of student acting , directing, and playwriting, with a concentration on the specialized techniques and content of Teatro Campesino . M.AM. 112-3. Bilingual Skills. A basic language course in which students with a background of both Spanish and English can learn the similarities as well as the differences i n the two languages. Oral as well as written exercises in Spanish . Readings in Southwest folklore . M.AM. 127-3. Contemporary Mexican American I. ( Soc . 127 . ) An i ntroductory sociology course in which the bas i c terminology of the Chicano milieu is defined and a survey made of the Chicano movement from its early manifestat ions to the present. M.AM. 135-1. Beginning International Folk Dance , Spanish and Mexican. (P. E . 135.) Basic dances of Mexico and Spain : El Jarabe Tapatio; La Bamba, jotas , and paso dobles . M.AM . 136-1. Advanced International Folk Dance , Spanish and Mexican . (P. E . 136. ) An advanced course in the dances of Spain and Mexico including : jotas , paso dobles , zapateados, and huastecas, and jaranas . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 49 M.AM. 137-3. Contemporary Mexican American II. (Soc . 137.) Cont i nuation of M .AM. 127 . A more detailed breakdown of the many facets of the Chicano movement today. M . AM . 211-3. Contemporary Mexican Literature in Translation. Mexican literat ure since World War I has been in the forefront o f literary innovations directly reflecting the rapid progress and changes in the society . The purpose of the course is literary but serves also to dispel many false views of Mexico as a rural , traditionally conservative country . M . AM. 212-3. Contemporary Latin American Literature in Translation. The approach is the same as in M .AM. 211. The best of the contemporary Latin American authors are studied : Borges , Fuentes , Rullo , Carpentier , Cortazar , and others . M.AM . 213-3. History of Chicano Art. A survey of art , indigenous as well as that with Spanish and Mexican influence . The focus on the Mexican American includes the fields of painting , sculpture , and architecture . M.AM. 300-3. The Chicano Movement . A study of the ideas of the contemporary thinkers and leaders of today ' s Mexican Amer i can and the events which have shaped them. M.AM . 302-3. Methodology of Tutoring the Educationally Disadvantaged . A course designed to i mprove the tutorial skills of upper-classmen , espec i ally Chicanos, or those who expect to help minority students . Concentration on tutoring of basic skills required for M.A.E.P . and Special Services tutors . M .AM. 303-3. History of the Spanish Language in the Southwest. The Spanish of the southwest is compared to that spoken in other areas of the world . The course i s the first and most basic in the linguist i c series in the Span ish d i scipline. Basic linguist i c term i nology is introduced and applied in the analysis of Southwest Span ish. Prer., Spanish 212 or equivalent. M.AM. 304-3. Workshop in Southwest Spanish. A research-or i ented workshop designed to conduct an indepth analysis of Southwest Spanish through field study. Basic fundamentals of field research will be introduced . Prer . , M .AM. 303 or consent of inst1 uctor . M.AM. 310-3 . Mexican American Ethnic Relations. (Same as Anthro . 310. ) The anthropology of North Americans of Spanish . Spanish-Indian , and Mexi can national descent , ethnohistorical backgrounds , current i nterrelat i ons and soc ial movements among rural and urban groups . Cultural patterns , ide ntity maintenance , and the social forms and problems of nationa l incorporation. M . AM. 311-3. Mexican Literature in Translation-Poetry. A survey of the masterpieces of Mexican poetry in English translations from Aztec poetry to modern day . M.AM. 312-3. Mexican Literature In Translation-Narrative. A survey of the masterpieces of Mexican narrative work s in English translation s , from the Po pol Vuh a Chilam Balam to the contemporary period. M . AM. 313-3. Arts of the Mexican Revolution . A study of the art forms that developed during the years of the Mexican Revolution . Both plastic and letters inclu ded . M.AM . 340-3 . Social Psychology and the Mexican American. ( Psych . 340.) Exposes students to the research on Mexican Americans i n the fields of intelligence and achievement , language and learning ability , attitudes , perception, personality , and motivation . M.AM. 369-3. Historical Geography of the Southwest . Regional study of man and culture i n relationship to the environment. M.AM. 383-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado I. (Hist. 383. ) Research-oriented seminar course in which the student is expected to gather material on the subject from or i ginal sources. M.AM. 384-3. History of Mexican American in Colorado 11. (Hist. 384.) Continuation of M .AM. 383 . M.AM. 399-3. History of the Mexican in the Southwest. A survey of the history of the Southwestern region of the U . S . from the indigenous origins, through Spanish conquest and colonization and later Anglo invasion . M.AM. 405-3. Intergroup Relations. (Soc. 405. ) A study of i ntergroup (race) relations at the small group level. Includes analysis of a group that has been stratified into a majority number of white students and a fixed number of minority students .

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50 / University of Colorado at Denver M.AM. 413. Contemporary Chicano Literature . (Engl. 413 . ) A study of the present narrat ive literature produced by Chicanos . No pol i tica l slant i s i mposed . The literary value is emphasized . M.AM . 430-3. Chicano and the U.S. Social System. A study of the Mex i can American in his contact with the systems o f j ustice , education , politics and soc ial sets , primarily i n the Southwest. M.AM . 432-3. Education in Multilingual Communities. ( Soc . 432 . ) A comb i ned soc ial problem and sociolinguistic approach to education in mult i lingual communities i n the United States Southwest. Topics considered will include historical and contemporary trends i n schools ' language poli cies and pract i ces ; intra-school social and academ i c strat i f ication; and consequences f or stude n t a c h i evement, asp ir a tion s , and vocational choice and channeling . M.AM . 459-3 . Mexican American in the Southwest. A stu dy of the development of the soc ial structures of the Mexi can Amer i can i n the Southwest and the forces that have affected them . M.AM. 460-3 . The Chicano Community and Community Organizations. ( Soc . 460 . ) Examination of the origin of the terms " community " and " bar rio." A comparative analysis of the i nternal barr i o structure and the larger society . Commun i ty organization and commun i ty development. Posi tive and negat ive role models / l eaders . Methods and techn i ques of community organ i zation as related to La Raza . M.AM. 462-3. The New Chicano Movement. ( Soc . 462 . ) A sem i nar i n which extensive field research i s r equired o f the student s a imed at discovering the current role of the Chicano i n American soc i ety . Note : Spanish 101 and 102 spec ial M.A.E . P . sec tions are taught by a Chicano with an understanding of the particular problems of the bilingual student. NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES LINDA MASON , Director N.AM. 250. The American Indian Experience. An introduct ion to Native Amer i can l i terature and other express ive f orms with emphasis on the aesthetic , l i ngu i st i c , psycho l ogical , and h i stor i cal propert ies, as well as the contemporary , soc ial, and cultural i nfluence upon the native author and his mater ial. N.AM. 321. The American Indian and Federal Law: A Survey of Legal Status and Problems. ( Soc .Sci. 321. ) A survey of the specia l status of American Indi ans , as well as the problems , costs , and benef its affect ing various tribal groups and indiv iduals as e x empl i f ied in a sel ect ion of actua l case studies . N.AM. 391-3 . Seminar in American Indian Education. ( Soc . Sci. 391. ) Study of the h i stor i cal development of American Ind ian educat i on and proposed solutions to selected problems in contemporary Indian education . Emphasis on alternative means as viewed by American Indi ans . N.AM. 436-3. The American Indian in Contemporary Society. (Anthro. 436 . ) Begins with the historical background on American Indian acculturation and persistence , but emphasizes the present day relat i ons between Indian communit ies and the dominant soc i ety , stress i ng conditions and events in Denver and the Southwest generally . N.AM. 472-3. North American Indian Art. (Fine Arts 472 . ) Survey of major t r ibal styles of the North American continent. Special Programs COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM DANIEL GUIMOND, Coordinator The University of Colorado at Denver offers undergraduates an opportunity to earn academic credit for approved work experience through the Cooperative Education Program. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences participates in this program, listing three divisional courses; A. H . 398, N . P . S . 398, and S.Sc. 398 . Students placed by the cooperative education office in paid or volunteer ass i gnments , as well as students who have obtained their own jobs , may be eligible , subject to the guidelines below : 1 . The student should have reached the sophomore level of University work and must be a degree student i n College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . 2. The participating student should have at least a 2 . 5 grade-point average . Students with GPAs in the 2 . 0 (C) to 2.4 range must obtain the approval of the dean in order to participate in the program . 3 . Job experiences approved for credit should be preprofessional in nature and should be generally related to the student's major area of study . Jobs of a routine nature , lacking experience relat i ve to the undergraduate academic curriculum , are not suitable for University credit. 4 . A job in which the learning possibilities and responsibilities of the student remain static w ill not be approved for more than one semester . In contrast , a job in which the learning opportunities and responsibilities vary and increase may be eligible for credit over a longer time span . 5 . Projects will be granted from 1 to 6 hours of elec tive credit per semester , 3 being the normal credit for each project. However , certain projects , such as full time intensive internship , may be granted as much as 6 credits. 6 . Twelve semester hours will be the normal maximum number of credits a student can earn in cooperative education . In some disciplines , cooperative education hours may count toward satisfying require ments for the major . Information and forms for placement and credit are available in Room 809 , or call ext. 555. DISTRIBUTED STUDIES PROGRAM Students working toward the B . A . degree may elect a major in a Distributed Studies Program in any one of the three divisions of the College . Requirements are a minimum of 60 semester hours in two or three subjects in which a discipline major program for the B .A. is offered. One of these shall be designated the primary subject. Discipline advisers shall have the prerogative of designating acceptable secondary subjects . Primary Subject. Minimum of 30 hours. (Not more than 30 hours will be required.) The grade-point average in the primary subject must be at least 2 .0; 30 hours of work must carry grades of C or better; 12 hours must be in upper division courses in which grades of C or better have been earned. The adviser for the primary area may stipulate specific course requirements . Secondary Subjects. Minimum of 30 hours distributed in one or two disciplines . A secondary subject shall consist of at least 12 hours in one discipline. Language Courses . No first-year course in English (1 00-101) or fo . reign language (1 01-1 02) may be used in satisfaction of the requirements of either a primary or a secondary subject.

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HONORS PROGRAM The Honors Program of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is des i gned for the student who likes to deal creat ivel y w ith ideas and who des i res to extend his education beyond the usual course requirements . The Honors Program also is responsible for determining which students merit the award of the bachelor ' s degree with honors : cum laude , magna cum laude , and summa cum l aude. These awards are made on the bas i s of special honors work and not simply o n the basis of grades. All honors courses are awarded upper div i sion credit. • A student may in either discipline honors or general honors , or both .lo become a candidate for discipline honors , the student must (1) have a 3 . 0 grade-point average ; (2) complete spec ial work such as seminars or research projects required by his particular discipline ; ( 3) take both the Undergraduate Program Area Test ( m Humanities , Natural Science , and Soc ial Science) and the Advanced Graduate Record Examinat ion; and (4) take an oral examination given by a committee of faculty members in his discipline and a member of the Honors Counc il. To become a candidate for genera l honors , the student must ( 1) have a 3 . 0 grade-po i nt average ; (2) complete at least four general honors courses ; (3) take the Undergraduate Program Area Test ; and (4) take oral and written honors examinations . Any qual i fied student may enroll in honors courses without becoming a candidate for graduation w i th honors . There are no examinations i n the honors courses themselves ; and no letter grades are awarded , only H P (Pass) , and F (Fail) . Detailed 1n!ormat1on concerning the Honors Program ma be obtamed from Dr . Fahrion , director, or i n the Off1ce of the Dean . STUDY SKILLS CENTER KATHY R . JACKSON , Director St.Sk. 100-1 . Developmental Composition. Offe red a s a n ai d to i mprov ing w riting s k ills. Areas i n whi c h the s tudent f eels a need f or growth are e x plo red, and a concentrated program for i mprovement i s then determ i ned fo r each individual. The mechan i cs of writing as well a s metho d s of res ea rch ar e rev i ewed a s a gene ral guide for compo s it ion gr owth . St.Sk . 101-1. Developmental Composition. Offered a s an ai d to i mproving writing skills . Area s i n which the student feel s a need f or comprehens i on . Improvement of other related reading skills , such as skimming and scanning , critical reading , read ing for the ma i n i dea , and signif i ca n t facts also are offered . St.Sk . 102-1. College Preparatory Mathematics. Offered as both a r ef r eshe r course f o r t hose int e r ested in b rushin g u p pre v ious a l gebra skills and an aid for students requir i ng specific help w ith any a l gebra course offered by the University . Preprofessional Programs CHILD HEALTH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM The Child Health Associate Program at the University of Colorado Medical Center is a three-year program designed to train men and women in ambulatory pediatric care of infants , children , and adolescents . The program emphasizes the medical and psychosocial College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /51 aspects of health care. Graduates of the p r ogram receive a Bachelor of Science (Child Health Assoc i ate) degree from the School of Medicine and are licensed to work i n assoc i ation with a physicia n i n such sett i ngs as private physicians ' offices , neighbo r hood health cli n ics, and public health fac i lities . Two years of college (60 semester hours, including one year of biology [ Bioi. 205-206 ]; one year o f chem istry [ Chern. 101-102 ]; one year of psychology [ Psych . 203 204 ]; and one year or 6 semester hours fro m one of the following areas-English, humanities , social sciences , or commun i cation) are required . Courses in anthropology, organ i c chemistry , and/ or Spanish are recommended. For further information write: Chi ld Health Associate Prog ram Box 2662 University of Colorado Medical Center 4200 East Ninth Avenue Denver, Colorado 80220 or telephone 394-7965 . At UCD , contact the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508 . The Child Health Associate Program also has been approved to award a Master of Science degree for those students who meet the criteria for admittance into the Graduate School. PREDENTAL HYGIENE In conjunction w ith the School of Dentistry , a B .S. degree program i n dental hygiene is available at the Uni vers i ty of Colorado. Dental hygiene enjoys an important role in the f ield of health science . The dental hygienist is concerned with the prevention of dental disease and is the only member of the auxiliary group i n the dental profession who performs a service d i rectly for a patient. The dental hygien i st must satisfactorily complete a college program and pass the state board examination . After being licensed by the state in which he or she wishes to practice , the dental hygienist has many opportunities for employment in private dental offices , state and city health agencies , federal government agencies , public and private schools , industrial dental clinics and hospitals , and in schools of dental hygiene as directors and teachers. Prerequisites . Two years of college (60 semester hours , including English composition , 6 semester hours ; mathematics, 3 semester hours ; psychology , 3 semester hours ; philosophy , 3 semester hours ; speech, 3 semester hours ; sociology , 3 semester hours ; general chemistry with laboratory [ Chern . 1011 02 ], 8 semester hours ; and general biology with laboratory [B ioi. 205206 ], 8 semester hours) . For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508. PRE DENTISTRY The University of Colorado School of Dentistry admitted its first class in June 1973. The student planning to seek admission to the School of Dentistry should consult the Health Sc i ences Committee, Room 508 , concerning his program . A minimum of 90 semester hours of accredited college or

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52/ University of Colorado at Denver university work must be completed. While there is no prescribed curriculum , the following courses are required: Semesters General chemistry (103-106) .......... .... .... ..... . . .... . ......................... . . 2 Organic chemistry (341343 and 342-344) ..... . .... ............... . ......... . 2 General biology (205-206) ...... . .... ................. .................. . .............. 2 Physics (201-202 or 111-112-114) .... ............ ........... ..... ............. ... 2 Genetics (Bioi. 383) ........... .... .................... ........... . . ................ .... .... 1 Engl ish l iterature ..... ................ ....... . ............. . ....... .... . . . . ................... 2 Mathematics . ..................................... ............. ........ ..... .... . .............. 2 (Should include at least college-level algebra and trigonometry or equivalent through advanced placement. Although calculus is not required , it is urged as a valuable conceptual bas i s for physiological processes . ) One semester of English composition is recommended and will be required for the classes entering fall 1978 and later . Applications are due December 15 for the class start ing the following June. TEACHER EDUCATION Students are referred to the School of Education office on the Denver Campus for detailed information concerning teacher education programs at both elementary and secondary levels. Two avenues are open to students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in teaching. 1. Elementary education majors and distr ibuted studies majors preparing to teach at the secondary school level normally transfer from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year and continue on to receive the Bachelor of Science degree in education. 2 . Students with a major program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who seek certification for teaching at the secondary school level remain in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the bachelor ' s degree , but take approximately 32 hours of professional education work in the School of Education. Pre-Education Program Students pursuing elementary education or distributed studies majors for secondary school teachers should so indicate on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by faculty members of the School of Education. Application for transfer to the School of Education and for admission to the Teacher Education Program should be made during the last semester of the sophomore year . The minimum requirements for acceptance are: 1 . Completion of at least 60 semester hours of acceptable college work with a grade-point average of 2.5 for all courses attempted, and 2.5 for all courses attempted at the University of Colorado ; and 2.5 in the major teaching field. No student will be recommended for certification to teach in any field or subject in which the grade-point average is less than 2 . 5 . 2. General education requirements for students planning to student teach at the secondary or elementary school level as follows: a . General Education (with early counseling, a major part of gen eral education , urban studies , and teaching field requirements can be combined) : (1) 12 cumulat ive semester hours to be completed in eac h of the following three areas ; sequences of course work not required : Semester Hours Arts and Humanities . . ........ ...................... .............. . 12 (In order to meet typical certif i cation requirements in other states , students should take at least 6 semes ter hours of humanities i n English language courses, e.g., Engl. 100 , Exposition I ; Engl. 101, Exposition II; Engl. 480 , Advanced Composition ; Engl. 484 , English Grammar ; Engl. 485 , History of the English Language) Social Sciences . . .... . . ..... . ........ ....... ........................... 12 Natural and Physical Sc i ences ... . .... .... ............. 12-16 (2) For elementary certification , the following work should be inc lude d as part of general education requ i rements : Two courses i n physical sci ence w ith lab . Two courses in biological science with lab. Two courses i n mathematics (Math . 303 and 304 ) b . Urban Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) .......... 9 Bachelor of Arts (in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) With Teacher Certification Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who intend to pursue a regular major curriculum in one of the disciplines or programs in the College, and who also desire secondary school teacher certification , must apply for and be accepted into the teacher education program . The requirements for such admission are identical with those in " a " above . These students also must meet all requirements for a bachelor ' s degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Early planning is crucial for students intendi ng to enter the teacher education program . Since the School of Education has initiated a new program at both the elementary and secondary levels, students are urged to consult the school early and regularly concerning new requirements. Professional Preparation for College Teachers The School of Education offers counseling to pro spective college-level teachers and has a number of courses suitable to their needs . A program for the preparation of community college teachers is now avail able in some subject fields. PREJOURNALISM Students are referred to the School of Journalism Bulletin for detailed information concerning require ments for the Bachelor of Science degree in journalism, which is granted only on the Boulder Campus . Prejournalism students should so designate them selves on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by members of the faculty of the School of Journalism (Boulder) . Students normally transfer to the School of Jour nalism at the beginning of the junior year. Application for intra-University transfer must be filed not later than 90 days prior to the term . for which the student wishes to

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register, or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration . A cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in prior work at the University of Colorado is required . PRELAW Students are referred to the School of Law Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the professional degree, Juris Doctor (J.D.), which is granted only on the Boulder Campus. The School of Law of the University of Colorado re quires a bachelor ' s degree for admission, but does not stipulate courses that shall constitute a prelaw cur riculum. The Law School Admission Test is required of all applicants for admission to the School of Law and should be taken as early as possible during the senior year in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students are urged to consult the Admissions Office of the School of Law, Room 118 , Fleming Law Building, Boulder , Colorado 80302 . MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY This curriculum leading to a B.S. degree in medical technology awarded by the School of Medicine con sists of six semesters of course work in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences followed by 12 months of clinical training at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver. Normally 94 semester hours of credit are earned in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and 40 semes ter hours of credit are allowed at the School of Medicine . To be eligible for admission to the clinical year at the School of Medicine a student must have met all course requirements prerequisite to clinical training as estab lished by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists . In addition , the student must meet the course require ments of the University of Colorado in medical tech nology . The clinical training period begins about June 15 of each year and continues for one calendar year. Applica tions must be received by February 1. No students are admitted to the clinical program at any time other than in June . Students must meet the grade-point requirements for graduation as outlined in the School of Medicine Bulle tin . Curriculum for B.S. Degree in Medical Technology fulfilling requirements, as well as general elect1ves, are to be chosen in consultation with the student's adviser. 1 . Six semesters of requirements to be taken in the C o llege of Liberal Arts and Sciences (with a minimum science GPA of 2.75 on a scale of 4 .0): Specif ic Requ irements Semester Hours "Chemistry . 0000 0000 00 00 oo ••••• 00 00.000.00 •• 00 000.000.00.00 00 00 00 • • 00.000 0000 0000 00. ooOO 16 Usually i ncludes General Chemistry (Chern. 1 03 1 06) plus biochem istry or organic chemistry . Quantitative analysis and phys ical chemistry are recommended . " Biology ..................... . ....................................... . ........... .......... 16 Must include microbiology or bacteriology . Remaining credits are earned from general biology , physiology , genetics , anatomy , histology , or embryology . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 53 Mathematics .. 00 00 00 00 00. 00. 00 00 00 00 00. 00 •• 00. 00. 00 00 00. 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 00. 00 00. 5-1 0 College algebra ; familiarity with the pr i nciples of calculus is desirable . • Physics .. oo.ooooooooooooooooo.ooooooooooooooo •• oo.oo.oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo•• 5-10 General physics , dealing with mechanics , optics , pneu matics , hydraulics , weight and measurements . General Curriculum (advised, not required) English .. ooooooooooooooo•oo oooooooooooooo •• oo.oo • • oooooooooo . ............. ooooooooooo 6 Speech or communications oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 000000 .. 00 .. .. 0000"00"00 3 Social sciences 00 • • 00. 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 00 00 00. 00. 00. 00. 00. 00. 00 •• 00 •••• 00 00. 00. 00. 00. 6 Phys ical education ... 00 •••• 00000 00 00 00 00 00 000.00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0000 00 •• 00 •• 00 00 2 Modern language (German , Russian , F rench, or Spanish . . 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 000.00 000 000 00 •• 00 •••• 00 00 00 0000 00 00... 3 10 Total semester hours 94-96 2. One calendar year on the Medical Center Campus in Denver . Requirements are listed in the School of Medicine Bulletin. Forty semester hours of credit are allowed . For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508 . PREMEDICINE Students are referred to the School of Medicine Bulletin for information concerning admissions policies of the School of Medicine and details of the curriculum leading to the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree . There is no prescribed curriculum for the premedical student , although certain courses are required (see below). Students intending to seek admission to the School of Medicine should fulfill all requirements for the bachelor ' s degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, even though in certain cases students may be admitted to a medical school without an undergraduate degree . On all application and registration materials, premedical students should so designate themselves so that they may be advised by the Health Sciences Committee, Room 508. Such students are urged to consult regularly with their advisers concerning choice of courses and requirements, applications, and evaluation for medical schools. In addition to an excellent overall academic record, premedical students must present superior work in the following courses: Semesters General chemistry (103-106) oooooo00oooooooooooooooooooo ...... oooooo0000000000000000' 2 Organic chemistry (341-343 and 342-344 ) 0000 000000 000000 00 .... 00 .... 00 0000 00 2 General biology or zoology (205-206) 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 .. 00 00 0000 0000. 2 Physics , inc luding lab. (201-202 or 111-112 114) ooooOoOOOOOoOOOOOOOOOOOOO 2 Literature . 00 • • 00.00. 00 0000 00 00 •••• 000 00.0000 00 • • 00 00 00 00 00. oo 00 •• 00.00 • • 00.00. 000 0000 00 .. 0000 000 2 Mathematics 000 00 •• 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 • • 00 00 00 00 0000 00 00 00 00 00 00 •• 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 2 (Should include at least college-level algebra and trigonometry or equivalent through advanced placement. Although calculus is not required , it is urged as a valuable conceptual basis for understanding rates of change in physiological processes . ) One semester of English composition is recommended and will be required for the classes entering fall 1978 and later. Beyond these specific courses, however, the School of Medicine strongly discourages premedicine students from taking courses covering material to be studied in 'The courses in biology , chemistry , and physics named above should i nclude laboratory work .

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54/ University of Colorado at Denver medical school. Rather , the undergraduate years should provide a liberal education as the foundation for technical and professional post-graduate study . A student should choose a major from those fields that interest him most ; it is not necessary that the ma j or be in a technical o r scientific area . PRENURSING Students are referred to the School of Nursing Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in nurs ing. Prenursing students should so designate themselves on all application and registration materials so that advis ing may be obtained through the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508 . The nursing program is a 4 Y 2 year curriculum involving two years of pre nursing studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences followed by a 2Y2-year program in the School of Nursing. Transfer from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the School of Nursing is normally made at the beginn ing of the j unior year , but applications for admission to the upper d i vision nursing program must be submitted by March 1 . Preprofessional requirements for admission to the School of Nurs ing include the completion of 60 semes ter hours with a grade average of at least 2.0 . The fol lowing courses are required : NATURAL SCIENCES B i o l ogy : One year general b i ology or zoology i ncluding labo r atory ( Bioi . 205 206 ) Chem istr y : One yea r gene ral chemistry w i t h l aboratory , inclu d in g inorganic and organic (Chern . 101-102) SOCIAL SCIENCES Psycho l ogy : One year of course work in general psycho l ogy including content in the phys i ological basis of behavior ( Psych . 203-204 ) Soci ology : Two courses i n general sociology (Soc. 111 and one o t her cou rse or Soc . Sci. 210 and one othe r cou rse. Soc . Sci. 211 will meet requ i rement ) Cultural anthropology : One course (Anthro . 1 04 ) GENERAL EDUCATION AND ELECTIVES At l east two two semester sequences in two areas below : Communication and theatre History Econom ics Honors Engl ish literature Mathematics Ethn i c studies Philosophy Fine arts Political science Fore i gn l anguage PRE PHARMACY Students are referred to the School of Pharmacy Bulletin for details of the curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Pharmacy degree . All academic advising for prepharmacy students is conducted by faculty members of the School of Pharmacy. Students should contact the school office , Ekeley 274 (Boulder Campus) , and arrange to meet with advisers . Advising may be obtained through the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508 , Denver Campus . Application for transfer to the School of Pharmacy must be filed no later than 90 days prior to the term for which the student wishes to register , or 60 days prior to preregistration if the student participates in early registration . Prior to enrolling for profess i onal courses in the School of Pharmacy , students must have completed the following courses and must have compiled a grade point average of 2 . 0 or higher : S emester Hou r s Inor ganic chemistry-includ ing quantitative and qualitative analysis (103 106) ..................... . . .... ............... .... . .... . 1 0 General biology or zoo l ogy (205 206 ) . . . . . . .... ... . ... . ...... ... . .. ..... .. . . . . . 8 College mathemat ics, algebra and tri gonometry (101102 ) ....... 5 6 English compos i t ion, lit e r ature , or fore i gn language ... . . .......... . . . 6 Physical education ... .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. . . .. . . .... .... .. . . . . . ... .... .... ... ... ....... . ..... 2 Organ i c chem i stry (341343 and 342 344 ) .... .... ........... ....... .... . ... 8 General physics (201-202 ) ........ ... ................. . ...... . ............ . ........... 10 Pr i nc i ples of economics (201202) .... . . .................. . . . . . . .... . .... . . ....... 6 Electives (nonprofessional ) ........ . ......................... . . . ........ . ...... ...... . 8 PHYSICAL THERAPY The curriculum in physical therapy at the University of Colorado is an accredited program approved by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the American Physical Therapy Association. Upon successful completion of the program , students are granted a Bachelor of Sci ence degree in physical therapy from the School of Medicine . The curriculum is composed of two phases of study: Phase One . Prephysical therapy constitutes the first three years. In these years the student fulfills his re quirements for Phase Two and acquires a liberal uni versity education . Phase Two. Phys i cal therapy education is accom plished during the final year . It is d i rected toward princi ples and practice of physical therapy as a profes . sional career . Phase Two is offered only at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver. University Requirements for Graduation Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy must satisfy the following require ments: 1 . Completion of Phase One to include 90 semester hours . A minimum of 2 semester hours must be in upper division courses (courses numbered 300 or above). 2 . Completion of Phase Two to include 57 quarter hours. Of the 57 hours , a grade of C or better is required in at least 40 hours and a C average must be main tained. 3. Residence requirement requires 30 semester hours at the University of Colorado . This requirement is automatically fulfilled during Phase Two . Selection of Students for Phase TwoPhysical Therapy (Senior Year) 1 . A maximum of 32 students is accepted . 2. Selection is made by a Selection Committee . 3. Selection is based on: a. Scholastic achievement of 3 . 0 (both in specific prerequisites and in cumulative grade-point average) b. Personal interview c . Health status d. State of residency

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4. Categor ies of students eligible to apply for selec tion : a . Physical therapy majors in attendance at any of the University of Colorado campuses may apply by April1 of their sophomore year . Selec tion will be made during the summer. (An eligible sophomore must be registered for his 60th semester hour . ) b . Other eligible candidates must apply by March 1 of their junior year and will be selected at the end of their junior year . (An eligible junior muBt have completed or be registered for his 90t semester hour . ) Persons qualified for this selection are limited to: (1) those enrolled in other accredited institu tions in Colorado (2) reside nts of states partic ipa ting in the WICHE program which do not have physi cal therapy programs (3) Colorado residents attending schools in other states (4) Colorado residents holding degrees who can meet the prerequisite requirements. c . Applications will not be accepted from persons who do not fall in the above categories . Specific Requirements-Phase One These requirements may be met only in an accredited college or university and must be completed before final acceptance into Phase Two . Required Courses Minimum Semester Hours B i ological Sciences . .................. ................ ............ .......... .... ........ . 14 General Biology Anatomy ( human , preferred ) Physiology ( human , prefe r red) (Prer . , 1 year of chemistry ) Humanities ........................... . ............................ .... ........... .. .. .. ...... 12 Psychology . ...... .. .. . ... .... .... .. .... .. .... ... . ... . .. .... .. .. .. .... .. . . .. . . .. .. .. .. .... .. .. 6 Soc ial science . .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. . 6 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences /55 Physical education : K i nesiology ... ..... . .. . . . . . ... ... . ... .. . .... . .. . ... . . ..... .... ... . .. . . ... . ... . ... .... .... . 2 Physical education act i vity courses (1 year need not be for credit) Physical sciences * General physics ... .. ........ ...... .... .... .... .......... .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. . . .... . 3 (Recommended content to i nclude mechanics , heat , electr i city ) *General chemistry .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 6 Recommended Courses-Phase One The curriculum is designed to offer students the op portunity to elect several courses in their areas of spe cial interest. Listed below are courses related to physi cal therapy which would benefit a physical therapy major. Biology Embryology Genetics Psycho logy Child and Adolescent Psychology Physio l og i cal Psychology Psychology of the Except i onal Child Psychology of Mental Retardation Psychology of Learning Child Development Physical Therapy Introduction to Physical Therapy (strongly recommended ) Physical Education Human Development and Movement Behav ior Exerc i se Physiology Community Health Developmental Phys i ology Other Courses Introduction to Statist i cs Anthropology Communication Skills First A i d For further information contact the Health Sciences Committee , Room 508. 'Any student anticipating further study in Gradu ate School should enroll in general physics ( one full year to tnclude laboratory work ), general chemistry (to i nclude organic chem is try) , and mathematics .

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College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration DODDS I. BUCHANAN, Associate Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration of the University of Colorado at Denver exist to serve today ' s need for competent and responsible administrative and related professional personnel, for the continued education of men and women already in such positions , and to further research and new thinking about administrative problems . The College of Business and Administration was admitted to membership in the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1938. The problems of administration are common to many kinds of public and private endeavor , and the College of Business attempts to confront these problems as they pertain to the management of business enterprises. The major purpose of the College of Business is to provide opportunities both for a liberal education and for professional training. Students are given help in preparing not only for effective careers but also for satisfying living and constructive citizenship . The Graduate School of Business Administration offers graduate-level education in business to persons with undergraduate degrees in business and other academic fields and prepares them for work in the broad spectrum of business enterprise . Organization Within the broad framework of policy established by the Regents of the University of Colorado , policy decisions for the College of Business are made by the Educational Policy Committee of the faculty under the chairmanship of the dean and are subject to review by the faculty as a whole. The College ' s activities are administered by the associate dean on the Denver Campus, by the heads of its several instructional divisions, and by other faculty directors of particular programs . Student Organizations Opportunity for association with other College of Business students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interests and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations : AIESEC-international business association Beta Alpha Psi-professional and honorary accounting fraternity Beta Gamma Sigma-honorary scholastic fraternity in business Beta Sigma-professional business fraternity for women CSBA-Ghicano business students association CUAMA-University of Colorado student chapter of the American Marketing Association Delta Phi Epsilon-honorary graduate fraternity in business education Delta Sigma Pi-national professional business fraternity for men MBA Association-University of Colorado association of master ' s students in business Phi Chi Theta-national professional business and economics fraternity for women Rho Epsilon-professional real estate fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon-professional and honorary management fraternity UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bache lor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student ach i eve the following general objectives : 1 . Understanding of the activities that constitute business enterprise and of the principles underlying adm i nistration of those activities . 2. Ability to think logically and analytically through the kinds of complex problems encountered by management. 3 . Facility in the arts of communication. 4 . Comprehension of the human relationships in volved in an organization. 5 . Awareness of the social and ethical responsibil ities of those in administrative positions . 6 . Skill in the arts of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus. ACADEMIC POLICIES Each student in the College of Business is respon sible for knowing and complying with the academic requirements and regulations established for the Col lege and for the student's classes . Upon admission to the College of Business, the student has the respon sibility for conferring with the student adviser in the College concerning an academic program. Standards of Performance Students are held to basic standards of performance established for their classes in respect to attendance, active participation in course work , promptness in completion of assignments , correct English usage both in writing and in speech , accuracy in calculations , and general quality of scholastic workmanship . Fulfillment of

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these fundamental responsibilities must be recognized by students as a requirement for continuance and as an essential condition for achievement of satisfactory academic standing. Only those who meet these standards should expect to be recommended for a degree. In general , examinations are required in all courses for all students , including graduating seniors . To be in good standing , the student must have an cverall grade-point average of not less than 2 . 0 (C) for all course work attempted and 2.0 (C) for all business courses attempted. This applies to work taken at all University campuses . Activity , physical education , and remedial course work is not included in the overall average . When spring semester grades become available , the College of Business Committee on Academic Deficiency will review the records of all students not meeting academic standards . Students below standard will be notified of (1) probationary status or (2) suspension . To return from probationary status to good standing , students must not only achieve a grade-point average of 2 . 0 or better for the academic year but also bring their cumulative grade average on all courses attempted , and on all College of Business courses attempted , to a 2 . 0 level or above. To receive credit , all courses must be listed on the student's registration in the Office of Admissions and Records. Courses completed on the University of Colorado Denver Campus are credited toward College of Business degree requirements exactly the same as courses taken on the Boulder Campus . Credits earned on the Denver Campus are applicable toward residence requirements only when earned after admission to the College of Business. Transfer Credit Credits in business subjects transferred from other institutions to the University of Colorado will be limited to the number of credit hours given for similar work in the regular offerings of the College of Business . In general , the College will limit transfer credit for business courses taken at a lower division level , which it applies toward degree requirements, to such courses as the College offers at that level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is given by the appropriate division head . Transfer students must take 30 hours of degree requirements in residency. For a detailed explanation of transfer credit , see the General Information section of this bulletin. Nonclassroom Sources of Credit A total of 6 hours of credit for business or nonbusiness courses in Experimental Studies or Independent Study programs will be accepted toward graduation. A maximum of 3 hours of this type of credit may be taken in any one semester . Correspondence Credit Not more than 9 semester hours of credit in bus in ess courses taken through correspondence study at the College of Business and Administrat ion / 57 Univesity of Colorado or any other institution of higher learning will be counted toward the B .S. degree in business. Required business courses and area of emphasis courses may not be taken . by correspon dence . . ROTC Credit Students may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours of credit in courses completed in the advanced ROTC program toward nonbusiness elective requirements and toward the 120-semester-hour total degree requirements for the B.S . degree in business . No credit toward degree requirements is granted for basic (freshman and sophomore) ROTC courses. For more detailed information , students should consult the ROTC adviser. Independent Study Credit Upper division undergraduate business students desir ing to do work beyond regular business course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) under the direction of an instructor who approves the project , but the students must have prior approval of the dean . Complete information and request forms are available in the Office of the Associate Dean. To receive credit for nonbusiness independent study courses, students should obtain the dean ' s approval prior to registering for the course . Further information and forms are available in the Office of the Associate Dean . Study Abroad Credit Transfer credit from study abroad programs is most appropriately applied as nonbusiness elective credit. Students are responsible for checking with the Office of the Associate Dean for details and approval. Adding and Dropping Courses See the General Information section of this bulletin for University-wide Drop / Add policies . Withdrawal A student leaving the University before the end of the semester should secure a Withdrawal Form from the Office of the Associate Dean and follow the instructions on the form . The completed form should be returned to the Office of Admissions and Records . Students who attend classes will be charged an appropriate amount or receive a refund according to a definite schedule published in the official Schedule of Courses each term . Registration for Business Courses Students may register for only those courses for which they have the stated prerequisite training . If junior standing is required , students should have earned at least 60 semester hours of credit ; for senior standing , 90 semester hours. Scholastic Load The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate student in the College of Business is 15 semester hours , with 19 hours the max i mum except as i ndicated below . Hours carried concurrently i n the Division of Continuing

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58/ University of Colorado at Denver Education , whether in classes or through correspon dence , are included in the student's load . Students having a grade-point average of 3 . 0 or higher for the most recent semester in which they completed at least 15 semester hours may register for a load exceeding 19 semester hours with the approval of the associate dean. Pass/Fail A maximum of 16 hours of a combination of business and / or nonbusiness course work may be taken on a pass / fail basis and credited toward the bachelor ' s de gree i n business. Transfer students are limited to 1 sem ester hour of pass/ fail for every 8 attempted at the University . For business majors , pass / fail courses may not be included in " core " courses or in the area of emphasis . Advanced standing and CLEP examinations will count toward the 16 hours of option. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Admission of Freshmen The College of Business and Administration expects entering freshmen to present 15 units of the following secondary course work : Units English ............... . ................ .......................................................... 3 Mathematics (college preparatory) .............................................. 2 Natura l science (lab-sci ence course) .................................... ....... 2 Social science (including history ) ........ ............ .............. ........ ....... 2 Electives ( areas such as foreign languages , additional courses in English , mathematics , natural or soc ial sciences ; may include up to 2 credits in business) .............. ............... 6 15 Preferred Admission. Students given first consideration are those who rank in the upper half of their high school graduating class , have a combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of 1000 or above or a composite American College Test (ACT) score of 23 or above , and have completed the high school course units as recommended by the appropriate college . Considered on an Individual Basis. Students considered on an individual basis are those who rank in the lower half of their high school graduating class, and / or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and show variat ions from the high school course unit " expectations . " Admission of Transfer and Former Students Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students to the University of Colorado (see General Information section.) Former students who have attended another college or university and who have completed 12 or more semester hours must reapply as transfer students and must present a 2 .0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted to be eligible for readm i ssion. A maximum of 60 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree in the College of Business and Administration . Students who do not meet the prescribed requirements may pet ition the Office of Admissions and Records for special consideration for entrance . Doubtful cases will be referred to the associate dean of the College . lntrauniversity Transfer Students seeking admission to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University must formally apply at the Office of Admissions and Records for intraunlverslty transfer . Application for admission to the College must be on file in the Office of Admi ssions and Records at least 90 days prior to the appropriate deadlines. Recommended Preparation for Study in Business Prospective students in business are encouraged to pursue a broad college preparatory program in high school, with particular emphasis on English, mathematics, the social sciences, and speech . Candidates for the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree normally enter as freshmen. During the first two years they acquire a broad background in mathematics , communications, and the social and behavioral sciences. They will complete required basic courses in each of the core areas of business study, for the most part during their junior year. The remainder of their degree program will consist of courses selected to further their professional preparat ion through more advanced work and electives. REQUIREMENTS FOR B.S. (BUSINESS) DEGREE The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is conferred after completion of these requirements: Total Credits . A minimum of 120 acceptable semester hours of credit , of which at least 51 hours must be in nonbusiness courses (including 9 hours of upper division work) and at least 51 hours in business courses. The remaining 18 hours may be in either , or some combination of both . Residence. Completion of at least one full academic year ' s work (normally 30 semester hours, usually in the senior year , after admission to the College of Business and Administration , and to include the 12 hours in the area of emphasis). Courses completed at any University of Colorado campus after the candidate has been admitted to the College are acceptable toward this requirement. Grade Average. A scholastic grade-point average of at least 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree ; an average of at least 2.0 for all business courses ; an average of at least 2 . 0 in the student's area of emphasis . Graduation With Honors . Upon recommendation of the faculty of the College of Business, students wno demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado

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while completing 30 hours after admission to the College of Business and Administration will be graduated cum laude . Those students who achieve an overall grade-point average of 3 . 5 and a grade-point average of 3 . 7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado while completing 30 hours after admission to the College of Business and Administration will be graduated magna cum laude. Courses . Completion of required courses in six groups : (A) Societal Studies , (B) Behavioral Studies , (C) Communications, (D) Information Systems, Quantitative Methods , and Data Processing , (E) Business Processes, and (F) Electives. These requirements are summarized below . Required Courses GROUP A: SOCIETAL STUDIES The activities of a business enterprise are carried on within a complex economic-political-social-cultural environment. Understanding of that environment is indispensable for socially responsible and successful endeavor. Requ ired Areas Semester Hours Introduction to Political Science ( Pol. Sci. 100) ............. . ............. 3 American Political System (Pol. Sci. 11 0 ) . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .... . . . . . . .. .. . . .. .. . 3 Introduction to Sociology ( Soc . 111) .............. ............... ............... 3 Princ i ples of Economics ( Econ . 201 and 202) ......... .............. .... . 6 Business Law (B.Law 300 ) ..................................... . .................... 3 Business and Government (B.Ad. 41 0) or Business and Society ( B .Ad. 411) .... .... .. .... ............. ... ... ... ... .. .. .. .. 3 21 GROUP B . BEHAVIORAL STUDIES Management is concerned with the activities of people and with their behavior individually, in work groups , and as members of an organization . In this regard the perceptions and methods of the behav ioral sciences contribute i ncreasingly to the understanding and effectiveness on the part of managers . In addition to courses in Group A which are both societal and behavioral , these behavioral studies are required : Required Areas Semester Hours Gene ral Psychology (Psych . 203 and 204 ) .... ...... ....................... 6 Introduct ion to Management and O rganiz ation ( Mgt. Org . 330 ) ............................................ 3 9 GROUP C . COMMUNICATIONS Probably no skills are more essential for effect iveness in management than those in communication, both oral and written. The business curriculum provides for further development of these skills in alternative ways, depend ing upon the student's inclinations and present commun ication competency . Two courses selected from the following tist are required (6 hours): Required Areas Semester Hours Exposition (Engl. 100 or 101) ............................................... .... . Introduction to Literature ( Engl. 110 or 111 or 112) ............ .. .. .. Report Writing (Engl. 315 ) .......... ............................................. .. Principles of Communicat ion (C.T . 202) .... .................... .......... .. Communication and Soc ial Change ( C . T . 210) ......................... 6 Discussion (C. T . 315) .............................................................. .. Argumentation (C . T . 320) ....................................... .... ...... ........ . Persuasion (C.T . 420) ................ . ........ .......... ........................... .. 6 College of Business and Administration /59 GROUP D : INFORMATION SYSTEMS , QUANTITATIVE METHODS , AND DATA PROCESSING Management relies heavily upon information systems , mathematical and statistical tools of analysis , and increasingly sophisticated decision-making techniques . In respect to each of these , computers may play an important role. These courses are required: Required Areas Semester Hours Mathematics (Math . 107 and 108) .... .... ........................................ 6 Business Information and the Computer (B .Ad. 200) .......... ........ 3 Business Statistics (Stat. 200) .................................................... . 3 Introductory Accounting-Financial Aspects (Acct. 200) .. ...... .... . 3 15 GROUP E : BUSINESS PROCESSES This group of courses is devoted to study of the basic processes involved in any enterprise . Using this background , students pursue more advanced study in a field (area of emphasis) in which they have developed particular interest. In the area of emphais they develop facility in more complicated forms of analysis and further develop their qualifications for employment. Required Areas Semester Hours Basic Finance (Fin . 305) .. .... ...... ...... .. .... .. .... ...... .... .. .. ...... ...... ...... 3 Operat i ons Analysis ( Mgt.Org . 300) .......... .... .... ...... .... .. .... .......... 3 Princ iple s of Market ing ( Mk . 300) .. ...... .... ...... .... .... .. .............. .... .. 3 Cases and Concepts i n Business Policy (B.Ad . 450) or Management Game and Cases in Bus ines s Policy ( B .Ad. 451) or Small Business Strategy , Policy and Entrepreneurship ( B . Ad. 452) .......... ...... ...... ............................ ....... ................... ... 3 Area of emphasis ( see description of the areas available) .......... 12 24 GROUP F: ELECTIVES Over one -third of the total hours required for the B.S . degree in business is in elective courses . These elective studies will almost certainly enhance the student's professional qualifications . Excess hours in required areas may be used as electives. A maximum of 12 hours credit in advanced ROTC on the Boulder Campus may be applied toward nonbusiness elective requirements. A maximum of 6 hours credit for physical education theory courses also may be applied to nonbusiness electives . Physical education activity courses may not be counted toward a B.S. degree in business. In the allocation of elect ive hours , these requirements must be met: Semester Hours Business elect i ves .... . ... .. . .. . ...... ...... ... ... .. .. .... .......... . ... .... .. ...... .. .. .. 9 Nonbusiness elect ives, at least 9 hours of which must be in courses numbered 300 and above ............... ........ . 18 Free electives-either business or nonbusiness or any combination ............. ............................................. ......... 18 Total elect i ves ....... . .... ... .... ........ . .............................. . ................... % Model Degree Program FRESHMAN YEAR Semester Hours communications .. .... .. . . .. .. . . .. .. .. .... .. .. .. ... . .... ... ... ........ .... .. .. ........... 6 College Algebra (Math . 1 07) .. ................. ... .. . ... ... ......... .... .. .... .... .. 3 College Calculus ( Math . 1 08) .... ...... . ... .... ...... .......... .. .. ...... . .. .. ..... 3 courses selected from the follow ing : Engl . 100 or 101; Engl . 130, 200, 206, 215; E ngl . 258 , 259, 260 or 261: C.T . 202: C . T . 210; C.T . 315 ; C . T . 320 ; C . T . 420 .

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60 / Univer s ity of Colorado at Denver Introduct ion to Political Science (Pol. Sci. 100) ............ . . . ... . ........ 3 Amencan Political Sys tem (Pol. Sci. 11 0) .. . . ... . . . . . . . ... . . . .. .. . ... .. . . . . . 3 Introduction to Sociology (Soc . 111) .. .. .... ........ .. ...... .... .. .. ... . .. .. .. .. 3 • introduction to Business (B .Ad. 100) ............ . ............................. 3 Nonbusiness electives .... .. .. .. .. .... ...... . ......... ...... .... ...... .... .... .... .... . 6 Total semester hours ................................................................... 30 SOPHOMORE YEAR Pr inciples of Economics (Econ . 201, 202) .................... . .............. 6 General Psychology ( Psych . 203 and 204) ................................. 6 Bus i ness Information and the Computer (B.Ad. 200) .................. 3 Bus i ness Statistics (Stat. 200) .... .. .. ........ ........ ...................... ...... . 3 Introductory Accoun tin g Financ ial Aspects (Acct. 200) ............. 3 tNonbusiness electives .. . . . . . ... . . .. .. .. .. .. .. ... . .... .. . . .. . . .. .... . . .. .... .. .... . .. . 9 Total semester hours ............................................... . ................... 30 JUNIOR YEAR Pr inciples of Market ing ( Mk . 300) ................................................ 3 Basic Finance (F i n . 305) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ........ ...... ...... .. .. ...... ... ...... .... . .. 3 Introduct ion to Management and O r ganizat ion ( Mgt.Org. 330) .... .. .................................. . .... ...... . .............. . . .. .... 3 Op erations Analysis ( Mgt. Org . 300) .. ............ .... ....... .... .. .. ... ... .... 3 Bus i ness Law (B.Law 300) .... ...................................................... 3 tNonbusiness electives ... .. . . .... .. ... .... ... . ... . ..... ... ... . . . . . . . .... . . .. ... ... .... 3 Business electives . .... .. .. .. .. .... .... .... ..... .... .... .. ... ... . ... . .. . ... .... .... .. . . ... 3 Either business or nonbusiness electives .................................... 9 Total semester hours .................................... ............ ................... 30 SENIOR YEAR Business Policy (B. Ad . 450 , 451, or 452) .................................... 3 Business and Government (B.Ad. 41 0 ) or Bus i ness a nd Society (B.Ad. 411) .. .. .. .. .. .... .. . .... .. .. .... .... ...... .. .. 3 Area of emphasis requirements .................................................. . 12 Bus iness e lectiv es . . .. .... . . .. .. ... . .. ............ ...... .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .... .. .. .. . ... .. .. 3 Either busi n ess or nonbusiness electives ......... .... ........ . .............. 9 Total semester hours ........................ .... ............................... . ....... 30 Graduation Check List The student alone is responsible for the fulf illment of these requirements . Questions concerning graduation should be directed to the Office of the College of Business and Administration . Graduation Requirements Semester Hours Group A : Societal Studies .......................................................... 21 Group B : Behavioral Studies .......................... ........... .... .... .. .. .. .. 9 Group C : Commun i cat i ons ...... .................... . ...... .... .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. 6 Group D : Information Systems , Quantitat ive Methods , and D ata Processing .... .... ........ ........ .... ............ ... .... ... 15 Group E : Business Processes .. .......... .................. . .................... 24 Group F : Electives ... ............................. ... ....... ........................... 45 Tota l Hours ........ . ............................... . ..................... ................... 12 0 Res idence Requiremen t . .. .... .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. . . .. .. .. ... . .. .. .. . ... .. 30 A D i ploma C ard must be filed with the Office of the College of Bus i ness and Administration at least 90 days prior to the des ired graduation . Area of Emphasis-Required Courses Although one area of emphasis will be listed on th e student's official records , students so desiring may accomplish the effect of a dual area of emphasis by carefu l selection of courses. A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended . The course requirements for the second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours . *Applies as a b u si ness elective. It is r ecommended, but not requ ired . tFor completion o f t h e B . S . (B u s.) deg ree requ irem ents, t h e student ' s p rogram must i n clud e at least 9 s e mester hours in upp e rdivision nonbusiness courses. ACCOUNTING Required : Acct. 214 , 322 , 323 , 432, and one three-hour accounting elec tive . COMPUTER-BASED INFORMATION SYSTEMS Required : C . S . 312 ; Mg. Sc . 445 , 455 ; Stat. 490. FINA NCE Required : F i n . 401, 402 , 433 , 455 . Recommended electives : Fin . 434 , 440 , 453 , 454 , 484 . MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION Personnel and Industrial Relations Area Required : Mgt. Org . 434 , 438 . Reco mmended electives (minimum 6 semester hours): Mgt.Org . 333 , 335 , 337 , 440 , 444 , 447 , 450 , 452,456; B . Ad . 452 , 470 ; 0 . Ad.440 ; Econ. 461; Psy . 485 , 487 ; Soc . 479 . Operations Management Area Required (any two of the following three courses) : Mgt.Org . 440 , 444 , 447 . Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours ) : Mgt.Org. 335 , 337,434,450 , 460 ; Acct. 432 ; B . Ad . 452 , 470 ; Mg .Sc . 445 , 455 ; Mk . 485 ; Stat. 470 , 480 , 484 . Organizational Behavior Area Required (any two of the following three courses) : Mgt.Org . 333 , 335 , 337 . Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours) : Mgt.Org. 434 , 438 , 444 , 447 , 450 , 456 , 460 ; B . Ad . 470 . Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship Area Required (any two of the following three cours es): B . Ad . 470 ; Fin . 401; Mgt.Org . 438 . Recommended elect i ves (minimum 6 semeste r hours ) : Mgt.Org . 333 , 335 , 434, 440 , 447 , 450 , 452 , 460 ; Acct. 322, 432 ; B . Ad . 452; Fin . 401, 402 ; Mk . 480 ; O .Ad. 440 . Transportation and Traffic Management Area Required (any two of the following three courses) : Mgt.Org . 45 0 , 452 , 458 . Recommended electives (minimum 6 semester hours ) : Mgt.Org . 337 , 434 , 438 , 440 , 456 , 460 ; Acct. 322 , 432 ; B .Ad. 470 ; Mk . 47 0 , 485 ; O .Ad. 440 , 441. MARKETING Required : Mk . 330 , plus 9 additional semester hours of marketing beyond Mk . 300 . OFFICE ADMINISTRATION Required: O .Ad. 300, 420 , 421, 440 , 441. REAL ES TATE Required R.Es . 300 , R.Es . 430 , 473 , 401 or Fin . 454 . Recommended e lectives (minimum 3 semester hours) : Acct. 44 1 ; Ins . 484 ; Fin . 401, 40 2 , 455 ; R.Es . 533 ; Arch . 420, 451; Arch .E. 240 . STATISTICS Required (any four of the following six courses) : Stat. 300 , 47 0 , 480, 482, 484 , 490 . Recommended elect ives : Mgt.Org . 440 , 444 , 447 ; Mk . 300 ; Mg . Sc. 445 , 455 . COMBINED PROGRAMS Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason , students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Such combined programs have been arranged for engineering and business, pharmacy and business , environmental design and business , and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well. The two p r ograms of study proceed concurrently , terminating together w ith the award of two degrees .

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Generally , at least five years will be needed for such combined programs . For students in combined programs, the requirements for the degree in business are as follows : 1 . Complet ion of at least 48 semester credits in business and economics , to include Econ . 201 and 202 (6 semester hours). required courses in business (30 semester hours) , and a business area of emphasis (12 semester hours) . 2 . Completion of at least 30 of these semester hours at the University of Colorado while concurrently enrolled in the College of Business . 3. Completion of nonbusiness requirements in mathematics , communications , and the social and behavioral sciences in a degree program approved in advance by the College of Business . In addition , for some courses and areas of emphasis , there are prerequisite requirements which must be met. 4. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business . Shown below i s the combined engineering-business program . For other combinations , students must consult with the associate dean of the College of Business . The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows : Courses Semester Hours Econ . 201 and 202 . Principles of Economics ( Should be completed during the student's sophomore or junior year . ) .................. . . . .... . ....................................... . ..... .......... 6 Acct. 220 . Introductory Account ing ..................... . ..... . ... ............... 3 B .Ad. 200 . Business Information and the Computer ......... . . ........ 3 Stat . 200 . Bus iness Statist ics ...................... .... ...... .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . .. .. .. . 3 Mk. 300 . Principles of Marketing ................................................. 3 Fin. 305 . Basic Finance ...................................... . ...... ...... ...... .... .. 3 Mgt.Org . 300 . Operations Analysis .. ............................................ 3 Mgt.Org . 330. Introduct ion to Management and Organizat ion . .. ... . . . . . . ... ... ...... . .. . .. .. . . .. . . . ... ... .. . . .. . .. . .. ... . .. . . . 3 B .Law 300 . Bus iness Law .......................................... .................. 3 B .Ad. 410. Bus i ness and Government ; or B .Ad. 411. Business and Soc i ety .. .... ........ .... .. .. .. .. ............ .... .. .. .. .... .. .... 3 B .Ad. 450 . Bus i ness Policy (Cases and Concepts in Busi ness Policy) ; or B .Ad. 451. ( M anagement G ames and Cases i n Business Policy ) ; or B .Ad. 452 . ( Small Busi-ness Strategy , Policy and Ent repreneurship) ...................... 3 Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields : accounting, computerbased information systems, f inance, i nternational business , marketing , office administration , operations management , organizational behav ior, real estate , small business manag'Olment, statistics , or transportat i on management. All work i n the area of emphas is must be t aken at the University of Colorado College of Business. Areas of Emphas i s .. ...... ...... ...... ...... .. .... .. .... .. ... ........ .... .. .. .. .. .. ... __!g 48 GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS The graduate programs leading to the Master of Business Administration degree are offered through the faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration . (Note : An application for admission to the Graduate School of Business Administration must be accompanied by a nonrefundable fee of $20 when the application is submitted . ) Graduate programs leading to the Doctor of Business Administration , Master of Science , and Master of Business Education are offered through the University of Colorado Graduate School. Master' s degree College of Business and Administrat ion /61 programs in business are accredited by the Amer i can Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business . Requirements for Admission-Master's Program Adm issi on to the graduate programs will be determined by the following criteria : 1 . Applicant's undergraduate academic record . 2 . Letters of recommendation submitted from former teachers or employers . 3 . The applicant's scores on the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business , which is required of all applicants . (This test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the country. For information and to make application for the test , write to the Educational Testing Service, P .0. Box 966, Princeton , New Jersey 08540 . ) In general, students failing to meet minimum standards are not admitted on prov isional status . Under exceptional circumstances, a student may be admitted on a provisional status for a specified probationary term . At the end of the probationary period , the Business Graduate Committee will review the student' s performance and recommend to the dean whet her the student should be admitted to regular degree status or dropped from the graduate program. Only graduate students admitted as regular degree or provisional students and senior undergraduates in engineer ing who intend to pursue graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the 500-level "fundamentals" courses (which are specifically for degree candidates) . Only graduate degree candidates will be permitted to register for the 600-level courses. Students who were registered as special students before the fall semester 1970 may request that work completed as a special student be applied toward a graduate degree. Students registering as special students after the fall semester of 1970 can request that work taken as a special student be applied toward a degree only if they are admitted to the Graduate School during the term in which they are taking work as a