Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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CONTENTS
General Information................................................... 1
Admission Policies and Procedures.................................. 2
Tuition, Fees, Financial Aid ....................................... 7
Registration....................................................... 11
Academic Policies.................................................. 12
Student Services................................................... 15
Academic Programs ................................................. 16
Administrative Officers........................................... 18
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences................................. 19
Division of Arts and Humanities ................................... 29
Division of Natural and Physical Sciences.......................... 34
Division of Social Sciences........................................ 38
College of Business and Administration
and Graduate School of Business Administration .................... 42
School of Education.................................................. 54
College of Engineering and Applied Science .......................... 56
College of Environmental Design ..................................... 76
Graduate School ..................................................... 84
College of Music ................................................... 102
Graduate School of Public Affairs .................................. 107
Course Descriptions ................................................ 115
Faculty............................................................. 176
Index .............................................................. 183
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ACADEMIC CALENDAR'
Summer 19792
June 4, 5 Registration.
June 11 First day of classes.
July 4 Holiday (no classes).
August 17 End of term.
Fall 1979*
August 27-29 Registration.
September 4 First day of classes.
November 22, 23 Thanksgiving holidays (no classes).
December 19 End of semester.
Spring 19802
January 14, 15 Registration
January 21 First day of classes.
March 17-22 Spring vacation (no classes).
May 16 End of semester.
May 17 Commencement.
Summer 19802
June 2, 3 Registration.
June 9 First day of classes.
July 4 Holiday (no classes).
August 15 End of term.
'The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. ‘Consult the Schedule of Courses for application deadline dates and deadlines for changing programs (dropping and adding classes).


DEGREE PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE'
HUMANITIES
BUSINESS
EDUCATION
ENGINEERING
ENVIRONMENTAL
DESIGN
MUSIC
NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SOCIAL SCIENCES
Baccalaureate Programs
communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, Spanish
(areas of emphasis) accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing, minerals land management, organizational management, personnel management, public agency administration, real estate, small business management, statistics, transportation management
elementary education, secondary education, rehabilitation services
civil engineering, civil engineering and business, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and business, electrical engineering and computer science, electrical engineering and computer science and business, applied mathematics, applied mathematics and business, mechanical engineering, mechanical engineering and business
offered only at Boulder
music and media
biology, chemistry, geography, geology, mathematics, physics, population dynamics, psychology
anthropology, economics, ethnic studies, history, political science, sociology, urban studies
Master's Programs
communication and theatre, communication disorders and speech science, English, humanities
M.B.A. areas of emphasis: accounting, finance, management science, marketing, organizational management, personnel management, production and operations management, transportation management.
M.S.: accounting, finance, management science, marketing, management and organization.
early childhood education, educational psychology, elementary education, foundations of education, guidance and counseling, library media, reading, secondary education
applied mathematics, civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science
architecture, architecture in urban design, interior design, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning
basic science, biology, chemistry, environmental science, geography, mathematics, psychology
public administration, urban affairs (also, doctorate in public administration)
anthropology, economics, history, political science, social science, sociology

'Courses in many other undergraduate and graduate areas are offered at UCD, but degrees must be completed at the University of Colorado at Boulder. UCD also offers preprofessional programs in law, journalism, and the health careers (child health associate, dental hygiene, dentistry, medical technology, medicine, nursing, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, physical therapy, and veterinary medicine).
iii


UNDERGRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION 12
Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission2 Required Credentials When to Apply Notes
FRESHMAN (Students seeking a bachelor's degree who have never attended a collegiate institution) IN GENERAL: a) Rank in upper half of high school graduating class. b) Have 15 units of acceptable high school work. c) Test scores: Resident Nonresident ACT comp: 23 25 or SAT comb: 1000 1050 Complete application $10 application fee Official high school transcript showing rank-in-class, date of graduation, 7th semester grades, 8th semester courses Official ACT or SAT score report. Not later than: July 1 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Seniors who meet or exceed all admission criteria may apply as early as Oct. 1 for following fall. For specific requirements refer to the college sections of this bulletin.
TRANSFER’ (Students seeking a bachelor's degree who have attended a collegiate institution other than CU) Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Residents must have a minimum 2.0 (C) GPA on all work attempted. Nonresidents must have a minimum 2.5 (C+) GPA on all work attempted. Complete application $10 application fee One official transcript from each college attended Not later than: July 1 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Transfers to the School of Education consult that section for additional requirements. Transfers with less than 12 semester hours of University acceptable transfer credit must also submit all required freshman credentials.
SPECIAL (Students who are not seeking a degree at this institution) Must be at least 21 years old (except in summer). Must be high school graduate. Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Complete application Not later than: July 1 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Application will also be accepted at registration if space allows. Graduate special students, see Graduate School Section for additional information.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Retiming special students, returning degree students who have not attended another institution since CU) Must be in good standing Former student application Same as for special students Students under academic suspension in certain schools or colleges at the University of Colorado may enroll during the summer terms as a means of improving their grade-point averages.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Returning degree students who have attempted 12 or more hours at another institution since attending CU) Same as for transfers Complete application $10 application fee One official transcript from each intervening college Same as for transfers
CHANGE OF STATUS: SPECIAL TO DEGREE (Former CU special students who wish to enter a degree program) Same as for transfers Same as for transfers Plus CU transcript and Courses in Progress form Same as for transfers
CHANGE OF STATUS: DEGREE TO SPECIAL (Former CU degree students who have graduated and wish to take additional work) Must have completed degree. Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions attended. Special student application Same as for special students Only students who have completed and received degree are eligible to change to special status.
INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER (Students who have been enrolled on one CU campus and wish to take courses on another) Must be in good standing Former student application Transfer to Denver; same as for specials Transfer from Denver: refer to appropriate bulletin. Transfers from Denver to another campus of CU should refer to appropriate bulletin for additional requirements.
INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER (Students who wish to change from one CU college to another, e.g., from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the College of Business) Same as for transfers Intra-university transfer application CU transcript Same as for transfers
‘Applications will be accepted only as long as openings remain. . Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary.
w


General Information
THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER: AN URBAN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
The University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) is an urban nonresidential campus located in downtown Denver. The campus is easily accessible to commuters from a four-county area and is close to major businesses and government offices in downtown Denver, as well as to civic and cultural centers. UCD is one of the largest state-supported institutions of higher education in Colorado in terms of enrollment, with an average of 8,000 students enrolled during a semester.
The UCD Administration Building is located at 1100 Fourteenth Street. UCD shares library, laboratory, classroom, and recreation facilities with two other metropolitan institutions on a single campus, the Auraria Higher Education Center.
Academic Programs
UCD is committed to meeting the needs of the metropolitan Denver community. Academic, public service, and research activities are geared to the needs of the urban population and environment, encompassing both traditional and nontraditional fields of study. Students enrolled at UCD can earn undergraduate degrees in 42 fields and graduate degrees in over 50 fields. The colleges and schools at UCD are:
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Environmental Design
College of Music
Graduate School
Graduate School of Public Affairs
The undergraduate colleges admit freshmen and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides preprofessional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in education and teacher certification to students with two years of college work. The Graduate School offers master’s programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering,
business, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The College of Environmental Design, the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to the master’s degree in their specialized areas. The Graduate School of Public Affairs also offers a doctorate in public administration.
Students
Highly motivated people from all walks of life make up UCD’s student body. The diversity of backgrounds, interests, occupations, and ages stimulates a unique learning experience for the men and women enrolled at UCD. Students range in age from 16 to 70. Approximately two-thirds of the students hold full-time jobs and 60 percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate level. In order to give students maximum flexibility in planning both educational and employment goals, more than half of the courses are offered during the evening hours. Students may begin studies in most areas at the beginning of the 16-week fall or spring semester, or the 10-week summer term.
Faculty and Accreditation
More than 200 highly qualified faculty members teach full time at UCD: 70 percent have doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student. UCD is accredited by or holds membership in the following organizations:
ACCREDITATION
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Architecture Accrediting Board
National Association of Schools of Music
MEMBERSHIP
Association of Urban Universities
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business
Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and Collegiate Schools of Planning
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration


2 / University of Colorado at Denver
The Engineers’ Council for Professional Development has accredited the programs in civil engineering and in electrical engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
University of Colorado System
UCD is one of four campuses of the University of Colorado. The University was founded in Boulder in 1876, and the University of Colorado at Boulder now serves over 20,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Medical Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves over 3,000 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. UCD’s special role within the University system is to provide urban-oriented educational programs for students in the Denver metropolitan area.
Qualified students may begin programs of study in some undergraduate, preprofessional, and graduate areas that they must complete at other University campuses. Students also have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system.
The official transcript of any student who first enrolled in the spring semester 1978 or afterwards and who graduates from an undergraduate program operated solely by UCD will indicate that the degree was conferred at Denver. At present the only undergraduate program operated solely by UCD is the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is a cooperative effort by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Auraria campus of the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library, classroom, and related facilities on the Auraria campus, a 168-acre site in downtown Denver.
The Auraria campus includes three administration buildings, five classroom buildings, the Learning Resources Center, the student center, child care and development centers, the physical education building, and two service buildings.
The Auraria Library is housed in the Learning Resources Center, with a branch in the Community Col-lege/Auraria Administration Building. The library collection includes books, reserve and reference materials, journals, microforms, records, tapes, and other media in various formats. Microform equipment and listening and viewing facilities are provided. General reference service, interlibrary loans, and assistance with individual library problems are available at the reference counter. UCD students may use the interlibrary loan service to obtain materials not held by the Auraria Libraries.
The new buildings share the campus with reminders of Denver’s past — 19th-century houses,
churches, and the famous Tivoli brewery built in 1882.
Equal Opportunity
The University of Colorado at Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and in employment.
In pursuance of this policy, no UCD department, unit, discipline, or employee shall discriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees.
The institution’s educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject to the provisions of Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
A UCD Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Program has been established to implement this policy. For information about these provisions on equity, discrimination, or fairness, consult the following persons who will advise individuals of existing complaint procedures within and outside the University: Affirmative Action Director Nereyda Bottoms, Room 803, 1100 Fourteenth Street (telephone: 629-2621); Title IX Coordinator Alice Owen, Room 212, 1100 Fourteenth Street (telephone: 629-2726); or Paul Kopecky, Rehabilitation Act Coordinator, Room 207, 11(X) Fourteenth Street (telephone: 629-2861).
1. ADMISSION POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES
General Policies
UCD seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of scholarly ability and accomplishment, as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Maturity, motivation, and potential for academic growth.
UCD reserves the right to deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
International Students
Undergraduate. International students who desire to attend the University of Colorado at Denver must present at least one full year of academic study from


General Information / 3
another accredited American collegiate institution before they may be considered for admission. A minimum of a 2.75 grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) on all work attempted and proof of English proficiency is required. An application form may be obtained at:
Office of Admissions and Records 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Application and credentials are to be presented to the admissions office four months prior to the start of the term for which the student is applying.
Graduate. International students who desire graduate study at UCD must possess the equivalent of an American baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree and fulfill other requirements as designated by the graduate program to which they are applying. Applications can be obtained in the individual graduate schools. Application and credentials should be presented to the individual graduate school 6 months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students
All questions and correspondence regarding undergraduate admission to UCD should be directed to: Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2660
APPLICATION DEADLINES
Undergraduate Fall Spring Summer
Students 1979 1980 1980
New Students July 1 Dec. 1 May 1
Transfer Students July 1 Dec. 1 May 1
International Students June 1 November 1 April 1
Former University of Colorado Students July 1 Dec. 1 May 1
Intrauniversity
Transfer Students 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
The University reserves the right to change application deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands, and applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions and Records, (303) 629-2660. All documents required for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions and Records by the deadline for an applicant to be considered for the term desired. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that sufficient time should be allowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previously, and foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions and Records from international locations.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering
and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music.
1. General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test. Applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an average standard score of 45 with no one score below 36 on each section of the GED test to be considered for admission. Applicants who have completed the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test must also submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language.”
Applicants should have completed 15 units of acceptable secondary school (grades 9-12) credit. A unit of credit is one year of high school course work. While the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences does not specify particular units, the other undergraduate colleges have the following requirements:
College of Business and Administration
English...................................................... 3
Mathematics (college preparatory)............................ 3
Natural sciences (laboratory type)........................... 2
Social sciences (including history) ......................... 2
Electives ................................................... 5
(Such as foreign languages and additional academic courses.
May include up to 2 units in business areas.) ____
Total 15
College of Engineering and Applied Science1
English...................................................... 3
Algebra...................................................... 2
Geometry..................................................... 1
(Trigonometry and higher mathematics recommended.)
Natural sciences ............................................ 2
(Physics and chemistry recommended.)
Social studies and humanities................................ 2
(Foreign languages and additional units of English, history, and literature are included in the humanities.)
Electives ................................................... 5
Total 15
College of Music
English...................................................... 3
Theoretical music.....................................
Physical science......................................
Social science............................................... 8
Foreign language......................................
Mathematics...........................................
Additional high school academic units ....................... 4
Total 15
It is expected that all students will have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. In lieu of the personal audition, applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length on 7*/2 ips monaural) or a statement of excellence by a qualified teacher. Interested students should write to the College of Music, UCD, for audition or interview applications.
2. All applicants. All applicants who meet the above requirements are classified in two ways for admission purposes.
'See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section for the level of mathematical competence desirable for engineering students.


4 / University of Colorado at Denver
a. Preferred consideration — applicants who rank in the upper half of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT) or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Engineering applicants are expected to have a strong mathematics and science background and somewhat higher scores on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. Business students are required to have strong mathematics background and higher class-rank and test scores.
b. Considered on an individual basis — applicants who rank in the lower 2/3 of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit.
How to Apply
1. Students should obtain an Application for Admission from their Colorado high school counselor or the Office of Admissions and Records at UCD, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202, (303) 629-2660.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions and Records. A $10 nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application. An applicant who is granted admission but who is unable to enroll for the term applied for will have the $10 fee valid for 12 months, provided the applicant informs Admissions and Records that he or she intends to enroll for a later term.
3. Students must have their high school send a transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions and Records.
4. The student must take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to UCD (ACT code 0533 or SAT code R-4875). High school students may obtain information from their counselors regarding when and where tests are given. Applicants who took one of these tests earlier and did not designate UCD to receive scores must request that scores be sent to UCD. This is done by completing a Request for Additional Score Report available at test centers or from the offices listed below.
Registration Department
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P. O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P. O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P. O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
5. Students must have GED test scores sent to UCD if they have High School Equivalency Certificates.
Checklist of Application Materials
1. Completed application form.
2. $10 application fee.
3. High school transcript of grades including class rank.
4. SAT or ACT test scores.
5. GED scores (for applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate) and copy of GED Certificate.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineeririg and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information, 629-2717.
1. Colorado Residents.1 Colorado residents who want to be considered for transfer admission to UCD must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average calculated on all work attempted and be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants to the Colleges of Business and Administration or Engineering and Applied Science must have a higher grade-point average to be considered for admission. Music applicants must successfully complete a music audition. The student must have completed at least 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) of work acceptable to the University. Students who have completed fewer than 12 semester credits must meet the admission requirements for freshmen. Students are grouped as follows for admission purposes:
a. Preferred consideration — applicants who meet the above academic standards and have completed more than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) from an institution of university rank, and applicants who have completed at least 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a community or state college.
b. Considered on an individual basis — applicants who meet the academic standards listed above and who have completed fewer than 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a community or state college, or those whose previous academic work does not meet the above standards. Primary factors considered are: (1) the college or school to which admission is desired; (2) quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and non-collegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance.
2. Nonresidents.1 Nonresident applicants to the College of Business and Administration must have a transferable grade-point average of at least 2.75 to be
‘See Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes for a definition of resident and nonresident.


General Information / 5
considered for admission. Nonresidents applying to the College of Engineering and Applied Science must have a grade-point average of at least 2.6 to be considered. Nonresidents applying to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or the College of Music must have at least a GPA of 2.0 to be considered.
How to Apply
1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the UCD Office of Admissions and Records, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202, (303) 629-2660.
2. The application form must be completed and returned to the Office of Admissions and Records with the $10 nonrefundable application fee.
3. The student must have an official transcript sent to the Office of Admissions and Records from each collegiate institution attended. If a student is currently enrolled, a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term.
4. Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that they may be able to receive credit for foreign language taken during the high school years providing they furnish an official high school transcript. Further information may be obtained from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Transfer of College-Level Credit
The Office of Admissions and Records and the appropriate dean’s office will determine which courses taken at another institution can be applied to a degree program at UCD after all transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirements at UCD.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution.
The University will accept up to 72 semester credits (108 quarter credits) of junior college work toward the baccalaureate degree requirements. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
For more detailed information by school and college regarding the transfer of college-level credit, see Academic Policies and Regulations.
Readmisslon Requirements for Former Students
1. Students Who Have Not Attended Another Institution. Former students of the University of Colorado who have not attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University must submit a Former Student Application, available from the Office of Admissions and Records, by the deadline for the term desired. No application fee and no supplementary credentials are required.
2. Students Who Have Attended Another Institution. Former students of the University of Colorado who have attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University must submit a Former Student Application and official transcripts from any institutions attended in the interim. Applicants who have completed 12 semester hours or 18 quarter hours at another institution since last attending the University also must submit a $10 nonrefundable evaluation fee.
Requirements for Intrauniversity Transfer
UCD students or former University of Colorado students may change colleges or schools within the University of Colorado provided they are acceptable to the college or school to which they wish to transfer. Transfer forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors with proved academic abilities may be admitted to UCD. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the Office of Admissions and Records, (303) 629-2660.
Admission of Graduate Degree Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate programs at UCD should be directed to the following:
Programs in Business
Office of Graduate Studies
Graduate School of Business Administration
629-2605
Programs in Environmental Design College of Environmental Design 629-2877
Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 629-2825
All Other Programs Graduate School 629-2663


6 / University of Colorado at Denver
The above offices are located at 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
As a principal part of its mission, UCD offers graduate- and professional-level programs for the convenience of Denver residents. During the 1977-78 academic year, approximately 35 percent of the student body was enrolled at the graduate level.
Graduate degree programs are offered through the Graduate School by its member schools and colleges, and outside the Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the College of Environmental Design, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. The particular admission and graduation requirements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections.
Students holding baccalaureate degrees but who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for graduate course work as graduate special students. Several types of students make use of the special student category. Among these are students who have attained whatever degree or credential status they feel is desirable, but who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; students who, for whatever reason (weak undergraduate background, change of discipline, or length of time since previous formal course work), feel the need to make up deficiencies before entering a degree program; and students who have not decided about entering a specific degree program. Such students should be aware that, generally, only limited course credits taken as a special student may be applied toward a degree program. Also, a 2.0 minimum grade-point average must be maintained to permit continuing registration as a graduate special student. Students interested in applying as graduate special students should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for applications.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES
Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specific requirements of the major departments of graduate study (i.e., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants in the fields of education, engineering, and the arts, sciences, and humanities should consult the general information section of the Graduate School portion of this bulletin as well as the following sections dealing with requirements and deadlines for specific programs. Applicants in the fields of business administration, public affairs, and environmental design should refer to the sections of this bulletin on the Graduate School of Business Administration, the Graduate School of Public Affairs, and the College of Environmental Design.
Admission of Nondsgree Special Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission as a special student should be directed to:
Office of Admissions and Records 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2660
Persons desiring admission as special students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 629-2717.
APPLICATION DEADLINES
Special Students Those who want to Fall 1979 Spring 1980 Summer 1980
take undergraduate or graduate courses July 1 Dec. 1 May 1
Those who want to
change from special to degree status July 1 Dec. 1 May 1
Those who want
teacher certification February 1 N.A. February 1
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Persons who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree are admitted as special students. Except during the summer term, special students must be at least 21 years of age. Courses taken as a special student are fully credited and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Persons who do not have an undergraduate degree are encouraged to apply to an undergraduate degree program rather than apply as special students. UCD will admit persons without an undergraduate degree as special students for one semester or summer term only; after that the student must apply to a regular degree program. Persons with a baccalaureate degree who seek teacher certification or renewal of certification may be admitted as special students if they meet the requirements of the School of Education. Special students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 at UCD.
HOW TO APPLY
To apply for admission as a special student, obtain a Special Student Application Form from the Office of Admissions and Records. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. There is no application fee, and no additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification or renewal of teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials.
Special students are advised that registration for courses is on a “space available” basis.


General Information / 7
CHANGING STATUS FROM SPECIAL TO DEGREE STUDENT
Special students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by completing the Special to Degree Application available from the Office of Admissions and Records. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $10 nonre-fundable application fee also must be submitted with the application. Special students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may transfer a maximum of 12 semester credits for courses taken as a special student to an undergraduate degree program, with approval by the dean. (Students enrolled as special students prior to the fall semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.)
Special students may apply for admission to a graduate degree program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master’s degree for courses taken as a special student at the University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a special student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program.
Official Notification of Admission
Official notification of admission to UCD as an undergraduate, graduate, or special student is provided by the Office of Admissions and Records on a Statement of Admission Eligibility Form. Letters from the various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are subject to official admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time after submitting application materials should contact the Office of Admissions and Records, (303) 629-2660.
II. TUITION AND FEES, EXPENSES, AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time, A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The rates below are for the 1978-79 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
TUITION RATES FOR 1978-79
Credit Hours of Enrollment Resident Nonresident
0 - 3 $ 69 $186
- 4 92 248
- 5 115 310
- 6 138 372
- 7 161 926
- 8 184 926
- 9 207 926
-18 232 926
For each hour over 18 additional $15 additional $62
OTHER FEES
1. Student activity fee (mandatory for all students):
Fall semester 1978 ....... $17l
Spring semester 1979 ..... $17*
2. Matriculation fee (mandatory for all new students):
Degree students ..........$15
Special students .........$ 5
This is a one-time nonrefundable fee charged at the time of initial registration. No further charges will be made for adding or dropping courses or for ordering transcripts. A special student who becomes a degree student will be charged $10 at the initial registration as a degree student.
3. Health insurance fee (automatic for all students unless waived):
Fall or spring semester .... $44.00 Summer term ................ $30.75
Health insurance coverage is automatic unless waived by the student by signing a waiver card and turning it in at the time of registration. Dependent coverage (spouse and/or children) is also available at an additional charge. Further information on health insurance is available from the Office for Student Affairs, 629-2861.
4. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by the Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation):
Dissertation fee .......... $99
5. CoPIRG fee (automatic for all students unless
waived): ....................................... $2.25
6. Comprehensive examination fee (mandatory for graduate student enrolled for a comprehensive examination only):
Minimum resident tuition ..$69
Graduate students enrolled for a comprehensive examination will be assessed regular tuition and fees if they need hours toward graduation.
7. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
'Includes bond retirement fee.


8 / University of Colorado at Denver
Breakage deposit ..........$10
This fee will be refunded at the end of the term if appropriate.
8. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses):
Music fee .................$18
College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $18 fee.
PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fees are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term. Arrangements may be made through the Finance Office at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. A minimum down payment consisting of the resident tuition for 0-3 hours or one-third of the total tuition and fees, whichever is greater, must be made at the time of registration. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer term.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Courses. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credit. The only exception to this regulation involves students with loans and other types of indebtedness which are payable after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check which is not acceptable to the bank may be immediately dropped from the rolls of the University.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
General Policies. A student is initially classified as a resident or nonresident student for tuition purposes at the time of application to the University. The classification is based on information furnished by the student and other relevant sources. To be eligible for in-state tuition (resident) status the following requirements (as defined in the Colorado Revised Statutes, Chapter 124, Article 18) must be met by students who are 21 years of age or older (or emancipated minors as defined by law): (1) the student must have been domiciled in Colorado for 12 consecutive months preceding the date of registration for the term in which in-state status is desired; (2) the student must demonstrate significant intent to make Colorado a fixed and permanent residence. Intent is demonstrated by compliance with other mandatory laws of the
state (i.e., valid driver’s license, valid motor vehicle registration, payment of state income tax, etc.). An unemancipated minor assumes the domicile of his or her parents.
Once the student’s status is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days after such a change occurs. An unemancipated minor whose parents move their residence outside of the state is considered a nonresident student from the date of the move and will be charged nonresident tuition at the next registration. The student or his or her parent is required to notify the Office of Admissions and Records in writting within 15 days after such a change occurs. Similarly, an adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days of the change.
Petitioning for a Change in Residency Classification. Any student who is 22 years of age or older, or an emancipated minor as defined by law, may change his or her residence and tuition classification status. Detailed information on the procedures which must be followed, including necessary petition forms, is available from the Office of Admissions and Records. Petitions will not be considered until an application for admission and supporting credentials have been received by the University. Changes in classification are effective at the time of the student’s next registration. A student who willfully gives wrong information in order to avoid paying out-of-state tuition is subject to legal and disciplinary action.
Estimated Expenses
Educational expenses at UCD include tuition, fees, and the cost of books and related instructional materials. Students who do not live with their parents must also include the cost of housing and food expenses. All students should consider transportation and personal expenditures (i.e., clothing, entertainment, etc.) in determining their expenses. Students who wish to review estimates of the cost of attendance at the University of Colorado at Denver should contact the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.
The financial aid program at the University is designed to assist those students who would be unable to attend the University without aid. While the primary responsibility for meeting the costs of education rests with individual students and their families, financial aid funds are offered to supplement whatever funds students and their families can provide. Since requests generally exceed the availability of funds, students and their families should be aware of procedures and deadlines in order to receive maximum consideration. Questions and requests for forms should be directed to the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment at UCD.


General Information / 9
Determination of Financial Need and Award
Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of attendance as defined by the institution (tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and essential incidental expenses) and total resources available to the student. These resources include a family contribution (summer savings, term earnings, a spouse contribution, and a parental contribution) and awards from agencies outside the University.
Financial need is determined by a national uniform needs analysis system administered by agencies such as the American College Testing Program. This system analyzes income and assets, family size, number of children in post-secondary education, student independence, etc., to determine a reasonable student and/or family contribution.
After the financial need is determined, students are ranked in order of financial need and are aided accordingly until all funds are committed. The financial aid package normally consists of a self-help component (loans and/or employment) and a gift aid component (grants and scholarships) proportionate to the available funds and to the number of needy students applying.
How to Apply
Application forms may be obtained by contacting the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment. Students are asked to complete an institutional application and a needs analysis form. Students will be contacted if additional information is necessary to complete the application.
Parents are expected to contribute toward a student’s educational costs. However, in certain cases students may be considered financially independent of their parents. To be eligible for financial aid as a self-supporting student, a student (1) cannot be claimed as a tax exemption, (2) cannot receive $750 or more, or (3) live at home for more than six consecutive weeks for the year aid is received and for the entire preceding calendar year. For example, for a student to receive aid as a self-supporting student during the 1979-80 academic year, the above three criteria must be met for 1978, 1979, and 1980.
Note: Requirements for receiving aid as a self-supporting student are subject to change by the federal government.
Self-supporting students must document their status by providing income tax forms or other supporting documents to show sufficient income to be self-supporting during the appropriate period of time. In some cases, additional documentation from parents is required to complete a student’s application. The information provided on the institutional application for financial aid is analyzed according to the uniform needs analysis fomula to determine the student’s ability to contribute to his or her educational costs during the academic year.
To be eligible for financial aid, students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents or have a refugee
visa. Eligible foreign students are advised to include a photo-copy of their visa cards with their applications to facilitate processing.
Available Funds
Undergraduate Students. Undergraduate students are eligible to submit the following three applications:
1. The University application plus the Family Financial Statement (FFS). Under this two-part application the student will be considered for:
Federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
Federal Work-Study Assistance
Federal National Direct Student Loan (NDSL)
State Colorado Student Grant (CSG)
State Colorado Work-Study Assistance State and Federal Colorado Student Incentive Grant (CSIG)
Institutional Grant Assistance
(Students classified as nonresident for tuition purposes are not eligible for state financial aid funds.)
2. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant. This is a separate federal grant program which students can apply for if they do not apply for financial aid under number one above.
3. Federally Insured Student Loan/Guaranteed Student Loan. See the Types of Aid Available section for details.
Graduate Students: Graduate students are eligible to submit the following two applications:
1. The University application plus the Family Financial Statement (FFS). Under this two-part application, the student will be considered for:
Federal Work-Study Assistance
Federal National Direct Student Loan (NDSL)
State of Colorado Graduate Grant
2. Federally Insured Student Loan/Guaranteed Student Loan. See the Types of Aid Available section for details.
Deadlines
April 2 — All undergraduate students applying for financial aid for the summer term and/or academic year.
October 1 — All undergraduate students applying for spring semester financial aid.
April 1 — Graduate students applying for summer term financial aid.
June 15 — Graduate students applying for financial aid for the fall and spring semesters.
October 1 — Graduate students applying for financial aid for the spring semester.
Special Note: An application for financial aid does not constitute an application for admission to the University. Please contact the Admissions and Records Office of the University for application forms and procedures. Applicants will not receive financial


10 / University of Colorado at Denver
aid until they are enrolled in a degree program at the University. Special students are not eligible for financial aid.
Types of Aid Available
SCHOLARSHIPS
UCD Scholarships. UCD scholarships provide up to $300 for entering Colorado residents of the Denver metropolitan area who are freshman or transfer applicants. These awards are funded by the State of Colorado. Students should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for application information.
Colorado Scholarships. Colorado Scholars Awards provide up to $300 for Colorado residents who have at least a 3.0 grade-point average and have attended the University for at least 24 semester credit hours. These scholarships are funded by the State of Colorado. Information and application materials are available in the Office of Financial Aid.
GRANTS
Basic Educational Opportunity Grant. The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant is a source of federal grant aid for which all students pursuing their first undergraduate degree must apply. Application can be made by submitting the Family Financial Statement or the separate Basic Grant application. Applications can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid. Grant amounts vary depending on financial need, costs at the institution, and Congressional allocation. This program is the base of all financial aid.
Colorado Student Grant. The Colorado Student Grant is an undergraduate grant for Colorado residents. This grant is based on financial need and funds are allotted to the University by the State of Colorado. Amounts vary from approximately $100 to $1,000 per year. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid and the Family Financial Statement.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are undergraduate federal grants varying in amounts from $200 to $1,500 per year. The total that may be awarded to one student is $4,000 for a four-year course of study. These grants are based on student need and availability of funds. This aid cannot exceed 50 percent of financial need for a student and must be matched with some other form of financial aid. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University application and the Family Financial Statement.
Graduate Grant. Grants for graduate students are available on a limited basis and will be awarded to students as eligibility and funds allow. Application is made by submitting the University application and the Family Financial Statement to the Office of Financial Aid.
LOANS
National Direct Student Loans. National Direct Student Loans are federal loans available to un-
dergraduate and graduate students with financial need. A student may borrow up to (a) $2,500 during the freshman and sophomore years; (b) $5,000 total for undergraduate study; (c) $10,000 for total graduate and undergraduate study. Application for the loan is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid and the Family Financial Statement.
Federally Insured Student Loan/Guaranteed Student Loan Programs. These two programs enable undergraduate and graduate students to borrow directly from a bank, credit union, savings and loan association, or other participating lenders who are willing to make the educational loan. The loan is guaranteed by a state or private nonprofit agency and insured by the federal government. Information and applications may be obtained from the lender.
EMPLOYMENT
College Work-Study Program. The College Work-Study Program is designed to provide jobs to undergraduate and graduate students who have financial need. The program is funded by the federal government and the State of Colorado. Employment is arranged whenever possible in the student’s major area of interest, with job opportunities both on- and off-campus. Awards average up to $1,600 per academic year. For details contact the Office of Student Employment. Application for this aid is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid and the Family Financial Statement.
Part-time Student Employment. The Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment assists students in obtaining part-time employment other than that based on financial need. Further information and application may be obtained from the office.
Other Sources of Aid
See the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment for details of these programs:
Bureau of Indian Affairs. Grants are available to Native American students.
LEEP Grants and Loans. Grants and loans for tuition, fees, and books are available to personnel working full time in law enforcement.
Short-Term Loans. Small, temporary loans are made to students facing financial emergencies. These loans are to be repaid during the semester.
Academic Requirements
Students receiving financial aid must demonstrate that they are maintaining normal progress and are in good standing at the University. Normal academic progress is defined as completing the minimum number of hours stipulated on the notification of financial aid by obtaining a grade of D or better for that number of hours. Less than normal progress can result in the loss of future financial aid. Part-time students may be considered for aid for the cost of tuition, fees, and books.


General Information /II
Duration of Aid
Financial aid is offered for one year (two academic semesters). Students must reapply for summer and for each academic year, prior to the established deadlines.
Use of Funds
All financial aid awards are to be used only for immediate educational expenses. These expenses include tuition, fees, books, supplies, room and board, transportation and essential miscellaneous expenses, such as clothing, medical, etc.
Refunds
The University tuition refund policy is published in the Schedule of Courses for each term. Students receiving financial aid may be required to return any refund to the University’s financial aid accounts.
Student Rights
Students have certain rights and responsibilities regarding financial aid and student employment. The rights are as following:
1. Information must be available to students regarding the following:
a. Application procedures and deadlines.
b. Available programs.
c. Method of determining financial need.
d. Determination of aid awards.
e. Disbursements of awards.
f. Award changes and their reasons.
g. Reasons for aid refusal.
2. The financial aid officer must be available at specific times to talk to students regarding their problems and needs.
3. Students have the right to appeal to the Financial Aid/Student Employment Committee regarding decisions or situations they regard as unfavorable.
4. Students borrowing under the National Direct Student Loan program have the right to the following information:
a. A copy of the promissory note indicating the specifics of the loan.
b. Specifics of the repayment plan.
c. Truth-in-lending requirements.
Student Responsibilities
1. Students must abide by application procedures and deadlines.
2. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment of any changes which affect their financial status (e.g., marriage, employment, birth of a child, etc.)
3. Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress as specifically outlined by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.
4. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment of all changes in their enrollment.
5. Students with National Direct Student Loans must follow the procedures below when they terminate enrollment:
a. Exit interview at the Finance Office.
b. Notification to the University of current address and phone.
c. Notification of cancellation or deferment (when applicable).
d. Actual repayments of the loan.
For further information concerning financial aid and student employment, please contact the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment, Room 1, UCD Administration Building, 629-2886. Specific application procedures and policies are subject to change.
III. REGISTRATION: SELECTING A PROGRAM AND COURSES
Selecting a Program and Courses
New and continuing UCD students are urged to review Section VI and the following sections of this bulletin. Section VI describes the traditional and non-traditional instructional programs available at UCD, and the sections which follow it give information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, graduation requirements, course load policies, and other information and specific policies. Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Courses, published several weeks before registration and available from the Office of Admissions and Records and the various deans’ offices.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning a program or selecting courses should contact the college or school in which they are enrolled to arrange for a counseling appointment. The appointment should be made prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their graduate department for assistance.
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall semester, usually on the first day of registration. The program is conducted by the Office of Admissions and Records and introduces the programs, activities, and services available at UCD, in addition to providing information on degree requirements, how to register, and similar matters.
Registration
GENERAL PROCEDURES
Registration for new students is held the week before classes begin on the dates indicated in the Schedule of Courses, published several weeks before registration. Only students who have been accepted for enrollment for a particular term may register for courses.


12 / University of Colorado at Denver
LATE REGISTRATION
Late registration dates are indicated in the Schedule of Courses. Students who register late may be charged a fee and may have difficulty enrolling in the courses they want because of limited space.
PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fees are assessed and payable at registration. Arrangements may be made with the Finance Office at the time of registration to defer payment of a portion of the charges with a minimum down payment or one-third of the tuition, whichever is greater. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Courses.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
UCD students may register for courses offered by Metropolitan State College and the Community College of Denver-Auraria with approval of their dean. Refer to the Schedule of Courses for more information.
IV. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit
Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-level courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. By passing an examination, the student will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student’s formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB), allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 3, 4, or 51 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 31 are considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. For more information, contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions and Records.
CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Students may receive credit by examination for work completed by private study or through employment experience. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at
UCD and have a grade-point average of at least 2.0. Examinations are arranged through the Office of Admissions and Records, and a nonrefundable fee is charged. Students should contact the office of the dean of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
An exciting challenge is available to incoming UCD students who may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. The cost for a single examination is $20.
Students who are interested in CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
Credit for Courses Taken at Other Institutions
Undergraduate transfer credit for courses taken at other collegiate institutions will be accepted upon approval by the Office of Admissions and Records, the school or college concerned, and/or the major department. In general, UCD will accept transfer credits insofar as they meet the degree, residence, and other requirements of the student’s program at UCD. For transfer credit to be considered, the course work must have been taken at a college or university of recognized standing and a grade of C or higher must have been earned. A maximum of 72 semester credit hours (or 108 quarter credit hours) of junior college work may be applied toward the requirements for the baccalaureate degree. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious/doctrinal courses. A maximum of 60 semester hours of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester hours of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. Transfer credit is not included in a student’s grade-point average but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is obtained from the division head. A maximum of 60 semester hours of junior college work and 9 semester hours of business courses taken through correspondence study may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and required business courses and those in the area of emphasis may not be taken through correspondence.
'Students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science must receive scores of 4 or 5 for credit to be granted; students with scores of 3 may be considered by the department concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance.


General Information / 13
Credit for Independent Study
Undergraduate students may register for independent study projects with written approval by the dean of the college or school and the appropriate faculty member. A maximum of 3 semester hours of credit may be given for independent study per semester. Policies on the application of independent study credit toward baccalaureate degree requirements are:
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences..........Maximum of 12
semester hours
College of Business and Administration .......Maximum of 6
semester hours, including courses in experimental studies
School of Education...........................maximum of 12
semester hours
College of Engineering and Applied Science ..........Variable
College of Music ....................................Variable
Credit for Military Service, Schooling and ROTC
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
Applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application in order to have credit for service and education evaluated: (1) copies of discharge and separation papers, and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service (USAF personnel will furnish an official transcript from the community college at the appropriate Air Force facility). Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that such credit is applicable to the degree sought at UCD. Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions (see above).
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 12 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements and only if the ROTC program is completed.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and procedures for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all schools and colleges of the University effective with the 1974-75 academic year.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/-Fail Procedure.
A—superior /excellent—4 credit points per credit hour.
B—good/better than average—3 credit points per credit hour.
C—competent!average—2 credit points per credit hour.
D—minimum passing—1 credit point per credit hour.
F—failing—no credit points per credit hour.
IF—incomplete—conversion after one academic year to F.
IW—incomplete—conversion after one academic year to W.
IP—in progress—thesis at the graduate level only.
P/F—pass/fail—P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree.
H/P/F—honors /pass/fail—intended for honors courses; credit hours count twoard the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
SPECIAL SYMBOLS
NC—indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
W—indicates withdrawal without credit.
Y— indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pass/fail basis should do so during regular registration procedures. (Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree). Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be effected only during the regular drop/add period.
2. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records.
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of special pass/fail registration. All students who register on a pass/fail basis appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations which require a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P.
4. Only 6 hours of course work may be P/F in any given semester.
5. Exception to the pass/fail regulations is permitted for certain specified courses offered by the School


14 / University of Colorado at Denver
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education, and certain teacher certification courses May not be used by students graduating with only 30 semester hours taken at the University
Business and Administration May not be used for “core” courses required for graduation and courses in area of emphasis Includes credit received through CLEP and advanced standing examinations Maximum of 1 semester hour of pass/fail for every 8 semester hours attempted at the University
Education No restrictions
Engineering and Applied Science Courses must be designated by major department; students without major not eligible; recommended maximum — one course/semester Includes courses taken in the honors program Maximum of 1 semester hour of pass/fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semester hours taken in the college
Graduate School Not applicable toward degree
Music Same as business Includes courses taken in the honors program
of Education, the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. However, a grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
Adding and Dropping Courses
Adding Courses. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 5 days of classes, provided there is space available. Approval signatures are not required.
Dropping Courses:
1. Students will be able to drop courses during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semesters (7th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped and signatures are not required.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (7th day of a summer term), only the instructor’s signature must be obtained and the instructor must indicate either a drop without discredit or failing. Tuition will be charged and the courses will appear on the student’s permanent record with a W grade.
3. After the 10th week of a fall or spring semester (5th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control. In addition to the instructors certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses. Tuition will be charged even though the drop is allowed.
Withdrawal From the University
To withdraw from the University, the student obtains approval of the dean’s office, Finance Office,
and the Office of Admissions and Records. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student’s permanent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (8th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student’s permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (5th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veterans’ benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of the appropriate office(s).
A student who ceases to attend classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive a grade of F for all course work enrolled for during that term.
A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the associate dean of the Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the associate dean and filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form, will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
For specific signatures and refunds the student must refer to the Schedule of Courses published prior to the beginning of each term.
Inspection of Educational Records
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. This act, with which the institution intends to comply fully, was designated to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect



General Information / 15
and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
A directory of records which lists all educational records maintained on students by this institution may be found in the offices of the chancellor on each campus.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information. Such information may be disclosed by the institution for any purpose, at its discretion. These items are: name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree (s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the 11th day of classes in any given term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Offices of Admissions and Records.
The University of Colorado assumes that failure on the part of any student to request specifically the withholding of categories of directory information indicates individual approval for disclosure.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Good Standing
To remain in good standing within a particular discipline, a student must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 (C) in all course work attempted. A minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must also be maintained to qualify for an undergraduate degree. Policies on academic probation, suspension, and dismissal vary by college or school, and students should refer to the sections of this bulletin dealing with the colleges and schools for information.
Student Classification
Students who have passed fewer than 30 semester hours are classified as freshmen. To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have passed 30 semester hours; to be classified as a junior, 60 hours; and to be classified as a senior, 90 hours of credit. All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according
to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Student Indebtedness
A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credit from the University. Transcripts will not be released to a student with a financial obligation to the University. The only exception to this policy involves students who have loans or other types of indebtedness which mature after graduation.
V. SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
The Division of Student Affairs offers educational and personal support services and programs designed to assist students in meeting their educational and personal growth objectives. The division office telephone number is 629-2861.
The University of Colorado at Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and employment. In pursuance of this policy, no UCD department, unit, discipline, or employee shall discriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees.
Academic Honorary Societies
Academic honorary societies are affiliated with each of the schools and colleges. Further information may be obtained from the deans’ offices.
Alumni and Friends Program
The UCD Alumni and Friends organization was established in 1975 to support the University of Colorado at Denver. Membership is open to all University of Colorado graduates, former students, and friends of the University.
The organization publishes a bimonthly newsletter of alumni and University activities, coordinates the UCD Teacher Recognition Awards Program, assists with student recruitment and registration, and advises on special media projects. Members work with UCD students, faculty, and staff in sponsoring a reception for each graduating class, and functions are planned which bring alumni and friends back to the campus. The office is located in Room 706 of the UCD Administration Building, telephone 629-2665.
Counseling Center
The services of the Counseling Center are open to all students and prospective students. Personal and vocational counseling, group experiences, and testing are provided by trained counselors. Interviews are confidential and there is no fee for counseling. The office telephone number is 629-2861.


16 / University of Colorado at Denver
Disabled Student Services
Disabled Student Services handles the special needs of physically handicapped students, helping them to obtain a university education. Services include academic support orientation programs, registration assistance, and the assignment of reserved parking spaces to students with serious physical impairments. The office telephone number is 629-8354.
Health Insurance Program
The student medical-hospital-surgical plan is automatic for all students unless waived. Dependent coverage is available at an additional charge. Students may waive this coverage by signing a waiver card and returning the card at the time of registration. Information may be obtained at 629-2861.
International Student Services
The Office for Student Relations provides assistance to the more than 300 international students who attend UCD. The office helps foreign students with such requirements as immigration certifications and passport assistance, and supplies information on study abroad programs, international student I.D. cards, and overseas travel.
Student Conduct, Policies, and Standarde
The Office for Student Relations, which protects student rights and responsibilities, administers the Code of Student Conduct. When a student enrolls in the University, he or she agrees to participate meaningfully in the life of the University and to share in the obligation to preserve and promote its educational endeavors. Each student preserves his or her rights as a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or to tolerate any impingement on the rights of others. Copies of the code and information regarding all student grievance procedures may be obtained in the Office for Student Relations. Telephone, 629-2861.
Student Employment Opportunities
The Office of Financial Aid offers job listings to all enrolled UCD students. Both on-campus and off-campus job openings are listed.
Students receiving financial aid may use this service only if the Office of Financial Aid has determined that earnings from the job in question will not exceed the amount of their unmet need. Telephone, 629-2886.
For information on career-related job opportunities, refer to Cooperative Education under Academic Programs.
Career Services
This office coordinates career planning, career counseling, vocational interest exploration, and career placement for UCD students and alumni.
Counseling programs are available to help students plan their futures and attain skills necessary for the
achievement of career goals. Assistance is provided in developing skills essential for resume preparation and interviewing techniques.
Local and national employers list available career vacancies and visit the campus to recruit qualified personnel. Students are advised to register for this service early in their senior year. Telephone, 629-2861.
Study Skills Center
The Study Skills Center is administered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences on behalf of UCD. The purpose of the center is to help UCD students develop methods of efficient study. Services are available to help specifically with particular subject areas, as well as to strengthen general academic and research skills. Telephone, 629-2802.
Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs offers all student veterans counseling regarding school attendance requirements, benefits, personal and vocational assistance, and other program information. Consult the veterans representative, 629-2630.
Women’s Center
The Women’s Center provides counseling regarding vocational choices and personal and school-related problems. The center is also a place to meet other women students or join a discussion group. Telephone, 629-2815.
VI. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Degree Programs
For complete bachelor’s and master’s degree programs offered by UCD, see the Degree Programs at a Glance chart at the beginning of this bulletin.
UCD also offers preprofessional programs in law, journalism, and the health sciences (child health associate, dental hygiene, dentistry, medical technology, medicine, nursing, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, physical therapy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine). Courses in many other undergraduate and graduate areas are offered at UCD, but degrees must be completed at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
The remaining sections of this bulletin discuss in detail each school and college and provide information on their specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, and similar information. Course offerings appear in a separate section of this bulletin.
Cooperative Education Program
1047 Ninth Street 629-2892
The Cooperative Education Program provides students with an opportunity to find work experience relevant to their academic programs. The program is


General Information / 17
open to all students who have completed their freshman year and have maintained a grade-point average of at least 2.5. The cooperative internship program consists of jobs developed by the program staff in a wide variety of federal, state, and private agencies and businesses. Positions are specifically geared to students’ academic and career goals. Cooperative education students can either work full time by alternating semesters of work with semesters of full-time school or they can work part time year around. Students enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are eligible to receive credit for preprofessional or professional work experience (see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin).
Educational Opportunity Program
Room 212, 1100 Fourteenth Street 629-2700
The Educational Opportunity Programs assist all educationally disadvantaged students at UCD. Support programs include specialized recruiting, intensive counseling, tutorial services, and community outreach programs. The program is designed to provide assistance to minority students and to acquaint students with the history and culture of Asian Americans, Blacks, Mexican Americans, and Native Americans. Student organizations provide assistance with recruitment, counseling, and tutoring; financial assistance is available through grants and the Work/Study Program. Courses are offered in Asian American, Black, Mexican American, and Native American Studies. These courses are open to all students and are described in the Course Description section of this bulletin.
Reserve Officer Training Programs
U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC): Folsom Stadium, Gate 3, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, 492-8351
U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC): Department of Military Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, 492-6495
University of Colorado at Denver students may participate in the Air Force ROTC program offered by the University of Colorado at Boulder and the Army ROTC program offered at UCD. The programs enable students to earn a commission in the Air Force or Army while earning a University degree. Both the Army and Air Force ROTC offer four-year programs designed for freshman students and two-year programs for junior students. Graduate students may also enroll in the Air Force two-year program. Both programs provide financial assistance to students in the junior and senior years, and the Air Force ROTC includes a scholarship program. Students should apply for the four-year program prior to or during their freshman year and for the two-year program no later than early in the spring semester of their sophomore year.
Senior Citizen Program
UCD’s Office of Academic Affairs coordinates tuition-free classes for persons 60 years of age and over. Senior citizens may register for any class on a noncredit/audit basis as long as space is available. Senior citizens should register and pick up class registration forms in Room 810, UCD Administration Building, and should take the completed forms to the first session of class for the instructor’s approval. The form then should be returned to Room 810, and a student I.D. card will be issued which entitles senior citizens to the same privileges as regular degree students. For further information call 629-2550.
Division of Continuing Education
The Division of Continuing Education at UCD provides lifelong learning experiences for people of all ages seeking to attain career and personal development goals and serves a society trying to cope with the problems and realities of rapidly changing patterns of living. The division offers a large noncredit program ranging from one-day workshops to certificate programs requiring several years to complete. Classes meet throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Off-campus credit classes are offered in the public schools, Lowry Air Force Base, and Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.
Noncredit programs are open to all adults regardless of previous education or training. Some advanced courses require a background in a specific subject matter area. Examples of these courses include licensing and professional designation refresher courses for engineers, accountants, and life insurance agents. Except in some certificate programs, no grade is awarded upon completion of a course.
Off-campus credit classes supplement the regular academic programs offered at UCD. These special purpose programs include recertification classes for public school teachers, vacation college, and certificate programs for government professionals. Admission requirements and refund policies for off-campus instruction are identical with requirements for enrollment in UCD. Individuals who have never been enrolled on any campus of the University of Colorado usually are admitted to off-campus instruction as special students.
Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Continuing Education Bulletin or other information may write or call the division office at UCD, 1100 14th Street, 629-2735.
BOARD OF REGENTS
JACK KENT ANDERSON, Golden, term expires 1985
RACHEL B. NOEL, Denver, term expires 1985
LOUIS F. BEIN, Berthoud, term expires 1981
RICHARD M. BERNICK, Denver, term expires 1981
FRED M. BETZ, JR., Lamar, term expires 1983
PETER DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1985
BYRON L. JOHNSON, Denver, term expires 1983
SANDY F. KRAEMER, Colorado Springs, term expires 1983
DAVID SUNDERLAND, Colorado Springs, term expires 1981


18 / University of Colorado at Denver
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS University-Wide
ROLAND C. RAUTENSTRAUS, President of the University; Professor of Civil Engineering. B.S. (C.E.), M.S., University of Colorado.
University of Colorado at Denver
HAROLD H. HAAK, Chancellor; Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Princeton University.
WILLIAM A. JENKINS, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Professor of Education. B.S., New York University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois.
MARTIN L. MOODY, Vice Chancellor for Administration; Professor of Civil Engineering. B.S. (C.E.), University of Missouri; M.S. (C.E.), University of Colorado; Ph.D. (C.E.), Stanford University. Professional Engineer: Colorado.
PAUL J. KOPECKY, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Assistant Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ed.D., University of Colorado.
KENNETH E. HERMAN, Director, Budget and Finance. B.S. (Bus.), University of Colorado.
GEORGE L. BURNHAM, Director, Admissions and Records. B.A., William Jewell College; M.A., University of Kansas City.
ELLEN CARUSO, Director, Alumni and Friends. B.A., University of Montana.
FLOYD C. MANN, Director, Institute for Urban and Public Policy Research; Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Michigan.
DONALD E. RIGGS, Director, Auraria Libraries; Associate Professor. B.A., Glenville State College; M.A., West Virginia University;
M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
TOM S. STEIN, Director, Community Relations. B.A., Carleton College; M.A., University of Colorado.
GORDON G. BARNEWALL, Associate Dean, College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration; Associate Professor of Marketing. B.S., University of Colorado; M.B.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University.
PAUL E. BARTLETT, Associate Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Professor of Civil Engineering. B.S. (C.E.), B.S. (Bus.), M.S. (C.E.), University of Colorado. Professional Engineer: Colorado.
WILLIAM D. BOUB, Dean, Summer Session; Director, Division of Continuing Education. B.S., Kansas State Teachers College; M.S., University of Illinois.
DANIEL FALLON, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Professor of Psychology. B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia.
GERALD W. LUNDQUIST, Associate Dean, School of Education; Professor of Education. B.A., University of Puget Sound; M.A., Ph.D., Arizona State University.
DWAYNE C. NUZUM, Dean, College of Environmental Design; Associate Professor of Architecture. B.Arch., University of Colorado; MJArch.), Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Doctoral (Town Planning), Delft Technical University, The Netherlands. Registered Architect: Colorado, Virginia.
FRANZ L. ROEHMANN, Acting Associate Dean, College of Music; Associate Professor of Music. B.S., State University of New York; M. Mus., Ed.D., University of Illinois.
ROBERT N. ROGERS, Associate Dean, Graduate School; Professor of Physics. B.S., Ph.D., Stanford University.
ROBERT F. WILCOX, Dean, Graduate School of Public Affairs; Professor of Public Affairs. M.A., Columbia University; A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Daniel Fallon, Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Study of the liberal arts and sciences aims to develop human potential in order to bring the best of human intellect and emotion to bear on the experiences and challenges of life. By providing a broad educational foundation, the arts and sciences prepare students to initiate careers, to change careers in midlife, to pursue advanced study in a discipline, to study for a professional career such as law or medicine, and, in general, to lead a rewarding and productive life. The curriculum helps students to increase substantive knowledge, to learn skills such as logical argument and clear expression, to gain new insights about relationships in nature and society, to develop critical thought and interpretive ability, to solve complex problems rationally, and to heighten aesthetic appreciation.
To accomplish these aims, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences supports a vigorous interaction between faculty and students. A young and dedicated faculty with strong academic credentials is committed to highly motivated urban students who represent a broad range of age and experience. Thus, the curriculum of the College maintains traditionally high university academic standards while providing numerous flexible learning opportunities to meet the varied objectives of university students from the Denver metropolitan area. At the undergraduate level, the College offers a high-quality liberal educational program that also prepares students for subsequent professional and graduate study. At the graduate level, the College offers students disciplinary and broad interdisciplinary master’s degree programs which may serve as a means of beginning study towards doctoral degrees.
Because students are consulted and involved in the design of both undergraduate and graduate programs, the curriculum of the College reflects the concerns of Denver area students. There are many opportunities to study urban problems, confront contemporary issues, participate in off-campus working internships, and in general make use of the resources of the city. To accommodate the many students who are employed full time during the day, about half of all courses offered by the College are scheduled after 5 p.m.
Many students enroll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to study the liberal arts and participate in the general education associated with the B.A. or B.F.A. degree as an end in itself. Upon receiving a degree, some students decide to continue study at the graduate level. Others set aside further formal study and initiate careers. Because a liberal education provides a broad foundation in problem-solving skills and substantive knowledge that can be widely applied, graduates of the College have begun careers in a variety of positions in industry, commerce, and government.
Many students also enroll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences specifically to prepare themselves for admission to one of the professional schools of the University, which include the School of Dentistry, School of Education, School of Journalism, School of Law, School of Medicine, School of Nursing, School of Pharmacy, and Graduate School of Public Affairs. The specific admission requirements for each of these professional schools can be met in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
The faculty of the College provide instruction at the undergraduate level through three academic divisions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences. Each division offers a wide variety of curricula including traditional undergraduate major programs, interdisciplinary studies, and preprofessional programs.
The degrees offered by the College at the undergraduate level are the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.). A number of degrees are offered at the graduate level.
MAJOR PROGRAMS
Students can earn the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in the following areas:
Anthropology Biology Chemistry Communication and theatre Economics
English (students may also take a special writing program option)
Ethnic studies Fine arts (students may study for either a B.A. or B.F.A. degree)
French
Geography
Geology
German
History


20 / University of Colorado at Denver
Mathematics (students may also take a special computer science option)
Philosophy
Physics
Political science
Population dynamics
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Urban studies
Special options are available for those students who would like to distribute their major program studies among two or more disciplinary majors (distributed studies) or who would like to propose a unique major program tailored to meet a specific objective (individually structured major).
The College also provides the necessary course work to prepare students for careers in elementary or secondary teaching, journalism, and law, as well as the following health science fields: child health associate, dental hygiene, dentistry, medical technology, medicine, nursing, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, physical therapy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine.
Double Majors and Second Degrees
Students may graduate with more than one major (e.g., mathematics and French) by completing all requirements for both majors.
Students who have been awarded a bachelor’s degree (either from the College or elsewhere) may be granted a second bachelor’s degree provided that (a) all general requirements for the degree have been met; (b) the major for the second bachelor’s degree is different from the major for the first; and (c) at least 30 hours are completed in this College after admission to the second degree program.
Students may earn two degrees from the University of Colorado simultaneously by fulfilling all requirements for both degrees. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requires that a student complete at least 90 liberal arts credits and 150 total credits in order to be granted two bachelor’s degrees.
It is recommended that students planning one of these multiple programs consult with the College Advising Office at the earliest possible date.
Note: Graduate degree programs offered by the faculty of the College through the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Entering First-Year Students
Students planning to enter the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must meet the requirements described in the General Information section of this bulletin under Admission Policies and Procedures. Applicants to the College are considered for admission according to the following schedule.1
If: And: Then:
Your Rank in Or Your
High School Your ACT Combined Your Status for Class Is Composite SAT Score Admission Is
Upper 1/2 23 or higher 1,000 or higher Assured admission
Upper 2/3 18-23 800 or higher Considered on an
individual basis
Lower 1/2 Below 18 Below 800 Considered by
Admissions Committee
Transfer Students
Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students as described in the General Information section of this bulletin. Applicants who have been away from a college environment for more than three years will be considered on the basis of all factors available: high school record, test scores, original college admission qualifications, college performance, and interim experiences that might suggest potential success in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. A maximum of 72 semester hours taken at a community college may be applied toward a degree in the College.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Students are referred to the General Information section of this bulletin for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at UCD. The policies which follow apply specifically to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Therefore, the faculty assumes that term papers, reports, studio work, results of laboratory experiments, and examinations submitted by the student represent the student’s own work. Students are referred to the Statement on Academic Honesty of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, available from the Office of the Dean for guidance on generally acceptable limits on cooperation in the preparation of academic work, and for a discussion of what constitutes academic dishonesty.
Academic dishonesty, such as plagiarism or cheating, is a serious charge which, if substantiated, may result in course failure, probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University. The Academic Ethics Committee, composed principally of faculty and students, is charged by the faculty of the College with considering evidence in contested cases, determining guilt or innocence, and assessing penalties. Special rules of the committee, available from the Office of the Dean have been designed to insure due process.
Academic Advice and Information
Students in the College are expected to assume the responsibility for planning their academic programs in accordance with College rules and policies and major requirements. To assist students, the College maintains an advising staff located in the UCD Administration Building, telephone 629-2555. Students are urged to consult with the staff of this office concerning individual academic problems.
As soon as the student has determined a major, he or she must declare the major to a department adviser. The department adviser will be responsible not
'This schedule corresponds to the general requirements described in the General Information section, but more detail is provided here for prospective College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 21
only for the student’s advising but also for the certification of the completion of the major program for graduation.
Students planning to earn a degree from one of the professional schools should see an adviser in that school. Each professional school has certain specific requirements. Preprofessional health science students should see a member of the Health Sciences Committee early in their careers. Appointments should be made through the sciences secretary in Room 232, 629-2646.
The College has organized a Legal Advisory Committee for the purpose of advising all UCD students who are interested in careers in law. This committee has a library of law school catalogues, pre-law handbooks, and other relevant documents, advises individual students, interviews students who need to secure a dean’s letter for application to certain law schools, and sponsors meetings at which information of interest to pre-law students is shared. Students may contact the Committee through the Office of the Dean.
UCD also has a counseling service available through the Office for Student Affairs to which a student may go for assistance with personal problems.
Career counseling is available to all students with majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Assistance in skills analysis, resume preparation, and job placement is available through the Office of the Dean, telephone 629-3396.
Academic Warning and Scholastic Suspension
Good academic standing in the College requires a grade-point average of 2.0 (C) on all University of Colorado course work. Grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado are used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and progress toward the degree. However, grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado.
Academic Warning
Students whose cumulative grade-point averages fall below a 2.0 (C) at the end of the fall semester will be so notified early in the spring semester. Students will be informed in writing concerning the grade-point requirements which must be met by the end of the spring semester.
Scholastic Suspension
Scholastic suspension means that a student is denied the opportunity to register for courses in the College for a specified period of time. If a student’s
G.P.A. drops below 2.0 at the end of any semester (excluding summer term), the student will be required to achieve better than a 2.0 in a succeeding semester, as described in the following sliding scale, or the student will be suspended. The student must then continue to meet the sliding scale every semester until the grade-point average reaches 2.0. Scholastic records of stu-
dents are reviewed as soon as possible after the close of each spring semester, and the student is informed in writing if he or she is to be suspended.
Grade-Point A verage in the Most
Hours Deficiency Recent Semester
1-10 2.2
11-20 2.3
21-30 2.4
Over 30 2.5
The hours deficiency is the number of credit hours of B work that the student must earn to raise the G.P.A. to 2.0 (C). For example, if the student has attempted 24 semester hours and has earned 42 quality points, the G.P.A. is 1.75. The student needs 6 semester hours of B to raise the G.P.A. to 2.0. To calculate the hours of B that are needed, multiply the total hours attempted by 2 and subtract the number of quality points from this figure. Example: 24 semester hours attempted x 2 = 48; 48 - 42 quality points = 6 semester hours of B needed or 6 hours deficiency.
In attempting to raise a grade-point average, a student may register for courses in the University of Colorado summer term on any campus, for correspondence study through the University, or for credit courses offered through the Division of Continuing Education.
First Suspension
The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term), after which the student will automatically be readmitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The student then will be expected to meet the sliding scale (based on the student’s University of Colorado record only) until the cumulative G.P.A. reaches 2.0. Failure to do so will result in a second suspension.
A student under a first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if the student has demonstrated academic improvement in one of the following ways:
1. By achieving a cumulative 2.5 average on all summer or correspondence work attempted at the University of Colorado since suspension. (A student must register for a minimum of 6 credits in the summer term on any campus, through correspondence work, or through credit courses in the Division of Continuing Education.)
2. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to
2.0 through correspondence or summer work at the University of Colorado.
3. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to
2.0 at another institution. (The cumulative grade-point average is defined as the grade-point average at the University of Colorado in combination with the work taken at all other institutions.) Upon return to the University, however, the student retains his or her previous grade-point average. (G.P.A. from another institution does not transfer back to the University.)


22 / University of Colorado at Denver
Second Suspension
A student suspended for a second time will be readmitted only under unusual circumstances and only by petition to the Academic Standards Committee of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Each petition will be examined individually. The committee will expect the student to show that chances for successful completion of an educational program in the College have been materially improved by factors such as increased maturity or a relief from stressful circumstances. The deadline for petitions to the Academic Standards Committee for reinstatement for any fall semester is August 1; for reinstatement for any spring semester, the deadline is December 1.
A student who completes 12 or more semester hours at another institution must apply for readmission to the University of Colorado as a transfer student, regardless of his or her status in the University of Colorado. He or she also must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted (at the University of Colorado and elsewhere) in order to be considered for readmission.
Petitioning for Special Requests or Exceptions to Standing Academic Policy
The Academic Standards Committee is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty. This faculty-student committee constitutes the bridge between the faculty in its legislative capacity and the students upon whom the legislation comes to bear. The committee alone is empowered to grant waivers of exemptions from and exceptions to the academic policies of the College.
One of the major responsibilities of the committee is the handling of suspensions and reinstatement of suspended students. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term). However, students suspended a second time will be reinstated only under unusual circumstances and only by petition to the committee.
Course Load
The normal course load is 12 to 18 hours. Students registered for fewer than 12 hours are regarded as part-time students. Students wishing to register for 20 hours or more must obtain approval from the dean. Designation as a part-time or full-time student depends only upon courses taken for credit in the University and does not include correspondence courses or noncredit courses. To receive credit, the student must be officially registered for each course.
Students who hold or expect to hold full- or part-time employment while enrolled in the College must register for course loads they can expect to complete without unusual difficulty. Recommended course loads are given below, but each student must weigh his or her own abilities and assess the demands of each course in determining an appropriate schedule. The College assumes that all courses selected will be completed.
Employed 20 hours per week — 10 to 13 semester hours, or three to four courses.
Employed 30 hours per week — 8 to 11 semester hours, or three courses.
Employed 40 hours per week — 6 to 9 semester hours, or two or three courses.
Summer Term: Since the summer term is only 10 weeks long, the recommended course load is less than in the fall and spring.
Employed fewer than 15 hours per week — 9 semester hours, or three courses.
Employed 15 to 30 hours per week — 7 semester hours, or two courses.
Employed over 30 hours per week — 3-5 semester hours, or one course.
Courses taken at the University of Colorado at Boulder or the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, or interinstitutionally with MSC or CCDA, are counted in the total load.
Note: 6 semester hours is considered a full load in the summer term. Maximum course load is 9 semester hours.
Earning Academic Credit —
Special Options and Cases
Students in the College may earn credit toward a degree for knowledge gained prior to enrollment in the College or for knowledge gained outside of College courses. Some specific programs by which credit is awarded include Credit by Examination, Advanced Placement, and the College-Level Examination Program. These are described in the General Information section of this bulletin. In addition, credit may be earned for Cooperative Education, Army ROTC, and the following activities.
Correspondence Study
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, with the approval of the dean, may take work in correspondence study offered by the University’s Division of Continuing Education. A maximum of 30 hours of correspondence work may count toward the degree.
Credit for Courses in the Professional Schools and in Physical Education
Students may count toward the Bachelor of Arts degree as many as 24 credit hours of course work from curricula leading to degrees other than the B.A. (business, engineering and applied science, environmental design, journalism, music, nursing, and pharmacy). College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students desiring secondary school certification will be allowed to take up to 34 hours in the certification program of the School of Education as part of their total required hours for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Vocational and technical courses from a two-year program may not be included. Activity courses in physical education, up to a maximum of 8 hours, will count toward the 120 required for the degree.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 23
Credit for Independent Study
Students may register for independent study with the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and divisional dean. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project (not to exceed 3 credits per semester) shall be arranged at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits taken on an independent study basis may apply toward the bachelor’s degree.
Effective summer 1978, independent study courses will be numbered as follows:
910 - 919 Freshman
920 - 929 Sophomore
930 - 939 Junior
940 - 949 Senior
950 - Graduate
999 - Candidate for degree
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)
An exciting challenge is available to entering College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students who want to earn university credit by examination in subject areas in which they have obtained college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board Testing Service. The College will award credit for the following subjects if a student scores at the 67th percentile:
Arts and Humanities American literature
Analysis and interpretation of literature English literature
Natural and Physical Sciences Biology
General chemistry Geology
Introductory calculus General psychology
Social Sciences
American government American history Introductory economics Western civilization
Students should contact the Office for Student Affairs, UCDA Room 207, to arrange for the examinations.
SUMMARY
Following is a listing of the types of credit and the maximum number of hours that may be earned for nonclassroom work.
Types of Credit Maximum Credit Hows
Allowed Toward the B.A. Degree
Advanced Placement Credit (AP) No limit
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 30 semester hours
Cooperative education Correspondence study Credit by examination Independent study
12 semester hours 30 semester hours No limit
12 semester hours
Graduation Requirements
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES
The student is ultimately responsible for knowing the requirements for his or her degree and for fulfilling these requirements. Upon completion of the requirements (including those of a major), the student will be awarded the appropriate degree.
THE LIBERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
In order to qualify for a B.A. or B.F.A. degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students must complete the liberal education program, which consists of area distribution requirements and a foreign language requirement.
To satisfy the area distribution requirements, students choose from a list of available courses in each of three areas:
1. Arts and humanities — 12 semester hours.
2. Natural and physical sciences — 12 semester hours.
3. Social sciences — 12 semester hours.
Lists of courses that will satisfy these area requirements are available in the Schedule of Courses published each fall and spring semester and summer term. The Schedule may be obtained in each divisional office and in the Office of the Dean of the College.
To satisfy the foreign language requirement, students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language. This requirement may be met prior to admission as a student by completion of a Level III high school course in any classical or modern foreign language. Students who have not satisfied the requirement upon admission may do so by (a) demonstration of a third-semester proficiency by examination, (b) completion of a third-semester course in the College, or (c) completion of Intensive German, which consists of 12 semester hours in one semester. Students are strongly urged to begin or continue their college-level language study immediately upon enrollment in the College. Students who elect to continue a language studied before entering the College will be placed in courses appropriate to their level of preparation. Careful rules for placement have been prepared and are available from the Office of the Dean of the College. Students are urged to consult the advising staff of the College or any foreign language faculty member regarding foreign language study and the foreign language requirement.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
A candidate for the degree Bachelor of Arts shall fulfill such requirements as may be stipulated for the major program. These requirements shall include at least 30 semester hours of work in the major area (as


24 / University of Colorado at Denver
determined by the adviser) of C grade or higher, at least 16 hours of which shall be at the upper division level. The grade average in the major shall be at least C. Not more than 48 semester hours in one field may be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. The student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the major. The adviser shall be responsible for determining when a student has satisfactorily completed the requirements for the major and for so certifying to the dean of the College.
For requirements of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, consult the Fine Arts section in the alphabetical listings under the description of programs.
UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENT
Students must complete at least 45 hours of upper division work (courses numbered 300 or higher) to be eligible for the bachelor’s degree. Any student may register for upper division courses providing he or she has satisfied the prerequisites or has the approval of the discipline in which the course is offered.
Courses transferred from a community college carry lower division credit. Exceptions to this require approval of the dean of the College and the appropriate discipline representative, who may ask the student to validate upper division credit by taking an advanced standing examination.
TOTAL CREDIT-HOUR AND GRADE-POINT REQUIREMENT
To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students must pass at least 120 semester hours with an average of at least 2.0 (C) in all courses attempted at the University of Colorado.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT
A candidate for a degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must earn the last 30 hours in the University of Colorado and must be enrolled as a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
The College will not graduate any student who has not completed at least 30 hours of letter-graded work at the University of Colorado.
SENIOR PROGRESS REPORT AND DIPLOMA CARD
Upon completion of 80 semester hours of course work, each student should request a Progress Report from the Office of the Dean to determine the student’s status with respect to degree requirements.
At the beginning of their last semester, students are required to file Diploma Cards, showing the date they intend to be graduated. Failure to file a Diploma Card will result in delayed graduation. Diploma Cards are available in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Office of Admissions and Records, and at registration.
SUMMARY CHECKLIST OF GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Liberal Education Program
1. Arts and humanities: 12 semester hours.
2. Natural and physical sciences: 12 semester hours.
3. Social sciences: 12 semester hours.
4. Foreign language: third-semester proficiency in any one language or completion of a Level III high school foreign language course.
Major Requirements
1. 30 to 48 hours in the major field.
2. At least 30 hours of C grade or better in the major field.
3. A 2.0 (C) grade-point average in all major course work.
4. A minimum of 16 semester hours of upper division courses in the major, C grade or higher.
5. Special requirements as stipulated by the major adviser.
General Requirements
1. A total of 120 semester hours passed.
(C) cumulative grade-point average on all University of Colorado course work.
3. A minimum of 45 semester hours of upper division course work.
4. The last 30 hours in residence in the College.
Note: Not more than 48 hours in any one field and not more than 24 hours outside the College can be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree.
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Honors
OLD POLICY FOR GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION
A student who performs superlatively in course work in the College will be awarded a bachelor’s degree accompanied by the statement, with distinction. To be eligible for graduation with distinction, a student must have completed at least 30 semester hours at the University of Colorado and have obtained a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher by the end of the semester prior to the final semester’s work toward the degree. The cumulative grade-point average must be based upon all collegiate work attempted, both at the University of Colorado and elsewhere.
NEW POLICY FOR GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION
Effective summer 1978, all graduating seniors must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Colorado (on any CU campus), including the final semester, with a grade-point average of at least 3.75. The 45 semester hours must be completed in the student’s junior and senior years. The


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 25
student also must meet the College’s residency requirement, i.e., the last 30 hours in the College.
Any students who feel that they are qualified to graduate with distinction, but who do not meet these standards, may petition to the Academic Standards Committee for a review of their particular cases. Petitions dealing with these standards will rarely be approved, however, and then only with evidence of academic performance equivalent to the standard.
Special Notes
1. Courses that UCD does not offer, but that the faculty encourages students to take at the other Auraria institutions (MSC and/or CCD), may be counted as part of the 45 semester hours. A list of such courses will be available in the College Academic Advising Office.
2. A maximum of 6 semester hours may be completed with a grade of P (on P/F option) and included in the 45 semester hours.
3. All credit courses which are completed through the Division of Continuing Education may be included in the 45 semester hours.
4. In calculating the minimum total of 45 semester hours, part of a semester will not be counted but, instead, all courses in a semester will be included.
The new policy outlined above was approved by the Academic Standards Committee on April 19, 1978. Both the old and the new policies will be administered simultaneously for all students who matriculated prior to summer 1978. For those students who matriculated in summer 1978 or thereafter, only the new policy will be used.
COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM
Independently of graduation with distinction, which is based on grades alone, the College offers a program through which students can qualify for the following honors awarded by the College: summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude. The determination of the level of honors to be awarded is made by the College Honors Council. These awards may be earned either in a specific department (Departmental Honors), or in general studies (General Honors) or in both. In either case, special independent creative work is required to qualify. Any junior or senior student with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (B) or higher may participate in the program.
In order to qualify for award of College honors in a discipline, a student must (a) complete a research project or honors thesis in the discipline, (b) take the Advanced Graduate Record Examination, and (c) take an oral examination administered by an honors committee.
The College-wide General Honors program is designed to encourage and assist academically strong students to achieve a greater degree of breadth in their educational experiences than they ordinarily might obtain in their college careers. The program is intended for the student who likes to deal creatively with ideas and who desires to extend education beyond the usual course requirements. Any qualified
junior or senior may enroll in honors seminars without becoming a candidate for graduation with honors. Grading in honors courses is based on the designations H (Honors), P (Pass), and F (Fail). All honors courses carry upper division credit. In cross-listed courses, open to honors students upon consent of the instructor, honors students may expect to do additional or independent work as determined in consultation with the professor.
In order to qualify for General Honors, a student must (a) complete at least four honors courses with grades of H, (b) submit an honors paper, and (c) take oral and written honors examinations administered by the College Honors Council.
Detailed information concerning the Honors Program may be obtained from the director of the Honors Program or from the College Advising Office. Students interested in the program ordinarily should begin participation in their junior year.
PHI BETA KAPPA
Students in the College who excel in their undergraduate studies may be invited to join Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest academic honorary society, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. For further information, interested students should contact the College Advising Office.
Cooperative Education
Based on the precept that employment experiences can often contribute to liberal education, the Cooperative Education Program is designed to provide opportunities to supplement academic work with practical experience. Students may be placed as employees with corporations, businesses, and public agencies in ways that complement or enhance their academic course work. Many cooperative education students choose to contract with a professor in their major fields to receive academic credit for their work experiences. An academic cooperative education contract designates a certain number of academic credits for satisfactory performance in a related work experience. The credit is contingent upon satisfactory completion of whatever academic project the faculty member chooses to assign in conjunction with the job.
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences participates in this program with cooperative education courses offered at the 398 level in each department. These courses are listed under each department heading in the Course Description section of this bulletin. Students placed by the Cooperative Education Office in paid or volunteer assignments, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, may be eligible, subject to the guidelines below:
1. The student should have reached the sophomore level and must be enrolled in an undergraduate degree program.
2. The student should have at least a 2.5 grade-point average. Students with GPAs in the 2.0 (C) to
2.4 range must obtain the approval of the dean in order to participate in the program.


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3. A job in which the learning possibilities and responsibilities of the student remain static will not be approved for more than one semester. In contrast, a job in which the learning opportunities and responsibilities vary and increase may be eligible for credit over a longer time span.
4. Projects will be granted from 1 to 6 hours of elective credit per semester, 3 being the usual number of credit hours for each project. Certain projects, such as certain full-time internships, may be granted as much as 6 credits.
5. Twelve semester hours is the maximum number of credits a student can earn in Cooperative Education. In some departments, Cooperative Education hours may count toward satisfying requirements for the major with the approval of the major adviser.
Students should contact the Cooperative Education Program office for further information and forms for placement and credit, 1047 9th Street, 629-2892.
Study Skills Center
The Study Skills Center is administered by the College on behalf of UCD. The purpose of the center is to help UCD students develop methods of efficient study. Services are available to help specifically with particular subject areas, as well as to strengthen general academic and research skills. Telephone, 629-2802.
Each semester the center offers three courses for which students may receive 1 semester hour of credit graded on a pass/fail basis: developmental composition, developmental reading, and college preparatory mathematics. Detailed course descriptions may be found in the Course Descriptions section of this bulletin.
A noncredit modular course, such as rapid reading, also is offered in which students may accelerate reading speed, learn reading flexibility, and build word-grouping ability and comprehension. Study technique workshops (noncredit) are offered in such topics as: reading for maximum effectiveness; writing papers and using the library; improving memory, study techniques, and note taking; tests without panic; and time management. Also, a noncredit spelling and vocabulary workshop is available.
The center has available a collection of books, including a number by minority authors and about minorities which may be utilized for research assignments as well as for improvement of general knowledge.
PREPARATION FOR PROFESSIONS SUCH AS LAW AND MEDICINE
Completion of the undergraduate curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences can prepare students for a number of careers in the professions. Information on preparation for those professions most frequently asked about by students in the College is presented here. Students seeking information about other professions should contact the College Advising Office.
Law
Students intending to enter a school of law may major in any field while completing their bachelor’s degree programs since law schools do not generally specify a particular undergraduate degree major. Successful prelaw students from the College have had majors in many different fields. However, students preparing for law school should place primary emphasis on learning superior methods of study, critical thinking, and communication skills, which are often considered more important by law schools than factual knowledge alone. College courses should be chosen with care to produce a balanced pattern of skills and insights. Sufficient English should be studied to insure good use of language skills in grammar, spelling, composition, and rhetoric, and also to develop a capacity for analysis and criticism. Because the natural sciences provide an appreciation for inductive and deductive approaches, evaluation of evidence, and detailed accuracy of observation, some study in this area is desirable. Mathematics is helpful in developing a capacity to think analytically, as are certain courses in philosophy.
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is required of all applicants for admission to law school and should be taken as early as possible during the senior year. For additional information, students should review the current Prelaw Handbook, published annually in October and prepared by the Law School Admissions Council and the Association of American Law Schools. This book includes material on the law and lawyers, prelaw preparation, applying to law schools, and the study of law, as well as individualized information on most American law schools. It may be ordered from Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Students interested in applying for admission to the School of Law of the University of Colorado should contact the Admissions Office of the School of Law, Room 118, Fleming Law Building, Boulder, Colorado 80309.
Journalism
Students interested in preparing for a career in journalism may decide to obtain a bachelor’s degree from the College as a general preparation, or they may choose to complete a B.S. degree in journalism. The B.S. degree in journalism is granted from the School of Journalism at the University of Colorado at Boulder. However, the first two years of the journalism curriculum may be completed at UCD within the College. Students pursuing the journalism B.S. degree normally transfer into the School of Journalism at the beginning of the junior year. To be considered for transfer admission, a student must have completed a minimum of 60 semester hours with a grade-point average of at least 2.25. Interested students should consult the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for detailed information concerning requirements for the B.S. degree in journalism.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 27
Health Careers
Course programs have been developed within the College to prepare students for the following specific careers within the general area of health sciences.
Child health associate Dental hygiene Dentistry
Medical technology
Medicine
Nursing
Optometry Osteopathy Pharmacy Physical therapy Podiatry
Veterinary Medicine
Because the prerequisites for these health career programs are continually changing, students interested in pursuing one of these careers should contact the Health Careers secretary, UCD East Classroom Building, Room 232, 629-2646, for current requirements and for advising.
Education
Two avenues are open to students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in teaching.
1. Students with a major program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who seek certification for teaching at the secondary school level remain in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the bachelor’s degree, but take approximately 30 hours of professional education work in the School of Education.
2. Elementary education majors and distributed studies majors preparing to teach at the secondary school level normally transfer from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year and continue there to receive the Bachelor of Science degree in education.
Students should contact the School of Education at UCD for detailed information concerning teacher education programs at both elementary and secondary levels, 629-2717.
TEACHER CERTIFICATION WITHIN THE COLLEGE
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who intend to pursue a major curriculum in one of the departments or programs in the College and who also desire secondary school teacher certification, must apply for and be accepted into the Teacher Education Program. The requirements for admission are identical with those under “2a” listed below for the pre-education program. These students also must meet all requirements for a bachelor’s degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Early planning is crucial for students intending to enter the Teacher Education Program. Since the School of Education has initiated a new program at both the elementary and secondary levels, students are urged to consult the School early and regularly concerning new requirements.
PRE-EDUCATION PROGRAM
Students pursuing elementary education or distributed studies majors for secondary school teachers should so indicate on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by the education counselor or faculty members. Application for
transfer to the School of Education and for admission to the Teacher Education Program should be made during the last semester of the sophomore year. The minimum requirements for acceptance are:
1. Completion of at least 60 semester hours of acceptable college work with a grade-point average of
2.5 for all courses attempted, and 2.5 for all courses attempted at the University of Colorado, and 2.5 in the major teaching field. No student will be recommended for certification to teach in any field in which the grade-point average is less than 2.5.
2. General education requirements for students planning to student teach at the secondary or elementary school level are as follows:
a. General education (with academic counseling early in the program, a major part of general education, urban studies, and teaching field requirements may be combined):
(1) 12 cumulative semester hours to be completed in each of the following three areas; sequences of course work not required:
Arts and Humanities................ 12
(In order to meet typical certification requirements in other states, students should take at least 6 semester hours of humanities in English language courses, e.g., Engl. 480, Advanced Composition; Engl. 484, English Grammar; Engl. 485, History of the English Language.)
Social sciences ....................12
Natural and Physical Sciences . 12-16
(2) For elementary certification, the following work should be included as part of general education requirements: Two courses in physical science with lab. Two courses in biological science with lab. Two courses in mathematics (Math. 303 and 304) one course in art, one course in arts methods, one course in music, one course in music methods, health, or physical education, and one course in health and physical education for the elementary child.
b. Urban Studies (College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences)...........................9
c. General Psychology......................3
COLLEGE-WIDE INTERDISCIPLINARY ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Most of the individual departments represented in the College have numerous links with other disciplines, and many faculty members consequently encourage students to take courses in related disciplines. In the natural and physical sciences new subject-matter areas are emerging from blends of traditional disciplines; examples include biochemistry, geophysics, biophysics, and psychobiology. In the social


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sciences the similarity of method and of subject matter from discipline to discipline tends to promote broad interaction and a sense of common purpose. In the arts and humanities the continual synthesis of useful analytical ideas and concepts gains strength as it is tested against differing perspectives; comparative literature, mixed media fine arts, and philosophical psychology are examples of this kind of interdisciplinary involvement. Therefore, students will often find opportunities to explore relationships among different disciplines while studying within traditional disciplines. In some instances, such as ethnic studies, much or most of the academic work can be characterized as interdisciplinary even though the area is treated as a traditional discipline. The following programs are explicitly interdisciplinary and college-wide in character.
Distributed Studies
The College’s distributed studies major has been designed for those students who wish to develop consolidated major programs based upon the study of two or three disciplines together rather than to focus their major programs on single disciplines. In pursuing a distributed studies major, a student works closely with a faculty adviser to develop a specific program. One discipline is designated as primary subject, and then one or two other disciplines are designated as secondary subjects. The total program must consist of at least 60 semester hours in at least two disciplines. The disciplines must be disciplines or areas offered within the College, and the program may not include a first-year course in English (101, 102) or foreign language (101, 102). General requirements for the primary subject are (a) a minimum of 30 semester hours with grades of C or better, and (b) a minimum of 12 semester hours of upper division course work with grades of C or better. General requirements for the secondary subject(s) are (a) a minimum of 30 semester hours from among one or two disciplines, and (b) at least 12 semester hours in any one discipline. The specific requirements in any case depend upon the program worked out with a faculty adviser, who may stipulate specific course requirements.
Ethnic Studies
For a complete description of the Ethnic Studies program, see the Division of Social Sciences section of this bulletin.
Individually Structured Major
Some students wish to study in depth, as a major program, a coherent topic area that crosses traditional disciplinary lines and/or requires significant independent study to complete. These students are encouraged to propose a design for an individually structured major program. To pursue an individually structured major program, a student must work out the details of the proposed program sometime after his or her first year in the College with a committee of three College faculty members. The major becomes
the student’s official program upon final approval by the faculty committee. In recent years students in the College have structured majors in such areas as French and cinematography, and oral history and environmental planning, and 18th-century studies.
Population Dynamics
Linda Dixon, Acting Director
The Population Dynamics Program is a multidisciplinary major designed to provide a comprehensive and flexible educational experience for persons who are interested in population processes, especially within the urban environment. Emphasis of the major is on the social, economic, and mental health problems complicated by the dynamics of population processes. The principal departments involved are biology, geography, psychology, and sociology. The major is appropriate for students intending careers in the fields of urban and community planning, family planning and counseling, population education, environmental demography, and population-related careers in community action programs, neighborhood health centers, and local, state, and federal agencies. Students completing this major may enter graduate programs in most of the social, behavioral, and natural sciences, demography (population studies), public affairs and administration, urban and regional planning, and in public health, medicine, law, or social services.
All students majoring in population dynamics will be expected to meet the following course requirements:
1. a. A minimum of 6 hours of P.D.P. 300-2,
Workshop in Population Dynamics1
b. A minimum of 3 hours of P.D.P. 310-3, Prac-ticum in Population Dynamics
c. N.P.S. 200-3, Human Sexuality
2. Any two of the following three courses:
Geog. 473-3. Population Geography
Soc. 421-3. Advanced Population Studies Soc. 424-3. Migration
3. One of the following four courses:
Psych. 210-4. Introduction to Research Methods
in Psychology
Soc. 317-3. Statistics
Math. 383-3. Introduction to Statistics
Geog. 400-3. Introductory Quantitative Methods
in Geography
4. A minimum of 24 additional hours from the following disciplines with not more than 12 hours from any one discipline: anthropology, biology, communication and theatre, computer science, economics, geography, physical education, political science, population dynamics, psychology, rehabilitation services, social science, and sociology. Students should consult with the program director in selecting these hours to be sure the courses are acceptable in the program.
'The Workshop in Population Dynamics has a varied theme each semester. It is the purpose of the workshop to synthesize the multidisciplinary nature of the program through selected themes. The workshop will utilize community persons to conduct various sessions relating the academic aspects of the program to community needs.


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 29
Note: Those students wishing to receive teacher certification should consult with the academic counselor in the School of Education and should familiarize themselves with the School of Education requirements in this bulletin.
Urban Studies
Cedric D. Page, Director
The Urban Studies Program has a fourfold purpose. First, it provides an in-depth understanding of urban problems to permit the student to pursue advanced degrees in one of several traditional academic disciplines in the College of Environmental Design or in the Graduate School of Public Affairs. Second, the program permits graduates to move directly into a variety of careers with federal, state, and local agencies as well as private companies concerned with urban affairs. It also provides a desirable second major or minor for students preparing for public school teaching, human service, legal, or medical careers. Third, an undergraduate degree in urban studies provides a liberating educational experience for those whose career interests have not been fully decided. Fourth, the major will increase an individual’s sensitivity to and awareness of the unique experiences and problems of economic, social, and ethnic groups in cities.
The generalist who is trained in the application of analytical and policy tools of a variety of disciplines will be more immediately employable and will be of significant value to his or her community. Since urban centers are increasing in size and influence, an understanding of the city and its problems is indispensable and essential to the modern urban society. The B.A. major in urban studies is designed to prepare and train such citizens.
REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS
The urban studies major is designed to provide both flexibility and depth in the relevant academic perspectives, as well as versatility in career selections. The major provides an interdisciplinary view of the city and its environs in a more comprehensive manner than any single traditional academic discipline can provide. The requirements of the major in course units therefore are greater. Whereas most academic disciplines require about 30 units of course work, the urban studies major requires 42. All students who intend to major in urban studies will be expected to meet the following requirements:
1. Soc. Sci. 210-3. People in an Urban Society. This course is the foundation and orientation course for further study in the social sciences. One objective of the course is to present to the student the most important theories and perspectives of several disciplinary approaches to urban society. Another objective is to encourage the student to recognize areas of overlap among the disciplines, the interrelationships between disciplines, and the value of interdisciplinary knowledge and research.
2. Four of the following six upper division courses (12 units):
Econ. 425. Urban Economics
Hist. 470. United States Urban History
Pol. Sci. 407. Urban Politics
Geog. 371. Ethnic Groups in American Cities
Anthro. 444. Urban Anthropology
Soc. 421. Advanced Population Studies
3. Any two of the following six courses (6 units): M.Am. 460. The Chicano Community and Community
Organization
M. Am. 127. Contemporary Americans Bl.St. 203. Black Behaviorial Analysis Bl.St. 323. Religion and the Black Man Soc.Sci. 329. Asian Americans
N. Am. 436. The American Indian in Contemporary Society
4. Soc. 402-3. Statistics.
5. In addition, each student will successfully complete not less than 3 units (6 units maximum) of cooperative education credit for relevant internship placement selected by the student and approved by the director of the Urban Studies Program. This requirement, usually taken toward the conclusion of the academic program, will include an orientation and seminar for the participating students (Soc.Sci. 450).
6. The above core program of required courses specifies a minimum of 27 of 42 units necessary for graduation with an urban studies major. The program director may authorize changes in the above core program depending upon the individual circumstances of the student. In addition to the minimum (core) 27 units required, the student will be advised to choose 15 units of electives from the following disciplines:
Anthropology History
Communication and Theatre Philosophy
Civil Engineering Political Science
Economics Psychology
Geography Sociology
Division of Arts and Humanities
Shirley White Johnston, Assistant Dean
The division includes the departments of communication and theatre, communication disorders and speech science, English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, and Spanish. Complete undergraduate majors are offered in all but communication disorders and speech science.
This division offers course work in several special interdisciplinary programs, including comparative literature, humanities, and the Writing Program. The Writing Program is designed to prepare professional writers in the techniques and vocabularies of fields such as fine arts, science, engineering, creative writing, business, social sciences, and literature. Two cocurricular programs also are open to students: theatre and forensics.
Students interested in majoring in any of the disciplines or in participating in any of the specialized


30 / University of Colorado at Denver
programs should request additional information from the divisional office.
For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes.
COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE
Faculty: Samuel A. Betty, J. Brad Bowles, Laura Cuetara, Robley D. Rhine, Jon A. Winterton. Attendant: Ila M. Warner.
An undergraduate wishing to major in communication and theatre will choose one of the three basic areas of emphasis: communication, theatre, or communication and theatre education. An emphasis in radio-television is available, but part of the work must be completed at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Each emphasis has its own requirements for graduation, and specific programs will be developed in consultation with the student’s major adviser to insure that each student’s term-by-term schedule, choice of electives, involvement in cocurricular and extracurricular activities will be best suited to his or her needs, skills, and goals. Lists of required and suggested courses in each of the three areas of emphasis may be obtained from the divisional office.
Communication Emphasis
The primary goal is to equip the student with a wide range of theoretical perspectives and diverse communication skills. The theoretical perspectives generally focus on face-to-face communication in interpersonal, small group, institutional, and community settings. The skills component of the emphasis seeks to equip students with flexibility in their communication repertoires so that they may react effectively to their analysis of communication situations.
The program offers two types of courses to the student: (1) courses in communication and rhetorical theory, which present traditional rhetorical theories, empirical support for communication theories, strategies for the application of communication theory to problems confronting the community; and (2) courses focusing on the development of the students’ communication skills which promote confidence in their abilities to perform effectively in many contexts. These courses build into the students’ repertoires the tactics and strategies of effective expression.
The communication emphasis requires that students take a total of 45 hours of course work (usually 15 courses) in communication and theatre. Six courses (18 hours) are required. Four courses (12 hours) are chosen from a list of specified alternatives. The remaining 15 hours may be chosen from a wide range of courses available in communication and theatre, allied disciplines, or independent study projects.
Since requirements for the communication emphasis insure that the student knows both com-
munication theory and how to apply it, communication graduates are generally well equipped for employment. Students with an interest in management and administration, training, writing and copy preparation, public relations, information services, and a wide variety of occupations focusing on communication will find in the communication emphasis a curriculum relevant to their expected employment needs.
Theatre Emphaele
This program provides a broad range of experiences in courses, laboratory workshops, full productions, and field work in the Denver area. Helping the student to answer questions concerning the significance of what theatre does to us and for us is the primary goal of the program.
Three kinds of courses will be taken by each student in theatre: (1) performance skills—acting, directing, oral interpretation, technical theatre; (2) critical skills—dramatic theory and criticism and theatre history; and (3) communication theory—interpersonal, small group, intercultural, social change, etc. In addition to the 42 hours of required courses within the department of communication and theatre, 12 additional hours from English, fine arts, and music are required.
As an integral part of the program, each student will have the opportunity to participate as performer, technician, or designer in faculty-directed productions which occur each term. The auditions, rehearsals, and performances involved in these productions provide opportunities for close examination of the process of making and performing theatre from practical, theoretical, critical, historical, and social perspectives. After each performance the audience will be invited to share their responses with the production team in order to provide some indication of impact.
In order to increase the range of practical and critical experience, each student will see and evaluate at least six live theatre productions in the Denver area each term. These experiences test the assumptions and beliefs about theatre discussed and worked with in classes and productions. As majors develop their performance and critical skills, special internships for credit in a variety of capacities may be arranged with local theatre operations through independent study or cooperative education.
Depending on the individual’s actual program of study (cocurricular and extracurricular activities), a degree in communication and theatre with an emphasis in theatre not only can provide a graduate with useful technical and practical skills, but also, and more importantly, it can provide critical insight into theatre as a human enterprise wherever it occurs. Through examining and experiencing theatre’s potential to achieve human value, students should develop personal, aesthetic, and social principles which will guide them to a sound career choices (as performers, technicians, designers, producers, or managers).


College of Liberal Arts and Sciences / 31
Communication and Theatre Education Emphaeie
The emphasis in communication and theatre education prepares students to meet Colorado certification requirements in communication or in theatre for grades 7-12. Requirements for these professional programs are complex and demanding. Interested students in their freshman or sophomore years should meet with the department adviser for the education emphasis to discuss the requirements and to plan a long-range schedule to be followed.
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND SPEECH SCIENCE
Faculty: Natalie Hedberg Daves, Philip M. Prinz; Visiting, Patricia Killian; Part-time, Tom Prescott, Lynn S. Snyder.
The B.A. degree in communication disorders and speech science is not available at UCD, but the following courses are open to undergraduates: C.D.S.S. 401 and 435. For information on graduate-level courses see Communication Disorders and Speech Science in the Course Description section of this bulletin. For information on M.A. and Ph.D. degrees see the Graduate School section.
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
Students wishing to pursue graduate work in comparative literature should consult the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog.
On the 400 level, students may read all texts in translation; however, reading knowledge in at least one foreign language is highly recommended. On the 500 and 600 levels, students must be able to read in two foreign languages.
ENGLISH
Faculty: Rex S. Bums, Richard T. Dillon, Evelyn Eff-land, Herbert G. Eldridge, Louis B. Hall, Robert D. Johnston, Shirley W. Johnston, Elihu H. Pearlman, Jean Phillips, Joel Salzberg, Doris J. Schwalbe, Mary Rose Sullivan, Peter L. Thorpe, B. Jeanne Webb, William A. West; Emeritus: Ida D. Fasel. Part-time, Howard Movshovitz.
The purpose of the English major is to provide a full exposure to the great tradition that constitutes the Anglo-American literary inheritance. In the process of studying individual works and the periods from which they emerged, students acquire an especially rich sense of the culture of which they are a part. All students, majors and nonmajors alike, may acquire an understanding of how various literatures reflect wide developments and trends in the history of culture and ideas in the Topics in Literature series, Engl. 290 to 294. Students may further widen their perceptions by the study of how literature, in its broadest sense, and ideas are expressed in film through Engl. 225, (Introduction to Film), and 306 and 307 (The History of Film I and II).
Students majoring in English must present a total of 36 hours in English, excluding Engl. 101, 102, and 103, of which 24 hours must be earned in upper division courses. None of the required 36 hours may be taken on a pass/fail basis. Of the 24 hours required at the 300- or 400-level, at least 3 must be earned in a course dealing with English literature before 1800, at least 3 in a course dealing with English literature after 1800, and at least 3 in a course on American literature. Required courses: Engl. 250, 251 (Survey of English Literature — 6 hours); Engl. 300 (Critical Writing — 3 hours); Engl. 497 or 498 (Major Authors or Topics in Literature — 3 hours).
At least 12 hours of the major’s upper- or lower-division work in English must be done at UCD in order to qualify for the B.A. in English.
English majors interested in graduating with honors should confer with the honors adviser as soon as possible, but definitely no later than the beginning of the spring term of their junior year.
Students who contemplate teaching should obtain from the School of Education sheets listing curricula required for a teaching certificate and should consult the School of Education, which supervises the teacher-training program. Since fulfilling requirements for education and English involves close scheduling, students should fulfill at least some of the college requirements during their freshman and sophomore years.
English for foreign students and courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language are listed in the course description section of this bulletin under communication and theatre.
For additional literature courses see Comparative Literature and Mexican American Studies.
Note: A considerable amount of writing is required in all English courses and is graded on form as well as on content.
In addition to the regular major, the English discipline offers a General Writing Program, an alternative to the traditional baccalaureate in English. Especially designed for future writers, it offers a wide range of intensive writing experience combining such areas as technical reports, fiction, and poetry. The student is trained in the rhetorics of the arts and humanities, the social sciences, and the sciences.
In order to enroll in the program, students must consult with the director of the General Writing Program through the division office at 629-2730.
FINE ARTS
Faculty: John R. Fudge, Gerald C. Johnson, Charles L. Moone, Ernest O. Porps, Ludwik Turzanski. Visiting, Jane Comstock. Adjunct: Paul E. Biagi, Richard G. Conn.
An education in fine arts is based on discipline, absorption, and knowledge. Discipline is the relationship of the student to his material or form. What comes through the form is the self of the student and his relationship to the world. This constant exposure through discipline leads to absorption which


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can be seen as a fascination with and appreciation of both himself and the world. In fine arts, the record of this process is made visible for the world to see and is called art.
The Fine Arts discipline offers both a B.A. degree and a B.F.A. degree in painting, sculpture, printmaking, or design. The B.A. degree must include 40, but not more than 48, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. The B.F.A. degree must include 54, but not more than 72, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. Students wishing to apply for the B.F.A. degree must have a 2.0 average in all course work at the time of application, which may not be earlier than the end of the junior year. Application forms are available in the divisional office.
The core curriculum for fine arts majors includes 12 hours of Studio I (Fine Arts 100, 101, 102), Studio II (Fine Arts 202), Fine Arts 180-181, Fine Arts 496, and 6 hours of upper division art history. The recommended program for the B.F.A. includes at least two years in one creative field (painting, printmaking, design, or sculpture) plus 9 semester hours in drawing. Students who are candidates for the B.F.A. must take a minimum of 27 hours while in residence.
Studio I and II Courses
For an orientation to studio practice, including drawing and an exploration of two- and three-dimensional media, fine arts majors are required to take 12 hours of Studio I and II courses. There are no prerequisites for Studio I and II courses, but all upper division courses require the corresponding basic course as a prerequisite.
FRENCH
Faculty: Simone Christopherson, Blandine M. Rickert; Part-time: Ruth Bleuz6, Lore Wiggins.
A B.A. degree with a French major prepares students for the following careers:
Foreign Service — Positions abroad with government agencies, private business, foundations, and other organizations having interests in French-speaking countries throughout the world.
Teaching — Teaching at all levels: elementary, secondary, and college.
Translation and Interpretation — Exchanges in the fields of science, culture, politics, and economics have become vital to the nations of the world. Effective international communication requires an increasing number of expert translators and interpreters.
International Trade — Administrative and managerial positions with U.S.-based firms involved in foreign trade.
A strong background in French can be very valuable to such programs as English, black studies, business, political science, interdisciplinary, and cross-cultural studies.
Students who have completed a Level III high school French course have automatically satisfied the college graduation requirement in a foreign language.
This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of French 201, 211, or 212 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied French in high school and who wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score or English ACT score. A student normally may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he or she is placed. For a complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credit, see the statement on foreign language available from the College Advising Office.
Students majoring in French must complete a minimum of 35 semester hours beyond first-year proficiency. Students presenting four years of high school French for admission must complete 30 hours beyond the second year. Students majoring in French may choose between the following options:
Option A: Literature. Required courses are: French 211 and 212; 301 and 302; 311 and 312; 401 and 402; and a minimum of 6 hours of French literature courses at the 400 level.
Option B: Culture and Civilization. Required courses are French 211 and 212, 301 and 302, 311 and 312, 401 and 402, 320, 420 and 421.
Students planning to acquire certification for teaching French at the secondary level are required to take French 496, Methods of Teaching Modern Languages (required by the School of Education). For those students Option B is preferable for the major.
UCD students who wish to take nonrequired courses in another institution must obtain permission from the French department chairman at UCD. Students must see the department adviser prior to registration for 300-level courses. Since all courses are not offered every year, it is extremely important for students to plan their schedules in advance to avoid a delay in graduation.
The department strongly recommends that all majors include some study in a French-speaking country in their major programs. Credit earned will normally count toward satisfaction of the major requirements, but the student should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to assure full transfer of credit.
Students majoring in French must satisfy the requirements of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 15 hours of upper division work, including all 400-level required courses, must be taken from the UCD French department in order to earn the UCD degree.
Literature courses at the 500 level are applicable to an M.A. degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and to the M.H. degree at UCD.
GERMAN
Faculty: M. Kent Casper, Carsten Seecamp; Part-time: Friedhelm F. Rickert.
The German program provides a variety of courses for students interested in German language, literature, history, philosophy, music, and art. The curriculum contains essentially three course clusters:


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basic language skill courses, from beginning through advanced levels; upper division literature courses taught in German; and German area studies courses taught in English with readings in English translation.
Foreign Language Requirement. Students who have completed a Level El high school German course have automatically satisfied the college requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Intensive German (13 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied German in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score or English ACT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he or she is placed.
The German Major. A B.A. degree with a German major can prepare the student for the following career options: teaching positions at the elementary and secondary levels, including the requisite undergraduate training for those wishing to pursue further graduate work; translator and interpreter positions (e.g., with the publishing trade or with various private firms or government agencies); foreign service with the U.S. State Department; or positions in international trade with U.S. firms abroad.
Students majoring in German must complete 35 hours beyond first-year proficiency. Not more than 12 hours may be taken on the second-year level toward the major. Course work successfully completed at other institutions will be evaluated for credit transfer, but a minimum of 12 hours of upper division credits must be taken within the UCD German department. Majors must maintain a B average in German. Required courses for the major are German 301-302, 401-402, plus a minimum of 9 hours in literature and/or culture courses at the 400 level. German majors are encouraged to take German area studies courses, but these courses may not count toward the major unless some of the readings and written assignments are done in German. Majors should consult with the instructor on this requirement. Students planning to acquire certification for teaching German at the secondary level are required by the School of Education to take German 496 (Methods of Teaching Modern Languages).
It is strongly recommended that all majors attempt to include some study in a German-speaking country in their programs. Credit earned abroad normally counts toward satisfaction of major requirements, but students should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to insure full transfer of credit.
PHILOSOPHY
Faculty: Charles Kenevan, Linda S. Leonard, Glenn A. Webster. Part-time: Sharon Coggan, Richard J. Stefanik.
The philosophy program is recommended to those students whose goal is a liberal arts education in the
finest sense. Philosophy is concerned with the most sustained and deeply reflected thoughts of human civilization, with the transmission and evaluation of basic beliefs and values. It is not an easy field of study, but for more than 25 centuries philosophy has been judged most rewarding by those who seek selfdevelopment, intellectual sophistication, and the happiness of a reflective life.
For career preparation, philosophy should be combined with other fields. It is an excellent undergraduate preparation for such professional fields as law and medicine.
A program for the philosophy major must include a minimum of five courses (15 hours) at the 300 level; a minimum of three courses (9 hours) at the 400 level; and a minimum of one course (3 hours) at the 500 level. The balance of the courses for the major may be taken at the discretion of the student.
The following courses are recommended (not required) for philosophy majors who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy: Symbolic Logic (Phil. 344); History of Philosophy (Phil. 300, 302, 402, 403, 404); Ethics (Phil. 315); Metaphysics (Phil. 335); Epistemology (Phil. 336); several courses concerned with a single philosopher (e.g., Phil. 580, 581, 582, etc.); and one course concerned with the relationship of philosophy to some other discipline (e.g., Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of History, etc.).
General prerequisites (which may vary for some courses) are: 100-level—none; 200-level—3 hours; 300-level—6 hours; 400-level—9 hours; and 500-level—12 hours. The prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor.
SPANISH
Faculty: James Anthony Black, Phil Jaramillo, Carlos deOnis, Francisco A. Rios, Edith R. Rogers, Donald L. Schmidt; Part-time: Martha Manier; Attendant: Daniel E. Martinez, Ila M. Warner.
The Spanish programs emphasize all phases of the study of the language, literature, civilization, and culture of Spain, Hispanic America, and the Spanishspeaking Southwest of the United States. The courses are directed toward three distinct groups: lower division students who are acquiring proficiency in a foreign language; upper division students who are either majoring in Spanish or increasing their competence through study in advanced courses in language and literature; and graduate students in the Spanish M.A. degree program offered in conjunction with the Boulder Campus (see the Graduate School section of this bulletin), most of whom are preparing for professional careers in teaching.
Courses prepare students in language, literature, and civilization as part of an enhanced liberal education and as professional training. Study under this department offers an opportunity to be better prepared for industry, commerce, government, public services, or further study at the graduate level. Courses also are functionally supportive of such programs as those leading to the teaching certificate,


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comparative literature, the Master of Humanities degree, and the Master of Arts degree in bilingual -multicultural emphasis offered at UCD.
Students who have completed a Level III high school Spanish course have automatically satisfied the college graduation requirement in foreign language. Requirement may also be satisfied by completion of Spanish 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied Spanish in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT or ACT score. A student may not receive credit for a course lower than that into which he or she is placed. For complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credits, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences general information section of this bulletin.
A major in Spanish consists of the following requirements:
1. Total of 36 credit hours in Spanish courses beyond 102, including the following minimum distribution; (a) at least 9 hours in upper division courses in language theory and practice (301-302, 401-402, 496); (b) at least 9 hours in upper division literature courses, including at least one course in Spanish Peninsular literature and one in Spanish-American literature; (c) at least 12 hours in courses numbered 400 or above. The required 12 hours at or above the 400 level must be completed in residence at UCD. None of the required 35 hours may be taken on a pass/fail basis.
2. Total of 6 hours from one or more of the following areas: (a) Latin American studies (e.g., history, political science, etc.); (b) Mexican American Studies; (c) linguistics; (d) upper division courses in another foreign language or comparative literature.
Students seeking certification for teaching at the secondary level should note that the School of Education requires Spanish 496 (Methods of Teaching Spanish); the 3 credit hours earned in that course count toward the major and are subject to the 48-hour maximum from one discipline allowed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the B.A. degree. Hence, students who begin the major program with Spanish 101 and intend to include secondary certification in their B.A. program must include Spanish 496 in their electives in Spanish.
To be admitted to practice teaching of Spanish, majors must take the language skills tests of the Modem Language Association Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students of Spanish and make satisfactory scores.
Students must see the department adviser prior to registration for their final 30 hours of course work. Failure to do so may result in delay of graduation. Students considering entering graduate school, either at UCD or elsewhere, should see an adviser as early as possible since admission depends largely on courses taken in the major.
It is strongly recommended that all majors include some study in a Spanish-speaking country in their programs. Credit earned normally counts toward
satisfaction of major requirements, but students should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to insure full transfer of credit. Courses taken abroad and designated as Spanish are subject to the 48-hour-maximum rule of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in study abroad should consult with the Spanish faculty or the UCD representative for International Education.
For comparative literature courses, see the Course Description section of this bulletin.
Division of Natural and Physical Sciences
Robert D. Elder, Assistant Dean
The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences offers study in traditional undergraduate disciplines, interdisciplinary programs, and preprofessional programs. Undergraduate majors are available in biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics, and psychology. Courses are offered in geology, but completion of a major requires some work at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The description of the program of each department includes the requirements for a major within that department and probable job opportunities in that field. The Collegewide interdisciplinary major program in population dynamics is also administered by faculty within the division.
The health-related preprofessional programs include child health associate, medical technology, physical therapy, dentistry, dental hygiene, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, nursing, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Students interested in these programs should consult with the Health Careers Committee of the division at the beginning of their preprofessional education and at selected intervals thereafter. Program requirements and appointments for advising can be obtained in the division office, East Classroom Bldg., Room 232.
Three sets of course options are available, in any combination, from which a nonscience major may satisfy the natural and physical science area requirement of 12 semester hours.
Set I, Topics in Science, consists of modular courses designed for, but not limited to, nonscience majors. Each module carries 1 semester hour of credit and is offered in a 1/3-semester time block of five weeks, during which the course meets the equivalent time of three lectures per week. There are no prerequisites. Each module is a self-contained unit designed to cover a given problem or topic in science. Normally, a student takes a single module during each five-week period with a maximum of three per semester. The topics change from semester to semester and from year to year. The Schedule of Courses for each semester lists the current topics offered.
Set II courses are one or two semesters in length and have no formal prerequisites. They include both introductory survey courses and special topics courses


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and are usually designed with the nonscience major in mind.
Set III includes all other natural and physical science courses offered in the division. Although these courses are generally intended for the science major, they are open to students with the proper prerequisites.
BIOLOGY
Faculty: Alan P. Brockway, Daniel D. Chiras, Jeanne A. Corny, Linda K. Dixon, Emily L. Hartman, James Joule, Phyllis W. Schultz; Emeritus: George J. Siemens.
The study of biology offers the student an introduction to the vast array of living systems that make up our world. With an understanding of biology, the student can truly learn to appreciate living by extending that term to other creatures. From the green plant to the fish to the human being, all are biological systems. The study of each system and its interrelationships with other systems can provide fascinating insights into life and the world environment.
A background in biology is vital to a paraprofes-sional or professional career in the health sciences. Furthermore, most professional schools expect applicants to have completed several biology courses. Students planning to teach should consult the School of Education for information on teacher certification.
All biology majors are required to take the complete list of biology core courses (20-21 credit hours) plus the specific ancillary core courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics, and statistics (29 credit hours). At this point a student must declare a particular direction by selecting one of the options listed below (i.e., ecology, genetics, organismic, or general biology). Course selections above the core level should be made in consultation with a biology faculty adviser. Students should contact their biology faculty advisers early in their academic careers.
Biology Core Courses Credit Hours
General Biology I and II (Biol. 205 and 206) 8
Principles of Ecology (Biol. 341) 3
Cell Biology (Biol. 361) 3
General Genetics (Biol. 383) 3
Plus one physiology or morphology course 3-4
Total Biology core 20-21
Ancillary Core Courses
General Chemistry, two semesters (Chem. 103 and 106) 10
University Mathematics I and II (Math. Ill and 112) 6
Physics for the Life Sciences (Phys. 251 and 252) 10
Introductory Statistics (Math. 383 or Psych. 210) ___3
Total ancillary core 29 In addition to the above core requirements the student must select at least four other courses in biology to complete his or her major requirements and a minimum of 36 biology credit hours for graduation. At least three of these courses must be taken from the list provided by the particular option which the student elects. Note that each option also carries a set of ancillary courses which are either required or recommended. Independent Study can be taken under any
of the options with the consent of an appropriate biology faculty adviser.
Ecology Option: Biol. 310, 331, 415, 425, 427, 441, 447, 470, 522. Ancillary ecology courses (recommended only): Calculus I, II and III (Math. 140, 241, 242), also Chem. 341, 342, 481, and 482 and approved courses from the Geog./Geol. series.
Genetics Option: Biol. 384, 410, 412, 451, 452, 470. Ancillary genetics courses: See genetics adviser.
Organismic Option (select a minimum of one physiology and one morphology course): Biol. 310, 322, 407, 413, 427, 461, 467, 541, 542. Ancillary organismic courses: Organic Chemistry I and II (Chem. 341 and 342) required. Also recommended: Calculus I and II (Math. 140 and 241) and General Biochemistry (Chem. 481 and 482).
General Biology Option: A student may prefer an undergraduate option which may or may not lead to training for an advanced degree and does not specifically lead the student in one of the three directions shown above. Hence, a student may declare a general biology option and choose from an array of courses under the strict guidance of an adviser. At least one biology course recognized by each of the above options must be included under this particular plan. To receive certification as a biology major at UCD, a student must complete a minimum of 15 hours of upper-division UCD biology courses.
CHEMISTRY
Faculty: Robert Damrauer, Sandra S. Eaton, Robert T. Kohl, John Lanning, Denis R. Williams; Visiting: Carl J. Formoso; Part-time: Martha B. Barrett, Lenore K. Damrauer; Adjoint: Robert M. Speights.
Why study chemistry? A practical reason is that our highly technical society faces many problems which can be solved through a thorough understanding of the science of chemistry and its methods of solving problems. A more intangible reason recognizes that chemistry is central to a variety of other disciplines and that many problems ultimately may have chemical solutions.
At the undergraduate level students can prepare for (1) careers in chemical and medical laboratories, (2) careers in nursing, medical technology, physical therapy, dental hygiene, and other health oriented fields, (3) postbaccalaureate programs in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, medicine, and dentistry. At the graduate level, the chemistry program offered at UCD culminates in the awarding of an M.S. degree. Students awarded M.S. degrees have job opportunities in research and technical laboratory services. In addition, flexible programs can be designed to combine chemical knowledge and skills with other interests of the M.S.-level student (e.g., business and biology).
For graduation at the bachelor’s level, students majoring in chemistry must present credits in the following courses or their equivalents: Chem. 103, 106, 311, 341, 342, 348, 349, 412, 413, 451, 452, 455; Phys. 231, 232, 233, 234; Math. 140, 241, 242. Students interested


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in the chemistry major should consult regularly with a member of the chemistry faculty. A copy of the chemistry major’s program may be obtained in EC Room 232.
Qualified majors are strongly urged to participate in the independent study program beginning in their junior year.
A distributed studies program in chemistry requires at least 30 hours of chemistry including the following or their equivalent: Chem. 103, 106, 311, 341, 342, 343 or 348, 344 or 349, and 451.
Students planning chemistry as a career should be familiar with the recommendations of the American Chemical Society for the professional training of chemists. Among these recommendations are a reading knowledge of German or Russian, one semester of inorganic chemistry (Chem. 401) or one semester of biochemistry (Chem. 481), and two semesters of advanced work (see graduate chemistry offerings). Six hours of Chem. 493 will satisfy the special courses requirement. An option leading to a degree accredited by the American Chemical Society is also offered. UCD maintains an ACS chapter of student affiliates.
Students wishing to graduate with honors in chemistry should plan to do a minimum of two semesters (6 credit hours) of research (Chem. 493), ordinarily starting in the junior year. Additional requirements are listed under Honors in the Special Academic Programs section.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Faculty: Roland A. Sweet, CLAS Adviser. Several computer scientists reside in other colleges: in engineering—Paul F. Hultquist, William D. Murray, and Burton J. Smith; in business—F. Parker Fowler Jr.
Computers have an impact on every aspect of modern life. Knowledge of the basic principles and methods of computer operation can be helpful to students in their personal lives as well as useful in developing job skills. Students interested in pursuing the study of computers in depth may designate computer science as a primary subject in the College’s distributed studies major program. In this program, a student completes 30 semester hours in computer science (and computer-related courses) and 30 semester hours distributed over one or two secondary subjects. For students pursuing a traditional major program in mathematics, or in electrical engineering within the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a special computer science option is available.
GEOGRAPHY
Faculty: Melvin Albaum, Yuk Lee, Cedric D. Page, Charles G. Schmidt, Richard E. Stevens. Part-time: James L. Huckabay.
Geography is a science that focuses on the spatial analysis of human/physical patterns and processes.
Geographers attempt to identify the factors affecting the distribution of people and their activities on the surface of the earth and to provide meaningful solutions to problems faced by societies. This discipline is an ideal major for the liberal arts student, providing exposure to the concepts and techniques utilized in investigating environmental issues, socioeconomic problems, and planning policies.
The program is designed to provide the student interested in economic, physical, or social geography with the background necessary for obtaining a rewarding job in government (federal, state, local) and private industry, as well as preparing students for graduate work. Recent graduates have found employment in forest management, surveying/mapping, land-use planning, location analysis, transportation planning, and environmental impact analysis.
Students majoring in geography must complete the following basic courses or their equivalents: Geog. 100, 101, 199, 306, and 361. In addition, majors must complete a minimum of 30 hours of course work in geography (at least 16 hours of which must be at the upper division level) and maintain a 2.0 average in all geography course work completed. Distributed studies majors selecting geography as a primary or secondary subject should consult with the department adviser.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Faculty: Wesley E. LeMasurier.
Geology is the study of the earth. The major topics in the field include (1) the origin and distribution of rocks and minerals that make up the planet and serve as raw materials and fuels for technology, (2) the processes that create continents and ocean basins and shape the surface of the earth, and (3) the history and evolution of the planet and its living organisms. Most topics serve as subjects of both basic research and applied technology.
Employment opportunities for well-qualified geologists are generally good for students holding B.A., M.S., or Ph.D. degrees. A graduate degree is strongly recommended for those seeking high-level positions. Major employers are the oil, mining, and engineering industries, federal and state surveys, and various teaching and research institutions, all of which are heavily represented in the Denver metropolitan area. Many persons combine a geology degree with a second degree in law, business, planning, engineering, or education to pursue a variety of other career options.
Students majoring in the geological sciences may choose from among six curriculum options to suit a variety of career or educational objectives. Most options require the following courses within the department: physical geology, mineralogy, structural geology, and field geology. Introductory petrology, stratigraphy, and paleontology are recommended. In addition, most career-oriented students must take the following courses in allied fields: Chem. 103, 106; Math. 140, 241, and 242 or 319 (or the equivalent


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courses at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Math. 130, 230); Phys. 231-232, 233-234.
UCD offers its program entirely in the evening (excepting field geology), with the assistance of honorarium faculty from industry, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the CU Boulder campus.
MATHEMATICS
Faculty: Nancy S. Angle, Roxanne M. Byrne, R. T. Clement, Vance Faber, Zenas R. Hartvigson, Collin J. Hightower, Sylvia Chin-Pi Lu, William W. McCormick, Paul A. O’Meara, Charles I. Sherrill, Roland A. Sweet; Part-Time: Beryle M. Barkley.
Mathematics is a body of deductive knowledge dealing with such topics as numbers, algebra, geometry, analysis, and logic. It permeates modern life and is encountered by the student very early, especially with respect to its applications. At UCD, the mathematics faculty continues to present applications, but broadens the study to include more of the actual mathematical theory itself, as well as its historical development.
The study of mathematics can prepare the student for careers in business, industry, teaching, and government. Mathematics is especially useful in engineering, science, and computer science, and it provides a good background for any of the professional schools.
A major in mathematics can be completed by students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences by satisfying all of the following requirements, completing each with a grade of C or better:
1. At least 30 semester hours of mathematics courses.
2. At least 18 semester hours of mathematics courses numbered above 300, approved by an adviser and excluding Math. 303, 304, 383, 427, 428, 429, 470, 475, 495, 496 and 497.
3. Math. 140, 241, 242, 300, 314, and 315.
4. Either Math. 431-432 or Math. 321-422.
5. Exceptions to the above can be made only by the designated department adviser.
No student may earn more than 9 hours credit in mathematics courses numbered below 140.
Students who plan to do graduate work in mathematics should take Math. 431-432; students who wish to obtain a secondary teaching certificate are encouraged to complete Math. 321-422; students planning to major in mathematics must see an adviser from that discipline.
Students who choose the computer science option in the mathematics major are required to take the following courses, all with grades of C or better:
Math. 140, 241,242 Math. 300, 314,315 Math. 431,432 Math. 443 Math. 481
C.S.201
C.S.311
C.S. 401 C.S.453
C.S. 465 (Math. 465) C.S. 546
Variations in these courses must be approved by a mathematics adviser.
At the graduate level, master’s degrees are available in mathematics, applied mathematics, and basic science (mathematics option).
The mathematics department offers a teaching internship program which consists of three phases as follows:
Phase 1. A junior-level student who is majoring in mathematics or applied mathematics, and who shows promise as a teacher, is sponsored by a member of the full-time faculty of the department. A freshman-level course is then assigned to the student, on an honorarium basis, with the understanding that the faculty member will attend all sessions of the course. The student will thus be acting as an intern and will be provided with a critique of his performance after each lecture.
It is the interested student’s task to convince a faculty member that he or she should sponsor the student. No faculty member is required to perform this function, nor is any compensation afforded to the sponsor for so doing.
Phase 2. After completion of one or two semesters of fully supervised classroom exposure, and upon the student’s entry into the senior year of study, the faculty sponsor may recommend that the intern be accepted as an undergraduate teaching assistant. With approval of the mathematics faculty, the student will then be assigned broader responsibility for one (or at most, two) freshman courses, with the faculty sponsor exercising such supervision as may appear appropriate under individual circumstances.
Phase 3. Upon completion of a baccalaureate program the intern hopefully would be prepared to accept a graduate teaching assistantship in the discipline or in a related interdisciplinary area as the next step in his or her professional career.
PHYSICS
Faculty: Willard R. Chappell, Martin M. Maltempo, Robert N. Rogers, John I. Shonle, William R. Simmons, Clyde S. Zaidins; Adjoint: Edward J. Davies, Sidney A. Freudenstein, III, In Kil Hwang, David P. Olsen, Jerry H. Wilson; Adjunct: Paul E. Biagi.
Physics as a discipline is the base on which many other areas of science and engineering rest. There are several variations of a major in physics available to suit career goals ranging from fundamental research to general education. Students interested in basic research or teaching in higher education need to prepare for graduate study in physics (Plan I). Careers in applied physics, primarily in industry, are best served by a Plan II or engineering physics major (see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for the latter). Plan II, coupled with appropriate education courses, is also advised for students desiring to teach physical science in primary or secondary schools. A new option (Plan III) which emphasizes conceptual, philosophical, historical, cultural, and social aspects of physics is available for students desiring a technical


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background for careers in business, law, politics, etc., or for general education. Physics is an important component in many interdisciplinary areas, such as environmental, geophysical, or energy studies. Majors in these areas are arranged individually.
All physics majors, under any option, must consult with an adviser. The basic requirements include Phys. 130 and two semesters of other sciences for all majors. Additional courses are:
Plan I. Phys. 231, 232, 233, 234, 311, 312, 317, 321, 331, 332, 341, 381, 481, 482, 495, and Math. 140, 241, 242.
Plan II. Phys. 231, 232, 233, 234, 311, 312, 317, 321, 331, 381, six hours of upper division physics electives, and Math. 140, 241, 242.
Plan in. Phys. 105,106, (201, 202) or (251, 252), 317, and 15 hours of upper division physics electives, such as 307 or 309, 308, 362, 363, 395, 464, or 466, and Philosophy of Science.
PSYCHOLOGY
Faculty: Janis W. Driscoll, Robert D. Elder, Daniel Fallon, Eben M. Ingram, Carolyn M. Simmons, Gary
S. Stern, Graham Sterritt; Visiting: John V. Davis; Emeritus: Nell G. Fahrion; Adjoint: Kurt W. Fischer.
Psychology is the scientific study of behavior, consisting of the following major areas of study: experimental psychology, biopsychology, developmental psychology, social psychology, and clinical psychology. The requirements for the psychology major are designed to expose the student to the spectrum of psychology, including an early exposure to methodology and statistics. Although some specialization is possible, the faculty believes that this is more appropriate at advanced levels and that the undergraduate should have a broad background upon which to base future specialization.
An undergraduate major in psychology provides a good general concentration for a B.A. degree. Job opportunities are developing for interdisciplinary combinations of psychology with other areas of study such as business, computer science, and statistical design. Traditionally, job opportunities within the field of psychology itself require graduate study; however, some students find jobs in the mental health and social service fields with a B.A. degree in psychology. The psychology major also prepares the student for graduate work in psychology. Programs leading to the master’s degree in particular applied areas of psychology appear to be one of the directions in which the field is moving.
Requirements for the psychology major are as follows: majors must complete at least 30 semester hours and not more than 48 semester hours in psychology with at least 16 hours in upper division courses. No grade below C in psychology courses is acceptable toward the major. College algebra and English 102 must be included in lower division curriculum. Specific course requirements are Psych. 203-204 and Psych. 207; Psych. 210; at least one biotropic course including Psych. 322, 405, 409, 410, 414, 416, 425, 438,
496; at least one sociotropic course including Psych. 364, 430, 431, 440, 441, 445, 449, 464, 466, 467, 471, 485; at least one advanced laboratory course including Psych. 417, 422, 444, 485; and one integrative course, Psych. 451.
Transfer psychology majors will be expected to complete at least 9 semester hours in psychology courses, including an advanced laboratory course, on the UCD campus.
Division of Social Sciences
M. Jay Crowe, Assistant Dean
In the last two decades, the social sciences have included study of some of the most intractable problems of contemporary society: the population explosion, urban concentration, the impact of rapidly changing technology, the strains of race relations, the conflicts arising from competing political ideologies, and the thrust of developing societies. The social science disciplines also provide important bridges between thought and action and between values and problemsolving techniques.
Social science majors provide excellent preparation for further professional training as well as for jobs in public service, secondary school teaching, office administration, journalism, and writing. Students can satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree at UCD in all the departments included in the division. The requirements of each major are explained under the respective departments.
The Division of Social Sciences includes the following departments: anthropology, economics, history, political science, and sociology. The College-wide interdisciplinary major programs in ethnic studies and urban studies are also administered by faculty in the division. The division offers courses in the various disciplines, in interdisciplinary studies, and in preprofessional studies.
Students should be aware of the possibilities for a distributed studies major in the social sciences. The most usual combinations are economics and sociology and history and political science. See the College-wide Interdisciplinary Academic Programs section of this bulletin for details on a distributed studies major.
ANTHROPOLOGY
Faculty: Robert A. Aldrich, JoAnn E. Glittenberg, Janet R. Moone, Loma Grindlay Moore, Duane Quiatt, Jack E. Smith; Visiting: Paul F. Brown; Part-time: Susan M. Collins; Adjunct: Richard G. Conn.
Anthropology provides a broad overview of human beings and their ways of living in the world. It considers humans as biological and social beings and seeks to understand their origins, biological and cultural evolution, present conditions, and future prospects. Anthropology seeks to explain both contemporary biological and cultural diversity, and those features shared by people everywhere. It also seeks to


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understand the past record of biological and cultural evolution.
Anthropological training has an application to many fields. It is especially helpful in the areas of environmental design, city planning, community development and architecture, the medical and nursing professions, and allied health sciences, law, public affairs, and secondary education.
Requirements for Majors. Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in anthropology with grades of C or better. Sixteen of the 30 hours must be upper division. The maximum number of hours in the major is 48. Anthropology majors must take the following courses or demonstrate a competent knowledge of materials and methods covered.
Introductory Courses. (Two are offered each semester and may be taken concurrently. There is no required sequence.)
Anthro. 100. Cultural Anthropology Anthro. 101. Biological Anthropology Anthro. 102. Prehistory Anthro. 453. History of Anthropology
Information for Nonmajors. Nonmajors receive 8 hours of credit toward the College social science requirement for Anthro. 100 and 102, and 4 hours of credit toward the College natural and physical science requirement for Anthro. 101. The full 12 hours of College requirements for each of these two science areas may be fulfilled by combining the above courses with other cultural or archaeological courses (Soc.Sci.) or other biological-physical anthropology courses (Nat. and Phys. Sci.) at the 200, 300, or 400 levels.
ECONOMICS
Faculty: Jeffrey Bauer, Gary Bickel, Suzanne W. Helbum, Byron L. Johnson, Patricia Malin, John R. Morris Jr., Alan R. Shelly; Part-time: David F. Bramhall.
Economics is important to the average citizen as well as to the professional. The economy influences daily life, and every person must make economic decisions. The economics student is trained to research, to analyze data, and to make forecasts. This background lends itself to careers in teaching, business, and government.
Economics deals with all aspects of the production and circulation of the worldly goods of humanity. Specific aspects are macroeconomics (inflation, unemployment, etc.) and microeconomics (theory of behavior of individual producers, consumers, and investors). Analytic scope ranges from precise mathematical modeling to general philosophical speculation on the nature of society and people.
Requirements for Majors. Students majoring in economics must meet the following requirements: at least 30, but not more than 48, semester hours in economics, of which 19 must be numbered 300 or higher; Econ. 381, 407, and 408, and a data processing course approved by the student’s adviser. Students planning to go to graduate school should also take at
least two semesters of calculus (more mathematics is desirable). At least 12 semester hours must be taken for credit on the Denver Campus. Hours outside of economics may be counted for the major at the discretion of the student’s adviser.
Students who do not have an adviser should see the department chairperson for assignment to an adviser. Any deficiencies in prerequisites for Econ. 381 should be removed as soon as possible, and the 381 requirement should be fulfilled early in the student’s career.
For all courses numbered above 300, the prerequisite, unless otherwise indicated, is Econ. 201 and 202, or Econ. 300.
Distributed Studies
Students majoring in distributed studies may make economics their primary area of concentration by taking 30 semester hours in economics. Required courses for this option are Econ. 407-408 and a course in statistics.
ETHNIC STUDIES
Faculty: Nereyda L. Bottoms, Cecil E. Glenn; Part-time: Larry T. Osaki, Fred Anthony Shearer.
Ethnic studies is the academic study of the culture of minority groups in the United States. Although the programs in ethnic studies have been designed to meet academic needs of all university students, many students interested in ethnic studies qualify for support from federal and state educational opportunity programs (EOP). Student organizations provide assistance with recruiting, counseling, personal guidance, and tutoring; financial help is available through grants and the Work/Study Program. The program offers three options for students: (a) the major, (b) the combined major, and (c) the specialization.
The Major. The major leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree in ethnic studies. The major program consists of 42 semester hours, with an average of C or better, 30 of which must be taken from the ethnic studies curriculum. The remaining 12 hours are taken from a list of related courses in other departments prepared annually by the ethnic studies faculty.
The Combined Major. The ethnic studies faculty urges students interested in the program to consider combining ethnic studies with a major in one of the many closely allied disciplines in the University. In this option, a student selects a major in an allied discipline such as communication and theatre, English, Spanish, sociology, history, political science, anthropology, psychology, or education, and pursues it simultaneously with ethnic studies as follows:
1. The student must meet all the requirements for the major in each department.
2. The student’s program of study must be approved by the chairpersons of both of the departments involved.


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3. Courses that are cross-listed between two departments will apply toward fulfillment of the requirements for either major field but not both.
The Specialization. Rather than majoring in ethnic studies, students pursuing a major in another department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may wish to pursue a specialization in ethnic studies. Students earn the specialization by completing the requirements for their particular academic major and, in addition, 12 semester hours in ethnic studies, 6 of which must be at the 300 level or higher.
HISTORY
Faculty: Fredrick S. Allen, Ernest Andrade Jr., Mark
S. Foster, Philip A. Hernandez, James B. Wolf; Visiting: Hugh S. C. Cunningham; Part-time: Mary Conroy, Myra L. Rich.
History constitutes an intellectual challenge not only because of its special discipline but also because an understanding of history requires one to integrate many branches of knowledge. Individual history courses cut across lines of the social sciences, humanities, even the natural sciences. But more important to the history student than learning facts is understanding the process of change. By comparing the state of humankind over years, decades, or centuries, the student of history isolates important societal changes and analyzes critical causal factors. This is training not only for learning, but for living.
The bachelor’s degree in history provides training for immediate postgraduate career entry or advanced training in several social sciences. History majors frequently choose careers in teaching or civil service; in addition, a number enter corporate management training programs or develop careers in sales. History is traditionally a valued background for law school applicants. A key attraction of the major in history is its versatility: an excellent choice for those who are still seeking career goals.
Requirements for Majors. Undergraduate students majoring in history must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in history, 16 of which must be upper division. Not more than 48 hours in the student’s major area will count toward the 120-hour graduation requirement. A student must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or better in the major to graduate.
History majors shall fulfill their lower division requirements by taking 12 hours of history at the 100 and 200 levels. All majors must take Hist. 101 and 102; in addition, they may take Hist. 151 and 152 or any two non-European history courses.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Faculty: Michael S. Cummings, Joel Edelstein, Jana Everett, Harold H. Haak, Stephen C. Thomas; Part-time: Arthur C. Paulson, Loren S. Weinberg; Adjoint: George W. Pring.
Political science studies people, power, and the public good. Looking at a variety of societies, institutions, and interpersonal situations, the discipline asks
who has power, where this power comes from, how it is used, and how it promotes or impairs the public good. It also asks what this public good is; how it differs from China to Rhodesia to Argentina to Colorado; and how the basic human needs for security, love, self-respect, and self-actualization depend upon political conditions, such as freedom and equality. Political science draws on insights from other fields, such as psychology, philosophy, economics, sociology, and world literature. Finally, it explores the relationship between idealism and realism, between theory and practice, between political thought and personal action.
Opportunities for students with a B.A. in political science include careers in business, teaching, journalism, and government service. A political science degree also serves as good preparation for professional training in law and public administration. In all cases, participation in an internship experience as an undergraduate will increase the student’s job opportunities. Students with an M.A. in political science may find careers in such areas as business, government research and administration, and teaching at the community college level.
Requirements for Majors. Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in political science, of which at least 18 must be in upper division courses. Courses are distributed among the primary fields as listed in this bulletin, i.e., American politics, comparative politics, international relations, political theory and public law, and public administration. The major must include the following: Pol. Sci. 100, 110, 200, 440, 441; Econ. 201 and 202; and one upper division course in each of three fields — American politics, comparative politics, international relations. With faculty approval, students may get course credit for political internships through Cooperative Education, Pol. Sci. 398.
SOCIOLOGY
Faculty: Richard H. Anderson, M. Jay Crowe, Karl
H. Flaming, Joyce M. Nielsen, Richard H. Ogles, Marilyn Stember; Visiting: Wanda I. Griffith; Part-time: J. Michael Davis; Adjoint: George S. Larimer.
Sociology is the study of group life in society. It is the investigation of social actions, values, and procedures that are involved in the development, structure, and operation of group life. Sociology attempts to present a perspective which encourages people to develop what has been called the sociological imagination — the use of reason to achieve lucid summaries of what is going on in the world and of what may be happening within themselves.
Training in sociology, especially at the graduate level, can open up almost any professional field. Knowledge of sociology and sociological method is valuable in management, research, government service, public affairs, and the health services.
The department has developed the following rationale for courses offered.


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1. Lower Division Courses (for majors and nonmajors).
a. One-hundred-level courses are an introduction to the broad sociological perspective as it applies to social life, social systems, and society.
b. Two-hundred-level courses introduce the student to somewhat more specific content areas: population study, human ecology, social psychology, etc.
2. Upper Division Courses (300 and 400)
a. Three-hundred-level courses serve as advanced surveys of some specific area of concentration. They are designed to acquaint the student with the issues, methods, concepts, and theoretical frameworks employed in the content area. Such courses as urban sociology, sociology of the family, and sociology of work are offered at this level. Many of these courses are open courses in that students from other departments and colleges are encouraged to enroll in them.
b. Four-hundred-level courses are devoted to a more detailed in-depth examination of
specific issues, approaches, and concepts within the previously identified content areas. These are advanced courses and are geared more directly to sociology and social science majors.
Requirements for Majors. Majors in sociology are required to complete 30 hours in sociology with a grade of C or better. Of these hours, 16 must be upper division, of which 12 hours must be 400-level courses. Maximum in the major is 48 hours. The following courses must be completed with a grade of C or better:
Soc. 100. Introduction to Sociology
Soc. 400. Contemporary Sociological Theory
Soc. 402. Statistics
A maximum of 6 hours of social science credit may be counted toward the major in sociology. As no fixed sequence of courses is prescribed, it is recommended and expected that students will select an adviser from the sociology faculty to help them develop their programs. This is particularly important for those intending to do graduate work in sociology.


College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Gordon G. Barnewall, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Business and Administration and the Graduate School of Business Administration at UCD offer programs designed to train competent, responsible administrative and related professional personnel. The College serves students entering this field of study and men and women already in administrative positions. It promotes research and new thinking about administrative problems.
The major purpose of the College of Business is to provide opportunities both for a liberal education and for professional training. Students are given help in preparing not only for effective careers but also for satisfying living and constructive citizenship.
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers graduate-level education in business to persons with undergraduate degrees in business and other academic fields and prepares them for work in the broad spectrum of business enterprise.
The College was admitted to membership in the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1938.
The College participates on a continuing basis in the Executive Program for the Gas Industry, the Institute for Organization Management, the Colorado School of Banking, the National Installment Banking School, the School of Bank Marketing, the School for International Banking, and many activities of the Center for Management and Technical Programs. The College also assists in the presentation throughout Colorado of a Certificate Program in Real Estate. The faculty also participate in many continuing education, government, and company educational programs.
The Business Alumni Advisory Council serves as a direct link with the business community to promote understanding, cooperation, and mutual gain in a variety of education-industry activities.
Career Opportunities
Graduates occupy positions and perform widely varied functions in:
Advertising Consumer credit and
Banking mortgage finance
Credit administration Financial management Industrial selling and purchasing Information Systems Insurance
International business Investments Management accounting Management consulting Marketing management Marketing research Media
Minerals land management Office management Operations research Personnel management Production management Public accounting Real estate Retailing
Selling and sales management Traffic management Transportation Wholesaling
Others hold positions of responsibility in fields as diverse as business journalism, public relations, city planning, chamber of commerce and trade association management, college administration, and government.
Organization
Within the broad framework of policy established by the Regents of the University of Colorado, policy decisions for the College of Business are made by the Educational Policy Committee of the faculty under the chairmanship of the dean and are subject to review by the faculty as a whole.
The College’s activities at UCD are administered by the associate dean, by the heads of its several instructional divisions, and by other faculty directors of particular programs.
Research Activities
The Business Research Division provides facilities and trained personnel for research on business and economic problems. Established in 1915, the unit serves as the research arm of the College. The division serves Colorado and the surrounding region to improve the general economic welfare of the area and to gather and disseminate business and economic information; encourages research by faculty members and graduate students; and develops closer relationships between students, faculty, and businessmen.
Through its monthly publication, The Colorado Business Review, the division provides basic business information concerning Colorado. Other publications include compilations of business and economic data, industry surveys, studies of special problems in


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business management and regional community studies.
Honors Program
Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation.
Students must achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude.
Those who achieve an overall grade-point average of
3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interests and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations:
AIESEC — international business association Beta Alpha Psi — national honorary and professional accounting fraternity
Beta Gamma Sigma — national honorary scholastic fraternity in business BREC — Buffalo Real Estate Club CSPA — Colorado Society for Personnel Administration (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations CUAMA — student chapter of the American Marketing Association
Delta Sigma Pi — national professional business fraternity
MBA Association — University of Colorado association of master’s students in business Phi Chi Theta — national professional business and economics fraternity
Rho Epsilon — professional real estate fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon — professional and honorary management fraternity
SAML — Student Association of Minerals Landmen Awards Banquet
Each spring the College sponors a banquet honoring top students in the graduating class. Scholastic honors from outside companies and memorials are given at this time, as well as honors from the dean’s office and other departmental offices. Both graduate and undergraduate awards are distributed, including recognition of those students graduating cum laude and magna cum laude. Graduating students also honor the outstanding teacher of the year.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies which apply to all UCD students are described in the General Information section of this bulletin. The policies that follow apply
specifically to the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration.
Upon admission, the student can be advised on the academic program by the College advisers. The student is responsible for knowing his/her status at all times.
Adding and Dropping Courses
See the General Information section of this bulletin for University-wide Drop/Add policies.
Administrative Drop. Instructors may recommend to the College of Business and Administration office that students who fail to meet expected course attendance standards be dropped without discredit during the first 10 weeks of the semester.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact the associate dean or staff members in the College of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College.
Attendance Regulations
Classroom attendance is at the discretion of the instructor. Students are responsible for determining each instructor’s policy on attendance.
Course Load
The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate student in the College of Business is 15 semester hours, with 19 hours normally the maximum. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s load.
Students having a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher for the most recent semester in which they completed at least 15 semester hours may register for a load exceeding 19 semester hours with the written approval of the associate dean.
Credit
To receive credit, all courses must be listed on the student’s registration in the Office of Admissions and Records. Credit is then evaluated by the College of Business to determine degree acceptability.
Courses completed at any University of Colorado campus are credited toward degree requirements, if appropriate to the degree program.
Registration for Business Courses
Students may register only for those courses for which they have the stated prerequisite training. Junior standing is required for all business courses numbered 300-499.
Pass/Fall
Business majors may not take any business courses or required nonbusiness courses under the pass/fail


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option. Only nonbusiness elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posed deadline and is irreversible.
Failed courses may be repeated, but the F will be included in the grade-point average.
Up to 16 semester hours may be taken pass/fail. Transfer students may take 1 semester hour pass/fail for every 8 semester hours taken at the University.
SPECIFIC UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES
Standards of Performance
Students are held to basic standards of performance established for their classes with respect to attendance, active participation in course work, promptness in completion of assignments, correct English usage both in writing and in speech, accuracy in calculations, and general quality of scholastic workmanship.
In general, examinations are required in all courses and for all students, including graduating seniors.
To be in good standing, students must have an overall grade-point average of not less than 2.0 (C = 2.0) for all course work attempted and a 2.0 for all business courses attempted. This applies to work taken at all University campuses. Activity physical education and remedial courses are not indued in the overall average.
When semester grades become available, students below standard will be notified of (1) probationary status or (2) suspension.
College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall grade average, or business course average, is less than 2.0 shall be placed on probation immediately. A student may be removed from probation when the overall average and the business average have been raised to 2.0.
2. A student shall remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College, and obtains no grade below a C; such probationary status may continue a maximum of four regular semesters, providing these provisions have been met. Failure to meet these provisions will result in indefinite suspension.
3. Indefinitely suspended students may attend the University of Colorado summer session in order to improve their grade averages in the area of deficiency, but may not attend any division of the University for at least two regular (fall and spring) semesters.
4. A student who has been under indefinite suspension for two semesters may apply for readmission to the College of Business and Administration. If readmitted, that readmission will be on a probationary status. After being readmitted under such probationary status, any student who fails to comply with the requirements of his/her probation will be subject to permanent suspension.
5. Any student who is placed on suspension more than once will be permanently suspended from the College of Business.
6. Any student earning all failing grades or no academic credit for the semester will not be permitted to register without the dean’s approval.
7. Official combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in the combined business program.
Transfer Credit
Credits in business and nonbusiness subjects transferred from other institutions will be limited to the number of credit hours given for equivalent work in the regular offerings of the University. Transfer work is only accepted from institutions accredited by the regional association. In general, the College will limit transfer credit for business courses taken at a lower division level to such courses as the College offers at that level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is given by the appropriate division head. Transfer students must take 30 hours of degree requirements in residency after admission to the College.
A maximum of 60 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the B.S. degree in business. Remedial or vocational work does not transfer. Business courses from junior colleges will not be applied toward degree requirements if the course work is offered at the junior-senior level at UCD.
For a detailed explanation of transfer credit, see the General Information section.
Correspondence Credit
Only 30 semester hours of credit, 9 of which may be in business, taken through correspondence study will be counted toward the B.S. degree in business. Required business courses and area of emphasis courses cannot be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability.
Credit by Examination
College Level Examination credits (CLEP subject examinations only) are acceptable toward degree requirements to a maximum of 30 hours. Specific information is available in the College of Business and Administration Office, Room 512.
CLEP credit will be applied in the same manner as transfer credits. For credit, students must rank in the 66.7 percentile based on national available norms. Generally, CLEP credit is only appropriate for (a) nonbusiness requirements and (b) nonbusiness electives. A maximum of 6 hours of credit in any one course area is allowed. CLEP may not be used in course areas where credit has already been allowed. General examinations are not acceptable.
Credit for CLEP subject examinations in business course areas must have prior approval in writing by the College of Business and Administration and by the appropriate division head.


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Advanced Placement (CEEB) credit will be given where appropriate to students who make scores of 3,4, or 5.
Special Sources of Credit
Up to 6 hours of experimental studies or independent study programs can be accepted toward graduation. A maximum of 3 hours of this type of credit may be taken in any one semester.
Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular business course coverage may take variable credit courses (1 to 3 semester hours) under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have prior approval. Information and request forms are available in the College of Business and Administration office.
To receive credit for nonbusiness independent study courses, students should obtain the associate dean’s approval prior to registering for the course. Further information and forms are available in the College office.
There is no credit for work experience or cooperative education programs.
ROTC Credit
Students who are enrolled in and complete the ROTC program may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours of advanced ROTC credit toward nonbusiness elective requirements and toward the 120-semester hour total degree requirement for the B.S. degree in business. No credit toward requirements is granted for basic (freshman and sophomore) ROTC courses. The ROTC adviser can provide more detailed information.
Study Abroad Credit
Transfer credit from study abroad programs is most appropriately applied as nonbusiness elective credit. Required business courses should not be taken during studies abroad. Students are responsible for checking with the College of Business and Administration for prior approval. Information on the various study abroad programs is available at the Office of International Education on the Boulder campus.
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. Understanding of the activities that constitute business enterprise and of the principles underlying administration of those activities.
2. Ability to think through logically and analytically the kinds of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. Comprehension of the human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the arts of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
Admission of Freshman Students
See the General Information section for admission and application procedures.
Prospective students in business are encouraged to pursue a broad college preparatory program in high school, with particular emphasis on English, mathematics, the social sciences, and speech.
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree normally enter as freshmen. The College expects entering freshmen to present 15 units of the secondary course work.
Admission of Transfer Students
See the General Information section for admission and application procedures.
Intrauniversity Transfer
Students who wish to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University must formally apply at the College of Business office (Room 512). A minimum University of Colorado grade-point average (established by the College) is required for consideration.
Students desiring admission to official combined programs must apply to and be accepted by the College of Business. Minimum grade-point averages are also established for these jointly enrolled students.
Second Undergraduate Degree
Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. The student who is accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a degree plan. For example, if a student registered for the second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records.
If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies consideration for the graduate program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master’s programs.
Academic Advising
Each student in the College of Business is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic requirements and regulations established for the College and for classes. Upon admission to the College of


46 / University of Colorado at Denver
Business and Administration or to the Graduate School of Business Administration, the student has the responsibility for conferring with the student advisers in the College concerning an academic program. Appointments for academic advising can be made by calling 629-2605.
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree requires:
1. Total Credits. A total of 120 acceptable semester hours of credit, of which at least 51 hours must be in non business courses (including 9 hours of upper division work) and at least 51 hours in business courses. The remaining 18 hours may be in either, or some combination of both. This credit cannot include remedial work, repetition of courses, courses failed, or activity physical education, recreation and dance courses. However, a maximum 6 hours of theory, physical education, recreation, and/or dance may be used. Advanced ROTC work is acceptable only if the ROTC program is completed. All incomplete grades and correspondence course grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades. A maximum of 60 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the B.S. degree in business.
2. Residence: Completion of at least 30 semester hours of business, usually in the senior year, after admission to the College of Business and Administration, including 12 hours in the area of emphasis. Courses completed at any University of Colorado campus after the candidate has been admitted to the College are acceptable toward this requirement.
3. Grade Average: A minimum scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 in the student’s area of emphasis.
4. Graduation With Honors: Upon recommendation of the faculty of the College of Business, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Please refer to the Honors Program under the Information About the College section.
5. Intent to Graduate Form. Students must file an Intent to Graduate Form with the College of Business and Administration office prior to registering for the last semester. Questions concerning graduation should be directed to a student adviser, Room 512.
6. Courses. Completion of all of the following required courses:
Semester Hours
Area of emphasis....................................... 12
College algebra and calculus ............................ 6
Communication and composition ........................... 6
Core requirements (basic courses in accounting, business law, business statistics, business and society, data processing, marketing, finance, organization management, production and operations management and business policy)...........................30
Electives
Business............................................... 9
Nonbusiness (to include 9 hours of upper division work) . 15 Free electives (either business or nonbusiness electives) .. 18
General psychology.......................................... 6
Introductory sociology or cultural anthropology ............... 3
Natural science (astro-geophysics, biology, chemistry, physical geography, geological sciences, and physics; applies as nonbusiness elective .... 3
Political science........................................... 6
Principles of economics.........................................6
Total 120
Upon reaching senior status, the student must contact the College of Business and Administration student adviser for a complete academic evaluation prior to registering for the last term on campus.
Model Degree Program
The following sequence of courses is a guide to registration.
Freshman Year Semester Hours
Engl. 102 or 103. English Composition ..................... 3
Comm. 202 or 210. Communication Theory or Public Speaking 3
Math. 107. College Algebra1................................. 3
Math. 108. College Calculus1................................ 3
Pol. Sci. 100. Introduction to Political Science............ 3
Pol. Sci. 110. American National Government ................ 3
Soc. 100. Introduction to Sociology2........................ 3
B.Ad. 100. Introduction to Business or a business elective3... 3
Nonbusiness electives4...................................... 3
Natural science ............................................ 3
Total 30
Sophomore Year
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics (macro/micro)... 6
Psych. 203, 204. General Psychology......................... 6
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer............ 3
Q.M. 201. Business Statistics .............................. 3
Acct. 200. Introduction to Financial Accounting............. 3
Nonbusiness electives4...................................... 9
Total 30
Junior Year
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing............................ 3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance..................................... 3
Or. Mg. 330. Introduction to Management and Organization . 3
Pr. Mg. 300. Production and Operations Management.......... 3
B. Law 300. Business Law ................................... 3
Business electives ......................................... 3
Nonbusiness electives4...................................... 3
Free electives.............................................. 9
Total 30
Senior Year
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy.................................. 3
B.Ad. 411. Business and Society
or B.Ad. 410. Business and Government.................. 3
Area of emphasis........................................... 12
Business electives ......................................... 3
Free electives ............................................. 9
Total 30
'Any of the following four options: (1) Math. 107 and 108; (2) Math. Ill and 140; (3)
Math 111 and 108; or (4) Math. 140 and 241. A maximum of 9 hours of mathematics below the level of Math. 140 can be applied toward the degree.
2Soc. 100 is recommended to meet the sociology requirement; however, Soc. 104, 119, 300, 301, 302. 303, 305, 384, and Anth. 100 are acceptable.
3Applies as a business elective. This course is recommended but not required.
4For completion of the B.S. (Business) degree requirements, the student’s program must include at least 9 semester hours in upper division, nonbusiness courses.


College of Business and Administration / 47
Area of Emphasis
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising 12 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado. Typically, students select an area of emphasis from those offered after taking several of the “core” courses. Then they take the hours required for their selected area. Available areas of emphasis are:
Accounting
Business education (Boulder)
Computer-based information systems Finance
Information science International business Marketing
Minerals land management Office administration1 Although only one area of emphasis will be listed on the student’s official records, students so desiring may accomplish the effect of a dual area of emphasis by careful selection of courses.
ACCOUNTING
Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced, and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Financial accounting Tax accounting
Auditing Data processing and
Managerial accounting control systems
Teaching and research
In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensible.
The undergraduate area of emphasis in accounting consists of 12 hours beyond Acct. 200 and 202:
Required Courses Semester Hours
Acct. 322. Intermediate Financial Accounting I.......... 3
Acct. 323. Intermediate Financial Accounting II ........ 3
Acct. 332. Cost Accounting................................. 3
Accounting elective....................................... 3
Total 12
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the required 12 hours. Many students take a total of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking two courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty in planning their accounting programs.
Students planning to take the CPA examination should take about 30 hours of accounting and also be well prepared in statistics, business law, finance, economics.
Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements
should consider continuing their education at the graduate level.
FINANCE
The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, monetary policy, banking, investments, and insurance. Finance is intended to give an understanding of fundamental theory pertaining to finance and to develop ability to make practical applications of the principles and techniques of sound financial management in business affairs. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies. Numerous opportunities are to be found with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis and decisionmaking. Acct. 202 is a prerequisite for this area.
Required Courses Semester Hours
Fin. 401. Business Finance I ........................... 3
Fin. 402. Business Finance II........................... 3
Fin. 433. Investment and Portfolio Management........... 3
Fin. 455. Monetary and Fiscal Policy ................... 3
Recommended Elective Courses
Fin. 440. International Financial Management............ 3
Fin. 434. Security Analysis............................. 3
Fin. 453. Bank Management .............................. 3
R.Es. 454. Real Estate Finance.......................... 3
Ins. 484. Principles of Insurance....................... 3
INFORMATION SCIENCE
The information science area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional administrative data processing managers in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for the analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems — systems for the collection, organization, accessing, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. The automation of data processing is also studied extensively.
The undergraduate area of emphsis consists of 12 hours beyond B.Ad. 200, Q.M. 201, and I.S. 215.
Required Core: (12 Hours) Semester Hours
1.5. 350. Database Information Systems.................... 3
1.5. 465. Systems Analysis and Design..................... 3
Q.M. 300. Intermediate Statistics ........................ 3
Q.M. 330. Operations Research............................. 3
In addition to the area courses above, I.S. 470 (Computerware) is recommended but not required.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
In recent years, companies have completely reoriented their thinking, planning, and operations to
'Area courses in office administration must be completed on the Boulder campus except for O.Ad. 440.
Organizational management Personnel management Production and operations management
Public agency administration Real estate
Small business management Transportation and traffic management


48 / University of Colorado at Denver
capitalize on the opportunities offered in the world marketplace. Every phase of business operation is affected by this reorientation, and individuals who offer the appropriate skills, training, and orientation are in great demand.
The program reflects the basic principle that effectiveness in international business is based on a thorough training in business administration. The international business program provides the opportunity to build on these skills. The student electing this area must complete at least 12 semester hours as follows:
Required Courses Semester Hows
Econ. 441. International Trade ............................... 3
plus three of the following courses:
B.Ad. 440. International Business Seminar .................... 3
Fin. 440. International Financial Management.................. 3
Tr.Mg. 458. International Transportation...................... 3
Mk. 490. International Marketing.............................. 3
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for the second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. Foreign language study is also recommended, and foreign language skills are much sought after by business recruiters for this field. Other courses emphasizing international affairs may be elected from the following departments: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. Students interested in this area may start their preparation by electing language and other liberal arts and sciences courses in their program.
MARKETING
Marketing is concerned with analyzing the market for a product or service, planning and developing that product, determining the most appropriate distribution channels, pricing the product, and promoting it. Today the administrative policies and practices of any well-managed firm should be marketing-oriented toward the consumer.
The career opportunities in marketing reflect the business person’s awareness of the importance of this field. Today many individuals are rising to top executive positions by the marketing route. There are more executive and other job opportunities for women in the marketing field than in any other single area outside teaching or secretarial work. One out of every four people gainfully employed in this country is in a marketing position.
Career opportunities abound in personal selling, advertising, sales management, marketing research, retailing, wholesaling, marketing by manufacturers, international marketing, etc.
Required Cowses Semester Hows
Mk. 330. Marketing Research ........................... 3
Marketing electives (beyond Mk. 300)................... 9
MINERALS LAND MANAGEMENT
The curriculum in minerals land management is designed to incorporate the primary course patterns of the College of Business and Administration along with certain field area preparation in geology, chemistry, economics, and land management.
With this preparation, the graduate is a candidate for entry into employment as a landman, exploration trainee, lease broker, and other jobs related to the minerals industry. Colorado is presently the headquarters for a wide assortment of resource-based companies operating throughout the western United States and Canada. These companies need qualified employees and have helped in the preparation of the program.
The four-year program will consist of all College of Business requirements and must include the following courses. Except as specifically stated, no 300- or 400-level course (business or nonbusiness) may be taken pass/fail.
1. Nonbusiness Cowses Semester Hours
Geol. 101. Introduction to Geomorphology ............. 4
Geology/Geography Option1.............................. 7
Chem. 101. General Chemistry........................... 4
Econ. 453. Natural Resource Economics or
Econ. 454. Environmental Economics..................... 3
2. Business Cowses
Acct. 202. Introduction to Managerial Accounting...... 3
R.Es. 300. Principles of Real Estate................... 3
3. A minimum of 12 hours for the major area is required as specified below:
Required Cowses
(The following four courses)
M.L. Mg. 485. Minerals Landman Administration........ 3
M.L.M. 495. Oil-Gas and Mineral Law.................. 3
Acct. 441. Income Tax Accounting..................... 3
Fin. 401. Business Finance I......................... 3
Recommended Elective Courses
R.Es. 430. Real Estate Appraisal..................... 3
R.Es. 473. Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions. 3
B.Law 412. Business Law ............................. 3
Econ. 476. Government Regulation of Business......... 3
Econ. 477, 478. Economic Development — Theory and Problems I, II............................... 6
ORGANIZATION MANAGEMENT
Organization management offers opportunities to develop understanding and skill in managing human resources in organizations. The curriculum provides the foundation for supervisory and general management careers.
‘A minimum of 7 hours of the following geology or geography courses. These may not be taken pass/fail. Geological Development of Colorado and the West (Geol. 163-4), Environmental Geology (Geol. 370-3), Geohydroloay (Geol. 404-3), Principles of Geomorphology (Geof. 463-4). Introduction to Geopnysical Prospecting (Geol. 493-4), Mineral Resources and World Affairs (Geol. 494-3), Map Interpretation (Geog. 306-3), Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photos (Geog. 406-3).


College of Business and Administration / 49
Required Courses Semester Hours
Or.Mg. 335. Managing Work Groups.......................... 3
Or.Mg. 437. Managing Complex Organizations................ 3
(One of the following:)
Ps.Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice.......... 3
Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice .... 3
Recommended Electives
(At least one of the following:)
Ps.Mg. 439. Personnel Management: Legal and Social Issues. 3
Pr.Mg. 444. Work Design and Measurement................ 3
Pr.Mg. 447. Policy Analysis in Production and
Operations Management ............................. 3
Pr.Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management........ 3
Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management.... 3
B.Ad. 470. Small Business—Management and Operations ... 3
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
Personnel management offers opportunities to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and labor relations. Students acquire understanding and skill in developing and implementing personnel systems including recruitment, selection, and union-management relations.
Required Courses Semester Hows
Ps.Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice......... 3
Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice .... 3 Ps.Mg. 439. Personnel Management: Legal and Social Issues. 3 Elective .................................................. 3
Recommended Electives
Or.Mg. 335. Managing Work Groups......................... 3
Or.Mg. 437. Managing Complex Organizations................. 3
Pr.Mg. 440. Planning and Control Systems in
Production and Operations Management................... 3
Pr.Mg. 444. Work Design and Measurement.................. 3
Pr.Mg. 447. Policy Analysis in Production and
Operations Management ................................. 3
Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management...... 3
B.Ad. 452. Small- Business Strategy, Policy, and
Entrepreneurship ...................................... 3
O.Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management................. 3
Econ. 461. Labor Economics ................................ 3
Psych. 485. Principles of Psychological Testing ........... 3
Psych. 487. Personality Assessment......................... 3
Soc. 479. Industrial Sociology ............................ 3
PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
Production and operations management studies are designed to prepare for careers as production manager, operations manager, management analyst, or systems analyst in such private sector organizations as manufacturing, banking, insurance, hospitals, and construction, as well as in a variety of municipal, state, and federal organizations.
Production or operations managers may be charged with the design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of the production systems. Managerial activities could include forecasting demand, production planning and inventory control, scheduling labor and equipment, job design and labor standards, quality control, purchasing, and facilities location and layout.
Students choosing this area of study may be asked to participate in live case research and consulting projects with local organizations under the direction of their instructor; encouraged to participate in the newly chartered student chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society; and encouraged to seriously consider preparing for and taking the five-part Certification Examinations given semi-annually by APICS.
Students whose major areas of emphasis are information science or transportation and traffic management will find the Pr.Mg. 400-level courses to be particularly well related to their courses of study.
Required Courses
(The following three courses)
Pr.Mg. 440. Planning and Control Systems in
Production and Operations Management................. 3
Pr.Mg. 447. Policy Analysis in Production and
Operations Management ................................ 3
Pr.Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management.......... 3
(One of the following courses)
Pr.Mg. 444. Work Design and Measurement.................. 3
Q.M. 330. Operations Research............................. 3
1.5. 215. Information Systems............................. 3
Mk. 485. Physical Distribution Management................ 3
Recommended Electives
1.5. 345. Information Systems............................. 3
Or.Mg. 335. Managing Work Groups......................... 3
Or.Mg. 437. Managing Complex Organizations................ 3
Ps.Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice......... 3
Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice .... 3
Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management...... 3
Acct. 332. Cost Accounting................................ 3
Q.M. 300. Intermediate Statistics......................... 3
PUBLIC AGENCY ADMINISTRATION
Public agency administration is designed to prepare for careers in management of governmental or other nonprofit service organizations. The curriculum in public agency administration provides the student with a foundation of core courses upon which to construct an area of emphasis which will focus on the type of service organization the student desires to enter upon graduation.
Required Courses
Acct. 480. Business and Governmental Budgeting
and Control.............................................. 3
Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Administration......................... 3
O.Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management................... 3
Q.M. 330. Operations Research................................ 3
REAL ESTATE
Real estate careers require knowledge of real estate investments, urban land economics, real estate law, appraising, finance, taxes, management, sales, and accounting.
Real estate is one segment of the economy in which it is still possible for a person to be his/her own boss whether as a broker, appraiser, developer, syndicator or property manager.


50 / University of Colorado at Denver
Semester Hours
Required Courses (After completion of R.Es. 300)
R.Es. 430. Real Estate Appraising......................... 3
R.Es. 454. Real Estate Financing.......................... 3
R.Es. 401. Urban Land Analysis or
R.Es. 433. Real Estate Investments ................... 3
R.Es. 473. Legal Aspects of Real Estate................... 3
It is strongly recommended that any student planning to sit for the Colorado broker’s examination take all six of the real estate courses.
Recommended Electives
Acct. 441. Income Tax Accounting........................ 3
Ins. 484. Principles of Insurance....................... 3
Fin. 455. Monetary and Fiscal Policy ................... 3
Fin. 433. Investment and Portfolio Management ........... 3
Mk. 310. Salesmanship................................... 3
Mk. 320. Consumer Behavior.............................. 3
Mk. 470. Sales Management .............................. 3
B.Ad. 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy,
and Entrepreneurship................................. 3
Arch. Eng. 240. Building Materials and Construction..... 3
SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Small business management studies provide understanding, knowledge, and skills in organizing and managing small business. The emphasis is on the managerial aspects of the wide range of activities required of the entrepreneur.
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements of the second area can be included as part of business or free electives. Additional courses in management, finance, accounting, and marketing should be planned in consultation with the adviser to serve individual career needs.
Required Courses Semester Hows
B.Ad. 470. Small Business—Management and Operation .... 3 (Two or three of the following four courses)
Fin. 401. Business Finance I ............................ 3
Acct. 332. Cost Accounting................................ 3
Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice____ 3
Mk. 480. Marketing Policies and Strategies............... 3
Recommended Electives (at least one of the following)
Ps.Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice......... 3
Pr.Mg. 440. Planning and Control Systems in
Production and Operations Management.................. 3
Pr.Mg. 447. Policy Analysis in Production and
Operations Management ................................ 3
Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management...... 3
Pr.Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management.......... 3
Mk. 485. Physical Distribution Management................ 3
O.Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management............... 3
Fin. 402. Business Finance II............................. 3
TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
The curriculum in transportation management includes the role of transportation in society and the problems of traffic management within specific industries as well as the management of firms in the transportation industry, such as airlines, trucking firms, railroads, and urban transit firms. Inter-
national transportation management problems and policies are analyzed.
One of the recommended elective courses may be substituted with permission of the adviser for one of the required courses if there is a schedule conflict, if the course is not available, or if a student demonstrates a career need for such a course.
Required Cowses Semester Hows
(Any four of the following six courses)
Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management..... 3
Tr.Mg. 452. Problems in Traffic Management .............. 3
Tr.Mg. 456. Air Transportation........................... 3
Tr.Mg. 457. Urban Transportation......................... 3
Tr.Mg. 458. International Transportation................. 3
Mk. 485. Physical Distribution Management............... 3
Recommended Electives
Ps.Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice......... 3
Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice--- 3
Tr.Mg. 451. Survey of Transportation..................... 3
Pr.Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management.......... 3
B.Ad. 470. Small Business—Management and Operation .... 3 O.Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management............... 3
COMBINED PROGRAMS
Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Such combined programs have been arranged for engineering and business, pharmacy and business, and environmental design and business and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well.
The two programs of study proceed concurrently, terminating together with the award of two degrees. Generally, at least five years will be needed for such combined programs. No substitutions are allowed in this program.
For students in combined programs, the requirements for the degree in business are as follows:
1. An application for admission to the combined program must be filed with the College of Business and approved by the deans of both colleges. Completion of at least 48 semester hours in business and economics, to include Econ. 201 and 202 (6 semester hours), required courses in business (30 semester hours), and a business area of emphasis (12 semester hours).
2. Completion of at least 30 of these semester hours at the University of Colorado while enrolled in the College of Business.
3. Completion of nonbusiness requirements in mathematics, communications, and the social and behavioral sciences in a degree program approved in advance by the College of Business. In addition, for some courses and areas of emphasis, there are prerequisite requirements which must be met.
4. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business. Students in combined degree program are subject to all policies of the College of Business.


College of Business and Administration / 51
5. Any combined degree student who does not make reasonable progress toward the completion of the business degree requirements, as determined by the College of Business, may be dropped from the program.
6. The number of students accepted in any combined program may be numerically limited and is dependent upon existing demand each semester.
Shown below is the combined engineering-business program. For other combinations, students should consult with the associate dean of the College of Business.
The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows:
Courses Semester Hours
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics (Should be completed during the student’s sophomore
or junior year.) ........................................ 6
Acct. 200. Introduction to Financial Accounting............. 3
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer............ 3
Q.M. 201. Business Statistics ............................... 3
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing............................. 3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance...................................... 3
Pr.Mg. 300. Production and Operations Management............ 3
Or.Mg. 330. Introduction to Management
and Organization ........................................ 3
B.Law 300. Business Law...................................... 3
B.Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B.Ad. 411.
Business and Society..................................... 3
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy Cases and Concepts in Business Policy; or B.Ad. 451. Management Games and Cases in Business Policy; or B.Ad. 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship.................... 3
Specified courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields: accounting, information systems, finance, international business, marketing, minerals land management, office administration, production/operations management, organizational behavior, personnel management, public agency administration, real estate, small business management, or transportation management. All work in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado, College of Business and Administration.
Area of emphasis........................................._12
Total 48
GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Requirements for Admission—Master’s Programs
Admission to the master’s programs will be determined by the following criteria:
1. Applicant’s academic record.
2. The applicant’s scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). (This test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to the Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 966, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.)
Because of the large number of applications which must be processed, the deadlines set out below are strictly adhered to, and applicants should be careful to observe them. Personal interviews are not required.
In general, students failing to meet minimum standards are not admitted on a provisional status.
Seniors in this University who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who need not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet requirements for bachelor’s degrees may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the director of graduate studies.
Completed applications, including GMAT scores, transcripts and a $20 nonrefundable application fee should be in the Office of Graduate Studies, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, by March 1 for summer admission, by April 1 for fall admission, and by October 1 for spring admission, or until available space is filled.
Daytime M.B.A. courses are offered in Boulder. Evening M.B.A. courses are offered in Denver and Colorado Springs.
BACKGROUND REQUIREMENTS
Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. For those students the M.B.A. or M.S. degree programs provide a series of graduate fundamental background courses. These inlcude: B.Ad. 501 (Acct.); B.Ad. 502 (Q.M.); B.Ad. 503 (Mk.); B.Ad. 504 (Mg. and Org.); B.Ad. 505 (Bus.Fin.); B.Ad. 506 (B.Law); B.Ad. 507 (Introduction to Management Science). In addition, all graduate students are required to take either B.Ad. 500 (Sources of Information and Research Methods) or pass a qualifying examination covering this subject matter. These fundamental courses do not carry graduate credit, nor may they be used to satisfy requirements for the bachelor’s degree in business. They are open only to admitted graduate students.
Graduate students possessing an undergraduate degree in business must be prepared to present the following acceptable course work in order to waive the relevant graduate fundamental course:
Introductory Accounting 6 semester hours
(Financial/Managerial)
Business Quantitative Methods By qualifying exam only Principles of Marketing 3 semester hours
Management and Organization 3 semester hours
Business Finance 3 semester hours
Business Law 3 semester hours
Business Operations Research 3 semester hours
Principles of Economics (Macro/Micro)
While it is not required that students have a background in mathematics and/or computer programming, it is highly recommended. Please see the adviser for suggested courses in these areas.
General Information — Master’s Programs
The M.B.A. program is a two-year curriculum with the possibility of waiver, for properly prepared students, of all or part of the first year. The student must request course exemption and should be prepared to support the request for waiver. Up to 25 credit hours (First Year Program) of course work may be waived.


52 / University of Colorado at Denver
Advising. All graduate students should report first to the student adviser in the Graduate School of Business Administration office for the purpose of ascertaining deficiencies and principal field of interest. The division heads of each area serve as faculty advisers.
During the first term of residence, each student should prepare a degree plan. This plan, with appropriate signatures, should be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies.
Qualifying Examination. Satisfactory performance on the Graduate Management Admission Test and admission into a master’s program with the status of a regular degree student will constitute the qualifying examination for graduate study.
Course Load. The normal course load for graduate students is 12-15 semester hours.
Minimum Hours Required. A candidate for a master’s degree in business must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work plus any deficiencies. A maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate work can be transferred from another AACSB-accredited master’s program.
Comprehensive Examination. Each candidate for a Master of Science or Master of Business Education degree is required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been met. This examination is given near the end of the candidate’s last semester of residence. Students must be registered when they take this examination. Comprehensive examinations are given in November, April, and July. A comprehensive examination is not required for students pursuing the Master of Business Administration degree program.
Students must file an Application for Admission to Candidacy with the Office of Graduate Studies during the first month of the final term of their residency.
Minimum Grade-Point Average. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved in courses taken after the student’s admission to the graduate program. If the student’s cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, he or she will be placed on academic probation and given one regular semester (summer terms excluded) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required average within the allotted time period will result in dismissal.
Work receiving the lowest passing grade, D, may not be counted toward a degree, nor may it be accepted for the removal of deficiencies. A graduate student may repeat once a course for which he or she has received a grade of C, D, or F. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the grade-point average.
To earn a grade of W (withdrawal) in a course, a graduate student must be earning a grade of C or better in that course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the semester.
An IF (incomplete) will be automatically converted to an F after one academic year.
Time Limit. All 30 semester hours of graduate work, including the comprehensive final examination, should be completed within five years or six successive summers. Candidates for the master’s degree are expected to complete their work with reasonable continuity.1
Master of Business Administration
The Master of Business Administration program is devoted to the concepts, analytical tools, and communication skills required for competent and responsible administration. The administration of an enterprise is viewed in its entirety and within its social, political, and economic environment.
In addition to the background requirements for a master’s degree listed above, the candidate for the M.B.A. degree must complete the specific requirements of the M.B.A. curriculum (30 semester hours) as follows:
Core Requirements Semester Hours
a. Functional Courses
Two of the following four functional courses are required: Fin. 601, Mk. 600, Pr.Mg. 640 (Logistics), and I.S. 645, at least one of which shall be either Fin. 601 or Mk. 600. Candidates with either marketing or finance undergraduate or graduate majors shall not take the corresponding functional course to fulfill this re-
quirement ............................................ 6
b. Business and Its Environment
Business, Government, and Society (B.Ad. 610)........... 3
c. Analysis and Control
Business and Economic Analysis (B.Ad. 615).............. 3
Administrative Controls (B.Ad. 620)..................... 3
d. Human Factors
Organizational Behavior (B.Ad. 640) .................... 3
e. Planning and Policy
Administrative Policy (B.Ad. 650)....................... 3
Area of Emphasis........................................... 9
Total 30
Areas of emphasis include accounting, finance, management science, marketing, office administration, organization management, personnel management, production and operations management, and transportation management.
For students taking an area of emphasis in accounting, Acct. 322, 323 and 332 or their equivalents are prerequisites for all graduate-level accounting courses. Acct. 533 is substituted for B.Ad. 620. Acct. 628 and two other graduate-level accounting courses are required in the area of emphasis. It is strongly recommended that accounting students take Fin. 601 as one of their functional courses.
Requirements for an area of emphasis in finance are Fin. 601, 602 and either Fin. 633 or 655.
Requirements for an area of emphasis in marketing are Mk. 600, 605 and one additional graduate marketing course.
Candidates pursuing the area of emphasis in management science must elect either a decision science option or an information science option. Those electing the decision science option will be required to take M.S. 601, 602 and Q.M. 602. Those electing the
•Under unusual circumstances, students whose residence is interrupted for legitimate reasons, such as military service, may apply for an extension of time.


College of Business and Administration / 53
information science option will be required to take I.S. 645, 650 and 665.
Students taking other areas of emphasis should consult the head of the division concerning the requirements.
No thesis is required in the M.B.A. program. In the total program there must be a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate course work and a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work at the 600 level. Independent study course 699 is normally not acceptable for credit in the final 30 semester hours of the M.B.A. program.
Master of Science
The Master of Science degree affords opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and a related minor field.
MAJOR FIELDS
For detailed information concerning requirements and recommended programs for each of the major fields, students should consult the following professors:
Accounting ................................ Professor White
Finance ..................................Professor Melicher
Management science ........................ Professor Plane
Marketing ............................... Professor Goeldner
Management and organization ............. Professor Hendrick
With the approval of the student’s adviser and the director of graduate studies, minor fields may be chosen from business subjects or from other graduate departments.
Fields available in the College of Business for selection as a minor are:
Accounting Business education Finance
Management science Marketing
Office administration
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
The minimum requirements for the M.S. degree, after all undergraduate background deficiencies have been removed, may be met by Plan I or Plan II. The student’s degree program should be approved in advance by the advisory committee and the director of graduate studies.
Plan I. The requirement is 30 semester hours of graduate credit including a thesis (4 to 6 hours credit) based upon original research by the candidate. A minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, including B.Ad. 630 (Business Research), is required of all candidates and, including the thesis, must be earned in a
Organization management Personnel management Production and operations management Real estate
Transportation management
major field. A minimum of three courses, normally 9 semester hours but not fewer than 6, must be completed in a minor field.
Plan II. Minimum of 30 semester hours of course work must be completed in courses numbered at the 500 level or above. Requirements must be met in both a major and a minor field. No thesis is required.
Of the 30 semester hours of graduate-level course work, a minimum of 16 hours must be at the 600 level.
All M.S. students must pass written comprehensive examinations covering major and minor fields. The candidate’s committee may require an oral final comprehensive examination subsequent to the written examination.
Master of Business Education
Students should refer to the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for information regarding the Master of Business Education program.
Minors Without Majors in Fields of Business
Graduate students majoring in other divisions of the University may elect as a minor some field of study within the College of Business and Administration. Acceptable fields are:
Accounting Business education Finance
Management science Marketing
Office administration Organization management Personnel management Production and operations management
Transportation management
The student must complete two preparatory fundamentals courses, or their equivalents, as background preparation in the particular field. These two courses will be selected in consultation with a College of Business and Administration adviser. Validation of background preparation may be required through examination, either written or oral, or both.
To complete a minor at the graduate level in one of the fields within the college, the student must present not fewer than two graduate courses, and not fewer than 6 semester hours at the 500 or 600 level. Courses taken to apply on a minor must form a logical sequence or unit and should be approved in advance by a representative of the subject field from which the courses are selected.
Doctor of Business Administration
Students should refer to the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for information regarding the Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.) program.


School of Education
Gerald W. Lundquist, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
UCD offers undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare teachers and other educational workers. The education of school personnel has long been a recognized responsibility of the University. No program of studies involves the coordination of more scholastic disciplines than does the education of teachers. None is more fundamental, more significant, more far-reaching, or more enduring in its impact on society.
The teacher education program, both undergraduate and graduate, is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Membership also is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education.
Students interested in pursuing a program of studies leading to initial teacher certification should consult the School of Education Office. Those desiring to pursue graduate programs or to take courses as graduate students should consult the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
All application forms for School of Education programs are available in the school office, located at 1156 9th Street, 629-2717.
INITIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
The Initial Certification Program is designed to prepare elementary and secondary teachers for urban school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teaching experiences, community field experiences, and urban studies courses.
Undergraduate teacher certification programs are available at UCD in elementary education and in secondary education in the fields of communication and theatre, English, German, French, Spanish, mathematics, science, and social studies.
Student Candidates
1. Juniors and seniors who are working on B.A. or B.S. degrees.
2. Persons who already have B.A., B.S., or advanced degrees, but who do not have teaching certificates.
The Program
First Semester (Fall) Semester Hours
T.Ed. 370. The City as a Cultural Laboratory ............ 2
T.Ed. 306. Foundations of American Education1............ 3
T.Ed. 313. General Educational Psychology1............... 3
T.Ed. 336. Teaching Reading in Urban Schools' ........... 3
Time Commitment for Field Experiences:
T.Ed. 306: Two hours per week in Denver Public Schools
T.Ed. 313: Two hours per week in Denver Public Schools
T.Ed. 336: Two hours per week in Denver Public Schools
If the student elects to take these courses out of sequence, such as T.Ed. 306 the first semester and T.Ed. 313 and 336 the following fall, the time commitment will be a minimum of four hours per week each semester.
City as a Cultural Laboratory: To be offered fall semester in the form of individualized field experiences in the city of Denver. Seminars will be held during the semester to process the experiences.
K-12: T.Ed. 336 and T.Ed. 313 will be offered with one section designated with an elementary emphasis and one section with an emphasis on secondary aspects. All other courses will maintain the K-12 perspective.
Academic Work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
(Prior to the end of the first semester, level of specialization to be pursued or involvement in multiple methods courses for purposes of dual certification should be indicated.)
Second Semester (Spring) Semester Hours
Special Methods:
a. For elementary certification:
T.Ed. 415. Basic Elementary Block ................... 9
b. For secondary certification:
Discipline-area methods course taught either in School of Education or College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences ................................... 3
T.Ed. 375. School-Based Field Experience (Secondary).......... 2
6 to 8 hours per week in Denver Public Schools
T.Ed. 375. School-Based Field Experience (Elementary)......... 4
10 to 12 hours per week in Denver Public Schools
(Full-time involvement in School of Education for elementary-level students during second semester of program.)
Academic work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for secondary-level students (as necessary).
Summer Session (Optional Enrollment)
This additional semester may be necessary for some students to complete program requirements during a two-year period.
1. Student teaching by petition only.
2. Academic work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
3. Elective courses in the School of Education also may be taken during the summer terms.
‘A field experience component is an integral part of each of these courses.


School of Education / 55
Third Semester (Fall ) Semester Hows
Elementary certification: (Involves a 10- to 12-week full-time student teaching assignment, concurrent seminar.)
T.Ed. 470. Student Teaching-Elementary School......... 8-9
T.Ed. 473. Workshops in Special Methods............... 4
T.Ed. 439. Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching .... 1
Secondary certification:
T.Ed. 471. Student Teaching — Secondary School (8-10
weeks full time or 15 weeks half-time assignment).. 8-9
T.Ed. 440. Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching......... 1
Academic work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (as necessary).
Fourth Semester (Spring ) Semester Hours
T.Ed. 414. Senior Seminar: Urban Education, Bilingual/
Multicultural Education, and Special Education ....... 3
T.Ed. 314. Communication: Human Relations and
Group Processes ...................................... 2
Urban Studies courses in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (if these are not previously completed as a part of academic major or General Education requirements) from such areas as teaching English as a second language, Black Studies, Mexican American Studies, minority literature, and/or urban-oriented work in sociology, anthropology, etc.................................. 9
Academic work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for both elementary- and secondary-level students (as necessary).
Students desiring dual certification and whose program permits.
Optional
T.Ed. 470. Student Teaching—Elementary School (10-12
weeks full-time assignment) ...................... 8-9
T.Ed. 471. Student Teaching—Secondary School (8-10 weeks
full time or 15 weeks half-time assignment)....... 8-9
T.Ed. 439. Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching .... 1
T.Ed. 440. Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching...... 1
All elementary majors are required to take 3 semester hours of elective credit in School of Education courses. This may be done at any time.
Admission Procedures
A check list which outlines the steps necessary for admission into the Initial Certification Program is available in the Education office. Students should obtain and follow the procedures as listed. For further
information contact the School of Education, 11569th Street, 629-2717.
Physical Education Programs
Metropolitan State College is responsible for teaching all undergraduate physical education for the Auraria Higher Education Center. This includes the basic activity program as well as the undergraduate major in health, physical education, and recreation. UCD students may take any activity class MSC offers. Check the appropriate Schedule of Courses for activities offered, class times, and procedures for enrolling in such classes.
Rehabilitation Services Program
The School of Education offers a two-year program in rehabilitation services to juniors and seniors, focusing strongly on the recruitment and training of minorities. Students entering the program must have completed 60 semester hours by September of the year for which application is made and should consult with the School of Education regarding entrance requirements. The program leads to a B.S. degree, but not a teaching certificate.
The program combines didactic and experiential facets of rehabilitation counseling. Trainees spend a minimum of two days per week working in settings such as drug and alcohol treatment centers, juvenile probation, and rehabilitation service agencies. The program requires 30 hours of core curriculum courses during the junior and senior years.
Applications of admission to the Rehabilitation Services Program are accepted each year until July 31.
Graduate Programs
Refer to the Graduate School section of this bulletin for information regarding graduate programs in education.


College of Engineering and Applied Science
Paul E. Bartlett, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Through engineering the resources of nature are used for the benefit of humanity and the environment. Engineers today are expected not only to be competent planners and designers of technical systems, but significant contributors to the betterment of their environment in the social and humanistic sense as well. It is no longer sufficient to build more powerful machines, more useful devices, and more effective controlling systems if the total effect is to deplete man’s resources, damage the environment, or contribute to the destruction of the economy.
An engineering career demands hard work, and so does an engineering education. In return engineers have excellent opportunities to work in various places, meet new challenges, or move upward in management. The engineer is generally well paid and usually in demand; in the rare times when there is a surplus of certain kinds of engineers, individuals usually have little difficulty finding attractive opportunities in other fields.
Currently, registration is required in all states for the legal right to practice professional engineering. Although there are variations in the state laws, graduation from an accredited curriculum in engineering, subscription to a code of ethics, and four years of qualifying experience are required. In addition, two days of examinations covering the engineering sciences and the applicant’s practical experience are required in most states. Those who cannot qualify for registration are expected to work under experienced registered engineers.
A listing of the fields in which engineers work would have many hundreds of entries. The following list by departments gives only a brief summary.
The aerospace engineering sciences prepare engineers for an industry that encompasses the design and construction of both commercial and military aircraft and the development and fabrication of space vehicles. The fallout from this technology has permitted the industry to enter also the fields of urban mass transit, undersea exploration, bioengineering, nuclear engineering, laser technology, and many other emerging high technology fields. An aerospace engineer often works at the forefront of engineering with scientists in the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, etc.
Applied mathematics meets the need of modern research, which is dependent upon advanced mathematical concepts. Almost all concerns that are engaged in industrial and scientific research today need applied mathematicians, as do organizations involved in computational work, statistical analysis, or stochastics.
Architectural engineering prepares students for careers in the building industry and for research at the graduate level on building-related topics. This course of study fulfills the academic requirements for registration as a professional engineer.
The architectural engineering curriculum is recommended for those wishing to specialize within the building industry in engineering design, construction and contracting, or sales engineering. The architectural engineering student may select any of three areas of specialization offered: construction engineering, environmental engineering, or structural engineering.
Chemical engineers convert natural resources into industrial and consumer products in facilities that include refineries and gasification plants. Among their products are many that often are not identified with chemical engineering—oils, metals, glass, plastics, rubber, paints, soaps and detergents, foods, beverages, synthetic and natural fibers, nuclear and exotic fuels, medicines, and many others.
The department has recently revised and upgraded its bioengineering/premedical engineering program. It is very much interested in research directed toward ecologically sound development of chemical processes. It is also working hard on energy problems and is stressing in its instructional program problems of energy conversion.
Civil engineering offers an interesting and challenging career to the student interested in the design and construction of buildings, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures; in transportation systems including highways, canals, pipelines, airports, rapid transit lines, railroads, and harbor facilities; in the transmission of water and the control of rivers; in the development of water resources for urban use, industry, and land reclamation; in the control of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment; in the construction and contracting industry; and in the problems concerned with man’s physical environment and the growth of cities.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 57
Electrical engineering offers professional possibilities that include teaching and research in a university; research in development of new electrical or electronic devices, instruments, or products; design of equipment or systems; production and quality-control of electrical products for private industry or government; and sales or management for a private firm or branch of government. There are numerous specialties within electrical engineering. Among them are the design of computer interfaces and computer software; electromagnetic fields, which are basic to radio, television, and related systems; communication theory and signal processing; electrical machinery; solid-state, integrated-circuit, and electron devices, energy and power, control systems and others.
The electrical engineering and computer science program is designed to provide entrance into the profession for students who wish to work in computer engineering. This includes design and construction of efficient software systems as well as an introduction to hardware design. Present interest is in the application of microprocessors.
The engineering physicist works where new kinds of engineering are being bom, or where many fields are being used jointly. General knowledge of the diverse fields of physics provides the ability to deal with industrial problems that cannot be solved by a standardized procedure in a specialized field. The training prepares the student for a career in physics where there are many and varied opportunities in development work and industrial research. It is also basic for graduate work in physics and for specialized training in research.
Mechanical engineering is very broad in scope, not identified with or restricted to a particular technology, vehicle, device, or system but instead is concerned with all such subjects, both individually and collectively. The objective of the undergraduate program is to prepare the student to meet and anticipate change, and to work with technologies as yet unknown. Typical starting assignments for the graduating senior include positions with oil, construction, and automotive industries.
B.S. Degree
The College of Engineering and Applied Science offers at UCD complete four-year programs leading to the B.S. degree in civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, mechanical engineering, and applied mathematics. A number of the courses leading to the B.S. degree in aerospace engineering sciences, architectural engineering, chemical engineering, and engineering physics also are offered at UCD.
The course requirements during the freshman year are essentially the same throughout the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
About two-thirds of the sophomore year is common to all, and the remainder of the courses begin to point to the various fields of engineering taught; real specialization begins, however, in the junior year and carrries on through the senior year. A fifth year of
study leading to the master’s degree is strongly urged for students of more than usual ability who feel they can profit from additional study. Those in this category are likely to achieve greater ultimate success in the engineering profession.
At UCD it is also possible for a student to obtain the bachelor’s degree in both engineering and business in five years plus one or two summer terms. Any of the engineering degree programs can be modified for an excellent premedical program. If liberal arts students elect certain courses in science, mathematics, and engineering as undergraduates, they may earn an engineering degree in four semesters after graduation from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
At the graduate level, UCD offers complete master’s degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering and applied mathematics. Many graduate courses leading to the Ph.D. in civil engineering and electrical engineering are also offered.
For information regarding courses and requirements leading to the Master of Engineering, Master of Science, or to the Ph.D. degree, see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog and the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
Summer Courses
Summer term courses are planned for regular students who must clear deficiencies and for transfer students. Courses also are offered for high school graduates who wish to enter as freshmen and for those who need to remove subject deficiencies. For information about courses, students should write to the associate dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, UCD, for the Schedule of Summer Courses.
For many students there are several advantages in starting their college careers during the summer term. Some required freshman and sophomore courses are normally offered at UCD during the summer. Generally, the summer classes are smaller than regular academic-year classes, which means that students can get more individual attention. Beginning during the summer term gives students a head start and enables them to take a lighter load during the fall semester or take additional courses to enrich their program.
Scholarships, Fellowships, and Loan Funds
Money contributed to the University Development Foundation for assistance to engineering students is deposited in appropriate accounts and used according to the restrictions imposed by the donors. Numerous industries match employee contributions. A list of companies contributing to scholarships and fellowships and different loan funds available can be obtained from the associate dean’s office.
Student Organizations
The following honorary engineering societies have active student chapters in the College of Engineering and Applied Science:


58 / University of Colorado at Denver
Chi Epsilon, civil and architectural fraternity Eta Kappa Nu, electrical engineering society Tau Beta Pi, engineering society
Student chapters of the following professional societies are well established at UCD:
American Society of Civil Engineers Association for Computing Machinery Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
The following societies have chapters on the Boulder Campus; however, UCD students are eligible for membership:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics American Institute of Chemical Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Society of Women Engineers
These societies meet frequently to present papers, speakers, films, and other programs of technical interest. A general student organization, known as the Associated Engineering Students, of which all students in the College are members, has supervision of matters of interest to the whole group.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The prospective engineering student needs to be able to work hard, should enjoy mathematics, and should have a keen interest in science and its methods. Sound curiosity about the principles governing the behavior of forces and materials and the ability to visualize structures and machines are necessary prerequisites. The ability to express ideas in both written and spoken form is of primary importance.
In order to enroll, the student must meet the admission requirements of the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the admission requirements described in the General Information section of this bulletin. Students who have been out of high school for two or more years may petition the College for admission. Persons of sufficient maturity and experience who do not meet the prescribed requirements for admission may be admitted upon approval of the associate dean.
Beginning students in engineering should be prepared to start analytic geometry-calculus. No credit toward a degree will be given for algebra or trigonometry (courses will be offered to allow a student to make up deficiencies). Any student who questions the adequacy of his precollege background in mathematics should see the applied mathematics coordinator for suggestions. A placement test covering precalculus mathematics will be given, prior to registration, to assist new freshmen in selecting the appropriate beginning mathematics course.
To be prepared for the type of mathematics courses that will be taught, the student must be competent in the basic ideas and skills of ordinary algebra, geometry, and plane trigonometry. These include such topics as the fundamental operations with algebraic expressions, exponents and radicals, fractions, simple factoring, solution of linear and
quadratic equations, graphical representation, simple systems of equations, complex numbers, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and geometric progressions, logarithms, the trigonometric functions and their use in triangle solving and simple applications, and the standard theorems of geometry, including some solid geometry. It is estimated that it will usually take seven semesters to cover this material adequately in high school.
Freshmen
High School Subjects Required
Required for Admission' Units2
English (literature, composition, grammar) 4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra 2
Geometry 1
Additional mathematics 1
Natural sciences (physics and chemistry
recommended) 2
Social studies and humanities 3
(Foreign languages and additional units of English, history, and literature are included)
Electives3 3
Totals 16
Former Students
Former students must meet the requirements outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin. Records made at collegiate institutions while the student was a member of the armed forces will not necessarily be a determining factor in a student’s readmission to the University of Colorado, but all such records should be submitted. Students who have withdrawn must obtain permission of the associate dean to reenroll in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Students who interrupt their course of study may be required to take any preparatory courses which have been added during their absence or to repeat courses in which their preparation is thought to be weak.
Transfer Students
Students transferring from other accredited collegiate institutions may be considered for admission on an individual basis if they meet the requirements outlined in the General Information section of this bulletin and the freshman requirements for entering the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Transfer from within the University to the College of Engineering and Applied Science will be considered
'Applicants not meeting these requirements will be considered on an individual basis. A student who is not prepared should expect to make up deficiencies.
*A unit of work in high school is defined as a course covering a school year of not fewer than 36 weeks, with five periods of at least 40 minutes per week. (Two periods of manual training, domestic science, drawing, or laboratory work are equivalent to one period of classroom work.) This is equivalent to 180 actual periods per unit. Fractional credits of value less than one-half unit will not be accepted. Not less than one unit of work will be accepted in a foreign language, elementary algebra, geometry, physics, chemistry, or biology.
*Electives may be chosen from any of the high school subjects (except physical education) which are accepted by an accredited school for its diploma and which meet the standards as defined by the North Central Association. However, not more than two units will be considered from drawing, shop, or other vocational work; courses that have descriptive geometry features may be considered for elective units beyond the recommended units.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 59
if the student’s prior academic record fulfills the admission requirements of the College.
All transfer applications are subject to review by a faculty committee which evaluates the applicant’s qualifications for academic success in engineering subjects.
The College seeks to identify applicants having a high probability of successful completion of their academic programs. Admission is based on evaluation of many criteria; among the most important are general level of academic performance before admission to the College and other evidence of motivation and potential, and scholarly ability and accomplishment. These are indicated by trends in the student’s record, by letters of recommendation from teachers and others qualified to evaluate the student, by accomplishments outside academic work, and by other relevant evidence.
The Committee on Admissions will set detailed standards for admission annually and may consider applicants on an individual basis.
TRANSFER CREDIT
After a prospective transfer student has made application and submitted transcripts to the University of Colorado, the Office of Admissions and Records issues a Statement of Advanced Standing (currently Form 382) listing those courses that are acceptable by University standards for transfer. A copy of this statement is received by the associate dean’s office at the time the student is admitted by the Office of Admissions and Records and is made a part of the permanent record. The appropriate engineering faculty departmental representative will use this copy of the form to indicate which of those credits listed may be acceptable toward the 136-hour graduation requirement in the College of Engineering and Applied Science and note the tentative acceptance of these credits by dating and initialing each acceptable course listed on the Statement of Advanced Standing. The student will be notified that the acceptance is tentative and is contingent upon satisfactory completion of a minimum of 30 semester hours at the University of Colorado before the credits may be officially applied toward the degree requirements. It is the responsibility of the transfer student, after having completed the 30 semester credit hours at the University of Colorado, to request final validation of the credits by his department and to have this validation noted on the Statement of Advanced Standing kept in the associate dean’s office.
If at any time a student wishes to have a course not previously accepted considered again for transfer, the student should consult with the departmental transfer adviser and complete a petition to the associate dean through the department chairman. All transfer credit must be validated by satisfactory achievement in subsequent courses.
NONTRANSFERABLE CREDITS
Students desiring to transfer credits from engineering technology programs should note that such credits
are accepted only upon the submission of evidence that the work involved was fully equivalent to that offered in this College.
There are technology courses given with titles and textbooks identical to those of some engineering courses. These may still not be equivalent to engineering courses because of emphasis that is non-mathematical or otherwise divergent.
In order to assist engineering technology students with transfer problems, the following guidelines have been established:
Courses on basic subjects such as mathematics, physics, literature, or history may be acceptable for direct transfer of credit if they were taught as part of an accredited program for all students and were not specifically designated for technology students.
Students who have taken technology courses (courses with technology designations) that may be valid equivalents for engineering courses have these options:
1. They may petition faculty advisers to waive the course. The requirement for a course can be waived if students demonstrate that, by previous course work, individual study, or work experience they have acquired the background and training normally provided by the course. No credit is given toward graduation for a waived course, but strong students may benefit from the waiver by being able to include more advanced work later in their curriculum. Other students may profit by taking the course at this College instead and thus establish a fully sound basis for what follows.
2. Credit for a course may be given if the course work was done at an accredited institution of higher education. The University of Colorado department involved may recommend that credit be transferred to count toward the requirements for a related course in its curriculum. Credit cannot be given for vocational-technical or remedial courses under rules of the University. (See section on transfer of college-level credit in the General Information section of this bulletin.)
3. Students may seek credit for the course by examination.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Refer to the General Information section of this bulletin for descriptions of University-wide policies.
The following policies apply specifically to the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Advanced Placement
Advanced placement credit may be granted by special examination of the department involved or by College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) tests. Credit by examination is not given for correspondence courses. If the applicant has scored 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination, credit toward graduation may be awarded. Students who have scored 3 may be considered for advanced placement by the department concerned but do not recieve


60 / University of Colorado at Denver
credit for the courses skipped. All advanced placement and transfer credit must be validated by satisfactory achievement in subsequent courses, in accordance with standard transfer policies of the College.
Advanced placement credit for the freshman mathematics courses in calculus and differential equations will be limited to not more than 4 hours each. Equivalent mathematics courses from other colleges are usually accepted at full value.
Attendance Regulations
Successful work in the College of Engineering and Applied Science is dependent upon regular attendance in all classes. Students who are unavoidably absent should make arrangements with instructors to make up the work missed. Students who, for illness or other good reason, miss a final examination must notify the instructor or the associate dean’s office no later than the end of the day on which the examination is given. Failure to do so will result in an F in the course.
Changing Departments
Students who wish to change to another department within the College of Engineering and Applied Science must apply for transfer by petition, and this petition must have the approval of both departments concerned and of the associate dean.
College-Level Examination (CLEP) Credit
Prospective students may earn college-level credit through the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations, provided that they score at the 67th percentile or above. Departments will advise students of the credits accepted for such courses. The number of credits so earned must be within the limits of the number of elective hours of the individual department. A list of subjects in which CLEP examination credit will be accepted may be obtained from the College of Engineering and Applied Science office. The currently approved list includes 23 subjects in the fields of computing, business, science, mathematics, the humanities, and social sciences. (See also College-Level Examination Program in the General Information section of this bulletin.)
Counseling
Freshman students are counseled by the associate dean’s office and by representatives from each academic department. These representatives are readily available to assist students with academic, vocational, or personal concerns.
Students are assigned specific departmental advisers for academic planning and should consult with the departmental chairman or designated representative for assignment.
Course Load Policy
Full-time Students. Undergraduate students employed less than 10 hours per week should register for the regular work as outlined in the departmental curricula. Additional courses may be allowed when there is satisfactory evidence that these extra courses can be taken profitably and creditably. Permission to take more than 21 hours or fewer than 12 hours may be granted only after written petition to the associate dean. The petition must carry the approval of the departmental faculty adviser.
Employed Students. Suggested maximum course loads for undergraduate students employed 10 or more hours per week are as follows:
Employed 40 or more hours per week—two courses (maximum of 9 semester hours)
Employed 30 to 39 hours per week—three courses (maximum of 12 semester hours)
Employed 20 to 29 hours per week—four courses (maximum of 15 semester hours)
Employed 10 to 19 hours per week—five courses (maximum of 18 semester hours)
Freshman Year
Fundamentals taught in the freshman year are of prime importance in the more advanced classes, and every effort is made to register a beginning freshman in the proper courses. (Course requirements for freshmen are detailed within the curriculum given under each department.)
All freshmen are urged to consult their instructors whenever they need help in their assignments.
Repetition of Courses
A student may not register for credit in a course in which he already has received a grade of C or better. When a student takes a course for credit more than once, all grades are used in determining the grade-point average. An F grade in a required course necessitates a subsequent satisfactory completion of the course. Stuu‘ cr: may not register for credit in any course which . iey have previously enrolled in and completed for NC (no credit).
Work Experience
It is the policy of the College of Engineering and Applied Science that any credits accrued in the official records of the student that were awarded for work experience (or for Cooperative Education experience) will not apply as part of the 136 semester hours required for an engineering degree.
Policy on Academic Progress
The following is a statement of the Policy on Academic Progress in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
An overall average of 2.0 or better, in hours taken at the University of Colorado toward graduation requirements, is necessary to remain in good standing in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Grades earned at another institution are not used in


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 61
calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. However, grades earned in another school or college within the University of Colorado will be used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and progress toward the bachelor of science degree in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Students whose overall averages fall below 2.0 will be placed on probation for the next semester in which they are enrolled in the College and will be so notified. If, after that semester the student’s average is still below 2.0, the student will be suspended from the College.
The following is additional information and interpretation of the policy:
1. Students who have been suspended are suspended indefinitely and may not enroll at any University of Colorado campus during any regular academic year, September through May, but may enroll in summer sessions or Vacation College and/or may take correspondence courses for credit through the Division of Continuing Education.
2. Students who have been suspended may apply for readmission if they bring their overall average up to a 2.0 through summer session, Vacation College, and/or correspondence work applying to engineering degree requirements as approved by a member of the Academic Progress Committee.
3. A student, upon satisfactorily completing at another college or university a minimum of 12 semester hours of work appropriate to an engineering curriculum subsequent to suspension, may apply for readmission as a transfer student.
4. Applicants for readmission to the University of Colorado cannot be assured readmission.
5. During a probation semester the student must complete a normal load, i.e., 12 hours or more (for a full-time student) of courses counting toward graduation requirements. Physical education courses do not count; if the student has previously completed 6 hours of ROTC courses, ROTC courses do not count; if 24 hours of social-humanistic subjects have been completed, social-humanistic subjects do not count.
6. Students who have been on probation or suspension at any time in the past will automatically be suspended if their overall average again falls below a 2.0.
Details of the probationary and suspension status and of the conditions for return to good academic standing will be stipulated in the letters of probation and suspension. Information regarding these matters may be obtained in the Office of the Associate Dean, Room 402.
Grading System, Pass/Fall and Drop/Add Procedures
See the General Information section of this bulletin for the University of Colorado uniform grading system and for additional pass/fail information and drop/add procedures. Also see the current Schedule of Courses.
GRADING SYSTEM
It is particularly important to note that in the College of Engineering and Applied Science courses to be counted toward fulfilling the 136-hour graduation requirement cannot be taken no credit (NC). Once a course has been taken for no credit, the course cannot be repeated for credit.
PASS/FAIL
The primary purpose for offering courses on a pass/ fail grade basis is to encourage students, especially juniors and seniors, to broaden their educational experience by electing challenging courses without serious risk to their academic records. In general pass/fail should be limited to 300- or 400-level courses. Below are specific pass/fail regulations for the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
1. A maximum of 16 pass/fail hours may be included in a student’s total program. A maximum of 6 hours may be taken in one semester, but it is recommended that not more than one course at a time be taken pass/fail.
2. Courses that a student may elect to take pass/ fail shall be designated and approved in advance by the student’s major department. If courses not so designated are taken, the earned grade will be recorded in place of the P or F grade. An engineering student who has not designated a major field will not be allowed the pass/fail option without approval through the associate dean’s office.
3. A transfer student may count toward graduation 1 credit hour of pass/fail for each 9 credit hours completed in the College; however, the maximum number of pass/fail hours counting toward graduation shall not exceed 16, including courses taken in the Honors Program under that program’s pass/fail grading system.
4. Students on academic probation should not enroll for pass/fail courses.
DROP/ADD
Only under very extenuating circumstances will petitions for dropping courses be considered after the tenth week of the semester.
Sequence of Courses
Full-time students should complete the courses in the department in which they are registered according to the curriculum shown under their major department in this bulletin. (Part-time students may need to modify the order of courses with adviser approval.) Any course in which there is a failure or an unremoved incomplete should, upon the first recurrence of such course, take precedence over other courses; however, each student must be registered so that departmental requirements will be completed with the least possible delay.
Students who do not earn a grade of C or better in a course that is prerequisite to another may not register


62 / University of Colorado at Denver
for the succeeding course unless they have the permission of both the department and the instructor of the succeeding course.
Students may enroll for as much as 50 percent of their courses in work that is not a part of the prescribed curricula of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, provided they have at least a 2.0 grade average in all college work attempted. Exceptions to this policy may be made by petition and may be made for students taking the combined engineering-business program.
PLANNING AN ENGINEERING PROGRAM
It is the responsibility of students to be sure they have fulfilled all the requirements, to file the intended date of graduation in the departmental office at the close of the third year, to fill out a Diploma Card at registration at the beginning of the last semester, and to keep the departmental adviser and the associate dean’s office informed of any changes in the students’ plans throughout the last year.
In order to become eligible for one of the bachelor’s degrees in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a student, in addition to being in good standing in the University, must meet the following minimum requirements:
Courses. The satisfactory completion of the prescribed and elective work in any curriculum as determined by the appropriate department.
Hours. A minimum of 136 hours, of which the last 30 shall be earned after matriculation and admission as a degree student, is required for students in the four-year curricula; however, many students will need to present more than the minimum hours because of certain departmental requirements and because they may have enrolled in courses which do not carry full credit toward a degree. The hours required for students in the combined business and engineering program vary by departments; as a guide, 166 semester hours are considered a minimum, but most students follow programs that bring the total above this figure.
Grade Average. A minimum grade-point average of
2.0 (C) for all courses attempted. A department may require a minimum grade of C in all major courses.
Faculty Recommendation. The recommendation of the faculty of the department offering the degree and the recommendation of the faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Incompletes and Correspondence Courses. It is the student’s responsibility to insure that all incompletes and correspondence courses are officially completed before the tenth week of the student’s final semester in school.
Simultaneous Conferring of Degrees. For combined business and engineering students, the degree B.S. in business and the degree B.S. in engineering must be conferred at the same commencement.
Commencement Exercises. Commencement exercises usually are held in May and August. Students finishing in December may attend commencement the following May or receive diplomas by mail.
Graduation With Honors
Honors at graduation are conferred in recognition of high scholarship and professional attainments. Honors and special honors are recorded on diplomas and indicated on the commencement program.
Seniors with an average of 3.8 or above usually are graduated with special honors, and those with an average of 3.5 to 3.79 with honors. Grades earned during the semester of graduation will not be considered in the determination of honors.
Social-Humanistic Content of the Engineering Curriculum
The faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science requires that 24 semester hours should be considered the minimum of social-humanistic content of the degree-granting departments. (Up to 6 hours of English composition may be used to satisfy this requirement.)
A minimum of 6 hours of literature is required. Six hours of social-humanistic subjects should be taken in the junior year and 6 in the senior year. These subjects should be taken from the following categories, with not fewer than 6 hours from category 2 below.
1. Literature (including foreign literature either in the original or in translation).
2. Economics, sociology, political science, history, and anthropology.
3. Fine arts and music (critical or historical).
Such courses as public speaking, elementary foreign
languages, technical writing, accounting, contracts, and management should be considered as technical and should be submitted for technical electives where applicable with departmental approval.
Qualified students will be permitted to take appropriate honors courses as substitutes for social-humanistic courses.
English for Engineering
Communications skills are essential for every professional person and are particularly so for the engineer. Most engineering departments require one of the following series of courses. It is not mandatory but is preferable that the courses be taken sequentially as shown. These courses are intended to develop the student’s writing ability and to allow a close analysis of significant works of world literature in translation and in English originals.
The following combinations are recommended: (1) Engl. 258, 259, 260, 261; or (b) Engl. 258, 259, and the following two introductory courses: Engl. 120 (Introduction to Fiction), Engl. 130 (Introduction to Drama and Poetry). Students who achieve a B average in two of the following English courses (120, 130, 258, and 259) may take immediately thereafter any literature courses listed by the Department of English. No social-humanistic credit will be given for courses dealing with English as a foreign language. Students having questions about the English requirement should see their departmental adviser.


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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
In addition to the standard four year degree programs previously listed, the College is involved in the following programs.
Combined Business and Engineering Curricula
Undergraduates in the College of Engineering and Applied Science with career interests in administration may complete all of the requirements for both a B.S. degree in engineering and a B.S. degree in business by extending their study programs to five years, including one or two summer terms. The 48 semester credits required in the College of Business and Administration may be started in the second, third, or fourth year, depending upon the curricular plan for the particular field of engineering in which the student is enrolled.
It is also possible for qualified graduates (GPA: 2.75 or better) to complete the requirements for a master’s degree in business within one year after receiving the baccalaureate degree in engineering. Before deciding upon the business option, a student should carefully consider, in consultation with departmental advisers, the relative advantages of the combined B.S. business-engineering curricula, the degree program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the M.S. degree program in the student’s own engineering discipline.
Combined business and engineering programs are available for students in aerospace engineering sciences, applied mathematics, architectural engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, engineering physics, and mechanical engineering.
Students taking a combined undergraduate program are not required to submit formal application for admission to the College of Business. They are permitted to enroll in business courses on the basis of a program approved by an adviser in the College of Engineering and Applied Science and by an assigned adviser from the College of Business.
Requirements for both the undergraduate business and engineering degrees must be completed concurrently. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business. Not fewer than 30 semester credits in business courses must be earned to establish residency credit. Courses offered by the College of Business may be used in lieu of electives required for undergraduate engineering degrees, subject to the approval of the individual department.
The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows:
Courses Semester Hours
Econ. 201 and 202. Principles of Economics ................. 6
(Should be completed during the student’s sophomore year or junior year.)
Acct. 200. Introduction to Financial Accounting............. 3
B.Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer............ 3
Q.M. 201. Business Statistics ............................. 3
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing........................... 3
Fin. 305. Basic Finance.................................... 3
Pr. Mg. 300. Production and Operations Management.......... 3
Or. Mg. 330. Introduction to Management and
Organization ............................................ 3
B. Law 300. Business Law .................................... 3
B.Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B.Ad. 411.
Business and Society..................................... 3
B.Ad. 450. Business Policy (Cases and Concepts in
Business Policy) ........................................ 3
Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields: accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing, office administration, operations management, organizational behavior, or transportation management. All course work in the area of emphasis must be taken in the University of Colorado College of Business and
Administration............................................_12
Total 48
The student should note that for some courses, and for some areas of emphasis, there are prerequisites which must be met. Since some of the courses may be taken as engineering electives, it is possible to obtain the two degrees in as few as 166 semester hours; however, most students will require more.
Joint Engineering Degreee
A student may obtain two engineering degrees by meeting the requirements and obtaining the approval of both departments concerned. Thirty hours of elective or required subjects in addition to the largest minimum number required by either of the two departments must be completed.
Premedicine Option
A professional school in a field such as medicine requires a student to have a college education prior to pursuing its professional courses. In practically all cases, medical students are university graduates, although occasionally a student may enter medical school after three years of university training. A student can prepare for medical school either in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The desirability of obtaining an engineering education prior to undertaking a study of medicine is increasing continually, as medicine itself is evolving. A great deal of additional equipment, most of it electronic, is being developed to assist the medical practitioner in treatment of patients. Bioengineering, engineering systems analysis, probability, and communication theory are highly applicable to medical problems. Improved communication techniques also are allowing the storage and retrieval of information not previously available to the medical doctor. An advanced knowledge of basic mathematics and computing techniques, along with increased understanding of physical chemistry, are improving the scientific base upon which medical knowledge rests. It is therefore desirable that the medical practitioner and researcher in the future be well equipped with the tools which engineering can offer.
To provide at least a minimum of the necessary knowledge, the additional courses listed below are


64 / University of Colorado at Denver
prescribed and must be completed with superior grades. General overall requirements for entry into most medical schools are given. Students can meet these requirements by careful substitution of electives in the engineering curriculum. In some cases where additional hours may be required, interested students should consult with the engineering department chairman.
General chemistry (103-106)............ 2 sem. (8-10 sem. hrs.)
Organic chemistry (341, 342, 343, 344) . 2 sem. (8-10 sem. hrs.)
General biology (205-206) ................ 2 sem. (8 sem. hrs.)
English composition....................... 1 sem. (3 sem. hrs.)
To prepare for a career in medicine in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, it is strongly recommended that the student follow a full four-year college course (with the equivalent of at least 136 semester hours) and earn a B.S. degree. It would be possible for students who applied themselves with unusual vigor to prepare for medical school in three years. In such cases, a minimum of 15 semester hours should be devoted to a major field of learning, instead of the 30 hours required for the four-year student. This student, of course, will not receive a degree in the premedical field. The study and practice of medicine require persistent hard effort, and so should the premedical education.
The Admissions Committee of the University of Colorado School of Medicine welcomes inquiries and visits from prospective students, particularly at the time of their first interest in medicine as their chosen profession.
Students desiring to enter a premedical program should consult the representative of the department involved. At UCD, premedical advising is available through the Health Careers Advisory Committee, Room 232.
GRADUATE STUDY IN ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering and Applied Science at UCD offers complete M.S. degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics. Many graduate courses leading to the Ph.D. in civil engineering and electrical engineering also are offered.
For information regarding courses and requirements leading to the degrees Master of Engineering and Master of Science or to the Ph.D. degree, see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog and the Graduate School section of this bulletin.
Education for Employed Professional Engineers
Continuing education for employed engineers grows more important each year. Therefore, the College puts great emphasis upon making graduate courses available through night and televised courses. A new degree, the Master of Engineering, permits graduate students more flexibility in defining specialized interdisciplinary fields that meet their professional needs. This degree has standards fully equivalent to those of the Master of Science degree.
In addition to credit course work, the College works jointly with the Division of Continuing Education to offer noncredit courses of interest to practicing engineers.
Concurrent B.S. and M.S. Degree Program In Engineering
Students who plan to continue in the Graduate School after completing the requirements for the B.S. degree may apply for admission to the concurrent degree program through their department early in the second semester of their junior year (after completion of at least 84 semester hours). Requirements are the same as for the two degrees taken separately: 136 credit hours for the B.S. degree and 24 hours plus thesis (Plan I) or 30 credit hours (Plan II) for the M.S. degree. Social-humanistic requirements must be completed within the first 136 credit hours. A 3.0 grade-point average for all work attempted through the first six semesters (at least 96 credit hours) and written recommendations from at least two major-field faculty members are required.
The purpose of the concurrent degree program is to allow the student who qualifies for graduate study and expects to continue for an advanced degree to plan his graduate program from the beginning of the senior year rather than from the first year of graduate study. The student can then reach the degree of proficiency required to begin research at an earlier time, and can make better and fuller use of courses offered in alternate years.
Students will be assigned faculty advisers to help them develop the program best suited to their particular interests. Those in the program will be encouraged to pursue independent study on research problems or in areas of specialization where no formal courses are offered. A liberal substitution policy will be followed for courses normally required in the last year of the undergraduate curriculum. The program selected must be planned so that the student may qualify for the B.S. degree after completing the credit-hour requirements for the degree if the student so elects, or if the student’s grade-point average falls below the 3.0 required to remain in the program. In this case, all hours completed with a passing grade while in the program will count toward fulfilling the normal requirements for the B.S. degree. There will be no credit given toward a graduate degree for courses applied to the B.S. degree requirements; however, students are still eligible to apply for admission to the Graduate School under the rules set forth in the Graduate School section of this bulletin. Normally, however, the student will apply for admission to the Graduate School when at least 130 of the 136 credit hours required for the B.S. degree have been completed, and will be awarded the B.S. and M.S. degrees simultaneously upon meeting the requirements set forth for the concurrent degree program.
Graduate Work In Business
Undergraduates in engineering who intend to pursue graduate study in business may complete some of


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 65
the business background requirements as electives in their undergraduate programs. Seniors in engineering who have such intentions and appear likely to qualify for admission to graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the graduate fundamentals courses which are designed to provide qualified students with needed background preparation in business.
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING SCIENCES
The primary objective of the aerospace engineering sciences curriculum is to provide sound general training in subjects fundamental to the practice of and research in this branch of engineering sciences. The major part of the first three years is devoted to the study of mathematics, physics, mechanics, chemistry, and the humanities. The fourth year is devoted to the professional courses in the fields of physics of fluids (fluid dynamics); propulsion and energy conversion; flight dynamics, control, and guidance; space system analysis; materials and structural mechanics; space environment; and bioengineering.
Planning of graduate study for students having sufficient ability and interest should begin by the start of the junior year. Such a plan should consider the foreign language requirements of appropriate graduate schools, and an advanced mathematics program included in technical electives consisting of Math. 431-432 and Math. 481 or 443.
The minimum total number of semester hours for the B.S. degree is 136. Students who wish to combine the business and aerospace engineering sciences curricula are advised to consider obtaining the B.S. degree in aerospace and the M.S. degree in business rather than a combined B.S. degree. Business courses may not be substituted for technical electives in the aerospace curriculum.
TRANSFER TO BOULDER
The complete aerospace engineering sciences program is not available at UCD. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan on transferring to the University of Colorado at Boulder at the start of the junior year. Students should complete the required freshman and sophomore courses in mathematics and physics before transferring to the Boulder campus. The complete curriculum degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog.
Curriculum for B.S. (Aerospace Engineering Sciences)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical first two years of the program:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I.............. 3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design........................ 2
Engl. 258. Great Books I (see note 1) ................... 3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 2) ................. 3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing....................... 3
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modem Engineering
(or C.E. 130)....................................... 2
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ............. 3
Phys. 231. General Physics I ............................. 4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I.......................... 1
Engl. 259. Great Books II (see note 1).................... 3
Ch.E. 210. Physical and Chemical Properties of
Matter (see note 3) .................................. 4
Social-humanistic elective (see note 2) ................... 3
Total 18
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ID................3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ..........................3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I............................3
Engl. 260. Great Books HI (see note 1).................... 3
Phys. 233. General Physics II...............................4
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II........................ 1
Total 17
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations............... 3
C.E. 311. Analytical Mechanics II ......................... 3
Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1)......................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics.................................. 3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 2).................... 3
Approved physics elective.................................. 3
Total 18
Notes for B.S. (Aerospace Engineering)
1. For other options in English, see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin.
2. Students may take electives pass/fail, subject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
3. Chem. 103 may be substituted.
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
Charles I. Sherrill ID, Coordinator
The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers all courses in mathematics, both required and elective, for undergraduate and graduate students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Three curricula leading to the degree B.S. (A.Math.) are offered. In Option I, the student takes a minor in a specific engineering department, satisfying an adviser from that department. In Option II, the student takes distributed course work in engineering departments, including a solid grounding in mechanics, electronics, and materials. (This option is intended for the above-average student.) Option III is a joint mathematics-computer science program. Regardless of the option chosen, each student is expected to complete a minimum of 45 semester hours of course work in mathematics.
Modem industrial and scientific research is so dependent on advanced mathematical concepts that applied mathematicians are needed today by almost all concerns which are engaged in such research.


66 / University of Colorado at Denver
The undergraduate curriculum is designed to give training in mathematics and in engineering and science. The use of numerical methods and electronic computers is included.
Nontechnical electives should be broadening and have cultural value. Courses in the humanities and the social sciences are required. Students interested in research should take a foreign language as early as possible. Beginning language courses are considered technical electives and do not count toward the social-humanistic electives. Some 300- and 400-level language courses may be counted. Under all circumstances, a student must plan a complete program and obtain the approval of a departmental adviser at the beginning of the sophomore year.
The B.S. degree in applied mathematics requires the completion of a minimum of 136 credit hours of course work with an average grade of C or better (a 2.0 grade-point average) and a grade of C or better in all mathematics courses. Course work in the social-humanistic elective area must be approved by the student’s adviser.
Curriculum for B.S. (Applied Mathematics)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ............3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry............................5
Engl. 258. Great Books I (see note 1) ..................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing (or E.E. 210).......3
Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5)..................... 2
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ........... 3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design 1.....................2
Engl. 259. Great Books II (see note 1)..................3
Phys. 231. General Physics I ...........................4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I........................ 1
Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5)..................... 3
Total 16
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III.............3
Engl. 260. Great Books ID (see note 1)..................3
Phys. 233. General Physics II.............................4
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II .......................1
Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5)..................._^_6
Total 17
Spring Semester
Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1)....................3
Math. 300. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics...........3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra.........................3
Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5)................... 8
Total 17
Junior Year Fall Semester
Math. 431. Advanced Calculus I........................... 3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics................................ 3
Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5) .................... 12
Total 18
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations.................. 3
Math. 481. Introduction to Probability Theory................. 3
Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5) ...................._12
Total 18
Senior Year Fall Semester
Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5) ....................... 17
Spring Semester
Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5)..................... 17
Requirements under each option are as follows:
Option I Semester Hours
Specialty in a specific engineering department............. 18-30
Technical electives........................................ 15-22
Other electives............................................ 11-30
Required social-humanistic electives (see note 2)............ 12
(Electives should include Math. 432)
Option II
Distributed engineering courses in the
engineering college .................................. 22-30
(A minimal program would consist of the following courses: C.E. 212, C.E. 311, E.E. 213, E.E. 313, E.E. 314, M.E. 301, M.E. 383 or C.E. 331 or their equivalents.)
Technical electives ....................................... 15-22
Other electives............................................ 11-30
Required social-humanistic electives (see note 2)..............12
(Electives should include Math. 432.)
Option III
Specific courses required under Option III:
E.E. 257 ......................................................3
E.E. 455 ......................................................3
E.E. 401 (C.S. 401)..........................................3
E.E. 453 (C.S. 453)..........................................3
E.E. 459 (C.S. 459)..........................................3
E.E. 458 and E.E. 460 .......................................2
Math. 311 .....................................................3
Math. 465 .....................................................3
Math. 466 .....................................................3
Technical electives ....................................... 6-23
Other electives........................................... 11-30
Required social-humanistic electives (see note 2)............ 12
Notes for B.S. (Applied Mathematics)
1. For other options in English, see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin.
2. Students may take social-humanistic electives pass/fail, subject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
3. A minimum of 10 approved courses in mathematics beyond 140, 241, 242, 319 and 320 is required of all students majoring in applied mathematics.
4. Math. 101, 111, 112, and 113 do not count toward the B.S. (A. Math.) degree or any other B.S. degree in engineering.
5. In addition to E.E. 201, Engr. 101 and Engr. 301, the student must take a minimum of 18 hours of approved elective engineering courses excluding chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses. Furthermore, the student who does not have a strong interest in applications of mathematics to engineering is encouraged to consider a major in mathematics in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.


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ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
John R. Mays, Coordinator
The architectural engineering curriculum is administered at the Boulder Campus by the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering of the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the College of Environmental Design. Its purpose is to prepare a student for a career in the building industry and for graduate-level research on building-related topics. The building industry is the largest single industry in the United States and includes many diverse skills and fields of knowledge.
This course of study fulfills the academic requirements for registration as a professional engineer.
The architectural engineering curriculum is recommended for those wishing to specialize within the building industry in engineering design, construction and contracting, or sales engineering. The architectural engineering student may select any of three areas of specialization offered: construction engineering, environmental engineering, or structural engineering.
Specialization in construction is for students planning a career in contracting and building construction. This program involves courses in construction management, planning and scheduling techniques, cost accounting, estimating and pricing, building materials, and construction methods.
Students interested in environmental engineering may concentrate their efforts in the fields of illumination and electrical systems design, heating-ventilating-air conditioning systems design, sanitation and water supply, or acoustics. A broad range of courses covering these subjects is available.
The third area of specialization is for those interested in the design of structural systems for buildings. Courses available include structural analysis; indeterminate structures; and steel, concrete, and timber design.
The five-year course leading to the combined degree in architectural engineering and business offers opportunity to complement the architectural engineering background with study in one of the major areas of business administration, such as personal and business management, marketing, and finance.
TRANSFER TO BOULDER
Approximately one-half of the architectural engineering program is available at UCD under the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering. Students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus at the start of the junior year. Students should complete the required freshman and sophomore courses in mathematics and physics before transferring to the Boulder Campus. The complete curriculum and descriptions of courses may be found in the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog.
Curriculum for B.S. (Architectural Engineering)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical first two years of the program:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ...............3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design 1........................ 2
Literature elective (see note 1) ................'.........3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing........................3
C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil Engineering................2
Social-humanistic elective................................. 3
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ..............3
Literature elective (see note 1) ............................3
Engr. 102. Fundamentals of Design II........................ 2
Phys. 231. General Physics I ................................4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I........................... 1
Ch.E. 210. Chemical and Physical Properties of
Materials (see note 3)................................. 4
Total 17
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus IE.................3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra............................3
Phys. 233. General Physics E.................................4
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics E .......................... 1
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I.............................3
Specialty requirement (structures and construction majors) take
C.E. 221; environmental majors take Arch.E. 362.).......... 3
Total 17
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations.................3
Arch.E. 240. Building Materials and Construction.............3
C.E. 312. Mechanics of Materials.............................3
C.E. 314. Materials Testing Laboratory (not required of
environmental majors) ...................................2
Basic science elective (see note 2) .........................3
Social-humanistic elective................................. 3
Total 17
Notes for B.S. (Architectural Engineering)
1. Great Books series recommended; see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin.
2. Departmental approval required.
3. Chem. 103-5 may be substituted for Ch.E. 210-4, in which case the technical elective requirement is reduced by one credit hour.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Meeting the crisis in oil and energy, depolluting the water and air, producing new and better materials to replace those that are limited or scarce—these are jobs in which one will find the chemical engineer.
Chemical plants (including refineries and gasification plants) convert natural resources into industrial and consumer products. Among their products are many that often are not identified with chemical engineering—oils, metals, glass, plastic, rubber, paints, soaps and detergents, foods, beverages, synthetic and natural fibers, nuclear and exotic fuels, medicines, and many others.


68 / University of Colorado at Denver
The department, located at the Boulder Campus, is very much interested in research directed toward ecologically sound development of chemical processes. It is also working hard on energy problems and is stressing problems of energy conversion in its instructional program.
Many essentials of life originate in chemical engineering. Recycling of wastes and resources is not a new idea in chemical engineering but a long-standing principle. Since the earth now is perceived as a self-renewing system, intelligent generalization of the recycle theory to the entire cycle of natural resources is a challenge and opportunity for chemical engineers. Cleaning up pollution from chemical plants and from other sources is largely a chemical engineering problem. The chemical engineer efficiently uses and conserves natural resources to create valuable end products and to preserve environmental values.
Thus, chemical engineering continually changes and progresses. The Department of Chemical Engineering at the Boulder Campus therefore helps students to prepare to be immediately valuable to industry and eventually to lead future developments in industry and research. Whether they plan to go into industry or on to graduate work, students are urged to watch, understand, and enjoy the sparkle and interplay of new ideas and new technologies.
TRANSFER TO BOULDER
The complete chemical engineering program is not available at UCD. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the University of Colorado at Boulder at the start of their junior year. Students should complete the required freshman and sophomore courses in mathematics and physics before transferring to the Boulder Campus. The complete curriculum, degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog.
Curriculum for B.S. (Chemical Engineering)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical first two years of the program:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I................3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry ...............................5
Engl. 258. Great Books (see note 1)........................ 3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design 1.........................2
CH.E. 130. Introduction to Chemical Engineering
(see note 2) ........................................_^_2
Total 15
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ...............3
Chem. 106. General Chemistry................................5
Engl. 259. Great Books II (see note 1)......................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.........................3
Social-humanistic elective................................ 3
Total 17
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III.............3
Phys. 231. General Physics I .............................4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I.......................... 1
Engl. 260. Great Books III (see note 1)...................3
Chem. 341. Organic Chemistry................................3
Chem. 343. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I................. 1
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra .......................... 3
Total 18
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations............... 3
Phys. 233. General Physics II...............................4
Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1)....................3
Chem. 342. Organic Chemistry................................3
Chem. 344. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II................. 1
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II ....................... 1
Ch.E. 212. Chemical Engineering Material and
Energy Balances (see note 3) ........................_^_3
Total 18
Notes for B.S. (Chemical Engineering)
1. For other English options, see the English listings in the Course Descriptions section of this bulletin.
2. Or C.E. 130 or E.E. 130.
3. Students should arrange to take Ch.E. 212 concurrently in Boulder during the spring semester of their sophomore year.
CIVIL AND URBAN ENGINEERING
Ernest C. Harris, Chairman
Civil engineering is generally the broadest field of engineering studied in American universities today. Civil engineering offers an interesting and highly challenging career to the student interested in the design and construction of buildings, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures; in transportation systems including highways, canals, pipe lines, airports, rapid transit lines, railroads, and harbor facilities; in the transmission of water and control of rivers; in the development of water resources for urban use, industry, and land reclamation; in the control of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment; in the construction industry; and in general in the rapidly expanding problems concerned with man’s physical environment and the growth of cities. Furthermore, students educated in civil engineering frequently find rewarding employment in other fields: for example, in aerospace structures, electric power generation, city planning, the process industries, industrial engineering, business management and law or medicine (after appropriate education in law or medical school). The breadth of the civil and urban engineering undergraduate program provides an excellent educational background for many fields of endeavor.
The curriculum is designed to give the student a broad knowledge of the basic engineering sciences of chemistry, mathematics (including differential equations), physics, mechanics (including fluid mechanics and soil mechanics), electrical engineering, and thermodynamics. In addition, it includes a mininum of 24 semester hours in social-humanistic studies.


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 69
Specialized training is achieved through certain required courses, followed by advanced technical electives. Thoughtful selection of these electives is advised, the objective being to permit a graduate to enter the engineering profession with a firm groundwork in fundamental engineering science and sufficient knowledge in specialized fields to cope intelligently with the technical problems of present-day civil and urban engineering.
A five-year program has been arranged for students who wish to pursue the combined curriculum for the civil engineering and business degrees.
A student interested in a premedical option should consult with an adviser and the department chairman at the earliest possible time in order to make proper plans for an acceptable program. See Premedical Option.
Curriculum for B.S. (Civil Engineering)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical program is:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hows
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I................3
Literature elective (see note 1) ..........................3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing........................3
C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil Engineering................ 2
C.E. 221. Plane Surveying .................................. 3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design I........................... 2
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II................ 3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry (or Ch.E. 210) ............... 4-5
Literature elective (see note 1) .......................... 3
E. Phys. 231. General Physics I ............................ 4
E.Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I......................... 1
Total 15-16
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III................3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ...........................3
E.Phys. 233. General Physics II .............................4
E.Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II ........................1
Social-humanistic elective...................................3
C.E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I........................... 3
Total 17
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations.................3
Social-humanistic elective...................................3
Basic science elective.......................................3
C.E. 312. Mechanics of Materials.............................3
Technical elective...........................................3
C.E. 314. Materials testing laboratory..................... 2
Total 17
Junior Year Fall Semester
C.E. 311. Analytical Mechanics II ...........................3
C.E. 331. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics........................3
C.E. 350. Structural Analysis................................3
C.E. 380. Soils and Foundation Engineering...................3
C.E. 360. Transportation Engineering........................3
Social-humanistic elective................................ 3
Total 18
Spring Semester
C.E. 332. Applied Fluid Mechanics...........................3
C.E. 457. Design of Steel Structures........................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics...................................3
Engineering science elective (see note 3) ..................3
Technical elective..........................................3
Social-humanistic elective................................ 3
Total 18
Senior Year Fall Semester
Geol. 207. Physical Geology 1...............................4
C.E. 458. Reinforced Concrete Design........................3
Civil engineering elective (see note 2).....................3
Social-humanistic elective..................................3
Engineering science electives (see note 3)................ 4
Total 17
Spring Semester
C.E. 341. Sanitary Engineering..............................4
Civil engineering electives (see note 2) ...................6
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I................................4
Social-humanistic elective................................ 3
Total 17
Notes for B.S. (Civil Engineering)
1. Courses from Great Books series recommended: see the English listings in the Course Descriptions section of this bulletin.
2. Civil engineering electives shall be chosen to form an integrated program, subject to the approval of the department.
3. Engineering science electives shall be taken from the list of courses approved by the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering.
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
William D. Murray, Chairman
The professional possibilities in electrical engineering include teaching and research in a university; research and development of new electrical or electronic devices, instruments, or products; production and quality-control of electrical products for private industry or government; design or operations in the electrical power industry; and sales or management for a private firm or branch of government.
The electrical engineering course of study at UCD begins with principles of physics, chemistry, and mathematics. An early, intensive training in the theory and laboratory application of electrical circuits is followed by more fundamentals in electronics, electromagnetic and transmission theory, electrical machines and transformers, heat, and mechanics. Many students find an opportunity to put their knowledge to work with jobs in industry or research projects being conducted at the University. Throughout the entire course of study, they reinforce their understanding of the theory in well-equipped laboratories.
Students are encouraged to develop interests outside of their electrical engineering specialty, thus


70 / University of Colorado at Denver
providing themselves with a well-rounded background and a sense of awareness and responsibility for their later role in society. They are urged to attend meetings of their student professional society, where practicing engineers from many engineering specialties speak of their experiences.
The curriculum is arranged so that transfer students may join the program without appreciable loss of time or credit.
The areas of specialization that electrical engineering students may enter upon graduation are so numerous it is impossible for the undergraduate training to cover them in detail. Intense specialization may be left to possible additional training graduates may receive when they assume positions with industrial firms, or acquired by specialization in a research field through graduate work beyond the bachelor’s degree. Students who have earned a B average or better in their undergraduate work and who have elected courses in their senior year that strengthen particularly their mathematical background may decide to take additional graduate work. The curriculum in electrical engineering is designed to make it possible for the graduating senior with high scholarship to finish a master’s degree in electrical engineering in about one additional full year of work at any of the nation’s major universities.
Electrical Engineering Curriculum
In the electrical engineering curriculum the student has considerable freedom in the senior electives. The student may select these electives to provide a good foundation in several of the seven electrical engineering areas listed: communications, digital, electronics, fields, materials, power, and systems. Some of these electives may be courses in other branches of engineering or in other colleges. Those students primarily interested in taking courses in the digital or computer area may do so in this curriculum or in the joint electrical engineering and computer degree option discussed below.
Combined Business Option
Students wishing to take the combined engineering-business program should not start this program until their fourth year, with the exception of electing Econ. 201 and 202 for two of their social-humanistic electives. Students with a B average may wish to consider obtaining a master’s degree in business administration. For both of these programs, students should refer to the College of Engineering and Applied Science introductory section of this bulletin.
Premedical Option
A program has been developed which permits the student to satisfy the entrance requirements for medical school, such as those of the University of Colorado, while earning a B.S. in electrical engineering.
Medical schools typically require that applicants have completed two semesters of general chemistry,
two semesters of organic chemistry, and two semesters of general biology, all with laboratories. A course in English composition is recommended.
More specific information on medical school requirements may be obtained at the office of the Health Careers Advisory Committee at UCD.
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
The joint degree in electrical engineering and computer science is a comprehensive program covering both hardware and software aspects of computer system design. It is directed to students whose major interests are in the computer itself and in a broad range of applications. The program leads to a B.S. (E.E. and C.S.) and can be a base for further study toward either an M.S. in computer science or an M.S. in electrical engineering.
A student need not make a decision to enter this program until the second semester of the sophomore year. The details of the program are listed in the section following the electrical engineering curriculum. The purpose of the changes is to add to the mathematics background in such a way as to provide a basis for graduate work in computer-related fields and to permit inclusion of courses in scientific application of computers, logic structure of computers, and assembly language programming. The student also will obtain actual operating experience with the departmental computers. Should students leave the program in favor of returning to the electrical engineering curriculum, they will need to satisfy the departmental requirements of mechanics and E.E. 354, which have been waived in the electrical engineering computer option curriculum.
Curriculum for B.S. (Electrical Engineering)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical program is:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .............. 3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry (see note 3).................5
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modem
Electrical Engineering.................................2
E.E. 210. Fundamentals of Computing........................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1).................... 3
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ............. 3
Phys. 231. General Physics I (see note 2).................4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I (see note 2) ........... 1
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design 1........................2
E.E. 257. Logic Circuits ...................................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1).................... 3
Total 16
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus in...............3
Phys. 233. General Physics II (see note 2).................4


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 71
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II ......................... 1
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I................................ 4
E.E. 253. Circuits Laboratory I............................. 1
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ...................... 3
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations................3
C.E. 313. Applied Mechanics (see note 4) ...................3
E.E. 214. Circuit Analysis II ..............................4
E.E. 254. Circuits Laboratory II............................ 1
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra............................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1)....................... 3
Total 17
Junior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I..........................3
E.E. 321. Electronics I.....................................3
E.E. 361. Electronics Laboratory I......................... 2
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics....................................3
E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability Theory .................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ..................... 3
Total 17
Spring Semester
E.E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields II.........................3
E.E. 322. Electronics II....................................3
E.E. 316. Energy Conversion 1...............................3
E.E. 331. Linear System Theory..............................3
E.E. 362. Electronics Laboratory I......................... 2
Electives (see note 5)....................................... 4
Total 18
Senior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 354. Power Laboratory I .................................2
Electives (see note 5)..................................... 10
Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) .................... 6
Total 18
Spring Semester
Eelctives (see note 5)..................................... 15
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1)...................... 3
Total 18
Notes for B.S. (Electrical Engineering)
Students should refer to the section on Academic Policies of the College of Engineering and Applied Science in this bulletin. In addition to planning for sequences of courses based on prerequisites, students should plan to complete sophomore level courses before taking junior level courses and should have completed their junior level E.E. courses before starting their 400-level electives.
1. Of the 24 hours of required social-humanistic electives, a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in literature and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area.
2. New physics sequence beginning spring 1978.
3. Or Ch.E. 210.
4. The mechanics requirement may be satisfied by the 3-hour course, C.E. 313, or the 6-hour sequences of either C.E. 212 and C.E. 311, or E.Phys. 221 and E.Phys. 332. Students who first take E.E. 313 may, with permission, take only C.E. 311.
5. The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation. Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering, mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his undergraduate adviser.
Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas: communications (C), digital (D), electronics (E), fields (F), materials (M), power (P), and systems (S). Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies, every student’s program must include 9 semester hours of electrical engineering theory courses in at least three areas and a minimum of three laboratory courses in three areas. These distribution requirements could be met through E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3) only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400 (1 to 3) and E.E. 500 (1 to 3) may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements.
A 3-hour upper division course in physics must be included among the technical electives.
The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work should take additional mathematics. Some preliminary consulting with a department graduate adviser is desirable.
Curriculum for B.S. In Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical program is:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ..............3
Chem. 103. General Chemistry (see note 3).................5
E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modern
Electrical Engineering.................................2
E.E. 210. Fundamentals of Computing.......................3
Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) ................... 3
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............3
Phys. 231. General Physics I (see note 2).................4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I (see note 2) ........... 1
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design I....................... 2
E.E. 257. Logic Circuits ..................................3
Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) ................ 3
Total 16
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III..............3
Phys. 233. General Physics II (see note 2) ...............4
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II (see note 2)........... 1
E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I...............................4
E.E. 253. Circuits Laboratory I........................... 1
Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) ..............._;_3
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 300. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics (see note 4) 3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........................3
E.E. 214. Circuit Analysis II ............................4
E.E. 254. Circuits Laboratory II.......................... 1
E.E. 453. Assembly Language Programming....................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ................. 3
Total 17
Junior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I........................3
E.E. 321. Electronics 1...................................3
E.E. 361. Electronics Laboratory I....................... 2
E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability ....................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics...........................•.....3


72 / University of Colorado at Denver
E.E. 458. Logic Laboratory.................................. 1
E.E. 401. Survey of Programming Languages.................. 3
Total 18
Spring Semester
E.E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields II......................... 3
E.E. 322. Electronics II.....................................3
E.E. 362. Electronics Laboratory II .........................2
E.E. 316. Energy Conversion 1................................3
E.E. 331. Linear System Theory...............................3
Social-humanistic elective (See note 1)....................^_3
Total 17
Senior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 422. Electronics III ...................................3
E.E. 459. Computer Organization..............................3
Math. 465. Numerical Analysis (see note 6) ..................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) .....................3
Electives (see note 5)..................................... 6
Total 18
Spring Semester
E.E. 460. Computer Laboratory .............................. 1
E.E. 559. Advanced Computer Architecture
(recommended, not required) ............................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) .....................6
Electives (see note 5)...................................._^_8
Total 18
Notes for B.S. In Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Students should refer to the section on Academic Policies of the College of Engineering and Applied Science in this bulletin. In planning their programs, students should consider prerequisite and corequisite requirements of courses and should plan to complete courses at the junior level before taking senior electives.
1. Of the 24 hours of social-humanistic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in literature and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area.
2. New physics sequence beginning spring 1978.
3. Or Ch.E. 210.
4. Or equivalent mathematics substitution with approval of adviser.
5. The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation. Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering, mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his undergraduate adviser.
Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas: communication (C), digital (D), electronics (E), fields (F), materials (M), power (P), and systems (S). Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies, every student’s program must include at least 9 semester hours of electrical engineering theory courses in at least three areas and a minimum of three laboratory courses in three areas. These distribution requirements could be met through E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3), shown in each area, only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 (1 to 3) may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements.
A 3-hour upper division course in physics must be included among the electives.
The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work should take additional mathematics. Some preliminary consulting with a departmental graduate adviser is desirable.
6. E.E. 455, Computer Techniques in Engineering, may be substituted.
ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION
Starting in the fall of 1978, the Engineering Design and Economic Evaluation program was merged with the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The E.D.E.E. degree will not be offered to new students. However, courses in design and economic evaluation have been retained and are administered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
William R. Simmons, Coordinator
The engineering physics curriculum gives students a thorough foundation in the physical principles underlying most of engineering. The large number of engineering electives which may be incorporated in the curriculum makes it possible for the student to prepare himself for professional work or graduate school in a wide variety of fields. Because the program is particularly flexible, the student should be aware that proper preparation for his professional field will require careful selection of his engineering electives. The student is urged to prepare, in consultation with the departmental coordinator, a coherent plan of courses to meet his professional objectives.
During the freshman and sophomore years, the student must attain a thorough training in mathematics and a grounding in fundamental methods and principles of the physical sciences.
During the junior and senior years the work in physics is amplified to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the various branches of physics such as nuclear physics, atomic physics, electronics, thermodynamics, mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. Individual initiative and resourcefulness are stressed. For purposes of federal Civil Service requirements this degree is an engineering degree from an accredited College of Engineering. Students who plan to become registered professional engineers should check the requirements for registration in their state before choosing their engineering electives.
It is recommended that students preparing for Graduate School also prepare for its foreign language requirement as part of their undergraduate curriculum.
At present, the Bachelor of Science degree in engineering physics is awarded on the Boulder Campus only; therefore, in order to earn a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from the Department of Physics and Astrophysics a student must, in addition to any other requirements, successfully complete 30 semester hours of courses on the Boulder Campus, including 12 semester hours in upper division physics courses.
Applied Physics Option
It is also possible to earn the degree Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics) with an applied physics option. This option differs from the regular engineering physics degree primarily in that fewer advanced theoretical physics courses are required and in


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 73
their place a selection of applied science courses is required. This option should not be selected by students intending to pursue graduate study in physics, but it is appropriate for students intending to pursue graduate work or employment in related fields such as geophysics, environmental science, oceanography, nuclear engineering, medicine, and law. Students intending to pursue this option should consult the coordinator by the beginning of their junior year regarding the electives which they wish to propose. The 24 hours of electives in pure or applied natural science must be approved by the engineering physics advising committee, which is located on the Boulder Campus. The committee will consider the proposed courses relative to the student’s stated educational and/or professional objectives. At least 30 semester hours of credit must be earned after the student’s proposed program is approved.
Curriculum for B.S. (Engineering Phyelce)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. Approved ROTC courses may be substituted for a maximum of 6 hours of electives. A typical program is:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ............... 3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design 1........................2
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1).................... 6
E.Phys. 111. General Physics (see note 8) ................... 4
Total 15
Spring Semester
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............. 3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1)....................3
E.Phys. 112. General Physics (see note 8) ................. 4
E.Phys. 114. Experimental Physics (see note 8)............. 1
C.S. 210. Fundamentals of Computing.........................3
Elective (see note 2)..................................... 3
Total 17
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III..............3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ....................3
E.Phys. 213. General Physics (see note 8) .................3
E.Phys. 215. Experimental Physics (see note 8).............1
Elective (see note 2).......................................3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ......................._^_3
Total 16
Spring Semester
Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations............... 3
Chem. 202. General Chemistry (see note 3)...................4
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ....................3
E.Phys. 214. Introductory Modern Physics (see note 8)......3
Elective (see note 2).....................................^_5
Total 18
Junior Year
Fall Semester
Upper division mathematics elective......................3
E.Phys. 317. Junior Laboratory........................... 2
E.Phys. 321. Classical Mechanics and Relativity.............4
E.Phys. 331. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism .......3
Elective (see note 2).........................................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ....................... 3
Total 18
Spring Semester
E.Phys. 318. Junior Laboratory................................2
E.Phys. 322. Classical Mechanics, Relativity, and
Quantum Mechanics....................................... 3
E.Phys. 332. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism .......3
E.Phys. 341. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.......3
Chem. 453. Physical Chemistry (see note 4) .................3
Chem. 454. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (see note 4) ........ 2
Total 16
Senior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 403. Electronics (see note 6)........................... 2
E.E. 443. Electronics Laboratory (see note 6)................ 1
E.Phys. 491. Atomic and Nuclear Physics.......................3
E.Phys. 495. Senior Laboratory............................... 2
Elective (see note 2).........................................7
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) .................... 3
Total 18
Spring Semester
E.Phys. 492. Atomic and Nuclear Physics...................... 3
Phys. 496. Senior Laboratory (see note 5) ................... 2
Elective (see note 2)....................................... 10
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ..................... 3
Total 18
Curriculum for B.S. (E.Phyelce)—
Applied Phyelce Option
The first five semesters are identical to the regular engineering physics curriculum listed above. The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. Approved ROTC courses may be substituted for a maximum of 6 hours of electives.
Junior Year
Spring Semester Semester Hours
E.Phys. 322. Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics ... 3
E.Phys. 332. Principles of Electricity and Magnetism .........3
Upper division thermodynamics elective........................3
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ......................3
Electives (see note 7)...................................... 4
Total 16
Senior Year Fall Semester
E.E. 403. Elements of Electronics (see note 6)............... 2
E.E. 443. Elements of Electronics Laboratory (see note 6) ... 1
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ..................... 3
Electives (see note 7)......................................_12
Total 18
Spring Semester
Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ..................... 3
Electives (see note 7)...................................... 15
Total 18
Notes for B.S. (Engineering Phyelce)
1. A total of 24 hours of social-humanistic electives is required. These must include 6 hours of literature and 6 hours selected from


74 / University of Colorado at Denver
economics, sociology, political science, history, and anthropology. The other 12 hours must be selected from the above subjects and/or fine arts and music (critical or historical only,), philosophy, and psychology.
2. Required and elective engineering courses (excluding mathematics and physics) must total 22 semester hours,
3. Chem. 202 is offered only at the Boulder Campus. UCD students may substitute Chem. 103 and 106 for Chem. 202.
4. Chem. 453 and 454 are offered only at the Boulder Campus. One semester of any upper division chemistry course with associated laboratory may be substituted for physical chemistry.
5. Or Phys. 455, or approved 3-hour physics elective.
6. E.E. 403 and 453 are offered only at the Boulder Campus. UCD students may substitute E.E. 321 and 361.
7. The elective courses are divided into three exclusive groups: (1) Physics electives. These must be five hours from among Phys. 318, 341, 361, 365, 366, 367, 446, 451, 455, 461, 462, 491, 492, 495, 496, 500, 501, 503, 504, and 580. (2) Applied natural science electives (24 semester hours, minimum). These must include 4 hours of upper-division laboratory courses and sufficient engineering courses so that the total of engineering courses (excluding mathematics and physics) is at least 22 semester hours. (3) Other courses.
8. See the E.Phys. coordinator.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Ralph C. Koeller, Coordinator
Mechanical engineering is perhaps the broadest in scope of all the engineering fields. It is not identified with or restricted to a particular technology, vehicle, device, or system; rather, it is concerned with all such subjects, both individually and collectively.
In an era when technology is changing rapidly, the education of an engineer must provide a base for working in fields which may now not exist. The objective of the undergraduate program in mechanical engineering is to give the student a broad intellectual horizon and such habits and skills of study that learning new science as it appears and taking the initiative in applying it will be second nature.
There can be only one firm foundation for the student preparing for a career in mechanical engineering: mathematics, physics, and chemistry are the basic ingredients. Also essential is mastery of such engineering sciences as solid and fluid mechanics; thermodynamics, and heat and mass transport; materials, and systems analysis and controls. Along with the study of these fundamentals, the engineer must experience the ways in which scientific knowledge can be put to use in the development and design of useful devices and processes.
The mechanical engineering program may be roughly subdivided into two-year groupings. In the first two years, the program emphasizes the fundamentals of those engineering sciences that are essential for an understanding of most branches of professional engineering. For the final two years, the department, in recognition of the extremely broad and varied demands which the advances of modem technology have imposed on the mechanical engineer, provides two plans, A and B, for the curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering. The plans are designed to accomodate the professional objectives of the individual student.
Plan A specifies a typical mechanical engineering curriculum and is intended for those students who
wish to obtain a broad, general education in mechanical engineering without an emphasis on any of the specific professional aspects.
Plan B is designed for students who know what they intend to do upon graduation. This option allows the student to pursue any course plan that meets a valid professional objective and has been approved by the advisory committee. Under Plan B, the specific requirements of the program are determined after a detailed conference with an appropriate departmental adviser. In the course of this conference, the professional objectives of the individual student are studied in detail, and a specific plan (with a minimum of 136 credit hours) is designed to meet these objectives. With liberal use of courses throughout the University, the following may be considered typical among the professional concentrations which can be achieved:
Thermodynamics Heat transfer Fluid mechanics Solid mechanics Electromechanical systems
Design
Power
Dynamics and controls Materials science Thermomechanical systems
All of the required courses for mechanical engineering plan A are offered at UCD. Plans are to expand the number of elective courses for plans A and B in the near future. Students should work closely with their mechanical engineering adviser as they may have to complete some courses in Boulder depending upon their study plan and the phasing in of the complete program at UCD.
Curriculum for B.S.
(Mechanical Engineering)
The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical program is:
Freshman Year
Fall Semester Semester Hours
Engl. 258. Great Books (see note 1)........................3
M.E. 130. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering...........2
Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ............... 3
E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing.........................3
Social-humanistic electives............................... 6
Total 17
Spring Semester
Engl. 259. Great Books II (see note 1).....................3
Phys. 231. General Physics I .............................. 4
Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I.......................... 1
Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............. 3
Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design 1........................ 2
Social-humanistic elective................................ 3
Total 16
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
M.E. 281. Mechanics I (see note 2)......................... 3
Engl. 260. Great Books III (see note 1).................... 3
Phys. 233. General Physics II...............................4
Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II ........................ 1
Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus III...............3
Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........................ 3
Total 17


College of Engineering and Applied Science / 75
Spring Semester
M.E. 282. Mechanics II (see note 2) ................3
Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1)....................3
Approved physics elective.................................3
wh.. 2- Elementary Differential Equations ................3
Engr. 301. Thermodynamics.............................. 3
Total 15
Junior Year Fall Semester
M.E. 312. Thermodynamics II..............................3
M.E. 314. Measurements I.................................2
M.E. 362. Heat Transfer................................ 3
M.E. 371. Systems Analysis I (see note 3)................3
M.E. 383. Mechanics III..................................3
Chem. 202. General Chemistry ...........................^_4
Total 18
Spring Semester
M.E. 301. Introduction to Materials Science I ...........3
M.E. 316. Measurements II .............................. 2
M.E. 372. Systems Analysis II (see note 3)...............3
M.E. 384. Mechanics IV...................................3
M.E. 385. Mechanics V....................................3
Technical elective...................................... 3
Total 17
Senior Year Fall Semester
M.E. 442. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory..................3
M.E. 414. Mechanical Engineering Design ....
M.E. 401. Introduction to Materials Science II
Technical elective...........................
Free elective................................
Total 18
Spring Semester
Social-humanistic elective.................................. 3
Technical electives ....................................... 15
Total 18
Notes for B.S. (Mechanical Engineering)
1. Or other English options; see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin.
2. M.E. 281 and M.E. 282 are offered only on the Boulder Campus. UCD students may substitute C.E. 212 and C.E. 311 for M.E. 281 and M.E. 282.
3. M.E. 371 and M.E. 372 are offered only on the Boulder Campus. UCD students may substitute E.E. 213 and E.E. 331 for M.E. 371 and M.E. 372.
CO CO CO I


College of Environmental Design
Dwayne C. Nuzum, Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Designers and planners of the physical environment have moved in recent years into expanded roles and responsibilities. Changes in breadth of concern and scope of service have brought the architect, the landscape architect, the urban and regional planner, the technologist in environmental systems, and the interior designer closer together. All are being asked to make decisions from more alternatives which have longer lasting effects. Lines of demarcation among these professions are being minimized and interdependence among them is increasing.
These requirements necessitate a broader base of educational experience, including not only a background for design technique, but also an increased association with an understanding of the physical and social sciences. The social and economic determinants to contemporary life, the complexities of urban and regional interdependence and the allied problems of transportation, growth and population, the effect of business and governmental activity, rapid technological advances — all require of the environmental designer a broad base if he or she is to meet present needs and anticipate and guide the future.
Preparation for professional service in these fields is partially through the academic process. Accordingly, in August 1969, by action of the Board of Regents, the University of Colorado was authorized to expand its offerings and change the designation of the School of Architecture to the College of Environmental Design. The change included phasing out the five-year undergraduate architecture curriculum and replacing it with a four-year undergraduate degree in environmental design. A series of graduate programs in architecture, urban design, interior design, landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning have been initiated and are fully operational.
Full professional status in most environmental design fields requires a minimum of five or six years of academic experience and two or three years of practical experience followed by state registration or licensing through a professional examination.
Qualifications for success in these careers are not easily measured. Candidates for this profession must have the ability to complete successfully an academic program ranging from fundamental humanistic and
scientific courses through applied technical activity to full creative development. They should have a background of secondary education that includes courses in mathematics and physics. Some experience in creative activity may aid them in predetermining their personal satisfaction from the creative process.
UCD Program
The College of Environmental Design at UCD offers five graduate programs: the Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban Design, Master of Interior Design—Interior Architecture and Space Planning, Master of Landscape Architecture, and the Master of Urban and Regional Planning-Community Development. See information following. Other undergraduate programs are available only through the University of Colorado at Boulder, and students should see the catalog for that campus.
Financial Aid
Graduate scholarships and fellowships are available to continuing students only, with the exception of Colorado Grants. A limited number of Colorado Grants are available to new students who are residents of the State of Colorado and who fulfill the University’s criteria for financial need. Forms to apply for State of Colorado Graduate Grants, Federal Work-Study assistance, and Federal National Direct Student Loans (NDSL), are available through the College of Environmental Design, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
The Division of Architecture offers three degree programs, all of which lead to the Master of Architecture. The three programs are named by typical time-in-residence: three-year, two-year, and one-year programs. The three- and two-year programs lead to the first professional degree for architectural practice; the one-year program leads to a second professional degree.
The one-year program is open only to applicants already holding the first professional degree in architecture (generally the bachelor’s, occasionally the master’s). Individually organized studies are focused on the student’s interests in architecture or in architecture with an urban design specialization.


College of Environmental Design / 77
The two-year program is open to holders of the Bachelor of Environmental Design or Architectural Studies degree and is arranged to receive graduates of the Division of Environmental Design at Boulder or similar undergraduate studies at other schools.
The three-year program is open to holders of the bachelor’s degree in all other fields.
Curriculum
The Division of Architecture is a professional school; its role and purpose is the education of men and women who wish to design buildings. The division provides studies in architectural design, graphic communications, history and theory, technology, and professional practice for this purpose.
Architectural design is the central activity of the several programs and the design studio serves to integrate architectural learning from all course work in the supportive arts and sciences. Most studies are conducted on the case study method; skill in the definition and the solution of design problems is acquired through the analysis and the working of exercises which simulate actual building problems. Advanced studio options are available with projects in the Community Center for Development and Design. The design thesis is the culmination of architectural studies.
Communications courses provide the graphic skills necessary to present design ideas. History and theory courses anchor the student’s work in social responsibility, and in an understanding of the forces that give shape to buildings and cities. Technology courses give basics in structures, and in the environmental concerns of utilities, heating, lighting, and acoustics. Professional courses provide exposure to the workings of contemporary practice, and an internship in a practicing professional’s office is a course option in the final year.
The goal of all of these studies is competency for the graduates of the division as intelligent, knowledgeable, and creative designers, each at the threshold of entry to architectural careers in private practice, government, or industry.
Admission Requirements
APPLICATION
The complete set of materials for application for the Master of Architecture programs include the application form, college transcripts, three recommendations, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work. To be considered for admission, the complete set of application materials must be received by March 15 preceding the fall semester of entry. The portfolio must be no larger than 14 inches by 17 inches. The application form and additional information may be obtained by writing to the Director of Architecture, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
Applicants must hold a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, or Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited four-year college or university to be accepted
into the three-year Master of Architecture program. A four-year degree in architecture or environmental design from an accredited college or university is required for acceptance into the two-year program. A Bachelor or Master of Architecture degree from an accredited architecture program is required for acceptance into the one-year master’s program. A student in the fourth year of the University of Colorado architectural engineering program may enter the first year of the three-year program with qualification based upon the course work taken previously and upon academic performance. However, a student in this program must still apply and be accepted into the Master of Architecture program and must have completed all requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in architectural engineering before entry into the second year of the program.
ADMISSION
An Admissions Committee will review the application materials and select students to be admitted to programs. Applicants will be notified that they have been accepted, are on a waiting list, or have not been accepted, prior to May 1.
The recommended minimum grade-point average is 2.75 on a 4-point scale. If the student’s grade-point average is below 2.75, the Graduate Record Examination is recommended as part of the application materials. The student, however, will be evaluated for admission on the basis of all the application materials and not the grade-point average alone.
One-Year Program
The one-year program is available only to students already holding the first professional degree, the Bachelor or Master of Architecture. The Master of Architecture or Master of Architecture in Urban Design is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester hours of courses and special projects arranged for the particular candidate’s program. The candidate and the adviser mutually develop the course of study through selection of offerings in the College of Environmental Design and other divisions of the University. The program is primarily research oriented, and students are allowed to pursue independently an area of their choice related to architecture.
One-Year Program
Course Requirements Semester Hours
Arch. 710-711. Research design thesis .................... 14
Elective course work program .............................. 18
Total 32
One-Year Program Order Of Studies
Fall Semester
Arch. 710. Research design thesis.......................... 7
Elective course work program .............................. 9
Total 16


78 / University of Colorado at Denver
Spring Semester
Arch. 711. Research design thesis.......................... 7
Elective course work program .............................. 9
Total 16
Total semester hours required..............................32
The research/design project for thesis must be approved by the Thesis Committee before the student enters the program. The student is asked to submit a statement describing the proposed project with the application. The project may be individual or collaborative, theoretical or real.
Two-Year Program
The two-year program is open to the student with a four-year Bachelor of Environmental Design or Architectural Studies degree who seeks the first professional degree in architecture. The program is a two-year, 64-semester-hour series of studies leading to the Master of Architecture degree.
Students in the third or fourth year of the University of Colorado Environmental Design degree program who intend to pursue the Master of Architecture should take Structures (Arch. 452 and 453), Environmental Systems (Arch. 450), Materials and Methods of Construction (Arch. 451), Architectural History (Arch. 470 and 471), and Architectural Graphics (Arch. 410 and 411), and a minimum of six semesters of Design (including Arch. 400 and 401). Students who have not completed these courses previous to entry will be asked to complete them while in the program. Students from other four-year design programs must have taken two semesters of architectural history, two semesters of basic structures (statics, strength of materials) and must show, with the portfolio, a graphics ability equivalent to the two-semester course in architectural graphics. Required courses in the two-year program that have been taken by the student in prior studies may be waived if the grade received is B or above. The Master of Architecture is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 64 semester hours and all required courses.
Two-Year Program Course Requirements Semester Hours
Architectural design....................................... 24
Technologies............................................... 15
Theory and practice .,...................................... 3
Professional practice and construction documents............ 4
Planning and Landscape Architecture electives .............. 6
Electives1................................................._12
64
Two-Year Program Recommended Order Of Studies
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
Arch. 600. Design .......................................... 5
Arch. 680. Theory and Practice...............................3
Arch. 650. Heating and Plumbing ............................ 3
Arch. 652. Timber and Structures ........................... 2
Arch. 653. Steel Structures................................. 2
Elective1.................................................. 2
17
Spring Semester, First Year
Arch. 610. Design ..............................................5
Arch. 651. Illumination and Acoustics.......................... 3
Arch. 654. Concrete Structures .................................2
Arch. 660. Professional Practice and
Construction Documents ....................................4
Elective1..................................................... 2
16
Fall Semester, Second Year
Arch. 700. Design ............................................5
Arch. 712. Thesis Preparation ................................2
Arch. 760. Internship (optional) .............................3
Electives1..................................................._;_6
16
Spring Semester, Second Year
Arch. 701. Design Thesis..................................... 7
Arch. 761. Internship (optional) .............................3
Arch. 750. Systems Synthesis .................................3
Elective1...................................................._2
15
Total semester hours required..................................64
Threo-Yoar Program
The three-year program is open to students with a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, with a particular program prerequisite of one year of high school or college physics, one semester of college algebra and trigonometry, and one semester of calculus. The mathematics and physics requirement must be completed before entering the program. The Master of Architecture is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 96 semester hours and all required courses.
Three-Year Course Requirements Semester Hours
Architectural design........................................34
Technologies................................................27
History/philosophy ......................................... 6
Graphic communications...................................... 6
Theory and practice......................................... 3
Professional practice and construction
documents .............................................. 4
Planning and Landscape Architecture
electives .............................................. 6
Electives1................................................._10
96
Three-Year Program Recommended Order Of Studies
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
Arch. 500. Design .......................................... 5
Arch. 510. Graphic communications I......................... 3
Arch. 551. Materials and methods of
construction............................................ 3
Arch. 552. Structures I .................................... 3
Arch. 570. History/philosophy I............................. 3
17
Spring Semester, First Year
Arch. 501. Design .......................................... 5
Arch. 511. Graphic communications II ....................... 3
'Elective courses may he taken from additional architecture or College course offerings, or from other divisions at the University of Colorado. A minimum of three semester hours must he acquired each from the Landscape Architecture and the Urban and Regional Planning curriculums.


College of Environmental Design / 79
Arch. 550. Environmental systems.............................. 3
Arch. 553. Structures II...................................... 3
Arch. 571. History/philosophy II.............................. 3
17
Fall Semester, Second Year
Arch. 600. Design ............................................ 5
Arch. 680. Theory and practice................................ 3
Arch. 650. Heating and plumbing............................... 3
Arch. 652. Timber structures.................................. 2
Arch. 653. Steel structures .................................. 2
15
Spring Semester, Second Year
Arch. 601. Design ............................................ 5
Arch. 651. Illumination and acoustics......................... 3
Arch. 654. Concrete structures................................ 2
Arch. 660. Professional practice and construction
documents ............................................... 4
Elective1..................................................... 2
16
Fall Semester, Third Year
Arch. 700. Design ............................................ 5
Arch. 712. Thesis preparation ................................ 2
Arch. 760. Internship (optional) ............................. 3
Electives1.................................................... 6
16
Spring Semester, Third Year
Arch. 701. Design Thesis...................................... 7
Arch. 761. Internship (optional) ............................. 3
Arch. 750. Systems synthesis.................................. 3
Elective1..................................................... 2
15
Total semester hours required............................... 96
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
The academic program leading to a Master of Landscape Architecture degree at the University of Colorado at Denver responds to a perceived need to offer professional training preparing students to meet the complex and demanding challenges of designing and shaping the environment.
Our rapidly growing western regions, both urban and rural, require comprehensive problem-solving skills which address regional climate, geology, soils, hydrology, and vegetation. These related processes provide a regional basis for planning and designing land areas for public/private use, enjoyment, and preservation.
Programs
UCD offers both two- and three-year graduate-level professional programs leading to the degree Master of Landscape Architecture. The two-year second professional degree program, comprised of a minimum of 64 semester hours, is structured to provide advanced training and exposure in the theoretical, technical, and practical aspects of design for those M.L.A. candidates possessing a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree. The three-year first professional degree program, comprised of a minimum of 96 semester hours, is offered to students with undergraduate
degrees not specifically related to landscape architecture.
These programs permit the M.L.A. candidate to pursue a wide range of career goals responding to the profession’s concerns and expertise in physical planning and design. A major goal of the program is to develop the candidates’ knowledge and practical skills of landscape architecture to assume effective roles in professional practice. Emphasis is placed upon emerging problems and frontier areas of the Rocky Mountain Region, and on applying problemsolving tools, theories, and methodologies to environmental concerns covering a broad range of scales and project types.
Curriculum
The curriculum includes those subjects considered as essential to core professional training in the field of landscape architecture, including design, technology, history, and professional practice. Both programs and courses have a design focus, upon real problemsolving situations with emphasis on design process.
Opportunities exist to develop complementary knowledge and skills related to interdisciplinary projects involving the graduate programs of architecture, urban design, urban and regional planning, and public administration, within the College of Environmental Design. Additionally, through the Center for Community Development and Design, the M.L.A. candidate is afforded opportunity for actual project experience and participation for a variety of projects within the Denver metropolitan area and the state of Colorado.
The hierarchy of courses from term to term includes sequences of design, technical, and history core courses required of all entering candidates. The final spring term is reserved for a design thesis project contributing to the program and the profession of landscape architecture. The thesis project is performed under the guidance of a Comprehensive Thesis Committee comprised of faculty, practicing professionals, and technical specialists in the thesis topic. Additionally, the M.L.A. candidate is required to complete a minimum 12-week internship with a professional landscape architecture office or under the work supervision of a professionally registered landscape architect.
Admission Requirements
Applicants to the three-year program or those who do not have a first professional degree, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, should have proficiency in college mathematics, physical science, English, environmental science, and a basic course in art or drawing.
Applicants to the two-year program, having undergraduate degrees in urban and regional planning, architecture, environmental design, or other physical
'Elective courses may be taken from additional architecture or College course offerings or from other divisions at the University of Colorado. A minimum of 3 semester hours each must be acquired from the Landscape Architecture and the Urban and Regional Planning curriculums.


80 / University of Colorado at Denver
design degrees are considered for admission upon individual evaluation of their undergraduate curriculum, scholastic performance, and professional experience. To be considered for admission into the graduate programs in landscape architecture, applicants must submit application forms, college transcripts, three recommendations, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work by March 15 preceding the fall semester they wish to enter the program. The portfolio format is to be 14 inches by 17 inches or smaller.
Application forms and further information may be obtained by writing to the Director of Landscape Architecture, College of Environmental Design, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
Order Of Studies
(Two- And Three-Year Programs )
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
L.A. 500. Landscape Architecture Design I .................. 5
L.A. 510. Graphic Communication I .......................... 3
L.A. 550. Landscape Architecture Engineering 1.............. 3
L.A. 561. Introduction to Ecology........................... 1
L.A. 570. History and Theory of
Landscape Architecture ................................. 3
L.A. 580. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials I ...................3
18
Spring Semester, First Year
L.A. 501. Landscape Architecture Design II................ 5
L.A. 511. Graphic Communication II........................ 3
L.A. 551. Landscape Architecture Construction I........... 3
L.A. 571. Landscape Architecture History and
Theory Contemp........................................ 3
L.A. 581. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials II.................3
17
Fall Semester, Second Year
L.A. 600. Landscape Architecture Design III................... 5
L.A. 650. Landscape Architecture Engineering II............... 5
L.A. 661. Introduction to Ecology............................. 1
L.A. 680. Rocky Mountain Planting Design Principles........... 3
UPCD 500. Introduction to Urban and
Regional Planning ..........................................3
17
Spring Semester, Second Year
L.A. 601. Landscape Architecture Design IV................ 5
L.A. 651. Landscape Architecture Construction II.......... 5
L.A. 660. Landscape Architecture Seminar ................. 2
L.A. 681. Rocky Mountain Planting Technology .............. 3
UPCD 614. History of Environmental Form ......................3
18
Fall Semester, Third Year
L.A. 700. Landscape Arch. Design V........................... 5
L.A. 760. Landscape Architecture Seminar .................... 2
L.A. 761. Introduction to Ecology............................ 1
L.A. 790. Independent Study (Thesis Preparation) ............ 3
Elective .................................................... 3
Elective .................................................... 3
17
Spring Semester, Third Year
L.A. 701. Landscape Architecture Design (Thesis).............. 7
L.A. 721. Professional Practice .................................3
10
Total Hours ..................................................97
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN
Program Description
Urban design is another of the graduate environmental design programs taught at facilities which are located within two urban renewal projects in the core of the metropolitan area. The curriculum focuses upon the complex problems that are generated by change and growth in a vigorous urban and regional laboratory. Emphasis is given to participatory community and publicly funded design, research, and technology. Special efforts are made to utilize the vast resources of information available from federal, state, and local agencies and institutions which are concentrated in the immediate community. Specific courses and projects attempt to incorporate these allied academic, civic, and citizen inputs into the design processes.
Direct daily contact with students and instructors in the planning, landscape, architecture, and interior divisions is very important and beneficial.
A specific effort is made in professional practice, internship, and directed elective courses to expose urban design students to broader group-oriented factors in the problem-solving process. Placement of students in combination architecture, urban design, and planning firms is a primary consideration in meeting the internship requirements.
The master’s year is a synthesis of the special civic-scale factors influencing urban design in one of four options: recreational facilities, community development, rehabilitation or renewal, transportation and health care. In this phase, students are carefully advised throughout the period of their independent research and design studies. Opportunities to do state and city outreach work in association with the Center for Community Development and Design (the College’s design aid field program for ethnic and economic minorities) are available. Many other real problems and/or case studies from the community which require anticipatory and feasibility design and development also are considered. Whenever possible, individual and/or team projects in cooperation with allied disciplines and institutions are encouraged.
Admission Requirements
In order for students to be considered for admission into the graduate program, they must submit application forms, college transcripts, three letters or recommendation, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work by April 15 preceding the fall semester they wish to enter. All portfolio material submitted with the application must be in 8 Vi" by 14" format or smaller. If slides are included,


College of Environmental Design / 81
they must be in a looseleaf slide holder. It is recommended that students indicate the type and length of all work experience they have had since receiving a degree. Application forms and information may be obtained by writing to Director of Master of Architecture in Urban Design, College of Environmental Design, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
ONE-YEAR PROGRAM (MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN)
A one-year program leading to the Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree is available to students holding a first professional degree in architecture, landscape architecture, or urban planning. The degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester credit hours. The program is for students who wish to pursue advanced studies in compound, complex community design problems.
Course Requirements Semester Hours
Urban Design Studio.............................. 12
Urban Design Seminar............................ 3-6
Planning ......................................... 6
Electives (professional) ....................... 6-9
Independent study ................................ 3
Total 32
The design studio is the focal point for the specialization selected by the student. The project chosen is developed on an independent study basis with meetings, seminars, and evaluations scheduled between the student and the faculty advisers. Cognate courses are selected with the guidance of the faculty advisers from related subjects offered by the College or other units of the University.
MASTER OF INTERIOR DESIGN-INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AND SPACE PLANNING
The Master of Interior Design program is structured to educate designers who will be qualified to assume responsible leadership roles in the continuing growth of the profession and in the improvement of the quality of man’s near environment by constructively relating the design process to man’s life process.
There are two programs leading to the Master of Interior Design degree. The two-year program is open to applicants holding Bachelor of Interior Design, Bachelor of Environmental Design, or Bachelor of Architecture degrees. The three-year program is designed for applicants holding bachelor’s degrees in other fields from accredited four-year colleges or universities.
The program is characteristically different from more traditional programs in the following ways:
Multidisciplinary Approach. Individualized instruction and guidance are provided in skills and knowledge that are integrated from related disciplines. Accordingly, the student develops personal models and methodologies within a multidisciplinary conceptual framework for the analysis, design, and evaluation of appropriate interior environments.
Interior Architecture and Space Planning Orientation. The program relies heavily upon the conviction that the design of an interior space and the building form containing it are inextricably related. The former inwardly responding to the human environment, the latter outwardly responding to the natural environment; both design activities requiring high degrees of interdependent specializations in generating an adequate integrative environmental form.
Social and Behavioral Base. Understanding the social, behavioral, and biological implications of man-environment interactions is emphasized as an integral part of design research/problem-solving methods in all design studio work.
Coordinated University-Professional Community Learning Experiences. The program is a direct response to the Rocky Mountain region’s general recognition of a need for designers whose professional community serves as an auxiliary source of educational enrichment by providing students with opportunities to combine theoretical and applied learning.
Admission Requirements
APPLICATION
In order for students to be considered for admission into the graduate program, they must submit application forms, two original transcripts, three recommendations, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work by March 15 preceding the fall semester that they wish to enter. The portfolio format is to be 14 inches by 17 inches or smaller. Application forms and information may be obtained by writing to the Director of Interior Design, College of Environmental Design, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
ADMISSION
A Faculty Admissions Committee will review the application materials and select the students to be admitted to the program. Applicants will be notified that they have been accepted, are on a waiting list, or have not been accepted, prior to May 1.
The recommended minimum grade-point average is 2.75 on a 4-point scale. If the student’s grade-point average is below 2.75 the Graduate Record Examination is recommended as part of the application materials. The student, however, will be evaluated for admission on the basis of all the application materials and not the grade-point average alone.
Sequence Of Studies,
Two And Three-Year Programs
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
I.D. 500. Design Research/Problem-Solving Methods ........ 5
Arch. 510. Graphic Communications 1........................ 3
Arch. 570. History/Philosophy I............................ 3
Arch. 551. Materials and Methods of Construction.......... 3
Elective Course ........................................... 3
17


82 / University of Colorado at Denver
Spring Semester, First Year
I.D. 501. Residential Design............................... 5
Arch. 511. Graphic Communications II...................... 3
Arch. 557. Elements of Structure.......................... 3
Arch. 571. History/Philosophy II........................... 3
Psych. 320. Human Behavior and Maturation
Through the Life Span................................. 3
or
Psych. 225. Biological Behavior............................ 3
17
Fall Semester, Second Year
I.D. 600. Transportation Design ........................... 5
Arch. 650. Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation
and Utilities.......................................... 3
L.A. 630. Landscape Architecture............................ 3
I.D. 680. Physical Environmental Factors ................... 3
I.D. 660. Furniture Design ................................. 3
17
Spring Semester, Second Year
I.D. 601. Commercial Design................................. 5
Arch. 651. Lighting and Acoustics .......................... 3
I.D. 681. Human Environmental Factors....................... 3
I.D. 662. Professional Practice............................. 3
B.Ad. 504. Fundamentals of Management and
Organization .......................................... 3
17
Fall Semester, Third Year
I.D. 700. Institutional Design................................ 7
I.D. 624. Environmental Signage and Graphic Design .......... 3
I.D. 663. Internship I........................................ 3
B.Law 300. Business Law....................................... 3
16
Spring Semester, Third Year
I.D. 701. Thesis.............................................. 7
I.D. 664. Internship II ...................................... 3
B.Law 412. Business Law....................................... 3
B.Ad. 411. Business and Society.............................. 3
or
Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing...............................3
16
MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
The MURP-CD program prepares planners to research, design, and evaluate the ends and means of social and environmental action. Careers in planning usually center in such growing fields as environmental design, community development, social services, natural resources, ecology, planning consultation, environmental assessment, urban renewal, and regional planning. Because Denver is the Rocky Mountain region’s central location for managing these fields of action, UCD planning students are able to combine easily the general principles of academic learning with practical experience in nearby operating agencies and organizations.
Curriculum
The curriculum requires 60 semester hours as a minimum for graduation. Forty-five of these semester hours are required core courses aimed at training the student in basic planning principles, content,
research methods, and plan/policymaking skills. Of these required credits, 4 are spent in experiential learning and internships with public agencies and other organizations.
Another 15 credit hours of the curriculum are elective. They are chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty adviser to form a consistent pattern of planning expertise along the lines of the individual’s major interests. The courses may be chosen from the MURP-CD’s own core electives, from other programs in the College of Environmental Design or from other graduate colleges at UCD. Typical areas of specialization have been ecology, transportation, planning administration, community development, urban design, and health planning.
The final curriculum requirement is the satisfactory completion, in the student’s last semester, of an in-depth planning study or project. The aim is to illustrate the individual’s ability to integrate and apply the knowledge and experience gained in the program. This is the major thrust of the core requirement entitled Planning Studio 3.
Admission Requirements
In order for a student to be considered for admission into the graduate program, application forms must be submitted by April 15 for the fall semester. Entry into the program at other times is not normally permitted. Applications for admission are reviewed by a faculty-student committee. Criteria for admission include academic performance, experience, interest, and motivation for study.
Candidates for admission should note that a 1-semester-hour course in statistics is part of the 60-hour core curriculum. Students who have taken an acceptable course in statistics may have this requirement waived.
Application forms and information may be obtained by writing to Director of Urban and Regional Planning-Community Development Program, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
CENTER FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN
The Center for Community Development and Design provides educational and technical assistance to solve design, planning, and community development problems upon request to groups, organizations, neighborhoods, communities, and small towns that cannot afford or do not have access to these services. The center provides these services to aid in the development of the community and to encourage local self-reliance. These services are provided by mobilizing the necessary and available resources of the College of Environmental Design and the community and by utilizing the appropriate community development process and participatory techniques.
A central goal of the center is to combine academic and practical experience of students working with community members on problem solving through


College of Environmental Design / 83
supervised projects in the field. The faculty and staff of the center coordinate community projects for which students register through classes in the various academic curricula. Students who register for these projects assume an added responsibility of satisfying client needs that goes beyond academic credit.
Students are expected to do two things: Utilize and develop professional expertise which not only enhances their own education but also better prepares them to assist in the community problem-solving process, and to develop an understanding for com-
munity participatory processes and be able to integrate these into the technical aspects of their community project.
The types of projects students may select to work on include developing a physical design program for a child care center in an inner-city neighborhood; assisting a neighborhood organize, design, and implement a self-help housing program in a small mountain town; and developing a comprehensive plan in cooperation with a planning commission in a Colorado high plains town.


Graduate School
Robert N. Rogers, Associate Dean
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The Graduate School is a University-wide body which authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. At UCD, Business and Administration (except the M.B.A. program), Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through the Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice, most master’s-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisers are concerned.
Doctoral-level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that discipline. At the present time all Ph.D. programs are coordinated through the corresponding Boulder department. However, in a number of disciplines most or all course work for the Ph.D. can be completed at Denver and the research adviser may be a member of the UCD faculty. Some departments in which this is the case are communication disorders and speech sciences, communication and theatre, electrical engineering, and civil engineering. In other disciplines, a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph.D. degree may be taken at UCD. Persons interested in pursuing doctoral-level work should consult with the appropriate discipline graduate adviser.
Anyone wishing further information not given in this bulletin should contact the Associate Dean of the Graduate School, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202.
Degrees Offered
The Master of Education (M.Ed.) and the Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Early childhood education Educational psychology Elementary education Foundations of education
Guidance and counseling Library media Reading
Secondary education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Accounting Applied mathematics Chemistry Civil engineering Electrical engineering
Environmental science Finance
Management and organization Marketing
Mechanical engineering
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.) The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
Facilities for Graduate Study and Research at UCD
Facilities for research in many fields are available at UCD as well as specialized institutes, seminars, and meetings of national standing.
The Graduate Student at UCD
Approximately 1,800 students are enrolled in graduate programs at UCD and an additional 1,400 special students take graduate courses. Of these, approximately 45 percent are part-time students.
Faculty
The faculty operating in these programs is mainly housed at UCD, although resources of other campuses at the University of Colorado are used.
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at UCD. In some cases, a specific required course may only be offered through the University of Colorado at Boulder in a given year.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology Geography
Biology History
Communication and theatre Mathematics Communication disorders and Political science speech science Psychology
Economics Sociology
English
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS
The University of Colorado administers various forms of financial aid for graduate students: fellowships, scholarships, and a number of awards from outside agencies.
The Graduate School each year awards to qualified regular degree graduate students approximately 50 doctoral fellowships paying up to $2,500 plus tuition.
Special fellowships and scholarships are also available for study in certain departments. Colorado


Graduate School / 85
Graduate Grants are also available to students who can show demonstrated need. For details contact the Graduate School Office.
Applications for fellowships, scholarships, and grants are due in the department before the announced department deadline. Fellowship awards are announced about March 15; Colorado Graduate Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The in-structorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appointments in 1978-79 was: one-half time instructor; $5,446 for the academic year; one-half time teaching assistant, $4,356 for the academic year.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a halftime teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Students appointed for one-half time qualify for resident tuition rates regardless of their actual Colorado residency status. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled students in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Holders of these positions pay resident tuition. Assistants must be enrolled students.
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans through the National Direct Student Loan Program and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March
1. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
International Education
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There are also occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office for Student Relations, 629-2861.
Institute for Urban and Public Policy Research
The institute was established at UCD to facilitate organized research on significant public policy issues and urban problems. Its principal objectives are (1) to improve public policy formation and decision making through more effectively relating issues with knowledge and research and (2) to assist faculty, policy makers, and students to work together as research teams on state and local problems that cut across disciplines.
Research in the institute is being done through centers, programs, and ad hoc teams utilizing individual expertise from the several campuses of the University of Colorado and other Colorado institutions of higher education as required to deal with a specific problem.
The institute has been involved in a number of research activities including determining effective methods of using scientific and technological resources in metropolitan, state, and regional government policy formation and decision making; environmental quality studies; energy-related research; health needs assessment; gerontological studies; evaluating community development programs; and attitude surveys. Its members have continuing programmatic research interests in the measurement of quality of life and social indicators, urban transportation policy; urban and regional planning; community and organizational development; and the physical, biological, and social effects of energy development.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to the Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
Admission to the Graduate School is not admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree must make special application at the time and in the manner prescribed by the requirements for the degree sought.


86 / University of Colorado at Denver
A student who is granted admission must reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal background acceptable to the University.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, an applicant for admission as a regular degree student must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have done work equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this University.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by his or her previous scholastic record.
3. Have had adequate preparation to enter upon graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a
3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the advanced degree intended or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School.
Pass/Fail Grades. In order to permit a meaningful evaluation of an applicant’s scholastic record, not more than 10 percent of those credit hours that are relevant to the intended field of graduate study shall have been earned with pass/fail grades, nor more than 20 percent overall. Applicants whose academic record contain a larger percentage of pass/fail credits must submit suitable additional evidence that they possess the required scholastic ability. If the applicant does not submit satisfactory additional evidence, he or she can be admitted only as a provisional student.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. With the concurrence of the dean of the Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term, which may not normally exceed one academic year. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point or higher, as may be required by the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. If students fail to maintain such a standard of performance, they will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at UCD should contact the UCD Office of the Graduate School concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the UCD Graduate School office, and two official transcripts from each university attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application processing fee of $20 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and most departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairman of each department or a committee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions and Records, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as special students (below).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 60 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1978-80, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid).
All credentials presented for admission to the University of Colorado become the property of the University.
SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet his requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for assistantships, or of any student before his or her status is determined.


Graduate School / 87
Students who are applying for the fall of 1980 take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee. Four to six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the Graduate School Office or the Student Relations Office at UCD, or from the Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records, UCD, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202, or to the Office of the Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Special students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible. A department rhay recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a special student at the University, or any combination thereof. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter, or summer term for which the student has applied for admission to the Graduate School, provided that the student’s application was on file with the department before the beginning of the semester, quarter, or term in question.
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to the Graduate School and who expect to study in the Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester they must notify the department which has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at UCD in order to attend the following semester.
Master’s Thesis or Report
Graduate students working toward master’s degrees, if they expect to present a thesis or M.Ed. report in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours, or for M.Ed. report for 2 semester hours. The student
may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis or report. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. If the thesis or report is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for not fewer than 5 semester hours in work numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours of other graduate work, or thesis.
A full load for purposes of determining residence credit during the summer term is 3 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or 6 semester hours of other graduate work, or thesis.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive graduate credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at UCD is 10 hours per 10-week summer term.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this bulletin.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES
Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to get from formal courses all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirements for an advanced degree. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, and proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted in Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.


88 / University of Colorado at Denver
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of the Graduate School. The committee’s decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
Grading System
The standing of a student in work intended for an advanced degree is to be indicated by the marks A, B, and C.
A — Superior, 4 credit points for each credit hour. B — Good, 3 credit points for each credit hour.
C — Fair, 2 credit points for each credit hour.
Work receiving the lowest passing grade, D, may not be counted toward a degree, nor may it be accepted for the removal of deficiencies. Marks below B are not accepted for the doctoral degree.
An IF or an IW grade may be given for incomplete work at the discretion of the instructor. For details, refer to the discussion of the uniform grading system. The grade of IP (in progress) will be given for continuing thesis work and will be valid until the thesis is completed.
A graduate student may repeat once a course for which, he or she obtained a grade of C, D, or F upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the advisory committee and the chairman of the department, provided the course has not previously applied toward a degree.
Graduate students may register for courses on a Pass/Fail basis; however, graduate credit will not be awarded, and such courses cannot be applied toward a graduate degree.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use and spelling of the English language may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. The satisfaction of this requirement depends not so much upon the ability to pass formal tests, although these may be demanded, as it does upon the habitual use of good English in all oral and written work. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
MASTER’S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to the Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the degree Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other
master’s degree will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Minimum Requirement
The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master’s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses which are listed at the 500 level or above and which are offered by those colleges or schools that are members of the Graduate School, or which have otherwise been approved by the dean of the Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the fall semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of the Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories:
1. Courses within the major department at the 500 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major department at any level, provided they are approved for graduate rank for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degreegranting program.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 500 level or above. However, as a result, most students who include 400-level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.


Graduate School / 89
Reid of Study
Studies leading to a master’s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Statue
After a student has made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term and after he has removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, he should confer with his major department and request that a decision be made on his status. This definite status must be set by his major department before a student may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modem languages as each department requires. See special departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the Graduate School.
All work accepted by transfer must come within the five-year time limit or be validated by special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 8 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in the Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to the Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master’s degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master’s degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to the Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 8 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the five-year time limit.
3. Has not been applied toward another degree.
4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and is approved by the dean of the Graduate School.
Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to the Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact the Graduate School office.
Residency
In general, the residency requirements can be met only by residence at this University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours of other graduate work. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. A student who is noticeably deficient in his general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master’s degree must file application to the dean’s office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive-final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean’s office and in various departments and must be signed by a representative of both the major and minor, if any, fields of study, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that his program outlined in the application meets the requirements set in his particular case.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master’s degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented


90 / University of Colorado at Denver
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive-final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications obtainable from the Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in the Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid at the Business Office when the thesis is deposited in the Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master’s degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
Comprehensive-Final Examinations
Each candidate for a master’s degree is required to take a comprehensive-final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of the candidate’s last semester of residence while he is still taking required courses for the degree, provided he is making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. A student must be registered when he or she takes the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean’s office at least three days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before it may be attempted again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive-final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Time Umlt
All work, including the comprehensive-final examination, should be completed within five years or six successive summers. Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination. A candidate for the master’s degree is expected to complete his work with reasonable continuity.
Deadlines for Master’s Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1070-80
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling the Graduate School office on the Boulder Campus, 492-7401.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Applications must be submitted at least 10 weeks before the student expects to take the comprehensive-final examination. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in the Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive-final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive-final examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in the Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by the Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated


Graduate School / 91
date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
Graduate Programs
ANTHROPOLOGY
The master’s program in anthropology offers general, flexible training in anthropology along with topical specialization and the opportunity to specialize in interdisciplinary, applied areas: medical anthropology and community and urban anthropology. The medical anthropology track is intended to serve students preparing for careers and those with established careers in the health care professions and related fields. Similarly, the community and urban anthropology track is intended to serve those who seek to employ anthropological concepts and methods of community analysis in public administration, development, planning, and allied fields. Working with an advisory committee, each student will tailor an individual program of studies around courses and seminars in anthropology and allied disciplines. These programs will culminate in either a master’s paper or master’s thesis. A primary goal of the program is to produce graduates who are capable of understanding and proficient at resolving, in cooperation with others, the many problems of complex societies; consequently, a premium will be placed on interdisciplinary instruction and practical exercises in the design and implementation of research in a variety of settings.
More detailed descriptions of the options available within the M.A. program may be obtained by writing to the Director of Graduate Studies, Anthropology, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th St., Denver, CO 80202.
Admission
Admission to the master’s program in anthropology is open to any holder of a baccalaureate degree, not necessarily in anthropology, provided he or she meets the following requirements: (1) general requirements for admission to the Graduate School (2.75 or better grade-point average for all undergraduate studies); and (2) knowledge of the fundamentals of anthropology. Applicants will be expected to have had a general introductory course in anthropology and secondary courses in ethnology, archaeology, linguistics, and physical anthropology or be able to demonstrate a mastery of materials equivalent to that which might reasonably be expected to result from such formal training. Applicants deficient in background may be admitted on a provisional basis but will be required to make up deficiencies without graduate credit during the first year in residence. A simpler alternative, when practical, would be to remove deficiencies as a special student prior to applying for admission to the graduate program.
In order to be considered for admission into the master’s program, an applicant must submit (1) two
copies of transcripts from all undergraduate institutions attended; (2) Graduate Record Examination scores for verbal and quantitative aptitude; and (3) at least three letters of recommendation. Evidence of previous nonacademic anthropology-oriented work or other experience will be carefully considered, as will that of special skills relevant to anthropological research. Departmental deadlines for receipt of applications for admission to the Graduate School, including accompanying materials, is April .15 for fall entrance.
Further information concerning specialization within the program, departmental admission and advising policies, etc., may be obtained by writing the Director of Graduate Studies in Anthropology. For general Graduate School requirements and application information, see beginning of graduate section of this bulletin.
Residency
A minimum of two full semesters devoted to advanced study is required by the Graduate School. Students working toward the master’s degree in anthropology will be strongly encouraged to attain that degree within three years following matriculation into the program.
Course Hours and Distribution
A minimum of 36 semester hours of credit is required for the M.A. degree in anthropology. Fifteen hours of nonthesis course work must be at the 500 level or above. Course work is to be distributed as follows for students pursuing an interdisciplinary speciality within the general anthropology track, the medical anthropology track, or the community and urban anthropology track:
Courses in anthropology ....15 semester hours minimum
Courses in related fields . 15 semester hours minimum
For students pursuing a subdisciplinary specialty within the general anthropology track, course work is to be distributed as follows:
Courses in anthropology ... 18 semester hours minimum
Courses in related fields ..12 semester hours minimum
The remaining 6 semester hours may be met either by writing a master’s thesis, for which 6 hours credit is given, or by taking 6 additional hours of course work if the student prefers to write a master’s paper.
Examination
Each student must pass a comprehensive M.A. examination demonstrating mastery of the fundamental principles of anthropology. This examination will ordinarily be taken before the conclusion of the fourth semester in residence.
Thesis or Paper
The student must either carry out an original research project and report the results in a thesis of professional quality or write a master’s paper, more limited in scope, to complete the degree. A thesis


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II AT DEN\JER 1979-80 UNI\JERSITY OF COLORADO BULLETIN

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DE:N\JE:R 1100 FOURTE:E:NTH-STRE:E:T DE:N\JE:R, COLORADO 80202 TE:LE:PHONE: 629-2800 COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND ADMINIITRATION .. t GRADUATE OF ADMINIITRATION E:DUCATION E:NGINEERING AND APPLIED E:NVIRONMENTAL GRADUATE liBERAL AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS PAID AT THE: POST OFFICE: KlULDE:R. COLOMDO 8030Q USPS 651 060

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THE AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER PARKING DENVER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS i 0 PHYSICAL PLANT pUBLIC ___ bJ ET !5 ,0 AOMimifilll I -(IJCOAl (BR) . u c . i ... ""-Strt11 I ATHLETIC FIELDS J . . SptM'

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II fiT DEN\JER y

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CONTENTS General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Admission Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Tuition, Fees, Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Academic Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Administrative Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Division of Arts and Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Division of Natural and Physical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Division of Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 School of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 College of Engineering and Applied Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 College of Environmental Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Graduate School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 College of Music .................................................... 102 Graduate School of Public Affairs .................................... 107 Course Descriptions ..... ....... .......................... ........... 115 Facult y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Index ............................................................. . 183 •

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Summer 19792 June 4, 5 Junell July 4 August 17 Fall 19792 August 27-29 September 4 November 22, 23 December 19 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1 Registration. First day of classes . Holiday (no classes). End of term. Registration . First day of classes. Thanksgiving holidays (no classes) . End of semester. Spring 19802 January 14, 15 January 21 March 17-22 May 16 May 17 Summer 19802 Registration First day of classes. Spring vacation (no classes). End of semeste r . Commencement. June 2, 3 Registration. June 9 First day of classes. July 4 Holiday (no classes). August 15 End of term. 'The U niveroity reserve s t h e righ t to alter the A c ademic Calendar at an y time . ' C on sult the Schedul e o f Courses f o r ar,pli catio n d e adl ine dates and deadlines f o r chang i n g program s ( dropping and add ing c asoes ) .

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HUMANITIES BUSINESS EDUCATION ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN MUSIC NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES PUBLIC AFFAIRS SOCIAL SCIENCES DEGREE PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE • Baccalaureate Programs communication and theatre, English, fine arts, French , German, philosophy, Spanish (areas of emphasis) accounting, computer-based information systems, finance, international business, marketing , minerals land management, organizational management, personnel management, public agency ad ministration , real estate, small business management , statistics, transportation management elementary education, secondary education , rehabilitation services civil engineering, civil engineering and business, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and business , electrical engineering and computer science, electrical engineering and com puter science and business , applied mathematics, applied mathematics and business, mechanical engineering , mechanical engineering and business offered only at Boulder music and media biology, chemistry , geography, geology, mathematics, physics , population dynamics , psychology anthropology, economics, ethnic studies, history, poli tical science , sociology, urban studies Master's Programs communication and theatre, com munication disorder s and speech science, English, humanities M.B .A. areas of emphasis: accounting, finance, management science, marketing, organizational manage ment, personnel management , produc tion and operations management, transportation management. M.S.: accounting , finance, manage ment science, marketing , management and organization. early childhood educa tion, educational psychology, elementary education, foundations of education , guidance and counseling, library media, reading, s econd ary education applied mathematics , civil engineer ing, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science architecture , architecture in urban de sign, interior design, landscape architecture , urban and regional plan ning basic science, biology , chemistry, en vironmental science, geography, mathematics , psychology public admin i stration , urban affairs (also , doctorate in public adminis tra tion) anthropology , economic s, history, political science, social science, sociology • 1Courses in man y oth e r undergraduate and graduate areas are offe r ed at UCD, but degrees must be completed at the Univer sity of Colorado at UCJ? also prepr ofessional prog.rB:ms in journa lism, and the health ca reer s (child associate , dental h ygtene , dentistry , med t ca l technology , medtcme , nursmg , optometry , oeteopathy , pharmacy, physt c al therapy , and veter i nary medici n e).

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UNDERGRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION 1 ' 2 Type of Appllc.,t Criteria lor AdmiMion' Required Cradentlala When to Apply No tea FRESHMAN IN GENERAL: Complete application Not later !han: For speci fic requirements refer to (Students seeking a bacha ) Rank in upper haij of high school $10 application fee July 1 for fall the college sections of this bul elor's degree who have graduating class. Official high school transcript Dec. 1 for spring letin. never attended a colb) Have 15 uni1s of acceptable high showing rank-in-{;lass , date of May 1 for summer legiate institution) school work. graduation, 7th semester c) Test scores: grades, 8th semester courses Seniors who meet or ex-Resident Nonresident Official ACT or SAT score report . ceed all admission criACT comp: 23 25 teria may app l y as or as Oct. 1 for following SAT comb : 1000 1050 fall. TRANSFER' Must be in good standing and eligible Complete application Not later !han : Transfers to the School of Educa-(Students seeking a to return to all institutions $10 application fee July 1 for fall tion consult !hat section for adbachelor's degree who previously attended . One official transcript from each Dec. 1 for spring ditional requ irements. have attended a col Residents must have a minimum 2.0 college attended May 1 . tor summer Transfers with less than 12 legiate institution other (C) GPA on all work attempted. semester hours of University acthan CU) Nonresidents must have a ceptable transfer credit must minimum 2 . 5 (C + ) GPA on all also submit all required work attempted . freshman credentials . SPECIAL Must be at l east 21 years old (except Complete application Not later than : Graduate special students , see (Students who are not in summer) . July 1 for fall Graduate School Section for adseeking a degree at !his Must be h i gh school 9raduate . Dec. 1 for spring ditional information . institution) Must be in good standing and eligible May 1 for summer to return to all institutions Application will also be previously attended . accepted at registration if space allows. RETURNING CU Must be -in good standing Former student application Same as for special stuStudents under academic suspen STUDENT dents sion in certain schools or col(Rellnling special students, leges at the University of returning degree stuColorado may enroll during the dents who have not at summer terms as a means of tended another instituimproving their grade-point tion since CU) averages. RETURNIIIIG CU Same as for transfers Complete application Same as for transfers STUDENT $10 fee (Returning degree students One o cial transcript from each who have attempted 12 intervening college or more hours at another institution since attending CU) CHANGE OF STATUS: Same as for transfers Same as for transfers Same as for transfers SPECIAL TO DEGREE Plus CU transcript and Courses (Former CU stu-in Progress form dents who wrsh to enter a degree program) CHANGE OF STATUS: Must have completed degree . Special student application Same as for specia l stuOnly students who have completed DEGREE TO SPECIAL Must be in good standing and eligible dents and received degree are eligible (Former CU degree stu-to retum to all institutions attended . to change to special status. dents who have graduated and wish to take additiona l work) INTERCAMPUS Must be in good standing Former student application Transfer to Denver; Transfers from Denver to another TRANSFER same as for specials campus of CU should refer to (Students who have been appropriate bulletin for additional enrolled on one CU Transfer from Denver : requirements. campus and wish to refer to appropriate take courses on bulletin . another) INTRAUNIVERSITY Same as for transfers Intra university transfer applicaSame as lot transfers TRANSFER tion (Students who wish to CU transcript change from one CU college to another , from the College of Li -eral Arts and Sciences to the College of Busin:SS) 'Applications will be accepted only 118 long 118 openings remain. 'Requirements for lndlvlduel schools or colleges may vary. w

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General Information THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER: AN URBAN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS The University of Colorado at Denver (UCD) is an urban nonre s idential campus located in downtown Denver. The campus is easily accessible to commuters from a four county area and is close to major businesses and government offices in downtown Denver, as well as to civic and cultural centers. UCD i s one of the largest state-supported institutions of higher education in Colorado in terms of enrollment, w ith an average of 8,000 students enrolled during a s emester. The UCD Administration Building i s located at 1100 Fourteenth Street. UCD shares library, laboratory, classroom , and recreation facilities with two other metropolitan institutions on a single c ampus, the Auraria Higher Education Center. Academic Programs UCD is committed to meeting the needs of the met r opolitan Denver community. Academic , public service, and research activities are geared to the needs of t he urban pop u lation and environment , encompass i ng both traditional and nontraditional fields of s tudy. Students enrolled at UCD can earn un de rgraduate degrees in 42 fields and graduate degrees in over 50 fields. The colleges and schools at UCD are: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Environmental Design College of Music Graduate School Graduate School of Public Affairs The undergraduate colleges admit fres hmen and of f er programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business , engineering, a nd music . The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides preprofessional training in the fields of education , law, journalism, and the health sciences . The School of Education offers programs leading to t he baccalaureate degree in education and teacher c ertification to students with two years of college work. The Graduate School offers master ' s programs in the arts, sciences , humanities, engineering , business , education, and music to students with bac calaureate degrees. The College of Environmental Design, the Graduate School of Business Adminis t ra tion, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to the master's degree in their specialized areas. The Graduate School of Public Affairs also offers a doctorate in public ad ministration. Students Highly motivated people from all walks of life make up UCD's student body. The diversity of backgrounds, interests, occupations, and ages stimulates a unique learning experience for the men and women enrolled at UCD. Students range in age from 16 to 70. Approximately two-thirds of the stu dents hold full-time jobs and 60 percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate level. In order t o give students maximum flexibility in planning both educational and employment goals, more than half of the courses are offered during the evening hours . Stu dents may begin studies in most areas at the begin ning of the 16-week fall or spring semester, or the 10week summer term. Faculty and Accreditation More than 200 highly qualified faculty members teach full time at UCD : 70 percent have doc t oral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student. UCD is accredited by or holds membership in the following organizations: ACCREDITATION North Central Association of Colleges and Se c on dary Schools National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Architecture Accrediting Board National Association of Schools of Music MEMBERSHIP Association of Urban Universities American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Busi ness Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and Collegiate Schools of Planning N ational Association of Schools of Public A f fairs and Administration

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2 I Uni ver sity of Colorado at Denver The Engineers' Council for Professional Development has accredited the programs in civil engineering and in electrical engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. University of Colorado System UCD is one of four campuses of the University of Colorado . The University was founded in Boulder in 1876, and the University of Colorado at Boulder now serves over 20,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Medical Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves over 3 ,000 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. UCD ' s special role within the University system is to provide urban-oriented educational programs for stu dents in the Denver metropolitan area. Qualified students may begin programs of study in some undergraduate , preprofessional, and graduate areas that they must complete at other University campuses . Students also have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events spon sored within t he University system. The official transcript of any student who first en rolled in the spring semester 1978 or afterwards and who graduates from an undergraduate program operated solely by UCD will indicate that the degree was conferred at Denver. At present the only un dergraduate program operated solely by UCD is the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Aurarla Higher Education Center The Auraria Higher Education Center is a cooperative effort by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Auraria campus of the Community College of Den ver. The three institutions share library, classroom, and related facilities on the Auraria campus, a 168-acre site in downtown Denver. The Auraria campus includes three administration buildings, five classroom buildings, the Learning Resources Center, the student center, child care and development centers, the physical education building , and two service buildings. The Auraria Library is housed in the Learning Re sources Center, with a branch in the Community College/Auraria Administration Building. The library collection includes books, reserve and reference materials, journals, microforms, records, tapes, and other media in various formats . Microform equipment and listening and viewing facilities are provided . General reference service, interlibrary loans, and assistance with individual library problems are available at the reference counter . UCD students may use the interlibrary loan service to obtain materials not held by the Auraria Libraries . The new buildings share the campus with reminders of Denver's past 19th-century houses, churches, and the famous Tivoli brewery built m 1882. Equal Opportunity The Univ ersity of Colorado at Denver follows a pol icy of equal opportunity in education and in employ ment. In pursuance of this policy, no UCD department, unit, discipline, or employee shall discriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race , sex, creed, color, age, national origin, or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affec ting present and prospective students or employees. The institution's educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject to the provisions of Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amend ments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. A UCD Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Pro gram has been established to implement this policy. For information about these provisions on equity, dis crimination, or fairness, consult the following persons who will advise individuals of existing complaint procedures within and outside the University: Affir mative Action Director Nereyda Bottoms, Room 803, 1100 Fourteenth Street (telephone: 629-2621); Title IX Coordinator Alice Owen, Room 212, 1100 Fourteenth Street (telephone: 629-2726); or Paul Kopecky, Rehabilitation Act Coordinator, Room 207, 1100 Fourteenth Street (telephone: 629-2861) . I. ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES General Policies UCD seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admis sion decisions are based on many factors, the most important being: 1. Level of previous academic performance . 2. Evidence of scholarly ability and accomplish ment, as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests. 3. Maturity, motivation, and potential for academic growth. UCD reserves the r i ght to deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed es sential by the Univers i ty in order to carry out its law ful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution. International Student• Undergraduate. International students who desire to attend the University of Colorado at Denver must present at least one full year of academic study from

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another accredited American collegiate institution before they may be considered for admission. A minimum of a 2 .75 grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) on all work attempted and proof of English proficiency is required. An application form may be obtained at: Office of Admissions and Records 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver , Colorado 80202 Application and credentials are to be presented to the admissions office four months prior to the start of the term for which the student is applying. Graduate. International students who desire graduate study at UCD must possess the equivalent of an American baccalaureate (undergraduate) degree and fulfill other requirements as designated by the graduate program to which they are applying. Ap plications can be obtained in the individual graduate schools. Application and credentials should be presented to the individual graduate schoolS months prior to the term for which the student is applying. Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students All questions and correspondence regarding undergraduate admission to UCD should be directed to: Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver , Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2660 APPLICATION DEADLINES Undergraduat e Fall Spri ng Students 1979 1980 New Students July 1 Dec.1 Transfer Students July 1 Dec . 1 International Students June 1 November 1 Former University of Colorado Students July 1 Dec . 1 Intra university Summer 1980 May1 May1 April1 May1 Transfer Students 60 day s prior to the beginning of the term The University reserves the right to change application deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands, and applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Of fice of Admissi ons and Records , (303) 629-2660. All documents re quired for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions and Records by the deadline for an applicant to be considered for the term desired . Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term . Transfer students are reminded that sufficient time shou ld be al lowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previously, and foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions and Records from international locations . ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN New freshmen may apply for admission to the Ool leges of Business and Administration, Engineering G e nera l Informati o n I 3 and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music. 1. General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test. Appli cants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an average standard score of 45 with no one score below 36 on each section of the GED test to be considered for admissi on. Applicants who have com pleted the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test must also submit scores from Test VI, "English as a Second Language . " Applicants should have completed 15 units of ac ceptable secondary school (grades 9 -12) credit. A unit of credit is one year of high school course work. While the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences does not specify particular units, the other undergraduate col leges have the following requirements: College of Business and Admi nistration English . . . .... . .......... . . .............................. 3 Mathematics (college preparatory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Natural sciences (laboratory type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Social sciences (including history) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 (Such as foreign languages and additi o nal academic course s. May include up to 2 units in business areas.) Total 1 5 College of Engineering and Applied Science • English . ............ ....... ...................... . . ...... 3 Algebra............ .................................... . . 2 Geometry..................................... ........... 1 (Trigonometry and higher mathematics rec o mmended . ) Natural sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (Physics and chemistry recommended.) Social studies and humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (Foreign languages and additional units of English, hist o ry , and literature are included in the humanities.) Electives ............ .................................... __.. Total 15 College of Music English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Theoretical music ... ................... ..... ...... . Physical science .............. . . . ................... . Social science ...................................... . Foreign language ........................... . . ...... . Mathematics .... . . . ...... ..................... . .... . 8 Additional high school academic units . . ................... ___1 Total 15 It is expected that all students will have had previous experience in an applied music area . Tw o years of piano training are recom mended. The College of Music require s an audition of all entering freshmen and undergradua t e transfer studen ts. In lieu of t he per sonal audition, applicants ma y s ubstitute tape recordings (abou t 10 minutes in length on 71/2 ip s monaural) or a s t atement of excellence by a qualified teacher . Intere s ted studen ts sh o uld write to the C o l lege of Music , UCD, for audi tio n or interv iew applications. 2. All applicants . All applicants who meet the above requirements are classified in two ways for ad mission purposes. ' See the College of Engi n e ering and Applied Scie nce sectio n for the leve l of m a thematical co mpet e n ce d esirable for e ngin eering s tude n ts.

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4 I University of Colorado at D enve r a. Preferred consideration applicants who rank in the upper half of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT) or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Engineering applicants are expected to have a strong mathematics and science back ground and somewhat higher scores on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. Business students are required to have strong mathematics background and higher class rank and test scores. b. Considered on an individual basis appli cants who rank in the lower 2/3 of their high school graduating class, and/or have com bined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit . How to Apply 1. Students should obtain an Application for Ad mission from their Colorado high school counselor or the Office of Admissions and Records at UCD , 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202, (303) 6292660. 2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions and Records. A $10 nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application. An applicant who is granted admission but who is unable to enroll for the term applied for will have the $10 fee valid for 12 months, provided the applicant informs Admissions and Records that he or she intends to enroll for a later term. 3. Students must have their high school send a transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions and Records . 4. The student must take either the American Col lege Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to UCD (ACT code 0533 or SAT code R-4875). High school students may obtain information from their counselors regarding when and where tests are given. Applicants who took one of these tests earlier and did not designate UCD to receive scores must request that scores be sent to UCD. This is done by completing a Request for Additional Score Report available at test centers or from the offices listed below. Registration Department American College Testing Program (ACT) P. 0. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P. 0. Box 592 Princeton, New Jersey 08540 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P. 0 . Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704 5. Students must have GED test scores sent to UCD if they have High School Equivalency Cer tificates. Checklist of Application Materials 1. Completed application form . 2. $10 application fee. 3. High school transcript of grades including class rank. 4. SAT or ACT test scores . 5. GED scores (for applican ts with a High School Equivalency Certificate) and copy of GED Cer tificate. All credentials presented for admission becom e the property of the University of Colorado and must re main on file. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science , Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music. Students interested in the field of education should cont act t he School of Education office for in formation , 629-2717. 1. Colorado Residents.1 Colorado residents who want to be considered for transfer admission to UCD must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-poin t average calculated on all work attempted and be eligi ble to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants to the Colleges of Business and Ad ministration or Engineering and Applied Science must have a higher grade-point average to be con sidered for admission. Music applicants must success fully complete a music audition. The student must have completed at least 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) of work acceptable to the University. Students who have completed fewer than 12 semester credits must meet the admission requirements for freshmen. Students are grouped as follows for admis sion purposes: a . Preferred consideration applicants who meet the above academic standards and have completed more than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) from an institution of univer sity rank , and applicants who have com pleted at least 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a community or state college. b. Considered on an individual basis appli cants who meet the academic standards listed above and who have completed fewer than 45 semester credits (68 quarter credits) from a community or state college, or those whose previous academic work does not meet the above standards. Primary factors con sidered are: (1) the college or school to which admission is desired; (2) quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and non collegiate achievements ; and ( 4) time elapsed since last attendance. 2 . Nonresidents .1 Nonresident applicants to the College of Business and Administration must have a transferable grade point average of at leas t 2. 75 to be 1See Residency Classification for Tuitio n Purposes for a definition o fresident and n o nre s i dent.

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considered for admission. Nonresidents applying to the College of Engineering and Applied Science must have a grade-point average of at least 2 . 6 to be con sidered. Nonresidents applying to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or the College of Music must have at least a GPA of 2.0 to be considered. How to Apply 1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the UCD Office of Admissions and Records, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver , Colorado 80202, (303) 629 2660. 2. The application form must be completed and returned to the Office of Admissions and Records with the $10 nonrefundable application fee. 3. The student must have an official transcript sent to the Office of Admissions and Record s from each collegiate institution attended. If a student is cur rently enrolled , a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. 4. Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that they may be able to receive credit for foreign language taken during the high school years providing they furnish an official high school transcript. Further information may be obtained from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Transfer of College-Level Credit The Office of Admission s and Records and the ap propriate dean's office will determine which courses taken at another institution can be applied to a degree program at UCD after all transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirements at UCD. College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by advanced placement ex aminations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. The University will accept up to 72 semester credits (10 8 quarter credits) of junior college work toward the baccalaureate degree requirements. No credit i s al lowed for vocational/technical, remedial , or religious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. For more detailed information by school and college regarding the transfer of college-level credit, see Academic Policies and Regulations. General Information I 5 Readmission Requirements for Former Students 1 . Students Who Have Not Attended Another In stitution. Former students of the University of Colorado who have not attended another collegiate in stitution since their last enrollment at the University must submit a Former Student Application, available from the Office of Admissions and Records, by the deadline for the term desired. No application fee and no supplementary credentials are required. _ . 2 . Students Who Ha ve Attended Another Instttu tion . Former students of the University of Colorado who have attended another collegiate institution since their last enrollment at the University must submit a Former Student Application and official transcripts from any institutions attended in the interim. Applicants who have completed 12 semester hours or 18 quarter hours at another institution since last at tending the University also must submit a $10 non refundable evaluation fee . Requirements for lntraunlverslty Transfer UCD students or former University of Colorado students may change colleges or schools within the University of Colorado provided they are acceptable to the college or school to which they wish to transfer. Transfer forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records . Students should observe ap plication deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses . Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer. High School Concurrent Enrollment High schoo l juniors and s.eniors with prove.d academi c abilities may be admitted to UCD. Cred1t for course s taken may subse quentl y be applied toward a Universit y degree program. For more inf_?rmation and application instruc tions, contact the Off1ce of Ad mission s and Records , (3 03) 629-2660. Admission of Graduate Degree Students All correspondence and question s regarding admis sion to the graduate programs at UC D should be directed to the following : Programs in Business Office of Graduate Studies Graduate School of Busine ss Administration 629-2605 Programs in Envi ronmental Design College of Environmental Design 629-2877 Program s in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 629-2825 All Othe r Programs Graduate School 629-2663

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6 I Univ e rsit y of Colorado at Den v er The above offices are located at 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. GRADUATE PROGRAMS As a principal part of its m1ss10n, UCD offers graduate-and professional-level programs for the con venience of Denver residents. During the 1977-78 academic year, approximately 35 percent of the stu dent body was enrolled at the graduate level. Graduate degree programs are offered through the Graduate School by its member schools and colleges, and outside the Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the College of En vironmental Design, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. The particular admission and gradua tion requirements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections. Students holding baccalaureate degrees but who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for graduate course work as graduate special students. Several types of students make use of the special student category. Among these are students who have attained whatever degree or credential status they feel is desirable, but who wish to take ad ditional course work for professional or personal improvement; students who, for whatever reason (weak undergraduate background, change of dis cipline, or length of time since previous formal course work), feel the need to make up deficiencies before entering a degree program; and students who have not decided about entering a specific degree program. Such students should be aware that, generally, only limited course credits taken as a special student may be applied toward a degree program. Also, a 2.0 minimum grade-point average must be maintained to permit continuing registration as a graduate special student. Students interested in applying as graduate special students should contact the Office of Admis sions and Records for applications . ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission require ments which are supplemented by specific require ments of the major departments of graduate study (i.e., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants in the fields of education , engineering, and the arts, sciences, and humanities should consult the general information section of the Graduate School portion of this bulletin as well as the following sec tions deal ing with requirements and deadlines for specific programs. Applicants in the fields of business administration, public affairs, and environmental design should refer to the sections of this bulletin on the Graduate School of Business Administration, the Graduate School of Public Affairs , and the College of Environmental Design. Admlaslon of Nondegree Special Students All correspondence and questions regarding admis sion as a special student should be directed to: Office of Admissions and Records 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2660 Persons desiring admission as special students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 629-2717 . APPLICATION DEADLINES Special Students Fall1979 Spring 1980 Summer 1980 Those who want to take undergraduate July 1 Dec . 1 Ma y 1 or graduate courses Those who want to change from special July 1 Dec . l May 1 to degree status . Those who want teacher certifies tion February 1 N.A . Februa ry 1 REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Persons who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a Uq4versity of Colorado degree are admitted as special students. Except dur ing the summer term, special students must be at least 21 years of age. Courses taken as a special stu dent are fully credited and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Persons who do not have an undergraduate degree are encouraged to apply to an undergraduate degree program rather than apply as special students. UCD will admit persons without an undergraduate degree as special students for one semester or summer term only; after that the student must apply to a regular degree program. Persons with a baccalaureate degree who seek teacher certification or renewal of certifica tion may be admitted as special students if they meet the requirements of the School of Education . Special students must maintain a grade point average of 2 . 0 at UCD. HOW TO APPLY To apply for admission as a special student, obtain a Special Student Application Form from the Office of Admissions and Records. Return the completed ap plication by the deadline for the term desired. There is no application fee, and no additional credentials are required . Applicants who seek teacher certification or renewal of teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit t he required credentials . Special students are advised that registration for courses is on a "space available" basis .

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CHANGING STATUS FROM SPECIAL TO DEGREE STUDENT Special students may apply for admission to an un dergraduate degree program b y completing the Special to Degree Application available from the Of fice of Admissions and Records. Academic credentials (i.e. , transcripts and/or test scores) and a $10 nonre fundable application fee also must be submitted with the application. Special students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may trans fer a maximum of 12 semester credits for courses taken as a special student to an undergraduate degree program , with approval by the dean. (Students enrolled as special students prior to the fall semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effec t between January of 1969 and August of 1970 . ) Special students may apply for admission to a graduate degree program by completing the applica tion required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 s emester hours of credit t oward the re quirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a special student at t he University o r at another recognized graduate school , or s ome combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a special stu pent during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program . Official Notification of Admission Official notification of admission to UCD as an un dergraduate, graduate, or spe cial student is provided by the Office of Admissions and Record s on a Stat ement of Admission Eligibili ty Form. Letters from the various schools and college s indi c ating acceptance into a particular program are subject to official admis sion to the institution. Applicant s who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time after submitting application materials should contact the Office of Admission s and Records , (303) 629-2660. II. TUITION AND FEES, EXPENSES, AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Tuition and Fees All tuition and fee charges are e stablis hed by the Board of Regents, the govern in g bod y o f t he Univer sity of Colorado , in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usuall y in the s pring ) by the Colorado General Assembly. The regents r eserve the right to change tuition and fee rat e s a t any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students s h o uld contac t the Office of Admissions and Records f o r further information on the tuition and fee charges for a parti cular term. The rates below are for the 1978-79 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost. G e n e ral Informati o n I 7 TUITION RATES FOR 1978-79 Credit H ours of Enrollme n t 0 . 3 . 4 . 5 -6 . 7 8 9 -18 F o r eac h h our over 1 8 OTHER FEES R esi d e n t $ 69 9 2 115 138 161 184 2 0 7 232 ad dition a l $ 1 5 N o nr esi d e n t $186 248 310 372 926 926 926 9 2 6 additional $ 6 2 1. Student activit y fee (mandatory for all stu dents): Fall s emester 1978 . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 71 Spring semester 197 9 . . . . . . . . $171 2. Matriculation fee (mandatory for all new stu dents): Degree students .............. $ 1 5 Special students ............ . $ 5 This is a one-time nonrefundable fee charged at the time of initial registration. No further charges will be made for adding or dropping courses or for ordering transcripts. A special student who becomes a <;iegree student will be charged $10 at the initial registration as a degree student. 3. H ealth insurance fee (automatic for all students unless waived): Fal l o r s pring s emester . . . . $44 .00 Summe r term ........ ..... $30.75 Health insurance coverage is automatic unless waived by the student by signing a waiver card and turning it in at the time of registration. Dependent coverage (spouse and/or children) is also available at an additional charge . Further information on health insurance is available from the Office for Student Affairs, 629-2861. 4. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by the Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation): Dis s ertation fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99 5 . CoPIRG fee (automatic for all students unless waived): ...... . . . . . ................. ..... $2.25 6 . Comprehensive examination fee (mandatory for graduate student enrolled for a comprehensive ex amination only): M i n i mum residen t t uiti o n ..... $69 Graduate students enrolled for a comprehensive ex amination will be assessed regular tuition and fees if they need hours toward graduation. 7. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course): 'Includes bond retirement fee.

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8 I Uni ve rsity of C o l o rado at Denver Breakage deposit . . ..... . ..... $10 This fee will be refunded at the e n d of the ter m if appropriate. 8. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses): Music fee .............. . . .... $18 College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $18 fee. PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES All tuition and fees are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term . Arrangements may be made through the Finance Office at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. A minimum down payment consisting of the resident tuition for 0-3 hours or one-third of the total tuition and fees, whic h ever is greater, must be made at the time of registration. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer term. Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Courses . A student with financial obliga tions to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credit. The only exception to this regulation involves stu dents with loans and other types of indebtedness which are payable after graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation . Any student who pays with a check which is not acceptable to the bank may be immediately dropped from the rolls of the University . Residency Clasalflcatlon for Tuition Purposes General Policies. A student is initially classified as a resident or nonresident student for tuition purposes at the time of application to the University . The clas sification is based on information furnished by the student and other relevant sources. To be eligible for in-state tuition (resident) status the following require ments ( as defined in the Colorado Revised Statutes, C hap t er 124, Article 18) must be met by students who are 21 years of age or older (or emancipated minors a defined by law): (1) the student must have been domiciled in Colorado for 12 consecutive months preceding the date of registration for the term in which in-state status is desired; (2) the student must demonstrate significant intent to make Colorado a fixed and permanent residence . Intent is demonstrated by compliance with other mandatory laws of the state (i.e., valid driver's license, valid motor vehicle registration, payment of state income tax, etc . ). An unemancipated minor assumes the domicile of his or her parents. . Once the student's status is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the con trary is presented . A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days after such a change occurs . An unemancipated minor whose parents move their residence outside of the state is considered a nonresident student from the date of the move and will be charged nonresident tui tion at the next registration. The student or his or her parent is required to notify the Office of Admissions and Records in writting within 15 days after such a change occurs. Similarly, an adult student or eman cipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days of the change. Petitioning for a Change in Residenc y Classifica tion. Any student who is 22 years of age or older, or an emancipated minor as by law, may change his or her residence and tuition classification status. Detailed information on the procedures which must be followed, including necessary petition forms, is available from the Office of Admissions and Records. Petitions will not be considered until an application for admission and supporting credentials have been received by the University . Changes in classification are effective at the time of the student's next registra tion. A student who willfully gives wrong information in order to avoid paying out-of-state tuition is subject to legal and disciplinary action. Estimated Expenses Educational expenses at UCD include tuition, fees, and the cost of books and related instructional materials. Students who do not live with their parents must also include the cost of housing and food ex penses. All students shou l d consider transportation and personal expenditures (i.e., clothing, entertain ment, etc.) in determining their expenses. Students who wish to review estimates of the cost of attendance at the University of Colorado at Denver should contact the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employ ment. The financial aid program at the University is designed to assist those students who would be unable to attend the University without aid. While the primary responsibility for meeting the costs of educa tion re s ts with individual students and their families, aid funds are offered to supplement whatever funds students and their families can provide. Since requests generally exceed the availability of funds , students and their families should be aware of procedures and deadlines in order to receive maximum consideration. Questions andrequests for forms s hould be directed to the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment at UCD.

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Determination of Financial Need and Award Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of attendance as defined by the institution (tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board , transportation and essential incidental expenses) and total resource s available to the student. These resources include a family contribution (sum mer sav ings, term earnings, a spouse contrib ution, and a parental contribution) and awards from agencies out side the University . F inancial need is determined by a na tional uniform needs analysis system administered by agencies such as the American College Testing Program. This system analyzes income and assets, family size, number of children in post-secondary education, s t u dent independence, etc ., to determine a reasonable student and/or family contribution. After the financial need is determined, students are ranked in order of financial need and are aided accor dingly until all funds are committed. The financial aid package normally consists of a self-help compo nent (loans and/or employment) and a gift aid compo nent (grants and scholarships) proportionate to the available funds and to the number of needy students applying . How to Apply Application forms may be obtained by contacting the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment. Students are asked to complete an institutional ap plication and a needs analysis form. Students will be contacted if additional information is necessary to complete the application. Parents are expected to contribute toward a stu dent' s educational costs. However, in certain cases students may be considered fmancially independent of their parents. To be eligible for financial aid as a self-supporting student, a student (1) cannot be claimed as a tax exemption, (2) cannot receive $750 or more, or (3) live at home for more than six consecutive weeks for the year aid is received and for the entire preceding calendar year. For example, for a student to receive aid as a self-supporting student during the 1979-80 academic year, the above three criteria must be met for 1978, 1979, and 1980. Note: Requirements for receiving aid as a self supporting student are subject to change by the federal government . Self-supporting students must document their status by providing income tax forms or other sup porting documents to show sufficient income to be self-supporting during the appropriate period of time . In some cases, additional documentation from parents is required to complete a student's applica tion. The information provided on the institutional application for financial aid is analyzed according to the uniform needs analysis fom ula to de t ermine the student's ability to contribute to his or her educational costs during the academic year. To be eligible for financial aid, students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents or have a refuge e General Information I 9 visa . Eligible foreign students are advised to include a photo-cop y of their visa cards with their applications to facilitate processing. Available Funds Undergraduate Students. Undergraduate students are eligible to submit the following three applications: 1. The U niversity application plus t he Family Financial Statement (FFS). Under this two-part ap plication the student will be consi dered for: Federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SE OG) Federal Work -Study Assistance Federal National Direct Student Loan ( NDSL ) State Col orado Student Grant (CSG) State Co lora do Work-Study Assistance State and Federal Colorado Student Incen tive Grant (CSIG) I nstitutiona l Grant Assistance (Students classified as nonresident for tuition pur poses are not eligible for state financial aid funds.) 2. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant. This is a separate federal grant program which students can apply for if they do not apply for financial aid under number one above . 3. Federally Insured Student Loan/Guaranteed Student Loan. See the Types of Aid Available section for details. Graduate Students: Graduate students are eligible to submit the following two applications: 1. The University application plu s the Family Financial Statement (FFS). Under this two-part ap plication, the student will be co nsidered for: Fede ral Work-Study Assistance Federal National Direct Student Loan (NDSL) State of Colorad o Graduate Grant 2. Federally Insured Student Loan/Guaranteed Student Loan. See the Types of Aid Available section for deta ils. Deadlines April 2 -All undergraduate students applying for financial aid for the summer term and/or academic year. October 1 -All undergradua te students applying for spring semester financial aid. April 1 -Graduate students applying for summer term financial aid. June 15 -Graduate students applying for financial aid for the fall and spring semesters. October 1 -Graduate students applying for finan cial aid for the spring semester. Special Note: An application for financial aid does not constitute an application for admission to t he University . Please contact the Admissions and Records Office of the University for application forms and procedures. Applicants will not receive financial

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10 I University of Colorado at Den ver aid until they are enrolled in a degree program at the University. Special students are not eligible for finan cial aid. Types o f Aid Available S C HOLARSHIPS UCD Sclwlarships . UCD scholarships provide up to $300 for entering Colorado residents of the Denver metropolitan area who are freshman or transfer appli cants . These awards are funded by the State of Colorado. Students should contact the Office of Ad missions and Records for application information. Colorado Scholarships. Colorado Scholars Awards provide up to $300 for Colorado residents who have at least a 3.0 grade-point average and have attended the University for at least 24 semester credit hours . These scholarships are funded by the State of Colorado. In formation and application materials are available in the Office of Financial Aid. G R ANTS Basic Educational Opportunity Grant. The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant is a source of federal grant aid for which all students pursuing their first undergraduate degree must apply. Application can be made by submitting the Family Financial Statement or the separate Basic Grant application. Applications can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid. Grant amounts vary depending on financial need, costs at the institution, and Congressional allocation. This program is the base of all financial aid. Colorado Student Grant. The Colorado Student Grant is an undergraduate grant for Colorado resi dents. This grant is based on financial need and funds are allotted to the University by the State of Colorado. Amounts vary from approximately $100 to $1,000 per year. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid and the Family Financial Statement. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant . Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are un d ergraduate federal grants varying in amounts from $200 to $1,500 per year. The total that may be awarded to one student is $4,000 for a four-year course of study. These grants are based on student need and avail ab ility of funds. This aid cannot exceed 50 per cent of financial need for a student and must be matched with some other form of financial aid. Ap plication for this grant is made by submitting the University application and the Family Financial Statement. Graduate Grant. Grants for graduate students are available on a limited basis and will be awarded to students as eligibility and funds allow. Application is made by submitting the University application and the Family Financial Statement to the Office of Financial Aid. LOANS National Dire c t Student Loans . National Direct Student Loans are federal loans available to undergraduate and graduate students with financial need. A student may borrow up to (a) $2,500 during the freshman and sophomore years; (b) $5,000 total for undergraduate study; (c) $10,000 for total graduate and undergradu ate study . Application for the loan is made by submitting the University Ap plication for Financial Aid and the Family Financial Statement. Federally Insured Student Loan/Guaranteed Stu dent Loan Programs . These two programs enable un dergraduate and graduate students to borrow directly from a bank, credit union, savings and loan associa tion, or other participating lenders who are willing to make the educational loan. The loan is guaranteed by a state or private nonprofit agency and insured by the federal government. Information and applications may be obtained from the lender. EMPLOYME N T College Work-Study Program . The College Work Study Program is designed to provide jobs to un dergraduate and graduate students who have finan cial need. The program is funded by the federal government and the State of Colorado. Employment is arranged whenever possible in the student's major area of interest, with job opportunities both on-and off-campus. Awards average up to $1,600 per academic year . For details contact the Office of Stu dent Employment. Application for this aid is made by submitting t h e University Application for Financial Aid and the Family Fi n ancial Statement. Part-time Student Employment. The Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment assists stu dents in obtaining part-time employment other than that based on financial need. Further information and application may be obtain e d from the office . Other Sources of Ai d See the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment for details of these programs: Bureau of Indian Affairs . Grants are available to Native American students. LEEP Grants and Loans. Grants and loans for tui tion, fees, and books are available to personnel work ing full time in law enforcement. Short-Term Loans . Small, temporary loans are made to students facing financial emergencies. These loans are to be repaid during the semester. Academic Requirements Students receiving financial aid must demonstrate that they are maintaining normal progress and are in good standing at the University . Normal academic progress is defined as completing the minimum number of hours stipulated on the notification of financial aid by obtaining a grade of D or better for that number of hours. Less than normal progress can result in the loss of future financial aid. Part-time stu dents may be considered for aid for the cost of tuition, fees, and books.

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Duration of Aid Financial aid is offered for one year (two academic semesters). Students must reapply for summer and for each academic year, prior to the established deadlines. Use of Funds All financial aid awards are to be used only for im mediate educational expenses. These expenses in clude tuition, fees, books , supplies, room and board , transportation and essential miscellaneous expenses , such as clothing , medical, etc. Refunds The University tuition refund policy is published in the Schedule of Courses for each ter.m. Students receiving fmancial aid may be required to return any refund to the University's financial aid accounts. Student Rights Students have certain rights and responsibilities regarding financial aid and student employment . The rights are as following: 1. Information must be available to students regarding the following: a. Applica . tion procedures and deadlines. b. Available programs. c. Method of determining financial need. d. Determination of aid awards. e. Disbursements of awards. f. Award changes and their reasons. g. Reasons for aid refusal. 2. The financial aid officer must be available at specific times to talk to students regarding their problems and needs. • 3. Students have the right to. appeal to the Finan cial Aid/Student Employment Committee regarding decisions or situations they regard as unfavorable. 4. Students borrowing under the National Direct Student Loan program have the right to the following information: a. A copy of the promissory note indicating the specifics of the loan . b. Specifics of the repayment plan. c . Truth-in-lending requirements. Student Responsibilities 1. Students must abide by application procedures and deadlines . 2. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment of any changes which affect their financial status (e.g., marriage, employment , birth of a child, etc.) 3. Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress as specific ally outlined by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment . 4. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment of all changes in their enrollment. General Information I 11 5. Students with National Direct Student Loans must follow the procedures below when they ter minate enrollment: a. Exit interview at the Finance Office. b . Notification to the Univers ity of current ad dress and phone . c. Notification of c ancellation or deferment (when applicable). d . Actual repayments of the loan. For further information concerning financial aid and student employment , please contact the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment, Room 1, UCD Administration Building, 629-2886. Specific ap plication procedures and policies are subject to change. Ill. REGISTRATION: SELECTING A PROGRAM AND COURSES Selecting a Program and Couraes New and continuing UCD students are urged to review Section VI and the following sections of this bulletin. Section VI describes the traditional and non traditional instructional programs available at UCD, and the sections which follow it give information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, graduation require ments, course load policies, and other information and specific policies. Courses available during a par ticular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Courses, published several weeks before registration and available from the Office of Admis sions and Records and the various deans' offices. Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning a program or selecting courses should contact the college or school in which they are enrolled to arrange for a counseling appointment. The appoint ment should be made prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their graduate department for assistance . Orientation An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall semester , usually on the first day of registration. The program is conducted by the Office of Admissions and Records and introduces the programs, activities , and services available at UCD, in addition to providing information on degree requirements , how to register , and similar matters. Registration GENERAL PROCEDURES Registration for new students is held the week before classes begin on the dates indicated in the Schedule of Courses , published several weeks before registration. Only students who have been accepted for enrollment for a particular term may register for courses.

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12 I Uni v ersit y of Colorado at D enver LATE REGISTRATION Late registration dates are indicated in the Schedule of Courses. Students who register late may be charged a fee and may have difficulty enrolling in the courses they want because of limited space. PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES All tuition and fees are assessed and payable at registration. Arrangements may be made with the Finance Office at the time of registration to defer pay ment of a portion of the charges with a minimum down payment or one-third of the tuition, whichever is greater. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Courses . INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION UCD students may register for courses offered by Metropolitan State College and the Community Col lege of Denver-Auraria with approval of their dean . Refer to the Schedule of Courses for more informa tion. IV. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-level courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination . By passing an examina tion , the student will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligi ble to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student' s formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is a p propriate. There are three types of examinations as described below. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) , allows stu dents to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Stu dents who take advanced placement courses and sub sequently receive scores of 3, 4, or 51 on the CEEB Ad vanced Placement Examination are given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 31 are considered for advanced placement by the dis cipline concerned . For more information, contact y our high school counselor or the Office of Admis sion s a nd Records. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Students may receive credit by examination for work completed by private study or t hrough employ ment experience. To qualify for an examination, t he student must be formally working toward a degree a t UCD and have a grade-point average of at least 2.0. Examinations are arranged through the Office of Ad missions and Records, and a nonrefundable fee is charged. Students should contact the office of the dean of the college or school in which the student is enrolled . COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM An exciting challenge is available to incoming UCD students who may earn University credit by examina tion in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are en couraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. The cost for a single examination is $20. Students who are interested in CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college. Credit for Courses Taken at Other Institutions Undergraduate credit for courses taken at other collegiate institutions will be accepted upon ap proval by the Office of Admissions and Records, the school or college concerned, and/or the major depart ment. In general, UCD will accept transfer credits in sofar as they meet the degree, residence, and other re qui r ements of the student's program at UCD . For trans fer credit to be considered , the course work must have been taken at a college or university of recognized standing and a grade of Cor higher must have been earned. A maximum of 72 semester credit hours (or 108 quarter credit hours) of junior college work may be applied toward the requirements for the baccalaureate degree . No credit is allowed for vocationaVtechnical, remedial, or religious/doctrinal courses. A maximum of 60 semester hours of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester hours of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. Transfer credit is not included in a student's grade-point average but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. The College of Business and Administration generally limits transfer credit for business courses taken a t the lower division level. All courses in the a r ea of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado unless written approval is obtained from the div i sion head. A maximum of 60 semester hours of junior college work and 9 semester hours of business courses taken through correspondence study may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to deter mine their acceptability , and required business course s and those in the area of emphasis may not be taken through correspondence . 'Stu dents in the College of Enginee r ing an d Applied Sc i e n ce m ust r ecei v e sco res of 4 o r 5 for credit to be g r a n ted ; students wit h sco r es o f 3 may b e consid e r ed b y t h e d e p a r tme n t con c erned . All credit must be validated b y subsequent a cade mic performance.

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Credit for Independent Study Undergraduate students may register for indepen dent study projects with written approval by the dean of the college or school and the appropriate faculty member. A maximum of 3 semester hours of credit may be given for independent study per semester. Policies on the application of independent study credit toward baccalaureate degree requirements are : College of Liberal Arts and Science s .......... . M ax im um o f 1 2 se me s ter h o urs C o llege of Business and Administration ......... Max i mum o f 6 s emes t er hours , including courses in experimen t al studies S chool of Educa tio n ........ .............. .... maxi m um of 12 s eme s ter hou rs College of Engineering and Applied Science . ..... . .... Variable College of Music ...................... . ............. Variable Credit for Military Service, Schooling and ROTC MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING Applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application in order to have credit for service and education evaluated: (1) copies of discharge and separation papers, and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service (USAF personnel will furnish an official transcript from the community college at the appropriate Air Force facility). Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that such credit is applicable to the degree sought at UCD. Credit for courses completed through the U.S . Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions (see above) . RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 12 . semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sop homore ROTC courses. Further more, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be ap plied toward baccalaureate degree requirements and only if the ROTC program is completed. Grading System and Policies The following grading system and procedures for pass/fa il registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been stan dardized for all schools and colleges of University effective with the 1974-75 academic year . G e n e r al Informat i on I 1 3 GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for whatever grade s y mbol ( A , B , C , D , F , IF , IW, or IP ) is to be assigned . Special s y mbols (NC , W, and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by t he instructor but are automatically converted by the grade applica t ion sys t em, expla i ned under Pass/ Fail Procedure. A -sup e rior/excell ent-4 credit points pe r credit h o ur. B-goo d/b e tter than a v erage 3 credit points per c redit hour. C-comp e t e nt/avera ge 2 credit points per credit hour. D minimum pas s ing ! credit point per credit hour . F fail i ng no credit points per credit hour. IF in c omplete-conversion after one academic y ear to F . IWincomplete-conversion after one academic year to W. !P-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only . P/F -pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor ' s degree. HIP/F -honors/pass/fail-intended for honors courses; credit hours count twoard the degree but are not included in t he grade point average. SPECIAL SYMBOLS NCindicates registration on a no-credit basis. W indicates withdrawal without c redit . Y indicates the final grade roster was not received by the t ime grades were processed. PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE 1. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pas s/fail basis should do so during regular registration procedures . (Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited towar d the bachelor ' s degree). Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be effected only dur ing the regular drop/add period . 2 . The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records. 3 . Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of special pass/fail registration . All students who register on a pass/fail basis appear on the regu lar class ros ter , and a normal letter grade is assig ned by the professor. When grades are re ceived in the Records Office, those registrations which require a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P . 4 . Only 6 hour s of course work may be P/F in any given semester. 5 . Exception to the pass/fail regulations is permit ted for certain specified courses offered by t he School

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14 I University of Colora do at Denver PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICfiONS Colleg e Liberal Arts and Sciences Business and Administration Education Engineering and Applied Science Graduate Scho o l Music G e n e ra l May be restricted in certain majors; n ot include d in 30 hours of C or better work re quired for major May n ot be used for "core" courses required for gradua tion and courses in area of emphasis No restrictions Courses must be de sign ated b y major depa rtme nt; stu de nts without major not eligi ble; recommended maximum one course/semester Not applicable towa rd degree Same as bu siness of Education, the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs. 6 . Graduate degree students can exercise the PIF option for undergraduate courses only. However, a grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement. Adding and Dropping Couraee Adding Courses. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 5 days of classes , provided there is space available . Approval signatures are not required. Dropping Courses: 1. Students will be able to drop courses during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semesters (7th day of the summer term) . Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped and signatures are not re quired. 2. Mter the 12th day of a fall or s pring semester (7th day of a summer term), only the instructor's signature must be obtained and the instructor must indicate either a drop without discredit or failing. Tuition will be charged and the courses will appear on the student's permanent record with a W grade. 3 . Mter the iOth week of a fall or spring semester (5th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are. circumstances clearly beyond the student's control. In addition to the in structors certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses. Tuition will be charged even though the drop is allowed . Withdrawal From the University To withdraw from the University, the student ob tains approval of the dean's office, Finance Office , 16 H ours Maximum Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative educa tio n, and certsin teacher cer tificat i o n courses Includes credit received t hrou g h C LEP and advanced stan ding exami nation s Includes courses taken in the honors program Inc! udes courses taken in t he honors program Transfer Students May not be used b y students graduating with only 3 0 sem es te r hours taken at t he U n ive r s it y Maximum of 1 semester hour of pass/fail for every 8 s emes ter hours attempted at the University Maximum of 1 semester hour of pass/fail may be applied to ward graduation for e v ery 9 semeste r h ours taken in t he college and the Office of Admissions and Records. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student' s perma nent record page . If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (8th day of the summer term) , the courses will not appear on the student's permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day , the courses will appear with W grades. Stu dents may not withdraw after the lOth week of the semester (5th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their con trol. Students who are receiving veterans ' benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of the appropriate office(s). A student who ceases to attend classes without of ficially withdrawing from the University will receive a grade ofF for all course work enrolled for during that term. A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the associate dean of the Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without com municating with the associate dean and filing the ap propriate Withdrawal Form , will be marked as having failed their courses for the term. For specific signatures and refunds the student must refer to the Schedule of Courses published prior to the beginning of each term. Inspection of Educational Recorda Periodically , but not . less than annually, the University of Colorado inform s students of the Family Educational Right s and Privacy Act of 1974. This act, with which the institution intends to comply fully, was designated to protect the privac y of educational records , to establish the right of students to inspect

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and review their educational records , and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or mis leading data thro ugh informal and formal hearings . Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERP A) concerning alleged failures by the institu tion to comply with the act. Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provi sions of the act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado. A directory of records which lists all educational records maintained on students by this institution may be found in the offices of the chancellor on each campus. The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information. Such information may be disclosed by the institution for any purpose, a t its discretion. These items are : name , address , telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards , honors , degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activi ties, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. Currently enrolled students may withhold dis closure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the 11th day of classes in any given term. Forms requesting the with holding of directory information are available in the Offices of Admissions and Records. The University of Colorado assumes that failure on the part of any student to request specifically the withholding of categories of directory information in dicates individual approval for disclosure . Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Admissions and Records. Good Standing To remain in good standing within a particular dis cipline, a student must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (C) in all course work attempted. A minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must also be maintained to qualify for an undergraduate degree. Policies on academic probation, suspension, and dis missal vary by college or school, and students should refer to the sections of this bulletin dealing with the colleges and schools for information. Student Classification Students who have passed fewer than 30 semester hours are classified as freshmen. To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have passed 30 semester hours; to be classified as a junior, 60 hours ; and to be classified a s a senior, 90 hours of credit. All transfer students will be classified on t he same basis according General Information I 15 to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado . Student Indebtedness A student with financial obliga tions to the Univer sity will not be permitted to register for any subse quent term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credit from the University. Transcripts will not be released to a student with a financial obligation to the University . The only excep tio n to this policy involves students who have loans or other types of indebtedness which mature after graduation. V. SERVICES FOR STUDENTS The Division of Student Affairs offers educational and personal support services and programs designed to assist students in meeting their educational and personal growth objectives. The division office telephone number is 629-2861. The University of Colorado at Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and employ ment. In pursuance of this policy , no UCD depart ment, unit, discipline, or employee shall discriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed , color, age , national or i gin , or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees. Academic Honorary Societies Academic honorary societies are afflliated with each of the schools and colleges. Further information may be obtained from the deans ' offices . Alumni and Friends Program The UCD Alumni and Friends organization was es tablished in 1975 to support the University of Colorado at Denver . Membership is open to all University of Colorado graduates, former students, and friends of the University. The organization publishes a bimonthly newsletter of alumni and University activities, coordinates the UCD Teacher Recognition Awards Program, assists with student recruitment and registra tio n, and ad vises on special media projects . Members work with UCD students, faculty, and staff in sponsoring a reception for each graduating class, and functions are planned which bring alumni and friends back to the campus . The of fice is located in Room 706 of the UCD Administr atio n Building, telephone 629-2665 . Counseling Center The services of the Counseling Center are open to all students and prospective students. Personal and vocational counseling, group experiences, and testing are provided by trained counselors. Interviews are confidential and there is no fee for counseling. The of fice telephone number is 629-2861.

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16 I Uni ve r sity of Colo rado at D e n ve r Disabled Student Services Disabled Student Services handles the special needs of physically handicapped students, helping them to obtain a university education . Services in clude academic support orientation programs, registration assistance, and the assignment of reserved parking spaces to students with serious physical impairments . The office telephone number is 629-8354 . Health Insurance Program The student medical-hospital-surgical plan is automatic for all students unless waived. Dependent coverage is available at an additional charge. Stu dents may waive this coverage by signing a waiver card and returning the card at the time of registration. Information may be obtained at 629-2861. International Student Services The Office for Student Relations provides as sistance to the more than 300 international students who attend UCD . The office helps foreign students with such requirements as immigration certifications and passport assistance, and supplies information on study abroad programs, international student I.D. cards, and oversea s travel. Student Conduct, Policies, and Standards The Offi c e for Student Relations, which protects student rights and responsibilities, administers the Code of Student Conduct. When a student enrolls in the Univer s ity , he or she agrees to participate meaningfull y in the life of t he University and to share in the obligation to preserve and promote its educational endeavors . Each student preserve s his or her rights as a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or to tolerate any impingement on the rights of others. Copies of the code and information regarding all student grievance procedures may be ob tained in the Off ic e f or Student Relations. Telephone, 629-2861. Student Employment Opportunities The Office of Financial Aid offers job listings to all enrolled UCD students . Both on campus and off campus job openings are listed. Students receiving financial aid may use this ser vice only i f t he Offic e of Financial Aid has determim i d that earnings from t he job in question will not exceed the am ount of their unmet need. Telephone , 629-2886 . For information on career-related job opportunities , refer t o Coopera t ive Education under Academic Programs. Career Services This o f fice coord i nates career planning, c areer counsel i ng, v o cation a l interest exploration , and career placemen t f or U CD students and alumni . C o un seling pro g ram s are a v ailable t o help students plan t he i r f u t ure s and attain skills necessary for the achievement of career goals. Ass istance is provided in de v eloping skills e s sential for resume preparation and interviewing techniques . L o cal and national employers list ayailable career vacancies and visit the campus to recruit qualified personnel. Students are advised to register for this service early in t heir senior year. Telephone, 629-2861. Study Skills Center The S tudy Skills Center is administered by the Col lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences on behalf of UCD. The purpose of the center is to help UCD students develop method s of efficient study. Services are available to help specifically with particular subject area s , as well a s t o strengthen general academic and re s earch s kills . Telephone, 629-2802. Veterans Affairs The Office o f Veterans Affairs offers all student vet erans counseling regarding school attendance re quirements , benefits, personal and vocational as sistance , and o t her program information . Consult the veterans repres e ntative, 629-2630. Women's Center The Women ' s Center provides counseling regarding vocational choices and personal and school-related problems . The center is also a place to meet other women students or join a discussion group. Telephone, 629-2815 . VI. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Degree Programs For complete bachelor' s and master's degree programs offered by UCD , see t he Degree Programs at a G lance chart at t he beginning of this bulletin . UCD also offers preprofessional programs in law , journali s m, and the health sciences (child health as s ociat e , dental hygiene, dentistry, medical technology, m e dicine , nursing, optometry, os te opathy , pharmacy , physical therapy, podiatry, and vete r in ar y medicine). Courses in many other un dergraduate and graduate areas are offered at UCD, bu t degrees mus t be completed at the University of Col o rad o at Boulder . T h e re mainin g sections of this bulletin discuss in deta i l each school and college and provide informa tion o n their s pecific policies on requirements for grad u a t i o n, course requirements for various majors, c our s e load policies , and similar information . Course offering s appear i n a separate section of this bulletin . Cooperative Education Program 1047 Ninth Street 629-2892 The Cooperative Education Program provides stu dents with an opportunity to find work experience relevant to their academic programs. The program is

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open to all students who have completed their freshman year and have maintained a grade-point average of a t least 2.5 . The cooperative internship program consists of jobs developed b y the program staff in a wide variety of federal, state, and private agencies and businesses . Po s itions are specificall y geared to students' academic and career goals. Cooperative education s t udents can either work full time b y alternating semester s of work wit h semesters of full-time school or they can work part time year around. Students enrolled in the College of Liberal A rts and Sciences are eligible to r eceive credit for pre professional or professional work experience (see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin) . Educational Opportunity Program R oom 212, 1100 Fourteenth Street 6 29-2700 The Educational Opportunity Programs assist all educationall y students at UCD . Supp_ort mclude specialized recruiting, inten sive counseling , tutorial services , and community out reach programs . The program is designed to provide assistance to minority students and to acquaint students with the history and culture of Asian Americans, Blacks, Mexican American s and Native Americans . Student organizations provide assistance with recruitment , counseling , and tutoring ; financial assistance i s available through grants and the Work/Stud y Program . Courses are offered in Asian American , Black, Mexican American and Native American Studies . These courses are open to all stu dents and are described in t he Course Description sec tion of this bulletin. Reserve Officer Training Programs U . S . Air Force Reser v e Officer Training Corps (AF R OTC): Folsom Stadium, Gate 3, University of Colorado a t B o ulder , B o ulder , Colorad o 80309 492' U.S. Arm y Re s erve Officer Training Corps (ROTC ) : Department of Military Science , University of Colorado a t Boulder, Boulder , Colorado 80309 492-6495 ' Universit y of Colorado at Denver students may par ticipate in t he Air Force ROTC program offered by the Univer s i t y of Colorado at Boulder and the Army ROTC pro gram offered a t UC D . The programs enable students to earn a commission in the Air Force or Army while earning a University degree . Both the Army and Air Force ROTC offer four-year program s designed for fre shman student s and two-year program s for junior students. Graduat e students may al s o enroll in t he Air Force tw o y ear program . Both program s provide financ i al as s i s tance t o students in the junior and s enior years , and the Air Force ROTC includes a sc holar s hip pro gram. Students s hould ap ply for the f o ur year program prior to or during their fre shman year and f o r t he two-year progr a m no later than earl y i n the s pring s emester of t heir s ophomore year . G ene r al Info rma tion I 17 Senior Citizen Program UCD ' s Office o f Academic Affa i r s coord i n ates tuition-free classes f o r persons 60 y ear s o f a g e a nd over . Senior citizens may regi ster for any cla ss on a noncredit/audit basis as long a s spac e is avail a ble. Senior citizens should register and pick up class registration forms in Room 810, U CD Administr ation Building. and s hould t ake the completed form s to the first ses s ion of class f o r t he instruc to r 's appro v al. T h e form then s hould be returned to Room 810, and a stu dent I.D. card will be issued which entitles se nior citizens to the same privileges as regular degree stu dents. For further information call 629-2 550. Division of Continuing Edu c ation The Division of Continuing Education a t UC D provides lifelong learning experiences for people of all ages seeking to attain career and personal development goals and serves a society trying to cope with t he problems and realities of rapidly changing patterns o f The division offers a large noncredi t program rangmg from one-day workshops t o cer t i fic a t e programs requiring several years to complete. Cla ss e s meet throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Off campus credit classes are offered in the p u blic schools , Lowry Air Force Base, and Fitzsimon s A rmy Medical Center . Noncredit programs are open t o all adults regardless of previous education o r t raining. Som e ad yanced courses require a background i n a specifi c s ub Ject matter area. Examples of these cour s es in c lude licensing and professional de s i gnation r e fr es h e r courses for engineers , accountan ts, and life in s ur a n c e Except in some program s , n o g rade IS awarded upon completiOn of a course . O ff campus credit classes supplement the re g ular academic programs offered at UCD. Thes e s p ecia l purpose programs include recer t ifica t i o n cla ss e s for school teachers , va c ation college , and cer tificate programs for government profe s sional s . Ad mission requirements and refund policie s for off campus instruction are identical w i t h requirem e nts for enrollment in UCD. Individuals who have n ev er been enrolled on any campus of the Unive rsity o f Colorado u s ually are admitted to off-campus in struc tion as special students . Indi v idual s interested in obtainin g a cop y of the Di v ision o f C ontinui n g Educati o n Bulleti n o r oth er i n formation may write or call the div i s i o n off ice at UCD , 1100 14th Street, 629-2735. BOARD OF REGENTS JACK KENT ANDERS O N , Gol d en, term expires 1985 RACHEL B . NOEL , D enver, te r m exp ir es 1985 L OUIS F . BEIN , Ber t h o ud , te rm e x p ire s 1981 RICHARD M. B ERNICK, Denver, term expi r es 1981 FRED M. BET Z, JR., La mar, t e rm expi r es 1983 PETER D I ETZE , B o uld e r , te rm expires 1985 BYRON L. J OHNSON , De nver , term expires 1983 S ANDY F. KRAEM E R , Col ora d o S pr i n gs, term expi r es 1983 DAVI D SUNDERLAND, Colorado Spr i ngs, term expi r es 1981

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18 I University of Colorado at Denver ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS University-Wide ROLAND C. RAUTENSTRAUS, President of the University; Professor of Civil Engineering . B.S. (C.E.), M.S., University of Colorado. University of Colorado at Denver HAROLD H. HAAK, Chancellor; Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., M.A . , U ni versity of Wiscon sin; Ph.D., Princeton University. WILLIAM A. JENKINS, Vice C h ancellor for Academic Affairs ; Professor of Educati on. B . S., New York U niver sity; M.S., Ph.D. , University of Illinois. MARTIN L. MOODY , Vice Chancellor for Administration; Professor of Civil Engineering . B.S . (C. E.) , University of Mi ssouri; M . S . (C.E.), University of Colorado; Ph.D . (C.E.), Stanford University. Professional Engineer: Colorado . PAUL J. KOPECKY , Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Assistant Professor of Education. B .A., University of Northern Co lorado; M .A., Ed. D., University of Colorado. KENNETH E. HERMAN, Director , Budget and Finance . B . S . (Bus.), University of Colorado. GEORGE L. BURNHAM, Director , Admiss ions and Records . B.A., William Jewell College; M.A., University of Kansas City. ELLEN CARUSO , Director , Alumni and Friends . B .A., University of Montana . FLOYD C . MANN , Director , Institute for Urban and Public Policy R esearch; Professor of Publi c Affairs. B .A., M.A., University of I owa; Ph.D. , University of Mich i gan . DONALD E. RIGGS, Dire ctor, Auraria Libraries; Associate Profes sor. B.A ., Glenville State College; M.A., West Virginia University; M . L.S . , U niversity of Pittsburgh; Ed. D., Virginia Polytechnic In stitute and State University. TOM S. STEIN, Director, Community Relations. B .A., Carleton College; M.A., University of Col orado . GORDON G . BARNEWALL, Associate Dean, College of Busines s and Administration and Graduate School of Bu si ne ss Administra tion; Associate Professor of Marketing. B . S ., U n iv ersity of Colorado; M.B.A. , Ph. D., Ohio State U niversity. PAUL E. BARTLETT , Associate Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Professor of Civil Engineering. B.S. (C.E .), B .S. ( Bu s.), M . S . (C.E.), Univers ity of Colorado. Professional Engineer : Colorado . WILLIAM D. BOUB, Dean, Summer Sessio n ; Director, Division of Continuing Education. B . S., Kansas State Teach ers Coll ege; M . S ., University of Illinois. DANIEL FALLON, Dean , College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ; Professor of Psychology . B . A . , Antioch College; M . A ., Ph.D., University of Virginia. GERALD W. LUNDQUIST, Associate Dean, Sc h ool of Education ; Professor of Education . B .A., University of Puget Soun d ; M . A ., Ph.D., Arizona State University. DWAYNE C . NUZUM, Dean, College of Environm ental Design ; A s sociate Professor of Architecture. B.Arch. , U niversity o f Colorado; M.(Arch .), Massachusetts Institute of Tec hnol ogy; Doctoral (Town Planning), Delf t Technical University, The Netherlands. Registe red Architect: Colorado, Virginia. FRANZ L. ROEHMANN, Acting Associate Dean, College of Music; Associate Professo r of Music. B .S., State University of New York ; M. Mus., Ed.D., University of Illinois. ROBERT N. ROGERS , Associate Dean , Graduate School; Professor of Physics. B . S., Ph.D., Stanford Univers ity . ROBERT F . WILCOX , Dean, Graduate Sc hool of Public Affairs ; Professor of Public Affairs . M.A., Columbi a University; A . B., M . A., Ph. D ., Stanford University.

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College of Liberal Arts a n d Scienc e s Daniel Fallon, Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Study of the liberal arts and sciences aims t o develop human potential in order to bring the best of human intellect and emotion to bear on the ex periences and challenges of life. By pro v iding a broad educational foundation, the arts and sciences prepare students to initiate careers , to change careers in midlife, to pursue advanced study in a discipline, t o study for a professional career such as law or medicine, and, in general, to lead a rewarding and productive life. The curriculum helps students to in crease substantive knowledge, to learn skills such as logical argument and clear expression , to gain new in sights about relationships in nature and society, to deve l op critical thought and interpretive ability, to solve complex problems rationally, and to heighten aesthetic appreciation. To accomplish these aims, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences supports a vigorous interaction between faculty and students . A young and dedicated faculty with strong academic credentials is commit ted to highly motivated urban students who represent a broad range of age and experience . Thus, the cur ric u lum of the College maintains traditionally high university academic standards while providing numerous flexible learning opportunities to meet the varied objectives of university students from the Denver metropolitan area . At the undergraduate level, the College offers a high-quality liberal educational program that also prepares students for su b sequent professional and graduate s tudy. At the gra d uate level, the College offers students disciplinary a nd broad interdisciplinary master's degree programs which may serve as a means of beginning study towards doctoral degrees. Because students are consulted and involved in the design of both undergraduate and graduate programs , the curriculum of the College reflects the concerns of D enver area students. There are many opportunities to study urban problems , confront contemporary is sues, participate in off-campus working internships , and in general make use of the resources of the ci t y . To accommodate the many students who are employed full time during the day , about half of all courses offered by the College are scheduled after 5 p.m . Many s tudents enroll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to study the liberal arts and participate in the general education associated with the B.A. or B.F.A. degree as an end in itself . Upon receiving a degree , some students decide to continue study at the gradua t e level. Others set aside further formal study and initiate careers. Because a liberal education provides a broad foundation in problem-solving skills and substantive knowledge that can be widely ap plied , graduates of the College have begun careers in a variet y of positions in industry , commerce, and government. Many students also enroll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences specifically to prepare themselves for admission to one of the professional schools of the University , which include the School of Dentistry, School of Education , School of Journalism , School of Law , School ofMedicine , School of Nursing, School of Pharmacy , and Graduate School of Public Affairs. The specific admission requirements for each of these professional schools can be met in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . The faculty of the College provide instruction at the undergraduate level through three academic divi sions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Physic a l Sciences , and Social Sciences. Each division offers a wide variety of curricula including traditional un dergraduate major programs , interdisciplinary studies , and preprofessional programs . The degrees offered by the College at the un dergraduate level are the Bachelor of Arts (B.A . ) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (B. F.A . ) . A number of degrees are offered at the graduate level. MAJOR PROGRAMS Students can earn the Bachelor of Arts (B.A . ) degree in the following areas: Ant hrop ology Biology Ch e m istry C o mmunicati o n and t hea t r e Econom ics Engli s h ( students may also tak e a s pe ci al writing pr ogr am o ption ) Ethnic s t ud i es Fine arts (s tudents ma y stud y for eit her a B . A . or B . F . A . degree) Fren c h Geography Geology Germ a n Hi sto r y

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20 I Universit y of Colorado at Denver Mathematics (students may also take a s pecial computer science option ) Philosophy Physics Political science Population dynamics Psycho l o g y Sociology Spanish Urban studies Special options are available for those students who would like to distribute their major program studies among two or more disciplinary majors (distributed studies) or who would like to propose a unique major program tailored to meet a specific objective (in dividually structured major). The College also provides the necessary course work to prepare students for careers in elementary or secon dary teaching, journalism, and law, as well as the fol lowing health science fields: child health associate, dental hygiene, dentistry, medical technology, medicine, nursing, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy , physical therapy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Double Majora and Second Degrees Students may graduate with more than one major (e.g. , mathematics and French) by completing all re quirements for both majors. Students who have been awarded a bachelor's degree (either from the College or elsewhere) may be granted a second bachelor's degree provided that (a) all general requirements for the degree have been met; (b) the major for the second bachelor's degree is dif ferent from the major for the first; and (c) at least 30 hours are completed in this College after admission to the second degree program. Students may earn two degrees from the University of Colorado simultaneously by fulfilling all require ments for both degrees. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requires that a student complete at least 90 liberal arts credits and 150 total credits in order to be granted two bachelor's degrees . It is recommended that students planning one of these multiple programs consult with the College Ad vising Office at the earliest possible date. Note: Graduate degree programs offered by the faculty of the College through the Graduate School section of this bulletin. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Entering First-Year Students Students planning to enter the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must meet the requirements described in the General Information section of this bulletin under Admission Policies and Procedures. Applicants to the College are considered for admission according to the following schedule.1 If : And : Then: Your Rankin Or Your HighSchoo l YourACT Combined Your Status for Class I s Composite SAT Score Admission Is Upper 1/2 23 or higher 1,000 or higher A ss ured admission Upper 2/3 18-23 800 or higher Considered on an individual bas is Lower 1/2 Below 18 Below800 Considered by Admi ssi ons Committee Transfer Students Students who have attended another college or uni versity are expected to meet the general requirements for admission of transfer students as described in the General Information section of this bulletin. Appli cants who have been away from a college environment for more than three yea rs will be considered on the basis of all factors available: high school record, test scores, original college admission qualifications , col lege performance , and interim experiences that might suggest potential success in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. A maximum of 72 semester hours taken at a community college may be applied toward a degree in the College. ACADEMIC POLICIES Students are referred to the General Information section of this bulletin for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at UCD . The policies which follow apply specifically to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct themselves in ac cordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Therefore, the faculty assumes that term papers, reports, studio work, results of laboratory ex periments, and examinations submitted by the stu dent represent the student's own work . Students are referred to the Statement on Academic Honesty of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences , available from the Office of the Dean for guidance on generally ac ceptable limits on cooperation in the preparation of academic work , and for a discussion of what con stitutes academic dishonesty . Academic dishonesty, such as plagiarism or cheating, is a serious charge which, if substantiated, may result in course failure, probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University. The Academic Ethics Committee, composed principally of faculty and stu dents , is charged by the faculty of the College with considering evidence in contested cases, determining guilt or innocence, and assessing penalties. Special rules of the committee, available from the Office of the Dean have been designed to insure due process. Academic Advice and Information Students in the College are expected to assume the responsibility for planning their academic programs in accordance with College rules and policies and ma jor requirements. To assist students, the College maintains an advising staff located in the UCD Ad ministration Building , telephone 629-2555. Students are urged to consult with the staff of this office con cerning individual academic problems. As soon as the student has determined a major, he or she must declare the major to a department ad viser . The department adviser will be responsible not I This schedu l e corresponds to the general r equirements described i n the Generallnforma tion s ection, but more detail is provided here for prospective College of Liberal Art.s and Scien c es students .

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only for the student's advising but also for the cer tification of the completion of the major program for grad u ation . Students planning to earn a degree from one of the professional schools should see an adviser in that school. Each professional school has certain specific requirements. Preprofessional health science students should see a member of the Health Sciences Commit tee early in their careers . Appointments should be made through the sciences secretary in Room 232, 629-2646. The College has organized a Legal Advisory Com mittee for the purpose of advising all UCD students who are interested in careers in law. This committee has a library of law school catalogues, pre-law hand books, and other relevant documents, advises in divi d ual students, interviews students who need to secure a dean's letter for application to certain law schools, and sponsors meetings at which information of interest to pre-law students is shared. Students may contact the Committee through the Office of the Dean. UCD also has a counseling service available through the Office for Student Affairs to which a stu dent may go for assistance with personal problems. C a reer counseling is available to all students with majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . As sistance in skills analysis, resume preparation, and job placement is available through the Office of the D ean, telepho n e 629-3396. Academic Warning and Scholastic Suspension Good academic standing in the College requires a grade-point average of 2 . 0 (C) on all University of Col orado course work. Grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado are used in d etermining the student's scholastic standing and progress toward the degree. However, grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the gr a de-point average at the University of Colorado. Academ ic Warning Students whose cumulative grade-point averages fall below a 2.0 (C) at the end of the fall semester will be so notified early in the spring semester. Students will be informed in writing concerning the grade-point req u irements which must be met by the end of the spri n g semester. Scholast ic Sus p ension Scholastic suspension means that a student is denied the opportunity to register for courses in the College for a specified period of time. If a student's G.P.A. drops below 2.0 at the end of any semester (ex cluding summer term), the student will be required to achieve better than a 2.0 in a succeeding semester , as d esc r ibed in the following sliding scale, or the student will b e suspended. The student must then continue to meet the sliding scale every semester until the grade point average reaches 2.0. Scholastic records of stu-College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 21 dents are reviewed as soon as possible after the close of each spring semester, and the student is informed in writing if he or she is to be suspended. Hour s Defi ciency 1-10 11-20 21-30 Over 30 Grade-Point A verage in the Most Recent Semester 2.2 2 . 3 2.4 2.5 The hours deficiency is the number of credit hours of B work that the student must earn to raise the G.P.A. to 2.0 (C). For example , if the student has at tempted 24 semester hours and has earned 42 quality points, the G.P .A. is 1.75. The student needs 6 semester hours of B to raise the G.P.A. to 2.0. To calculate the hours of B that are needed, multiply the total hours attempted by 2 and subtract the number of quality points from this figure. Example: 24 semester hours attempted x 2 = 48; 48 42 quality points = 6 semester hours of B needed or 6 hours deficiency. In attempting to raise a grade-point average, a stu dent may register for courses in the University of Colorado summer term on any campus, for cor r espondence study through the University, or for credit courses offered through the Division of Con tinuing Education. Firs t S usp en sion The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term), after which the student will auto matically be readmitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The student then will be expected to meet the sliding scale (based on the student's University of Colorado record only) until the cumulative G.P.A. reaches 2.0. Failure to do so will result in a second suspension. A student under a first suspension may be readmit ted before the end of the normal suspension period only if the student has demonstrated academic improvement in one of the following ways: 1. By achieving a cumulative 2.5 average on all summer or correspondence work attempted at the University of Colorado since suspension. (A student must register for a minimum of 6 credits in the sum mer term on any campus, through correspondence work, or through credit courses in the Division of Con tinuing Education.) 2. By raising the cumulative grade-point average to 2.0 through correspondence or summer work at the University of Colorado . 3 . By raising the cumulative grade-point average to 2.0 at another institution. (The cumulative grade point average is defined as the grade-point average at the University of Colorado in combination with the work taken at all other institutions.) Upon return to the University, however, the student retains his or her previous grade-point average. (G.P.A. from another institution does not transfer back to the University.)

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22 I University of Colorado at Denver Second Suspension A student suspended for a second time will be read mitted only under unusual circumstances and only by petition to the Academic Standards Committee of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Each petition will be examined individually. The committee will expect the student to show that chances for successful completion of an educational program in the College have been materially improved by factors such as in creased maturity or a relief from stressful circum stances. The deadline for petitions to the Academic Standards Committee for reinstatement for any fall semester is August 1; for reinstatement for any spring semester, the deadline is December 1. A student who completes 12 or more semester hours at another institution must apply for readmission to the University of Colorado as a transfer student, regardless of his or her status in the University of Colorado. He or she also must present a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted (at the University of Colorado and elsewhere) in order to be considered for readmission. Petitioning for Special Requests or Exceptions to Standing Academic Polley The Academic Standards Committee is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty . This faculty student committee constitutes the bridge between the faculty in its legislative capacity and the students upon whom the legislation comes to bear. The com mittee alone is empowered to grant waivers of exemp tions from and exceptions to the academic policies of the College. One of the major responsibilities of the committee is the handling of suspensions and reinstatement of suspended students. The normal period of suspension is two regular semesters (one academic year, excluding summer term). However, students suspended a second time will be reinstated only under unusual circumstances and only by petition to the committee. Course Load The normal course load is 12 to 18 hours. Students registered for fewer than 12 hours are regarded as part-time students. Students wishing to register for 20 hours or more must obtain approval from the dean. Designation as a part-time or full-time student de pends only upon courses taken for credit in the University and does not include correspondence courses or noncredit courses. To receive credit, the student must be officially registered for each course. Students who hold or expect to hold fullor part time employment while enrolled in the College must register for course loads they can expect to complete without unusual difficulty. Recommended course loads are given below, but each student must weigh his or her own abilities and assess the demands of each course in determining an appropriate schedule. The College assumes that all courses selected will be completed. Employed 20 hours per week 10 to 13 semester hours , or three to four courses . Employed 30 hours per week 8 to 11 semester hours, or three courses. Employed 40 hours per week 6 to 9 semester hours, or two or three courses. Summer Term : Since the summer term is only 10 weeks long, the recommended course load is less than in the fall and spring. Employed fewer than 15 hours per week 9 semester hours , or three courses. Employed 15 to 30 hours per week 7 semester hours, or two courses. Employed over 30 hours per week -3-5 semester hours, or one course. Courses taken at the University of Colorado at Boulder or the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, or interinstitutionally with MSC or CCDA, are counted in the total load. Note: 6 semester hours is considered a full load in the summer term. Maximum course load is 9 semester hours. Eamlng Academic Credit Special Options and Caaea Students in the College may earn credit toward a degree for knowledge gained prior to enrollment in the College or for knowledge gained outside of College courses. Some specific programs by which credit is awarded include Credit by Examination, Advanced Placement, and the College-Level Examination Program. These are described in the General Informa tion section of this bulletin. In addition, credit may be earned for Cooperative Education, Army ROTC, and the following activities . Correspondence Study Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, with the approval of the dean, may take work in correspondence study offered by the Univer sity's Division of Continuing Education. A maximum of 30 hours of correspondence work may count toward the degree. Credit for Courses In the Professional Schools and In Physical Education Students may count toward the Bachelor of Arts degree as many as 24 credit hours of course work from curricula leading to degrees other than the B.A. (business, engineering and applied science, en vironmental design, journalism, music, nursing, and pharmacy). College of Liberal Arts and Sciences stu dents desiring secondary school certification will be allowed to take up to 34 hours in the certification program of the School of Education as part of their total required hours for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Vocational and technical courses from a two-year program may not be included . Activity courses in physical education, up to a maximum of 8 hours, will count toward the 120 required for the degree.

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Credit for Independent Study Students may register for independent study with the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and divisional dean. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study projec t (not to ex ceed 3 credits per semester) shall be arranged at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits taken on an independent study basis may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Effective summer 1978, independent study courses will be numbered as follows: 910 -919 Freshman 920 -929 Sophomore 930 -939 Junior 940 -949 Senior 950 Graduate 999 Candidate for degree COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) An exciting challenge is available to entering Col lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences students who want to earn university credit by examina tio n in subject areas in which they have obtained college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board Testing Service. The College will award credit for the following subjects if a student scores at the 67th percentile: Arts and Human ities American literature Analysis and interpretation of literature English literature Natural and Physical Sciences Biology General chemistry Geology Introductory calculus General psychology Social Sciences American government American history Introductory economics Western civilization Students should contact the Office for Student Af fairs, UCDA Room 207, to arrange for the examina tions. SUMMARY Following is a listing of the types of credit and the maximum number of hours that may be earned for nonclassroom work. Types of Credit Advanced Placement Credit (AP) College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Maximum Credit Hours Allowed Toward the B .A. Degree No limit 30 semester hours College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 23 Cooperative education Correspondence study Credit by examination Independent study 12 semester hours 30 semester hours No limit 12 semester hours Graduation Requirements STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES The student is ultimately responsible for knowing the requirements for his or her degree and for fulfilling these requirements. Upon completion of the require ments (inclu ding those of a major) , the student will be awarded the appropriate degree. THE LIBERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM In order to qualify for a B.A. or B.F.A. degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students must complete the liberal education program, which consists of area distribution requirements and a foreign language requirement. To satisfy the area distribution requirements, stu dents choose from a list of available courses in each of three areas: 1. Arts and humanities -12 semester hours . 2. Natural and physical sciences -12 semester hours. 3. Social sciences -12 semester hours . Lists of courses that will satisfy these area require ments are available in the Schedule of Courses published each fall and spring semester and summer term. The Schedule may be obtained in each divisional office and in the Office of the Dean of the College. To satisfy the foreign language requirement, stu dents must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language . This requirement may be met prior to ad mission as a student by completion of a Level ill high school course in any classical or modern foreign language. Students who have not satisfied the re quirement upon admission may do so by (a) demonstration of a third-semester proficiency by ex amination, (b) completion of a third-semester course in the College, or (c) completion oflntensive German, which consists of 12 semester hours in one semester. Students are strongly urged to begin or continue their college-level language study immediately upon enroll ment in the College. Students who elect to continue a language studied before entering the College will be placed in courses appropriate to their level of prepara tion. Careful rules for placement have been prepared and are available from the Office of the Dean of the College. Students are urged to consult the advising staff of the College or any foreign language faculty member regarding foreign language study and the foreign language requirement. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS A candidate for the degree Bachelor of Arts shall fulfill such requirements as may be stipulated for the major program. These requirements shall include at least 30 semester hours of work in the major area (as

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24 I University of Colorado at Denver determined by the adviser) of C grade or higher , at least 16 hours of which shall be at the upper division level. The grade average in the major shall be at least C. Not more than 48 semester hours in one field may be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. The student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the major. The adviser shall be responsible for determining when a student has satisfactorily completed the requirements for the major and for so certifying to the dean of the College. For requirements of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, consult the Fine Arts section in the alphabetical listings under the description of programs. UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENT Students must complete at least 45 hours of upper division work (courses numbered 300 or higher) to be eligible for the bachelor's degree. Any student may register for upper division courses providing he or she has satisfied the prerequisites or has the approval of the discipline in which the course is offered. Courses transferred from a community college carry lower division credit. Exceptions to this require ap proval of the dean of the College and the appropriate discipline representative, who may ask the student to validate upper division credit by taking an advanced standing examination. TOTAL CREDIT-HOUR AND GRADE-POINT REQUIREMENT To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students must pass at least 120 semester hours with an average of at least 2.0 (C) in all courses attempted at the University of Colorado . RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT A candidate for a degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must earn the last 30 hours in the University of Colorado and must be enrolled as a degree student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . The College will not graduate any student who has not completed at least 30 hours of letter-graded work at the University of Colorado. SENIOR PROGRESS REPORT AND DIPLOMA CARD Upon completion of 80 semester hours of course work , each student should request a Progress Report from the Office of the Dean to determine the student's status with respect to degree requirements. At the beginning of their last semester, studen t s are required to file Diploma Cards , showing the date they intend to be graduated. Failure to file a Diploma Card will result in delayed graduation. Diploma Cards are available in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Office of Admissions and Records, and at registration. SUMMARY CHECKLIST OF GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Liberal Education Program 1. Arts and humanities: 12 semester hours. 2 . Natural and physical sciences: 12 semester hours . 3. Social sciences: 12 semester hours . 4. Foreign language: third -s emester proficiency in any one language or completion of a Level ill high school foreign language course. Major Requirements 1. 30 to 48 hours in the major field. 2. A t least 30 hours of C grade or better in the major field. 3 . A 2.0 (C) grade-point average in all major course work . 4. A minimum of 16 semester hours of upper divi sion courses in the major, C grade or higher . 5 . Special requirements as stipulated by the major adviser . General Requirements 1. A total of 120 semester hours passed . (C) cumulative grade-point average on all University of Colorado course work. 3. A minimum of 45 semester hours of upper divi sion course work. 4. The last 30 hours in residence in the College. Note: Not more than 48 hours in any one field and n o t more than 24 hours outside the College can be counted in the 120 hours required for the degree. SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Honors OLD POLICY FOR GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION A student who performs superlatively in course work in the College will be awarded a bachelor's degree accompanied by the statement, with distinc t ion. To be eligible for graduation with distinction, a student must have completed at least 30 semester hours at the University of Colorado and have obtained a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher by the end of the semester prior to the final semester's work toward the degree. The cumulative grade point average must be based upon all collegiate work attempted, both at the University of Colorado and elsewhere. NEW POLICY FOR GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION Effective summer 1978, all graduating seniors must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Colorado (on any CU campus) , in cluding the final semester, with a grade-point average of at least 3 .75. The 45 semester hours must be com pleted in the student's junior and senior years . The

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student also must meet the College's residency re quirement, i . e ., the last 30 hours in the College. Any students who feel that they are qualified to graduate with distinction, but who do not meet these standards, may petition to the Academic Standards Committee for a review of their particular cases. Peti tions dealing with these standards will rarely be ap proved, however, and then only with evidence of academic performance equivalent to the standard. Special Notes 1. Courses that UCD does not offer , but that the faculty encourages students to take at the other Auraria institutions (MSC and/or CCD), may be counted as part of the 45 semester hours . A list of such courses will be available in the College Academic Ad vising Office. 2. A maximum of 6 semester hours may be com pleted with a grade of P (on P/F option) and included in the 45 semester hours. 3. All credit courses which are completed through the Division of Continuing Education may be in cluded in the 45 semester hours. 4. In calculating the minimum total of 45 semester hours, part of a semester will not be counted but, in stead, all courses in a semester will be included. The new policy outlined above was approved by the Academic Standards Committee on April 19, 1978. Both the old and the new policies will be administered simultaneously for all students who matriculated prior to summer 1978. For those students who matriculated in summer 1978 or thereafter, only the new policy will be used . COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM Independently of graduation with distinction, which is based on grades alone, the College offers a program through which students can qualify for the following honors awarded by the College: summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude . The deter mination of the level of honors to be awarded is made by the College Honors Council. These awards may be earned either in a specific department (Departmental Honors), or in general studies (General Honors) or in both. In either case, special independent creative work is required to qualify. Any junior or senior student with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (B) or higher may participate in the program. In order to qualify for award of College honors in a discipline, a student must (a) complete a research project or honors thesis in the discipline, (b) take the Advanced Graduate Record Examination, and (c) take an oral examination administered by an honors committee. The College-wide General Honors program is designed to encourage and assist academically strong students to achieve a greater degree of breadth in their educational experiences than they ordinarily might obtain in their college careers. The program is intended for the student who likes to deal creatively with ideas and who desires to extend education beyond the usual course requirements. Any qualified College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 25 junior or senior may enroll in honors seminars without becoming a candidate for graduation with honors. Grading in honors courses is based on the designations H (Honors), P (Pass), and F (Fail). All honors courses carry upper division credit. In cross-listed courses, open to honors students upon consent of the instruc tor, honors students may expect to do additional or in dependent work as determined in consultation with the professor. In order to qualify for General Honors, a student must (a) complete at least four honors courses with grades of H , (b) submit an honors paper, and (c) take oral and written honors examinations administered by the College Honors Council. Detailed information concerning the Honors Program may be obtained from the director of the Honors Program or from the College Advising Office. Students interested in the program ordinarily should begin participation in their junior year. PHI BETA KAPPA Students in the College who excel in their un dergraduate studies may be invited to join Phi Beta Kappa, the nation' s oldest academic honorary society, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. For further information, interested students should contact the College Advising Office . Cooperative Education Based on the precept that employment experiences can often contribute to liberal education, the Cooperative Education Program is designed to provide opportunities to supplement academic work with practical experience. Students may be placed as employees with corporations , businesses, and public agencies in ways that complement or enhance their academic course work. Many cooperative education students choose to contract with a professor in their major fields to receive academic credit for their work experiences . An academic cooperative education contract designates a certain number of academic credits for satisfactory performance in a related work ex perience. The credit is contingent upon satisfactory completion of whatever academic project the faculty member chooses to assign in conjunction with the job. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences par ticipates in this program with cooperative education courses offered at the 398 level in each department. These courses are listed under each department heading in the Course Description section of this bul letin. Students placed by the Cooperative Education Office in paid or volunteer assignments, as well as stu dents who have obtained their own jobs , may be eligi ble, subject to the guidelines below: 1. The student should have reached the sophomore level and must be enrolled in an undergraduate degree program. 2. The s tudent sho uld have at lea s t a 2.5 grade point average. Students with GPAs in the 2.0 ( C) to 2.4 range must obtain the approval of the dean in order to participate in the program .

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26 I University of Colorado at Denver 3. A job in which the learning possibilities and responsibilities of the student remain static will not be approved for more than one semester. In contrast, a job in which the learning opportunities and respon sibilities vary and increase may be eligible for credit over a longer time span. 4. Projects will be granted from 1 to 6 hours of elec tive credit per semester, 3 being the usual number of credit hours for each project. Certain projects, such as certain full-time internships, may be granted as much as 6 credits. 5. Twelve semester hours is the maximum number of credits a student can earn in Cooperative Educa tion. In some departments, Cooperative Education hours may count toward satisfying requirements for the major with the approval of the major adviser. Students should contact the Cooperative Education Program office for further information and forms for placement and credit, 1047 9th Street, 629-2892. Study Skills Center The Study Skills Center is administered by the Col lege on behalf of UCD. The purpose of the center is to help UCD students develop methods of efficient study. Services are available to help specifically with particular subject areas, as well as to strengthen general academic and research skills. Telephone, 6292802. Each semester the center offers three courses for which students may receive 1 semester hour of credit graded on a pass/fail basis: developmental composi tion, developmental reading, and college preparatory mathematics. Detailed course descriptions may be found in the Course Descriptions section of this bul letin. A noncredit modular course, such as rapid reading, also is offered in which students may accelerate reading speed, learn rea ding flexibility, and build word-grouping ability and comprehension. Study technique workshops (noncredit) are offered in such topics as: reading for maximum effectiveness; writing papers and using the library; improving memory, study techniques, and note taking; tests without panic; and time management. Also, a noncredit spell ing and vocabulary workshop is available. The center has available a collection of books, in cluding a number by minority authors and about minorities which may be utilized for research assignments as well as for improvement of general knowledge. PREPARATION FOR PROFESSIONS SUCH AS LAW AND MEDICINE Completion of the undergraduate curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences can prepare stu dents for a number of careers in the professions . Infor mation on preparation for those professions most fre quently asked about by students in the College is presented here . Students seeking information about other professions should contact the College Advising Office. Law Students intending to enter a school of law may ma jor in any field while completing their bachelor's degree programs since law schools do not generally specify a particular undergraduate degree major . Suc cessful prelaw students from the College have had majors in many different fields. However, students preparing for law school should place primary emphasis on learning superior methods of study , critical thinking, and communication skills, which are often considered more important by law schools than factual knowledge alone. College courses should be chosen with care to produce a balanced pattern of skills and insights. Sufficient English should be studied to insure good use of language skills in gram mar, spelling, composition, and rhetoric, and also to develop a capacity for analysis and criticism. Because the natural sciences provide an appreciation for in ductive and deductive approaches, evaluation of evidence, and detailed accuracy of observation, some study in this area is desirable. Mathematics is helpful in developing a capacity to think analytically, as are certain courses in philosophy. The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is required of all applicants for admission to law school and should be taken as early as possible during the senior year. For additional information, students should review the current Prelaw Handbook, published an nually in October and prepared by the Law School Admissions Council and the Association of American Law Schools. This book includes material on the law and lawyers, prelaw preparation, applying to law schools, and the study of law, as well as individualized information on most American law schools. It may be ordered from Educational Testing Service, Princeton , New Jersey 08540. Students interested in applying for admission to the School of Law of the University of Colorado should contact the Admissions Office of the School of Law, Room 118, Fleming Law Building, Boulder, Colorado 80309. Journalism Students interested in preparing for a career in journalism may decide to obtain a bachelor's degree from the College as a general preparation, or they may choose to complete a B.S. degree in journalism. The B.S . degree in journalism is granted from the School of Journalism at the University of Colorado at Boulder. However , the first two years of the jour nalism curriculum may be completed at UCD within the College. Students pursuing the journalism B.S. degree normally transfer into the School of Jour nalism at the beginning of the junior year. To be con sidered for transfer admission, a student must have completed a minimum of 60 semester hours with a grade-point average of at least 2.25. Interested stu dents should consult the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for detailed information concerning requirements for the B . S . degree in journalism.

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Health Careers Course programs have been developed within the College to prepare students for the following specific careers within the general area of health sciences. Child health a s sociate Optometry Dental hygiene Osteopathy Denti s try Pharmacy Medical technology Physical therapy Medi c ine Podiatry Nursing Veterinary Medicine Because the prerequisites for these health career programs are continually changing, students in terested in pursuing one of these careers should contact the Health Careers secretary, UCD East Class room Building, Room 232, 629-2646, for current re quirements and for advising. Education Two avenues are open to students wishing to prepare themselves for careers in teaching. 1. Students with a major program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who seek certification for teaching at the secondary school level remain in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the bachelor ' s degree, but take approximately 30 hours of profes sional education work in the School of Education. 2 . Elementary education majors and distributed studies maj.ors preparing to teach at the secondary school level normally transfer from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year and continue there to receive the Bachelor of Science degree in education . Students should contact the School of Education at UCD for detailed information concerning teacher education programs at both elementary and secon dary levels , 629-2717. TEACHER CERTIFICATION WITHIN THE COLLEGE Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who intend to pursue a major curriculum in one of the departments or programs in the College and who also desire secondary school teacher certification, must apply for and be accepted into the Teacher Education Program. The requirements for admission are iden tical with those under "2a" listed below for the pre education program. These students also must meet all requirements for a bachelor ' s degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Early planning is crucial for students intending to enter the Teacher Education Program. Since the School of Education has initiated a new program at both the elementary and secondary levels, students are urged to consult the School early and regularly concerning new requirements. PRE-EDUCATION PROGRAM Students pursuing elementary education or distributed studies majors for secondary school teachers should so indicate on all application and registration materials so that they may be advised by the educa tion coun s elor or faculty members. Application for College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 27 transfer to the School of Education and for admission to the Teacher Education Program should be made during the last semester of the sophomore year . The minimum requirements for acceptance are: 1. Completion of at least 60 semester hours of ac ceptable college work with a grade-point average of 2 . 5 for all courses attempted, and 2 . 5 for all courses attempted at the University of Colorado , and 2 . 5 in the major teaching field . No student will be recom mended for certification to teach in any field in which the grade-point average is less than 2 . 5 . 2 . General education requiremen t s for students planning to student teach at the secondary or elementary school level are as follows: a. General education (with academic counsel ing early in the program , a major part of general education, urban studies, and teaching field requirements may be com bined): (1) 12 cumulative semester hours to be completed in each of the following three areas ; sequences of course work not required: Arts and Humanities ............ 12 (In order to meet typical certification requirements in other states, students should take at least 6 semester hours of humanities in English language courses , e.g. , Engl. 480, Advanced Composition; Engl. 484, English Grammar; Engl. 485, History of the English Language. ) Social sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Natural and Ph y sical S c iences .12-16 (2) For elementary certification, the following work should be included as part of general education requirements: Two courses in physical science with lab. Two courses in biological science with lab. Two courses in mathematics (Math. 303 and 304) one course in art, one course in arts methods, one course in music, one course in music methods, health, or physical educa tion , and one course in health and physical education for the elementary child . b. Urban Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) ......................... 9 c . General Psychology ...... . ............. 3 COLLEGE-WIDE INTERDISCIPLINARY ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Most of the individual departments represented in the College have numerous links with other dis ciplines , and many faculty members consequently en courage students to take courses in related disciplines . In the natural and physical sciences new subjectmatter areas are emerging from blends of traditional disciplines ; examples include biochemistry, geo physics, biophysics , and psychobiology. In the social

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28 I Universit y of Colo rado at Denver sciences the similarity of method and of subject matter from discipline to discipline tends to promote broad interaction and a sense of common purpose. In the arts and humanities the continual synthesis of useful analytical ideas and concepts gains strength as it is tested against differing perspectives; comparative literature, mixed media fine arts , and philosophical psychology are examples of this kind of inter disciplinary involvement. Therefore, students will often find opportunities to explore relationships among different disciplines while studying within traditional disciplines. In some instances, such as ethnic studies, much or most of the academic work can be characterized as interdisciplinary even though the area is treated as a traditional discipline. The fol lowing programs are explicitly interdisciplinary and college-wide in character. Distributed S tudies The College's distributed studies major has been designed for those students who wish to develop con solidated major programs based upon the study of two or three disciplines together rather than to focus their major programs on single disciplines. In pursuing a distributed studies major, a student works closely with a faculty adviser to develop a specific program . One discipline is designated as primary subject, and then one or two other disciplines are designated as secondary subjects. The total program m ust consist of at least 60 semester hours in at least two disciplines. The disciplines must be disciplines or ar eas offered within the College, and the program may not include a first-year course in English (101, 102) or foreign language (101, 102). General requirements for the primary subject are (a) a minimum of 30 semester hours with grades of Cor better, and (b) a minimum of 12 semester hours of upper division course work with grades of C or better. General requirements for the secondary subject(s) are (a) a minimum of 30 semester hours from among one or two disciplines, and (b) at least 12 semester hours in any one dis cipline . The specific requirements in any case depend upon the program worked out with a faculty adviser, who may stipulate specific course requirements. Ethnic Studies For a complete description of the Ethnic Studies program , see the Division of Social Sciences section of this bulletin . Individually Structured M ajor Some students wish to study in depth, as a major program , a coherent topic area that crosses traditional disciplinary lines and/or requires significant indepen dent study to complete. These students are en couraged to propose a design for an individuall y struc tured major program . To pursue an individually structured major program , a student must work out the details of the proposed program sometime after his or her first year in the College with a committee of three College faculty members. The major becomes the student' s official program upon final approval by the faculty committee . In recent years students in the College have structured majors in such areas as French and cinematography, and oral history and en vironmental planning, and 18th-century studies. Population Dynamics Linda Dixon , Acting Director The Population Dynamics Program is a mul tidisciplinary major designed to provide a comprehen sive and flexible educational experience for persons who are interested in population processes, especially within the urban environment. Emphasis of the major is on the social, economic, and mental health problems complicated by the dynamics of population processes. The principal departments involved are biology, geography, psycho l ogy, and sociology. The major is appropriate for students intending careers in the fields of urban and community planning, family planning and counseling, population education, en vironmental demography, and population-related careers in community action programs, neighborhood health centers, and local, state, and federal agencies. Students completing this major may enter graduate programs in most of the social, b ehavioral, and natural sciences, demograp h y (pop ul ation studies), public affairs and administration, urban and regional planning, and in public health, me d icine, l a w , or social services. All students majoring in population dynamics will be expected to meet the following course require ments: 1. a. A minimum of 6 hours of P.D. P. 300-2, Workshop in Population Dynamics1 b. A minimum of 3 hours of P.D.P. 310-3, Prac ticum in Population Dynamics c. N.P.S. 200-3, Human Sexuality 2. Any two of the following three courses: Geog. 473-3 . Population Geography Soc. 421-3. Advanced Population Studies Soc. 424-3 . Migration 3. One of the following four courses : Psych . 210-4. Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology Soc. 317-3. Statistics Math. 383-3 . Introduction to Statistics Geog . 400-3. Introductory Quantitative Methods in Geography 4 . A minimum of 24 additional hours from the fol lowing disciplines with not more than 12 hours from any one discipline : anthropology, biology, communication and theatre, computer science, economics, geography, physical education, political science, population dynamics , psychology, rehabilita tion services, social science, and sociology. Students should consult with the program director in selecting these hours to be sure the courses are acceptable in the program. 1The Workshop in Population Dynamics has a varied theme eac h semeste r . I t is the pur pose o f the workshop to synthesize the multidisciplinary nature of the progr am through selected themes . The workshop will utilize co mmun ity persons to conduct various sessions r elating the academic aspects of the program to com munit y needs .

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Note: Those students wishing to receive teacher certification should consult with the academic counselor in the School of Education and should familiarize themselves with the School of Education requirements in this bulletin. Urban Studies Cedric D. Page, Director The Urban Studies Program has a fourfold purpose . First , it provides an in-depth understanding of urban problems to permit the student to pursue advanced degrees in one of several traditional academic dis ciplines in the College of Environmental Design or in the Graduate School of Public Affairs. Second, the program permits graduates to move directly into a variety of careers with federal, state, and local agen cies as well as private companies concerned with urban affairs. It also provides a desirable second ma jor or minor for students preparing for public school teaching, human service, legal, or medical careers. Third, an undergraduate degree in urban studies provides a liberating educational experience for those whose career interests have not been fully decided. Fourth, the major will increase an individual's sen sitivity to and awareness of the unique experiences and problems of economic, social, and ethnic groups in cities. The generalist who is trained in the application of analytical and policy tools of a variety of disciplines will be more immediately employable and will be of significant value to his or her community. Since urban centers are increasing in size and influence, an understanding of the city and its problems is in dispensable and essential to the modern urban society. The B.A. major in urban studies is designed to prepare and train such citizens. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS The urban studies major is designed to provide both flexibility and depth in the relevant academic perspectives, as well as versatility in career selections. The major provides an interdisciplinary view of the city and its environs in a more comprehensive manner than any single traditional academic discipline can provide. The requirements of the major in course units therefore are greater. Whereas most academic disciplines require about 30 units of course work, the urban studies major requires 42. All students who in tend to major in urban studies will be expected to meet the following requirements: 1. Soc. Sci. 210-3. People in an Urban Society. This course is the foundation and orientation course for further study in the social sciences. One objective of the course is to present to the student the most important theories and perspectives of several disciplinary approaches to urban society. Another objective is to encourage the student to recognize areas of overlap among the disciplines, the interrelationships between disciplines, and the value of interdisciplinary knowledge and research. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 29 2. Four of the following six upper division courses (12 units): Econ . 425. Urban Economics Hist . 470. United States Urban History Pol. Sci. 407. Urban Politics Geog. 371. Ethnic Groups in American Cities Anthr o . 444. Urban Anthropology Soc . 421. Advanced P o pulation Studie s 3. Any two of the following six courses (6 units) : M .Am. 460. The Chicano Community and Community Or ganization M .Am. 127. Contemporary Americans Bl.St . 203. Black Behaviorial Analysis Bl.S t . 323. Religion and the Black Man Soc.Sci. 329. A s ian Amer ic ans N .Am. 436. The American Indian in Contemporary Society 4 . Soc. 402-3. Statistics. 5. In addition, each student will successfully com plete not less than 3 units (6 units maximum) of cooperative education credit for relevant internship placement selected by the student and approved by the director of the Urban Studies Program. This re quirement , usually taken toward the conclusion of the academic program, will include an orientation and seminar for the participating students (Soc. Sci. 450). 6. The above core program of required courses specifies a minimum of 27 of 42 units necessary for graduation with an urban studies major. The program director may authorize changes in the above core program depending upon the individual circum stances of the student. In addition to the minimum (core) 27 units required, the student will be advised to choose 15 units of electives from the following dis ciplines: Anthropology Communication and Theatre Civil Engineering Economics Geography History Philosophy Political Science Psychology Sociology Division of Arts and Humanities Shirley White Johnston, Assistant Dean The division includes the departments of com munica tio n and theatre, communication disorders and speech science , English, fine arts, French, German, philosophy, and Spanish. Complete un dergraduate majors are offered in all but communica tion disorders and speech science . This division offers course work in several special interdisciplinary programs, including comparative literature, humanities, and the Writing Program . The Writing Program is designed to prepare professional writers in the techniques and vocabularies of fields such as fine arts, science, engineering, creative writing , business, social sciences , and literature. Two cocurricular programs also are open to students: theatre and forensics . Students interested in majoring in any of the dis ciplines or in participating in any of the specialized (

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30 I University of Colorado at Denver programs should request additional information from the divisional office. For information on scheduling of courses, consult the appropriate Schedule of Courses for day, time, and meeting place of classes. COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE Faculty: Samuel A. Betty, J. Brad Bowles, Laura Cuetara, Robley D. Rhine, Jon A. Winterton. Atten dant: lia M. Warner. An undergraduate wishing to major in communica tion and theatre will choose one of the three basic areas of emphasis: communication, theatre, or com munication and theatre education. An emphasis in radio-television is available, but part of the work must be completed at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Each emphasis has its own requirements for graduation, and specific programs will be developed in consultation with the student's major adviser to in sure that each student's term-by-term schedule, choice of electives, involvement in cocurricular and extracurricular activities will be best suited to his or her needs, skills, and goals. Lists of required and sug gested courses in each of the three areas of emphasis may be obtained from the divisional office. Communication Emphasis The primary goal is to equip the student with a wide range of theoretical perspectives and diverse communication skills. The theoretical perspectives generally focus on face-to-face communication in in terpersonal, small group, institutional, and community settings. The skills component of the emphasis seeks to equip students with flexibility in their communication repertoires so that they may react effectively to their analysis of communication situations. The program offers two types of courses to the stu dent: (1) courses in communication and rhetorical theory, which present traditional rhetorical theories, empirical support for communication theories, strategies for the application of communication theory to problems confronting the community; and (2) courses focusing on the development of the stu dents' communication skills which promote con fidence in their abilities to perform effectively in many contexts. These courses build into the students' repertoires the tactics and strategies of effective ex pression. The communication emphasis requires that stu dents take a total of 45 hours of course work (usually 15 courses) in communication and theatre. Six courses (18 hours) are required. Four courses (12 hours) are chosen from a list of specified alternatives. The remaining 15 hours may be chosen from a wid.! range of courses available in communication and theatre, allied disciplines, or independent study pro jects. Since requirements for the communication emphasis insure that the student knows both communication theory and how to apply it, communica tion graduates are generally well equipped for employ ment. Students with an interest in management and administration, training, writing and copy prepara tion, public relations, information services, and a wide variety of occupations focusing on communica tion will find in the communication emphasis a cur riculum relevant to their expected employment needs. Theatre Emphasis This program provides a broad range of experiences in courses, laboratory workshops, full productions, and field work in the Denver area. Helping the stu dent to answer questions concerning the significance of what theatre does to us and for us is the primary goal of the program. Three kinds of courses will be taken by each student in theatre: (1) performance skills-acting, directing, oral interpretation, technical theatre; (2) critical skills-dramatic theory and criticism and theatre history; and (3) communication theory-interpersonal, small group, intercultural, social change, etc. In addition to the 42 hours of required courses within the department of communication and theatre, 12 ad ditional hours from English, fine arts, and music are required. As an integral part of the program, each student will have the opportunity to participate as performer, technician, or designer in faculty-directed produc tions which occur each term. The auditions, rehear sals, and performances involved in these productions provide opportunities for close examination of the process of making and performing theatre from prac tical, theoretical, critical, historical, and social perspectives. After each performance the audience will be invited to share their responses with the production team in order to provide some indication of impact. In. order to increase the range of practical and critical experience, each student will see and evaluate at least six live theatre productions in the Denver area each term. These experiences test the assumptions and beliefs about theatre discussed and worked with in classes and productions. As majors develop their performance and critical skills, special internships for credit in a variety of capacities may be arranged with local theatre operations through independent study or cooperative education. Depending on the individual's actual program of study ( cocurricular and extracurricular activities), a degree in communication and theatre with an emphasis in theatre not only can provide a graduate with useful technical and practical skills, but also, and more importantly, it can provide critical insight into theatre as a human enterprise wherever it occurs. Through examining and experiencing theatre's poten tial to achieve human value, students should develop personal, aesthetic, and social principles which will guide them to a sound career choices (as performers, technicians , designers, producers, or managers).

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Communication and Theatre Education Emphaela The emphasis in communication and theatre education prepares students to meet Colorado cer tification requirements in communication or in theatre for grades 7-12. Requirements for these profes sional programs are complex and demanding . Interested students in their freshman or sophomore years should meet with the department adviser for the education emphasis to discuss the requirements and to plan a long-range schedule to be followed. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND SPEECH SCIENCE Faculty: Natalie Hedberg Daves, Philip M. Prinz; Visiting, Patricia Killian; Part-time, Tom Prescott , Lynn S. Snyder. The B.A. degree in communication disorders and speech science is not available at UCD, but the follow ing courses are open to undergraduates: C.D.S.S. 401 and 435. For information on graduate-level courses see Communication Disorders and Speech Science in the Course Description section of this bulletin. For infor mation on M.A. and Ph.D. degrees see the Graduate School section. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE Students wishing to pursue graduate work in com parative literature should consult the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog . On the 400 level, students may read all texts in translation; however, reading knowledge in at least one foreign language is highly recommended. On the 500 and 600 levels, students must be able to read in two foreign languages. ENGLISH Faculty: Rex S. Bums, RichardT. Dillon, Evelyn Eff land, Herbert G. Eldridge, Louis B. Hall, Robert D. Johnston, Shirley W. Johnston, Elihu H. Pearlman , Jean Phillips, Joel Salzberg, Doris J. Schwalbe, Mary Rose Sullivan , Peter L. Thorpe, B. Jeanne Webb, Wil liam A. West; Emeritus: Ida D. Fasel. Part-time, Howard Movshovitz. The purpose of the English major is to provide a full exposure to the great tradition that constitutes the Anglo-American literary inheritance. In the process of studying individual works and the periods from which they emerged, students acquire an especially rich sense of the culture of which they are a part. All stu dents, majors and nonmajors alike, may acquire an understanding of how various literatures reflect wide developments and trends in the history of culture and ideas in the Topics in Literature series , Engl. 290 to 294. Students may further widen their perceptions by the study of how literature , in its broadest sense, and ideas are expressed in film through Engl. 225, (Introduction to Film) , and 306 and 307 (The History of Film I and II). College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 31 Students majoring in English must present a total of 36 hours in English , excluding Engl. 101, 102, and 103, of whic h 24 hours must be earned in upper divi sion courses. None of the required 36 hours may be taken on a pass/fail basis. Of the 24 hours required at the 300or 400-level, at least 3 must be earned in a course dealing with English literature before 1800, at least 3 in a course dealing with English literature after 1800, and at least 3 in a course on American literature. Required courses: Engl. 250, 251 (Survey of English Literature-6 hours); Engl. 300 (Critical Writing-3 hours); Engl. 497 or 498 (Major Authors or Topics in Literature -3 hours). At least 12 hours of the major's upper-or lowerdivision work in English must be done at UCD in order to qualify for the B . A. in English . English majors interested in graduating with honors should confer with the honors adviser as soon as possi ble, but definitely no later than the beginning of the spring term of their junior year . Students who contemplate teaching should obtain from the School of Education sheets listing curricula required for a teaching certificate and should consult the School of Education, which supervises the teacher-training program. Since fulfilling require ments for education and English involves close scheduling , students should fulfill at least some of the college requirements during their freshman and sophomore years. English for foreign students and courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language are listed in the course description section of this bul letin under communication and theatre. For additional literature courses see Comparative Literature and Mexican American Studies . Note: A considerable amount of writing is required in all English courses and is graded on form as well as on content. In addition to the regular major, the English dis cipline offers a General Writing Program, an alter native to the traditional baccalaureate in English. Especially designed for future writers, it offers a wide range of intensive writing experience combining such areas as technical reports, fiction, and poetry . The student is trained in the rhetorics of the arts and humanities, the social sciences, and the sciences. In order to enroll in the program, students must consult with the director of the General Writing Program through the division office at 629-2730. FINE ARTS Faculty: John R. Fudge, Gerald C. Johnson, Charles L . Moone , Ernest 0 . Porps , Ludwik Turzanski. Visiting, Jane Comstock. Adjunct: Paul E. Biagi , Richard G. Conn. An education in fine arts is based on discipline, absorption, and knowledge. Discipline is the relationship of the student to his material or form. What comes through the form is the self of the student and his relationship to the world. This constant ex posure throug h discipline leads to absorption which

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32 I Universit y of Colorado at Denver can be seen as a fascination with and appreciation of both himself and the world. In fine arts, the record of this process is made visible for the world to see and is called art. The Fine Arts discipline offers both a B.A. degree and a B.F.A. degree in painting, sculpture, print making, or design. The B.A. degree must include 40, but not more than 48, hours in fine arts, 24 of which must be in upper division courses. The B.F.A . degree must include 54, but not more than 72, hours in fine arts , 24 of which must be in upper division courses. Students wishing to apply for the B.F .A. degree must have a 2.0 average in all course work at the time of ap plication, which may not be earlier than the end of the junior year. Application forms are available in the divisional office. The core curriculum for fine arts majors includes 12 hours of Studio I (Fine Arts 100, 101, 102), Studio II (Fine Arts 202), Fine Arts 180-181, Fine Arts 496, and 6 hours of upper division art history. The recom mended program for the B.F.A. includes at least two years in one creative field (painting, printmaking, design, or sculpture) plus 9 semester hours in drawing. Students who are candidates for the B.F .A. must take a minimum of 27 hours while in residence. Studio I and II Couraee For an orientation to studio practice, including drawing and an exploration of twoand three dimensional media, fine arts majors are required to take 12 hours of Studio I and II courses. There are no prerequisites for Studio I and II courses, but all upper division courses require the corresponding basic course as a prerequisite. FRENCH Faculty: Simone Christopherson , Blandine M. Rickert; Part-time: Ruth Bleuze, Lore Wiggins. A B.A. degree with a French major prepares stu dents for the following careers: Foreign Service Positions abroad with govern ment agencies, private business, foundations, and other organizations having interests in French speaking countries throughout the world. Teaching Teaching at all levels: elementary, secondary, and college. Translation and Interpretation Exchanges in the fields of science, culture, politics, and economics have become vital to the nations of the world. Effective in ternational communication requires an increasing number of expert translators and interpreters. International Trade -Administrative and managerial positions with U . S.-based firms involved in foreign trade. A strong background in French can be very valuable to such programs as English, black studies, business, political science, interdisciplinary, and cross cultural studies . Students who have completed a Level III high school French course have automatically satisfied the college graduation requirement in a foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of French 201, 211, or 212 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied French in high school and who wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score or English ACT score. A student normally may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he or she is placed . For a complete state ment of policy on foreign language placement and credit, see the statement on foreign language available from the College Advising Office. Students majoring in French must complete a minimum of 35 semester hours beyond first-year proficiency . Students presenting four years of high school French for admission must complete 30 ho u rs beyond the second year. Students majoring in French may choose between the following options: Option A : Literature. Required courses are: French 211 and 212; 301 and 302; 311 and 312; 401 and 402; and a minimum of6 hours of French literature courses at the 400 level. Option B: Culture and Civilization. Required courses are French 211 and 212, 301 and 302, 311 and 312, 401 and 402, 320, 420 and 421. Students planning to acquire certification for teaching French at the secondary level are required to take French 496, Metho d s of Teaching Modern Languages (required by the School of Education). For those students Option B is preferable for the major. UCD students who wish to take nonrequired courses in another institution must obtain permission from the French department chairman at UCD. Students must see the department adviser prior to registr a tion for 300-level courses. Since all courses are not offered every year, it is extremely important for students to plan their schedules in advance to avoid a delay in graduation. The department strongly recommends that all ma jors include some study in a French speaking country in their major programs. Credit earned will normally count toward satisfaction of the major requirements, but the student should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to assure full transfer of credit. Students majoring in French must satisfy the re quirements of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 15 hours of upper division work, in cluding all 400-level required courses, must be taken from the UCD French department in order to earn the UCD degree. Literature courses at the 500 level are applicable to an M .A. degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and to the M.H. degree at UCD. GERMAN Faculty: M. Kent Casper, Carsten Seecamp; Part time: Friedheim F . Rickert. The German program provides a variety of courses for students interested in German language, literature, history, philosophy , music, and art. The curriculum contains essentially three course clusters:

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basic language skill courses, from beginning through advanced levels; upper division literature courses taught in German; and German area studies courses taught in English with readings in English transla tion. For eign Language Requirement. Students who have completed a Level ill high school German course have automatically satisfied the college requirement in foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion oflntensive German (13 credit hours in one semester), by completion of German 201, or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied German in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT score or English ACT score. A student may not receive credit for a course at a lower level than that into which he or she is placed. The German Major. A B.A. degree with a German major can prepare the student for the following career options : teaching positions at the elementary and secondary levels, including the requisite undergraduate training for those wishing to pursue further graduate work; translator and interpreter positions (e.g., with the publishing trade or with various private firms or government agencies); foreign service with the U . S. State Department; or positions in international trade with U.S. firms abroad. Students majoring in German must complete 35 hours beyond first-year proficiency. Not more than 12 hours may be taken on the second-year level toward the major. Course work successfully completed at other institutions will be evaluated for credit transfer, but a minimum of 12 hours of upper division credits must be taken within the UCD German department. Majors must maintain a B average in German. Required courses for the major are German 301-302, 401-402, plus a minimum of 9 hours in literature and/or culture courses at the 400 level. German majors are encouraged to take German area studies courses, but these courses may not count toward the major unless some of the readings and written assignments are done in German. Majors should consult with the in structor on this requirement. Students planning to ac quire certification for teaching German at the secon dary level are required by the School of Education to take German 496 (Methods of Teaching Modern Languages). It is strongly recommended that all majors attempt to include some study in a German-speaking country in their programs. Credit earned abroad normally counts toward satisfaction of major requirements, but students should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to insure full transfer of credit. PHILOSOPHY Faculty: Charles Kenevan, Linda S. Leonard, Glenn A. Webster. Parttime: Sharon Coggan, Richard J. Stefanik . The philosophy program is recommended to those students whose goal is a liberal arts education in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 33 finest sense. Philosophy is concerned with the most sustained and deeply reflected thoughts of human civilization, with the transmission and evaluation of basic beliefs and values. It is not an easy field of study, but for more than 25 centuries philosophy has been judged most rewarding by those who seek self development, intellectual sophistication, and the happiness of a reflective life. For career preparation, philosophy should be com bined with other fields. It is an excellent un dergraduate preparation for such professional fields as law and medicine. A program for the philosophy major must include a minimum of five courses (15 hours) at the 300 level; a minimum of three courses (9 hours) at the 400 level; and a minimum of one course (3 hours) at the 500 level. The balance of the courses for the major may be taken at the discretion of the student. The following courses are recommended (not re qui r ed) for philosophy majors who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy: Symbolic Logic (Phil. 344); History of Philosophy (Phil. 300, 302, 402, 403, 404); Ethics (Phil. 315); Metaphysics (Phil. 335); Epistemology (Phil. 336); several courses concerned with a single philosopher (e.g., Phil. 580, 581, 582, etc.); and one course concerned with the relationship of philosophy to some other discipline (e.g., Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of History, etc.). General prerequisites (which may vary for some courses) are: 100-level-none; 200-level-3 hours; 300level-6 hours; 400-level-9 hours; and 500-level-12 hours. The prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor. SPANISH Faculty: James Anthony Black, Phil Jaramillo, Carlos deOnis, Francisco A. Rios, Edith R. Rogers, Donald L. Schmidt; Part-time: Martha Manier; At tendant: Daniel E . Martinez, Ila M. Warner. The Spanish programs emphasize all phases of the study of the language, literature, civilization, and culture of Spain, Hispanic America, and the Spanish speaking Southwest of the United States. The courses are directed toward three distinct groups: lower divi sion students who are acquiring proficiency in a foreign language; upper division students who are either majoring in Spanish or increasing their competence through study in advanced courses in language and literature; and graduate students in the Spanish M.A. degree program offered in conjunction with the Boulder Campus (see the Graduate School section of this bulletin), most of whom are preparing for professional careers in teaching. Courses prepare students in language, literature, and civilization as part of an enhanced liberal educa tion and as professional training. Study under this department offers an opportunity to be better prepared for industry, commerce, government , public services, or further study at the graduate level. Courses also are functionally supportive of such programs as those leading to the teaching certificate,

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34 I University of Colorado at Denver comparative literature, the Master of Humanities degree, and the Master of Arts degree in bilingual multicultural emphasis offered at UCD. Students who have completed a Level ill high school Spanish course have automatically satisfied the college graduation requirement in foreign language. Requirement may also be satisfied by com pletion of Spanish 211 or by demonstration of equivalent proficiency by placement test. Students who have studied Spanish in high school and wish to continue with the language will be placed according to their high school record and verbal SAT or ACT score. A student may not receive credit for a course lower than that into which he or she is placed. For complete statement of policy on foreign language placement and credits, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences general information section of this bulletin. A major in Spanish consists of the following require ments: 1. Total of 36 credit hours in Spanish courses beyond 102, including the following minimum dis tribution; (a) at least 9 hours in upper division courses in language theory and practice (301-302, 401-402 , 496); (b) at least 9 hours in upper division literature courses, including at least one course in Spanish Peninsular literature and one in Spanish-American literature; (c) at least 12 hours in courses numbered 400 or above. The required 12 hours at or above the 400 level must be completed in residence at UCD. None of the required 35 hours may be taken on a pass/fail basis. 2. Total of 6 hours from one or more of the following areas: (a) Latin American studies (e.g., history , political science, etc.) ; (b) Mexican American Studies; (c) linguistics; (d) upper division courses in another foreign language or comparative literature. Students seeking certification for teaching at the secondary level should note that the School of Educa tion requires Spanish 496 (Methods of Teaching Spanish); the 3 credit hours earned in that course count toward the major and are subject to the 48-hour maximum from one discipline allowed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the B.A. degree. Hence , students who begin the major program with Spanish 101 and intend to include secondary certifica tion in their B.A. program must include Spanish 496 in their electives in Spanish. To be admitted to practice teaching of Spanish, majors must take the language skills tests of the Modern Language Association Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students of Spanish and make satisfactory scores. Students must see the department adviser prior to registration for their final 30 hours of course work. Failure to do so may result in delay of graduation. Students considering entering graduate school, either at UCD or elsewhere , should see an adviser as early as possible since admission depends largely on courses taken in the major . It is strongly recommended that all majors include some study in a Spanish-speaking country in their programs. Credit earned normally counts toward satisfaction of major requirements, but students should see an adviser before enrolling in a foreign program to insure full transfer of credit. Courses taken abroad and designated as Spanish are subject to the 48-hour-maximum rule of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in study abroad should consult with the Spanish faculty or the UCD representative for International Education . For comparative literature courses, see the Course Description section of this bulletin. Division of Natural and P hysical Sciences Robert D. Elder, Assistant Dean The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences offers study in traditional undergraduate disciplines, interdisciplinary programs, and preprofessional programs. Undergraduate majors are available in biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics, and psychology. Courses are offered in geology, but completion of a major requires some work at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The description of the program of each department includes the require ments for a major within that department and probable job opportunities in that field. The College wide interdisciplinary major program in population dynamics is also administered by faculty within the division. The health-related preprofessional programs in clude child health associate, medical technology, physical therapy, dentistry, dental hygiene, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, nursing, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine . Students interested in these programs should consult with the Health Careers Committee of the division at the beginning of their preprofessional education and at selected intervals thereafter . Program requirements and appointments for advising can be obtained in the division office, East Classroom Bldg., Room 232. Three sets of course options are available, in any combination, from which a nonscience major may satisfy the natural and physical science area requirement of 12 semester hours . Set I , Topics in Science, consists of modular courses designed for, but not limited to, nonscience majors. Each module carries 1 semester hour of credit and is offered in a 1/3-semester time block of five weeks, dur ing which the course meets the equivalent time of three lectures per week. There are no prerequisites. Each module is a self-contained unit designed to cover a given problem or topic in science. Normally, a student takes a single module during each five-week period with a maximum of three per semester. The topics change from semester to semester and from year to year. The Schedule of Courses for each semester lists the current topics offered . Set II courses are one or two semesters in length and have no formal prerequisites. They include both in troductory survey courses and special topics courses

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and are usually designed with the nonscience major in mind. Set ill includes all other natural and physical science courses offered in the division. Although these courses are generally intended for the science major, they are open to students with the proper prere quisites. BIOLOGY Faculty: Alan P. Brockway, Daniel D. Chiras, Jeanne A. Conry, Linda K. Dixon, Emily L. Hartman, James Joule, Phyllis W. Schultz; Emeritus: George J. Siemens. The study of biology offers the student an introduc tion to the vast array of living systems that make up our world. With an understanding of biology, the student can truly learn to appreciate living by extending that term to other creatures. From the green plant to the fish to the human being, all are biological systems. The study of each system and its interrelationships with other systems can provide fascinating insights into life and the world environment. A background in biology is vital to a paraprofes sional or professional career in the health sciences. Furthermore , most professional schools expect appli cants to have completed several biology courses. Students planning to teach should consult the School of Education for information on teacher certification. All biology majors are required to take the complete list of biology core courses (20-21 credit hours) plus the specific ancillary core courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics, and statistics (29 credit hours) . At this point a student must declare a particular direction by selecting one of the options listed below (i.e., ecology, genetics, organismic, or general biology). Course selections above the core level should be made in consultation with a biology faculty ad viser. Students should contact their biology faculty advisers early in their academic careers. Biolog y Core Courses Credit Hours General Biology I and II (Bioi. 205 and 206) 8 Principles of Ecology (Bioi. 341) 3 Cell Biology (Bioi. 361) 3 General Genetics (Bioi. 383) 3 Plus one physiology or morphology course _H Total Biology core 20-21 Ancillary Core Courses General Chemistry, two semesters (Chern . 103 and 106) 10 University Mathematics I and ll (Math. 111 and 112) 6 Physics for the Life Sciences (Phys. 251 and 252) 10 Introductory Statistics (Math. 383 or Psych. 210) __ 3 Total ancillary core 29 In addition to the above core requirements the student must select at least four other courses in biology to complete his or her major requirements and a minimum of 36 biology credit hours for graduation. At least three of these courses must be taken from the list provided by the particular option which the student elects. Note that each option also carries a set of ancil lary courses which are either required or recom mended . Independent Study can be taken under any College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 35 of the options with the consent of an appropriate biology faculty adviser. Ecology Option: Bioi. 310, 331, 415, 425, 427, 441, 447, 470, 522. Ancillary ecology courses (recom mended only): Calculus I, IT and ill (Math. 140, 241, 242), also Chern. 341, 342, 481, and 482 and approved courses from the Geog./Geol. series. Genetics Option: Bioi. 384, 410, 412, 451, 452, 470. Ancillary genetics courses: See genetics adviser. Organismic Option (select a minimum of one physiology and one morphology course): Bioi. 310, 322, 407, 413, 427, 461, 467, 541, 542. Ancillary organismic courses: Organic Chemistry I and IT (Chern. 341 and 342) required. Also recommended: Calculus I and IT (Math. 140 and 241) and General Biochemistry (Chern. 481 and 482). General Biology Option: A student may prefer an undergraduate option which may or may not lead to training for an advanced degree and does not specifically lead the student in one of the three direc tions shown above. Hence, a student may declare a general biology option and choose from an array of courses under the strict guidance of an adviser. At least one biology course recognized by each of the above options must be included under this particular plan. To receive certification as a biology major at UCD, a student must complete a minimum of 15 hours of upper-division UCD biology courses. CHEMISTRY Faculty: Robert Damrauer, Sandra S. Eaton, Robert T. Kohl, John Lanning, Denis R. Williams; Visiting: Carl J. Formoso; Part-time: Martha B. Barrett, Lenore K. Damrauer; Adjoint: Robert M. Speights. Why study chemistry? A practical reason is that our highly technical society faces many problems which can be solved through a thorough understanding of the science of chemistry and its methods of solving problems. A more intangible reason recognizes that chemistry is central to a variety of other disciplines and that many problems ultimately may have chemical solutions. At the undergraduate level students can prepare for (1) careers in chemical and medical laboratories, (2) careers in nursing, medical technology, physical therapy, dental hygiene, and other health oriented fields, (3) postbaccalaureate programs in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, medicine, and dentistry. At the graduate level, the chemistry program offered at UC D culminates in the awarding of an M.S. degree. Stu dents awarded M.S. degrees have job opportunities in research and t echnical laboratory services. In addi tion, flexible programs can be designed to combine chemical knowledge and skills with other interests of the M.S.-level student (e.g., business and biology). For graduation at the bachelor's level, students ma joring in chemistry must present credits in the follow ing courses or their equivalents: Chern. 103, 106, 311, 341, 342, 348, 349, 412, 413, 451, 452, 455; Phys. 231, 232, 233,234;Math. 140, 241,242.Studentsinterested

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36 I University of Colorado at Denver in the chemistry major should consult regularly with a member of the chemistry faculty. A copy of the chemistry major's program may be obtained in EC Room 232. Qualified majors are strongly urged to participate in the independent study program beginning in their junior year. A distributed stud ies program in chemistry requires at least 30 hours of chemistry including the following or their equivalent: Chern. 103, 106, 311, 341, 342, 343 or 348, 344 or 349, and 451. Students planning chemistry as a career should be familiar with the recommen d ations of the American Chemical Society for the professional training of chemists. Among these recommendations are a reading knowledge of German or Russian, one semester of inorganic chemistry (Chern. 401) or one semester of biochemistry (Chern. 481), and two semesters of advanced work (see graduate chemistry offerings). Six hours of Chern. 493 will satisfy the special courses requirement. An option leading to a degree accredited by the American Chemical Society is also offered. UCD maintai ns an ACS chapter of student affiliates. Students wishing to graduate with honors in chemistry should plan to do a minimum of two semesters (6 credit hours) of research (Chern. 493), or dinarily starting in the junior year. Additional re quirements are listed under Honors in the Special Academic Programs section. COMPUTER SCIENCE Faculty: Roland A . Sweet, CLAS Adviser. Several computer scientists reside in other colleges: in engineering-Paul F. Hultquist, William D. Murray, and Burton J. Smith; in business-F. Parker Fowler Jr. Computers have an impact on every aspect of modern life. Knowledge of the basic principles and methods of computer operation can be he l pful to stu dents in their personal lives as well as useful in developing job skills. Students interested in pursuing the study of computers in depth may designate computer science as a primary sub ject in the College's distributed studies major program. In this program, a student completes 30 semester hours in computer science (and computer-related courses) and 30 semester hours . distributed over one or two secondary subjects. For students pursuing a traditional major program in mathematics, or in electrical engineering within the College of Engineering and Applied Science, a special computer science option is available . GEOGRAPHY Faculty: Melvin Albaum, Yuk Lee, Cedric D . Page, Charles G. Schmidt, Richard E. Stevens. Part-time: James L. Huckabay. Geography is a science that focuses on the spatial analysis of human/physical patterns and processes. Geographers attempt to identify the factors affecting the distribution of people and their activities on the surface of the earth and to provide meaningful solu tions to problems faced by societies. This discipline is an ideal major for the liberal arts student, providing exposure to the concepts and techniques utilized in investigating environmental issues, socioeconomic problems, and planning policies. The program is designed to provide the student in terested in economic, physical, or social geography with the background necessary for obtaining a rewarding job in government (federal, state, local) and private industry, as well as preparing students for graduate work. Recent graduates have found employment in forest management, surveying/mapping, land-use planning, location analysis, transportation planning, and environmental impact analysis. Students majoring in geography must complete the following basic courses or their equivalents: Geog. 100, 101, 199, 306, and 361. In addition, majors must complete a minimum of 30 hours of course work in geography (at least 16 hours of which must be at the upper division level) and maintain a 2.0 average in all geography course work completed. Distributed studies majors selecting geography as a primary or secondary subject should consult with the department adviser. GEOLOGICA L SCIENCES Faculty: Wesley E. LeMasurier. Geology is the study of the earth. The major topics in the field include (1) the origin and distribution of rocks and minerals that make up the planet and serve as raw materials and fuels for technology, (2) the processes that create continents and ocean basins and shape the surface of the earth, and (3) the history and evolution of the planet and its living organisms. Most topics serve as subjects of both basic research and ap plied technology. Employment opportunities for well-qualified geologists are generally good for students holding B.A . , M.S. , or Ph.D. degrees. A graduate degree is strongly recommended for those seeking high-level positions. Major employers are the oil , mining, and engineering industries, federal and state surveys, and various teaching and research institutions , all of which are heavily represen t ed in the Denver metropolitan area. Many persons combine a geology degree with a second degree in law, business, plan ning , engineering, or education to pursue a variety of other career options. Students majoring in the geological sciences may choose from among six curriculum options to suit a variety of career or educational objectives. Most op tions require the following courses within the department: physical geology, mineralogy, structural geology, and field geology. Introductory petrology, stratigraphy, and paleontology are recommended. In addition , most career-oriented students must take the following courses in allied fields: Chern. 103, 106; Math. 140, 241, and 242 or 319 (or the equivalent

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courses at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Math. 130, 230); Phys. 231-232, 233-234. UCD offers its program entirely in the evening (ex cepting field geology), with the assistance of honorarium faculty from industry, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the CU Boulder campus. MATHEMATIC& Faculty: Nancy S. Angle, Roxanne M. Byrne, R. T. Clement, Vance Faber, Zenas R. Hartvigson, Collin J. Hightower, Sylvia Chin-Pi Lu, William W. McCor mick, Paul A. O'Meara, Charles I. Sherrill, Roland A. Sweet; Part-Time: Beryle M. Barkley. Mathematics is a body of deductive knowledge dealing with such topics as numbers, algebra, geometry, analysis, and logic. It permeates modem life and is encountered by the student very early, es pecially with respect to its applications. At UCD, the mathematics faculty continues to present applica tions, but broadens the study to include more of the actual mathematical theory itself, as well as its historical development. The study of mathematics can prepare the student for careers in business , industry, teaching, and government. Mathematics is especially useful in engineering, science, and computer science, and it provides a good background for any of the professional schools. A major in mathematics can be completed by stu dents in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences by satisfying all of the following requirements, com pleting each with a grade of C or better: 1. At least 30 semester hours of mathematics courses. 2. At least 18 semester hours of mathematics courses numbered above 300, approved by an adviser and excluding Math. 303, 304, 383, 427, 428, 429, 470, 475, 495, 496 and 497. 3. Math. 140, 241, 242, 300, 314, and 315. 4. Either Math. 431-432 or Math. 321-422. 5. Exceptions to the above can be made only by the designated department adviser. No student may earn more than 9 hours credit in mathematics courses numbered below 140. Students who plan to do graduate work in mathematics should take Math. 431-432; students who wish to obtain a secondary teaching certificate are encouraged to complete Math. 321-422; students plannirig to major in mathematics must see an adviser from that discipline. Students who choose the computer science option in the mathematics major are required to take the fol lowing courses, all with grades of C or better: 481 c.s. 201 c .s. 311 c.s. 401 C.S.453 C . S. 465 465) c . s . 546 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 37 Variations in these courses must be approved by a mathematics adviser. At the graduate level , master's degrees are available in mathematics, applied mathematics , and basic science (mathematics option) . The mathematics department offers a teaching internship program which consists of three phases as follows: Phase 1 . A junior-level student who is majoring in mathematics or applied mathematics, and who shows promise as a teacher, is sponsored by a member of the full-time faculty of the departmen t. A freshman-level course is then assigned to the student, o n an honorarium basis, with the understanding that the faculty member will attend all sessions of the course. The student will thus be acting as an intern and will be provided with a critique of his performance after each lecture. It is the interested student's task to convince a faculty member that he or she should sponsor the stu dent. No faculty member is required to perform this function, nor is any compensation afforded to the sponsor for so doing. Phase 2 . After completion of one or two semesters of fully supervised classroom exposure, and upon the student's entry into the senior year of study , the faculty sponsor may recommend that the intern be ac cepted as an undergraduate teaching assistant . With approval of the mathematics faculty, the student will then be assigned broader responsibility for one (or at most, two) freshman courses, with the faculty sponsor exercising such supervision as may appear ap propriate under individual circumstances. Phase 3. Upon completion of a baccalaureate program the intern hopefully would be prepared to ac cept a graduate teaching assistantship in t h e dis cipline or in a related interdisciplinary area a s the next step in his or her professional career. PHYSICS Faculty: Willard R. Chappell, Martin M. Maltempo, Robert N. Rogers, John I. Shonle, William R. Sim mons, Clyde S. Zaidins; Adjoint: Edward J . Davies, Sidney A. Freudenstein, Ill, In Kil Hwang, David P. Olsen, Jerry H. Wilson; Adjunct: Paul E. Biagi. Physics as a discipline is the base on which many other areas of science and engineering rest. There are several variations of a major in physics available to suit career goals ranging from fundamental research to general education. Students interested in basic research or teaching in higher education need to prepare for graduate study in physics (Plan I). Careers in applied physics, primarily in industry, are best served by a Plan II or engineering physics major (see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for the latter). Plan II, coupled with appropriate education courses, is also advised for students desiring to teach physical science in primary or secondary schools. A new option (Plan Ill) which emphasizes conceptual, philosophical, historical, cultural , and social aspects of physics is available for students desiring a technical

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38 I University of Colorado at Denver background for careers in business, law, politics , etc., or for general education . Physics is an important com ponent in many interdisciplinary areas, such as en vironmental, geophysical , or energy studies. Majors in these areas are arranged individually. All physics majors, under any option, mus t consult with an adviser. The basi c requirements include Phys. 130 and two semesters of other sciences for all majors. Additional courses are: Plan I. Phys. 231, 232, 233, 234, 311, 312, 317, 321, 331, 332, 341, 381, 481, 482, 495, and Math. 140, 241, 242. Plan II. Phys. 231, 232, 233, 234, 311, 312, 317, 321, 331, 381, six hours of upper division physics electives, and Math. 140, 241, 242. Plan III . Phys. 105, 106, (201, 202) or (251, 252), 317, and 15 hours of upper division phys ics electives , such as 307 or 309, 308, 362, 363, 395, 464, or 466, and Philosop hy of Science. PSYCHOLOGY Faculty: Janis W . Driscoll , Robert D. Elder , Daniel Falloq, Eben M. Ingram, Ca rolyn M . Simmons, Gary S. Stern, Graham Sterritt; Visiting: John V . Davis; Emeritus: Nell G. Fahrion; Adjoint : Kurt W. Fischer. Psychology is the scientific study of behavior , con sisting of the following major areas of study: ex perimental psychology, biopsychology, developmen tal psyc hology, social psychology, and clinical psy chology. The requirements for the psychology major are designed to expose the student to the spectrum of psychology, including an early exposure to methodology and statistics . Although some specialization is possible, the faculty believes that this is more appropriate at advanced levels and that the undergraduate should have a broad background upon which to base future specialization. An undergraduate major in psychology provides a good general concentration for a B .A. degree. Job op portunities are developing for interdisciplinary com bina tions of psychology with other areas of study such as business, computer science, and statistical design. Traditionally, job opportunities within the field of psychology itself require graduate study; however, some students find jobs in the mental health and social service fields with a B.A. degree in psychology. The psychology major also prepares the studen t for graduate work in psychology. Programs leading to the master 's degree in particular applied areas of psy chology appear to be one of the directions in which the field is moving . Requirements for the psychology major are as fol lows: majors must complete at least 30 semester hours and not more than 48 semester hours in psy chology with at least 16 hours in upper division courses. No grade below C in psychology courses is acceptable toward the major. College algebra and English 102 must be included in lower division curriculum. Specific course requirements are Psych. 203-204 and Psych. 207; Psych. 210; at least one biotropic course including Psych. 322, 405, 409, 410, 414, 416, 425, 438, 496; at least one sociotropic course including Psych. 364, 430, 431, 440, 441, 445, 449, 464, 466, 467, 471, 485; at least one advanced laboratory course including Psych. 417, 422, 444, 485; and one integrative course, Psych. 451. Transfer psychology majors will be expected to complete at least 9 semester hours in psychology courses, including an advanced laboratory course, on the UCD campus. Division of Social Sciences M . Jay Crowe, Assistant Dean In the last two decades, the social sciences have in cluded study of some of the most intractable problems of contempo rary society: the population explosion, urban concentration, the impact of rapidly changing technology, the strains of race relations, the conflicts arising from competing political ideologies, and the thrust of developing societies. The social science dis ciplines also provide important bridges between thought and action and between values and problem solving techniques. Social scie nce majors provide excellent preparation for further professional training as well as for jobs in public service, secondary school teaching, office ad ministration, journalism, and writing. Students can satisfy all requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree at UCD in all the departments included in the division. The requirements of each major are ex plained under the respective departments. The Division of Social Sciences includes the follow ing departments: anthropology, economics, history, political science, and sociology . The College-wide in terdisciplinary major programs in ethnic studies and urban studies are also administered by faculty in the division . The division offers courses in the various dis ciplines, in interdisciplinary studies, and in preprofes siona l studies. Students should be aware of the possibilities for a distributed studies major in the social sciences. The most usual combinations are economics and sociology and history and political science. See the College-wide Interdisciplinary Academic Programs section of this bulletin for details on a distributed studies major . ANTHROPOLOGY Faculty: Robert A. Aldrich, JoAnn E. Glittenberg, Janet R. Moone, Lorna Grindlay Moore, Duane Quiatt, Jack E. Smith; Visiting: Paul F. Brown; Part time: Susan M. Collins; Adjunct: Richard G. Conn. Anthropology provides a broad overview of human beings and their ways of living in the world. It con siders humans as biological and social beings and seeks to understand their origins, biological and cultural evolution, present conditions, and future prospects. Anthropology seeks to explain both con temporary biological and cultural diversity, and those features shared by people everywhere. It also seeks to

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understand the past record of biological and cultural evolution. Anthropological training has an application to many fields. It is especially helpful in the areas of environmental design, city planning, community development and architecture , the medical and nurs ing profes sions, and allied health sciences, law, public affairs , and secondary education. Requirements for Majors. Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in anthropology with grades of Cor better. Sixteen of the 30 hours must be upper division. The maximum number of hours in the major is 48. Anthropology ma jors must take the following courses or demonstrate a competent knowledge of materials and methods covered. Introductory Courses. (Two are offered each semester and may be taken concurrently. There is no required sequence.) Anthro . 100. Cultural Anthropology Anthro. 101. Biological Anthropology Anthro. 102. Prehi story Anthro. 453. History of Anthropology Information for Nonmajors . Nonmajors receive 8 hours of credit toward the College social science re quiremen t for Anthro. 100 and 102, and 4 hours of credit toward the College natural and physical science requirement for Anthro. 101. The full12 hours of Col lege requirements for each of these two science areas may be fulfilled by combining the above courses with other cultural or archaeological courses (Soc.Sci.) or other biological-physical anthropology courses (Nat. and Phys . Sci.) at the 200, 300, or 400 levels. ECONOMICS Faculty: Jeffrey Bauer , Gary Bickel , Suzanne W. Helburn, Byron L. Johnson, Patricia Malin, John R. Morris Jr., Alan R. Shelly; Part-time: David F. Bramhall . Economics is important to the average citizen as well as to the professional. The economy influences daily life, and every person must make economic deci sions. The economics student is trained to research, to analyze data, and to make forecasts. This background lends itself to careers in teaching, business, and government. Economics deals with all aspects of the production and circulation of the worldly goods of humanity. Specific aspects are macroeconomics (inflation, un employment , etc.) and microeconomics (theory of behavior of individual producers, consumers, and investors). Analytic scope ranges from precise mathematical modeling to general philosophical speculation on the nature of society and people. Requirements for Majors . Students majoring in econom ics must meet the following requirements: at least 30, but not more than 48, semester hours in economics, of which 19 must be numbered 300 or higher; Econ. 381, 407, and 408, and a data processing course approved by the student's adviser . Students plannin g to go to graduate school should also take at College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 39 least two semesters of calculus (more mathematics is desirable). At least 12 semester hours must be taken for credit on the Denver Campus. Hours outside of economics may be counted for the major at the discre tion of the student's adviser. Students who do not have an adviser should see the department chairperson for assignment to an adviser. Any deficiencies in prerequisites for Econ. 381 should be removed as soon as possible , and the 381 requirement should be fulfilled early in the student's career. For all courses numbered above 300, the prere quisite , unless otherwise indicated, is Econ. 201 and 202, or Econ. 300. Distributed Studies Students majoring in distributed studies may make economics their primary area of concentration by tak ing 30 semester hours in economics. Required courses for this option are Econ. 407-408 and a course in statistics. ETHNIC STUDIES Faculty: Nereyda L. Bottoms, Cecil E. Glenn; Parttime: Larry T . Osaki, Fred Anthony Shearer. Ethnic studies is the academic study of the culture of minority groups in the United States. Although the programs in ethnic studies have been designed to meet academic needs of all university students, many students interested in ethnic studies qualify for sup port from federal and state educational opportunity programs (EOP). Student organizations provide as sistance with recruiting, counseling , personal guidance, and tutoring; fmancial help is available through grants and the Work/Study Program . The program offers three options for students: (a) the ma jor, (b) the combined major, and (c) the specializa tion. The Major. The major leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree in ethnic studies. The major program consists of 42 semester hours, with an average of Cor better, 30 of which must be taken from the ethnic studies cur riculum. The remaining 12 hours are taken from a list of related courses in other departments prepared an nually by the ethnic studies faculty. The Combined Major. The ethnic studies faculty urges students interested in the program to consider combining ethnic studies with a major in one of the many closely allied disciplines in the University. In this option, a student selects a major in an allied dis cipline such as communication and theatre, English, Spanish, sociology, history, political science, anthropology, psychology , or education, and pursues it simultaneously with ethnic studies as follows: 1. The student must meet all the requirements for the major in each department. 2. The student's program of study must be ap proved by the chairpersons ofbothofthedepartments involved .

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40 I Universit y of Colorado at Denver 3. Courses that are cross-listed between two departments will apply toward fulfillment of the re quirements for either major field but not both. The Specialization. Rather than majoring in ethnic studies, students pursuing a major in another department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may wish to pursue a specialization in ethnic studies . Stu dents earn the specialization by completing the re quirements for their particular academic major and, in addition, 12 semester hours in ethnic studies, 6 of which must be at the 300 level or higher. HISTORY Faculty: FredrickS. Allen, Ernest Andrade Jr., Mark S. Foster , Philip A. Hernandez, James B. Wolf; Visiting: Hugh S. C . Cunningham; Part-time: Mary Conroy , Myra L. Rich. History constitutes an intellectual challenge not only because of its special discipline but also because an understanding of history requires one to integrate man y branches of knowledge. Individual history courses cut across lines of the social sciences, humanities , even the natural sciences. But more important to the history student than learning facts is understanding the process of change. By comparing the state of humankind over years , decades, or cen turies, the student of history isolates important societal changes and analyzes critical causal factors. This is training not only for learning, but for living. The bachelor's degree in history provides training for immediate postgraduate career entry or advanced training in several social sciences. History majors fre quently choose careers in teaching or civil service ; in addition, a number enter corporate management training programs or develop careers in sales. History is traditionally a valued background for law school ap plicants. A key attraction of the major in history is its versatility: an excellent choice for those who are still seeking career goals. Requirements for Majors . Undergraduate students majoring in history must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in history , 16 of which must be upper division. Not more than 48 hours in the student's ma jor area will count toward the 120-hour graduation re quirement. A student must have a cumulative grade point average of2.0 or bet t er in the major to graduate. History majors shall fulfill their lower division re quirements by taking 12 hours of history at the 100 and 200 levels. -All majors must take Hist. 101 and 102; in addition, they may take Hist . 151 and 152 or any two non-European history courses. POUTICAL SCIENCE Faculty: Michael S. Cummings, Joel Edelstein, Jana Everett, Harold H . Haak, Stephen C . Thomas ; Part time: Arthur C. Paulson , Loren S . Weinberg; Adjoint: George W. Pring. Political science studies people, power, and the public good. Looking at a variety of societies, institu tions , and interpersonal situations , the discipline asks who has power, where this power comes from, how it is used , and how it promotes or impairs the public good. It also asks what this public good is; how it differs from China to Rhodesia to Argentina to Colorado; and how the basic human needs for security, love, self respect, and self-actualization depend upon political conditions, such as freedom and equality. Political science draws on insights from other fields, such as psychology, philosophy, economics, sociology, and world literature. Finally, it explores the relationship between idealism and realism, between theory and practice, between political thought and personal ac tion. Opportunities for students with a B.A. in political science include careers in business, teaching, jour nalism, and government service. A political science degree also serves as good preparation for professional training in law and public administration. In all cases, participation in an internship experience as an undergraduate will increase the student's job oppor tunities. Students with an M.A. in political science may find careers in such areas as business, govern ment research and administration, and teaching at the community college level. Requirements for Majors. Undergraduate majors must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in political science, of which at least 18 must be in upper division courses. Courses are distributed among the primary fields as listed in this bulletin, i.e., American politics, comparative politics, international relations, political theory and public law, and public ad ministration . The major must include the following: Pol. Sci. 100, 110, 200, 440, 441; Econ. 201 and 202; and one upper division course in each of three fields American politics, comparative politics, international relations. With faculty approval, students may get course credit for political internships through Cooperative Education, Pol. Sci. 398. SOCIOLOGY Faculty : Richard H. Anderson, M. Jay Crowe, Karl H. Flaming, Joyce M. Nielsen, Richard H. Ogles, Marilyn Stember; Visiting: Wanda I. Griffith; Part time: J . Michael Davis; Adjoint: George S. Larimer. Sociology is the study of group life in society. It is the investigation of social actions, values, and procedures that are involved in the development, structure, and operation of group life. Sociology at tempts to present a perspective which encourages peo ple to develop what has been called the sociological imagination the use of reason to achieve lucid sum maries of what is going on in the world and of what may be happening within themselves. Training in sociology, especially at the graduate level , can open up almost any professional field. Knowledge of sociology and sociological method is valuable in management, research, government ser vice, public affairs, and the health services. The department has developed the following rationale for courses offered.

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1. Lower Division Courses (for majors and nonma jors). a. One-hundred-level courses are an introduc tion to the broad sociological perspective as it applies to social life, social systems, and society. b. Two-hundred-level courses introduce the student to somewhat more specific content areas: population study, human ecology, social psychology, etc. 2. Upper Division Courses (300 and 400) a. Three-hundred-level courses serve as ad vanced surveys of some specific area of con centration. They are designed to acquaint the student with the issues, methods, concepts , and theoretical frameworks employed in the content area. Such courses as urban sociology, sociology of the family, and sociology of work are offered at this level. Many of these courses are open courses in that students from other departments and colleges are encouraged to enroll in them. b. Four-hundred-level courses are devoted to a more detailed in-depth examination of College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I 41 specific issues, approaches, and concepts within the previously identified content areas. These are advanced courses and are geared more directly to sociology and social science majors. Requirements for Majors . Majors in sociology are required to complete 30 hours in sociology with a grade of Cor better. Of these hours, 16 must be upper division, of which 12 hours must be 400-level courses. Maximum in the major is 48 hours. The following courses must be completed with a grade of Cor better: Soc. 100. Introduction to Socio logy Soc. 400. Contemporary Sociological Theory Soc. 402. Statistics A maximum of 6 hours of social science credit may be counted toward the major in sociology. As no fixed se quence of courses is prescribed, it is recommended and expected that students will select an adviser from the sociology faculty to help them develop their programs. This is particularly important for those in tending to do graduate work in sociology.

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College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Gordon G. Barnewall , Associate Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Business and Administration and the Graduate School of Business Administration at UCD offer programs designed to train competent, responsible administrative and related professional personnel. The College serves students entering this field of study and men and women already in ad ministrative positions. It promotes research and new thinking about administrative problems. The major purpose of the College of Bus i ness is to provide opportunities both for a liberal education and for professional training. Students are given help in preparing not only for effective careers but also for satisfying living and constructive citizenship. The Graduate School of Business Administration offers graduate-level education in business to persons with undergraduate degrees in business and other academic fields and prepares them for work in the broad spectrum of business enterprise . The College was admitted to membership in the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1938 . The College participates on a continuing basis in the Executive Program for the Gas Industry, the In stitute for Organization Management, the Colorado School of Banking, the National Installment Banking School, the School of Bank Marketing, the School for International Banking, and many activities of the Center for Management and Technical Programs. The College also assists in the presentation throughout Colorado of a Certificate Program in Real Estate. The faculty also participate in many continu ing education, government, and company educational programs. The Business Alumni Advisory Council serves as a direct link with the business community to promote understanding, cooperation, and mutual gain in a variety of education-industry activities . Career Opportunities Graduates occupy positions and perform widely varied functions in: Adver tis ing Banking Con s umer credit and m o rtgage fmance C redit admini s tra t ion Financial management Indu s trial s elling and purchasing Information Systems Insurance In t ernational business Investmen ts Managemen t accounting Management consulting Marketing management Marketing research Media M i nerals land management Office managemen t Operation s research Personnel management Production management Public accounting Real estate Retailing Selling and sales management Traffic management Transportation Wholesaling Others hold positions of responsibility in fields as diverse as business journalism , public relations, city planning , chamber of commerce and trade association management, college administration, and govern ment . Org anizatio n Within the broad framework of policy established by the Regents of the University of Colorado, policy decisions for the College of Business are made by the Educational Policy Committee of the faculty under the chairmanship of the dean and are subject to review by the faculty as a whole. The College ' s activities at UCD are administered by the associate dean, by the heads of its several in structional divisions, and by other faculty directors of particular programs. Research Activities The Business Research D ivision provides facilities and trained personnel for research on business and economic problems. Established in 1915, the unit serves as the research arm of the College. The division serves Colorado and the surrounding region to improve the general economic welfare of the area and to gather and disseminat e business and economic in formation; encourages research by faculty members and graduate students; and develops closer relationships between students, faculty, and busi nessmen. Through its monthly publication, The Colorado Business Review, the division provides basic business information concerning Colorado. Other publications include compilations of business and economic data, industry surveys, studies of special problems in

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business management and regional community studies. Honors Program Upon recommendation of the faculty , students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade point average of 3 . 5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall grade-point average o f 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the Universit y of Colorado will be consi d ered for magna cum laude . Student Organizations Opportuni t y for association with other College o f Business and Administration students in varied ac tivities intended t o stimulate professional interests and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations : AIESEC international business assoc iation Beta Alpha Psi -national honorary and professional accounting fraternity Beta Gamma Sigma national honorary scholastic fraternit y in business BREC Buffalo Real Estate Club CSPA Colorado Society for Personnel Administra tion (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations CUAMA -student chapter of the American Marketing Association Delta Sigma Pi -nat ional profe ss ional busines s fraternit y MBA Association Universit y of C o lorado associa tion of master's student s in busines s Phi Chi Theta national professional business and economics fraternity Rho Epsilon professional real estate fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon professional and honorary management fraternity SAML -Student Association of Minerals Landmen Awards Banquet Each spring the College sponors a banquet honoring top students in the graduating class. Scholastic honors from outside companies and memorials are given at this time, as well as honors from the dean' s office and other departmental offices . Both graduate and undergraduate awards are distributed , including recognition of those students graduating cum laude and magna cum laud e . Graduating students also honor the outstanding teacher of the year. ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic policies which apply t o all U CD students are described in the General Information section of this bulletin. The policies that follow apply College of Business and Administration I 43 specifi c ally to the C o llege of Business and Ad ministration and Graduate School of Business Ad ministra t ion . Upon admission , t he student can be advised on the academic pro gram by the College advisers. The student is re s ponsible for knowing his/her status at all times. Adding and Dropping Courses See the General Information section of this bulletin for University wide Drop/Add policies. Admi n istrat ive Dro p . Instructors may recommend to the College of Business and Administration office that students who fail t o meet expe c ted course a t ten dance standards be dropped withou t discredit during the first 10 weeks of the semester. Appeal Procedure Students should contact the as s ocia t e dean or staff members in t he College of Business and Admin i s t ra tion office for appeal and petition procedures pertain ing to rules and regulations of the College. Attendance Regulations Clas s room attendance is at the discretion of the in s tructor . Students are responsible for determin i ng each in structor's policy on attendance. Course Load The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate student in the College of Business is 15 semester hours , with 19 hours normally the maximum. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continu ing Education, whether in classes or through cor respondence , are included in the student's load . Students having a grade-poin t average of 3.0 or higher for the most recent semester in which they completed at least 15 semester hours may register for a load exceeding 19 semester hours with the written approval of the associate dean. Credit To receive credit, all courses mus t be listed on the student's registration in the Office of Admissions and Records. Credit is then evaluated by the College of Business to determine degree acceptability. Courses completed at any University of Colorado campus are credited toward degree requirements , if appropriate to the degree program. Registration for Business Courses Students may register only for those courses for which they have the stated prerequisite training . Junior s tanding is required for all business courses numbered 300-499. Pass/ Fall Business majors may not take any business courses or required nonbusiness courses under the pass/fail

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44 I University of Colorado at D enve r option. Only nonbusiness elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Pass/fai l determination must be made within the posed deadline and is irreve rsible . Failed courses may be repeated, but the F will be included in the grade-point average. Up to 16 se mester hours may be taken pass/fail. Transfer students may take 1 s emester hour pass/fail for every 8 semester hour s t aken at the University. SPECIFIC UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC POLICIES Standards of Performance Students are held to basic sta ndards of performance established for their classes with respect to attendance, active participation in course work, promptnes s in completion of assignments, correct English u sage both in writing and in speech, accuracy in calculations, and genera l quality of scholastic workman ship . In g eneral , examinations are required in all courses and for all students, including graduating seniors. To be in good standing, students must have an overall grade-point average of not less than 2.0 (C = 2.0) for all course work attempted and a 2.0 for all business courses attempte d. This applies to work taken at all University campuses. Act ivity physical edu catio n and remedial courses are not inclued in the overall average. When semester grades become availa ble, students below standard will be notified of (1) proba tio nary status or (2) suspension. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows: 1. Any student whose overall grade average , or busine ss course average, is less than 2.0 shall be placed on probation immediately. A student may be removed from probation when the overall average and the business average have been raised to 2 .0. 2. A student shall remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College, and obtains no grade below a C; such probationary status may con tinue a maximum of four regular semesters, providing these provisions have been met. Failure to meet these provisions will res ul t in indefinite suspension. 3. Indefini tely s uspended students may attend the University of Colo rado su mmer session in order to improve their grade averages in the area of deficiency, but may not attend any division of the University for at least two regular (fall and spring) se mesters . 4. A student who has been under indefinite suspen sion for two semesters may appl y for readmission to the College of Business and Administration . If read mitted , that readmission will be on a probationary status. After being readmitted under such proba tionary status, any student who fails to comply with the requirements of his/her probation will be subject to permanent suspe nsi on. 5. Any student who is placed on susp ension more than once will be permanently suspe nded from the College of Busine ss. 6. Any student earning all failing grades or no aca demic credit for the sem ester will not be permitted to register without the dean's approval. 7. Official combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Busines s students in or der to be continued in t he combined business program. Transfer Credit Cr edits in business and nonbusiness subjects trans ferre d from other institutions will be limited to the number of credit hours given for equivalent work in the regular offerings of the University . Transfer work is o nly accepted from institutions accredited by the regional association. In general , the College will limit t ransfer credit for business courses taken at a lower division level to such courses as the College offers at that level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be take n a t t he University of Colorado unless written ap proval is given by t he appropriate division head. Transfer students must take 30 hours of degree re quirements in residency after admission to the Col lege. A maximum of 60 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the B . S . degree in business. Remedial or vocational work does not transfer. Business courses from junior colleges will not be applied toward degree requirements if the course work is offered at the junior-senior level at UCD. For a detailed explanation of transfer credit, see the General Information section. Correspondence Credit Only 30 semester hours of credit, 9 of which may be in business, taken through correspondence study will be counted toward the B.S. degree in business. Required business courses and area of emphasis courses cannot be taken by correspondence. All cor respondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability . Credit by Examination College Level Examination credits (CLEP subject examinations only) are acceptable toward degree re quirements to a maximum of 30 hours. Specific infor mation is available in the College of Busine ss and Ad ministration Office, Room 512. CLEP credit will be applied in the same manner as transfer credits. For credit, students must rank in the 66.7 percentile based on national available norms . Generally, CLEP credit is only appropriate for (a) nonbusiness requirements and (b) nonbusiness elec tives. A maximum of 6 hours of credit in any one course area is allowed. CLEP may not be used in course areas where credit has already been allowed. General examinations are not acceptable. Credit for CLEP subject examinations in business course areas must have prior approval in writing by t he College of Business and Administration and by the appropriate division head.

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Advanced Placement (CEEB) credit will be given where appropriate to students who make scores of 3, 4, or 5. Special Sources of Credit Up to 6 hours of experimental studies or indepen dent study programs can be accepted toward gradua tion. A maximum of 3 hours of this type of credit may be taken in any one semester. Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular business course coverage may take variable credit courses (1 to 3 semester hours) under the direction of an instructor who approves the pro ject, but the student must have prior approval. Infor mation and request forms are available in the College of Business and Administration office. To receive credit for nonbusiness independent study courses, students should obtain the associate dean's approval prior to registering for the course. Further information and forms are available in the College office. There is no credit for work experience or cooperative education programs. ROTC Credit Students who are enrolled in and complete the ROTC program may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours of advanced ROTC credit toward nonbusiness elective requirements and toward the 120-semester hour total degree requirement for the B.S. degree in business. No credit toward requirements is granted for basic (freshman and sophomore) ROTC courses. The ROTC adviser can provide more detailed information. Study Abroad Credit Transfer credit from study abroad programs is most appropriately applied as nonbusiness elective credit. Required business courses should not be taken during studies abroad. Students are responsible for checking with the College of Business and Administration for prior approval. Information on the various study abroad programs is available at the Office of Inter national Education on the Boulder campus. UNDERORADUATEDEQREEPROORAM The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objec tives: 1. Understanding of the activities that constitute business enterprise and of the principles underlying administration of those activities. 2. Ability to think through logically and analytically the kinds of complex problems en countered by management. 3. Facility in the arts of communication. 4. Comprehension of the human relationships in volved in an organization . 5. Awareness of the social and ethical respon sibilities of those in administrative positions. College of Business and Administration I 45 6. Skill in the arts of learning that will help the stu dent continue self-education after leaving the campus. Admission of Freshman Students See the General Information section for admission and application procedures. Prospective students in business are encouraged to pursue a broad college preparatory program in high school, with particular emphasis on English, mathematics, the social sciences, and speech. Candidates for the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree normally enter as freshmen. The College ex pects entering freshmen to present 15 units of the secondary course work. Adml881on of Transfer Students See the General Information section for admission and application procedures. lntraunlverelty Transfer Students who wish to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University must formally apply at the College of Business office (Room 512). A minimum University of Colorado grade-point average (established by the College) is required for considera tion. Students desiring admission to official combined programs must apply to and be accepted by the Col lege of Business. Minimum grade-point averages are also established for these jointly enrolled students. Second Undergraduate Degree Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree , provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business . The student who is accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a degree plan. For example, if a student registered for the second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records. If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies con sideration for the graduate program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master's programs. Academic Advising Each student in the College of Business is responsi ble for knowing and complying with the academic re quirements and regulations established for the Col lege and for classes. Upon admission to the College of

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46 I University of Colorado at Denver Business and Administration or to the Graduate School of Business Administration , the student has the responsibility for conferring with the student ad visers in the College concerning an academic program. Appointments for academic advising can be made by calling 629-2605. Graduation Requirements The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree requires: 1. Total Credits . A total of 120 acceptable semester hours of credit, of which at least 51 hours must be in nonbusiness courses (including 9 hours of upper divi sion work) and at least 51 hours in business courses. The remaining 18 hours may be in either, or some combination of both . This credit cannot include remedial work, repetition of courses , courses failed, or activity physical education, recreation and dance courses. However, a maximum 6 hours of theory, physical education, recreation, and/or dance may be used. Advanced ROTC work is acceptable only if the ROTC program is completed. All incomplete grades and correspondence course grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. It is the student's responsibility to contact the instructor con cerning the removal of incomplete grades. A max imum of 60 semester hours taken at junior colleges may be applied toward the B.S. degree in business. 2. Residence: Completion of at least 30 semester hours of business, usually in the senior year, after ad mission to the College of Business and Administra tion, including 12 hours in the area of emphasis . Courses completed at any University of Colorado campus after the candidate has been admitted to the College are acceptable towa rd this requirement. 3. Grade Average : A minimum scholastic grade point average of 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 in the stu dent's area of emphasis. 4. Graduation With Honors: Upon recommenda tion of the faculty of the College of Business, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Please refer to the Honors Program under the Information About the College section. 5 . Intent to Graduate Form. Students must file an Intent to Graduate Form with the College of Business and Administration office prior to registering for the last semester. Questions concerning graduation should be directed to a student adviser, Room 512. 6 . Courses . Completion of all of the following re quired courses: Sem ester Hour s Area of emphasis ................ ......................... 12 College algebra and calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Communication and composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Core requirements (basic courses in accounting , business law, business statistics, business and soc iety , data processing, marketing, finance, o r ganization management, production and operations management and business policy) ...................... 30 Electives Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Nonbusiness (to include 9 hours of upper division work) . 15 Free electives (either business or nonbusiness electives) .. 18 General psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Introductory sociology or cultural anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Natural science (astro geophysics, biology, chemistry, physical geography, geological sciences, and physics ; applies as nonbusiness elective . . . . 3 Political science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Principles of economics ................................... ____..2 Total 120 Upon reaching senior status, the student must con tact the College of Business and Administration stu dent adviser for a complete academic evaluation prior to registering for the last term on campus. Model Degree Program The following sequence of courses is a guide to registration. Freshman Year Semester Hours Engl. 102 or 103. English Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Comm . 202 or 210. Communication Theory or Public Speaking 3 Math. 107. College Algebra' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Math. 108. College Calculus' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pol. Sci. 100. Introduction to Political Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pol. Sci. 110. American National Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Soc. 100. Introduction to Sociology2 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 3 B.Ad. 100. Introduction to Business or a business elective3•.• 3 Nonbusiness electives• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Natural science .......................................... __2_ Total 30 Sophomore Year Econ . 201 and 202. Principle s of Economics (macro/micro) . . . 6 Psych . 203, 204. General Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 B .Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer . . . . . . . . . 3 Q.M . 201. Business Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acct . 200. Introduction to Financial Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Nonbusiness electives• ............. ....................... Total 30 Junior Year Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin . 305. Basic Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Or. Mg. 330. Introduction to Management and Organization . 3 Pr. Mg. 300. Production and Operations Management....... 3 B . Law 300. Business Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Business electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Nonbusiness electives• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Free electives .... ........................................ Total 30 Senior Y ear B . Ad. 450. Business Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Ad. 411. Business and Society o r B . Ad. 410. Business and Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Area of emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Business electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Free electives ................. ........................... Total 30 'Any of the follo wing f ou r options: (1) Math. !07 and 108; (2) Math. Ill and 140; (3) Ma t h . Ill and 108; or (4) Math. 140 and 241. A maximum of 9 hours of mathematics below the level o f Math. 140 can be applied toward the degree . 2 oc . 100 is recommended to meet the soc iology requirem e nt; however , Soc. 104, 119, 300 , 301, 302. 303, 30.?, 384, and A nth. 100 are acceptable. ,Applies as a business elective . This course is recommende d but not required . tfor completion of the B . S. (Business) degree the student's program must include at l east 9 se m es ter hours in upper division , n onbus iness courses.

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Area of Emphaala Each candidate for the B.S. (Business) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising 12 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado. Typically, students select an area of emphasis from those offered after taking several of the "core" courses. Then they take the hours required for their selected area. Available areas of emphasis are: Accounting Business education (Boulder) Computer-based information systems Finance Information science International business Marketing Minerals land management Office administration1 Organizational management Personnel management and operations management Public agency administration Real estate Small business management Transportation and traffic management Although only one area of emphasis will be listed on the student's official records, students so desiring may accomplish the effect of a dual area of emphasis by careful selection of courses. ACCOUNTING Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, ad vanced, and graduate levels . They provide prepara tion for practice in one or more of the following fields: Financial accounting Auditing Managerial accounting Tax accounting Data processing and control systems Teaching and research In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and com munication skill is indispensible . The undergraduate area of emphasis in accounting consists of 12 hours beyond Acct. 200 and 202: Required Course s Semester Hour s Acct . 322. Intermediate Financial Accounting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acct. 323. Intermediate Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acct. 332. Coat Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Accounting elec tiv e ................................ ....... _.2. Total 12 Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the required 12 hours . Many students take a total of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking two courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty in planning their accounting programs. Students planning to take the CPA examination should take about 30 hours of accounting and also be well prepared in statistics, business law , finance , economics. Graduate study in accounting is receiving increas ing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements College of B usiness and Administration I 47 should consider continuing their education at the graduate level. FINANCE The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, monetary policy, banking, investments, and insurance. Finance is intended to give an under standing of fundamental theory pertaining to finance and to develop ability to make practical applica tion s of the principles and techniques of sou11d financial management in business affairs. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about finan cial problems and to formulate sound financial deci sions and policies. Numerous opportunities are to be found with financial institutions and in the field of business fmance. Emphasis is placed on financial policy , management, control, analysis and decision making . Acct. 202 is a prerequisite for this area. Required Courses Semester Hours Fin. 401. Business Finance I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin. 402. Business Finance II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin . 433. Investment and Portfolio Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin. 455 . Monetary and Fiscal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommended Electiue Courses Fin . 440. International Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin. 434. Security Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin. 453 . Bank Managemen t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R.Es . 454. Real Estate Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ins. 484. Principles of Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 INFORMATION SCIENCE The information science area is designed for thos e who wish to prepare themselves for careers as profes sional administrative data processing managers in business and government . The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for the analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems systems for the collection, organization, accessing, and analysis of in formation for the planning and control of operations. The automation of data processing is also studied ex tensively. The undergraduate area of emphsis consists of 12 hours beyond B.Ad. 200, Q.M. 201, and I.S. 215. Required Core: (12 Hours ) Semester Hour s I.S. 350. Database Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I.S. 465. Systems Analysis and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Q .M . 300 . Intermediate Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Q .M . 330 . Operations Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 In addition to the area courses above, I.S. 470 (Computerware) is recommended but not required. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS In recent years, companies have completely reoriented their thinking, planning , and operations to IAfta co urses in office administration mu e t be completed o n the Boulder campus except for O .Ad. 440.

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48 I U niversity of Colorado at Denver capitalize on the opportunities offered in the world marketplace . Every phase of business operation is af fected b y this reorientation, and individuals who offer the appropriate skills, training, and orientation are in great demand. The program reflects the basic principle that effec tiveness in international businass is based on a thoro ugh training in business administration. The in ternational business program provides the oppor tunity to build on these skills. The student electing this area must complete at least 12 semester hours as follows: Required Courses Semester Hours Econ . 441. International Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 plus three of the following courses: B .Ad. 440. International Busine88 Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fi n. 440. International Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Tr. Mg. 458. International Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk. 490. Interna tio nal Marketing. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .. . .. .. 3 A second area of emphasis in business is highly recomm ended. The course requirements for the sec o nd area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. Foreign language study is also recommended, and foreign language skills are much sought after by business recruiters for this field. Other courses emphasizing international affairs may be elected from the following departments: anthro pology , economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. Students in terested in this area may start their preparation by electing language and other liberal arts and sciences courses in their program. MARKETING Marketing is concerned with analyzing the market for a product or service, planning and developing that product, determining the most appropriate distribu tion channels, pricing the product, and promoting it. Today the administrative policies and practices of any well-managed firm should be marketing-oriented toward the consumer. The career opportunities in marketing reflect the business person's awareness of the importance of this field. Today many individuals are rising to top ex ecutive positions by the marketing route. There are more executive and other job opportunities for women in the marketing field than in any other single area outside teaching or secretarial work . One out of every four people gainfully employed in this country is in a marketing position. Career opportunities abound in personal selling, advertising, sales management, marketing research, retailing, wholesaling, marketing by manufacturers, international m arketing, etc. R equire d Courses Semes ter Hours Mk . 330. Marketing Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Marketing electives (beyond Mk . 300)...................... 9 MINERALS LAND MANAGEMENT The curriculum in minerals land management is designed to incorporate the primary course patterns of the College of Business and Administration along with certain field area preparation in geology, chemistry , economics, and land management. With this preparation, the graduate is a candidate for entry into employment as a landman, exploration trainee, lease broker , and other jobs related to the minerals industry. Colorado is presently the head quarters for a wide assortment of resource-based com panies operating throughout the western United States and Canada. These companies need qualified employees and have helped in the preparation of the program. The four-year program will consist of all College of Business requirements and must include the following courses. Except as specifically stated, no 300or 400level course (busines:> 0r nonbusiness) may be taken pass/fail. I . Nonbus i ness Courses Semester Hours Geol. 101. Introdu ction to Geomorphology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Geology/Geography Option1 .. .. • .. .. • • .. .. .. .. • .. • • .. • .. 7 Chern. 101. General Chemistry... . .. . .. . .. .. .. . . .. . .. .. . 4 Econ. 453. Natural Resource Economics or Econ . 454. Environmental Econom ics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 . Business Courses Acct . 202. Introduction to Managerial Accounting . . . . . . . . 3 R.Es. 300. Principles of Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3. A minimum of 12 hours for the major area is required as specified below: Required Courses ( The following four courses) M .L. Mg. 485. Minerals Landman Administration........ 3 M . L . M . 495. Oil-Gas and Mineral Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acct . 441. Income Tax Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin . 401. Busine88 Finance I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommended Elective Courses R.Es . 430. Real Estate Appraisal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R.Es . 473. Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions . . . . . 3 B.Law 412. Busine88 Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Econ. 476. Government Regulation of Busine88........... 3 Econ . 477, 478. Economic Development Theory and Problems I , II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ORGANIZATION MANAGEMENT Organization management offers opportunities to develop understanding and skill in managing human resources in organizations. The curriculum provides the foundation for supervisory and general manage ment careers. 1 A minimum or 7 houn or the Collowinc poi"'Y or ,..,.,..phy couneo . '1"may not be taken paoo/Cail. Geololical Dewlopment or Colorado and the Weot (Geol. .153."'1 En vi ron mental Geoloey (Geol. 370), Geohydrol01y ( Geol. oWol-3), Pnnc1p eo or G-..orpholocY (Geol. 463-4) Introduction to Geophyoical Proapect!nc (Geol. 493_.), Mineral Reeourcea and Worid Atrairo (Geol. Mop Interpretation (Gq. 306-3), Geocraphic Interpretation or Aerial Pbotoa (Gq. 406-3).

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Requir e d Course s Semester Hour s Or .Mg. 335. Managing Work Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Or.Mg. 437. Managing Complex Organizations.............. 3 (One of the following:) Ps. Mg . 434. Labor Relations : Policy and Pract ic e . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ps . Mg . 438. Personnel Management : Polic y and Practice . . . . 3 Recommend e d El ectives (At least one of the following : ) Ps.Mg. 439. Personnel Management : Legal and Social Issues . 3 Pr.Mg. 444. Work Design and Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg. 447. Policy Analysis in Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr .Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management . . . . . . . . . 3 Tr. Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management . . . . . 3 B.Ad . 470. Small Business-Management and Operations . . . 3 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Personnel management offers opportunities to develop professional competence in the areas of per sonnel administration and labor relations . Students acquire understanding and skill in developing and implementing personnel systems including recruit ment, selection, and union-management relations. Required Course s Semester Hours Ps. Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice . . . . 3 Ps . Mg. 439. Personnel Management : Legal and Social Issues . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommended Elect ives Or .Mg. 335. Managing Work Groups....................... 3 Or .Mg. 437. Managing Complex Organizations........ ... ... 3 Pr.Mg . 440. Planning and Control Systems in Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg. 444. Work Design and Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg . 447. Policy Analysis in Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management . . . . . 3 B.Ad . 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy, and Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 O .Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Econ. 461. Labor Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Psych . 485. Principles of Psychological Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Psych . 487. Personality Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Soc. 479. Industrial Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Production and operations management studies are designed to prepare for careers as production manager, operations manager, management analyst, or systems analyst in such private sector organiza tions as manufacturing, banking, insurance, hospi tals, and construction, as well as in a variety of municipal, state, and federal organizations. Production or operations managers may be charged with the design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of the production systems. Managerial activities could include forecasting demand, produc tion planning and inventory control, scheduling labor and equipment , job design and labor standards, quality control, purchasing, and facilities location and layout . College of Business and Administration I 49 Students choosing this area of study may be asked to participate in live case research and consulting pro jects with local organizations under the direction of their instructor; encouraged to participate in the newly chartered student chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society; and en couraged to seriously consider preparing for and tak ing the five-part Certification Examinations given semi-annually by APICS. Students whose major areas of emphasis are infor mation science or transportation and traffic management will find the Pr. Mg. 400-level courses to be par ticularly well related to their courses of study. Required Courses (The following three courses) Pr.Mg . 440. Planning and Control Systems in Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr. Mg . 447. Policy Analysis in Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr. Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management . . . . . . . . . 3 (One of the following courses ) Pr.Mg . 444. Work Design and Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Q . M . 330. Operations Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I.S. 215. Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk . 485. Physical Distribution Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommend e d Electives I.S. 345. Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Or .Mg. 335. Managing Work Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Or.Mg. 437. Managing Complex Organizations........... ... 3 Ps . Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ps . Mg . 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice . . . . 3 Tr.Mg . 450. Transportation Operation and Management..... 3 Acct . 332. Cost Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Q.M. 300. Intermediate Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PUBLIC AGENCY ADMINISTRATION Public agency administration is designed to prepare for careers in management of governmental or other nonprofit service organizations. The curriculum in public agency administration provides the student with a foundation of core courses upon which to construct an area of emphasis which will focus on the type of service organization the student desires to enter upon graduation. Required Courses Acct. 480. Business and Governmental Budgeting and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ps . Mg . 438. Personnel Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 O .Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Q . M . 330. Operations Research.... ........................ 3 REAL ESTATE Real estate careers require knowledge of real estate investments, urban land economics, real estate law, appraising, finance, taxes, management, sales, and accounting. Real estate is one segment of the economy in which it is still possible for a person to be his/her own boss whether as a broker, appraiser, developer, syndicator or property manager.

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50 I University of Colorado at Denver Required Courses Semester Hours (After completion of R.Es . 300) R.Es . 430. Real Estate Appraising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R.Es . 454. Real Estate Financing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R.Es. 401. Urban Land Analysis or R.Es . 433. Real Estate Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R.Es. 473. Legal Aspects of Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 It is strongly recommended that any student plan ning to sit for the Colorado broker's examination take all six of the real estate courses. Recommended Electives Acct . 441. Income Tax Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ins . 484. Principles of Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin. 455. Monetary and Fiscal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin . 433. Investment and Portfolio Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk. 310. Salesmanship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk . 320. Consumer Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk . 470. Sales Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B .Ad. 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy , and Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . Eng . 240. Building Materials and Construction . . . . . . . . 3 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP Small business management studies provide under standing, knowledge, and skills in organizing and managing small business. The emphasis is on the managerial aspects of the wide range of activities re quired of the entrepreneur. A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended . The course requirements of the second area can be included as part of business or free elec tives. Additional courses in management, fmance, ac counting, and marketing should be planned in con sultation with the adviser to serve individual career needs. Required Courses Semester Hours B.Ad. 470. Small Business-Management and Operation . . . . 3 (Two or three of the following four courses) Fin . 401. Business Finance I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Acct. 332. Cost Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ps.Mg . 438. Personnel Management: Policy and Practice . . . . 3 Mk. 480. Marketing Policies and Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommended Electives (at least one of the following) Ps.Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg. 440. Planning and Control Systems in Production and Operations Management.............. .. 3 Pr.Mg. 447. Policy Analysis in Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg . 460. Purchasing and Materials Management..... .... 3 Mk . 485. Physical Distribution Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 O .Ad. 440. Principles of Office Management................ 3 Fin . 402. Business Finance II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT The curriculum in transportation management in cludes the role of transportation in society and the problems of traffic management within specific in dustries as well as the management of firms in the transportation industry, such as airlines, trucking firms, railroads, and urban transit firms. International transportation management problems and policies are analyzed. One of the recommended elective courses may be substituted with permission of the adviser for one of the required courses if there is a schedule conflict, if the course is not available, or if a student demonstrates a career need for such a course. Required Courses Semester Hours (Any four of the following six courses) Tr.Mg. 450. Transportation Operation and Management . . . . . 3 Tr.Mg. 452. Problems in Traffic Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Tr.Mg. 456. Air Transportation............................ 3 Tr.Mg. 457. Urban Transportation......................... 3 Tr.Mg. 458. International Transportation........ .... .... ... 3 Mk . 485. Physical Distribution Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommended Elect ive s Ps .Mg. 434. Labor Relations: Policy and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ps.Mg. 438. Personnel Management : Policy and Practice . . . . 3 Tr.Mg. 451. Survey of Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg. 460. Purchasing and Materials Management . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Ad . 470. Small Business-Management and Operation . . . . 3 O.Ad . 440. Principles of Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 COMBINED PROGRAMS Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in com bined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Such combined programs have been arranged for engineer ing and business, pharmacy and business, and en vironmental design and business and may be ar ranged for other professional combinations as well. The two programs of study proceed concurrently, terminating together with the award of two degrees. Generally, at least five years will be needed for such combined programs . No substitutions are allowed in this program. For students in combined programs, the require ments for the degree in business are as follows: 1. An application for admission to the combined program must be filed with the College of Business and approved by the deans of both colleges. Comple tion of at least 48 semester hours in business and economics, to include Econ. 201 and 202 (6 semester hours), required courses in business (30 semester hours), and a business area of emphasis (12 semester hours). 2. Completion of at least 30 of these semester hours at the University of Colorado while enrolled in the College of Business. 3. Completion of nonbusiness requirements in mathematics, communications, and the social and behavioral sciences in a degree program approved in advance by the College of Business. In addition, for some courses and areas of emphasis, there are prere quisite requirements which must be met. 4. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business. Stu dents in combined degree program are subject to all policies of the College of Business.

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5. Any combined degree student who does not make reasonable progress toward the completion of the business degree requirements, as determined by the College of Business , may be dropped from the program. 6. The number of students accepted in any com bined program may be numerically limited and is dependent upon existing demand each semester. Shown below is the combined engineering-business program. For other combinations , students should consult with the associate dean of the College of Business. The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows: Courses S e meste r Hours Econ . 201 and 202. Principles o f Economics { Sho u ld be completed during the student's sophomore or junior year . ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Acct. 200. Introduction to Financial Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Ad . 200. Business Informa tion and the Computer . . . . . . . . . 3 Q.M . 201. Buainess Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk. 300. Principles of Marke tin g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin . 305. Basic Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr.Mg . 300. Production and Opera t ions Management . . . . . . . . 3 Or .Mg. Introduction to Managemen t and Organ ization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Law 300. Business Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B . .Ad. 410. Business and Government ; or B .Ad. 411. Business and Soc i ety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Ad . 450. Business Policy Cases and Concepts i n Busi ness Policy; or B.Ad. 451. Management Games and Cases in Business Policy ; o r B .Ad. 452. Small Busi ness Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Specified courses in an area of emphasis i n one of the following fields : accounting , information systems, finance , international business, marketing, minerals land management, office ad ministration , produc t ion/opera ti ons management , organizational behavior, personnel managemen t, public agenc y administration , real estate, small business managemen t, o r tran s portation manage ment. All work in the area of emphasis must be t aken a t the Univer sity of Colorado , College of Bus i ness and Adm ini s t ra t ion . Area of emphasis ..................... ................... Total 48 Requirements for Adml•lon-Maeter'e Programs Admission to the master ' s programs will be deter mined by the following criteria: 1. Applicant ' s academic record. 2. The applicant's scores on the Graduate Manage ment Admission Test (GMAT). (This test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to the Educational Testing Service , P.O. Box 966, Princeton , New Jersey 08540.) Because of the large number of applications which must be processed, the deadlines set out below are strictly adhered to, and applicants should be careful to observe them. Personal interviews are not required. In gene . ral , students failing to meet minimum stan dards are not admitted on a provisional status . College of Business and Administratio n I 51 Seniors in this Universi t y who have satisfied the u n dergraduate residence requirements and who need no t more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet requirements for bachel o r ' s degrees may be admitted to the Graduate Schoo l of Business Administration by special permission of the director of graduate studies . Completed applications, including GMAT scores , transcripts and a $20 nonrefundable application fee should be in the Office of Graduate Studies, Graduate School of Business Administration , University of Colorado at Boulder , Boulder, Colorado 80309, by March 1 for summer admission, by Aprill for fall ad mission , and by October 1 for spring admission, or un til available space is filled . Daytime M . B . A . courses are offered in Boulder . Evening M.B.A. courses are offered in Denver and Colorado Springs. BACKGROUND REQUIREMENTS Students applying for graduate program s in busines s do not need to have t aken their un dergraduate degrees in business . For those students the M.B.A . or M.S. degree programs provide a se ries of graduate fundamental background courses. These inlcude : B.Ad. 501 (Acct.) ; B.Ad . 502 (Q.M.); B . Ad . 503 (Mk.) ; B . Ad. 504 (Mg. and Org .); B.Ad. 505 (Bus . Fin . ) ; B.Ad. 506 (B.Law); B.Ad. 507 (Introd u c tion to Management Science). In addition , all graduate students are required to take either B.Ad . 500 (Sources of Information and Research Methods) or pass a qualifying examination covering this subjec t matter. These fundamental courses do not carry graduate credit, nor may they be used to satisfy re quirements for the bachelor ' s degree in business. They are open only to admitted graduate students. Graduate students possessing an undergraduate degree in business must be prepared to present t he following acceptable course work in order to waive the relevant graduate fundamental course: Introductory Accounting Business Quantitat ive Methods Principles of Marketing Management and Organ i zation Business F i nance Business L aw Business Operations Research Principles of Economics 6 semester hours { Financial/Managerial) B y qualifying exam only 3 semester hours 3 semester hours 3 semester hours 3 semester hours 3 semester hours { Macro/Micro ) While it is not required that students ha ve a background in mathematics and/or comput er programming, it is highly recommended. Please see the adviser for suggested courses in these areas . Gener al Information Maeter'e Programs The M.B.A . program is a two-year curriculum with the possibility of waiver, for properly prepared s t u dents, of all or part of the first year. The student mus t request course exemption and should be prepared t o support the request for waiver . Up to 25 credit hours (First Year Program) of course work may be waived .

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52 I Univers i t y of Colorado a t D e n ver Advising . All graduate students should report first to the student adviser in the Graduate School of Business Administration office for the purpose of ascertaining deficiencies and principal field of in terest. The division heads of each area serve as faculty advisers. During the first term of residence , each s t udent should prepare a degree plan. This plan , with ap propriate signatures, should be filed in the Office of Graduate Studies. Qualifying Examination. Satisfactory performance on the Graduate Management Admission Test and admission into a master ' s program with the status of a regular degree student will constitute the qualifying examination for graduate study. Course Load. The normal course load for graduate students is 12-15 semester hours . Minimum Hours Required. A candidate for a master' s degree in business must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work plus any deficiencies. A maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate work can be transferred from another AACSB-accredited master's program. Comprehensive Examination. Each candidate for a Master of Science or Master of Business Education degree is required to take a comprehensive final ex amination after the other requirements for the degree have been met . This examination is given near the end of the candidate's last semester of residence. Stu dents must be registered when they take this ex amination. Comprehensive examinations are given in November, April, and July. A comprehensive ex amination is not required for students pursuing the Master of Business Administration degree program . Students must file an Application for Admission to Candidacy with the Office of Graduate Studies during the first month of the final term of their residency. Minimum Grade-Point Average . A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved in courses taken after the student's admis sion to the graduate program. If the student ' s cumulative grade-point average falls below 3 . 0 , he or she will be placed on academic probation and given one regular semester (summer terms excluded) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average . Failure to achieve the required average within the al lotted time period will result in dismissal. Work receiving the lowest passing grade , D, may not be counted tOward a degree, nor may it be ac cepted for the removal of deficiencies. A graduate stu dent may repeat once a course for which he or she has received a grade of C, D, or F. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the grade-point average. To earn a grade of W (withdrawal) in a course, a graduate student must be earning a grade of Cor bet ter in that course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the semester . An IF (incomplete) will be automatically converted to an F after one academic year . Time Limit. All 30 semester hours of graduate work, including t he comprehensive final examination, s hould be completed within five years or six succes sive summers . Candidates for t he master ' s degree are expected to complete their work with reasonable con tinuity.1 Maater of BUalneee Administration The Master of Business Administration program is devoted to the concepts, analytical tools, and com munication skills required f or competent and respon sible administration. The administration of an enterprise is viewed in its entirety and within its social, political , and economi c environment. In addition to the background requirements for a master ' s degree listed above, the C!indidate for the M . B.A. degree must complete the specific require ments of the M.B.A. curriculum (30 semester hours) as follows: Core Requ i r e men ts Seme s ter Hour s a. F unctional Courses Two of t he following f o u r func ti onal courses are required : Fin . 601, Mk. 600, Pr. Mg . 6 4 0 ( Logis ti cs ), and I.S . 645, a t least one o f which shall be either Fin . 601 or Mk . 600. Candidates with either marketing or fmance undergraduate or graduate majors shall no t take the corresponding functional course to fulfill this requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 b . Business and Its Env i ronment Busine88 , Governmen t, and Societ y ( B .Ad. 610) . . . . . . . . . . 3 c . Analysis and C ontrol Business and Economic Analysis ( B .Ad. 615) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Administrative Con t rols (B.Ad . 620) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 d . Human Factors Organizational Behavior (B.Ad . 640) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 e. Planning and Policy Administrative Polic y ( B .Ad. 650) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Area of Emphasis .. .. .. ...... . ........ . . . . . .............. 00 Areas of emphasis include accounting, finance, management science , marketing, office administra tion, organization managemen t , personnel manage ment, production and operations management, and transportation management. For students taking an area of emphasis in ac counting, Acct. 322, 323 and 332 or their equivalents are prerequisites for all graduate-level accounting courses . Acct. 533 is substituted for B.Ad. 620. Acct. 628 and two other graduate-level accounting courses are required in the area of emphasis . It is strongly recommended that accounting students take Fin . 601 as one of their functional courses. Requirements for an area of emphasis in finance are Fin. 601, 602 and either Fin . 633 or 655. Requirements for an area of emphasis in marketing are Mk. 600, 605 and one additional graduate marketing course . Candidates pursuing the area of emphasis in management science must elect either a decision science option or an information science option. Those electing the decision science option will be required to take M .S. 601 , 602 and Q . M . 602. Those electing the 1U nd e r unueual circumt tan cee, st uden ts whoee reside n ce ia interrupte d f o r legitimate reaeona, suc h a s m ilit ary service , may a pp ly for an e xten&ion of time .

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information science option will be required to take I.S. 645, 650 and 665. Students taking other areas of emphasis should consult the head of the division concerning the re quirements . No thesis is required in the M.B .A. program. In the total program there must be a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate course work and a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work at the 600 level. Independent study course 699 is normally not acceptable for credit in the final 30 semester hours of the M.B.A . program. Matlter of Science The Master of Science degree affords opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a par ticular major field and a related minor field. MAJOR FIELDS For detailed information concerning requirements and recommended programs for each of the major fields, students should consult the following profes sors: Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor White Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Melicher Management science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Plane Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Goeldner Management and organization . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Hendrick With the approval of the student's adviser and the director of graduate studies, minor fields may be chosen from business subjects or from other graduate departments. Fields available in the College of Business for selec tion as a minor are: Accounting Business education Finance Management science Marketing Office administration MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS Organization management Personnel management Production and operations management Real estate Transportation management The minimum requirements for the M.S. degree, after all undergraduate background deficiencies have been removed, may be met by Plan I or Plan II. The student's degree program should be approved in ad vance by the advisory committee and the director of graduate studies. Plan I. The requirement is 30 semester hours of graduate credit including a thesis (4 to 6 hours credit) based upon original research by the candidate. A minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, including B.Ad. 630 (Business Research), is required of all can didates and, including the thesis, must be earned in a College of Business and Administration I 53 major field. A minimum of three courses, normally 9 semester hours but not fewer than 6 , must be com pleted in a minor field. Plan II. Minimum of 30 semester hours of course work must be completed in courses numbered at the 500 level or above. Requirements must be met in both a major and a minor field. No thesis is required. Of the 30 semester hours of graduate-level course work, a minimum of 16 hours must be at the 600 level. All M.S . students must pass written comprehensive examinations covering major and minor fields. The candidate 's committee may require an oral final com prehensive examination subsequent to the written ex amination. Maater of Buelneaa Education Students should refer to the Uni ve rsity of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for information regarding the Master of Business Education program. Minora Without MaJora In Fields of Buelneea Graduate students majoring in other divisions of the University may elect as a minor some field of study within the College of Business and Administra tion . Acceptable fields are: Accounting Business education Finance Managemen t science Marketing Office adm i nistration Organization management Personnel management Production and operations management Transportation management The student must complete two preparatory fundamentals courses, or their equivalents, as background preparation in the particular field. These two courses will be selected in consultation with a College of Business and Administration adviser. Valida tion of background preparation may be required through examination, either written or oral, or both. To complete a minor at the graduate level in one of the fields within the college , the student must present not fewer than two graduate courses , and not fewer than 6 semester hours at the 500 or 600 level. Courses taken to apply on a minor must form a logical se quence or unit and should be approved in advance by a representative of the subject field from which the courses are selected. Doctor of BU.Ineea Admlnletratlon Students should refer to the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog for information regarding the Doctor of Business Administration (D. B.A.) program.

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School o f E ducation Gerald W. Lundquist, Associate Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE S CHOOL UCD offers undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare teachers and other educational workers. The education of school personnel has long been a recognized responsibility of the University. No program of studies involves the coordination of more scholastic disciplines than does the education of teachers. None is more fundamental, more signifi cant, more far-reaching, or more enduring in its im pact on society . The teacher education program, both un dergraduate and graduate, is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the National Council for the Ac creditation of Teacher Education. Membership also is held in the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education. Students interested in pursuing a program of studies leading to initial teacher certification should consult the School of Education Office. Those desiring to pursue graduate programs or to take courses as graduate students should consult the Graduate School section of this bulletin. All application forms for School of Education programs are available in the school office, located at 1156 9th Street, 629-2717. INITIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM The Initial Certification Program is designed to prepare elementary and secondary teachers for urban school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teaching experiences, community field experiences, and urban studies courses. Un d ergraduate teacher certification programs are available at UCD in elementary education and in sec ondary education in the fields of communication and t heatre, English, German, French, Spanish, mathematics, science, and social studies. Student Candidates 1. Juniors and seniors who are working on B.A. or B.S. degrees . 2. Persons who a l ready have B.A., B.S., or ad vanced d egrees, but who do not have teaching cer t ificates . The P r o gram FIRST SEMES TER (FALL) Semester Hours T . Ed . 370. The City as a Cultural Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 T . Ed. 306. Foundations of American Education1 • • • • • • • • • . • • 3 T . Ed. 313. General Educational Psychology1 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 3 T . Ed . 336. Teaching Reading in Urban Schools1 • • • • • • • • • • • • 3 Time Commitment for Field Experiences : T . Ed . 306: Two hours per week in Denver Public Schools T . Ed . 313: Two hours per week in Denver Public Schools T . Ed . 336: Two hours per week in Denver Public Schools If the student elects to take these courses out of sequence , such as T.Ed. 306 the first semester and T.Ed. 313 and 336 the following fall, the time commitment will be a minimum of four hours per week each semester. City as a Cultural Laboratory: To be offered fall semester in the form of individualized field experiences in the city of Denver. Seminars will be held during the semester to process the ex periences . K-12: T .Ed. 336 and T . Ed. 313 will be offered with one section designated with an elementary emphasis and one section with an emphasis on secondary aspects. All other courses will maintain the K -12 perspective. Academic Work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Prior to the end of the first semester , level of specialization to be pursued or involvement in multiple methods courses for purposes of dual certification should be indicated.) SECOND SEMESTER (SPRING) Semester Hours Special Methods: a . For elementary certification : T . Ed. 415. Basic Elementary Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 b. For secondary certification : Discipline-area methods course taught either in School of Education or College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 T . Ed . 375. School-Based Field Experience (Secondary) . . . . . . 2 6 to 8 hours per week in Denver Public Schools T.Ed. 375. School-Based Field Experience (Elementary) . . . . . 4 10 to 12 hours per week in Denver Public Schools (Full-time involvement in School of Education for elementary-level students during second semester of program . ) Academic work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for secondary-level students (as necessary) . SUMMER SESSION (OPTIONAL ENROLLMENT) This additional semester may be necessary for some students to complete program requirements during a two-year period. 1. Student teaching by petition only . 2. Academic work in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 3 . Elective courses in the School of Education also may be taken during the summer terms . 'A field experience component is an integral part of each of these counes .

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THIRD SEM E TER ( FALL) Semester Hour Elementary certif i cation : (Involves a 10to 12-week full time stu dent teaching assignment , concurrent seminar . ) T.Ed. 470. Student Teaching Elementary School . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 T . Ed. 473. Workshops in Special Method s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 T.Ed. 439. Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching . . . . . . . 1 Secondary certification : T . Ed . 471. Student Teaching Secondary School (8-10 weeks full t ime or 15 weeks half time assignment) . . . . . 8-9 T . Ed . 440. Seminar in Secondary Student Teach i ng . . . . . . . . . 1 A c ad emic wor k i n C oll ege of L i b e ral Arts and S c i e nc es ( as neces sary) . FOURTH SEME TER (SPRING) Semes ter Hours T . Ed . 414. Senior Seminar: Urban Education , Bilingual/ Mu l ticultural Education , and Special Education . . . . . . . . 3 T .Ed. 314. Communication : Human Relations and Group Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Urban Studies courses in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (if these are not previou sly completed as a part of academic major or General Edu c ation requirements) from such areas as teaching English as a s econd language , Black Studies , Mexican American Studies , minority literature , and/or urban-oriented work in sociology , anthropology, etc.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Academic work i n C o llege o f Liberal Arts and S cie n ces for both el e m e ntary -and sec ondaryl e vel students (as nece s sary) . Students desir i ng dual certification and whose program permits . Optional T . Ed . 470. Student Teac hing-Elementary School (10-12 weeks full-time assignment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 T.Ed. 471. Student Teaching-Secondary School (8-10 weeks full time or 15 weeks half-time assignment ) . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 T . Ed . 439. Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching . . . . . . . 1 T . Ed . 440. Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching . ........ 1 All elementary majors are required to take 3 semester hours of elective credit in School of Education courses . This may be done at any time . Admission Procedures A check list which outlines the steps necessary for ad mission into the Initial Certification Program is available in the Education office. Students shoul d ob tain and follow the procedures as listed. For further School of Education I 55 information contact the School of Education, 1156 9th Street, 629-2717. Physical Educati o n Programs Metropolitan State College is responsible for teaching all undergraduate physical education for the Auraria Higher Education Center. This includes the basic activity program as well as the undergraduate major in health , physical education, and recreation. UCD students may take any activity class MSC of fers . Check the appropriate Schedule of Courses for activities offered, class times, and procedures for enrolling in such classes. R ehab ilitat ion Services Program The School of Education offers a two-year program in rehabilitation services to juniors and seniors, focus ing strongly on the recruitment and training of minorities. Students entering the program must have completed 60 semester hours by September of the year for which application is made and should consult with the School of Education regarding entrance re quirements. The program leads t o a B.S. degree, but not a teaching certificate. The program combines didactic and experiential facets of rehabilitation counseling. Trainees spend a minimum of two days per week working in settings such as drug and alcohol treatment centers, juvenile probation, and rehabilitation service agencies. The program requires 30 hours of core curriculum courses during the junior and senior years. Applications of admission to the Rehabilitation Services Program are accepted each year until July 31. Graduate Programs Refer to the Graduate School section of this bulletin for information regarding graduate programs in education.

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College of Engineering and Applied Science Paul E. Bartlett, Associate Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Through engineering the resources of nature are used for the benefit of humanity and the environment. Engineers today are expected not only to be competent planners and designers of technical systems, but significant contributors to the betterment of their en vironment in the social and humanistic sense as well. It is no longer sufficient to build more powerful machines, more useful devices, and more effective controlling systems if the total effect is to deplete man's resources, damage the environment, or con tribute to the destruction of the economy. An engineering career demands hard work, and so does an engineering education . In return engineers have excellent opportunities to work in various places , meet new challenges, or move upward in manage ment. The engineer is generally well paid and usually in demand; in the rare times when there is a surplus of certain kinds of engineers, individuals usually have little difficulty finding attractive opportunities in other fields. Currently, registration is required in all states for the legal right to practice professional engineering. Although there are variations in the state laws, gradu ation from an accredited curriculum in engineering, subscription to a code of ethics , and four years of qualifying experience are required. In addition, two days of examinations covering the engineering sciences and the applicant's practical experience are required in most states. Those who cannot qualify for registration are expected to work under experienced registered engineers. A listing of the fields in which engineers work would have many hundreds of entries. The following list by departments gives only a . brief summary. The aerospace engineering sciences prepare engineers for an industry that encompasses the design and construction of both commercial and military aircraft and the development and fabrication of space vehicles. The fallout from this technology has permit ted the industry to enter also the fields of urban mass transit, undersea exploration, bioengineering, nuclear engineering, laser technology, and many other emerg ing high technology fields. An aerospace engineer often works at the forefront of engineering with scien tists in the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, etc. Applied mathematics meets the need of modern research, which is dependent upon advanced mathematical concepts . Almost all concerns that are engaged in industrial and scientific research today need applied mathematicians, as do organizations in volved in computational work, statistical analysis, or stochastics. Architectural engineering prepares students for careers in the building industry and for research at the graduate level on building-related topics. This course of study fulfills the academic requirements for registration as a professional engineer. The architectural engineering curriculum is recom mended for those wishing to specialize within the building industry in engineering design, construction and contracting, or sales engineering. The architec tural engineering student may select any of three areas of specialization offered: construction engineer ing, environmental engineering, or structural engineering. Chemical engineers convert natural resources into industrial and consumer products in facilities that in clude refineries and gasification plants. Among their products are many that often are not identified with chemical engineering-oils, metals, glass, plastics, rubber, paints, soaps and detergents, foods, beverages, synthetic and natural fibers, nuclear and exotic fuels, medicines, and many others. The department has recently revised and upgraded its bioengineering/premedical engineering program. It is very much interested in research directed toward ecologically sound development of chemical processes. It is also working hard on energy problems and is stressing in its instructional program problems of energy conversion. Civil engineering offers an interesting and challeng ing career to the student interested in the design and construction of buildings, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures; in transportation systems in cluding highways, canals, pipelines, airports, rapid transit lines, railroads, and harbor facilities; in the transmission of water and the control of rivers; in the development of water resources for urban use, in dustry, and land reclamation; in the control of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment; in the construction and contracting in dustry; and in the problems concerned with man's physical environment and the growth of cities.

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Electrical engineering offers professional pos sibilities that include teaching and research in a uni versity; research in development of new electrical or electronic devices, instruments, or products; design of equipment or systems; production and quality-control of electrical products for private industry or govern ment; and sales or management for a private firm or branch of government. There are numerous specialties within electrical engineering. Among them are the design of computer interfaces and computer software; electromagnetic fields, which are basic to radio, television, and related systems; communication theory and signal processing; electrical machinery; solid-state, integrated-circuit, and electron devices, energy and power, control systems and others . The electrical engineering and computer science program is designed to provide entrance into the profession for students who wish to work in computer engineering. This includes design and construction of efficient software systems as well as an introduction to hardware design. Present interest is in the application of microprocessors. The engineering physicist works where new kinds of engineering are being born, or where many fields are being used jointly. General knowledge of the diverse fields of physics provides the ability to deal with in dustrial problems that cannot be solved by a stan dardized procedure in a specialized field. The training prepares the student for a career in physics where there are many and varied opportunities in develop ment work and industrial research. It is also basic for graduate work in physics and for specialized training in research. Mechanical engineering is very broad in scope, not identified with or restricted to a particular tech nology, vehicle, device, or system but instead is con cerned with all such subjects, both individually and collectively. The objective of the undergraduate program is to prepare the student to meet and an ticipate change, and to work with technologies as yet unknown. Typical starting assignments for the graduating senior include positions with oil, construc tion, and automotive industries. B.S. Degree The College of Engineering and Applied Science offers at UCD complete four-year programs leading to the B.S. degree in civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, mechanical engineering, and applied mathematics. A number of the courses leading to the B.S. degree in aerospace engineering sciences, architectural engineering, chemical engineering , and engineering physics also are offered at UCD. The course requirements during the freshman year are essentially the same throughout the College of Engineering and Applied Science. About two-thirds of the sophomore year is common to all, and the remainder of the courses begin to point to the various fields of engineering taught; real specialization begins, however , in the junior year and carrries on through the senior year. A fifth year of College of Engineering and Applied Science I 57 study leading to the master's degree is strongly urged for students of more than usual ability who feel they can profit from additional study. Those in this category are likely to achieve greater ultimate success in the engineering profession. At UCD it is also possible for a student to obtain the bachelor 's degree in both engineering and business in five years plus one or two summer terms. Any of the engineering degree programs can be modified for an excellent premedical program. If liberal arts students elect certain courses in science, mathematics , and engineering as undergraduates, they may earn an engineering degree in four semesters after graduation from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. At the graduate level, UCD offers complete master's degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering and applied mathematics. Many graduate courses leading to the Ph.D. in civil engineering and electrical engineering are also offered. For information regarding courses and require ments leading to the Master of Engineering, Master of Science, or to the Ph.D. degree, see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog and the Graduate School section of this bulletin. Summer Couraee Summer term courses are planned for regular stu dents who must clear deficiencies and for transfer stu dents. Courses also are offered for high school graduates who wish to enter as freshmen and for those who need to remove subject deficiencies. For informa tion about courses, students should write to the as sociate dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science , UCD, for the Schedule of Summer Courses. For many students there are several advantages in starting their college careers during the summer term. Some required freshman and sophomore courses are normally offered at UCD during the summer. Generally , the summer classes are smaller than regular academic-year classes, which means that stu dents can get more individual attention. Beginning during the summer term gives students a head start and enables them to take a lighter load during the fall semester or take additional courses to enrich their program. Scholarships, Fellowehlpe, and Loan Funds Money contributed to the University Development Foundation for assistance to engineering students is deposited in appropriate accounts and used according to the restrictions imposed by the donors. Numerous industries match employee contributions . A list of companies contributing to scholarships and fel lowships and different loan funds available can be ob tained from the associate dean's office. Student Organizations The following honorary engineering societies have active student chapters in the College of Engineering and Applied Science:

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58 I Uni ver si t y of Colo rad o at D e n ve r Chi Epsilon, civil and architectural fraternity Eta Kappa Nu, electrical engineering society Tau Beta Pi , engineering society Student chapters of the following professional societies are well established at UCD: American Society of Civil Engineers Association for Computing Machinery Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers The following societies have chapters on the Boulder Campus; however, UCD students are eligible for membership: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics American Institute of Chemical Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Society of Women Engineers These societies meet frequently to present papers, speakers, films, and other programs of technical in terest. A general student organization , known as the Associated Engineering Students , of which all stu dents in the College are members, has supervision of matters of interest to the whole group. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION The prospective engineering student needs to be able to work hard, should enjoy mathematics, and should have a keen interest in science and its methods. Sound curiosity about the principles governing the behavior of forces and materials and the ability to visualize structures and machines are neces sary prerequisites . The ability to express ideas in both written and spoken form is of primary importance. In order to enroll, the student must meet the admis sion requirements of the College of Engineering and Applied Science and the admission requirements described in the General Information section of this bulletin. Students who have been out of high school for two or more years may petition the College for ad mission . Persons of sufficient maturity and experience who do not meet the prescribed requirements for ad mission may be admitted upon approval of the as sociate dean. Beginning students in engineering should be prepared to start analytic geometry-calculus. No credit toward a degree will be given for algebra or trigonometry (courses will be offered to allow a stu dent to make up deficiencies) . Any student who ques tions the adequacy of his precollege background in mathematics should see the applied mathematics coordinator for suggestions. A placement test covering precalculus mathematics will be given, prior to registration, to assist new freshmen in selecting the appropriate beginning mathematics course. To be prepared for the type of mathematics courses that will be taught, the student must be competent in the basic ideas and skills of ordinary algebra, geometry, and plane trigonometry. These include such topics as the fundamental operations with algebraic expressions, exponents and radicals, frac tions, simple factoring, solution of linear and quadra tic equations, graphi c a l r epresentation, simple system s of equation s, comple x n umb ers, the binomial theorem, arithme t i c and geomet ric progressions, logari t hms , the trigonometri c functio n s and their use in triangle solving and simple appli c a tions, and the standard theorems o f geomet ry, includ ing some solid geometry. It is e s timated tha t it will usually take seven s emesters t o c o v er t his m a t e ri al adequately in high school. F RESHMEN H igh School Subjects R e qu i r ed for Admission1 Englis h (lite rature, composit i on, grammar) Mat hem atics d istributed as follows: Alg ebra Geo m etry Add itio n a l m athematics Natural scie n ces (physics and c h emistry rec o m me nded ) S oci al studi e s and human ities ( F oreig n lan guages and additio n al u n its of E ngli s h , h isto r y, and l ite ra ture are i n clu d ed) Elective s3 Totals Former S tudents Required Units2 4 2 1 1 2 3 3 16 Former students must mee t t h e requirements out lined in the General Informatio n section of this bul letin. Records made at collegiate institutions while the student was a member of the armed forces will not necessarily be a determining fa ctor in a student's readmission to the Universit y of C o lorado, but all such records should be submitted . Students who have withdrawn must obtain perm iss ion of the associate dean to reenroll in the College of Engin eering and Ap plied Science. Students who interrupt their course of study may be required to take any preparator y courses which have been added during the i r absence or to repeat courses in which t heir preparat ion i s thought to be weak. Transfer S tudents Students transferring from othe r accredited col legiate institutions may be c o nsidered for admission on an individual basis if they mee t t he requirements outlined in the General Informa t ion section of this bulletin and the freshman requirem e n t s for entering the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Transfer from within the U ni v e rs it y to the College of Engineering and Applied Sci ence will be considered 1Appli c ant.o not m eeti n g these requi r e m e nt.o will be CO!ll!idered on an individual baais . A atudent who ia not prepar ed should e
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if the student's pri or academ i c record f ulfills the ad mission require men ts of t he College. All transfer appli c a tio ns are subject t o review by a faculty committee which evaluates the applicant's qualifications for academic s uccess in engineering subjects. The College s eek s to iden t ify applicants having a h igh probability of s uccessful completion of their academic programs. Admi ss ion is based on evaluation of many criteria; amon g t he most important are general level of aca demic performance before admis sion to the Coll e g e and ot her evidence of motivation and potential, and sch o larl y a bility and accomplish ment. These are indica t ed by trends in the student's record, by letters o f r e c ommendation from teachers and oth ers quali f ied to evaluate the student, by ac complishments o uts ide a c ademic work , and by other relevant evi dence . The Committ ee on Admissions will set detailed standards for admission annually and may consider applicants on a n i ndividual basis . TRANSFER CREDIT After a pros pective transfer student has made ap plication an d submitted t ranscrip t s t o t he University of Color a do, the Office of Admissions and Records is sues a Statemen t o f Ad v anced Standing (currently Form 382) listi ng those courses that are acceptable by University standards f or transfer. A copy of this statement is received by the associate dean's office at the time t h e studen t i s admitted by the Office of Admissions and Records and is made a part of the permanent rec ord . The appropriate engineering faculty departmental representative will use this copy of the form to i ndicate which of those credits listed may be accept able toward the 136hour graduation re quirement in t he College of Engineering and Applied Scienc e and note the tentative acceptance of these credits by dat ing and initialing each acceptable course liste d on the Statement of Advanced Standing . The student will be no t ified that the acceptance is tentative and i s contingent upon satisfactory comple tion of a min im u m of 30 s emester hours at the Univer sity of Color ad o before t he credits may be officially applied toward t he degree requirements . It i s t h e responsibility o f the transfe r student, after having completed the 30 s eme ster credit hours at the Uni versity of Color ado , t o r e ques t final validation of the credits by his d epartment and to ha v e this v alidation noted on the Sta tement of Adv anced Standing kept in the associate d e an ' s off i ce . If at any time a student wishes to hav e a course not previously acce p t ed considered again for transfer , the student shoul d consult w ith the departmental trans fer adviser and c omplete a petition t o t he associate dean through the depar tment chairman . All transfer credit must be v al idate d b y s a tis fa cto r y achievemen t in subsequent cou r s es. NONTRA NSF ERABLE CREDITS Stu dents d esir in g to transfer credits from engineer ing technology p ro grams should note that such credits Colle ge of Eng i neering and Applied Science I 59 are accepted only upo n t he submission of evidence that the work involved was fully equivalent to that offered in t his College. There are technology courses given with titles and textbooks identical to t hose of some engineering courses . These may still not be equivalent to engineer ing courses because of emphasis that is non mathematical or otherwise divergent . In order to assist engineering technology students with t ransfer problems , the following guidelines hav e been es t ablished: Courses on basic s ubjects such as mathematics, physics , lit erature , or history may be acceptab l e for direct transfer of credit if they were taught as part of an accredited program for all students and were not specifically designated for technology students. Students who have taken technology courses (courses with technology designations) tha t may be valid equivalents for engineering courses have these options: 1. They may petition faculty advisers to waive t he course . The requirement for a course can be waived if students demonstrate that, by previous course work , individual study, or work experience they have acquired the background and training normally provided by the course . No credit is given toward graduat i on for a waived course , but strong students may benefit from the waiver by being able to include more ad v anced work later in their curriculum. Other stu dents may profit by taking the course at this Col lege in stead and thus establish a fully sound basis for what follow s. 2. Credi t for a course may be given if the course work was done at an accredited institution of higher education . The University of Colorado departmen t i n volved may recommend that credit be transferred to count toward the requirements for a related course in its curriculum . Credit cannot be given for vocational technical or remedial courses under rules of the U ni versity . (See section on transfer of college-level credit in the General Information section of this bulletin.) 3 . Students may seek credit for the course b y ex amination . ACADEMIC POLICIES Refer t o t he General Information section of this bul letin for descriptions of University wide policies. The following policies apply specifically to the Col lege of Engineering and Applied Science . Advanced Placement Advanced placement credit may be granted by special examination of t he department involved or by College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB ) tests . Credit by examination is not given for correspondence courses. If the applicant has sco red 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination , credit toward graduation may be awarded . Students who have s c ored 3 may be considered for advanced placement by the department concerned but do not recieve

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60 I University of Colorado at Denver credit for the courses skipped . All advanced placement and transfer credit must be validated by satisfactory achievement in subsequent courses, in ac cordance with standard transfer policies of the Col lege. Advanced placement credit for t h e freshman mathematics courses in ca l culus and differentia l equations will be limited to not more than 4 hours each. Equivalent mathematics courses from other col leges are usually accepted at full value. Attendance Regulations Successful work in the College of Engineering and Applied Science is dependent upon regular atten dance in all classes. Students who are unavoidably absent should make arrangements with instructors to make up the work missed. Students who, for illness or other good reason , miss a final examination must notify the instructor or the associate dean's office no later than the end of the day on which t h e examina tion is given. Failure to do so will result in an Fin the course. Changing Departments Students who wish to change to another department within the College of Engineering and Applied Science must apply for transfer by petition, and this petition must have the approval of both departments concerned and of the associate dean. College-Level Examination (CLEP) C redit Prospective students may earn college-level credit through the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations, provided that they score at the 67th percentile or above. Departments will advise stu dents of the credits accepted for such courses. The number of credits so earned must be within the limits of the n u mber of elective hours of the individual d epartment. A list of subjects in which CLEP ex amination credit will be accepted may be obtained from the College of Engineering and Applied Science office. The currently approved list includes 23 sub jects in the fields of computing, business, science, mathematics, the humanities, and socia l sciences. (See also College-Level Examination Program in the General Information section of this bulletin.) Counseling Freshman students are counseled by the associate dean's office and by representatives from each academic department. These representatives are readily available to assist students with academic, vocational, or personal concerns. Students are assigned specific departmental ad visers for academic planning and should consult with t h e departmental c h airman or designated represen t ative for assignment. Course Load Polley Full-time Students. Undergraduate students employed less than 10 hours per week should register for the regular work as outl ined in t h e d epa rtmental curricu l a. Additional courses may b e a ll owed w h e n there is satisfactory evide nce t hat t h ese extr a co u rses can be taken profitably an d creditab ly. Permissio n to take more than 21 hours or fewer than 12 ho u rs may be granted only after written petition to the assoc i ate dean . The petition must carry the approval of t h e departmental faculty adviser. Employed Students. Suggested maximum course loads for undergraduate students em pl oyed 10 or more hours per week are as follows: Employed 40 or more hours per week two courses (maximum of 9 semester hours) Employed 30 to 39 hours per week three courses (maximum of 12 s eme s ter hours) Empl oyed 20 to 29 hours per week four courses (maximum of 15 semester hours) Employed 10 to 19 hours per week five courses (maximum of 18 s emester hours) Freshman Year Fundamentals taught in the freshma n year are of prime importance in the more advanc e d classes, an d every effort is made to register a beg inn ing fres h m a n in the proper courses. (Course re qu irements for freshmen are detailed withi n the curricu l um given u n der each department.) All freshmen are urged to consult their instructors whenever they need help in their ass i gnments. Repetition of Courses A student may not register for cre dit i n a course in which he already has received a gra d e of Cor better. When a student takes a course for c r e dit mor e than once, all grades are used in determi n i n g the gra depoint average. An F grade in a require d course neces sitates a subsequent satisfactory com p l etion of t h e course. Stw.k"' : may not register for credit in any course which , ,ey have previously enrolled in and completed for NC (no credit) . Work Experience It is the policy of the College of Engi n e e ring a n d Applied Science that any credits accrue d in the official records of the student that were awar ded for wor k ex perience (or for Cooperative Education experience) will not apply as part of the 136 sem ester hours required for an engineering d egree. Polley on Academic Progress The following is a statement of the Policy o n Academic Progress in the College of Eng in eerin g a n d Applied Science. An overall ave r age of 2.0 o r better, i n h o u rs taken a t the University of Colora d o toward graduation r equ ir e ments, is necessary to remain in good stan ding i n t h e College of Engi n eering and Ap pli ed S cience . G rades earned at anoth e r institution are no t u s ed i n

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calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. However, grades earned in another school or college within the University of Colorado will be used in determining the student's scholastic standing and progress toward the bachelor of science degree in the College of Engineering and Applied Science . Students whose overall averages fall below 2.0 will be placed on probation for the next semester in which they are enrolled in the College and will be so notified . If, after that semester the student's average is still below 2.0, the student will be suspended from the Col lege. The following is additional information and in terpretation of the policy : 1. Students who have been suspended are sus pended indefmitely and may not enroll at any Univer sity of Colorado campus during any regular academic year , September through May, but may enroll in sum mer sessions or Vacation College and/or may take cor responden c e courses for credit through the Division of Continuing Education. 2. Students who have been suspended may apply for readmission if they bring their overall average up to a 2.0 through summer session , Vacation College , and/or correspondence work applying to engineering degree requirements as approved by a member of the Academic Progress Committee. 3. A student, upon satisfactoril y completing at another college or university a minimum of 12 semester hours of work appropriate to an engineering curriculum subsequent to suspension , may apply for readmission as a transfer student. 4. Applicants for readmission to the University of Colorado cannot be assured readmission. 5. During a probation semester the student must complete a normal load, i . e., 12 hours or more (for a full-time student) of courses counting toward gradua tion requirements. Physical education courses do not count; if the student has previously completed 6 hours of ROTC courses, ROTC courses do not count; if 24 hours of social-humanistic subjects have been com pleted, social-humanistic subjects do not count. 6. Students who have been on probation or suspen sion at any time in the past will automatically be suspended if their overall average again falls below a 2.0. Details of the probationary and suspension s tatus and of the conditions for return to good academic standing will be stipulated in the letters of probation and suspension . Information regarding these matters may be obtained in the Office of the Associate Dean, Room 402. Grading System, Paaa/Fall and Drop/ Add Procedures See the General Information section of t his bulle t in for the University of Colorado uniform grading system and for additional pass/fail information and drop/add procedures. Also see the current Schedule of Courses . C ollege of Engi n e erin g and Appli ed Scien c e I 61 GRADING SYSTEM It is particularly important to note that in the Col lege of Engineering and Applied Science courses to be counted t oward fulfill in g the 136-hour graduation re quirement cannot be taken no credit (NC) . Once a course has been taken for no credit , the course cannot be repeat e d for c r e dit. PASS/FAIL The primary purpose f or offering courses on a pass/ fail grade basis is to encourage s t udents, especially juniors and seniors, to broaden their educational ex perience by electing challenging courses without serious risk to their academic records. In general pass/fail should be limited to 300or 400-level courses. Below are specific pass/fail regulations for the College of Engineering and Applied Science . 1. A maximum of 16 pass/fail hours may be in cluded in a student' s total program. A maximum of 6 hours may be taken in one semester , but it is recom mended that not more than one course at a time be taken pass/fail. 2. Courses that a student may elect to take pass/ fail shall be designated and approved in advance by the student's major department. If courses not so designated are taken, the earned grade will be recorded in place of the P or F grade. An engineering student who has not designated a major field will not be allowed the pass/fail option without approval through the associate dean's office . 3. A transfer student may count toward graduation 1 credit hour of pass/fail for each 9 credit hours com pleted in the College; however, the maximum number of pass/fail hours counting toward graduation shall not exceed 16, including courses taken in the Honors Program under that program ' s pass/fail grading system . 4. Students on academic probation should not enroll for pass/fail courses . DROP/ADD Only under very extenuating circumstances will petitions for dropping courses be considered after the tenth week of the semester. Sequence of Courses Full-time students should complete the courses in the department in which they are registered according to the curriculum shown under their major department in this bulletin. (Part-time students may need to modify the order of courses with adviser approval.) Any course in which there is a failure or an unremoved incomplete should, upon the first recurrence of such course , take precedence over other courses; however, each student must be registered so that departmental requirements will be completed with the least possible delay. Students who do not earn a grade of C or better in a course that is prerequisite to another may not register

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6 2 I U n ive rsity o f Colorado a t D enve r for t he succeeding course unle ss t he y have the permis sion of both t he depar tment and t he instruc to r o f the succeeding c o urse . Students may enroll for a s mu ch a s 50 percent of their courses in work that i s not a part of the prescribed curricula o f t he College o f Engineering and Applied Science , pro v ided the y ha v e at lea s t a 2.0 grade average in all c o llege work attempted. Excep tions to this polic y may be made b y petition and may be made for students taking the combined engineeringbusiness pro gram . PLANNING AN ENGINEERING PROGRAM It is the r e sponsibility o f stude n ts to be sure they have fulfilled all the requirement s, t o file the intended date of graduation in the departmen t al office at the close of the t hird year , to fill ou t a Diploma Card at registrati o n a t the beginning o f the last semester , and to keep the departmen t al advi s er and the associate dean ' s o ffice informed of an y c han g e s in the s t udents ' plans throughout the l as t y ear . In order to become e l igi ble f o r o n e o f the bachelor ' s degrees in the Colleg e of Eng ineering and Applied Science , a student, in addition t o being in good standing in the Univ e r s i ty, must meet the following minimum requiremen ts: C o urses. The sa t i sfactory completion of the prescribed and electi v e work in any curriculum as determined by the app ro priate department. Hour s . A minimum o f 136 hours, of which the last 30 shall be earned after matricula t ion and admission as a degree student, is requir e d f o r students in the four-year curricula; howev er , many students will need to presen t more than the minimum hours be c au s e of certain departmental requiremen t s and because they may have enrolled in cours es w hi c h do not carry full credit toward a degree. The hours r equired for stu dents in the combined bu s iness and engineering program var y b y dep a rtmen ts; as a guide , 166 semes t er hours are con s idered a minimum , bu t most students follo w pro gram s that bring the total above this figure. Grade Average. A min i mum grade-point average of 2.0 (C) for all courses attempted. A department may require a minimum grade of C in all major courses. Facult y Recommendation. The recommendation of the faculty of the department offering the degree and the recommendation of t he faculty of the College of Engineering and Applied Science . Incompletes and Corre s pondence Courses. It is the student's responsibility to insure that all incomple t es and correspondence cours es are officially completed before the tenth week of the student's final semester in school. Simultaneous Conferrin g of Degre e s . For combined business and engineering students, t he degree B.S. in business and the degree B.S . in engineering must be conferred at the same commencement. Commencement Exercis es. Commencement exer cises usually are held in May and August. Students finishing in December may attend commencement the following May or receiv e diplomas by mail. Graduation With Honors Honors at gradua t ion are conferred in recognition of high scholarship and profe s sional attainments. Honors and special honors are recorded on diplomas and indicated on the commencement program. Seniors with an average of 3 . 8 or above usually are graduated with s pecial honors, and those with an average of 3.5 to 3 . 79 with honors. Grades earned dur ing the semester of graduation will not be considered in the determination of honors. Social-Humanistic Content of the Engineering Curriculum The faculty of the College of Engineering and Ap plied Science requires that 24 semester hours should be considered the minimum of social-humanistic content of t he degree-granting departments. ( Up to 6 hours of English composition may be used to satisfy t hi s requirement. ) A minimum of 6 hours of literature is required . Six hours of social-humanistic subject s should be taken in the junior year and 6 in the s enior year . These subjects should be taken from the following categories, with not fewer than 6 hours from ca t egory 2 below. 1. Literature (including foreign literature either in the original or i n translation). 2 . Economics, s ociology , political science, history, and anthropology . 3 . Fine arts and music (critical or historical) . Such courses a s public speaking , elementary foreign languages , technical writing , accounting , contracts, and management s hould be considered as technical and should be submitted for technical electives where applicable with departmental approval. Qual i fied students will be permitted to take ap propriate honors courses as substitutes for social humanis t i c cour s es . English for Engineering Communications skills are essential for every professional person and are particularly so for the engineer . Most engineering departments require one of the following series of courses. It is not mandatory but is preferable that the courses be taken sequen tially as shown. These courses are intended to develop the student' s writing ability and to allow a close analysis of significant works of world literature in translation and in English originals. The following combi nation s are recommended: (1) Eng l. 258, 259, 2 60, 261; or (b) Engl. 258, 259, and the following two introductory courses : Engl. 120 ( Introduction to Fiction) , Engl. 130 (Introduction to Drama and Poetry ) . Students who achieve a B average in two of the following English courses (120, 130 , 258, and 259) may take immediately thereafter any literature courses listed b y the Department of English. No social humanistic credit will be given for courses dealing with English a s a foreign language . Students having questions about the Engli s h require ment s hould see their departmental adviser .

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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES In addition to the standard four year degree pro grams previ ous l y listed, the College is involved in the following programs. Combined Buelne• and Engineering Curricula Undergraduates in the College of Engineering and Applied Science with career interests in administra tion may complete all of the requirements for both a B.S. degree in engineering and a B.S. degree in business by extending their study programs to five years, including one or two summer terms. The 48 semester credits required in the College of Business and Administration may be started in the second, third, or fourth year, depending upon the curricular plan for the particular field of engineering in which the student is enrolled . It is also possible for qualified graduates (GPA: 2.75 or better) to complete the requirements for a master ' s degree in business within one year after receiving the baccalaureate degree in engineering. Before deciding upon the business option , a student should carefully consider, in consultation with departmental advisers, the relative advantages of the combined B . S . business-engineering curricula, the degree program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the M.S . degree program in the student ' s own engineering discipline . Combined business and engineering programs are available for students in aerospace engineering sciences, applied mathematics, architectural engineering, chemical engineering , civil engineering, electrical engineering, electrical engineering and com puter science , engineering physics, and mechanical engineering . Students taking a combined undergraduate program are not required to submit formal applica tion for admission to the College of Business. They are permitted to enroll in business courses on the basis of a program approved by an adviser in the College of Engineering and Applied Science and by an assigned adviser from the College of Business. Requirements for both the undergraduate business and engineering degrees must be completed concur rently. At least a 2.0 grade average must be earned in all courses undertaken in the College of Business. Not fewer than 30 semester credits in business courses must be earned to establish residency credit. Courses offered by the College of Business may be used in lieu of electives required for undergraduate engineering degrees, subject to the approval of the individual department . The requirements for all combined business and engineering programs are as follows: Courses Semester Hours Econ . 201 and 202. Principles of Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 (Should be completed during the student's sophomore year or junior year.) Acct . 200. Introduction to Financial Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B .Ad. 200. Business Information and the Computer . . . . . . . . . 3 College of Enginee ring and Applied Science I 63 Q . M . 201. Business Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mk. 300. Principles of Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Fin . 305. Basic Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Pr. Mg. 300. Production and Operations Management . . . . . . . 3 Or . Mg . 330. Introduction to Management and Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B . Law 300. Business Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B .Ad. 410. Business and Government; or B .A d . 411. Business and Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Ad. 450. Business Policy (Cases and Concepts in Business Policy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Courses in an area of emphasis in one of the following fields: ac counting , computer-based information systems, finance , inter national business, marketing , office administration, operations management , o rganizational behavior, or transportation manage ment. All course work in the area of emphas is must be taken in the University of Colorado College of Business and Administration ............. . . . .... ....................... _ll Total 48 The student should note that for some courses, and for some areas of emphasis, there are prerequisites which must be met. Since some of the courses may be taken as engineering electives, it is possible to obtain the two degrees in as few as 166 semester hours; however, most students will require more. Joint Engineering Degrees A student may obtain two engineering degrees by meeting the requirements and obtaining the approval of both departments concerned. Thirty hours of elec tive or required subjects in addition to the largest minimum number required by either of the two departments must be completed. Premedlclne Option A professional school in a field such as medicine re quires a student to have a college education prior to pursuing its professional courses. In practically all cases, medical students are university graduates, although occasionally a student may enter medical school after three years of university training. A stu dent can prepare for medical school either in the Col lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences or in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The desirability of obtaining an engineering education prior to undertak ing a study of medicine is increasing continually, as medicine itself is evolving. A great deal of additional equipment, most of it electronic, is being developed to assist the medical practitioner in treatment of patients. Bioengineering, engineering systems analysis, probability, and communication theory are highly applicable to medical problems. Improved communication techniques also are allowing the storage and retrieval of information not previously available to the medical doctor. An advanced knowledge of basic mathematics and computing techniques, along with increased understanding of physical chemistry, are improving the scientific base upon which medical knowledge rests. It is therefore desirable that the medical practitioner and researcher in the future be well equipped with the tools which engineering can offer. To provide at least a minimum of the necessary knowledge, the additional courses listed below are

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64 I University of Colorado at Den ve r prescribed and must be completed with superior grades. General overall requirements for entry into most medical schools are given. Students can meet these requirements by careful substitution of electives in the engineering curriculum. In some cases where additional hours may be required , interested students should consult with the engineering department chairman . General ch em istry (103 106 ) . . . . . . . . . . . 2 se m. (8-10 s em . hrs . ) Organic chemistry (341 , 342, 343, 344) . 2 se m . (8-10 sem. hrs.) General biol ogy (205-206) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 sem. (8 se m . hrs.) English composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 sem . (3 s em. hrs.) To prepare for a career in medicine in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, it is strongly recommended that the student follow a full four-year college course (with the equivalent of at least 136 semester hours) and earn a B.S. degree. It would be possible for students who applied themselves with un usual vigor to prepare for medical school in three years. In such cases, a minimum of 15 semester hours should be devoted to a major field of learning, instead of the 30 hours required for the four-year student. This student, of course, will not receive a degree in the premedical field. The study and practice of medicine require persistent hard effort, and so should the premedical education. The Admissions Committee of the University of Colorado School of Medicine welcomes inquiries and visits from prospective students , particularly at the time of their first interest in medicine as their chosen profession. Students desiring to enter a premedical program should consult the representative of the department involved . At UCD, premedical advising is available through the Health Careers Advisory Committee, Room 232. GRADUATE STUDY IN ENGINEERING The College of Engineering and Applied Science at UCD offers complete M.S. degree programs in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and applied mathematics. Many graduate courses leading to the Ph.D. in civil engineering and electrical engineering also are offered. For information regarding courses and require ments leading to the degrees Master of Engineering and Master of Science or to the Ph.D. degree, see the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog and the Graduate School section of this bulletin. Education for Employed Prot ... lonal Engineers Continuing education for employed engineers grows more important each year. Therefore, the College puts great emphasis upon making graduate courses available through night and televised courses . A new degree, the Master of Engineering, permits graduate students more flexibility in defining specialized inter disciplinary fields that meet their professional needs. This degree has standards fully equivalent to those of the Master of Science degree. In addition to credit course work, the College works jointly with the Di v ision of Continuing Education to offer noncredit courses of interest to practicing engineers. Concurrent B.S. and M.S. Degree Program In Engineering Students who plan to continue in the Graduate School after completing the requirements for the B.S. degree may apply for admission to the concurrent degree program through their department early in the sec ond semester of their junior year (after completion of at least 84 semester hours) . Requirements are the same as for the two degrees taken separately: 136 credit hours for the B . S . degree and 24 hours plus thesis (Plan I) or 30 credit hours (Plan II) for the M.S. degree. Social-humanistic requirements must be com pleted within the first 136 credit hours. A 3.0 grade point average for all work attempted through the first six semesters (at least 96 credit hours) and written recommendations from at least two major-field faculty members are required . The purpose of the concurrent degree program is to allow the student who qualifies for graduate study and expects to continue for an advanced degree to plan his graduate program from the beginning of the senior year rather than from the first year of graduate study . The student can then reach the degree of proficiency required to begin research at an earlier time, and can make better and fuller use of courses offered in alter nate years. Students will be assigned faculty advisers to help them develop the program best suited to their par ticular interests. Those in the program will be en couraged to pursue independent study on research problems or in areas of specialization where no formal courses are offered. A liberal substitution policy will be followed for courses normally required in the last year of the undergraduate curriculum. The program selected must be planned so that the student may qualify for the B.S. degree after completing the credit hour requirements for the degree if the student so elects, or if the student's grade-point average falls below the 3.0 required to remain in the program. In this case, all hours completed with a passing grade while in the program will count toward fulfilling the normal requirements for the B.S . degree. There will be no credit given toward a graduate degree for courses applied to the B.S. degree requirements; however, students are still eligible to apply for admis sion to the Graduate School under the rules set forth in the Graduate School section of this bulletin. Nor mally, however, the student will apply for admission to the Graduate School when at least 130 of the 136 credit hours required for the B.S. degree have been completed, and will be awarded the B . S. and M.S. degrees simultaneously upon meeting the require ments set forth for the concurrent degree program. Graduate Work In Bueln ... Undergraduates in engineering who intend to pur sue graduate study in business may complete some of

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the business background requirements as electives in their undergraduate programs. Seniors in engineering who have such intentions and appear likely to qualify for admission to graduate study in business will be permitted to register for any of the graduate fun damentals courses which are designed to provide qualified students with needed background prepara tion in business. AEROSPACE ENGINEERING SCIENCES The primary objective of the aerospace engineering sciences curriculum is to provide sound general train ing in subjects fundamental to the practice of and research in this branch of engineering sciences. The major part of the first three years is devoted to the study of mathematics, physics, mechanics, chemistry, and the humanities. The fourth year is devoted to the professional courses in the fields of physics of fluids (fluid dynamics); propulsion and energy conversion; flight dynamics, control, and guidance; space system analysis; materials and structural mechanics; space environment; and bioengineering. Planning of graduate study for students having suf ficient ability and interest should begin by the start of the junior year. Such a plan should consider the f6reign language requirements of appropriate graduate schools, and an advanced mathematics program included in technical electives consisting of Math. 431-432 and Math. 481 or 443. The minimum total number of semester hours for the B.S. degree is 136. Students who wish to combine the business and aerospace engineering sciences cur ricula are advised to consider obtaining the B.S. degree in aerospace and the M.S. degree in business rather than a combined B.S. degree. Business courses may not be substituted for technical electives in the aerospace curriculum. TRANSFER TO BOULDER The complete aerospace engineering sciences program is not available at UCD. Therefore , students wishing to complete this program should plan on transferring to the University of Colorado at Boulder at the start of the junior year. Students should com plete the required freshman and sophomore courses in mathematics and physics before transferring to the Boulder campus. The complete curriculum degree re quirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog . Curriculum for B.S. (Aero.pace Engineering Sclencee) The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical first two years of the program: FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Semester Hours Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Engl. 258. Great Books I (see note 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Social-humanistic elective (see note 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Coll e ge of Enginee ring and Applied Science I 65 E . E . 201. Introduction to Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 E.E. 130. Problems and Methods of Modem Engineering (or C . E. 130) ...................... . . ................ . _1 Total 16 Spring Semester Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Phys. 231. General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Engl. 259. Great Books II (see note 1). . . ..... ........ . . . ... 3 Ch. E . 210. Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter (see note 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Social humanistic elective (see note 2) ...... . .............. _1 Total 18 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ill .............. 3 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........ ................. 3 C . E. 212. Analytical Mechanics I ........................... 3 Engl. 260. Great Books ill (see note 1) ...... . ....... ....... . 3 Phys . 233. General Physics II .............................. . 4 Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II ................ ....... ..:...1 Total 17 Spring Semester Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C . E. 311. Analytical Mechanics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1) ...... . ... ............ 3 Engr. 301. Thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Social humanistic elective (see note 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Approved physics elective ........ . ...................... . . _1 Total 18 Notee for B.S. (Aeroepace Engineering) 1. For other options in English, see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin . . 2. Students may take electives pass/fail, subject to the regula tJons of the College of Engineering and Applied Science . 3. Chern . 103 may be substituted. APPLIED MATHEMATICS Charles I. Sherrill ill, Coordinator The Division of Natural and Physical Sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers all courses in mathematics, both required and elective, for undergraduate and graduate students in the Col lege of Engineering and Applied Science. Three curricula leading to the degree B.S. (A.Math.) are of fered. In Option I, the student takes a minor in a specific engineering department, satisfying an adviser from that department. In Option II, the student takes distributed course work in engineering departments, including a solid grounding in mechanics, electronics, and materials. (This option is intended for the above average student.) Option ill is a joint mathematics computer science program. Regardless of the option chosen, each student is expected to complete a minim urn of 45 semester hours of course work in mathematics. Modem industrial and scientific research is so dependent on advanced mathematical concepts that applied mathematicians are needed today by almost all concerns which are engaged in such research.

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66 I University of Colorado at Denver The undergraduate curriculum is designed to give training in mathematics and in engineering and science. The use of numerical methods and electronic computers is included. Nontechnical electives should be broadening and have cultural value. Courses in the humanities and the social sciences are required. Students interested in research should take a foreign language as early as possible. Beginning language courses are considered technical electives and do not count toward the social humanistic electives. Some 300and 400-level language courses may be counted. Under all circum stances, a student must plan a complete program and obtain the approval of a departmental adviser at the beginning of the sophomore year. The B.S. degree in applied mathematics requires the completion of a minimum of 136 credit hours of course work with an average grade of Cor better (a 2.0 grade-point average) and a grade of C or better in all mathematics courses. Course work in the social humanistic elective area must be approved by the stu dent's adviser. Curriculum for B.S. (Applied Mathematics) FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Semester Hours Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ............... 3 Chern. 103. General Chemistry ............................. 5 Engl. 258. Great Books I (see note 1) ....................... 3 E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing (or E.E . 210) ........... 3 Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5) ...................... _:..1 Total 16 Spring Semester Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ll ............ . . 3 Engr . 101. Fundamentals of Design I. ....................... 2 Engl. 259. Great Books ll (see note 1) ....................... 3 Phys. 231. General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I .......................... 1 Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5) . .................. . . . .,_1 Total 16 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus lli ..... ......... 3 Engl. 200. Great Books lli (see note 1) . . .................... 3 Phys. 233. General Physics ll ............................... 4 Phys. 234. Experimental Physics II ......................... 1 Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5) ...................... ..:._! Total 17 Spring Semester Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1) ...................... 3 Math. 300. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics ............ 3 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ......................... 3 Approved elective (see notes 3 and 5) ...................... ..:J!. Total 17 JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester Math. 431. Advanced Calculus I...................... ..... 3 Engr . 301. Thermodynamics............................... 3 Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5) ..................... Total 18 Spring Semester Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Math. 481. Introduction to Probability Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Appro v ed electives (see n o tes 3 and 5) ..................... Total 18 SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5) ..................... 17 S pring Semester Approved electives (see notes 3 and 5) ..................... 17 Requirements under each option are as follows: Option I Semester Hours Specialty in a specific engineering department . . . . . . . . . . . 18-30 Technical electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-22 Other electives ........................................ 11-30 Required social-humanistic electives (see note 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 (Electives should include Math. 432) Option II Distributed engineering courses in the engineering college . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-30 (A minimal program would consist of the following courses: C.E. 212, C.E. 311, E . E. 213, E.E. 313, E.E. 314, M . E. 301, M . E. 383 or C.E . 331 or their equivalents.) Technical electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-22 Other electives ........................................ 11-30 Required social humanistic electives (see note 2) ............ 12 (Electives should include Math. 432.) Option Ill Specific courses required under Option lll: E.E. 257 .................................................. 3 E . E . 455 .................................................. 3 E. E. 401 (C.S. 401) ........................................ 3 E . E . 453 (C.S. 453) .............................. .......... 3 E . E. 459 (C.S. 459) ........................................ 3 E.E . 458 and E.E. 460 ..................................... 2 Math. 311 . . ................................ . ............. 3 Math. 465 .... ............................................ 3 Math. 466 ............................. ................... 3 Technical electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23 Other electives .... .................................... 11-30 Required social-humanistic electives (see note 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Notes for B.S. (Appled Mathematlce) 1. For other options in English, see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin. 2. Students may take social-humanistic electives pase/fail, sub ject to the regulations of the College of Engineering and Applied Science. 3. A minimum of 10 approved courses in mathematics beyond 140, 241, 242, 319 and 320 is required of all students majoring in ap plied mathematics . 4. Math. 101, 111, 112, and 113 do not count toward the B.S. (A. Math. ) degree or any other B .S. degree in engineering. 5. In addition to E . E. 201, Engr. 101 and Engr . 301, the student must take a minimum of 18 hours of approved elective engineering courses excluding chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses. Furthermore , the student who does not have a strong interest in ap plications of mathematics to engineering is encouraged to consider a major in mathematics in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .

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ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING John R. Mays, Coordinator The architectural engineering curriculum is ad ministered at the Boulder Campus by the Depart ment of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering of the College of Engineering and Ap plied Science and the College of Environmental Design. Its purpose is to prepare a student for a career in the building industry and for graduate-level research on building-related topics. The building in dustry is the largest single industry in the United States and includes many diverse skills and fields of knowledge. This course of study fulfills the academic require ments for registration as a professional engineer. The architectural engineering curriculum is recom mended for those wishing to specialize within the building industry in engineering design, construction and contracting, or sales engineering. The architec tural engineering student may select any of three areas of specialization offered: construction engineer ing, environmental engineering, or structural engineering. Specialization in construction is for students plan ning a career in contracting and building construc tion. This program involves courses in construction management, planning and scheduling techniques, cost accounting, estimating and pricing, building materials, and construction methods. Students interested in environmental engineering may concentrate their efforts in the fields of illumina tion and electrical systems design, heating ventilating-air conditioning systems design, sanita tion and water supply, or acoustics. A broad range of courses covering these subjects is available. The third area of specialization is for those in terested in the design of structural systems for buildings. Courses available include structural analysis; indeterminate structures; and steel, con crete, and timber design. The five-year course leading to the combined degree in architectural engineering and business offers op portunity to complement the architectural engineer ing background with study in one of the major areas of business administration, such as personal and business management, marketing, and finance. TRANSFER TO BOULDER Approximately one-half of the architectural engineering program is available at UCD under the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering. Stu dents wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the Boulder Campus at the start of the junior year. Students should complete the required freshman and sophomore courses in mathematics and physics before transferring to the Boulder Campus. The complete curriculum and descriptions of courses may be found in the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog. College of Engineering and Applied Science I 67 Curriculum for B.S. (Architectural Engineering) The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical first two years of the program: FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Semester Hours Math . 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I . . ............. 3 Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Literature elective (see note 1) ... . ............... ; ... ...... 3 E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing ................ . ....... 3 C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil Engineering .... .............. 2 Social humanistic elective .................... . .......... . . _,_1 Total 16 Spring Semester Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ll ..... ......... 3 L i terature elective (see note 1) .......... . .... . . ............ 3 Engr. 102. Fundamentals of Design ll ............. .......... 2 Phys. 231. General Physics I . .............................. 4 Phys . 232. Experimental Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Ch.E. 210. Chemical and Physical Properties of Materials ( see note 3) ......................... . . ...... ..:....! Total 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ill .......... . . . . 3 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ........... ........... ... 3 Phys. 233. General Physics ll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Phys . 234. Experimental Physics ll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 C . E . 212. Analytical Mechanics I .................... . ...... 3 Specialty requirement (structures and construction majors ) take C.E. 221; environmental majors take Arch.E . 362.) .......... _,_1 Total 17 Spring Semester Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations ............... 3 Arch . E. 240. Building Materials and Construction ............ 3 C . E . 312. Mechanics of Materials ........................ ... 3 C.E. 314. Materials Testing Laboratory (not required of environmental majors) ......... .. ....... ....... . ....... 2 Basic science elective (see note 2) ...... . .............. . .... 3 Social-humanistic elective ... . ............... . . ............ _,_1 Total 17 Not-for B.S. (Architectural Engineering) 1. Great Books series recommended; see the English listings in the Course Description section of this bulletin. 2 . Departmental approval required. 3 . Chern. 103-5 may be substituted for Ch.E. 210-4, in which case the technical elective requirement is reduced by one credit hour. CHEMICAL ENOIIEEAINO Meeting the crisis in oil and energy, depolluting the water and air, producing new and better materials to replace those that are limited or scarce-these are jobs in which one will find the chemical engineer. Chemical plants (including refineries and gasifica tion plants) convert natural resources into industrial and consumer products. Among their products are many that often are not identified with chemical engineering-oils, metals, glass, plastic, rubber, paints, soaps and detergents, foods, beverages, syn thetic and natural fibers, nuclear and exotic fuels, medicines, and many others.

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68 I University of Colorado at Denver The department, located at the Boulder Campus, is very much interested in research directed toward ecologically sound development of chemical pro cesses. It is also working hard on energy problems and is stressing problems of energy conversion in its in structional program. Many essentials of life originate in chemical engineering. Recycling of wastes and resources is not a new idea in chemical engineering but a long-standing principle . Since the earth now is perceived as a self renewing system, intelligent generalization of the recycle theory to the entire cycle of natural resources is a challenge and opportunity for chemical engineers. Cleaning up pollution from chemical plants and from other sources is largely a chemical engineering problem. The chemical engineer efficiently uses and conserves natural resources to create valuable end products and to preserve environmental values. Thus , chemical engineering continually changes and progresses . The Department of Chemical Engineering at the Boulder Campus therefore helps students to prepare to be immediately valuable to in dustry and eventually to lead future developments in industry and research . Whether they plan to go into industry or on to graduate work , students are urged to watch, understand , and enjoy the sparkle and in terplay of new ideas and new technologies. TRANSFER TO BOULDER The complete chemical engineering program is not available at UCD. Therefore, students wishing to complete this program should plan to transfer to the University of Colorado at Boulder at the start of their junior year. Students should complete the required freshman and sophomore courses in mathematics and physics before transferring to the Boulder Campus. The complete curriculum, degree requirements, and descriptions of courses may be found in the University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog . Curriculum for B.S. (Chemical Engineering) The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical first two years of the program: FRESHMAN Y EAR Fall Semester Semester Hours Math . 140. Analytic " Geometry and Calculus I ............... 3 Chem. 103. General Chemistry ............................. 5 Engl. 258. Great Books (see note 1) . ........................ 3 Engr. 101. Fundamentals of Design I ........................ 2 CH.E . 130. Introduc ti on to Chemical Engineering (see n ot e 2 ) ....................................... . . . ..:...l Total 15 Spring Semeste r Math. 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ll .............. 3 Chem . 106. General Chemistry ............................. 5 Engl. 259. Great Books ll (see note 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 E.E. 201. Introduction to Computing . . ...................... 3 Social-humanistic elective .............. . .................. ..:...2. Total 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Math. 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ill ......... ..... 3 Phys . 231. General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Phys . 232. Experimental Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Engl. 260. Great Books ill (see note 1) ... .................. . 3 Chem . 341. Organic Chemistry ....................... . ..... 3 Ch em. 343. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ...................... . . ..:...2. Total 18 Spring Semester Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations ............... 3 Phy s . 233. General Physics II ....................... . . . ..... 4 Engl. 261. Great Books IV (see note 1) .................... . . 3 Chem. 342. Organic Chemistry ......................... .... 3 Chem. 344. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II . ............... 1 Phys . 234. Experimental Physics ll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Ch.E. 212. Chemical Engineering Material and Energy Balances (see note 3) ........................ . . ..:...2. Total 18 Notes for B.S. (Chemical Engineering) 1. For other English options, see the English listings in the Course Descriptions section of this bulle tin. 2 . Or C.E. 130 or E.E. 130. 3. Students should arrange to take Ch.E . 212 concurrently in Boulder during the spring semester of their sophomore year . CIVIL AND URBAN ENQINEEAINQ Ernest C. Harris, Chairman Civil engineering is generally the broadest field of engineering studied in American universities today. Civil engineering offers an interesting and highly chal lenging career to the student interested in the design and construction of buildings, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures ; in transportation systems including highways, canals, pipe lines, air ports, rapid transit lines, railroads, and harbor facilities; in the transmission of water and control of rivers ; in the development of water resources for urban use, industry , and land reclamation; in the con trol of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment; in the construction industry; and in general in the rapidly expanding problems con cerned with man's physical environment and the growth of cities. Furthermore, students educated in civil engineering frequently find rewarding employ ment in other fields: for example , in aerospace struc tures, electric power generation, city planning, the process industries, industrial engineering, business management and law or medicine (after appropriate education in law or medical school). The breadth of the civil and urban engineering undergraduate pro gram provides an excellent educational background for many fields of endeavor. The curriculum is designed to give the student a broad knowledge of the basic engineering sciences of chemistry, mathematics (including differential equa tions), physics , mechanics (including fluid mechanics and soil mechanics), electrical engineering, and ther modynamics . In addition, it includes a mininum of 24 semester hours in social-humanistic studies .

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Specialized training is achieved through certain re quired courses, followed by advanced technical elec tives. Thoughtful selection of these electives is ad vised , the o bjective being to permit a graduate to enter the engineering profession with a firm ground work in fundamental engineering science and suf ficient knowledge in specialized fields t o cope intelli gently with t he technical problems of present-day civil and urban engineering . A five-year program has been arranged for students who wish to pursue the combined curriculum for the civil engineering and business degrees. A student interested in a premedical option should consult with an adviser and the department chairman at the earliest possible time in order to make proper plans for an acceptable program . See Premedical Option. Curriculum for B.S. (Civil Engineering) The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typ i cal program is: FREsHMAN Y EAR Fall Semester S emester Hour s Math . 140. Ana lytic G eometry and Calculus I ............... 3 Literature elec tiv e ( see note 1 ) ....... . . . . . ...... ..... . .... . 3 'E . E . 201. Introduction to Computing ......... ............... 3 C.E. 130. Introduction to Civil Engineering .................. 2 C.E. 221. Plane Surveying ....... .................... . ..... 3 Engr. 1 01. Fu ndamentals of Design I. ..... ....... . .... ..... _,_1 Total 16 Sprif18 Semes ter Math 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chem . 103. General Chemistry (or Ch.E. 210) ............. 4-5 Literature elective (see note 1 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 E . Phys . 231. General Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 E . Phys . 232. Experimental Physics I ..... . ....... . . . . ...... _ 1 Total 15-16 SOPHOMORE Y EAR Fall Semeste r Math . 242. Analy tic Geometry and C alculus ill ............ . . 3 Ma t h . 319. App lie d Linear Algeb r a .... . . . .... . ............. 3 E . Phys . 233. General Physics II .................... ........ 4 E . Phys . 234. Experimental Phy sics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Social human i s t i c elective ......... ...... . ...... .......... . . 3 C.E. 212. Ana lytical Mechanics I ..... . .............. ...... T otal 1 7 Sprif18 Semes t e r Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations ........ . . . .... 3 Social-humanistic elective . ....... . . . ..... . . . ...... ... . . . . . . 3 Basic science elective . . .... . ............. ....... . ..... . .... 3 C . E . 312. Mechan i cs of Materials ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ...... 3 Technical elect ive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C.E . 314. Materials testing laboratory ... . . .... ............. _,_1 Total 17 JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semeste r C . E . 311. Anal yti cal Mechan ics II ............ ........ ...... 3 C . E . 331. The o retical Fluid Mechanics ...................... 3 C . E . 350. Stru c tural Analysis .... .......... . . . . . ... ... . .... . 3 C.E. 380. Soils and Foundation Engineering ... .............. 3 Coll e ge of Eng i neering and Applie d S c ien c e I 69 C . E . 360. Transportation Engineering ...................... . 3 Social humanistic elective ... . . . .... . . . .... . . . ............. Total 18 Sprif18 Semes t e r C.E . 332 . Applied Fluid Mechani c s ............... . ......... 3 C . E . 457. Design of Steel S t ructures ........................ 3 Engr. 301. The rmodynamics ............ .......... .... ..... . 3 Engineering s cience elective ( see note 3 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Techni c al elective .......... . . . . . ......................... . 3 S o cial humanistic elec tiv e .......... . . . .................... T o tal 1 8 S E NIOR YEAR Fall S e mes t er Geol. 207. Physical Geology I. .. . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. .. . . .. . 4 C . E . 458. Reinforced Concrete Design . ......... .... . . . ...... 3 Civil engineering elective ( see note 2) ........ . . ..... . . . ..... 3 Social-humanistic elective . . . ...... . ..... . . . . ... ........... . 3 Engineering science electives (see note 3) .................. .:.....! Total 17 Sprif18 Semes ter C . E. 341. Sanitary Engineering ........ . . . ............. ..... 4 Civil engineering electives (see note 2) ... ... . . . ........ ..... 6 E . E . 213. Circuit Analysis I . . . . . ........ ........... ..... ... 4 Social-humanistic elective ... ....... . . . . .... .... . . . . . ...... Total 17 Notee for B.S. (Civil Engineering) 1. Courses from Great Books series recommended: see the English listings in the Course Descript i ons sec tion of this b ullet in . 2 . Civil engineering electives shall be c hosen to form an in tegrated program, subject to the approval o f the departmen t . 3 . Engineering science electives shall be taken from the list o f courses approved by the Department of C ivil and Urban Engineer ing. ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING William D. Murray, Chairman The professional possibilities in electrical engineer ing include teaching and research in a university; research and development of new electrical or electronic devices, instruments, or products; produc tion and quality-control of electrical products for private industry or government; design or operations in the electrical power industry; and sales or manage ment for a private firm or branch of government . The electrical engineering course of study at U C D begins with principles of physics, chemistry , and mathematics. An early, intensive training in t he theory and laboratory application of electrical cir cuits is followed by more fundamentals in electr o nics, electromagnetic and transmission theory , elec tri cal machines and transformers, heat , and mechanics . Many students find an opportunity to put their knowledge to work with jobs in industry or research projects being conducted at the University . Thr ough out the entire course of study , they r ein f orce their understanding of the theory i n w ell equ ippe d laboratories . Students are encouraged to develop interests out side of their electrical engineering specialty, thus

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70 I Univers i t y of Colorad o at D e n ve r providing themselves wit h a well-rounded background and a sense of awareness and res ponsibility f or t heir later role in society. They are urged to attend meetings of their student" pro f essional socie ty, w he r e practicing engineers from many engineering specialties speak of their experiences. The curriculum is arranged so that trans f er s t u dents may join t he program without appreciab l e loss of time or credit. The areas of specialization that electrical engineer ing students may enter upon graduation are s o numerous it is impossible for the undergraduate train ing to cover them in deta il. Intense specializatio n m a y be left t o possible addi t ional training graduate s may receive when they assume positions with industrial firms, or acquired by specialization in a research field through graduate work beyond the bachelor 's degree. Students who have earned a B average or be t ter in their undergraduate work and who have e l e c ted courses in their senior year that s t rengthen par ticularl y the i r mathema ti cal backgr o und may dec i de to take additi onal graduate work . The curriculum i n electrical engineering is designed to make it po s sible for the graduatin g senior with h igh s cholarship to finish a master ' s degree in electrical engineering in about one additional full year of work at any of t he na tion ' s major universi t ies . Electrical Engineering Curriculum In the electrical engineering curriculum the student has considerable freedom in the senior electives . The studen t may select t hese elective s to provide a good foundation in several of the seven electrical engineer ing areas listed : communications, digital, elec t ronics , fields , material s , power , and systems. Some of t hese e l ectiv e s may be c o urses in o ther branche s o f eng ineering or in other colleges. Those s t uden ts primaril y intere s ted in taking course s in the digi t al or compu t e r area may do so in this curriculum or i n t h e joint electri c al engineering and compu t er degree op tion discussed below. Combined Bualneee Option Students wishing to take the combined engineering business program should not start this program until their fourth year , with the except i on of electing Econ . 201 and 202 for two of t heir social humanisti c elec tives . Students with a B average may wish to cons i der obtaining a master's degree in business administra tion. For both of these programs, students should refer to the College of Engineering and Applied S c ience in trod u c t ory se c tion o f t his bulletin . Premedical Option A program has been developed which pe r mits the studen t t o satisfy the entrance requirement s for med ica l s ch ool, such as those o f the Univers ity of Col orado, wh ile e a rnin g a B . S . in e lectrical engineer ing . Medical sch o ol s typic ally require that applicants have comple t e d two semest ers of gen e ral c hem ist ry, t w o s emesters of organic chemistry , and two semesters of general biology , all with laboratories . A course in Engli s h composi t ion i s recommended . M or e s pecific information on medical s chool re quir e men t s may be obtained at the office of the H eal t h Careers Advisory Committee at UCD . Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The j oin t degree in electrical engineering and com puter science is a comprehensive program covering b oth hardware and software aspects of computer s y s tem design. It is directed to students whose major i nterests are in the computer itself and in a broad range of applications. The program leads to a B.S. ( E.E. and C.S.) and can be a base for further study toward either an M.S. in computer science or an M . S . in el ect rical engineering . A s t udent need not make a decision to enter this pro g r am un til the second semester of the sophomore y e ar . The details of the program are listed in the sec t i o n following the electrical engineering curriculum. The purpose of the changes i s to add to the mathematics background in such a way as to provide a basis for graduate work in computer-related fields and to permit inclusion of courses in scientific ap plication of computers, logic structure of computers, and a s sembly language programming. The student also will obtain actual operating experience with the departmental computers. Should students leave the program in favor of returning to the electrical engineering curriculum , they will need to satisfy the departmental requirements of mechanics and E.E. 354, which have been waived in the electrical engineering computer option curriculum . Curriculum for B.S. (Electrical Engineering) The minimum total number of hours for the degree i s 136. A typical program is: FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Semest e r Hours Ma t h . 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .......... . . . . . 3 C hern . 103. General Chemistry (see note 3 ) .......... ... .... . 5 E . E . 130. Problems and Methods of Modem E lectrical Engineering ... .... ...................... . .... 2 E. E . 210. F undamentals of C omputing ....... . . . ............ 3 Soci al humanistic elective ( see note 1) ........ ..... . . . . . . . ..:..1 Total 16 Spr i ng Seme ster Ma t h . 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculu s II . ......... ... . 3 Phys. 231. General Physi c s I (see note 2 ) . ...... . . . . . . . . . .... 4 Phys. 232. Experimental Physics I ( see not e 2) ....... . . ..... 1 En gr . 1 01. F u ndamentals of Design I ........................ 2 E . E . 257. Logic Circui ts ................................ ... 3 Social humanistic elective ( see note 1 ) .... . .... ..... . . . .... ..:..1 Total 16 S OPHOMORE YEAR Fall Seme s ter Math . 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ill .... .... ...... 3 P h ys. 233 . G e neral Physic s II ( see note 2 ) .............. . .... 4

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Phys. 234. Experimental Physic s II ......................... 1 E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I ....................... ......... 4 E . E . 253. Circuits Laboratory I ............................. 1 Social humanistic elective (see note 1) ......... ....... . .... Total 16 Spring Semester Math. 320. Elementary Differential Equations ............... 3 C.E. 313. Applied Mechanics (see note 4) ............. . ..... 3 E. E. 214. Circuit Analysis II .................. . .... . ..... . . 4 E.E. 254. Circuits Laboratory II ............................ 1 Math . 319. Applied Linear Algebra ................ . ..... ... 3 Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) .............. ...... Total 17 JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester E . E. 313. Electromagnetic Fields I .......................... 3 E.E. 321. Electronics I .......... ........................... 3 E . E . 361. Electronics Laboratory I . .......... . . . ... ......... 2 Engr . 301. Thermodynamics ......................... ....... 3 E.E. 381. Introduction to Probability Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) . .................... Total 17 Spring Seme s ter E . E. 314. Electromagnetic Fields II ......................... 3 E.E. 322. Electronics II ....... . ... ......................... 3 E.E. 316. Energy Conversion I ........................ ..... . 3 E.E. 331. Linear System Theory . . . . .......... . . ............ 3 E. E. 362. Electronics Laboratory I .......................... 2 Electives (see note 5) . ... ........ . . . .............. ........ ..:....f Total 18 SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester E . E . 354. Power Laboratory I ............ . ........... ...... 2 Electives (see note 5) ...................... . . . ... ... . . .... 10 Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) ...... . ............ Total 18 Spring Semester Eelctives (see note 5) . ............. . . . ............... ..... 15 Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ... . .......... ....... _1 Total 18 Notea for B.S. (Electrical Engineering) Students should refer to the section on Academic Policies of the College of Engineering and Applied Science in this bulletin . In ad dition to planning for sequences of courses based on prerequisites, students should plan to complete sophomore level courses before taking junior level courses and should have completed their junior level E . E. courses before starting their 400-level electives. 1. Of the 24 hours of required social-humanistic electives, a stu dent must have a minimum of 6 hours in literature and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences . The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area. 2. New physics sequence beginning spring 1978. 3. Or Ch . E. 210. 4 . The mechanics requirement may be satisfied by the 3-hour course , C . E . 313, or the 6-hour sequences of either C.E. 212 and C. E . 311, or E . Phys . 221 and E . Phys . 332. Students who first take E . E . 313 may , with permission, take only C.E. 311. 5. The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most Likely to concentrate after graduation . Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering , mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, or 500 levels. In all cases the student needs the approval of his un dergraduate adviser. College of Engineering and Applied Science I 71 Electr ical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas : communications (C), digital ( D ), electronics ( E) , fields (F) , materials (M) , power ( P) , and systems ( S) . Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas , but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies , every student's program must include 9 semester hours of electrical engineering theory courses in at least three areas and a minimum of three laboratory courses in three areas. These distribution require ments could be met through E . E. 400 (1 to 3), and E.E. 500 ( 1 to 3) only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area. E.E. 400 (1 to 3) and E . E . 500 (1 to 3) may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution requirements . A 3-hour upper division course in physics must be included among the technical electives . The student who has good grades and is interested in graduate work should take additional mathematics. Some preliminary con sulting with a department graduate adviser is desirable. Curriculum for B.S. In Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical program is: FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Semester Hours Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ........ ....... 3 Chern . 103. General Chemistry (see note 3) .......... ....... . 5 E . E . 130. Problems and Methods of Modem Electrical Engineering . .................... . ..... . . . . . . . 2 E . E . 210. Fundamentals of Computing .... . .......... . . ..... 3 Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) .................... Total 16 Spring Semester Math . 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .............. 3 Phys . 231. General Physics I ( see note 2 ) ............. . ...... 4 Phys . 232. Exper i mental Physics I (see note 2 ) ...... ........ 1 Engr . 101. Fundamentals of Design I ........................ 2 E . E . 257. Logic Circuits ................................... 3 Social humanistic electives (see note 1 ) .................... Total 16 SOPHOMO R E YEAR Fall S e m este r Math . 242. Analytic Geometry and Calculus ill ........ . . . . . . 3 Phys . 233. General Physics II (see note 2 ) ................... 4 Phys . 234. Experimental Physics II (see note 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 E.E. 213. Circuit Analysis I ...... . . . ....................... 4 E . E . 253. Circuits Laboratory I ..................... . .... ... 1 Social-humanistic electives (see note 1) ..... ....... ....... . Total 16 Spring Semester Math. 300. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics (see note 4) 3 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ......... ...... .......... 3 E . E . 214. Circuit Analysis II . .............................. 4 E.E. 254. Circuits Laboratory II ............................ 1 E. E . 453. Assembly Language Programming ................. 3 Social humanistic elective ( see note 1) ...... . ............. . Total 17 JUNIOR Y EAR Fall Semester E . E . 313. Electromagnetic Fields I .......................... 3 E . E . 321. Electronics I ..................................... 3 E . E . 361. Electronics Laboratory I ............. . ............ 2 E.E . 381. Introduction to Probability ....................... 3 Engr . 301. Thermodynamics ......................... : ...... 3

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72 I University of Colorado at D e nver E. E . 458. Logic Laboratory ................................. 1 E.E. 401. Survey of Programming Languages ............... Total 18 Spring Semester E . E . 314. Electromagnetic Fields ll ......................... 3 E . E . 322. Electronics ll .................................... 3 E. E . 362. Electronics Laboratory ll ........................ . 2 E . E. 316. Energy Conversion I .............................. 3 E.E. 331. Linear System Theory ............................ 3 Social humanistic elective (See note 1) . .................... Total 17 SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester E.E. 422. Electronics lli ..................... . . . ........... 3 E.E. 459. Computer Organization ..................... . ..... 3 Math. 465. Numerical Analysis (see note 6 ) ................. 3 Social humanistic elective (see note 1) ...................... 3 Electives (see note 5) . . ................................... ..:.... Total 18 Spr i ng Semester E.E. 400. Computer Laboratory ............................ 1 E . E. 559. Advanced Computer Architecture (recommended, not required) ........................... 3 Social-humanistic elective (se e n o te 1) ...................... 6 Ele ctives (see not e 5) .......... .......................... . ..:..J! Total 18 Notes for B . S . In Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Students should refer to the section on Academic Polic ies of the College of Engineering and Applied Science in this bulletin . In planning their programs , students should consider prerequisite and corequisite requirements of courses and should plan to complete courses at the junior level before taking senior electives. 1. Of the 24 hours of social humanistic electives a student must have a minimum of 6 hours in literature and a minimum of 6 hours in social sciences. The electrical engineering department does not require a sequence of two courses in one area. 2 . New phy sics sequence beginning spring 1978. 3. Or Ch.E. 210. 4 . Or equivalent mathematics substitution with approval of ad viser . 5 . The purpose of these electives is to allow the student to develop some breadth in electrical engineering as well as to develop some depth in areas in which he is most likely to concentrate after graduation . Usually these courses will be taken in electrical engineering , mathematics, and physics at the 300, 400, o r 500 levels . In all cases the student needs the approval of his un dergraduate adviser . Electrical engineering courses at the 400 and 500 levels are separated into the following seven areas: communication (C), digital (D), electronics (E) , fields (F) , materials (M), power ( P) , and systems (S) . Seniors are free to elect courses from any of these areas, but in order to insure a minimum breadth of studies , every student ' s program must include at least 9 semester hours of electrical engineering theory courses in at least three areas and a minimum of three laboratory courses in three areas . These distribu tion requirements could be met through E . E . 400 (1 to 3), and E . E. 500 (1 to 3), shown in each area, only if the subject matter studied is actually in the appropriate area . E.E. 400 (1 to 3), and E . E . 500 (1 to 3) may be used only once to satisfy part of the distribution re quirements . A 3-hour upper division course in physics must be i ncluded among the electives . The student who has good grades and i s i nterested in graduate work s hould take additional mathematics . Some preliminar y con sulting with a departmental graduate adviser is desirable . 6. E. E. 455, Computer Techniques in Engineering , may be sub stituted . ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION Starting in the fall of 1978, the Engineering Design and Economic Evaluation program was merged with the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The E.D.E.E. degree will not be offered to new students. However , courses in design and economic evaluation have been retained and are administered through the Department of Mechanical Engineering. ENGINEERING PHYSICS William R. Simmons, Coordinator The engineering physics curriculum gives students a thorough foundation in the physical principles un derlying most of engineering. The large number of engineering electives which may be incorporated in the curriculum makes i t possible for the student to prepare himself for professional work or graduate school in a wide variety of fields . Because the program is particularly flexible , the student should be aware that proper preparation for his professional field will require careful selection of his engineering electives. The student is urged to prepare, in consultation with the departmental coordinator, a coherent plan of courses to meet his professional objectives. During the freshman and sophomore years, the stu dent must attain a thorough training in mathematics and a grounding in fundamental methods and princi ples of the physical sciences. During the junior and senior years the work in physics is amplified to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the various branches of physics such as nuclear physics, atomic physics , electronics, ther modynamics, mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. Individual initiative and resourcefulness are stressed. For purposes of federal Civil Service requirements this degree is an engineering degree from an accredited College of Engineering. Students who plan to become registered professional engineers should check the re quirements for registration in their state before choos ing their engineering electives. It is recommended that students preparing for Graduate School also prepare for its foreign language requirement as part of their undergraduate cur riculum. At present, the Bachelor of Science degree in engineering physics is awarded on the Boulder Campus only; therefore, in order to earn a bachelor's degree in engineering physics from the Department of Physics and Astrophysics a student must, in addition to any other requirements , successfully complete 30 semester hours of courses on the Boulder Campus, in cluding 12 semester hours in upper division physics courses. Applied Physics Option It is also possible to earn the degree Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics) with an applied physics option. This option differs from the regular engineering physics degree primarily in that fewer ad vanced theoretical physics courses are required and in

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their place a selection of applied science courses is re quired. This option should not be selected by students intending to pursue graduate study in physics, bu t it is appropria te for students intending to pursue graduate work or employment in related fields such as geophysics, environmental science , oceanography, nuclear engineering, medicine, and law. Students in tending to pursue this option should consult the coor dinator by the beginning of their junior year regarding the electives which they wish to propose. The 24 hours of electives in pure or applied natural science must be approved by the engineering physics advising com mittee, which is located on the Boulder Campus. The committee will consider the proposed courses relative to the student's stated educational and/or profes sional objectives. At least 30 semester hours of credit must be earned after the student's proposed program is approved. Curriculum tor B.S. (Engineering Physics) The minim urn total number of hours for the degree is 136. Approved ROTC courses may be substituted for a maximum of 6 hours of electives. A typical program is: FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester S e me s ter Hour s Math. 140. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ...... . . . ...... 3 Engr . 101. Fundamentals of Design I . . . . ............ . ....... 2 Social-humanistic elective (see note 1) ............ . ......... 6 E.Phys . 111. General Physics (see note 8) . ................ . ..:....! Total 1 5 Spring Semester Math . 241. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ....... . ...... 3 Socia l-human istic elective (see note 1) ... . . .... . .... . . . . .... 3 E.Phys. 112. General Physics (s ee note 8) ..... . . . . . . .... . . . . 4 E . Phys . 114. Experimental Phys i c s ( see note 8 ) .... ...... . ... 1 C.S . 210. Fundamentals of Computing .................... . . 3 Elective (see note 2) . ........ ...... ...... ....... . . .... . ... Total 17 SO P HOMOR E YEAR Fall Semester Math. 242. Analy tic Geometr y and Cal c ulu s III ....... .... . . . 3 Social-humanistic elective ( see note 1 ) ........ .............. 3 E . Phys. 213. General Physics (see note 8) .... ............... 3 E . Phys. 215. Experimental Physics (see note 8 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Elective (see note 2 ) . . . . . . . .............. ........... . ..... . 3 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra . . ................... . . . Total 16 Spring Semest e r Math. 320. Elementary Differen ti al Equations .. ... .......... 3 Chern . 202. General Chemistry ( see note 3 ) . . . . .... . . . ....... 4 Social humanistic elective (see note 1) ........... .... ....... 3 E . Phy s . 214. Introdu c tory Modem Physic s (see note 8 ) . . . . ... 3 Elective (see note 2 ) ..... . . . ... ... .... .... . .... _ . . . . ...... Total 1 8 J U NIOR YEAR Fall Semester Upper division mathematics elective ........ . ............. . . 3 E . Phys . 317. Junior Laboratory ........... ............ ... . . . 2 Col lege of Engin ee ring and Appli e d S c i e nc e I 73 E . Phys. 321. C lassical Mechan i cs and Rela tivity . . . . . ........ 4 E . Phys . 331. Principles of Electricity and Magne t ism . . .... . . 3 Elective (see note 2 ) ...................... ................. 3 Social humani s t ic elective ( see no te 1 ) ............. ........ Tot al 1 8 Spring S e mester E .Phys. 318. Junior Labora to ry . .... . ......... . . . . .......... 2 E . Phys. 322. C lassical Me ch an ics, Rela tivity , and Quantum Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 E.Phys . 3 3 2 . Principles of Elec t ricity and Magne t i s m ....... . 3 E .Phys. 341. Therm o dyna mics a nd Statistic a l Mechanics ..... 3 Ch ern. 453. Physica l Che mistry (see n ote 4) . . ...... ......... 3 Chern . 454. Physical Chem istry Laborato ry ( see not e 4 ) ..... ..:...1 Total 16 S EN IOR Y EAR Fall S e m este r E . E . 403. Elec tronic s (see no te 6 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 E. E . 443 . E lec t r onics Labora tory (see n ot e 6) ......... . ...... 1 E .Phys. 4 91. A t omic and N uclear Physics .......... ..... . ... 3 E.Phy s . 4 95. Senior Labora tory .............. ......... ...... 2 Elective (see note 2) ....................................... 7 Social humanisti c elective (see note 1 ) .............. . ...... Total 18 Sprin g Se me ste r E . Phy s . 492. Atomic and uclear Phy sics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Phy s. 496. Seni o r Labora tory (see n ote 5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Elective ( see n ot e 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Social humani s tic elective (see n o te 1) ..................... ___1 T ot al 18 Curriculum tor B.S. (E.Physlcs)Applled Physics Option The first five semesters are identical to the regular engineering physics curriculum listed above. The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. Approved ROTC courses may be substituted for a maximum of 6 hours of elective s . J UNIOR Y EA R Spring S e mest e r S e mest e r Hour s E . Phys . 322. Clas s ical Mechan ics and Quan t um Mechan ics ... 3 E.Phys. 332. Principles of Elec t ricity and Magnetism .... .... 3 Upper division thermodynamics elective ... ...... ..... ..... . . 3 Social humanistic elective (se e note 1) ...................... 3 Elective s (se e note 7 ) . . ......... . ........................ ..:....! Thtal w SENIOR YEAR Fall S e mest e r E . E . 403. Elements of Electronics ( see note 6 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 E.E . 443. Elements of Electronics Laboratory ( see note 6) . . . 1 Social-humanisti c elective (see no t e 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective s (see note 7) ........... .......................... _ll Total 1 8 Sprin g Se m este r Social human istic elective ( s e e n ot e 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Electives ( see note 7) . . ............. . . . ....... . . . ..... . . . . _ll T o tal 1 8 Notes tor B.S. (Engineering Physics) 1. A t otal of 24 hours of s ocial humanis tic elec tives i s required . Thes e mu s t include 6 hour s of literature and 6 h o urs selected from

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74 I University of Colorado at D e n ve r economics, sociology , political science , history, and an t hr o pology . The other 12 hours must be selected from the above subject s and/ or fine arts and music (critical or historical o nly,), philo s ophy, and psychology . 2. Required and elective engineering courses (excluding mathematics and phy s ics ) mu s t total 22 semester hours. 3 . Chern . 202 is offered only at the Boulder Campus . U CD stu dents may s ubsti t ute Chern . 103 and 106 f o r C hern . 202. 4 . Chern . 453 and 454 are o ffered only a t the Boulder C ampus . One semester of any upper division chemi s try course wit h as sociated laboratory may be substituted for phy s ical chemistry . 5 . Or Phys. 455, or approved 3 hour ph ys ics elective. 6 . E . E . 403 and 453 are o ffered only a t t he Boulder C ampus . UCD students may substitute E . E . 321 and 361. 7 . The elective course s are divided into t hree exclus ive groups: (1) Physics electives. These must b e five h o urs from am o ng Phys . 318 , 341, 361, 365, 366, 367, 446, 451, 455, 4 61, 462, 491, 492, 495, 496 , 500, 501, 503, 504, and 580. (2) Applied natural scien c e elec tives (24 semester hours , minimum ) . These mus t include 4 hour s of upper division laboratory c o urses and sufficient engineering courses so that t he total o f engineer i ng courses (exc luding mathemati cs and ph ysics) i s a t least 22 semester hours . (3) O t her courses . 8 . See t he E . Ph ys. coordinator . MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Ralph C. Koeller, Coordinator Mechanical engineering is perhaps the broadest in scope of all the engineering fields. I t is not identified with or restricted to a particular technology, vehicle , device, or system ; rather , it is concerned with all such subjects, both individually and collectively. In an era when technology is changing rapidly, the education of an engineer must provide a base for working in fields which may now not exist. The objec tive of the undergraduate program in mechanical engineering is to give the student a broad intellectual horizon and such habits and skills o f study that learn ing new science as it appears and taking the initiative in applying it will be second nature. There can be only one firm foundation for t he stu dent preparing for a career in mechanical engineering: mathematics , physics, and chemistry are the basic in gredients . Also essential is mastery of such engineer ing sciences as solid and fluid mechanics; ther modynamics , and heat and mass transport ; materials, and systems analysis and controls. Along with the study of these fundamentals, the engineer must ex perience the ways in which scientific knowledge can be put to use in the developmen t and design of useful devices and processes. The mechanical engineering program may be roughly subdivided into two-year groupings . In the first two years, the program emphasizes the fun damentals of those engineering sciences that are es sential for an understanding of most branches of professional engineering. For the final two years , the department, in recognition of the extremely broad and varied demands which the advances of modern technology have imposed on the mechanical engineer , provides two plans , A and B , for the curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering. The plans are designed to ac comodate the professional objectives of the individual student. Plan A specifies a typical mechanical engineering curriculum and is intended for those students who wish to obtain a broad, general education in mechanical engineering without an emphasis on any of the specific professional aspects. Plan B is designed for students who know what they intend to do upon graduation. This option allows the student to pursue any course plan that meets a valid professional objective and has been approved by the advisory committee. Under Plan B, the specific re quirements of the program are determined after a detailed conference with an appropriate departmental adviser. In the course of this conference, the profes sional objectives of the individual student are studied in detail, and a specific plan (with a minimum of 136 credit hours) is designed to meet these objectives. With liberal use of courses throughout the University, the following may be considered typical among the professional concentrations which can be achieved: T hermod y namic s Design Hea t tra nsfer Power Fluid mechanic s Dynamics and controls Solid mechanics Materials science Electrome c hanical systems Thermomechanicalsystems All of the required courses for mechanical engineer ing plan A are offered at UCD. Plans are to expand the number of elective courses for plans A and Bin the near future. Students should work closely with their mechanical engineering adviser as they may have to complete some courses in Boulder depending upon their study plan and the phasing in of the complete program at UCD . Curriculum for B.S. (Mechanical Engineering) The minimum total number of hours for the degree is 136. A typical program is: F RESHMAN YEAR F all Se m este r Semester Hour s En gl. 258. G r e a t Book s (see n ote 1 ) ......................... 3 M . E . 1 3 0 . Intr o duction to Mechanical Engineering ........... 2 Math . 140. Analytic Geometr y and C alculus I ............... 3 E . E . 201. Introduc tion t o Computing ........................ 3 Soc ial hum a nisti c ele c t ives .....................•..... . .... ,__ To tal 17 S prin g Sem este r En gl. 259 . Great Book s ll (see note 1) ....................... 3 Phys. 231. General Phy sics I ..... . ....................... . . 4 Phys. 232. Exper i mental Physics I ........ . ................. 1 M a th . 241. Anal y ti c Geometry and Calculus ll .............. 3 En g r . 1 01. Fundam e ntals of Design I ........................ 2 S ocia l h uma n is ti c elective ................................. ..:..J! T otal 16 SOPH O MORE Y EA R F all Semester M . E . 2 81. Mechanic s I (see note 2) ............ ............. 3 Engl. 260. Gr e a t Books III ( see note 1) ....... ............... 3 Ph ys. 233. General Physics ll ............................... 4 Phys. 234. Exp e r i mental Phy sics ll ........................ . 1 Math. 2 42. Anal yti c Geometry and Cal c ulus ill .............. 3 Math. 319. Applied Linear Algebra ..................... . . . ..:..J! Total 17

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Spring Semester M.E. 282. Mechanics IT (see note 2) ............. o .... o ..... 3 Engl. 261. Great Books N (see note 1) ...................... 3 Approved physics elective .............. .... o . . . o o ....... o . . 3 wh. . 2-Elementary Differential Equations o ..... o ........ o . 3 Engr. 301. Thermodynamics .. o .... ........ o ............... ..:..1 Total 15 JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester M . E. 312. Thermodynamics IT .......................... o ... 3 M . E. 314. Measurements I ......... o ............... o ...... o 2 M . E . 362. Heat Transfer ............................ . o . o .. o 3 M .Eo 371. Systems Analysis I (see.note 3) ... o .... o ........ o. 3 M . E . 383. Mechanics ill . 0 •••••••• o ... o .................... 3 Chern . 202. General Chemistry .. 0. o. o o o ......... o ..... o ... _,__1 Total 18 Spring Semester MoE. 301. Introduction to Materials Science I 0 • o .. o o ........ 3 M . E . 316. Measurements II ................... o o .......... o 2 M.E. 372. Systems Analysis II (see note 3) .................. 3 M.E. 3840 Mechanics N ................................... 3 M.E. 385. Mechanics V .............. o ...... o ........... .. o 3 Technical elective ......................... o ....... o ...... ..:..1 Total 17 College of Engineering and Applied Science I 75 SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester M . E . 442. Mechanical Engineering Labora tory ............. 0. 3 M .E. 414. Me c hanical Engineering Design ...... ........ 0 •••• 3 M . E. 401. In t roduction to Materials Science IT ......... 0 ••••• 3 Technical elective ......... ....... . ........... 0 •••••• 0 ••••• 6 Free elective ................................. 0 ••••••••••• ..:..1 Total 18 Spring Semester Social-humanistic elective ................. 0 •••••••••• o . . . . 3 Technical electives ....................................... ...lQ Total 18 Notes for B . S . (Mechanical Engineering) 1. Or other English options; see the English listings in the Course Description sect ion of this bulle ti n . 2. M .E. 281 and M.E . 282 are off ered o nly on the Boulder Campus. UC D stu dents may substit ute C.E. 212 and C . E . 311 for MoE. 281 and M . E . 282. 3. M.E. 371 and M . E. 372 are offered only on the Boulder Campus. UCD students may s ubstitute EoE. 213 and E . E . 331 for M .Eo 371 and M . E. 372.

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College of Environmental Design Dwayne C . Nuzum, Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Designers and planners of the physical environment have moved in recent years into expanded roles and responsibilities. Changes in breadth of concern and scope of service have brought the architect, the land scape architect, the urban and regional planner, the technologist in environmental systems, and the in terior designer closer together. All are being asked to make decisions from more alternatives which have longer lasting effects. Lines of demarcation among these professions are being minimized and in terdependence among them is increasing. These requirements necessitate a broader base of educational experience, including not only a background for design technique, but also an in creased association with an understanding of the physical and social sciences. The social and economic determinants to contemporary life, the complexities of urban and regional interdependence and the allied problems of transportation, growth and population, the effect of business and governmental activity, rapid technological advances all require of the en vironmental designer a broad base if he or she is to meet present needs and anticipate and guide the future. Preparation for professional service in these fields is partially through the academic process. Accordingly, in August 1969, by action of the Board of Regents, the University of Colorado was authorized to expand its offerings and change the designation of the School of Architecture to the College of Environmental Design. The change included phasing out the five-year un dergraduate architecture curriculum and replacing it with a four-year u . ndergraduate degree in environmen tal design. A series of graduate programs in architecture, urban design, interior design, landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning have been initiated and are fully operational. Full professional status in most environmental design fields requires a minimum of five or six years of academic experience and two or three years of prac tical experience followed by state registration or licensing through a professional examination. Qualifications for success in these careers are not easily measured. Candidates for this profession must have the ability to complete successfully an academic program ranging from fundamental humanistic and scientific courses throug h applied technical activity to full creative development . They should have a background of secondary education that includes courses in mathematics and physics. Some experience in creative activity may aid them in predetermining their personal satisfaction from the creative process . UCD Program The College of Environmental Design at UCD offers five graduate programs: the Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban Design, Master of Interior Design-Interior Architecture and Space Planning, Master of Landscape Architecture, and the Master of Urban and Regional Planning-Community Development. See information following. Other un dergraduate programs are available only through the University of Colorado at Boulder, and students should see the catalog for that campus. Financial Aid Graduate scholarships and fellowships are available to continuing students only, with the exception of Colorado Grants. A limited number of Colorado Grants are available to new students who are resi dents of the State of Colorado and who fulfill the Uni versity's criteria for financial need. Forms to apply for State of Colorado Graduate Grants, Federal Work Study assistance, and Federal National Direct Student Loans (NDSL), are available through the College of Environmental Design, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE The Division of Architecture offers three degree programs, all of which lead to the Master of Architec ture. The three programs are named by typical time in-residence: three-year, two-year, and one-year programs. The three-and two-year programs lead to the first professional degree for architectural practice; the one-year program leads to a second professional degree. The one-year program is open only to applicants already holding the first professional degree in architecture (generally the bachelor's, occasionally the master's). Individually organiz ed studies are focused on the student's interests in architecture or in architecture with an urban design specialization.

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The two-year program is open to holders of the Bachelor of Environmental Design or Architectural Studies degree and is arranged to receive graduates of the Division of Environmental Design at Boulder or similar undergraduate studies at other schools. The three-year program is open to holders of the bachelor's degree in all other fields. Curriculum The Division of Architecture is a professional sc h oo l ; its role and p urpose is the education of men and women who wish to design buildings. The division provides studies in architectural design , graphic com munications , history and theory, technology, and professional practice for this purpose. Architectural design is the central activity of the several programs and the design studio serves to in tegrate architectural learning from all course work in the supportive arts and sciences. Most studies are conducted on the case study method; skill in the definition and the solution of design problems is ac quired through the analysis and the working of exer cises which simulate actual building problems. Ad vanced studio options are available with projects in the Community Center for Development and Design . The design thesis is the culmination of architectural studies. Communications courses provide the graphic skills necessary to present design ideas. History and theory courses anchor the student's work in social respon sibility, and in an understanding of the forces that give shape to buildings and cities. Technology courses give basics in structures, and in the environmental concerns of utilities, heating, lighting, and acoustics. Professional courses provide exposure to the workings of contemporary practice, and an internship in a practicing professional's office is a course option in the final year. The goal of all of these studies is competency for the graduates of the div i sion as intelligent, knowledge able, and creative designers , each at the threshold of entry to architectural careers in private practice, government, or industry. Admission Requirements APPLICATIO N The complete set of materials for application for the Master of Architecture programs include the applica tion form, college transcripts, three recommenda tions, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work. To be considered for admission, the complete set of application materials must be received by March 15 preceding the fall semester of entry. The portfolio must be no larger than 14 inches by 17 inches. The application form and additional information may be obtained by writing to the Director of Architecture, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Str eet, Denver, Colorado 80202. Applicants must hold a Bachelor of Arts , Bachelor of Fine Arts, or Bachelor of Science degree from an ac credited four-year college or university to be accepted College of Environmental Design I 77 into the three-year Master of Architecture program. A four-year degree in architecture or environmental design from an accredited college or university is re quired for acceptance into the two-year program. A Bachelor or Master of Architecture degree from an ac credited architecture program is required for acceptance into the one-year master's program. A student in the fourth year of the University of Colorado architectural engineering program may enter the first year of the three-year program with qualification based upon the course work taken previo u sly and upon academic performance. However, a student in this program must still apply and be accepted into the Master of Architecture program and must have completed all requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in architectural engineering before entry into the second year of the program. ADM I S SIO N An Admissions Committee will review the applica tion materials and select students to be admitted to programs. Applicants will be notified that they have been accepted, are on a waiting list, or have not been accepted, prior to May 1. The recommended minimum grade-point average is 2.75 on a 4-point scale . If the student's grade-point average is below 2.75, the Graduate Reco r d Examination is recommended as part of the application materials. The student, however, will be evaluated for admission on the basis of all the application materials and not the grade-point average alone. One-Year Program The one-year p r ogram is available only to students already holding the first professional degree, the Bachelor or Master of Architecture. The Master of Architecture or Master of Architecture in Urban Design is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester hours of courses and special projects ar ranged for the particular candidate's program. The candidate and the adviser mutually develop the course of study through selection of offerings in the College of Environmental D es i gn and other divisions of the University. The program is primarily research oriented, and students are allowed to pursue independently an area of their choice related to architecture. ONEYEAR PROGRAM C ourse R e qu i r e m e nts Semester H o ur s Arch . 710-711. Research design thesis ...................... 14 Elective course work program ................ . . ........... _1 Total 32 O NE-YEAR PROGRAM ORDER OF STUDIES Fall S e mester Arch. 710. Research design thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Elective course work program ........ . . . . . . .... . .......... __j! T o tal 16

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78 I University of Colorado at Denver Spring Seme ster Arch . 711. Re searc h design thes i s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Elective course work program ............................. ___!! Total 16 Total semester hours required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 The research/design project for thesis must be ap proved by the Thesi s Committee before the student enters the program. The student is asked to submit a statement describing the proposed project with the application . The project may be individual or col laborative , theoretical or real. Two-Year Program The two-year program is open to the student with a four-year Bachelor of Environmental Design or Architectural Studies degree who seeks the first profe ssi onal degree in architecture. The program is a two-year, 64-semester-hour series of studies leading to the Master of Architecture degree . Students in the third or fourth year of the Uni versity of Colorado Environmental Design degree program who intend to pursue the Master of Architec ture should take Structures (Arch. 452 and 453), En vironmental Systems (Arch. 450), Materials and Methods of Construction (Arch. 451), Architectural History (Arch. 470 and 471), and Architectural Graphics (Arch. 410 and 411), and a minimum of six semesters of Design (incl uding Arch. 400 and 401). Students who have not completed these courses previou s to en try will be asked to complete them while in t he program. Students from other four-year design programs must have taken two semesters of architectural his tory , two semest ers of basic structures (statics, strength of materials) and must show, with the portfolio, a graphics ability equivalent to the two semester course in architectural graphics. Required courses in t he two-year program that have been taken by the student in prior studies may be waived if the grade received is B or above. The Master of Architec ture is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 64 semester hours and all required courses. Two.Y EAR P R O GRAM COURSE REQUIREME N T S Semester Hours Architectural design .......... ................ . . . . ........ 24 Technologie s . . ............................... ............ 15 Theory and practice . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Professional practice and constructio n d ocume nts . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Planning and Landscape Architect ur e electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Electives1 ••••••• ••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• 64 TWO .YEAR PROGRAM REC OMMENDED ORDER 0 F STUDIES Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours Arch . 600. Design ... . . ............ ..... . . . . ............... 5 Arch . 680. Theory and Practice . . . .................. ........ 3 Arch . 650. Heating and Plumbing .......................... 3 Arch . 652. Timber and S t ructures ............... . . . ........ 2 Arc h . 653. Steel Structures ............................ . .... 2 Elective1 •••••••• •••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••. • ••••••••••• ..:..1_ 17 Spring Semester , First Year Arch . 610. Design .... .... ................................. 5 Arch . 651. lllumination and Acoustics ......... .............. 3 Arch . 654. Concrete Structures .... ............. ....... . . . . . 2 Arch . 660. Profe ss ional Practice and Const ruction Document s ........ . ........... •.......... 4 Elective1 .•• • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • •••••••••••••• • ..:..1_ 16 Fall Semeste r , Second Year Arch. 700. Design . ........................................ 5 Arch. 712. Thesis Preparation .... .................. . . . ... .. 2 Arch. 760. Internship (optional) .... . ...................... . 3 Electives 1 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••••• _,__& 16 Spring Semester , Second Year Arch . 701. Design Thesis . . . ................................ 7 Arch . 761. Internship (optio nal) . .................•......... 3 Arch . 750. Systems Synthesis ......... . .... . . . ............. 3 Elective1 • • • • • ••••••••• • •••• •••• • • ••••••••••••••••••••••• • ..:..1_ 15 Total semester hours required .... . ........ ..... ... ........ 64 Three-Year Program The three-year program is open to students with a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, with a particular program prerequisite of one year of high school or college physics, one semester of college algebra and trigonometry, and one semester of calculus . The mathematics and physics requirement must be completed before entering the program. The Master of Architecture is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 96 semester hours and all required courses. THREE. YEAR COURSE R EQUIREMENTS Semeste r Hour s Arc hitectural design ...................... ................ 34 Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 History/philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Graphic communications....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Theo r y and practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Professional practice and construction d ocume nts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Planning and Landscape Architecture electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Electives1 • • •••••••••••••• • • ••••••••••••• •••• • •••• • ••••• • • _j..Q 96 THREE.YEAR PROGRAM RECOMMENDED 0 RDER 0 F STUDIES Fall Semeste r , First Year Semester Hours Arch . 500. Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch . 510. Graphic communications I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . 551. Materials and methods of construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch. 552. Structures I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch. 570. History / phil oso phy I ..... . . . . . ....... .......... . 17 Sp r ing Semester, First Year Arch. 501. Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch. 511. Graphic commu nications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1Elec t ive co urses ma y be taken from additi o nal ar c h i t e cture o r College course o ffering s, o r from othe r d ivis i ons at the U n i versity of Co lorad o. A minimum o f three se meste r h o urs m ust b e ac quired ea c h from the Landscape Archit ec ture and the Urban and Regional Pl anning c urri c ulums.

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Arch . 550. Environmen ta l systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch. 553. Structures II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . 571. Histo ry/philosoph y II ......................... . . _2 17 Fall S e mester , Second Y ear Arch . 600. Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arc h . 680. Theor y and prac tice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . 650. Heating and plumb ing. ........................ . 3 Arch . 652. Timber structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Arc h . 653. Steel struc t ures ......................... ....... ___1 1 5 Spring Seme ste r , Second Y e ar Arch. 601. Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch . 651. lllurnina tion and acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . 654. Concrete s tructure s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Arch . 660. Professional practice and construction :J 16 Fall Se me ster, Third Year Arch . 700. Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch . 712. Thesis preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Arch . 760. Internship (optional ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 El ectives1 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ___ 16 Spr ing Semester , Third Year Arch . 701. Design Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Arch . 761. Internship (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch. 750. Systems synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective1 •••••••••••••.•.•••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••• ___1 15 Total semester hours required ................ ............. 96 MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE The academic program leading to a Master of Landscape Architecture degree at the University of Colorado at Denver responds to a perceived need to of fer professional training preparing students to meet the complex and demanding challenges of designing and shaping the environment. Our rapidly growing western regions, both urban and rural, require comprehensive problem-solving skills which address regional climate, geology, soils, hydrology , and vegetation. These related processes provide a regional basis for planning and designing land areas for public/private use, enjoyment, and preservation. P rograms UCD offers both two-and three-year graduate-level professional programs leading to the degree Master of Landscape Architecture. The two-year second profes sional degree program, comprised of a minimum of 64 semester hours , is structured to provide advanced training and exposure in the theoretical, technical , and practical aspects of design for those M.L.A. can didates possessing a Bachelor of Landscape Architec ture degree . The three-year first professional degree program, comprised of a minimum of 96 semester hours , is offered to students with undergraduate College of Environmental Design I 79 degrees not specifically related to landscape architecture. These programs permit the M .L. A . candidate to pursue a wide range of career goals responding to the p7ofessi on's c?ncerns an_d expertise in physical plan mng and design . A maJor goal of the program is to the candidates ' knowledge and practical skills of landscape architecture to assume effect ive roles in professional practice. Emphasis is placed upon emerging problems and frontier areas of the Rocky Mountain Region, and on applying problem s?lving tools, theories, and methodologies to en vrronmental concerns covering a broad range of scales and project types. Curriculum The curriculum includes those subjects considered as essential to core professional training in the field of architecture, including design , technology, history, and professional practice. Both programs and courses have a design focus, upon real problem solving situations with emphasis on design process . Opportunities exist to develop complementary skills related to interdisciplinary pro Jects mvolvmg the gr aduate programs of architecture urban design, urban and regional planning, and administration, within the College of En VIronmental Design. Additionally, through the Center for Community Development and Design, the M . L .A . candidate is afforded opportunity for actual project and participation for a variety of projects Withm the Denver metropolitan area and the state of Colorado . The hierarchy of courses from term to term includes sequences of design , technical, and history core courses required of all entering candidates . The final spring term is reserved for a design thesis project con tributing to the program and the profession of land scape architecture. The thesis projec t is performed under the guidance of a Comprehensive Thesis Com mittee comprised of faculty , practicing professionals, technical specialists in the thesis topic. Ad ditionally , the M.L.A. candidate is required to com plete a minimum 12-week internship with a profes sional landscape architecture office or under the work supervision of a professionally registered landscape architect . Admission Requirements Applicants to the three-year program or those who do not have a first professional degree, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture , should have proficiency in college mathematics, physical science, English en vironmental science, and a basic course in art or draw ing. Applicants to the two-year program , having un derg:aduate in urban and regional planning, architecture, enVIronmental design , or other physical 'Elective may be taken . fron:a additional a r c hitectur e or College course offer ings or fro m ot h e r diviSIOn s at the Untverstt y o f Colorado. A min imum of 3 semeste r hours each mu s t be acqui r ed from the Landsca pe Architectu r e and the Urban and Regi onal Plan ning curriculums. •

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80 I Universit y of Colorado at Denver design degrees are considered for admission upon in dividual evaluation of their undergraduate cur riculum, scholastic performance, and professional ex perience. To be considered for admission into the graduate programs in landscape architecture , appli cants must submit application forms, college tran scripts , three recommendations , statement of pur pose , and a portfolio of academic and professional work by March 15 preceding the fall semester they wish to enter the program. The portfolio format is to be 14 inches by 17 inches or smaller . Application forms and further information may be obtained by writing to the Director of Landscape Architecture, College of Environmental Design , Uni versity of Colorado at Denver , 1100 14th Street, Denver , Colorado 80202. ORDER OF' S TUDI E S ('1\VOA ND THREE-YEAR PROGRAMS) Fall Se mest e r , F i r s t Y ear Sem e ster Hours L . A . 500. Landscape Architec t ure Design I ...... _ .... _ . _ _ _ _ 5 L . A . 510. Graphic Communi cation I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 L.A . 550. Land s cape Architecture Enginee ri ng I . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 L.A . 561. In t r o duction to Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 L . A . 570. H istory and Theory o f Land s cape Ar chit ecture ....................... ____ .. _ . 3 L.A . 580. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials I __ __ . _ ___ . _ . _ . 18 S p r ing Sem este r , F i r st Year L.A . 5 01. Lands c ape Arch i tecture Design II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 L . A . 511. Graphi c Communica t ion II....... ....... . . . ...... 3 L . A . 551. Landscape Arc hitecture Construction I . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 L.A. 571. Landscape Architecture History and Theory Contemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 L . A . 581. Roc k y Mountain Plant Materials II .............. 17 Fall Sem e s te r , Sec ond Year L . A . 600. L andscape Arc h i tec t ure D esign III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 L . A . 650. Landscape Architecture Engineering II . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 L .A. 661. Introducti on to Ecol ogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 L . A . 680 . Rock y M o untain Plan t ing Design Principles . . . . . . . 3 UPCD 500. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning ................................... 17 Spr i n g Semes ter , Second Year L . A . 601. Land s cape Architecture Design IV . . . . . ........... 5 L . A . 651. Landscape Architecture Construction II . . . . . . . . . . . 5 L . A . 660 . Landscape Architecture Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 L . A . 681. Rock y Mountain Planting Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 UPCD 614. History of Environmental Form ............... 18 Fall S e m e st er, Third Y ear L . A . 700. Landscape Arch . Design V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 L . A . 760. Lands cape Architecture Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 L . A . 761. Introduction to Ecology ..................... _ ... _ 1 L . A . 790. Independent Study (Thesis Preparation) . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ele ctive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective ........................................... _. _ .. 17 Spr i n g Semester , Third Y ear L.A . 701. Landscape Arc hitecture D esi gn ( Thesis ) . . . . . . . . . . . 7 L . A . 721. Professional Practice ............... _ ....... _ . . . 10 Total Hours ............................................. 97 MASTE R OF ARCHITEC T U R E I N URBAN DESIGN Program Descrip tion Urban design is another of the graduate en vironmental design programs taught at facilities which are located within two urban renewal projects in the core of the metropolitan area. The curriculum focuses upon the complex problems that are generated by change and growth in a vigorous urban and regional laboratory. Emphasis is given to participatory community and publicly funded design, research, and technology. Special efforts are made to utilize the vast resources of information available from federal, state, and local agencies and institutions which are concentrated in the immediate community. Specific courses and projects attempt to incorporate these allied academic, civic, and citizen inputs into the design processes . Direct daily contact with students and instructors in the planning, landscape, architecture, and interior divisions is very important and beneficial. A specific effort is made in professional practice, in ternship, and directed elective courses to expose urban design students to broader group-oriented fac tors in the problem solving process. Placement of stu dents in combination architecture, urban design, and planning firms is a primary consideration in meeting the internship requirements . The master's year is a synthesis of the special civic scale factors influencing urban design in one of four options: recreational facilities, community develop ment, rehabilitation or renewal, transportation and health care. In this phase, students are carefully ad vised throughout the period of their independent research and design studies. Opportunities to do state and city outreach work in association with the Center for Community Development and Design (the Col lege's design aid field program for ethnic and economic minorities) are available. Many other real problems and/or case studies from the community which require anticipatory and feasibility design and development also are considered. Whenever possible, individual and/or team projects in cooperation with allied disciplines and institutions are encouraged. Admission Requirements In order for students to be considered for admission into the graduate program, they must submit applica tion forms, college transcripts , three letters or recom mendation, statement of purpose , and a portfolio of academic and professional work by April 15 preceding the fall semester they wish to enter. All portfolio material submitted with the application must be in B W ' by 14" format or smaller . If slides are included,

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they must be in a looseleaf slide holder. It is recom mended that students indicate the type and length of all work experience they have had since receiving a degree. Application forms and information may be ob tained by writing to Director of Master of Architec tu r e in Urban Design, Coll ege of Environmental D esign, University of Colorado at Denver , 1100 14th Street, Denver, Col orado 80202. O N E Y E A R P R OGRAM ( MAS TER O F A RCHITE C TURE I N URBAN DE SIGN ) A one-year prog r am leading to the Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree is available to students holding a first professional degree in architecture, landscape architecture, or urban plan ning. The degree is a war d e d upon satisfactory com pletion of 32 semester cre dit h ours. T h e program is for students who wish to pursue advanced studies in com pound, complex community design problems. Course Requir e m ents S e mester Hours Urban De s i g n S t udio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Urban Design Seminar ................................... 3-6 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Electives (professional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Independent study ......... . . .......... ................. _1 llial The design studio is the focal point for the specialization selected by the student. The project chosen is developed on an independent study basis with meetings, seminars, and evaluations scheduled between the student and the faculty advisers. Cognate courses are selected with the guidance of the faculty advisers from related subjects offered by the College or other units of the University. MASTER OF INTERIOR DESIGNINTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AND SPACE PLANNING The Master of Interior Design program is structured to educate designers who will be qualified to assume responsible leadership roles in the continuing growth of the profession and in the improvement of the quality of man' s near environment by constructively relating the design process to man's life process . There are two programs leading to the Master of Interior Design degree. The two-year program is open to applicants holding Bachelor of Interior Design , Bachelor of Environmental Design, or Bachelor of Architecture degrees. The three-year program is designed for applicants holding bachelor's degrees in other fields from accre d ited four-year colleges or uni versities. The program is characteristically different from more traditional programs in the following ways: Multidisciplinary Approach. Individualized in struction and guidance are provided in skills and knowledge that are integrated from related dis ciplines. Accordingly , the student develops personal models and methodologies within a multidisciplinary conceptual framework for the analysis , design, and evaluation of appropriate interior environments. Colleg e of Environmental Design I 81 Interior Architecture and Spac e Planning Ori e nta tion. The program relies heavily upon the conviction that the design of an interior space and the building form containing it are inextricably related. The former inwardly responding to the human environ ment, the latter outwardly responding to the natural environment; both design activities requiring high degrees of interdependent specializations in generating an adequate integrative environmental form. Social and Behavioral Base. Understanding the social, behavioral, and biological implications of man environment interactions is emphasized as an integral part of design research/problem-solving methods in all design studio work. Coordinated University-Professional Community Learning Experiences . The program is a direct response to the Rocky Mountain region's general recognition of a need for designers whose professional community serves as an auxiliary source of edu cational enrichment by providing students with opportunities to combine theoretical and applied learning. Admission Requir e ments APPLI CATIO N In order for students to be considered for admission into the graduate program, they must submit applica tion forms , two original transcripts, three recommen dations, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of academic and professional work by March 15 preceding the fall semester that they wish to enter. The portfolio format is to be 14 inches by 17 inches or smaller. Application forms and information may be obtained by writing to the Director of Interior Design, College of Environmental Design , University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver , Colorado 80202. ADMIS SION A Faculty Admissions Committee will review the application materials and select the students to be ad mitted to the program . Applicants will be notified that they have been accepted , are on a waiting list , or have not been accepted, prior to May 1. The recommended minimum grade-point average is 2.75 on a 4-point scale. If the student' s grade-point average is below 2.75 the Graduate Record Examina tion is recommended as part of the application materials. The stu dent, however, will be evaluated for admission on the basis of all the application materials and not the grade-point average alone. S E Q UENCE O F S TUDlES, Two AND THREE-Y EAR PROGR A M Fall S e mester , Fir s t Year S e mest e r H o ur s I.D . 500. De sig n Re s earch/Problem Solvin g Meth o d s . . . . . . . . 5 Arch. 510. Gr a phi c Communicati o ns I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . 570. Hi s tory/Philosoph y I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch. 551. Materials and Me t h o d s of Con s tru c tion . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elec t ive C o urse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 7

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82 I University of Colorado at Denver Spr i n g S e m este r , First Year I.D . 501. Residential Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch. 511. Graphic Communications II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch . 557. Elements of Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arch. 571. History/Philosophy II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Psych . 320 . Human Behavior and Maturation Through the Life Span . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 or Psych. 225. Biological Behavior ............................ _1 17 Fall Semester , Second Year I.D . 600. Transportation Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch . 650 . Heating , Air Conditioning , Ventilation and Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 L.A . 630. Landscape Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I.D . 680. Physical Environmental Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I. D . 660. Furniture Design .......... ...................... _1 17 Spring Semester , Second Year I.D . 601. Commercial Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Arch . 651. Lighting and Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I.D . 681. Human Environmental Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I.D . 662 . Professional Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B .Ad. 504. Fundamentals of Management and Organization ....................... ................. . _1 17 Fall Semester , Third Year I.D. 700. Institutional Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 I . D . 624. Environmental Signage and Graphic Design . . . . . . . 3 I. D . 663. Internship I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Law 300. Business Law ................................ . _1 16 Spring Seme ste r , Third Year I.D . 701. Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 I.D . 664 . Internship II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B . Law 412. Business Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B.Ad . 411. Business and Society........................... 3 or Mk . 300. Principles of Marketing .......................... _1 16 MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT The MURP -CD program prepares planners to research, design, and evaluate the ends and means of social and environmental action. Careers in planning usually center in such growing fields as environmental design, community development, social services, natural resources, ecology, planning consultation, en vironmental assessment, urban renewal, and regional planning . Because Denver is the Rocky Mountain region's central location for managing these fields of action, UCD planning students are able to combine easily the general principles of academic learning with practical experience in nearby operating agencies and organizations. Curricul u m The curriculum requires 60 semester hours as a minimum for graduation. Forty-five of these semester hours are required core courses aimed at training the student in basic planning principles, content, research methods , and plan / policymaking skills . Of these required credits, 4 are spent in experiential learning and internships with public agencies and other organizations. Another 15 credit hours of the curriculum are elec tive. They are chosen in consultation with the stu dent's faculty adviser to form a consistent pattern of planning expertise along the lines of the individual's major interests. The courses may be chosen from the MURP -C D's own core electives, from other programs in the College of Environmental Design or from other graduate colleges at UCD . Typical areas of specializa tion have been ecology, transportation, planning ad ministration, community development, urban design, and health planning . The final curriculum requirement is the satisfactory completion, in the student's last semester, of an in depth planning study or project. The aim is to il lustrate the individual's ability to integrate and apply the knowledge and experien .ce gained in the program. This is the major thrust of ' the core requirement en titled Planning Studio 3. Admlaelon Requirements In order for a student to be considered for admission into the graduate program, application forms must be submitted by April15 for the fall semester. Entry into the program at other times is not normally permitted. Applications for admission are reviewed by a facultystudent committee . Criteria for admission include academic performance, experience, interest, and motivation for study. Candidates for admission should note that a 1-semester-hour course in statistics is part of the 60hour core curriculum. Students who have taken an acceptable course in statistics may have this re quirement waived. Application forms and information may be ob tained by writing to Director of Urban and Regional Planning-Community Development Program, Uni versity of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. CENTER FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN The Center for Community Development and Design provides educational and technical assistance to solve design, planning, and community development problems upon request to groups, organizations, neighborhoods, communities, and small towns that cannot afford or do not have access to these services. The center provides these services to aid in the development of the community and to encourage local self-reliance. These services are provided by mobiliz ing the necessary and available resources of the Col lege of Environmental Design and the community and by utilizing the appropriate community development process and participatory techniques. A central goal of the center is to combine academic and practical experience of students working with community members on problem solving through

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supervised projects in the field. The faculty and staff of the center coordinate community projects for which students register through classes in the various academic curricula. Students who regi s ter for these projects assume an added responsibility of satisfying client needs that goes beyond academic credit. Students are expected to do two things: Utilize and develop professional expertise which not onl y enhances their own education but also better prepares them to assist in the community problem-solving process, and to develop an understanding for com -College of Environmental Design I 83 munity participator y processe s and be able to in tegrate these into the technical aspects of their com munity project. The types of projects student s may select to work on include developing a physical design program for a child care center in an inner-city neighborhood; as sisting a neighborhood organize , design, and imple ment a self-help housing program in a small mountain town; and developing a comprehensive plan in cooperation with a planning commission in . a Colorado high plains town.

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Graduate School Robert N . Rogers , Associate Dean INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL The Graduate School is a University wide body which authorizes programs within i t s constituen t col leges and schools. At UCD , Business and Administra tion (except the M . B .A. program) , Educat ion, Engineering , Liberal Ar ts and Sciences , and Music are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through the Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus . In practice , most mas t er ' s-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular op ti ons and advisers are con cerned. Doctoral-le v el programs in a discipline are v i ewed as t he responsibility of the entire University com munity of that discipline . A t the present time all Ph.D. programs are coordinated through t he cor responding Boulder department. However, in a number of disciplines mo s t or all course work for the Ph. D. can be completed at Denver and the research adviser may be a member of the UCD faculty . Some departments in which this is the case are communica tion disorders and speech sciences , communication and theatre, electrical engineering , and civil engineer ing . In other disciplines , a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph. D. degree may be taken at UCD . Persons interested in pursuing doctoral-level work should consul t with the ap propriate discipline graduate adviser. Anyone wishing further information not given in this bulletin should contact the Associate Dean of the Graduate School, University of Colorado at Denver , 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. Degrees Offered The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at UCD . In some cases, a specific required course may only be of fered through the University of Colorado at Boulder in a given year. The Master of Arts (M .A.) in: An t hrop o logy Biology Communication and theatre Communication disorder s and speech science Economics English Geograph y History Mathemati cs Political science Psychology Sociology The Master of Education (M.Ed . ) and the Master of Arts (M . A . ) in: Earl y c hildhood edu c a tio n Educational p s y c h o logy Elementary e du c ati o n F o undati o n s o f educati o n G uid a nce and coun se l i n g Library media Read i n g Secondary edu c a tion The Master of Science (M. S . ) in : A cco un ting Env i r onmenta l scie n c e Applied ma t hemati cs F i n a nce Chemis try M a n ag emen t and o r g aniza t ion C i vil eng i ne e r i ng Marketin g Ele c tri c al e ngineering Mechanical enginee ri ng The Master of Basic Science ( M.B . S.) The Master of Humanities (M.H.) The Master of Social Science (M.S . S.) Facilities tor Graduate Study and Research atUCD Facilities for re s earch in many fields are available at UCD a s well as specialized institutes , seminars , and meetings of nat ional standing. The Graduate Student at UCD Approximately 1 ,800 students are enrolled in graduate programs at UCD and an additional 1,400 special students take graduate courses . Of these , ap proximately 45 percent are part-time students. Faculty The faculty operating in these programs is mainly housed at UCD , although resources of other campuses at the University of Colorado are used . Financial Aid tor Graduate Study SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS The University of Colorado administers various forms of financial aid for graduate students: fel lowships , scholarships, and a number of awards from outside agencies. The Graduate School each year awards to qualified regular degree graduate students approximately 50 doctoral fellowships paying up to $2,500 plus tuiti on. Special fellowships and scholarships are also available for study in certain departments. Colorado

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Graduate Grants are also available to students who can show demonstrated need. For details contact the Graduate School Office. Applications for fellowships, scholarships, and grants are due in the department before the an nounced department deadline . Fellowship awards are announced about March 15; Colorado Graduate Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester . GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The in structorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appointments in 1978-79 was: one-half time instructor; $5,446 for the academic year; one-halftime teaching assistant, $4,356 for the academic year. A half-time appointment for an instructor is con sidered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Students appointed for one-half time qualify for resident tuition rates regardless of their actual Colorado residency status. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled students in good standing for the full period of their appointment. RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Holders of these positions pay resident tuition . Assistants must be enrolled students. LOAN FUNDS Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans through the National Direct Student Loan Program and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid . EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employ ment or through the college work-study program . Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin . Students are also referred to prospective employers in accor dance with this policy. Graduate School I 85 International Education The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities , and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships. The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities . A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There are also occasional summer programs offering academic credit. Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education. For additional information contact the Office for Student Relations, 629-2861. Institute for Urban and Public Polley Research The institute was established at UCD to facilitate organized research on significant public policy issues and urban problems. Its principal objectives are (1) to improve public policy formation and decision making through more effectively relating issues with knowledge and research and (2) to assist faculty, policy makers, and students to work together as research teams on state and local problems that cut across disciplines. Research in the institute is being done through centers , programs, and ad hoc teams utilizing in dividual expertise from the several campuses of the University of Colorado and other Colorado institu tions of higher education as required to deal with a specific problem. The institute has been involved in a number of research activities including determining effective methods of using scientific and technological resources in metropolitan, state, and regional government policy formation and decision making; en vironmental quality studies; energy-related research; health needs assessment; gerontological studies; evaluating community development programs; and attitude surveys. Its members have continuing programmatic research interests in the measurement of quality of life and social indicators , urban trans portation policy; urban and regional planning; com munity and organizational development; and the physical, biological, and social effects of energy development. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION General Requirements Students may be admitted to the Graduate School in either of the two categories described below. Admis sion to the Graduate School is not admission to candidac y for an advanced degree . A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree must make special application at the time and in the manner prescribed by the requirements for the degree sought.

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86 I University of Colorado at Denver A student who is granted admission must reflect in a moral and ethical sense a personal background ac ceptable to the University. The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an in ability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functwns as an educational institution. R EGUL A R DEGREE STUDENTS Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval , an applicant for admission as a regular degree student mus t : H?ld a degree from a college or un1Vers1ty of recogmzed standing , or have done work to that required for such a degree and eqmvalent to the degree given at this University. 2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by his or her previous scholastic record. 3. Have had adequate preparation to enter upon graduate study in the field chosen. 4 . Have at least a 2. 75 undergraduate grade point average on all work taken . 5 . Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments. Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the advanced degree intended or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School. Pass/!ail Grades . In order to permit a meaningful evaluatwn of an applicant's scholastic record , not more than 10 percent of those credit hours that are relevant to the intended field of graduate study shall have been earned with pass/fail grade s , nor more than 20 percent overall. Applicants whose academic record contain a larger percentage of pass/fail credits must submit suitable additional evidence that they possess the required scholastic ability. If the applicant does not submit satisfactory additional evidence he or s h e can be admitted only as a provisional student. PROVISI O N AL DEGREE STUDENTS Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. With the concurrence of the dean of the Graduate School a department may admit provisional students fo; a probationary term, which may not normally exceed one academic year . At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program . Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University . Provisional degree students are required to main tain a 3.0 grade-point or higher, as may be required by the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken whether or not it is to be applied toward the degree sought. If students fail to maintain such a standard of performance , they will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School. Applicatio n Procedures Graduate students who expect to study at UCD should contact the UCD Office of the Graduate School concerning procedures for forwarding com pleted applications. An applicant for admission must present a com pleted Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the UCD Graduate School office, and two official transcripts from each university at tended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application processing fee of $20 (check or money order) when the application is sub mitted. No application will b e processed unless this fee is paid . Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and most depart ments require three or four letters of recommendation. When a prospective degree student applies for ad mission, the chairman of each department or a com mittee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions and Records, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are re ferred to as special students (below). A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 60 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be re quired by the major department. Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1978-80, e.g. , fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc. , must file a completed application with the department before the an nounced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid) . All credentials presented for admission to the Uni versity of Colorado become the property of the Uni versity. SE N I ORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO A senior in this University who has satisfied the un dergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet his requirements for a bachelor ' s degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School by special permission of the dean. GRADUATE RECOR D EXA MIN ATIONS At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for assistantships, or of any student before his or her status is determined.

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Students who are applying for the fall of 1980 take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee . Four to six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institu tion. Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the Graduate School Office or the Student Relations Office at UCD, or from the Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley , California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. SPECIAL STUDENTS A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records , UCD, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colorado 80202, or to the Office of the Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Special students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted. Special students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and sup porting credentials as soon as possible. A department rhay recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours of credit toward the require ments of a master's degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a special student at the University, or any combination thereof. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit for courses taken as a special student for the semester, quarter, or summer term for which the student has applied for admission to the Graduate School, provided that the student's application was on file with the department before the beginning of the semester, quarter , or term in question . REGISTRATION Course Work and Examinations On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to the Graduate School and who expect to study in the Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registra tion procedures. Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester they must notify the department which has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at UCD in order to attend the following semester. Master's Thesis or Report Graduate students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis or M.Ed. report in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours, or for M.Ed. report for 2 semester hours. The student Graduate School I 87 may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence , but the total number of hours for all s emesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis or report. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. If the thesis or report is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has beEm submit ted.) Limitation of Registration FULL LOAD A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for not fewer than 5 semester hours in work numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours of other graduate work , or thesis. A full load for purposes of determining residence credit during the summer term is 3 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or 6 semester hours of other graduate work, or thesis. MAXIMUM LOAD No graduate student may receive graduate credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester. The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at UCD is 10 hours per 10-week summer term . TUITION AND FEES The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this bulletin. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to get from formal courses all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirements for an advanced degree. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective , and proportion. All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status. A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted in Graduate School. For the Ph.D. , a course mark below B is unsatisfac tory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.

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88 I Universit y of Colorado at Denver A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department. Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of the Graduate School. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student' s ma jor department and the dean. In case of lack of agree ment between the department and the dean or in case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee. Grading System The standing of a student in work intended for an advanced degree is to be indicated by the marks A , B , and C. A Superior, 4 credit points for each credit hour. B-Good , 3 credit points for each credit hour. C Fair , 2 credit points for each credit hour. Work receiving the lowest passing grade , D , may not be counted toward a degree , nor may it be ac cepted for the removal of deficiencies. Marks below B are not accepted for the doctoral degree. An IF or an IW grade may be given for incomplete work at the discretion of the instructor . For details, refer to the discussion of the uniform grading system . The grade of IP (in progress) will be given for contin uing thesis work and will be valid until the thesis is completed . A graduate student may repeat once a course for which he or she obtained a grade of C, D, or F upon written recommendation to the dean b y the chairman of the advisory committee and the chairman of the departm ent, provided the course has not previousl y applied toward a degre e . Graduate students may register for courses on a Pass/Fail basis; however , graduate credit will not be awarded, and such courses cannot be applied toward a graduate degree . Use of English A student who is noticeably deficient in the use and spelling of the English language may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. The satisfaction of this requirement depends not so much upon the ability to pass formal tests, although these may be demanded, as it does upon the habitual use of good English in all oral and written work. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance. Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in es timating the can didate's proficiency. MASTER'S DEGREE A student regularly admitted to the Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the degree Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degree will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met. In general, only graduates of an approved institu tion who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below . All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary ad ditional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses . The requirements stated below are minimum re quirements; additional conditions set by the depart ment will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules. Minimum Requirement The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfllled by following either Plan I or Plan ll below. Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above. Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above. Plan IT does not represent a free option for the stu dent. A candidate for the master's degree may be al lowed to select Plan ll only on the recommendation of the department concerned. Graduate Credit Graduate credit is given for courses which are listed at the 500 level or above and which are offered by those colleges or schools that are members of the Graduate School , or which have otherwise been ap proved by the dean of the Graduate School. No as surance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department. Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years. Courses taken during the fall semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate raqk if they are taught by members of the Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories: 1. Courses within the major department at the 500 level or above . 2. Courses outside the major department at any level , provided they are approved for graduate rank for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree granting program. This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 500 level or above. However , as a result, most students who include 400level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation .

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Field of Study Studies leading to a master ' s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program. Statue After a student has made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term and after he has removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise , he should con fer with his major department and request that a deci sion be made on his status. This definite status must be set by his major department before a student may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned . Language Requirements Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modem languages as each department requires. See special departmental requirements . Credit by Transfer Resident graduate work of high quality done 41. a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the depart ment concerned and approved by the dean of the Graduate School. All work accepted by transfer must come within the five-year time limit or be validated by special ex amination . The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 8 semester hours. Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in the Graduate School of this Universi t y a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to the Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. Work already applied toward a master ' s degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master ' s degree at the Univer sity of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is no t recognized. Excess undergraduate credits from another institu tion may not be transferred to the Graduate School. Seniors in this University may , however, transfer a limited amount of advanced residen t work {up to 8 semester hours) provided such work : Grad u ate Schoo l I 89 1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University. 2. Comes within the five-year time limit . 3. Has not been applied toward another degree. 4 . Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and is approved by the dean of t he Graduate School. Requests for transfer of credi t to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submittEld to the Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact the Graduate School of fice . Residency In general, the residency requirements can be met only by residence at this University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the t i me designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours of other graduate work . See Limitation of Registra t ion , Full Load, for require ments for full residence credit during the summer . A student who is noticeably deficient in his general training , or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified. Assistants and other employee s of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one yea r in fewer than four semesters. Admission to Candidacy A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master 's degree must file applica tion to the dean ' s office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be deter mined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status. . This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by a representative of both the major and minor , if any , fields of study , certifying that the student ' s work is satisfactory and that his program outlined in the application meets the requirements set in his particular case. A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation. Theela Requirements A thesis , which may be of a research , expository, critical, or creative type , is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented

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90 I University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an ad vanced degree must: 1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field . 2. Be based upon independent study and investiga tion. 3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred. 5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive-imal examination is given. 6 . Comply in mechanical features with specifica tions obtainable from the Graduate School. Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in the Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract. All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid at the Business Office when the thesis is deposited in the Graduate School. Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be ac cepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The registered credit for the sis must total a minimum of 4 or a max imum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis . Comprehenelve-Final Examlnatlona Each candidate for a master's degree is required to take a comprehensive-final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been com pleted . This examination may be given near the end of the candidate's last semester of residence while he is still taking required courses for the degree, provided he is making satisfactory progress in those courses . The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed: 1. A student must be registered when he or she takes the examination. 2. Notice of the examination must be illed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination. 3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean. 4 . The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essen tially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field . 5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments. 6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or m in o r field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fie l ds of study in this University. 7. A student who fails the comprehensive fin al ex amination may not attempt the examination a gain until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the exa mining committee has been completed. The studen t may retake the examination only once . Supplemental Examlnatlona Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given im mediately. If the student fails the supplemental ex amination, three months must elapse before it may be attempted again. Course Examination• The regular written examinations of each se m ester except the last must be taken . Course examinati ons of the last semester, which come after the c ompre hensive-imal examination has been passed , may be omitted with the consent of the instructor . Time Umlt All work, including the comprehensive -final ex amination, should be completed within five y e a rs or six successive summers. Work done earlier wil l no t be accepted for the degree unless validated by a s p ecial examination. A candidate for the master' s de gree is expected to complete his work with reasonable c o n tinuity. Deadllnea for Maater'a Degree Candldatea Expecting to Qraduate During 1878-80 Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling the Graduate School office on the Bo ulder Campus , 492-7401. 1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit. 2. Applications for admission to candidacy . Ap plications must be submitted at least 10 weeks befor e the student expects to take the comprehensive -fin a l examination. Students are urged to submit this f orm by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form m ay b e picked up in the department or in the Graduate School office . ) 3. Last day for thesis to be approved by de part ment. 4 . Last day for scheduling of comprehensive -final examination. 5. Last day for taking comprehensive-fina l ex amination . 6. Last day for filing thesis in the Gradua t e S chool. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in o rder to be accepted by the Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p . m . on the ind ic ated

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date will be graduated at the commencement follow ing that for which the deadline is indicated. Graduate Programs ANTHROPOLOGY The master's program in anthropology offers general, flexible training in anthropology along with topic al specialization and the opportunity to specialize in interdisciplinary, applied areas: medical anthropology and community and urban anthropolo gy. The medical anthropology track is intended to serve students preparing for careers and those with established careers in the health care professions and related fields. Similarly, the community and urban anthropology track is intended to serve those who seek to employ anthropological concepts and methods of community analysis in public administration, development, planning, and allied fields. Working with an advisory committee, each student will tailor an individual program of studies around courses and seminars in anthropology and allied disciplines. These programs will culminate in either a master's paper or master's thesis. A primary goal of the program is to produce graduates who are capable of understanding and proficient at resolving, in coopera tion with others, the many problems of complex soci eties ; consequent ly , a premium will be placed on interdisciplinary instruction and practical exercises in the design and implementation of research in a variety of settings. More detailed descriptions of the options available within the M.A. program may be obtained by writing to the Director of Graduate Studies, Anthropology, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th St., Denver, CO 80202. Admlealon Admission to the master's program in anthropology is open to any holder of a baccalaureate degree, not necessarily in anthropology, provided he or she meets the following requirements: (1) general requirements for admission to the Graduate School (2.75 or better grade-point average for all undergraduate studies); and (2) knowledge of the fundamentals of an thropology. Applicants will be expected to have had a general introductory course in anthropology and secondary courses in ethnology, archaeology, linguistics, and physical anthropology or be able to demonstrate a mastery of materials equivalent to that which might reasonably be expected to result from such formal training. Applicants deficient in background may be admitted on a provisional basis but will be required to make up deficiencies without graduate credit during the first year in residence. A simpler alternative, when practical, would be to remove deficiencies as a special student prior to ap plying for admission to the graduate program . In order to be considered for admission into the master's program, an applicant must submit (1) two Graduate School I 91 copies of transcripts from all undergraduate institu tions attended; (2) Graduate Record Examination scores for verbal and quantitative aptitude; and (3) at least three letters of recommendation. Evidence of previous nonacademic anthropology-oriented work or other experience will be carefully considered, as will that of special skills relevant to anthropological research . Departmental deadlines for receipt of ap plications for admission to the Graduate School , in cluding accompanying materials, is April .15 for fall entrance. Further information concerning specialization within the program, departmental admission and ad vising policies, etc., may be obtained by writing the Director of Graduate Studies in Anthropology. For general Graduate School requirements and applica tion information, see beginning of graduate section of this bulletin. Reeldency A minimum of two full semesters devoted to ad vanced study is required by the Graduate School. Stu dents working toward the master's degree in anthropology will be strongly encouraged to attain that degree within three years following matriculation into the program. Couree Houra and Dlatr1butlon A minimum of 36 semester hours of credit is re quired for the M.A. degree in anthropology. Fifteen hours of nonthesis course work must be at the 500 level or above. Course work is to be distributed as follows for students pursuing an interdisciplinary speciality within the general an thropology track, the medical anthropology track, or the community and urban anthropology track: Courses in anthropology . . . . . . . . . . 15 semester hours minimum Courses in related fields . . . . . . . . . . 15 semester hours minimum For students pursuing a subdisciplinary specialty within the general anthropology track, course work is to be distributed as follows: Courses in anthropology .......... 18 semester hours minimum Courses in related fields . . . . . . . . . . 12 semester hours minimum The remaining 6 semester hours may be met either by writing a master's thesis, for which 6 hours credit is given, or by taking 6 additional hours of course work if the student prefers to write a master's paper. Examination Each student must pass a comprehensive M.A. ex amination demonstrating mastery of the fundamental principles of anthropology. This examination will or dinarily be taken before the conclusion of the fourth semester in residence. Theele or Paper The student must either carry out an original research project and report the results in a thesis of professional quality or write a master's paper, more limited in scope, to complete the degree. A thesis

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92 I Universit y of Colorado at Denver provides a valuable opportunity to initiate or pursue important, individual research objectives . The master ' s paper is intended as a flexible alternative for students who wish to pursue in depth some issue or specialty topic without engaging in the sustained research effort on which a master ' s thesis depends. APPLIED MATHEMATICS See Mathematics Program . BASIC SCIENCE, MASTER OF Collin Hightower , Coordinator for UCD The program leading to the Master of Basic Science degree is interdisciplinary. It provides an oppor t unity for present and prospective mathematics and science professionals and others to extend and/or broaden their training in computer science, mathematics , museology, and the natural and physical sciences at advanced undergraduate and graduate level s . These professionals include public school teachers , in dustrial scientists, engineers, business persons, and others . The student may elect the mathematics , science, or museology options as described below . Wide latitude is possible in the details of a degree plan so that each student may f ollow a course of study most pertinent to their interests. The degree plan will be designed in conjunction with the student's adviser and must be approved by the execu tive committee . All course s credited toward the degree must be taken through the University of Colorado at Boulder , Colorado Springs , or Denver, over a period of five years or six successive summers. The Master of Basic Science degree is supervised by an advisory committee appointed by the dean of the Graduate School, and application should be made to the Master of Basic Science Office , Ketchum 306, University of Colorado , Boulder , regardless of the campus which the student plans to attend. Requirements for Admlnlon 1. General regulations for admission to the Graduate School apply (see Requirements for Admis sion ) . 2. A student is expected to have had at least 40 semester hours in the natural sciences and mathematics , including one year of calculus , upon ad mission . Students may be admitted to the program with a deficiency in calculus, but must remedy the deficiency within two years after admission by com pleting Math. 140-241 with a grade of C or better (or other courses in mathematical subjects on approval by the advisory committee with a grade of C or bet ter). Requirements for the Master of Basic Science Degree 1. General regulations of the Graduate School governing the award of the master's degree apply (see Master of Arts and Master of Science) except as modified below . 2. The student is required to complete 24 semester hours of University credit for the Plan I (thesis) option and 30 semester hours for the Plan II (no thesis) op tion. All of these hours shall be numbered 300 and above, and be taught by members of the graduate faculty. At least 12 of these hours shall be numbered 500 or higher, not to include thesis credit. Normally, not more than 3 hours of 500-level credit should be in dependent study . 3 . Minimum Grade-Point Average. Courses on the 300 and 400 level will be accepted toward the degree only with grades of A orB; 500and 600-level courses will be accepted toward the degree with grades of A , B , or C. The student must have a B average in all courses taken subsequent to his admission to the program , including courses not actually offered for the degree . PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Students who are not presenting a thesis for the degree must pass a final examination or prepare a paper describing a research project or other specialized study. The choice of these is at the discre tion of the Administrative Committee which also must approve the candidate's performance. THREE OPTIONS There are three basic options within the program: mathematics, museology, and science. A Plan II (no thesis) option is available in the science option. Mathematics Option 1. A reasonable degree of competence is required in the fields of analysis, algebra, and geometry. A minimum of 15 semester hours of upper division courses (300 level or above) in mathematics must be offered for the degree, including at least 3 hours of analysis , 6 hours of algebra, and 3 hours of geometry. 2. One upper division sequence of at least 6 semester hours in any of the physical or biological sciences represented in the program. With permis sion, two independent one-semester courses in the same area may be substituted for the one-year se quence. 3. Upper division electives in science, mathematics , or computer sciences, to complete an ap proved 30-semester-hour degree plan. Of these 30, twelve or more hours must be from courses numbered 500 or higher. The 30 hours may also include 3 semester hours of upper division courses or seminars in secondary school mathematics teaching, history of mathematics or science, or philosophy of mathema tics or science. Science Option 1. An upper division sequence (300 level or above) of at least 6 semester hours in each of two of the physical or biological sciences named above. With permission, two independent one-semester courses in the same area may be substituted for one of the one year sequences.

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2. Upper division electives in science , mathema tics, or computer sciences, to complete an approved degree plan . Of the total , twelve hours or more must be from courses numbered 500 or higher. The 30 hours may also include 3 semester hours of upper division courses or seminars in secondary school teaching , history of science or mathematics , or philosophy of science or mathematics. Muse o logy Option (Boulder Campus Only) 1. At least 8 but not more t han 12 semester hours of courses offered by the museum. Three to 6 semester hours of courses in the College of Business and Ad ministration of which 3 semester hours must be in the area of small business management. The total museum-business semester hours may not exceed 15. 2. An upper division sequence (300 level or above) of at least 6 semester hours in one of the departments (other than museum) represented in the program. 3 . Upper division electives in science , mathema tics , or computer science, to complete an approved 30semester hour degree plan. Of the 30 hours, at least 12 hours must be numbered 500 or above. BIOLOGY Students wishing to pursue graduate work in biol o gy should be familiar with the University of Colorado Requirements for Advanced Degrees. There are no special discipline requirements , although the prospective student must consult wit h a faculty ad viser prior to making application . The general portion of the GRE is required, and the specialty area is recommended. Applications are submitted directly to the biology graduate coordinator at UCD . The discipline offers either Plan I ( with thesis) or Plan IT (without thesis) Master of Arts degrees in en vironmental, organismic , and population biology, and Plan IT M.A. degree in biology with education. Upon admission to the program the student in consultation with an adviser will design a study program suited to the student's specific needs. There is no core of re quired courses structured into the master ' s degree program . Courses acceptable toward the master ' s degree in biology include, in addition to biology courses and subject to the approval of the adviser , any appropriate 400-500-, and 600-level courses offered in other disciplines or divisions of the University . It should be noted that the student may have to complete some courses at the Boulder or Medical Center campuses . In conjunction with the College of Engineering and Applied Science an interdisciplinary program has been developed with a major in environmental science. The program offers several subject concen t ra tions within both basic and applied environmental science . Included within the basic approach are con centrations in ecology , earth s cience , populat i on studies, and physics-chemistry. Included within the applied approach are concentrations in conservation of natural resources, systems analy sis, and en vironmental quality control. Graduate School I 93 Students i nterested in this program should contact the Graduate Representative for Biology , Professor Daniel Chiras. CHEMIST R Y The M.S. degree is offered at UCD in any one of the following basic fields: analytical , bio-, i norganic, organic, or physical chemistry. Additionally, problems involving application of chemical knowledge to the problems of our environment are en couraged. The M.S. program is available to both fulland partt ime students . The chemistry faculty at UCD strives to ensure that students receive excellent super vision of work and advising in the graduate program. Students enrolled in the program have a good opportunity to be appointed as teaching assistants. Research activities on the part of the chemistry faculty provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain research assistantships. Degree Requirement& Two types of degrees are offered : Plan I requires 24 credit hours including 15 to 20 credit hours of formal course work, 4 to 9 credit hours in research courses, the completion of a research in vestigation, and the presentation of a thesis. Plan II requires 24 hours of formal course work and 6 credit hours of research without a thesis . Prerequisite . An undergraduate major in chemistry is desirable since all students are required to pass ex aminations covering the major fields of chemistry . The GRE (Graduate Record Examination) scores are required. Advanced chemistry GREs are recom mended. Students who plan to enroll in the graduate program must take a qualifying examination to deter mine their background and qualifications for ad vanced study in the field of chemistry . CIVIL ENGINEERING Civil engineering graduate programs at UCD are of fered through the combined departments of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering (Boulder) and Civil and Urban Engineering (Denver) . Studen t s wishing to pursue graduate work in civil engineering leading to candidacy for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees should read carefully Requirements for Advanced Degrees in this bulletin . All requirements for the M.S. and a large part of those for the Ph.D. may be completed at UCD. A pamphlet elaborating on the rules as they apply to civil engineering is available from the departmental office a t UCD. No qualifying examination is required for the M.S. degree ; however, in competition for all University fellowships , the Graduate Record Examination , con sisting of the aptitude te s ts and the advanced t es t in engineering, is used in the evaluation of candidates. Therefore , students are advised to take this examina tion prior to their arrival on campus .

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94 I University of Colorado at Denver Programs are available in the fields of transportation, water resources, hydraulics, soil mechanics, structural mechanics , and structural design. In each program, courses are selected by the stu dent (under supervision of the faculty adviser) in such a way as to meet the student's interests and the re quirements of the Graduate School. See also Master of Engineering degree. The civil engineering program has no Ph. D. tool foreign language requirement other than those communication requirements established by the Graduate School. Center for Urban Transportation Studies The Center for Urban Transportation Studies (CUTS), operating under the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering, was established: (1) to assume a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in develop ing research, research facilities, and interdisciplinary graduate programs in urban transportation; and (2) to provide a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Moun tain region, making available to outside organizations the expertise within the University. Through CUTS, the departments offer inter disciplinary graduate programs and research oppor tunities designed to develop professionals who will be capable of dealing with the complex problems of urban transportation in a competent and meaningful manner . Students in these programs are expected to reach significant levels of competence not only in urban transportation but also in at least two relevant minor areas , such as architecture , environmental design, urban planning, business management, geography, political science, public administration, sociology, computing science, and systems analysis. The Center for Urban Transportation Studies operates within the framework of the Institute for Urban and Public Policy Research at UCD. COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE Applicants are admitted to the graduate program in communication and theatre on the basis of their academic records and on recommendations. While there are no specific prerequisites beyond those re quired by the Graduate School , students admitted who are unable to offer a substantial number of semester hours of work in the area of their intended specialization or allied fields must expect that a significant number of additional courses and semester hours will be required of them in order to make up deficiencies. Every student must take a d i agnostic examination before completing 9 semester hours . For every student who declares intention to qualify for an advanced degree, an adviser and committee will be selected not later than the beginning of the student ' s second semester (or second summer term) in residence. It is the duty of this adviser and committee to assume the responsibility for (1) approving the stu dent's graduate program; and (2) evalua ti ng the student's qualifying examinatipn, thesis, and comprehensive-final examination. All master 's degree candidates are required to com plete C.T. 601 or its equivalent. At least two courses (4 to 8 hours) must be taken outside the department or outside the depar t mental area(s) of concentration. Plan I , With Thesis. After any undergraduate deficiencies have been removed, students under Plan I must normally earn 27 semester hours, of which a minimum of 16 must be earned in one major area. Four to 6 thesis credit hours may be counted toward the 27 -hour requirement. The Plan II Option without thesis is available at UCD only upon application. Courses at the 500 level or above may be applied toward the graduate degree by graduate students in communication and theatre. Some courses are available only on the Boulder Campus; inquiry should be made. The graduate courses in communication and theatre are also applicable to the Master of Humanities program at UCD . COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND SPEECH SCIENCE The graduate curriculum in communication dis orders and speech science leads to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees . The major area of emphasis at UCD is language and learning disabilities. Requirements for certification in the state of Colorado and by the American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) can be met. The program in communication disorders and speech science is accredited by ASHA . At pres ent, students must take courses on both the Denver and Boulder campuses. Prospective students should read Requirements for Advanced Degrees and request additional information from the Graduate School Office. Master's Degree The M .A. degree plan includes course work in speech pathology , language pathology, learning dis abilities , audiology , and education. Clinical and educational practicums with the communicatively disordered are required of all students. Students who do not have an undergraduate degree in the field will also be required to take courses in the basic com munication processes. Students may fulfill the Graduate School require ments for the master's degree by following Plan I or Plan IT. Doctor's Degree The Ph. D . degree plan is developed with the stu dent 's advisory committee to meet the individual in terests and needs of each student. In addition to the major sequence of courses and practicum offered in language and learning disabilities, the student must select two or three minor areas of emphasis from this

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or other departments. A sequence of courses in statistics also is required . Students must meet requirements of the Graduate School for the doctoral degree as well as 8 hours among the following courses: C . D.S.S . 795-4. Practicum ill: Clinical Supervision C . D.S.S. 796-2. Practicum IV: Clinical Administration C . D.S.S. 7972 . Practicum V : Research Coordination C . D.S.S. 798-2. Practicum VI: Classroom Instruction COMPUTER SCIENCE Under the auspices of the Computer Science Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the mathematics discipline at UCD are offering a program leading to the M.S. in com puter science. The program consists of a core of five courses required of all students and the selection of a specialty field (numerical computation, program ming languages , computer systems, management science , or signal processing) in which additional courses are taken. Students may choose the thesis option (Plan I) or the non thesis option (Plan II). Those selecting Plan I may register for 4 to 6 semester hours of credit for t'hesis research, working with a faculty adviser from the Boulder or Denver campus. Those selecting Plan II must take C.S. 701, the master's reading option, offered on the Boulder Campus. In both cases the stu dent's advisory committee usually will consist of faculty from both campuses . Admission to the program is granted by the Com puter Science Department (Boulder). Information on the program can be obtained from the department, 492-7514, the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at UCD, or Professor Roland Sweet, UCD mathematics department. ECONOMICS The M.A. degree in economics is offered at both the Denver and Boulder campuses. The requirements are the same and the examinations are offered jointly, but the emphasis and fields offered differ. The Denver program is oriented toward part-time students con cerned with urban problems or seeking to teach below university level. Persons interested in the program should contact the graduate adviser, Professor Alan Shelly. Requirement. for Adml ... on (Students not meeting these requirements may be admitted provisionally.) 1. General requirements of the Graduate School. 2. Three letters of recommendation. 3. Sixteen semester hours of economics. 4. Acceptable GRE scores. Degree Requlremente 1. Economic Theory: Econ. 507. 2. Quantitative Methods: Econ. 580 (or 480), and Econ . 581. Graduate School I 95 3. Plan I: Two fields of concentration. Each field requires 6 credit hours, but the structure is highly flexible, e.g. , one field can be an internship. Plan II: An M.A. thesis. 4. Plan I: Thirty semester hours, of which 16 must be at the 600 level (500 level if taken prior to fall 1975). Plan II: Twenty four semester hours, of which 12 must be at the 600 level (500 if taken prior to fall 1975). Thesis credit does not count toward the 12 600level hours. EDUCATION Graduate study in education at the University of Colorado is offered on three campuses (Denver, Boulder, and Colorado Springs) and through 14 program areas. All inquiries regarding programs at UCD should be directed to the Associate Dean's Of fice, School of Education, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, Colorado 80202, or to the Associate Dean of the Graduate School at UCD . A wide range of professional and academic interest is served by these programs. Programs of study can be undertaken in the following areas: Early childhood education Educational psychology Elementary education Foundations of education Guidance and counseling (elementary, secondary, and agency settings) Library media Reading Secondary education• Mathematics education Science education Graduate studies in education are offered at the M.A. (thesis and nonthesis) level. In some instances, doctoral work can be taken at UCD, but only with the prior approval of a student's adviser, and the dean's office on both the Boulder and Denver campuses. Outlines of each of the graduate programs of study are available upon request from the School of Educa tion Office at UCD. Since many of the graduate degree plans are flexible and can be designed around individual student needs, it is highly desirable that the prospective candidate discuss tentative programs of studies with appropriate faculty members prior to submitting applications. Application for Admlealon A prospective candidate should request application forms from the Associate Dean, School of Education, University of Colorado at Denver. The completed form should be returned to the Associate Dean, School of Education, UCD, together with a $20 application fee. The fee should be in the form of a check or money order payable to the University of Colorado. Two copies of official transcripts of all previous college and university study should be ordered by the applicant to be sent to the associate dean. Four recommendations on the forms provided, or by letter, should be fur nished. At least two of these should be from college or university professors who can write with assurance about the applicant's academic and professional achievement promise. One or two recommendations from supervisors or employers are acceptable with reference to an applicant's ability and contribution to

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96 I University of Colorado at Denuer with which he was or is associated. Ap phcatwn papers and all supporting documents (includin.g GRE scores or MAT scores, see below) must be m the associate dean's office on March 1 for summer, July 1 for fall , and October 1 for spring semester admission. request the Educational Testing Sel'Vlce to send therr scores on the aptitude test (ver bal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record Ex amination (GRE), or scores from the Miller's Analogy Test, to the dean's office. If an applicant has not taken the Graduate Record Examination or the Mil ler's Analogy Test, he should arrange to do so. The GRE or MAT is administered at many centers throughout the country . Information about the GRE may be obtained from the Graduate School Office the Student Relations Office at UCD, the Testing Service, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or the graduate office of a university in the applicant ' s area. Maeter'e Degree Two Master of Arts degree plans and a Master of Education plan are available , each comprising one academic year or more of graduate work beyond the bachelor's degree. The minimum residence require ment for any master's degree is one academic year or the equivalent, and it may be satisfied by two semesters in residence, or three full summer sessions, or any combination equal to two semesters. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 1. M . A. Plan I (With Thesis). The program con sists of 36 semester hours or more, including 4 semester hours for the master ' s thesis. While the in clusion of a minor field is not required by the Graduate School , a student and adviser may agree on a minor, in which 4 to 8 semester hours can be applied toward degree requirements. The M.A. thesis is written in accordance with the specifications set by the Graduate School and under the supervision of the student's adviser. When a com plete first draft is ready for fmal typing, the thesis must be read by a second reader appointed by the dean's office. If the second reader approves the thesis, both the reader and the adviser will sign it when it is presented for filing with the Graduate School. If the reader does not approve, he and the student's adviser will confer and sugge