Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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Full Text
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
AT DENVER
Undergraduate and Grai
Catalog of late Studies 19S7-S8

niversity of Colorado Bulletin
1 YEARS L


ectory of Colleges and Schools
6701 7540142
Pages
74
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
Architecture Landscape Architecture
Architecture in Urban Design Urban and Regional Planning
Interior Design
94 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Accounting
Business Administration Business Administration for Executives Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development Finance
Health Administration Health Administration Executive Program Human Resources Management
Information Systems International Business Management Management Science and Information Systems Marketing
Operations Management Quantitative Methods Real Estate
Transportation and Distribution Management
124
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Tfcacher Certification Programs
Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision Instructional Technology Counseling and Personnel Services
Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
Educational Psychology Elementary Education Foundations
Instructional Technology Corporate Instructional Development and "Raining Instructional Computing Specialist
Instructional Technologist Library Media Specialist Language and Culture Reading and Writing Research and Evaluation Methodology Secondary Education Special Education/Educationally Handicapped
152
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Mechanical Engineering Engineering, Master of
186
280
284
292
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology
Basic Science, Master of
Biology
Chemistry
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
Environmental Science, Master of Ethnic Studies Fine Arts Geography Geology
Army ROTC
Music
History
Humanities, Master of Mathematics Modem Languages Philosophy Physics
Political Science Psychology
Social Science, Master of Sociology
Technical Communication, Master of
MILITARY SCIENCE
Air Force ROTC
COLLEGE OF MUSIC
Performance Music
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Criminal Justice Public Administration
Directory of Programs and Degrees — Inside Back Cover


Legend
A/P.......School of Architecture and Planning
BA .......................... Bachelor of Arts
BFA ..................... Bachelor of Fine Arts
BS........................ Bachelor of Science
BS (CSE)...................Bachelor of Science
in Computer Science and Engineering
CB.........................College of Business
CLAS ......College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
e.................................. Emphasis
ED..........................School of Education
ED S.......................Education Specialist
ENGR ..................College of Engineering
GSBA........................Graduate School of
Business Administration
GSPA.........Graduate School of Public Affairs
m..................................... Minor
MA............................Master of Arts
M.ARCH ................Master of Architecture
MAUD Master of Architecture in Urban Design
MBA ........Master of Business Administration
MBS....................Master of Basic Science
MCJ.................Master of Criminal Justice
ME .....................Master of Engineering
MH .......................Master of Humanities
MID ...............Master of Interior Design
MLA.........Master of Landscape Architecture
MPA...........Master of Public Administration
MS .........................Master of Science
MURP . Master in Urban and Regional Planning
o ....................................Option
PH D .....................Doctor of Philosophy
XMBA ..................... Executive Master of
Business Administration
XMSHA............. Executive Master of Science
in Health Administration
Degree Programs
Accounting ................................e (CB)
Accounting ...............................MS (GSBA)
Accounting and Information Systems...........MS (GSBA)
Anthropology....................................... BA (CLAS)
Anthropology .............................MA (CLAS)
Applied Mathematics................................ BS (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics.................................MS (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics.....................PH D (ENGR)
Architecture....................................M.ARCH (A/P)
Architecture in Urban Design ...........MAUD (A/P)
Basic Science ...........................MBS (CLAS)
Bilingual Education .......................e (ED)
Biology............................................ BA (CLAS)
Biology ................................. MA (CLAS)
Biology ............................... PH D (CLAS)
Business Administration .................MBA (GSBA)
Business Administration,
Executive Program.....................XMBA (GSBA)
Chemistry.......................................... BA (CLAS)
Chemistry ................................MS (CLAS)
Civil Engineering.................................. BS (ENGR)
Civil Engineering ........................MS (ENGR)
Communication and Theatre ............... BA (CLAS)
Communication and Theatre.......................... MA (CLAS)
Communication.......................... PH D (CLAS)
Computer Science.....................................o (CLAS)
Computer Science .........................MS (ENGR)
Computer Science and Engineering .. BS (CSE) (ENGR) Corporate Instructional Development and Training ... e
Counseling and Personnel Services...................MA (ED)
Criminal Justice ........................MCJ (GSPA)
Early Childhood Education ..................MA (ED)
Economics .............................. BA (CLAS)
Economics..........................................MA (CLAS)
Education ................................. PH D (ED)
Education Specialist........................ED S (ED)
Education Technology................................e (ED)
Educational Administration ..................e (ED)
Educational Psychology......................MA (ED)
Educationally Handicapped ...................e (ED)
Electrical Engineering .................BS (ENGR)
Electrical Engineering......................MS (ENGR)
Elementary Education........................MA (ED)
Engineering ............................ME (ENGR)
English............................................BA (CLAS)
English............................................MA (CLAS)
English ................................PH D (CLAS)
English as a Second Language........................e (ED)
Entrepreneurship and
New Venture Development..........................e (CB)
Environmental Science..............................MS (CLAS)
Finance .....................................e (CB)
Finance.....................................MS (GSBA)
Fine Arts..........................................BA (CLAS)
Fine Arts..................................BFA (CLAS)
Foundations.................................MA (ED)
French .................................... BA (CLAS)
Geography ..................................BA (CLAS)
Geography..........................................MA (CLAS)
Geology............................................BA (CLAS)
German.............................................BA (CLAS)
Health Administration ..................MS (GSBA)
Health Administration,
Executive Program................XMSHA (GSBA)
History............................................BA (CLAS)
History............................................MA (CLAS)
Human Resources Management ..................e (CB)
Humanities.........................................MH (CLAS)
Industrial and Organizational
Psychology......MBA/BA (CLAS), MBA/MA (CLAS)
Infant Specialization .......................e (ED)
Information Systems .........................e (CB)
Instructional Computing Specialist ...............e
Instructional Technologist .......................e
Instructional Technology....................MA (ED)
Instructional Technology ...................PH D (ED)
Interior Design...................................MID (A/P)
International Affairs...............................m (CLAS)
International Business..............................e (CB)
Landscape Architecture ....................MLA (A/P)
Library Media Specialist ....................e (ED)
Management..........................................e (CB)
Management.........................................MS (GSBA)
Management Science and
Information Systems.............................MS (GSBA)
Marketing...........................................e (CB)
Marketing ..................................MS (GSBA)
Mathematics ................................BA (CLAS)
Mathematics........................................MA (CLAS)
Mechanical Engineering .....................BS (ENGR)
Mechanical Engineering.............................MS (ENGR)
Operations Management .......................e (CB)
Philosophy........................................ BA (CLAS)
Physics............................................BA (CLAS)
Political Science ..........................BA (CLAS)
Political Science..................................MA (CLAS)
Psychology.........................................BA (CLAS)
Psychology .................................MA (CLAS)
Public Administration .....................MPA (GSPA)
Public Administration................... PH D (GSPA)
Reading ................................... MA (ED)
Real Estate....................................e (CB)
Secondary Education ........................MA (ED)
Social Science.............................MSS (CLAS)
Sociology......................................... BA (CLAS)
Sociology ..................................MA (CLAS)
Spanish........................................... BA (CLAS)
Special Education ......................... MA (ED)
Teacher Certification Programs ..............c (ED)
Technical Communications ...................MS (CLAS)
Transportation and Distribution Management .. e (CB)
Urban and Regional Planning...............MURP (A/P)
Writing............................................BA (CLAS)


University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Denver, Colorado 80202 - 2298 Telephone — 303/556-2800
SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID
ATTHE POST OFFICE BOULDER, CO 80302
$3.50


CU-Denver is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its authorization by the Board of Regents to establish permanent educational presence within the city. Today, CU-Denver — the city's only public university — has become a leader in quality undergraduate, graduate, and professional education.
CU-Denver's new replacement facility — five stories high and totaling 250,000 square feet of space — is the largest higher education facility ever developed by the State of Colorado. Completion of the facility is expected in early 1988.


Fraternal Building
In 1957, a move was made to the former Hamway Building at 1100 14th St.
— 1,500 showed up! The C.A. Johnson Building at 509 17th St., became the first "permanent" home of the DENVER CENTER in the winter of 1939.
The DENVER EXTENSION CENTER leased the Fraternal Building, 1405 Glenarm Pl„ in 1948.
The University of Colorado had been offering special courses for Denverites since 1912, when the Extension Division was established. It was only in 1938, however, that the Denver Center was formally organized as a permanent unit of CU in Denver with an office, an administrator, and one full-time faculty member. CU expected a couple of hundred Denverites to take advantage of college credit courses


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1987-88
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 556-2800
Although this bulletin was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. CU-Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this bulletin are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
University of Colorado Bulletin.
(USPS 651-060)
262 Stadium Building, Campus Box 384, Boulder, Colorado 803(09.
Volume 1987, No. 2, May/June Published 4 times a year: March/April, May/June, August/September, January/ February.
Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Bulletin, 1100-14th St., Campus Box 167, Denver, Colorado 80202.


4 / University of Colorado at Denver
ACADEMIC CALENDAR1
Summer 19872 Summer 19882
May 27-29 June 1 July 6 August 7 Registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). End of term. June 6-10 June 13 July 4 August 5 Orientation and registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). End of term.
Fall 19872 Fall 19882
August 17-21 August 24 September 7 November 26-27 December 16 Registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). Thanksgiving holidays (no classes). End of semester. August 18-23 August 25 September 5 November 24-25 December 19 Orientation and registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). Thanksgiving holidays (no classes). End of semester.
Spring 19882 Spring 19892
January 11-15 January 18 March 21-25 May 13 Registration. First day of classes. Spring vacation (no classes). End of semester. January 16-20 January 23 March 20-24 May 19 Orientation and registration. First day of classes. Spring vacation (no classes). End of semester.
‘The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time.
2Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs (dropping and adding classes), and procedures for registration.


Chancellor / 5
Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Chancellor Glencbn F. Drake
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado's premier institutions of higher education.
Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Colorado's only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system.
As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Since 1972, enrollment has grown to approximately 10,617 students, including 5,790 undergraduates and 4,827 graduate students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University's seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff.
I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
Glendon F. Drake
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


6 / University of Colorado at Denver
ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents
CHARLES M. ABERNATHY, JR., M.D., Montrose, term expires 1988
RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992
PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1990 LYNN J. ELLINS, Longmont, term expires 1990 HUGH C. FOWLER, Denver, term expires 1988 SANDY F. KRAEMER, Colorado Springs, term expires 1988
NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1990 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term expires 1992
University-Wide Officers
E. GORDON GEE, President of the University; Professor of Law. B.A., University of Utah; J.D., Columbia University; Ed.D., Tfeacher's College, Columbia University. HUNTER RAWLINGS, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Professor of Classics. B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Princeton University.
C. WILLIAM FISCHER, Vice President for Budget and Finance; Professor Attendant Rank of Public Affairs.
B.A., Muskingum College; M.P.A., Harvard University. THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., LL.B., University of Colorado.
EDWARD W. MURROW, Tteasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado.
CU-Denver Officers
OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR
Chancellor ...................Glendon F. Drake
Special Assistant ..........Susan Guyer
Associate Director, Governmental
and External Affairs........Mary T. Cramer
Director, Public Relations and
Publications................Bob Nero
Director, Campus Affairs......Barbara O'Brien
Dean, School of Architecture and
Planning....................
Dean, College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business
Administration .............
Dean, School of Education......
Resident Dean, College of Engineering and Applied
Science ....................
Dean, College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences ...................
Acting Resident Dean, College of
Music ......................
Dean, Graduate School of Public
Affairs.....................
Director, Auraria Library......
Associate Director .........
Director, Division of Continuing
Education...................
Acting Dean, Student
Academic Services...........
Director, Academic Center
for Enrichment ...........
Director, Center for Internships and Cooperative Education Director, Educational
Opportunity Program.......
Director, Student Services and
Veterans Affairs .........
Director, Women's Resources .
Hamid Shirvani
Donald L. Stevens William F. Grady
Paul E. Bartlett
John Ostheimer
Roy Pritts
Marshall Kaplan Patricia Senn Breivik Jean F. Hemphill
William D. Boub
George H. Wayne
Kathy R. Jackson
Janet Michalski
Cecil E. Glenn
Bruce E. Williams Pamela Kesson-Craig
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance . Director, Affirmative Action .... Director, Budgets and Fiscal
Planning....................
Bursar ........................
Director, Computing Services .. Director, Financial Aid/Student
Employment .................
Director, Financial and Business
Services ...................
Acting Director, Personnel
Services ...................
Director, Student Administrative Services .....................
FINANCE
Jeffrey W. Konzak George Autobee
Julie Tbrres Norman Chandler George E. Funkey
Ellie Miller
Kenneth E. Herman
Phillip H. Becker
George L. Burnham
DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Vice Chancellor for Academic
Affairs.....................John S. Haller, Jr.
Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Dean,
The Graduate School.......David W. Greenfield
Acting Assistant Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs .......Thomas A. Clark
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities ....................Femie Baca
DIVISION OF PLANNING Acting Vice Chancellor for
Planning....................Bruce W. Bergland
Director, Institutional Research and Planning...................Ralph Henard
CU FOUNDATION
Vice President, CU Foundation at
Denver .....................Barbara S. Allar
Assistant Director of Alumni and Annual Fund....................Beverly Brunson


Administration t 7
Chancellor's Advisory Group
VERONICA BARELA, Executive Director NEWSED, Community Development Corporation JACQUES W. BERNIER, Manager, Personnel Administration, Aerospace Systems Program, Hughes Aircraft Company
DIANA BOULTER, President, The Denver Partnership THE HON. JEANNE FAATZ, Colorado State Representative WILLIAM W. FLETCHER, President and General Manager, Rocky Mountain News
DAVID GREENBERG, Greenberg/Baron Associates THE HON. REGIS GROFF Colorado State Senator JOHN KASSER, College Football Associates LEE LARSON, Vice President/General Manager, KOA Radio 85
FRANK NEWMAN, President, Education Commission of the States
C. NEIL NORGREN, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Butler Fixture Company
THOMAS PECHT, Publisher, Denver Business Journal BRUCE ROCKWELL, Executive Director, The Colorado Thist HERRICK ROTH, President, Herrick Roth Associates ROBERT SCANLAN, Regional Manager, Coldwell Banker BILL SCHEITLER, President of the City Council, Denver GAIL SCHOETTLER, Colorado State Tfeasurer JEROME SERACUSE, Fellow, American Institute of Architects
TOM STRICKLAND, Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber & Madden KEN TONNING, Vice President/General Manager, KUSA-TV, CH 9
BEN TRUJILLO, President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
SOLOMON TRUJILLO, Colorado Vice President and Chief
Executive Officer, Mountain Bell
CLAIR VILLANO, Director, Consumer Fraud Division
THE HON. WILMA WEBB, Colorado State Representative
MICHAEL R. WISE, Chairman of the Board, Silverado
Banking
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means "Let your light shine."
According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the "morning of life," and the scroll represents written language.


8 / University of Colorado at Denver
Table of Contents
Contents Page
Academic Calendars................................... 4
Message from the Chancellor.......................... 5
Administration of the University
and of the CU-Denver Campus ...................... 6
Chancellor's Advisory Group ......................... 7
The University ..................................... 11
History ............................................ 11
Academic Structure .............................. 11-12
Academic Programs................................... 12
Accreditation....................................... 13
Memberships ........................................ 13
General Information.............................. 11-53
Weekend University.......................... 13, 53
Student Organizations .............................. 13
Faculty............................................. 14
Auraria Higher Education Center..................... 16
Affirmative Action ................................. 17
Research ........................................... 17
Centers and Institutes for
Research, Service, and Training .............. 17-23
Admission Policies and Procedures................ 25-31
Undergraduate Admission Information .......... 25-29,31
Freshmen Requirements............................ 25-27
Transfer Students ............................... 27-28
Former Students..................................... 28
International Students ............................. 28
Graduate Admission.................................. 29
Tfests .......................................... 26-27
Tuition and Fees ................................ 32-34
Residency Classification............................ 34
Financial Aid.................................... 34-39
Registration..................................... 39-40
Academic Policies and Regulations ............... 41-45
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act ..................................... 44
Student Services ................................ 45-49
Student Conduct Policies and Standards .......... 45-46
Educational Opportunity Program .................... 47
Testing Center...................................... 48
Veterans Affairs ................................... 48
Women's Resources ................................. 48
Student Government ................................. 49
Special Programs and Facilities ................. 49-53
Alumni Association.................................. 49
Book Center ........................................ 49
Computing Services.................................. 51
Division of Continuing Education............ 51-52
Development Program................................. 52
International Education.......................... 52-53
Contents Page
Library Services............................... 54-57
Media and Telecommunications...................... 56
Architecture and Planning Library................. 57
The Graduate School ........................... 58-71
Degrees Offered ............................... 59-60
Financial Aid ................................. 60-61
Admission Requirements ........................ 61-63
Registration...................................... 63
Requirements for Advanced Degrees.............. 63-64
Campus Map .................................... 72-73
School of Architecture and Planning ........... 74-93
Architecture .................................. 77-81
Interior Design ............................... 81-84
Landscape Architecture ........................ 84-87
Urban and Regional Planning ................... 87-90
Urban Design .................................. 90-92
Center for Community Development and Design .................................. 92-93
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business
Administration............................. 94-123
Accounting................................... 103-107
Business Administration ..................... 107-109
Business Law .................................... 109
Entrepreneurship and New Venture
Development................................... 110
Finance ..................................... 110-112
Health Administration........................ 112-115
Human Resources Management ...................... 115
Information Systems ......................... 115-117
Information Systems, Management
Science and .............................. 115-116
Insurance ....................................... 117
International Business........................... 117
Management .................................. 117-119
Management Science............................... 119
Marketing.................................... 119-121
Operations Management........................ 121-122
Quantitative Methods ............................ 122
Real Estate ................................. 122-123
Transportation and Distribution
Management ................................... 123
School of Education ......................... 124-151
Teacher Certification Programs............... 127-128
Administration, Curriculum, and
Supervision............................... 128-131
Counseling and Personnel Service............. 131-133
Early Childhood Education and Early
Childhood Special Education .............. 133-135
Educational Psychology....................... 135-136


Contents / 9
Contents
Elementary Education...............
Foundations .. ....................
Instructional Technology...........
Language and Cjulture .............
Reading and Writing................
Research and Evaluation Methodology
Secondary Education................
Special Education/Educationally Handicapped |.....................
College of Engineering and Applied Science...................
Applied Mathematics................
Civil Engineering..................
Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science ...............
Mechanical Engineering.............
Engineering — Non-Departmental ...
Master of Engineering..............
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Anthropology.......................
Master of Basic Science............
Biology ......|....................
Chemistry..........................
Communication and Theatre .........
Economics_____[....................
English ...........................
Master of Environmental Science ....
Ethnic Studies.....................
Fine Arts.....\....................
Geography .........................
Page
136-138
138- 139
139- 143 144-146 146-148
148
148-150
150-151
152-185
163-165
165-169
169-179
179-183
183-184
184
186-279
199-203
203- 204
204- 208 208-211 211-217 217-222 222-228
228
228-231
231-234
234-236
Contents Page
Geology....................................... 236-239
History ...................................... 239-244
Master of Humanities ......................... 244-245
Mathematics .................................. 246-255
Modern Languages .................L........ 255-260
Philosophy ................................... 260-262
Physics....................................... 263-264
Political Science ............................ 264-269
Psychology ................................... 269-272
Master of Social Science ..................... 272-274
Sociology..................................... 274-278
Master of Technical Communication............. 278-279
Military Science.................
Army ROTC .......................
Air Force ROTC ..................
College of Music ................
Music.......J....................
Performance Music ...............
Graduate School of Public Affairs
The Centers......................
Master of Public Administration__
Doctor of Philosophy, Public
Administration................
Master of Criminal Justice.......
Faculty Roster...................
Index ...........................
Application Form.................
Degree Programs .................
.... 280-283
.... 281
.... 282-283
.... 284-291
.... 288-290
.... 290-291
.... 292-305
.... 296
.... 297-299
.... 299-303
.... 303-305
.... 306-319
.... 321-324
.... 325-326
Inside back cover




General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver is one of the most important educational resources in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in the University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields and graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, educational administration, and education technology. Doctoral studies also are available in engineering and other fields in cooperation with CU-Boulder. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and in CU-Denver's Weekend University.
Students' ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 27. TVvo-thirds hold full-time jobs and 53 percent attend part time. Sixty-five percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels.
CU-Denver's faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and advantages of the urban environment and responsible to the needs of students and the community. The combination of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine "real world" experience with academic excellence.
History
Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876. In 1912, the University of Colorado's Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver, to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree-granting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado -Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969,23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver's current site. And in this same year the Denver "Center" was renamed CU-Denver. IWo years later the University of Colorado was reorganized
into four campuses — Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 22,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,500 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver's role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system.
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System — Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver—has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources across campuses, the System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters. A system-wide Faculty Council is the major component of faculty governance. It is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver, as well, has its own faculty governance structure. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. Three Vice Chancellors assist the Chancellor in the fields of Academic Affairs, Administration and Finance, and Planning and Enrollment Management. Each of these


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Vice Chancellors is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs acts in the absence of the Chancellor, sets the highest standards in teaching, research, and service, and oversees all academic units, The Graduate School, the library, research administration, continuing education, and student services. Nine academic support programs are overseen by the Dean of Student Services: Counselor Training, Testing, Educational Opportunities Program, Student Activities, the Women's Resource Center, Veterans Affairs, Center for Academic Enrichment, Legal Services, and Internships and Cooperative Education. Senior Citizens' programs also are available. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance manages admissions, student records, financial aid, computing services, and the campus budget. The Vice Chancellor for Planning oversees the ongoing process of strategic planning for campus initiatives. One element of this process is "enrollment management." Such management addresses the development and the implementation of a comprehensive strategy to promote the campus, build appropriate academic programs, and ensure an effective relationship with prospective and current students, and with graduates of CU-Denver. An Office of Public Relations reports directly to the Chancellor and assists in orchestrating all promotional efforts and the external affairs of the campus.
The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU-System counterpart. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. But, with the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Adminstration School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Music Graduate School of Public Affairs
These units now accommodate over 10,500 students — nearly half as large as CU-Boulder itself— taught by about 300 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they've only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed
entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges admit freshmen and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher certification. The Graduate School offers master's programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. And CU-Denver faculty also participate in a few other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
For a complete account of bachelor's and master's degree programs offered by CU-Denver, see the listing of degree programs on the inside back cover of this bulletin. The college and school sections of this bulletin describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. Not only has the academic reach extended to nights and weekends, but a significant new center for advanced studies is under way at Greenwood Plaza in the southern area of the metropolitan region. New, highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region's economy. And centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are generating important practical solutions to some of Colorado's and the nation's most


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serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. Through history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver — an urban campus — is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move. Join us and share in an exciting adventure in learning.
The Weekend University
The Spring 1987 semester was the first term of CU-Denver's Weekend University. The Weekend University course offerings are part of the regular academic program at CU-Denver. Students who apply for admission to the Weekend University are also eligible to take CU-Denver classes which meet during the week. All CU-Denver students may choose to take Weekend University classes. Weekend University courses appear in the Schedule of Classes and are open for registration by mail.
Accreditation and Memberships
ACCREDITATION
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration American Society of Landscape Architects American Planning Association National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Architectural Accrediting Board See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this bulletin for the programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and "technology National Association of Schools of Music National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
MEMBERSHIPS
Listed below are the organizations affiliated with the various divisions and departments at CU-Denver:
School of Architecture and Planning
American Institute of Architects American Institute of Planners American Institute of Certified Planners American Society of Landscape Architects American Society of Interior Designers Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Council of Landscape Architecture Educators
College of Business and Administration The Economic Club of Colorado
School of Education Colorado Principals Center
National Educational Renewal Projects-Partnerships
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Colorado Minority Engineering Association Associated Engineering Students American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society of Women Engineers
Graduate School of Public Affairs
American Society for Public Administration National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management
Pi Alpha Alpha, Public Affairs Honorary Association
Western Executive Seminar Center
Metro Air Quality Council
Institute for Nonprofit Organization Management
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Denver Natural History Museum
Denver Art Museum
Mesa Verde National Park
Denver Zoological Garden
Denver Public School System
Colorado Chapter of the American Chemical Society
Psi Chi
College of Music
Colorado Choir, Inc.
Sigma Alpha Iota
Continuing Education
Rocky Mountain Chapter of Chartered Life Underwriters Colorado Chapter: Purchasing Management Association Colorado Department of Labor and Employment League of Women Voters
Student Academic Services
Alpha Kappa Delta American Planning Association Venture Network Apartheid Awareness Group Associated Engineering Students
Big Mountain Support Group Central American Support Alliance
Chinese Student Association Delta Sigma Phi Entrepreneur's Club Fine Arts Club Geology Club Green Coalition Thu Beta Phi Iranian Cultural Club Mexico Information Committee
Musicians Association Phi Chi Theta Pre-Law Club Second Stage
Society of Women Engineers Venture Network Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Vietnamese Students Association American Marketing Association
American Society of Civil Engineers
Amnesty International Associated Black Students Auraria Peace Council Black Student Planners Association Chemistry Club Deezine Club Economics Club Etta Kappa Nu Forensics Ibam Golden Key National Honor Society
Health Careers Club International Christian Fellowship MBA Association Mineral Landsmen Native American Student Organization Phi Sigma Alpha Psi Chi
Sigma Alpha Iota Sociology Club


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FACULTY
About 300 highly qualified faculty members teach full-time at CU-Denver; well over four in five have doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student.
Research Award Winners for 1986-87
Gerald Audesirk, Biology — tor significant research and sizable grants in the area of neurobiology and effects of trace metals on nervous system functioning.
Mark Foster, History — in recognition of his books, American Itansportation and The Denver Bears, a history of Denver's minor league baseball team.
William Fowler, Music — for his series of textbooks on piano pedagogy and the importance of visualizing the keyboard before playing.
Lynn Johnson, Civil Engineering — in recognition of research on "Microcomputer Programs for Pavement Drainage" and "Flash Flood Forecasting," and for the sizeable grants he received for these projects.
Yuk Lee, Urban and Regional Planning — in recognition of his consistently high level of research productivity. His research covers urban spatial analysis, urban economic retail locational analysis, spatial cognition, urban planning, and mathematical and quantitative analysis.
Norma Livo, Education — for two decades of tremendous creativity, productivity, and community involvement in her field. She has helped revive storytelling through books and articles she has written, conferences organized, hundreds of school presentations, and through her own masterful storytelling.

Eric Poole, Criminal Justice — for his phenomenal research and publication record. A nationally recognized scholar, he has published more than 40 research articles and continues to publish an average of one article every two months.
John Ruhnka, Business — for his published work on ventures capital, financing of new ventures, SEC regulation of financial markets, and corporate disclosure. Recently he wrote articles on corporate disclosure for The Harvard Business Review and Securities Regulation Law Journal.
Ruth Thorne-Thomsen, Fine Arts — in recognition of her national reputation for photography exhibits. In the last two years her outstanding work has been displayed in major cities in the U.S.


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Teachers of the Year —1986-87
Peter Bryant (left), Associate Professor of Management Science and Information Systems. Since joining the CU-Denver faculty in 1981, Professor Bryant has taught undergraduate, graduate, and Executive MBA courses in the College of Business. He is currently area coordinator for Management Science and Information Systems.
Laura Goodwin (center), Associate Professor of Education, specializes in teaching and research related to statistics, research methods, and evaluation. She is very productive in research and writing, and presently coordinates the Educational Psychology program. Professor Goodwin came to CU-Denver in 1983 from the CU Health Sciences Center.
John Mays (right), Professor of Civil Engineering, joined CU-Denver in 1967. As a structural engineer, he teaches an array of classes which are not only technical but remarkably well received. His classroom is characterized by orderly presentations and superior support materials including innovative computer-based approaches.


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Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student center, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver's past — historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli has been newly renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment.


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Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Title IX
CU-Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and in employment. In pursuance of this policy, no Denver campus department, unit, discipline, or employee shall discriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees.
The institution's educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject to the provisions of the Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vietnam-Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, and Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.
A CU-Denver Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity program has been established to implement this policy. For information about these provisions on equity, discrimination, or fairness contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1250 14th St., Suite 740, 556-2509.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research of its faculty. It is equally supportive of the other creative endeavors of its faculties in the arts, humanities, and design fields. These achievements not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver's service to the community at large.
An important thrust in research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is the multidisciplinary and applied. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its position within a thriving metropolitan area serves, as well, as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines. These, of course, are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study, with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. Funded research is a major priority at CU-Denver. During 1985-86, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $3,600,380 for research, training, and public service programs. All
signs point to a steady increase in funded research in the years ahead at CU-Denver. And the benefits for the campus will be substantial. Such research assists in sustaining scholarly discourse, enables faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provides the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhances the education of students. Many students actively participate in research activities overseen by faculty members.
Current externally funded projects address such diverse topics as these: novel mechanisms in aqueous coal liquefaction; educational assistance to public schools, cities, counties, and local governments; training in health administration; education and applied research programs for field-based service in rural Colorado settings; minority business development and technical assistance; development of curricula which use instructional video for teaching science to high school students; preparation of personnel to provide special education and related services to newborn and infant handicapped children; flash flood forecasting using radar sensing of rainfall; quantitative relationships for sporangiophore growth of phycomyces; a cellular analysis of lead effects on the nervous system; a pale-oecological investigation of the Minturn Formation; acidification status of Colorado lakes; and algebraic multigrid and the fast adaptive composite multigrid method in large scale computation. Perspectives on public works decision making and provision of administrative and technical services in support of metropolitan air quality are additional externally funded activities. Much research, of course, goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publication, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities.
Many members of our faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the campus, and establish the credibility of its faculty and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
School of Architecture and Planning
CENTER FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN
The Center for Community Development and Design is the research, community service, and the student field studies division of the School of Architecture and Planning. Building upon two decades of experience, the Center believes that the creative, synthetic processes of design and planning can reach appropriate solutions to community and environmental problems through active involvement of citizens and applied research. As the outreach unit of the School, the Center responds to and


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initiates a variety of opportunities for research and educationally-oriented public service projects for faculty, staff, and students.
In undertaking project work, the Center organizes interdisciplinary research and assistance teams, capable of addressing complex policy, planning, design, and development problems and needs of Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West. Over one hundred requests for assistance and new research projects are handled annually. Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West provide a dynamic learning laboratory for applied research and service in such areas as economic development, housing policy, neighborhood and small town planning, participatory design, park and open space design, and urban design. The Center offers field study opportunities in both urban neighborhoods and in rural communities.
Scope of Work
Solving urban and rural problems in the Rocky Mountain West means confronting both high plains semi-arid conditions and the fragile alpine environment. The sensitive development of human settlement in harmony with this delicate natural environment is an overarching goal of the School. This goal is realized through pragmatic service and applied research projects. Faculty and student research and assistance teams have conducted projects in such areas as:
Commercial Revitalization. The Center assists small and medium size towns, urban neighborhoods, and municipal agencies in developing comprehensive economic development plans for older commercial districts and downtown business areas. Working with community and merchant organizations, the Center helps develop public-private resources to implement strategic plans for the long-term diversification of local economies. Center staff assist twelve to fifteen communities a year, identify their unique competitive opportunities, develop design guidelines, prepare financing packages, provide designs for strategic parcels of land, and evaluate the success of the projects.
Housing Policy. In an era of fundamental shifts, policies have drastically reduced resources for housing — especially for low and moderate income citizens. The Center has undertaken several research initiatives, to affect housing policies for those groups. The Center works with housing agencies to assess current conditions and to conduct research on and development of new policies and programs. Based on its research and work with constituent groups, the Center was instructional in convincing city leaders to develop an $11 million Housing TTust Fund for Denver, developing city policies and plans to eliminate homelessness, and is currently engaged in research to evaluate and modify private lending practices in inner-city neighborhoods, and housing needs assessment for the disabled.
Rural Community Assistance. The Rocky Mountain West is overwhelmingly rural in character and is often described as "the boom or bust" center of the United States because of the historic instability of mineral and
natural resources industries. Rural communities are pursuing opportunities for economic diversification in the hope of leveling out the "peaks and valleys" of their economies. In response to this need, the School of Architecture and Planning has teamed with the Colorado State Department of Local Affairs and with Mountain Bell Corporation to form Colorado Initiatives.
This program's purpose is to assist rural Colorado counties and municipalities in developing sound community economic strategies that improve local conditions. Each year ten communities are selected for specialized technical research and financial planning assistance. In addition to this targeted assistance, the School works with other rural communities in a more broad based, developmental way on a variety of local issues. For example, the town of Burlington, Colorado, requested assistance with a site plan for an old town museum. This one project led to six other projects over a two-year period in the town of 3,500 people: a site design for a 190-acre industrial park, a market study for the Old Tbwn, a design for the town entrance and unified public signage system, and a main street revitalization study. These projects have culminated in a regional economic base study for the surrounding four-county area.
Minority Business Development. In responding to one of Denver's and Colorado Springs' urgent inner-city needs, the Center has developed a program to strengthen minority and women-owned businesses. This program is designed to improve their access to capital and provide better goods and services to inner-city neighborhoods. As these businesses become stronger, they hold the potential for creating new jobs for inner-city residents. Five corporations, three government agencies, two nonprofit corporations, and the School provide support to this program which is operated and managed by the Center. Seventy-five individual businesses obtain management and technical assistance, loan packaging, market research, or assistance for building renovation each year.
School of Education
THE COLORADO PARTNERSHIP FOR EDUCATIONAL RENEWAL
The Colorado Partnership for Educational Renewal consists of the University of Colorado System, Metropolitan State College, and several Colorado School districts. The basic purpose of the Partnership is to stimulate change in the K-12 public school system and simultaneously in the education of educators. Serving as equal partners, the University and School have a stake in and responsibility for public school improvements, just as the public schools have a like interest in and responsibility for the education of those who staff the schools. More specifically, The Colorado Partnership seeks solutions to persistent "hard rock" issues such as minority achievement, at-risk youth, dropouts, teacher education, the common curriculum, research and evaluation, and educational leadership. Contact Lance V. Wright, Executive Director, for more information.


COLORADO PRINCIPALS' CENTER: ORIGIN AND DESCRIPTION
During Sumjner 1985, a group of Colorado principals spent ten days it the Harvard Principals' Center Summer Institute. Their experience was so positive and renewing, that they returned home with the question: "Why not a principal^ center in Colorado?" Several key people and two institutions responded to the question.
The University of Colorado at Denver's School of Education, headed by Dean Bill Grady, and the Colorado Association of School Executives(CASE), headed by Dr. Gerald Difford, formed a partnership to develop the idea into a reality. A planning luncheon was attended by principals and other school executives. Several superintendents agreed to enter the partnership by contributing funds for center development. Thus began the Colorado Principals' Center.
The primary mission of the Colorado Principals' Center is to enable principals to shape their professional intellectual development. Activities related to this mission include topical seminars, panel discussions, roundtable discussions, and ongoing special interest groups.
Tbpical seminars feature individual presenters (primarily principals) who provide information on promising or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and opportunities for participant interaction. Panel discussions highlight current "high-relevance" topics, with panel and participant interaction in formal and informal settings. Special interest groups facilitate exploration of relevant problems, and issues through brainstorming and idea sharing during a series of meetings. The opportunity for reflective writing is a major feature of Center events.
The Center also focuses on conducting and disseminating research. Current plans include the initiation of two research projects, one of which will assess the needs and expectations principals want their Center to meet. The other project will study the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership. Newsletters feature periodic current research abstracts.
Graduate students are hired by the Center as research assistants. Additionally, graduate students in the School of Education carrying 9 semester hours or more, or enrolled as administrative interns, are offered student membership at no cost.
In addition to part-time research assistants, Center staff includes an executive director who is also an assistant professor, and a secretary, both shared with the Department Of Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision.
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Lance Wright (left) directs The Colorado Principals’ Center which provides inservice education for principals and other school site managers. William Grady (center), dean of education, visits a workshop.


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STORYTELLING CONFERENCE
The School of Education sponsors an annual Storytelling Conference. Presenters include poets, artists, and yamspinners from throughout the U.S. In its 11th year, the conference draws local school teachers as well as interested persons from the general public.
YOU, ME AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECT
This project in the School of Education is based on a curriculum of science, technology, and society that is being implemented by an instructional television series. Its purpose is to help students become effective citizens in our highly developed technological society. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.
Currently five programs, with the appropriate teaching materials and transparency masters, are available nationally from the Agency for Instructional Technology. The remaining seven programs are on schedule in design, production, and evaluation. A national team of highly competent educators, scientists, engineers, and television producers are contributing skills to assure a high quality of accomplishment for the project.
High school students are tested after viewing an instructional television program produced by the You, Me and Technology Project.
Minaruth Galey, director of the national You, Me and Technology Project, introduces an instructional television program to high school students.


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College of Engineering and Applied Science
CENTER FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION STUDIES
The Center for Urban Transportation Studies (CUTS) has as its responsibility:
1. Tb assume a leading role in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation.
2. Tb provide a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region, making available to outside organizations the expertise within the University.
CUTS is interested in helping to optimize the quality of human life by concentration on research, service, and education in the transportation sector of society. Particularly, CUTS is desirous of improving the movement of people and goods so as to provide enhanced safety, economy, efficiency, and overall amenity.
Administratively, the Center (CUTS) is a part of the Department of Civil Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The director of CUTS is a civil engineering faculty member representing the transportation engineering and planning disciplines.
Recent and current research include investigations of
(1) the relationship between rutting of asphalt pavements and truck tire pressures, and (2) the performance of a new type of urban interchange in order to improve its design from the standpoint of safety and capacity. Service activities have involved workshops and short courses to help advance the state-of-the-practice relative to the state-of-the-art in transportation engineering.
As an element of the University, the fundamental thrust of CUTS is, and properly must remain, educational. The Center's emphasis is the broad field of transportation, and includes both urban and non-urban aspects of transportation. Since transportation concerns itself with the safe, efficient, and environmentally responsible movement of people and goods, it either directly or indirectly affects all citizens and many facets of their day-to-day living. This breadth necessarily involves most of the disciplines within the University. The need for better trained researchers and practitioners in all of the transportation related disciplines is clearly evident. CUTS provides “hands-on" experience within the traditional University structure, offering an opportunity for students through research and service activities which emphasize these otherwise unavailable learning opportunities. These activities take place under conditions of competent supervision that ensure the provision of sound advice and research results to those served by CUTS.
LAND INFORMATION SYSTEMS GROUP
A Land Information Systems Group (LISG) has been formed at CU-Denver to provide opportunity for faculty and students to pursue interests in this multidisciplinary subject area. Housed in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the LISG is headed by Lynn Johnson, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering.
The objectives of the LISG are to facilitate the educational, research, and public service mission of CU-Denver in the subject areas of computer-aided planning and design, water resources planning, land records systems, geoprocessing and geographic information systems, facilities management and mapping, computer-aid design, and related legal and policy issues.
LISG is multidisciplinary and provides an avenue for individuals to participate together on research and development projects, curriculum development, and to share hardware and software resources. For further information contact Professor Johnson at 556-2739 or 556-2871.
The Graduate School
CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
The Center for Environmental Sciences conducts basic and applied research which focuses on understanding and providing solutions for environmental issues. The Center reports to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of The Graduate School. The Center typically organizes faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students into interdisciplinary teams to study environmental concerns of interest to the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado, and the Rocky Mountain Region. Typical projects in the past have involved studies of pollution resulting from oil shale production, coal mining, and uranium tailings. These projects have been funded by federal agencies, industry, and private foundations.
In recent years the Center has had a major program dealing with acid rain. The Center has a state-of-the-art analytical chemistry laboratory. The Center has also been at the forefront in the application of artificial intelligence methods to the interpretation of large environmental databases. Approximately fifteen CU-Denver faculty from ten different departments (and three colleges) have participated in Center projects. In addition, more than thirty faculty from other campuses of the University of Colorado, as well as other universities in Colorado, New Mexico, and South Dakota, have participated in these projects which have provided opportunities for theses and jobs to numerous students.
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN RHETORIC
The Center for Research in Rhetoric began in 1984 for the purpose of conducting original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived. The Center engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. The interdisciplinary nature of the Center draws on the diverse strengths and unique perspectives of individuals from various disciplines in the University.


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Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office.
COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS GROUP
A particularly strong Computational Mathematics Group has made CU-Denver a regional center for computational mathematics with a national and international reputation. Mathematics clinics investigate contemporary societal issues through the application of mathematical concepts to specific problems. Other research includes the development of fast algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations on super computers, the analysis and development of combinatorial algorithms used in scheduling artificial intelligence, and the applications of discrete mathematics to problems in ecology, engineering, and computer science.


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Graduate School of Public Affairs
THE CENTERS
In just a few short years, The Center for Public Private Sector Cooperation and The Center for the Improvement of Public Management have emerged as a highly effective force in helping to identify and solve some of Colorado's and the Rocky Mountain West's most pressing problems.
Under the auspices of the Graduate School of Public Affairs, The Centers have taken a leadership role in a wide range of public policy arenas.
Dean Marshall Kaplan, head of the Graduate School of Public Affairs, established The Centers in 1981. The idea was to create a center that would take an active, hands-on approach to solving community, state, and regional problems, provide academic enrichment for students and faculty — and get results. The Centers are accomplishing these goals — and will continue to do so.
Founded with the support of the Piton and Gates Foundations, The Centers are nonprofit units of the Graduate School of Public Affairs. They have a staff of skilled professionals who are supplemented by faculty and students. The Centers' Advisory Board consists of 32 distinguished university, public, and private sector leaders who help guide the activities and counsel the staff of each center.
THE CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
The underlying idea of this Center is simple — the better our public officials are trained, the better will be the quality of life for all residents of the Rocky Mountain Region.
This Center focuses on management training and career development for public officials. It provides exceptional educational and leadership programs that were not available in the Rocky Mountain West until the Center was established.
At the heart of the Center's activities is the highly successful Rocky Mountain Program, an intensive 10-day training seminar conducted twice yearly for mid- to upper-level public managers. Some of the nation's most distinguished scholars, public administrators, and consultants lead workshops and discussion groups. The program relies on case studies and on developing practical, effective approaches to deal with real-world problems confronting public managers.
The Centers fulfill the desire of the Graduate School of Public Affairs to take an innovative, highly active part in strengthening the abilities of business, nonprofit organizations, community groups, and governments to deal with the complex problems of today's society.
While they work together on many projects, each center has its own mission.
THE CENTER FOR PUBLIC-PRIVATE SECTOR COOPERATION
This Center specializes in bringing together people from the private, public, and nonprofit sectors in cooperative efforts to address the state's and region's needs in
areas such as housing, growth management, air pollution, public finance, social services, and capital investment. It serves as a catalyst for forging bonds between leaders with common interests but different constituencies.
As one respected businessman noted, the Center has helped build bridges of understanding and cooperation between governments and business.
The Center helps organizations build skills in the areas of strategic planning, economic development, program management, financing, leadership training, public participation, concensus building, and conflict resolution. The Center has had a direct, major impact on improving life throughout Colorado.
National Veterans Training Institute
CU-Denver, working in cooperation with Colorado's Department of Labor and Employment, houses the nation's first National Veterans Training Institute. The program provides skills development training to approximately 1,200 veterans' employment representatives and employees of the Disabled Veterans Outreach program. The program indirectly serves veterans, with an increased emphasis on improving the quality and quantity of services for disabled veterans.
The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor Veterans Employment and TLaming Service (VETS).




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ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver RO. Box 1469 Denver, CO 80201-1469 (303) 556-2660
General Policies
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment, as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success.
CU-Denver reserves the right to deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs unavailable at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major.
Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students
RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES
Undergraduate Fall Spring Summer
Students 1986 1987 1987
New Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Transfer Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Former University of Colorado Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Intrauniversity j
Transfer Students 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
International Students
Undergraduate: July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Graduate: May 29 Oct. 30 March 12
The University reserves the right to change docu-ments/credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660. For an applicant to
be considered for a specific term, ALL documents required for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions by the DEADLINE for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. Hansfer students are reminded that sufficient time should be allowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previously, and foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
New freshmen may apply for admission to the College of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Music.
General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Applicants who are high school graduates should have completed a minimum of 15 units of acceptable secondary school (grades 9-12) academic credit. Students applying for admission to the Colleges of Engineering and Business must have completed a minimum of 16 units of acceptable secondary school credit. A unit of credit is one year of high school course work. The other undergraduate colleges have the following requirements:
College of Business and Administration
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly recommended) .......................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one
year of geometry) ...................................4
Natural sciences (laboratory type)......................2
Social sciences (including history) ....................2
Foreign language (both units in a single language) .....2
Electives ............................................. 2
(Additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.)
Total 16
College of Engineering and Applied Science1
English (literature, composition, grammar) ...........4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra ........................J..................2
Geometry ......................................... 1
Additional mathematics (trigonometry
recommended)......................................1
Natural sciences (physics and chemistry recommended) .. 2
'See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this bulletin for more specific information, and for new high school requirements effective Fall 1988.


26 / General Information
Social studies and humanities
(Foreign languages and additional units of English,
history, and literature are included)..................3
Electives ............................................... 3
Tbtal 16
College of Music
English ..................................................3
Theoretical music............................
Physical science.............................
Social science........................................... 8
Foreign language.............................
Mathematics..................................
Additional high school academic units ..................._4
Tbtal 15
All students are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. TVvo years of piano training are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Music, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Academic Units......................................15
Tbtal 15
Beginning in the Fall Semester 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado will be required to meet the following University-wide minimum academic preparation: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language. The University of Colorado at Denver will require units of credits indicated in the following chart:
College (total units) English Mathe- matics Natural Science Social Science Foreign Languagee Other
Business (16) 4a 4 3C 2 2 F
Engineering (16) 4 4b 3d 2 2 1*
Liberal Arts and Sciences (14) 4 3 3 2 2
Music (15) 4 3 3 2 2 lh
a Includes two years of composition and one year of oral communications.
b Includes at least two years of algebra, one year of geometry, and one year of college preparatory mathematics such as trigonometry, analytical geometry, or elementary functions.
c Includes two years of a laboratory science.
d Includes one year of physics and one year of chemistry-
e All units must be in a single foreign language.
f One year of academic elective (not including high school business
courses).
s One year of academic elective. h One year in the arts.
All applicants who meet the above requirements are classified in two ways for admission purposes:
1. Preferred consideration is given to applicants who rank in the top 40% of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT); however, business and engineering applicants are expected to have strong mathematics and science background, higher class rank and higher test scores. Music applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.
2. Applicants who rank in the lower 60% of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit are reviewed on an individual basis.
Tb be considered for admission, applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an average standard GED score of 45 with no score below 36 on any section of the test. Applicants who complete the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test also must submit scores from Test VI, “English as a Second Language."
How to Apply
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official.
4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to send a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and to request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code R-4875). High school students may obtain information about when and where these tests are administered by contacting their counselors.


General Information / 27
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver to receive scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. Complete a Request for Additional Score Report at test centers or from the offices listed below.
Registration Department
American College Testing Program (ACT)
RO. Box 414
Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
RO. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717). International students must submit proof of language proficiency.
Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Music. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the College of Music for audition information (556-2727).
2. College of Business and Administration. Tb be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but With a 3.2 5 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is availably. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be denied admission to the College of Business and referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration.
No applicant will be accepted with less than a 2.0 GPA in all college level course work attempted. Similarly, no applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
3. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will still be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are (1) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
How to Apply
1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 nonrefundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
Liberal arts and music applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
ALL engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/ SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modem foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Transfer of College-Level Credit
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the


28 / General Information
Office of Admissions and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions can be applied to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken Pass/Fail are transferred when a grade of C or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept up to 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Music requires that 56 of the hours needed for graduation be completed in residence. This total may be reduced by the faculty on the basis of excellent work done at CU-Denver and high scholarship exhibited at institutions previously attended. In no case shall the minimum be fewer than 40 hours distributed over three semesters.
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Former students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student Receipt of Documents deadlines. This requires payment of the $30 non-refundable application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver,
Admissions Processing, P.O. Box 1469, Denver, CO 80201-1469.
Students who last attended less than one year ago but attended another college or university during the interim are required to pay a $30 transfer application fee. Tfan-scripts must be requested by the student and sent by the registrar of the other institution(s) to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, RO. Box 1469, Denver, CO 80201-1469.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Den-ver's schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Information about requirements for each college and school can be found in this bulletin.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of I-20's.
Fall Spring Summer
1987 1988 1988
Undergraduates:
July 22 December 1 May 3
Graduates:
May 29 October 30 March 12
Graduate. International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an
undergraduate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. Applications are available from The Graduate School. Application and credentials should be received by The Graduate School six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degree-seeking status. They may attend summer terms as a non-degree student. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms.
CU-DENVER INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intrauniversity Tlansfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are


General Information / 29
made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applications and deadline information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying.
HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
High school juniors and seniors with proven academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (303-556-2660).
Admission of Graduate Degree Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following:
Programs in Business
Office of Graduate Studies
Graduate School of Business Administration
623-4436
Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-2755
Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 556-2825
All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
As a principal part of its mission, CU-Denver offers graduate and professional-level programs and during the 1986-1987 academic year, approximately 45 percent of the student body was enrolled at the graduate level.
Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schools and colleges (School of Education, College of Engineering and Applied Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of Music), and outside The Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Architecture and Planning and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. The particular admission and graduation requirements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections of this bulletin.
GRADUATE ADMISSDN REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES
Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specific requirements of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this bulletin as well as the college or school sections for requirements and deadlines for specific programs.
Admission of Non-Degree Students
Persons who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree may be admitted as non-degree students. In general, correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each school/ college limits the number of semester hours transferable toward a degree program. Students should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the acceptable number of hours which may be taken as a non-degree student.
Undergraduate. CU-Denver will enroll persons without an undergraduate degree as non-degree students, but applicants are encouraged to apply to an undergraduate program rather than to apply as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Non-degree students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 at CU-Denver.
Note: International students are not admitted as nondegree students, except for summer terms.
Graduate. Students with the baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who have attained the degree or credential status they want, but who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before entering a specific program.
Non-degree students should be aware that generally only a limited number of course credits taken by a nondegree student may be applied toward a degree program at CU-Denver.
Tb permit continuing registration as a non-degree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained.
Note: International students are not admitted as nondegree students, except for summer terms.
HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION
Tb apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office


30 / General Information
of Admissions. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $10' nonrefundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
CHANGING STATUS FROM NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Non-degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program, with the approval of the dean. Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the fall semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.)
Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate degree program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program.
Official Notification of Admission
Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions on a Statement of Admission Eligibility Form. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not
receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after submitting application materials should contact the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660.
Tentative Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. Registration for subsequent terms will be denied when documents have not been received.
‘Subject to change


u NDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION1-2-3
Type of Applicant; Criteria for Admission1 Required Credentials When to Apply Notes
FRESHMAN (Student seeking bachelor's degree who has never attended a collegiate institution) IN GENERAL: a) Ranks in top 40 % of high school graduating class. b) Has 15 units of acceptable high school work. c) Tfcst scores: ACT comp: 23 Complete application $30 application fee Official high school transcript showing rank-in-class, date of graduation, 7th semester grades, 8th semester courses Official ACT or SAT score report. Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Seniors who meet or exceed all admission criteria may apply as early as Oct. 1 for following fall. For specific requirements refer to the college sections of this bulletin. For example, Music requires an audition.
Note: Business and i SAT comb: 1000 Engineering applicants are expected to have higher test scores, class rank, and number of academic units.
TRANSFER (Student seeking a bachelor's degree who has attended a collegiate institution other than CU) IN GENERAL: Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants must have minimum 2.0 GPA on all work attempted. Business and Engineering applicants will be required to have a higher GPA. Complete application $30 application fee TVvo official transcripts sent from each college attended. Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Liberal Arts and Music transfers with fewer than 12 sem. hrs. of college work. Business transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs., and Engineering transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs. must also submit all freshman credentials.
NON-DEGREE (Student who is not seeking a degree at this institution) Must be high school graduate or have a G.E.D. Complete application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications will also be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Non-degree students who have earned a baccalaureate degree should see Graduate School section for additional information.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Returning non-degree and or degree student who has not attended another institu tion since CU) Must be in good standing Former student application Not later than:3 July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Will be admitted to their previous major unless a new major is requested. Students under academic suspension in certain schools or colleges at the University of Colorado may enroll during the summer terms to improve their grade-point averages.
FORMER CU STUDENT (Degree student who has attended another institution since attending CU) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee TVvo offiical transcripts from each intervening college Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
CHANGE OF STATUS: NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE (CU non-degree student who wishes to enter a degree program) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee CU transcript Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications will be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Must meet the same criteria as transfer student.
CHANGE OF STATUS: DEGREE TO NON-DEGREE (Former CU degree student who has graduated and wishes to take additional work) Must have completed degree Non-degree student application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Only students who have completed and received degrees are eligible to change to non-degree status.
INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER (Student who has been enrolled on one CU campus and wishes to take courses on another) Must be in good standing Former student application Transfer to Denver, not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Transfer from Denver: refer to the bulletin for other campus. Transfers from Denver to another campus of CU should refer to the bulletin of the campus to which they are applying for additional requirements. Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER (Students who wish to change from one CU college to another, e.g., from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the College of Business) Same as for transfer. Must be a continuing student enrolled on the campus to which you are applying. Intrauniversity transfer application CU transcript 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
‘Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary. 2Foreign students should see International Students in the Admissions section of this bulletin. Preferred deadline.


32 / General Information
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1986-87 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
Other Fees1
1. Student Activity Fee (required for all students):
Fall semester 1986 ................$ 12.00
Spring semester 1987 ..............$ 12.00
Summer term 1987 .................. $ 8.00
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required for all students):
Each term.......................... $ 19.00
3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable
fee required of all students each term) $ 3.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term for
all new students): ................$ 15.00
This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student's first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts.
5. Health Insurance Fee (optional):
Fall semester...................... $ 64.50
Spring semester (includes summer) $109.00
Summer term only................... $ 44.50
Students who wish health insurance coverage must complete and submit a request card with the Bursar's Office before the end of the drop/add period.
The insurance program primarily subsidizes major medical expenses according to the schedule of benefits stated in the insurance brochure, which may be obtained from the Office of Student Academic Services. Dependent coverage (spouse and/or children) also is available at an additional charge. Further information on health insurance is available from the Office of Student Academic Services, 556-2861.
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment.
7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master's degree is completed. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as "Candidate for Degree." Students enrolled only as "Candidate for Degree" pay $97 in the Graduate School of Business, $87 in the
College of Engineering and the Graduate School of Public Affairs, $74 in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and $77 for all other programs.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit ................. $ 20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
9. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses):
Music fee......................... $ 24.00
College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term.
10. Reinstatement fee: Students must pay a reinstatement fee in addition to the original balance and interest before they may register for classes again or receive grades for completed work.
Reinstatement fee................. $ 25.00
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Arrangements may be made through the Bursar's Office at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an additional service charge of $15.
Audit
Tb qualify as an auditor for Fall or Spring Semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The
'Subject to change.


FALL 1986 AND SPRING 1987 TUITION
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES AND THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree (SO)
Credit hours Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 54 $ 246
2 108 492
3 162 738
4 216 984
5 270 1,230
6 324 1,476
7 378 2,455
8 432 2,455
9 486 2,455
10-15 each credit 543 2,455
hour over 15 54 246
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences and in non-Denver campus programs: Nursing, Medicine, Law, etc.
Credit hours Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 74 $ 258
2 148 516
3 222 774
4 296 1,032
5 370 1,290
6 444 1,548
7 518 2,584
8 592 2,584
9 666 2,584
10-15 741 2,584
each credit
hour over 15 74 258
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College
of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs
Credit hours Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 87 $ 270
2 174 540
3 261 810
4 348 1,080
5 435 1,350
6 522 1,620
7 609 2,703
8 696 2,703
9 783 2,703
10-15 873 2,703
each credit
hour over 15 87 270
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.
Credit hours Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 64 $ 256
2 128 512
3 192 768
4 256 1,024
5 320 1,280
6 384 1,536
7 448 2,555
8 512 2,555
9 576 2,555
10-15 643 2,555
each credit hour over 15 64 256
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Education, (except Education Administration) the School of
Architecture and Planning, the College of degree graduate students (SW) Music, and non-
Credit hours Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 77 $ 258
2 154 516
3 231 774
4 308 1,032
5 385 1,290
6 462 1,548
7 539 2,584
8 616 2,584
9 693 2,584
10-15 773 2,584
each credit
hour over 15 77 258
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with p rograms in the
Graduate School of Business Administration and Education
Administration
Credit hours Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 97 $ 270
2 194 540
3 291 810
4 388 1,080
5 485 1,350
6 582 1,620
7 679 2,703
8 776 2,703
9 873 2,703
10-15 972 2,703
each credit
hour over 15 97 270
Graduate degree students who are registered as "candidate
for degree" will be assessed the corresponding resident tui-
tion for one credit hour plus the Student Information System fee.


34 / General Information
Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor's cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the Fall or Spring Semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Ihition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor's parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado begins the day subsequent connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one's 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student's tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as non-resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition the Office of Admissions and Records for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted no later than two weeks before the first day of classes of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident so that the classification will be determined prior to registration and payment of fees. It is preferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Record-Office after they have registered, before the end of the drop/add period. At that time the student's bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as nonresidents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
The financial aid program is designed to assist those students who would be unable to attend the University without assistance. Whereas the primary responsibility for meeting the costs of education rests with the individual students and their families, financial aid funds are offered to supplement whatever funds students and their families can provide. Because requests generally exceed the availablity of funds, students and their families should be aware of procedures and deadlines in order to
'A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.


General Information / 35
receive maximum consideration. Questions and requests for forms should be directed to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment at CU-Denver, Central Classroom Building, Room 105, 556-2886.
Estimated Expenses
Educational expenses at CU-Denver include tuition, fees, and the cost of books and related instructional materials. Students who do not live with their parents also must include the cost of housing and food expenses. All students should consider transportation and personal expenditures (i.e., clothing, entertainment, etc.) in determining their expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment establishes standard budgets for different types of students (dependent students living at home with parents, single students living away from home, married students, etc.) to bring about consistency and equity in determining the financial needs of all students. The standard budgets are established in line with parameters set by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the U.S. Department of Education.
For the 1986-87 academic year the standard budgets allowed $255 per month living allowance for dependent students living at home, $565 per month for single students not living at home, and $845 per month for married students. An allowance of $170 per month was added per dependent child in the student's home. The living allowance included amounts for rent, food, utilities, personal expenses, and transportation. The approximate fulltime cost of tuition, fees, and medical expenses for the 1986-87 academic year was $1,272 for a resident student and $5,115 for a non-resident student. Books and supplies were estimated at $400 for the 1986-87 academic year.
All expenses will increase slightly for the 1987-88 academic year. The State of Colorado and the Board of Regents usually set tuition guidelines and rates during the month of June for the summer and academic year. The standards for living allowances usually are set during the spring semester for the following summer and academic year.
Students who have additional costs above the standard allowances can request a review of their situation by the Financial Aid Committee. The committee must receive documentation of extra expenses and can consider an individual exception to the standard allowances. Examples of these kinds of exceptions are babysitting, medical, dental, and optical expenses.
Determination of Financial Need and Award
Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of attendance as defined by the institution (tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and essential incidental expenses) and total resources available to the student. These resources include family contribution (summer savings, term
earnings, a spouse contribution, and a parental contribution) and awards from agencies outside the University.
The family contribution is determined by a national uniform needs analysis system administered by agencies such as the American College Testing Program. This system analyzes income and assets, family size, number of children in post-secondary education, student independence, etc., to determine a reasonable student and/or family contribution.
After the financial need is determined and complete application materials have been received, students are ranked in order of financial need and are aided accordingly until all funds are committed. The financial aid package normally consists of a self-help component (loans and/or employment) and a gift aid component (grants) proportionate to the available funds and to the number of needy students applying. A small portion of Colorado work-study funds is available to interested students who do not document financial need.
How to Apply
Application forms may be obtained by contacting the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Students are asked to complete an institutional application and a need analysis form. The application includes a checklist of other documents to be submitted.
Parents are expected to contribute toward a student's educational costs. However, in certain cases students


36 / General Information
may be considered financially independent of their parents. The need analysis form includes a complete explanation of self-supporting status.
Note: Requirements for receiving aid as a self-supporting student are subject to change by the federal and state governments.
Self-supporting students must document their status by providing income tax forms or other supporting documents to show sufficient income to be self-supporting during the appropriate period of time. In some cases, additional documentation from parents is required to complete a student's application. The information provided on the application for financial aid is analyzed according to the uniform needs analysis formula to determine the student's ability to contribute his or her educational costs during the academic year.
lb be eligible for financial aid, students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents or have a refugee visa. Eligible foreign students are advised to include a photocopy of their visa cards with their applications to facilitate processing. In addition, students who are required to register for the draft through Selective Service must be registered in order to be eligible for federal financial aid. All students must sign a Statement of Selective Service Registration Compliance, and proof of registration may be required.
Application and Completion Dates
A student may apply for a Pell Grant at any time up to May 1988. GSL, PLUS, and Supplemental Student Loan applications must be submitted approximately 55 days before the end of the academic term of the loan period. Other aid is offered on a first-come, first-served basis to needy students who have complete applications on file with the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Students should begin the application process by February 1, 1987, and all materials should be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment and forms processed by ACT and the Pell Grant contractor by April 1987. In every case, the aid offered depends upon the student showing financial need and hinds being available.
Special Note: An application for financial aid does not constitute an application for admission to the University. Please contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions and Records for application forms and procedures. Applicants will not receive financial aid until they are enrolled in a degree program at the University. Non-degree students are not eligible for most financial aid.
Types of Aid Available
The following information is subject to change by state and federal law and regulation.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Colorado Scholarships. Colorado Scholars Awards provide funds for resident undergraduate students and
are funded by the State of Colorado. Information and application materials are available in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Regents Scholarships. Regents Scholarships, funded by the State of Colorado, provide tuition and regular student fees to new resident undergraduate students (freshmen and transfers). The CU-Denver Office of Admissions and Records should be contacted for further information.
Deans Scholarships. Deans Scholarships, funded by the State of Colorado, provide funds for resident undergraduate students. Contact your dean's office for further information.
GRANTS
Pell Grant. The Pell Grant is a source of federal grant aid for which all students pursuing their first undergraduate degree may apply. Application can be made by submitting the Family Financial Statement or the separate Federal Student Aid Application. Applications can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Grant amounts vary depending on financial need, costs at the institution, and Congressional allocation.
Colorado Student Grant. The Colorado Student Grant is an undergraduate grant for Colorado residents. This grant is based on financial need and funds are allotted to the University by the State of Colorado. Amounts vary from approximately $100 to $1,000 per year. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are undergraduate federal grants varying in amounts from $100 to $2,000 per year. These grants are based on student need and availability of funds. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University application, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents.
Colorado Student Incentive Grant. This is the name given in Colorado to the federal program known as State Student Incentive Grant. The program is for Colorado residents seeking their first undergraduate degree and who show substantial financial need. Awards range from $100 to $2,000 per year and are funded one-half by the State of Colorado and one-half by the federal government. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University application, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents.
Graduate Grant. Grants for graduate students are available on a limited basis and will be awarded to students as eligibility and funds allow. Application is made by submitting the University application, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents. The award is funded by the State of Colorado.
Graduate Fellowships. Grants for graduate students are awarded based upon academic merit. Contact your graduate department for more information.
LOANS
Colorado Guaranteed Student Loan Program. The primary purpose of this program is to make low-interest,


General Information / 37
long-term loans available to students to help them meet their post secondary educational expenses. The student first must obtain an application from a participating lending institution or the Colorado Guaranteed Student Loan Program office. Some lenders provide the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment with a supply of application forms. Arrangements for repayment must be made within four months after graduation or other termination of at least half-time studies. The student must contact the lender to arrange a repayment schedule. The interest rate under this plan is limited to 8 percent per annum simple interest for first-time borrowers (for previous borrowers,; the interest rate will be 7 or 9 percent). In return for its guarantee of a student's loan, CGSLP requires the student to pay in advance a guarantee fee equal to one percent per annum on the outstanding principal balance to cover the anticipated in-school period plus a six-month grace period and a 5 percent (of the original principal amount) origination fee.
A financial nqed test must be done by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. If the student shows financial need, then the student is eligible to borrow the loan. All students should complete the need analysis form and submit it along with the regular Guaranteed Student Loan application, the University GSL application, and copies of family tax returns to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
The maximum a freshman or sophomore undergraduate student may borrow is $2,625 a year. A junior or senior undergraduate may borrow up to $4,000 per year. A graduate or professional student may borrow up to $7,500 a year. The total that may be borrowed for undergraduate study is $17,250. The total for all undergraduate and graduate study is $54,750. The government pays the interest on loans until the repayment period begins, six months after the student ceases to be at least a half-time student. Repayment is usually at the rate of $50 per month and cannot exceed ten years.
Carl Perkins Goan Program (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The Carl Perkins Loan is a federal loan available to undergraduate and graduate students with financial need. A student may borrow up to (a) $4,500 during the freshman and sophomore years; (b) $9,000 total for undergraduate study; (c) $18,000 total for graduate and undergraduate study. Application for the loan is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid, the Family Financial Statement (FFS), and other required documents. Interest and payment on the loan are deferred while the borrower is enrolled on at least a half-time basis at an approved institution of higher education. Interest at 5 percent per year begins to accrue 9 months after the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student. Repayment is due at that time usually at the rate of $50 per month plus interest, and cannot exceed 10 years.
Parents Loans to Undergraduate Students. This type of loan allows parents to borrow funds for their dependent children. Repayment begins 60 days after disbursement, at 12% interest. Parents of dependent undergraduate students may borrow up to $4,000 per year. PLUS loan borrowers must pay an insurance premium of up to 1%
of the total loan, collected in advance. Refinancing at lower interest rates may be possible.
Colorado Alternative Student Loan Program (CASL). This loan program allows students to borrow up to $7,000 per academic year for educational expenses and it also permits other individuals, such as parents, other relatives, or close friends, to borrow on behalf of the student. The borrower must have sufficient income and credit to qualify to be eligible for CASL. The interest rate will probably be less than 13% per year and will be specified at the time private funds are committed for this loan program. Monthly repayment of interest begins immediately and continues for up to four years if the student continues to be enrolled in college. Loan principal repayment begins 120 days after the student ceases enrollment and the entire loan must be repaid within ten years. The student must be pursuing a degree at CU-Denver in order to be eligible for CASL, but there is no minimum number of credit hours required. The program is funded by private funds and is managed by the Colorado Student Loan Program.
Supplemental Loans. Students who do not qualify for Guaranteed Student Loan may borrow through the Supplemental Loan Program. Students may apply for up to $4,000 per year with a cumulative limit of $20,000. Beginning with new or refinanced loans made on or after July 1, 1987, the interest rate for both PLUS and Supplemental Loans will be variable, set annually at
3.75 percent above the T-Bill rate with a 12 percent cap.
EMPLOYMENT
College Work-Study Program. The College Work-Study Program is designed to provide jobs to undergraduate and graduate students. The program is funded by the federal government and the State of Colorado. Employment is arranged whenever possible in the student's major area of interest, with job opportunities both on- and off-campus. Students are permitted to choose their own job from the eligible positions posted. Awards average up to $2,800 per academic year. For details contact the Office of Student Employment. Application for this aid is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents. Students and employers in the Work-Study Program are expected to assume responsibilities considered normal in an employee-employer relationship.
Part-time Student Employment. The Auraria Student Assistance Center, Career Planning and Placement Office, and the CU-Denver Office of Student Employment assist students in obtaining part-time employment other than that based on financial need. Further information and/or application may be obtained from these offices.
OTHER SOURCES OF AID
See the Office of Financial Aid for details of these programs:


38 / General Information
Bureau of Indian Affairs. Grants are available to Native American students.
Short-ltrm Loans. Small, temporary loans are made to students facing financial emergencies. These loans are to be repaid during the semester.
Advantage Scholarship. CU-Denver funded this special program during 1986-87 for the first time. The program is designed to provide special services to minorities or first generation college students, including financial aid counseling, admissions assistance, academic advising, part-time employment on-campus, and tuition assistance if no other grant or scholarship is available. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for application materials and information.
Academic Requirements
Students receiving financial aid must demonstrate that they are maintaining satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. The satisfactory academic progress standards have three sections: 1) A student must complete a minimum number of hours compared to hours attempted each term by obtaining a grade of D or better if undergraduate, or a grade of C or better if graduate; 2) A student must maintain a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 for undergraduates and 3.0 for graduates; and 3) A student is eligible for financial aid only until a certain number of credit hours have been earned. Students should obtain a complete copy of the CU-Denver Satisfactory Progress Policy from the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment to determine their eligibility for financial aid. Colorado Scholars, Regents Scholars, Deans Scholars, Pell Grant, Guaranteed Student Loan, Supplemental Loan, Advantage Scholarship, and PLUS loans may be received by students who are enrolled at least halftime. Other aid may be received only by fulltime students.
Duration of Aid
Financial aid is offered for one year at a time. Students must reapply for summer and for each academic year, according to the established priority dates.
Use of Funds
All financial aid awards are to be used only for immediate educational expenses. These expenses include tuition, fees, books, supplies, room and board, transportation, and essential miscellaneous expenses, such as clothing, medical, etc.
Refunds
The University tuition refund policy is published in the Schedule of Classes for each term. For the Fall 1986 Semester, the policy for refunds upon complete withdrawal from the University was 100% tuition and refundable fees minus $25 refund if the student withdrew
before the term began, 75% of tuition and refundable fees if the student withdrew by the third day of the third week of classes, and 50% of tuition and refundable fees if the student withdrew by the fourth week of classes. Students receiving financial aid may be required to return any refund to the University's financial aid accounts.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Students have certain rights and responsibilities regarding financial aid and student employment. Students may review applicable policies and procedures in the CU-Denver Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Specific application procedures and policies are subject to change.
Further Information and Application Forms
Further information and application forms may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, Central Classroom Building, Room 105, on the Auraria campus, or by writing to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 Fourteenth Street, Campus Box 125, Denver, Colorado 80202. Persons in the Denver metropolitan area are encouraged to visit the office to receive application forms and information. Peer counselors and


General Information / 39
University counselors are available to discuss individual situations and aid eligibility.
REGISTRATION
school dean's office. In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the course. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course:
Level of Courses Student Classification
Selecting a Program and Courses
Students should review the following sections of this bulletin that describe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information.
Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes, published several weeks before registration. These are available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning a program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration.
Graduate students should contact their graduate program for assistance.
Course Scheduling and Abbreviations
For information on scheduling courses, students are encouraged to contact an advisor through their college or
100 Freshman
200 Sophomore
300 Junior
400 Senior
500 Graduate students or qualified seniors
who have the instructor's or dean's permission
600 Master and Ph.D. graduate students
700 Master's thesis
800 Doctor's thesis
900 Independent study
The Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 400 and 500 levels. However, the evaluation and requirements for students enrolled at the graduate (500) level will be different than those enrolled at the undergraduate (400) level. It should be expected that work at the graduate level would involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the undergraduate level.
The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/ recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a student


40 / General Information
enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 15-week term. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions.
Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are:
Coreq. — Corequisite His. — Hours Lab. — Laboratory Led. — Lecture
Prer. — Prerequisite Rec. — Recitation Sem. — Semester Wk. — Week
for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. CCD courses are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must contact the Office of Admissions and Records on their own campus.
Thus, the description of CHEM. 106-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit which is divided into 3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit. Further, the student must have completed CHEM. 103 (the prerequisite) before enrolling.
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the Fall and Spring Semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation, conducted by the Office of the Dean of Student Academic Services and the various schools and colleges, introduces the academic programs, activities, and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and on degree requirements also is provided.
Registration
CU-Denver conducts common registration in cooperation with Metropolitan State College. Registration involves the following processes: (1) mail registration,
(2) walk-in registration, and (3) course adjustment (drop/add).
Students eligible for mail registration who choose to take advantage of this process may register and pay tuition and fees by mail. A walk-in registration will be available for students who do not wish to, or are not eligible to, register by mail.
For complete instructions, students should refer to the Schedule of Classes published at the beginning of each semester and summer term.
Course Loads
Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. The student should obtain the dean's signature on the Registration Form or Course Change Form during Walk-in Registration.
Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed:
Employed 40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week: 5-8 semester hours
20-29 hours per week: 7-11 semester hours
10-19 hours per week: 9-15 semester hours
Students must weigh their capabilities against the demands of each course.
DEFINITION OF FULL- AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING
Undergraduates: Full time: Half time 12 or more semester units 6 or more semester units
Graduates: Full time: Halftime: 8 or more hours 4 or more hours
Summer
Undergraduates: Full time: Halftime: 8 or more semester units 4 or more semester units
Graduates: Full time: Half time: 5 or more hours 3 hours
POOLED COURSES
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College. CU-Denver students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes. CU-Denver students are expected to take at least half their hours in CU-Denver courses each term.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll for courses offered by the various campuses of the Community College of Denver. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver
CCD courses are not considered for full- or half-time status. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
SHORT-TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Tbpics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.


General Information / 41
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit
Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses! in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. By passing an examination, the student will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student's formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores Of 3, 4, or 51 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 34 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. For more information contact your high school counselor or the Director of Admissions for CU-Denver.
Credit By Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged. Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.
College-level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. The cost for a single examination is $30. For more information call 556-2861.
Students who are interested in CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
Tb have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and procedures for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor Pass/
‘Students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science must receive scores of 4 or 5 for credit to be granted; students with scores of 3 may be considered by the department concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance.


42 / General Information
fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
A—superior/excellent—4 credit points per credit hour.
B—good/better than average—3 points per credit hour.
C—competent/average—2 credit points per hour.
D—minimum passing—1 credit point per credit hour.
F—Failing—no credit points per credit hour.
Some schools and colleges have approved use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B -I- corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B - corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors in those schools and colleges may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF — incomplete — regarded as F if not completed within one year maximum.
1W — incomplete — regarded as W if not completed within one year maximum.
IP — in progress — thesis at the graduate level only.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student's completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Students should not re-register for courses for which they have received INCOMPLETES.
Students receiving INCOMPLETES: most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to "complete" the incomplete.
P/F—pass/fail—P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor's degree.
H/P/F — honors/pass/fail — intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
Special Symbols
NC — indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
W — indicates withdrawal without credit.
Y — indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 500 level of a slash course (400/500) will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated commensurate with graduate standards as specified by the course instructor.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pass/fail basis should do so during the regular registration. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis only may be made during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester.
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register on a pass/
fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records.
5. Exception to the pass/fail regulations is permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. If you register for a course on a pass/fail basis, you may not later decide that you want a letter grade. Each school or college limits the hours and courses for which you may register on a pass/fail basis. Please note: many colleges will not accept a "P" grade for transfer credit.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades of P, NC, Y,W,IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average.
If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in The Graduate School.
The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester.
Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
GRADE REPORTS
Grade reports normally are available for students to pick up at the Information Center within two to three weeks after the end of the semester. Students must present picture identification. Grade reports are not automatically mailed; however, a self-addressed, stamped envelope may be supplied to the Records Office by individual students who wish to have their grades mailed.
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by


General Information / 43
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
16 Hours
College General Maximum Transfer Students
Only non-business electives may be taken Pass/Fail
Business and Administration Engineering and Applied Science
Graduate School Liberal Arts and Sciences
Music
Required courses may not be taken Pass/Fail. Courses must be designated by major department: students without major not eligible; recommended maximum — one course/ semester.
Not applicable toward degree
May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester.
Only non-music electives may be taken Pass/Fail. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester.
Includes courses taken in the honors program
Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL. 100 Proficiency Test or MATH. 100 Test.
Includes courses taken in the honors program
Maximum of 1 semester hour of Pass/Fail for every 8 semester hours completed and passed at the University
Maximum of 1 semester hour of Pass/Fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semester hours taken in the college.
May not be used by students graduating with only 30 semester hours taken at the University
mail from the University of Colorado at Boulder, Records Office, Campus Box B-7, Transcript Section, Regent Administrative Center 125, Boulder, CO 80309. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately five weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following;
1. Student's full name (include maiden or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term.
6. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student."
7. Student's signature. (This is the student's authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions cannot be furnished. These transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution.
Adding and Dropping Courses1
ADDING COURSES
Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (7 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available.
DROPPING COURSES
1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the dropped courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor's signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student's permanent record
â– For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate term.


44 / General Information
with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an Fgrade. No adjustment of tuition is made for courses which are dropped after the 12th day (8th day for the summer term) of full-term classes.
3. After the 10th week of a fall or spring semester (7th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student's control. In addition to the instructor's certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses. Tuition will be charged even though the drop is allowed.
4. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form.
Withdrawal from the University
lb withdraw from the University, the student must obtain approval of the dean's office, Bursar's Office, and Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student's permanent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student's permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran's benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term.
lb withdraw from the University, a graduate student must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
For specific signatures, requirements, and tuition adjustment the student should refer to the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons' ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Inspection of Educational Records
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designated to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Art. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
A directory of records, listing all educational records maintained on students by this institution, may be found in the Office of Admissions and Records on each campus.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree (s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. lb withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in each and every term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records.
Students must request each term to have directory information withheld for that term. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld for that term, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Art may be referred to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Good Standing
lb remain in good standing within a particular school or college, an undergraduate student must maintain a grade-point average of at least 2.0 (C) in all course work attempted. A graduate degree student must maintain a grade-point average of at least 3.0. Non-degree students must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.0. Policies on academic probation, suspension, and dismissal vary by college or school, and students should


General Information / 45
refer to sections of this bulletin dealing with the colleges and schools for information.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed:
Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90 + hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Student Indebtedness
A student with overdue financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to graduate, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or credit from the University. Transcripts will not be released for a student with an overdue financial obligation to the University.
STUDENT SERVICES
Dean of Student Academic Services
This office is responsible for providing student advocacy leadership for the Student Academic Services programs and offices. It also serves as a liaison with student government, provides CU-Denver representation in Auraria-shared student services, and coordinates orientation programs for new students, commencement, the Senior Citizens Program, the Ahlin Fund for disabled students, and student research programs. The office telephone is 556-8427.
The Dean of Student Academic Services office protects student rights and responsibilities by administering the Standards of Student Conduct. When a student enrolls in the University, he or she agrees to participate meaningfully in the life of the University and to share in the obligation to preserve and promote his or her rights as a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or to tolerate any infringement on the rights of others. Copies of the standards and information regarding all student grievance procedures may be obtained in the Student Academic Services office.
Student Conduct Policies and Standards
Students should thoroughly familiarize themselves with the academic and nonacademic student conduct standards of the University. Academic standards questions should be directed to the dean of the school or
college in which the student is enrolled. Nonacademic conduct questions should be directed to the Office of the Dean of Student Academic Services.
Your enrollment in the University is voluntary. When you were admitted, you became responsible for appropriate performance and behavior as defined and described in this document. As a member of the University community, you are held accountable for civil and criminal laws as well as University Standards. Enrollment in the University does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws.
You are accountable to both civil and University authorities for arts which constitute violations of laws as well as violations of University rules and regulations. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the ground that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates standards as defined within this document and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Standards of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The following guidelines attempt to balance your needs and the needs of the University. If you are found in violation of one of the Standards of Conduct, one of the University's primary interests will be to help you avoid further inappropriate behavior and become a responsible member of the university community. However, if you fail to correct inappropriate behavior, or if you violate one of these Standards of Conduct, the University will consider taking disciplinary action that may, in some cases, lead to your suspension or permanent expulsion from the University. The behavior outlined below will not be tolerated because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education


46 / General Information
Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands on, treating with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature.
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to defraud.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the private property of students, university officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the term firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Off Campus: physical abuse of any person, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person, or conduct which interferes with the public or private rights of citizens, when it is determined that the continued presence of the student would clearly constitute a threat or danger to the CU-Denver/Auraria community.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the redress of grievances. For additional information, students shall refer to the University of Colorado Students' Rights and Responsibilities Regarding Standards of Conduct, Discipline and Review.
Student Activities
The Office of Student Activities is the coordinating and resource center for student government, clubs,
organizations, student programs, Greek social organizations, and academic honor societies. All student fee expenditures are monitored to assure that they meet all ASUCD, CU-Denver and state regulations and procedures. The Student Activities Officer also represents the Dean of Student Academic Services on a number of CU-Denver, ASUCD, and AHEC committees and maintains a good communication level with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. Student Activities is located in Room 153, Student Center, 556-3399.
Academic Center for Enrichment
The Academic Center for Enrichment is a learning assistance center that provides the following types of services to the students at the University of Colorado at Denver: (1) instruction — English-as-a-second-lan-guage and study skills courses (math, reading, writing); (2) tutorial—individualized, group, and specialized; (3) diagnostic tests — math, reading, spelling, vocabulary, study skills, and composition; (4) counseling coordination —personal, career, and academic; (5) workshops — college survival skills and study skills; and (6) peer advocacy.
Services are available to all students including returning veterans, first generation college participants, teenagers, ethnic minorities, recipients of financial aid, physically handicapped, and working people.
GRE and GMAT review courses are coordinated with the Division of Continuing Education. The center also operates an ethnic library from which students may borrow books for reports or leisure reading. For information call 556-2802.
Center for Internships and Cooperative Education
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education provides students with an opportunity to supplement


General Information / 47
their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences or internships related to their academic studies. The center is open to all students in the colleges and schools of CU-Denver who have completed their freshman year and have maintained a grade-point average of at least 2.5. Students are placed either as paid Coop trainees or volunteer Co-op interns with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in positions that complement their academic course work. Co-op students can work full time by alternating semesters of work with semesters of full-time school, or they can work part time year around. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Music award academic credit at the 398 level for a Co-op or internship experience. Students placed by the center in paid or volunteer assignments, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, may be eligible to earn Co-op internship credit. For more information contact the center at 556-2892.
Counselor Training Center
Using the services of students in master's level counseling programs, help is provided to deal with personal concerns. Group meetings address topical issues and crisis counseling is available. Information and appointments can be made by contacting the center at 556-8427.
Educational Opportunity Program
The Educational Opportunity Program assists all ethnic minority students at CU-Denver. Support programs
include specialized recruiting, student advocacy, intensive counseling, tutorial services, and community outreach programs. The program is designed to provide assistance to minority students and to acquaint students with the history and culture of Asian Americans, Blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians. Student organizations provide assistance with recruitment, counseling, and tutoring; financial assistance is available through grants and the Work/Study Program. For more information call 556-8427.
Legal Services
The legal staff is available to assist the students with off-campus legal problems through such services as legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, assistance in negotiation, and referral to private attorneys at a reduced rate. The service is a free, student fee funded program; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Contact the office for further details at 556-3333, Room 255A, Student Center.
Non-degree Student Advising
All non-degree students who are undecided about a major may receive counseling about admission procedures and academic advising during orientation. See Schedule of Classes under Orientation. Non-degree students who have decided on a major should contact the
Civil engineering major at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.


48 / General Information
school or college offering that major. For information contact 556-2861.
financial aid information available. For further information contact 556-2815.
Student Health Insurance Program
A student medical hospital-surgical plan is available for all students: dependent coverage also is available at an additional charge. For further information refer to the portion on Ihition and Fees in the General Information section of this bulletin, or call 556-8427.
Testing Center
This multi-faceted assistance center provides various testing for all levels of postsecondary education, professional certification, accreditation, and academic and career planning evaluations. The center provides registration information concerning the following:
ACT American College Test
CAT California Achievement Test
CEII Colorado Educational Interest Indicator
GRE Graduate Record Examination
GMAT Graduate Management Admissions Test
GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test
MAT Miller Analogy Test
MBTI Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
TOEFL Tfest of English as a Foreign Language
CLEP College Level Examination Program
SCII Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory
For further information contact 556-2861.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs is an initial contact point for veteran-students attending CU-Denver under their veterans benefits earned while serving in the Armed Forces.
The office maintains proper certification for each veteran-student so that the Veterans Administration is assured that veterans are, in fact, pursuing specific academic programs.
In addition, the OVA provides Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, tutorial assistance, Colorado Ihition Assistance Program, and work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information contact 556-2630.
Women's Resources
CU-Denver provides female students and prospective students with programming and various resources. Services offered include on-going workshops, student advocacy, seminars, support and educational groups as well as career and personal counseling. Referral sources related to family, health, legal, and financial matters are provided. Women's Resources also offers four scholarships to women, and has extensive scholarship and
A deaf student (right) learns some finer points of volleyball from his teacher (center) and a sign language interpreter.


General Information / 49
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASUCS)
Student government serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. Thus, student activity fees pay for a legal aid program, recreational activities, women's resources, numerous student organizations, the Advocate (student newspaper), and numerous special events and activities.
Auraria Student Assistance Center
The Auraria Student Assistance Center (ASAC) is composed of five offices offering specialized assistance to all present and prospective Auraria students.
1. Office of Information and Referral Services. This is a central information source that provides objective assistance to prospective students desiring to enroll at CU-Denver or one of the other academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
2. Office of Career Planning Placement Services. Assistance is offered to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment.
3. Office of Disabled Student Services. This officer provides academic support of services to ensure programmatic access for students with disabilities.
4. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. Campus branch office of the State of Colorado Department of Social Services. This office assists disabled students in becoming fully employable and self-supporting.
5. Office of International Student Services. The office assists international students on campus from 80 countries by providing support services and aiding in bridging the cultural gaps which many of them experience when entering the community to attend college.
6. Office of Off-Campus Housing Referral Services. Provides information on apartments and dormitory living arrangements.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the University through a variety of networks and activities. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degreed former students are also welcome to participate.
Horizons, a newspaper published in the fall, winter, and spring of each year, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities on campus which might interest them. The Mack Easton Award for Distinguished Service is bestowed each year at commencement and is sponsored by the Association. A program of alumni access to the campus recreation center, library, and parking lots has been recently instituted.
The governing board is comprised of alumni representing all of the schools and colleges on campus. This group plans events, implements programs, and raises funds with the goal of advancing the University and increasing the visibility of alumni.
Auraria Book Center
The Auraria Book Center carries a complete stock of academic, technical, reference, and examination preparation books. The Book Center also stocks computers and peripherals, software, and supplies for office, art, and engineering. Special orders for books are welcomed, and a search for out-of-print books is available at no charge.
Students should bring their printouts to locate course books. Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves; the course call number is printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional book.
When available, used books sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books returned within the first three weeks of a regular semester's start. Two ID's are required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard and VISA.
The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Center lower mall and offers extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and refunds and exchanges also are handled here.
Photocopying services are available in the Convenience Store. Transparencies, reductions, and other options may be specified, and a self-serve copier is available for small orders.
The Book Center is located in the Auraria Student Center, lower level, 9th and Lawrence Streets. For further information and hours, contact 556-3230.




General Information I 51
Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center is a non-profit organization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center.
The Center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time. It is divided into two toddler classroqms, three preschool classrooms, and one kindergarten/after-school classroom. Children must be 18 months to eight years of age to attend.
The philosophy of the Center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide safe, nurturing environment. The program involves the assessment of individual needs, establishing goals and activities that are appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually-oriented program provided at the Center.
Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time or hourly basis to accommodate students' varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188.
Auraria Student Center
The Student Center, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, the campus Book Center, a study lounge, game room, offices for student government and organizations, a copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, meeting and conference facilities, and a tavern.
campus houses a Cyber 170/720 and an IBM 4381 system. The IBM 4381 is used for administrative purposes, and faculty and students may access the Cyber system through the Denver campus or dial-in lines.
The Denver campus maintains a PRIME 750-9950 computer network, a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/780, a PYRAMID Technologies 90X, an Intel HyperCube, and a number of IBM and Apple Personal Computers. The PRIME system operates with 13.5 megabytes of memory and 2550 megabytes of disk storage; the VAX with 4 megabytes of memory and 822 megabytes of disk storage; the PYRAMID with 4 megabytes of memory and 400 megabytes of disks; and the Intel with 16 megabytes of memory and 40 megabytes of disks. These systems are the ones primarily used for instructional purposes. Increasing emphasis is being placed on the use of the personal computers, and to that end Computing Services maintains five teaching labs. These are used in conjunction with regularly scheduled classes.
Computing Services staff provides assistance to academic and administrative users on all computing systems available and on every phase of their use. Advisers assist students enrolled in computing courses with questions regarding programming and use of the computer systems and software available. Administrative users are assisted in their duties by the data processing staff and a systems analyst. Computing systems at every location on campus are maintained by an operations supervisor and staff who assist faculty and staff with hardware questions and problems.
The goal of the Computing Services department is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information call 556-2583.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. Currently there are several resources used to achieve this purpose. The Boulder
Division of Continuing Education
Through its Division of Continuing Education (CE), the University of Colorado at Denver provides off-campus credit and noncredit educational opportunities for


52 / General Information
the life-long learner and the non-traditional student. More than 7,000 employees of business, industry, and government, homemakers, senior citizens, and alumni participated in CE classes, workshops, and seminars during the past year.
Ib provide easy access to as many students as possible, CE uses the city and its environs as its classroom. CU-Denver's excellent faculty is teamed with highly talented part-time instructors from the Denver metropolitan area to ensure quality and excellence in instruction. Credit class offerings provide a linkage between CU-Denver's resident degree program on-campus and the part-time, off-campus student. Programs are specially designed to offer career updating for such professionals as teachers, engineers, attorneys, and architects. Off-campus credit classes at Lowry Air Force Base and Fitzsimons Army/ Medical Center give the military student the opportunity to take core course requirements that will later lead to the completion of a degree.
CE delivers a wide array of noncredit courses for those interested in career updating, personal enrichment, and intellectual stimulation. Specific programs are developed at the request of business and professional groups. These programs include licensing and refresher courses for engineers, accountants, life insurance agents, and architects. Seminars and certificate programs for business and industry are designed to help keep supervisors and managers abreast of new technologies and their management. Courses in the arts and humanities explore such topics as parenting, self-awareness, music and art, photography, languages, and literature.
Through these off-campus programs, and as part of its public service mission, CU-Denver seeks to extend its educational resources to the off-campus student. Individuals, groups, and organizations with special education interests are invited to call the Division of Continuing Education at 556-2735.
Development Program
In 1981-82 CU-Denver established a development program in conjunction with the University of Colorado Foundation Inc. The CU Foundation was established in 1967 at the direction of the Board of Regents of the University as a privately governed, non-profit corporation, chartered under the laws of the State of Colorado. It is operated exclusively for charitable, scientific, or educational purposes designed to promote the welfare of CU. The CU Foundation and its development offices are the approved agency to solicit, receive, and administer gifts from private sources for the benefit of all campuses.
The Development Program also is integrally related to the Alumni Association and offers leadership to that group.
International Education
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty,
entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships at CU-Boulder. The office also arranges study abroad programs and offers over 30 different programs around the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in these programs.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety, in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. Such programs are available at the Universities of Lancaster and Reading, England; the University of Bordeaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, West Germany; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technology in Monterrey, Mexico; Konan University, Kobe, Japan; the University of Seville, Spain; and the National Taiwan University in Thipei.
For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive language learning. Single semester programs are offered in Chambery and Rennes, France; Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico; London, England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Seville and Alicante, Spain. Summer programs are located in Kassel, West Germany; Perugia, Italy; and London, England. Special summer programs, e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific departments upon request.
Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these study abroad programs. A B


General Information / 53
average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for most of the academic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to program costs in most cases, and all credit earned while abroad is considered resident credit.
More information about study abroad programs is available in the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741.
Weekend University
Weekend University course offerings are part of the regular academic programs at CU-Denver. Students who apply for admission to Weekend University classes also are eligible to take CU-Denver classes which meet during the week.
A wide variety of course options are offered to students during the weekend period from noon Fridays through Sundays. Some students will register as nondegree students — those not seeking a degree — while others may already be enrolled in degree programs at CU-Denver, but desire the additional flexibility provided in the weekend offerings.
Courses are drawn from all colleges and schools at CU-Denver, and the number of offerings is expected to grow to accommodate an even wider variety of educational purposes. It will eventually include a significant number of general education course requirements in the University's undergraduate programs. A wider array in graduate offerings will emerge as important certificate and degree programs are drawn into the weekend format.
For admission information, students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
CU-Denver staff take a break to cheer the Denver Broncos to victory in the 1986 American Football League Championship.
Beaming proudly over a successful registration are (left to right): Gwen Hill, acting director of admissions: George Burnham, director, student administrative services: Marti Barrett, registrar; and Arne Amesen, assistant director of admissions.


“The Library is both physically and intellectually the heart of the campus. It is a good place to think, to plan, and to learn. "
— Patricia Senn Breivik, Director Auraria Library


Library Services
Auraria Library
Director: Patricia Serin Breivik Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant Director for Collection and Automation Services: Marilyn J. Mitchell Assistant Director for Instruction and Research Services: Mary Lou Goodyear Assistant Director for Media and Telecommunications Services: Muriel E. Woods
Offices: Auraria Library, 10th and Lawrence Sts. Telephone: — Administration: 556-2805 Ttelephone: — Information: 556-2741
Faculty: Professor: Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Professor: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Elnora Mercado, Terry Ann Mood, Martin A. Tessmer, Robert L. Wick, Muriel E. Woods Instructors: Anneli Ahtola, Lori Arp, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde, Mary Lou Goodyear, Eileen Guleff, Kathleen Kenny, Marilyn J. Mitchell, Kay Nichols, Elizabeth Porter, Linda D. Ranson, Jay Schafer, Louise T. Stwalley, Rutherford W. Witthus, Christina
J. Woo, Eveline L. Yang
Board of Directors, Friends of Auraria Library
Claudia Allen, Gannett Outdoor Robert Backus, Holme Roberts and Owen Patricia Breivik, Director, Auraria Library Carol Chapman, Assistant to the Director, Auraria Library
Tom Clark, Forward Metro Denver Group, Denver Chamber of Commerce
Lucy Creighton, First Interstate Bank of Denver Nancy Ellins
Mark E. Jones, Merrill Lynch Michael R. Moore, Arthur Young & Co.
Darwin Niekerk, Modeling and Analysis,
Adolph Coors Co.
Christopher G. Nims, Gensler & Associates Elizabeth Quinn, Fairmont Hotel Joan Ringel, Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Clair E. Villano, Consumer Fraud Division, District Attorney's Office
Lester Woodward, Davis, Graham & Stubbs


56 / Library
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Collection
The Auraria Library has a collection of over 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government publications and a full depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.
The Online Public Access Catalog
Access to the Auraria Library's collection is through the online Public Access Catalog (PAC), a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state. The online Public Access Catalog, which was developed as a cooperative project by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The online PAC system allows faster and more comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. In addition to using PAC at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; PAC also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer.
Reference Services
The Auraria Library's reference department stands ready to assist students and faculty in using the Library's resources. The reference department is staffed during all times the Library is open. In addition, brief reference questions, such as whether or not the Library owns a particular item, can be answered over the phone.
a faculty member's request a film or videotape can be transmitted directly into the classroom over this system. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan's, the Student Center, and the Library's television studio to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab is also available for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division and a professional graphic designer is available to assist users.
Students and faculty use the self-service graphics lab to develop visual aids.
Media Services
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services. The media distribution department manages the Library's media collection, which consists of videotapes, audiotapes, records, 16mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online Public Access Catalog. This department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Library operates an 18-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; at


Library / 57
Computer Assisted Research
Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, many of the business databases also contain directory and financial information. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the Library's reference department.
Architecture and Planning Library
The Library's main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Branch Library. With a collection of over 21,000 books, 120 periodical subscriptions, and 12,000 slides, this branch library offers specialized information to students of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and planning. This branch library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
Information Retrieval Service
The information retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers. For a reasonable fee, Library staff can assist patrons in locating and checking out the library materials they need. Working from the patron's bibliography, staff can: locate and check out books owned by the Library; photocopy articles from journals owned by the Library; submit interlibrary loan requests for materials which the Library does not own; and deliver the materials to the patron's home or office. Inquiries about this time-saving service should be directed to the reference department.
Library Instruction
Services for Persons with Disabilities
The Library is committed to making its resources and services accessible to all students; in addition to owning a variety of adaptive equipment to assist persons with disabilities, personal assistance in using the Library is available from the reference department.
Additional Facilities
Coin-operated typewriters, a copy center, change machines, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
The Library is committed to educating people to meet the demands of the Information Society. The Library offers a wide range of instructional programming, including a self-paced audiocassette walking tour of the Library, as well as class sessions to teach information access skills and strategies.
Internships
The Library offers internships, practicums, and independent studies to students interested in telecommunications or information management.
Students get experience in front of and behind the camera in the Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library.


"Graduate education is learning how to increase knowledge, and the focus of graduate education at CU-Denver is on the process of scholarship — not just on obtaining information. We hope that our graduates will become tomorrow's problem solvers."
— Dean David W. Greenfield The Graduate School


The Graduate School
Dean: David W. Greenfield
School Office: 1250 14th St., Suite 700
Telephone: 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The 1983 Brademas report on Graduate Education in America concluded that "Graduate education and research are the bedrock of every important area of our national life." The report highlighted the fact that a strong national security program, a healthy growing economy, and the prospects for improvement in the quality of life are all dependent upon high quality and vigorous graduate programs in our universities.
High quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity in their disciplines and, thus, are teacher/scholars who continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques and bring this cutting edge knowledge to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver not only gain from interactions with the graduate faculty but also gain from other students in the classroom. Because most of CU-Denver's graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom.
The Graduate School is a University-wide body that authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. At CU-Denver, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through The Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice, most Master's-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisers are concerned.
Doctoral-level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that discipline. Doctoral-level programs on the CU-Denver campus are either coordinated through the office of the system graduate dean or through the corresponding Denver or Boulder department. The Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics, educational administration, and educational technology are system degrees in which application is made to The Graduate School at CU-Den-ver. In a number of other disciplines with integrated degrees, most or all course work for the Ph.D. can be completed at Denver and the research adviser may be a
member of the CU-Denver faculty, but the degree program is administered by the Boulder department. In other disciplines, a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph.D degree may be taken at CU-Denver. Persons interested in pursuing doctoral level work should consult with the appropriate discipline graduate adviser.
Anyone wishing further information not given in this bulletin should write to the dean of The Graduate School, University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street, Denver, CO 80202.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver. In some cases, a specific required course may only be offered through the University of Colorado at Boulder in a given year.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology History
Biology Mathematics
Communications and theatre Political science Economics Psychology
English Sociology
Geography
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Counseling and personnel services
Early childhood education Educational administration Educational psychology Educational technology Elementary education Foundations, education Instructional technology
(emphasis in corporate instructional development and training, instructional computing specialist, instructional technologist, library media specialist) Reading
Secondary education Special education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied mathematics Chemistry Civil engineering Computer science
Electrical engineering Environmental science Mechanical engineering Technical communications
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.) The Master of Engineering (M.E.) The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.) The Specialist in Education (Ed. S.)


60 / The Graduate School
Significant course work can be taken at the Denver campus in the following master's degree programs:
Fine arts Geology Journalism Philosophy
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in:
Applied mathematics
Education (emphasis in education administration and education technology)
Significant course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Students can be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School. It is usually advised that a student complete some course work at another campus of the University.
Biology Chemistry Civil engineering Communication Computer science
Electrical engineering
English
Geography
Mechanical engineering Psychology
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 3,180 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each Fall and Spring Semester, and an additional 1,833 non-degree students take graduate courses. Of these, approximately 53 percent are part-time students.
Faculty
The faculty teaching in these programs are headquartered at CU-Denver, although resources of other University of Colorado campuses are used.
are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise, and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. In order for fellowships to be renewed, students holding them must reapply each year to The Graduate School.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instruc-torship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appointments in 1986-87 was: one-half time instructor, $8,500 for the academic year; one-half time teaching assistant, $6,800 for the academic year.
A half-time appointment for a instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Nonresident students employed as assistants may or may not be eligible for the nonresident tuition differential stipend for their first-year appointment as an assistant only. Exceptions extending beyond the first year must be approved in advance by the respective dean. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled students in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Nonresident students who are appointed as research assistants in nongeneral fund accounts may or may not be eligible for resident tuition rates. Assistants must be enrolled students.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this bulletin.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Graduate School.
Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester. Applications
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.


Graduate / 61
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap^ or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
Admission to The Graduate School is not admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree must make special application at the time and in the manner prescribed by the requirements for the degree sought.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, an applicant for admission as a regular degree student must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have done work equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by his or her previous scholastic record.
3. Have had adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Pass/Fail Grades. In order to permit a meaningful evaluation of an applicant's scholastic record, not more than 10 percent of those credit hours that are relevant to the intended field of graduate study shall have been earned with pass/fail grades, nor more than 20 percent overall. Applicants whose academic record contains a larger percentage of pass/fail credits must submit suitable additional evidence that they possess the required scholastic ability. If the applicant does not submit satisfactory additional evidence, he or she can be admitted only as a provisional student.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term, which may not normally exceed one academic year. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a
3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance, will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subjects and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate


62 / The Graduate School
student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the CU-Denver Graduate School office concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the CU-Denver Graduate School office, and two official transcripts from each university attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefimdable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a committee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to The Graduate School dean's office, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree students (below).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1987-88, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid).
READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program but who did not complete that degree program and who have not been continuously registered at the University must:
1. Clarify their status with the department to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
2. After receiving departmental approval, as indicated above, submit a former student application to The Graduate School dean's office before deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University. Application deadlines are available from the department.
Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must complete the appropriate forms at the time they apply for readmission.
Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in The Graduate School office prior to February 15 for the Summer Term, March 15 for the Fall Semester, and August 1 for the Spring Semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for assistantships, or of any student before his or her status is determined.
Students who are applying for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee. Four to six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from The Graduate School office or the CU-Denver Testing Center, or from The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records, CU-Denver, 110014th Street, Denver, CO 80202. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hocus credit toward the


Graduate t 63
requirements of a master's degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University, or both. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a nondegree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any course work transferred in this manner.
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes a graduate student may not drop, add, or change a course to no credit without presenting a letter to the dean of The Graduate School, CU-Denver, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6
semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for not fewer than 5 semester hours in work numbered 500 or above, or at least 8 semester hours in a combination of undergraduate/graduate/professional course work acceptable for graduate credit, or any number of thesis hours.
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work, or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this bulletin. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take such work as is approved by the major department.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this bulletin.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advance degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will


64 / The Graduate School
not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period ofresidence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirements for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of The Graduate School. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
In calculating a student's grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first and second year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student's transcript.
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use and spelling of the English language may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. The
satisfaction of this requirement depends not so much upon the ability to pass formal tests, although these may be demanded, as it does upon the habitual use of good English in all oral and written work. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate's proficiency.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirement
The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester horns of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master's degree may be allowed to


Graduate / 65
select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 500 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories:
1. Courses within the major department at the 500 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major department at the 400 level and above, provided they are approved for graduate rank for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and the dean of The Graduate School.
3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 300- and 400- level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 500 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 400 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master's degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modem languages as each department requires. See
special departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School.
All work accepted by transfer must come within the 5-year time limit or be validated by special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 8 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master's degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the Master's degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 8 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the five-year time limit.
3. Has not been applied toward another degree.
4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School.
Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact The Graduate School office. Ib be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School.
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use the resources of the Division of Continuing Education in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the graduate dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at this University for at least two


66 / The Graduate School
semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. A student who is noticeably deficient in his/her general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than halftime. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master's degree must file application in the dean's office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student's work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in University of Colorado Graduate School
Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which is obtainable from The Graduate School.
IVvo weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.
Comprehensive Final Examinations
Each candidate for a master's degree is required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of the candidate's last semester of residence while he/she is still taking required courses for the degree, provided he/she is making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. A student must be registered when he or she takes the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.


Graduate t 67
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination. three months must elapse before he or she may attempt the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master's degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Time Limit
All work, including the comprehensive final examination, should be completed within five years or six successive summers. Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination. Candidates for the master's degree are expected to complete their work with reasonable continuity.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1987-88
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Applications must be submitted at least 10 weeks before the
student expects to take the comprehensive final examination. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. Tb state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student's work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them


68 / The Graduate School
as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 500 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credit until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D. a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehen-sives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student's grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B, C and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 500-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Quality of Work
Students are expected to complete with distinction all work in the formal courses in which they enroll. A course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. Upon recommendation by the advisory committee and the chair of the department and with the approval of the dean, a student may be required to withdraw at any time for failure to maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the candidate wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more others to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student's special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee
(beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor's degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to full-time work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student's advisory committee, the chair of the student's major department, and the dean of The Graduate School.
TVvo semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University.
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
Students are required to meet the following language requirements.


Graduate / 69
Communication Requirement. All graduate students for whom English is the native language are required to demonstrate at least second-year college proficiency in a foreign language of their choice. This requirement may be satisfied in the following ways.
1. The student's undergraduate transcript may be presented, showing completion of grade C or better of at least 3 semester hours of a fourth-semester undergraduate college course in a foreign language. The transcript must accompany the student's Application for Admission to Candidacy when it is submitted to The Graduate School.
2. The student may take The Graduate School Foreign Language Tfcst (GSFLT) at the Testing Office before or after admission to The Graduate School. Students should check with The Graduate School for the passing score required for each language.
3. If the student wishes to demonstrate competence in a language for which the GSFLT is not available, a test designed and administered by the appropriate language department at the University of Colorado may be taken, with the passing criterion to be set comparable to the above GSFLT criterion.
4. The student may register at the University for any fourth-semester course in a foreign language and pass it with a C or better. (Registration in such courses is contingent upon the language department's approval.)
A student who elects 2, 3, or 4 above must complete the requirements before the Ph.D. comprehensive examination may be scheduled.
Students whose native language is not English will, by passing their courses and completing their graduate work at the University, demonstrate sufficient ability in English to meet the communication requirement.
Special Languages. When special languages are needed as tools to read foreign literature in a particular field, the individual academic departments may require further training in foreign languages for all their Ph.D. graduate students. The choice and number of languages as well as the required levels of skill and the methods of testing these skills are determined by the individual departments.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the Doctorate until the student has established in this Graduate School a satisfactory record in residence, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph.D. is 10 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by
The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, shall have passed the language requirements, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to “candidacy for degree" will register for and be charged for 10 hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for 7 hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for 3-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and adviser will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classifications identified above.
If a student who is certified for the Ph.D. degree, or who has received permission to take the comprehen-sives and passes them prior to meeting the language requirement must be continuously enrolled as stated above. This continuing registration is independent on whether the candidate is in residence at the University. (See also section on Residence.)
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student's mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty. The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation and showing mature scholarship and critical judgement as well as familiarity with tools and methods of research must be


70 / The Graduate School
written upon some subject approved by the student's major department. Ib be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the University of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student's responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program.
One formally-approved, typewritten copy of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be pub-fished in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee
and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International; and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee appointed by the dean, which will consist of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the dean's office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.
Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within four years of the date on which the comprehensive examination was passed, a second examination similar in extent to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. If the second comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work.




AR ....... Arts Bldg.
AU ....... Auraria Library
BR ....... Bromley Building
BU ....... Business Services
CC ....... Child Care Center
CD ....... Child Development Center
CN ....... Central Classroom
DR........ Dravo
EC........ East Classroom
EG ....... Emmanuel Gallery
MR........ Mercantile Restaurant
PE........ Physical Education
PP........ Physical Plant
PS........ Public Safety
RO ....... Rectory Office
SA ........ St. Cajetan's Center
SE........ St. Elizabeth's Church
SF........ St. Francis Center
SI ....... Science Building
SO ....... South Classroom
ST........ Student Center & Book Center
TE......... Technology Building
TV ........ Tivoli
UA ....... UCD Administration
WC........ West Classroom
CU-Denver Offices
Academic Affairs, Vice Chancellor........................DR
Academic Center fix Enrichment.......................... EC
Accounting/Accounts Payable..............................DR
Administration and Finance, Vice Chancellor .............DR
Admissions.............................................. BR
Affirmative Action.......................................DR
Alumni ..................................................DR
American Indian Education Program....................... UA
Analytical Laboratory ...................................EC
Architecture and Planning, School of.................... DR
Asian American Education Program ....................... UA
Black Education Program....................................
Budget/Fiscal Planning ....................................
Bursar^ Office ............................................
Business and Administration, College of, and Graduate School
of Business Administration ................
Business Services.............................
Centers, The..................................
Chancellor....................................
Colorado Partnership fix Educational Renewal ..
Colorado Principals' Center...................
Community Development and Design, Center for
UA Computational Mathematics Group..........
DR Computing Services........................
BR Continuing Education, Division of........
Copy Center.............................
BUS Development..............................
DR Education, School erf....................
UA Educational Opportunity Program .........
DR Engineering and Applied Science, College of
DR Environmental Sciences, Center fix .....
DR Finance/Controller........................
BR Financial Aid/Student Employment .........


^jj1 University of Colorado at Denver
Auraria Higher Education Center
Community College of Denver Metropolitan State College University of Colorado at Denver
Visitor PsrttinQ in Lots Q & R
Braille Map available at Disabled Student Services Central Classroom 106
O 1985 AHEC
iduate School, The..........................................DR
panic American Education Program............................UA
xmation Center ............................................ EC
jrnships and Cooperative Education, Center for........9th St.
id Information Systems Group .............................. UA
eral Arts and Sciences, College of
iearfc Office.........................................9th St.
idvising .................................................. EC
â– ary, Auraria.............................................. AU
irchitectune and Planning Library.......................... BR
sic. College of............................................ AR
National VfeteranS Training Institute.........................DR
R?rsonnd Services.............................................DR
Public Affairs, Graduate School of............................UA
Public Relations and Publications.............................DR
Records/Registration ........................................ BR
Research Administration.......................................DR
Research in Rhetoric, Center for........................9th St.
Senior Citizen Program .......................................UA
Student Academic Services.................................... UA
Student Government ...........................................ST
Urban Transportation Studies, Center for..................... UA
Vfcterart; Affairs .............................................. EC
VNfamcn's Resources ............................................. UA
Ybu, Me and Technology Project .................................. DR
Note: Check the current Auraria Campus Directory for up-to-date listings. In early 1988 many CU-Dcnver offices will relocate to the replacement facility, now under construction on the campus.


"Our approach to planning and design encompasses a broad array of educational approaches and professional perspectives. We seek not only to provide students with the skills which are essential for professional practice, but also to engender an appreciation of historical antecedents, modes of inquiry, and paradigms which inform the fields of architecture, urban and regional planning, landscape architecture, and urban and interior design."
— Dean Hamid Shirvani School of Architecture and Planning


School of Architecture and Planning
Dean: Hamid Shirvani Associate Dean: M. Gordon Brown Assistant to the Dean: Nancy Briggs School Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor "telephone: 556-2755
Dean's Advisory Council:
Cabell Childress, FAIA, Cabell Childress Architects Rodney Cobi, ASLA, City of Boulder Planning Department
David Daileda, AIA, CHD Architects Virginia Dubrucq, AIA, Consultant Curtis Fentress, AIA, C.W. Fentress and Associates, P.C. Robert Fuller, AIA, Fuller and Fuller Associates David Howlett, AICP, Director, Economic Development City of Littleton
Dayl Larson, FAIA, Haller and Larson Architects Jack Leaman, FASLA, AICP, Director of Planning, City of Colorado Springs
Jennifer Moulton, AIA, Anthony Pellecchia Architects William Muchow, FAIA, W.C. Muchow and Partners Jane Ries, FASLA, Jane Silverstein Ries Landscape Architects
Eugene Sternberg, AIA, Consultant Ronald Straka, FAIA, Office of Project Management City and County of Denver
Jerome Seracuse, FAIA, Seracuse, Lawler, and Partners
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Architecture and Planning is nationally unique because of its students and alumni, its faculty and staff, its missions, and its location. The School has been able to attract high quality students with a strong professional career orientation. Through their achievements, the alumni of our School are major contributors to its image. The School of Architecture and Planning is committed to offer professional and specialized degree programs through rigorous instruction and research programs in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, interior design, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The School is committed to excellence in instruction and research while providing a balance of design skills and intellectual inquiry. As a graduate school with five degree offerings, and a part of a university with a mandate for excellence and national and international recognition, we are evolving as the intellectual design forum in the Western region.
The School of Architecture and Planning is devoted to "design" as its central intellectual concern. The term design is used here in its broadest sense to include full
range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. Students are introduced to fundamentals of design analysis and synthesis based on humanistic ideals as the means of meeting their personal aspirations. They leam how to think, analyze, synthesize, and be creative, and develop an intellectual framework in regard to design and planning.
Our interest is to educate designers who are able to deal with a variety of issues, programs, and problems within their particular context and time frame. In other words, we are interested in educating designers with the capacity to think innovatively and to challenge each situation on its own merit. The School of Architecture and Planning is dedicated to excellence in design education.
SUPPORT FACILITIES Architecture and Planning Library
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library, serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture, design, and planning. It contains the following collections to support the curricula of the School:
Reference — technical materials selected to support design and planning studio projects.
Circulating — material in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, interior design, urban design, and urban and regional planning.
Documentary—planning documents issued by local, regional, state, and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado communities and concerns.
Periodical—current materials relating to architecture, design, and planning.
Reserve—resource materials for required and supplemental class reading.
Nonprint — media, including architectural slides and micro-computer software.
The library is open 71 hours per week, including evenings and Sundays. The staff consists of a librarian, library assistant, and several student assistants. The library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as interlibrary loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.


76 / School of Architecture and Planning
Computer Laboratory
The Computer Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is equipped for upscaled computer-aided design and drafting with a micro-computer based networking system. Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs in addition to four IBM PC/XTs are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstations are linked through the addition of AutoCAD compatible software that extends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE/CADD. Now possible is:
AutoWord—An interactive word processing package for editing and displaying text of drawings.
Auto CoGo — A coordinate geometry program that allows entry of survey and engineering data for site planning and engineering.
LandSoft—A system for introducing landscape architectural symbols and drafting extension into the AutoCAD and AE/CADD utilities.
Generic Ttmplate — A means of customizing or creating unique design and drafting templates.
The six high resolution PC/AT workstations also make use of the latest School CAD/D software, the computer-vision system which includes the Personal Architect and Personal Designer packages. Hardware in the School Laboratory CAD/D system therefore includes:
Tfen PC workstations (as mentioned above), eight with high resolution monitors and digitizing tablets. Novell NS68B Central File Server with two megabytes of memory, a Novell NPS2 120 megabyte drive, and ports to accommodate up to 24 workstations and five shared output devices.
Zenith Z100 PC with Tecmar 60MB magnetic tape backup system, used for systems operation and as a plot station with Gould Colorwriter 6320 and Hewlett/ Packard plotters. (Large format (24" x 36") plotting must be done at the University computing Center on a Calcomp Plotter.)
Calcomp 9100 24" x 36" Digitizer with 16 button cursor.
With this very specialized equipment and software, students and faculty can create computer-generated architectural plans; elevation and perspective drawings; interior design and landscape plans; drawings and renderings; and flowcharts, charts, graphs, and organizational charts while storing specifications, information, and other data that can be used in creating architectural schedules, engineering, HVAC and lighting calculations, or for estimating.
The network linked PCs mentioned above and an IBM/PC and Apple/PC may be used with a variety of software packages available through the Architecture and Planning Library to perform a variety of tasks such as word processing, spreadsheets, engineering, and energy calculations.
Model Shop and Photo Laboratory
The School maintains a darkroom for student use as well as a variety of camera and audiovisual equipment.
These facilities are valuable aids in preparing class presentations, design projects, portfolios, and in learning multi-media techniques for presentations. The model shop is available for use in fabricating architectual models and in furniture design projects. A staff technician is on duty to assist students in the use of their facilities.
NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS
The School of Architecture and Planning at the University of Colorado at Denver actively seeks students from throughout the United States and abroad. Its faculty includes many whose work is nationally recognized. The curriculum in every academic professional program attempts to accommodate the variety of planning problems and design issues which arise across the nation. Each program's curriculum, of course, embodies a core of knowledge that underlies professional practice everywhere.
"In-state" students are eligible for the lower tuition rates available to residents. An in-state student, under statutory provisions of the State of Colorado, is one who has established a legal domicile in Colorado for at least one year preceding the beginning of the term for which in-state classification is sought. Persons over 22 years of age and those who are otherwise emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. For further information consult Residency Classification in the General Information section of this bulletin.
Information regarding financial assistance for both in and out-of-state students will be provided in response to inquiries about the programs in architecture and planning at CU-Denver. A limited number of non-resident tuition differential awards are available each year. These are provided to non-resident students having research or teaching assistantships supported by state appropriations. Additional support in the form of internships, fellowships, grants, and contract research with faculty members also is available.
INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver Office of Admissions requires that all applicants to CU-Denver meet certain qualifications. Your qualifications are determined by records and credentials that you are required to provide. It is important that all documents are received by the School of Architecture and Planning before the deadline date of the term that you plan to attend. If your documents are received later than our


Architecture / 77
published deadline, you will be considered for the next available term.
Admissions Requirements
1. Application for admission.
2. $50 nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application.
3. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies.
4. TVvo certified copies of official academic records from each college you attended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany documents that are not in English.
5. TVvo official transcripts of college studies from each United States collegiate institution that you attended. Hand-carried copies are not acceptable. The transcript must be sent to this office by the issuing institution.
6. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish your English language proficiency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. TOEFL score must be 500 or higher to be considered for admission by the University.
7. Four letters of recommendation.
8. Portfolio required for the architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and urban design programs.
Additional supporting documents subsequently may be required by the office of admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a master's degree.
Financial Requirements
You must provide evidence that sufficient funds are available for you to attend the University of Colorado at Denver, lb provide this evidence you should follow these instructions:
1. Complete the “Financial Resources Statement." You must prove that you have sufficient money to pay your expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as part of your application.
a. If you are using your own money, your bank must certify that you have the full amount of money on deposit to meet your tuition and expense costs. In Part
2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement your bank must certify that the money you need is on deposit in your account.
b. If you are being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, your sponsor must agree to provide the money, and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Your sponsor's bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money you will need. All subscriptions of Section 2 must be completed and signed.
c. If you have been awarded a scholarship, Part 2,
Section 3, of the Financial Resources Statement must
be completed.
2. An incomplete statement of Financial Resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay your admission, or cause you to be denied admission, to the University. Be sure your Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete
Application Deadlines
Master of Architecture .. March 15 Fall term Master of Interior
Design ... I..........March 15 Fall term
Master of Landscape
Architecture .........March 15 Fall term
Master of Urban and
Regional Planning ... March 15 Fall term
(Priority deadline)
May 1 Fall term
(Space Available)
Master of Architecture
in Urban Design.......March 15 Fall term
(Priority deadline)
May 1 Fall term
(Space Available)
September 1 Spring term
Programs of Study
ARCHITECTURE
Program Director: Robert Kindig Secretary: Annette Korslund Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor "telephone: 556-2877
Faculty: Professors: Eugene F. Benda, Davis C. Holder, Robert W. Kindig, Gary Long, John M. Prosser, Hamid Shirvani
Associate Professors: M. Gordon Brown, Paul J. Foster Assistant Professors: Gary Crowell, Francine Haber, Bennett Neiman, Gail W. Kam, Diane L. Wilk Adjunct: Theodor Grossman, Marvin Hatami, Anthony Pellecchia, John Shuttleworth Emeritus: G.K. Vetter
The architecture program in the School of Architecture and Planning is a professional design curriculum focused on four major architectural components: architectural design; design technology; history, theory, and criticism of architecture; and visual studies. The primary objective of the program is to prepare students to enter the professional practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods of planning and design in architecture. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop:


78 / School of Architecture and Planning
Awareness of sensitivity to the quality of the physical environment.
Intellectual understanding of the history, theory, and criticism of arts and architecture.
Professional competence in design technology.
Analytic, problem solving competence of synthesis and communication of the above knowledge into "physical form".
Understanding of the institutional framework within which design takes place.
Understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goals of the program are to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of physical and environmental quality while acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architecture, and design expertise.
Degrees Offered
The architecture program offers both first and post professional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional M.Arch. degree requires three and one-half years of full time study. The first professional degree can also be completed in two years (by admission with advanced standing to the three and one-half year program). A thesis is required in each of these programs. Students holding a Bachelor's degree in fields other than architecture would enter the first professional M.Arch. program which typically requires 106 credit hours for completion. Admission with advanced standing is open to holders of a B.S. in Architecture or Environmental Design. This group of students would pursue the first professional M.Arch. degree, completing their program in two years with 71 credit hours of study.
The architecture program also offers a one-year postprofessional Master of Architecture open only to applicants already holding the first professional degree in architecture (B.Arch.) and entails a minimum of 30 credit hours. Individually organized studies focus on the student's specific interests in architecture and urban design. A thesis is required.
The first professional M.Arch. degree program is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), the Association of the Collegiate Schools of Architecture, and the American Institute of Architects.
Curriculum
The curriculum includes studies in architectural design, graphics communication, history and theory, technology, and professional practice. Architectural design is the central focus of the curriculum and integrates history and theory, technology and professional practice. Design studios function as a laboratory for synthesis of the materials covered in lectures and seminars and for exploration into viable solutions to architectural
problems. The design thesis is the culmination of the architecture curriculum.
Communication courses provide students with essential skills for expressing their ideas and concepts acting as an essential medium for expression of the architect's thought processes. Using this fundamental architectural tool, students learn to make the connections between conceptual ideas and actual image.
The body of knowledge offered in history and theory courses forms a foundation of spiritual, emotional, institutional, and cultural meanings upon which architectural ideologies are based. The student acquires an intellectual framework and awareness of architecture as a manifestation of the society's sociopolitical and cultural change.
Since architectural technology is essential knowledge for an architect, students also must become informed concerning structures, materials, environmental control, and all other technological aspects of architecture. Professional practice courses expose the student to actual implementation of architectural projects and the internship program exposes them to real office practice.
Application and Admission
The complete set of materials for application for admission to all Master of Architecture programs includes: the application form, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, a portfolio of academic, creative and/or professional work and a non-refundable application fee of $30. The portfolio must be no longer than 14 by 17 inches. International applicants see the section on International Applicants at the beginning of the School general information, for additional information.
Tb be considered for fall admission, all application materials must be received by March 15. Applications received after March 15 may be considered for nondegree student status only.
For application form and additional information please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, Colorado 80202
(303) 556-2755
Specific requirements, including prerequisites, for each of the master's degree programs are given below.
An Admissions Committee will review the application materials and select students to be admitted to programs. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1.
The recommended minimum grade-point average for admission is 3.00 on a 4-point scale. If the student's grade-point average is below 3.00, the Graduate Record


Architecture / 79
Examination (GRE) is recommended as part of the application materials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the basis of all application materials and not on grade-point average alone.
THREE-YEAR PROGRAM
The three-year program is open to students with a bachelor's degree. A particular program prerequisite is one year of basic college level physics and mathematics through beginning calculus. The physics and mathematics requirements must be met before entering the program or can be obtained while registered at the School or Architecture and Planning by attending the summer term prior to the fall entrance of first year.
Three-Year Program Course Requirements:
Semester Hours
Architectural Design ..................................30
Graphics ......|........................................6
"technologies ...j.....................................25
History/Theory........................................ 10
Professional Practice and Construction Documents........6
Planning................................................3
Electives .....!...................................... 15
Thesis ........(...................................... 11
TOTAL 106
Fall Semester, 500 Level
ARCH. 500. Design ......................................5
ARCH. 505. Introduction to Design and Planning ........ 1
ARCH. 510. Graphics I ..................................2
ARCH. 551. Materials and Methods of Construction......3
ARCH. 552. Basic Structures I...........................3
ARCH. 571. 19th and 20th Century History............... 3
17
Spring Semester, 500 Level
ARCH. 501. Design .................................. 5
ARCH. 511. Graphics II...............................2
ARCH. 553. Basic Structures II ......................3
ARCH. 630. Site Engineering .........................3
Theory Requirement..................................... 3
16
Summer Term, 500-600 Level
ARCH. 502. Design/Construction Drawings................8
Elective ............................................ _3
11
Fall Semester, 6d0 Level
ARCH. 600. Design .....................................5
ARCH. 650. HVAC .......................................3
ARCH. 665. Structures III..............................2
URP. 500. Fundamentals Planning Policy ................3
Elective ......j....................................._3
16
Spring Semester, 600 Level
ARCH. 601. Design .......................................5
ARCH. 651. Lighting and Acoustics . L....................3
ARCH. 666. Structures IV.................................2
Theory Requirement..................L....................3
Elective ....L......................I.................._3
16
Fall Semester, 700 Level
ARCH. 700. Design .......................................5
ARCH. 712. Thesis I......................................5
ARCH. 660. Professional Practice ... I...................3
Elective ...........................L..................._3
16
Spring Semester
ARCH. 701. Thesis II.....................................6
ARCH. 713. Thesis Graphics .........L....................2
ARCH. 750. Systems Synthesis.............................3
Elective ............................................... 3
14
THREE-YEAR PROGRAM WITH ADVANCED STANDING
Advanced standing in the three-year program is available to students with a four-year Bachelor of Architecture or Environmental Design degree who seek the second professional degree in architecture. The minimum program is a two-year, 71 semester-hour series of studies leading to the Master of Architecture degree. The physics and mathematics prerequisites stated for the three-year program (above) must be met prior to admission with advanced standing.
Students from four-year design programs must have taken two semesters of architectural history, two semesters of basic structures (statistics and strength of materials), and must exhibit (in their portfolio) a graphics ability equivalent to that required in the school's two-semester course in architectural graphics. Required courses in the two-year program that have been taken by the student in prior studies may be substituted if the grade received was B or above. The Master of Architecture degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 71 semester hours, all required courses and a thesis.
Minimum Course Requirements Semester Hours
Architectural Design ............................... 20
"technologies....................................... 17
Theory................................................3
Professional Practice and Construction Documents......6
Planning..........................i...................3
Thesis ............................................ 11
Thesis Graphics.....................................2
Electives ......................................... 9
71
Recommended Order of Studies
Fall Semester, 600 Level Semester Hours
ARCH. 600. Design ....................................5
ARCH. 605. Introduction to Arch, program..............1
ARCH. 650. HVAC ..................................... 3


80 / School of Architecture and Planning
ARCH. 665. Structures III...............................2
URP. 500. Fundamentals Planning Policy .................3
Theory Requirement..................................... 3
17
Spring Semester, 600 Level
ARCH. 601. Design ......................................5
ARCH. 630. Site Engineering ............................3
ARCH. 651. Lighting and Acoustics.......................3
ARCH. 666. Structures IV................................2
Elective .............................................. 3
16
Summer Term, 500-600 Level
ARCH. 502-602 Design/Construction Drawings..............8
Elective .............................................._3
11
Fall Semester, 700 Level
ARCH. 700. Design ......................................5
ARCH. 712. Thesis I.....................................5
ARCH. 660. Professional Practice .......................3
Elective .............................................. 3
16
Spring Semester, 700 Level
ARCH. 701. Thesis II....................................6
ARCH. 713. Thesis Graphics .............................2
ARCH. 750. Systems Synthesis........................... 3
11
ONE-YEAR PROGRAM
The one-year program is available only to students already holding the first professional degree, the Bachelor or Master of Architecture. This Master of Architecture degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 30 semester hours of studio course work and a thesis. The program of study is flexible based on the student's background and area of interest.
COURSES
Architectural Design
ARCH. 500-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Design theory, application, and methods. Design fundamentals, vocabulary, visual design, and introductory building design.
ARCH. 501-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Scope of study expands in scale from a small social unit to a subcommunity. Design parameters investigated are human needs and activities, climate, pedestrian and vehicular circulation, site planning, structure, and materials.
ARCH. 502/602-8. Architectural Design and Construction Drawings. Summer session. Four studio-seminar periods per week. First five weeks involves design of building with emphasis on design process. In the second five weeks the schematic design is taken through design development into working drawings.
ARCH. 510-2, 511-2. Architectural Graphics I and II. TVvo lecture-studio periods per week. Graphic skills for design:
diagramming, schematic sketches, communication, two and three-dimensional representation, shade and shadow, color. ARCH. 600-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Building design within the context of urban environments, site, climate, codes, utilities, and circulation. Integration of architectural form and space with structure and environmental controls.
ARCH. 601-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Four independent studios offered for diversity of project scale, building type, and theoretical emphasis. Selection allows some degree of student initiative in exploration of personal interests.
ARCH. 700-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Four studio selections organized as in ARCH. 601 above. ARCH. 601 and 700 studios include projects emphasizing urban design, urban context problems, major building complex problems, building type problems (e.g., housing), and energy-conscious design. One studio is organized around projects from the Center for Community Development and Design and another is arranged with other divisions for interdisciplinary work.
ARCH. 701-6. Thesis II. Three studio-seminar periods per week. The thesis is the final design product of the program and serves to integrate all prior architectural learning. During this phase, the student must demonstrate the self-discipline and self-direction necessary to accomplish a complete archi-tectual design project. The project must present a major design challenge to the student; however, an area of interest may be selected by the student such as housing, health care facilities, recreational facilities, urban infrastructure, historic preservation, and architectural technology.
ARCH. 710-7, 711-7. Research/Design. Advanced study and research for second professional degree.
ARCH. 712-5. Thesis I. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Research and study leading to the development of a project program, including site selection and analysis. Projects may be developed for thesis work with the Center for Community Development and Design. Conceptual design may be commenced during this stage.
ARCH. 713-2. Thesis Graphics. This course is taught concurrently with ARCH. 701 and is intended to assist the student in all phases of thesis presentation and reproduction.
Technologies
ARCH. 551-3. Materials and Methods of Construction. TVvo lectures and one lab or field trip per week. Study of materials and components for construction and construction methods and techniques for residential and commercial buildings. ARCH. 552-3, 553-3. Basic Structure I and II. TVvo lectures per week. Analysis of basic structures. Applications of structural systems.
ARCH. 630-3. Site Engineering. TVvo lectures per week. Site analysis, legal description, topographic mapping, land use, drainage and site services.
ARCH. 650-3. Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning, and Utilities. One lecture tutorial per week. Energy conscious design. Principles and application of HVAC systems. Water supply and sanitation systems.
ARCH. 651-3. Lighting and Acoustics. TVvo lectures per week. Illumination quantity and quality, daylighting and electric lighting, lighting design and application. Electrical distribution systems. Principles of sound transmission and absorption, room acoustics, architectural acoustics problems.
ARCH. 655-2. Acoustics. One lecture per week. Advanced problems in noise control and room acoustics.


Interior Design / 81
ARCH. 656-2. Masonry Structures. One lecture per week. Design of masonry elements for buildings.
ARCH. 658-1. Elevators and Escalators. One lecture per week. Design and analysis of transportation systems.
ARCH. 665-2, 666-2. Structures III and IV. T\vo lectures per week. Structural design of buildings and building elements. Design with steel, timber, concrete, and other building materials. Advantages and disadvantages in application of various materials and building systems.
ARCH. 667-3. Computer Graphics/Micro. One seminar and lab per week. Introduction to computers and their architectural applications. Hands on exercises with the school micro computer lab and the University Prime system.
ARCH. 668-3. Computer Applications in Architecture. One seminar lab per week. Introduction to computers and applications in architectural graphics, word processing, business management, computer-aided design, and database management. Micro computer based.
ARCH. 722-3. Daylighting. One seminar per week. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of illumination from sky and sun and reflective surfaces, lighting and heat loss, heat gain. ARCH. 723-3. Energy Audits. One seminar per week. Analysis of existing buildings for energy usage and design of retrofit options.
ARCH. 750-3. Systems Synthesis. A synthesis of the preceding environmental systems and structures courses. Design of the structural frame and the lighting and comfort control systems of the thesis building project. Taken concurrendy with thesis.
Professional Practice
ARCH. 660-3. Professional Practice. TWo lectures per week. Ethics, management, documents, organization, legal aspects, and production procedures for a professional practice.
ARCH. 661-3. Construction Documents. TWo labs per week. Construction communication techniques. Preparation of working drawings and specifications for a small building designed by the student in ARCH. 600 (Design).
ARCH. 663-2. Designer and the Law. One lecture per week. Provides a basic understanding of the designer's legal rights and responsibilities; covers basic legal concepts and their relation to the practice of the design professional.
ARCH. 760-3, 761-3. Internship. Eight hours per week. Work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an office by the School and receives academic credit instead of pay. Student must have completed Professional Practice and Construction Documents and be in the last year of the program.
History and Theory
ARCH. 505/605-1. Introduction to Architecture Program. One
lecture per week. Basic computer literacy and presentations by faculty member on design philosophy.
ARCH. 540-1. Design and Planning Journalism. One seminar period per week. Writing methods for architectural criticism; description and evaluation of the built environment.
ARCH. 571-3. Nineteenth- and 20th-Century Architectural History. TWo lectures per week. The background for contemporary architecture. The development of the avant-garde from the late 19th century to the international style. Traditional and vernacular architecture. Recent developments.
ARCH. 670-3. American Architectural History. TWo lectures per week. European roots and colonial derivatives. Classicism and electicism in the 19th century. The impact of technology and industrialization. Heritage and the development of new forms.
ARCH. 672-3. European, Japanese, South American Architecture Now. TWo seminars per week. Research and discussion on contemporary design theories, concentrating on non-American work, New Rationalism, regionalism, College City, high tech, and other topics. Prer., ARCH. 571 or equivalent. ARCH. 673-3. Designer Philosophies. TWo seminars per week. The ideas and contributions of key designers in history, style, culture and change.
ARCH. 675-3. Post Modern Seminar. TWo seminars per week. Readings of background sources, papers, and presentations. Pluralism and meaning in architecture today. Prer., ARCH. 571 or equivalent.
ARCH. 678-3. Architectural Preservation. One seminar per week. Existing structures, documentation and historical research. Curatorial theory, strategies, and economics for historic buildings.
ARCH. 679-3. Architectural Conservation. One seminar per week. Technical analysis of existing buildings; materials; finishes, structures, mechanical and electrical systems. Studies in building stabilization, rehabilitation, and materials conservation.
ARCH. 683-3. Teaching Methods in Architecture. Three lab sessions per week. Provides practical experience in teaching. ARCH. 684-3. Architecture Development/Politics. One seminar per week. Relationship of the architect to development and political processes.
ARCH. 686-3. Special Topics. Various topical courses are offered in architecture history, criticism, technology, professional practice, and other related areas.
Independent Study
ARCH. 960-1-3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to architecture.
INTERIOR DESIGN
Program Director: Donald J. Sherman Secretary: Louise Garcia
Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor â– telephone: 556-3475 Faculty: Professor: M. G. Barr Associate Professor: Donald J. Sherman Assistant Professor: Gail W. Kam
The interior design program is intended to prepare students to enter professional practice at the first professional level; to advance their professional standing through the postprofessional focus; and/or to prepare them to teach at the university level.
The program has the following basic components: design theory, history and criticism, technology, visual studies, and professional practice.
Degrees Offered
The interior design program offers both first professional and postprofessional Master of Interior Design degrees.
The first professional master's degree program requires three years of full-time study and 96 credit


82 / School of Architecture and Planning
hours. It is suited for the student without an undergraduate professional design degree. The postprofessional M.I.D. degree emphasizes design theory and research and requires two years of full-time study and a minimum of 64 credit hours. Students opting for this degree must already have a professional design degree,
i.e., B.I.D., B.Arch., B.L.A., etc. A thesis is required of all M.I.D. candidates.
Curriculum
The basis of the interior design curriculum is philosophical, scholarly, and practical. Using an integrated approach to design studio, the curriculum focuses on an advanced level of design process and problem solving producing creative and knowledgeable designers capable of thinking and designing comprehensively.
The interior design program is different from traditional programs in the following ways:
1. Multidisciplinary Approach. Individualized instruction and guidance enable the student to integrate skills and knowledge from several related disciplines,
i.e., architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design. This allows students to develop individualized and personal skills for the analysis, design, and evaluation of appropriate interior environments.
2. Social and Behavioral Base. Understanding the social, behavioral, and biological implications of man/ environment interaction is an integral part of research, design process, and problem-solving methods taught in design studios.
3. Coordinated University-Professional Practice Experiences. Professionals and educators working together provide relevant training and educational enrichment for students in interior design in many ways. By invitation, practitioners in interior design and architecture lecture, serve as studio jurors and critics, and serve on thesis committees. Whenever possible, students serve as part-time employees in design firms as another expression of the professional community's involvement and interest in the interior design student's education.
Application and Admission
The complete set of materials for application to the Master of Interior Design program includes the application form, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, a portfolio of academic, creative and/or professional work, and a nonrefundable application fee of $30. The portfolio must be no larger than 14 by 17 inches. Slides are acceptable but must be annotated. International applicants see the School general information at the beginning of this section.
Tb be considered for admission in the fall term, the complete set of application materials must be received by March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. Applications received after
March 15 may be considered for non-degree student status only.
For application forms and additional information, please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, Colorado 80202
(303) 556-2755
The three-year program is open to students with a bachelor's degree. A particular program prerequisite is completed course work in college physics and mathematics through introductory calculus. For admission to the two-year program, applicants, in addition, must have a four-year degree in interior design, architecture, or environmental design.
The recommended minimum GPA for admission is
3.0 on a 4-point scale. If the student's GPA is below 3.0, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended as part of the application materials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the basis of all application materials and not on grade-point average alone.
RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES,
THREE-YEAR PROGRAM
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
INTD. 500. Interior Design Studio I.......................5
INTD. 510. Interior Design Graphics I.....................3
INTD. 530. Principles and Methods of Programming........2
INTD. 551. Materials and Methods of Construction........3
ARCH. 552. Structures I................................._3
16
Spring Semester, First Year
INTD. 501. Interior Design Studio II .....................5
INTD. 511. Interior Design Graphics II....................3
INTD. 552. Survey of Finish Materials.....................2
INTD. 671. Color Theory.................................. 1
INTD. 672. Color Application............................. 1
INTD. 673. Lighting Theory............................... 1
INTD. 674. Lighting Application.......................... 1
ARCH. 571. 19th and 20th Century History................_3
17
Fall Semester, Second Year
INTD. 600. Interior Design Studio III ....................5
INTD. 620. History of Interiors ..........................3
INTD. 650. HVAC ..........................................3
ARCH. 653. Acoustics ................................... I
INTD. 681. Interior Construction Detailing ............. 3
15
Spring Semester, Second Year
INTD. 601. Interior Design IV.............................5
INTD. 620. History of Interiors I ........................3
INTD. 660. Furniture Design...............................3


Interior Design I 83
ARCH. 663. Designer and the Law..........................2
Elective .......)......................................._3
16
Fall Semester, Third Year
INTD. 700. Interior Design Studio V ...................5
INTD. 702. Thesis Preparation............................3
INTD. 724. Advanced Graphics.............................3
Electives/Seminars ...................................._6
17
Spring Semester, Third Year
INTD. 701. Thesis........................................6
Electives/Seminars ..................................... 9
15
Tbtal hours required, 3-year program: 96
RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES, TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
INTD. 600. Interior Design Studio III ...................5
INTD. 620. History of Interiors .........................3
INTD. 650. HVAC .........................................3
INTD. 681. Interior Construction Detailing...............3
ARCH. 653. Acoustics ..................................._1
15
Spring Semester, First Year
INTD. 601. Interior Design Studio IV.....................5
INTD. 620. History of Interiors .........................3
INTD. 660. Furniture Design..............................3
ARCH. 663. Designer and The Law..........................3
INTD. 673. Lighting Theory ............................. 1
Elective ............................................... 3
V7
Fall Semester, Second Year
INTD. 700. Interior Design Studio V .....................5
INTD. 702. Thesis Preparation............................3
INTD. 724. Advanced Graphics.............................3
Electives/Seminajrs .................................... 6
L7
Spring Semester, Second Year
INTD. 701. Thesis........................................6
Electives/Seminars ..................................... 9
14
Tbtal hours required, 2-year program: 64
Electives and seminars are offered on topics pertinent to the interior design discipline, i.e., environmental psychology, man-environment systems, sociology, environmental form, and research methods. Specific topics are listed in the Schedule of Classes for each semester.
COURSES
INTD. 500-5. Interior Design Studio I. A project oriented studio introducing basic design principles and problem solving methods. A design vocabulary is presented and experienced through a series of projects which range from simple two and
three dimensional studies to more complex exercises in space planning and material selection. Emphasis is placed on individual growth in the design process.
INTD. 501-5. Interior Design Studio II. Continuation of Interior Design Studio I focusing on the development of design process, and introducing the rules of syntactics and analytics as they pertain to design.
INTD. 510-3. Interior Design Graphics Studio I. Basic graphic tools — ink and color free-hand drawing, model making techniques, model photography, perspective shade and shadow, atmospheric perspective, reproduction methods, blueprint making — and their application to interior design graphics.
INTD. 511-3. Interior Design Graphics Studio II. Continuation of Interior Design Graphics I focusing on more complex application of basic graphic tools to interior design graphics, and introducing professional portfolio design concepts which each student will develop into their own personal portfolio. INTD. 530-2. Principles and Methods of Programming. A survey seminar in design programming as it relates to the design process. Context includes information collection, interpretation, and documentation. The approach to the subject matter is multi-disciplinary in nature, allowing the student to apply skills and knowledge to his/her specific design field. INTD. 552-2. Survey of Finish Materials. This course is an in-depth investigation of materials commonly used as interior finishes. It provides the opportunity to study the composition and characteristics of the individual materials, the various applications of each, the processes used to transform the raw material into a finished product, and the governmental regulations and tolerances controlling the specification of them. INTD. 600-5. Interior Design Studio III. Problem solving and evaluation of the interior environment through functional and aesthetic necessities with attention paid to the contextual aspects. Practical and theoretical issues are presented. Design theory and philosophy are investigated in depth with space planning, spatial definition, human behavior, and history collectively explored.
INTD. 601-5. Interior Design Studio IV. Studio class explores various situational problems and solutions in the design of the interior environment. Projects differ according to the context of the human experience with the students responsible for methodology and chronology through experience gained in previous design studios.
INTD. 620-3. History of Interior I. TVvo lectures per week where design theory related to history provides a basis for exploring interior design and furniture from ancient to 18th Century English.
INTD. 621-3. History of Interior II. A continuation of INTD. 620, from 18th Century American to and including modem times.
INTD. 660-3. Furniture Design. A project-oriented studio/lec-ture course, the main goal of which is a further development of the design process. Each project involves research, programming, design, and presentation. Areas of focus include physical human factors, material characteristics, structure, joinery, history of furniture, drawing skills, and model building skills. INTD. 671-1. Color Theory. This course explores the central issues of the science of color, exploring color affect and responses through exercises with color and form.
INTD. 672-1. Color Application. Based on the knowledge of color theory, this course pursues the interaction of personality and color, use of color and the practical applications of the science of color
INTD. 673-1. Lighting Theory. The course investigates the processes and the objectives of lighting and provides the


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vocabulary necessary to the understanding and interpretation of lighting needs in design.
INTD. 674-1. Lighting Application. Strategies and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course covering both the theoretical and practical issues of lighting. Hands-on experimentation will lead to the discovery of the visual definitions of lighting vocabulary.
INTD. 667-3. Computer Graphics/Micro. One seminar and lab per week. Introduction to computers and their architectural applications. Hands-on exercises with the School micro computer lab and the University Prime system.
INTD. 681-3. Interior Construction Detailing. Graphic representation of building construction related to the interior environment. Various types of interior construction, finishing, and terminology will be explored and conventional methods of graphic representation for these methods will be taught. Lecture material/exercises that produce construction documents for interior construction.
INTD. 686-3. Special Topics. Various topical courses are offered in Interior Design that relate theory and methods to specific problems/issues in the profession.
INTD. 700-5. Interior Design Studio V. A studio emphasizing interdisciplinary teamwork with architects, landscape architects, and planners with community-oriented projects related to interior design.
INTD. 702-3. Thesis Preparation. Independent study leading to the development of a finish project program.
INTD. 701-6. Thesis. Approved professional research or design project concentrations in an area of interior design. Each candidate for the graduate degree is required to submit and defend a thesis project to demonstrate a high level of competence in solving problems through research, design, and planning. A thesis proposal must be submitted to the program chairman and thesis committee in the semester preceding the semester of thesis work.
INTD. 724-3. Advanced Graphics. Programming and design development of sign systems and graphics as integral parts of total environments, with respect to information transfer and symbolic communication.
Electives/Seminars. Electives and seminars are offered on topics pertinent to the interior design discipline, i.e., environmental psychology, man-environment systems, sociology, environmental form, and research methods. Specific topics are listed in the Schedule of Classes for each semester.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Program Director: Harry L. Gamham Secretary: Louise Garcia
Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Second Floor Ttelephone: 556-3475 Faculty: Professor: Hamid Shirvani Associate Professor: Harry L. Gamham Assistant Professor: Lauri Johnson
The landscape architecture program in the School of Architecture and Planning is a professional design program. The primary objective is to educate students to be effective practicing landscape architects in both the private and public sectors. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop:
Awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the landscape.
Intellectual understanding of the social arts and of humanistic and environmental approaches to design. Analytic problem-solving competence of synthesis and communication of the above knowledge into physical form.
Technical competence for implementing the physical forms.
Understanding of the institutional framework within which design is executed.
Skills and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the landscape architecture student with a deep appreciation of landscape and environmental quality while acquiring critical capacity through comprehension of all facets of landscape architecture and design expertise.
Degrees Offered
The landscape architecture program offers both first and second professional Master of Landscape Architecture degrees. The first professional M.L.A. degree requires three years of full-time study and a minimum of 96 credit hours. The first professional master's degree is suited for students without a professional design degree.
The second professional degree requires two years of full-time study and minimum of 64 credit hours. Students who enter this program must hold a professional design degree, i.e., B.L.A., or B.ARCH.
A thesis is required of all M.L.A. candidates.
The first professional Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) degree is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board of the American Society of Landscape Architects, and is recognized by the Council of Landscape Architecture Educators.
Curriculum
The curriculum has been planned to develop awareness and skills considered essential to core and advanced professional training in the field of landscape architecture. Emphases include design, land and construction technology, history and theory of the built environment, and a working knowledge of natural systems. The primary focus of the program is design of and on the landscape.
Opportunities exist to develop complementary knowledge and skills through interdisciplinary projects involving the other programs in the School of Architecture and Planning: architecture, interior design, urban design, and urban and regional planning.
The hierarchy of courses from term to term for the most part is planned sequentially to lead to the thesis, a comprehensive individual experience under the guidance of the L.A. faculty. The thesis itself requires two courses: Landscape Architecture Thesis Research and


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Landscape Architecture Thesis. Either a design project or applied research may be the basis for the thesis.
Application and Admission
lb be considered for admission into the landscape architecture program, applicants must submit application forms, a nonrefundable application fee of $30, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose and a portfolio of academic, creative, and/or professional work. The portfolio should be 14 by 17 inches or smaller. International applicants see the School general information at the beginning of this section.
For admission to the fall term, these materials must be received by March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. Applications received after March 15 may be considered for nondegree student status only.
For application forms and information please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 556-2755
The recommended minimum grade-point average for admission is 3.00 on a 4-point scale. If the student's grade-point average is below 3.00, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended as part of the application materials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the basis of all application materials and not on grade-point average alone.
The three-year program is open to students with a bachelor's degree. The program requires previous courses in college mathematics, physical science, and English.
Applicants to the two-year program having undergraduate degrees in urban and regional planning, architecture, environmental design, or other physical design degrees are considered for admission upon individual evaluation of their undergraduate curriculum, scholastic performance, and professional experience.
RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES, 3-YEAR PROGRAM Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
LA. 500. Landscape Architecture Design I .............5
LA. 505. Introduction to Design and Planning..........1
LA. 510. Graphic Communication I......................3
LA. 561. Synthecology Field Research I................1
LA. 580. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials ..............3
LA. 590. Semi-Arid Region Ecology Seminar ............ 3
16
Spring Semester, First Year
LA. 501. Landscape Architecture Design II.............6
LA. 550. Landscape Engineering I .....................5
LA. 570. Landscape Architecture History
and Theory Seminar .......L.................3
LA. 581. Rocky Mountain Plant Design................._3
17
Fall Semester, Second Year
LA. 600. Landscape Architecture Design III...........6
LA. 650. Landscape Engineering II ...................5
LA. 661. Synthecology Field Research II .............1
LA. 667. Computer Graphics/Micro ....................3
LA. 691. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation ... _3
18
Spring Semester, Second Year
LA. 601. Landscape Architecture Design IV................6
LA. 660. Landscape Engineering III.......................5
LA. 685. Advanced Landscape Architecture
Computer Systems............|....................3
Elective ................................................._3
17
Fall Semester, Third Year Semester Hours
LA. 700. Landscape Architecture Design V
(Interdisciplinary) ........\....................6
LA. 761. Synthecology Field Research III...................1
LA. 790. Landscape Architecture Thesis Research ...........4
Elective .....L......................j...................3
Elective .....I.......................................... 2
16
Spring Semester, Third Year
LA. 701. Landscape Architecture Thesis ....................6
LA. 760. Landscape Architecture Professional
Practice Seminar............................... 3
Elective ............................\..................._3
12
Tbtal hours required for three-year M.L.A. degree .......96
RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES, 2-YEAR PROGRAM
Fall Semester, First Year
LA. 600. Landscape Architecture Design III.............6
LA. 650. Landscape Engineering II .....................5
LA. 661. Synthecology Field Research II ...............1
LA. 667. Computer Graphics/Micro ......................3
LA. 691. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation ... _3
18
Spring Semester, First Year
LA. 601. Landscape Architecture Design IV
(Regional Design)..........J..................6
LA. 660. Landscape Engineering III.....................5
LA. 686. Advanced Landscape Architecture
Computer Systems...............3 Elective.............._3
17
Fall Semester, Second Year
LA. 700. Landscape Architecture Design
(Interdisciplinary) .......J...................6
LA. 761. Synthecology Field Research III.................1


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LA. 790. Landscape Architecture Thesis Research ............4
Elective ...................................................3
Elective .................................................. 3
17
Spring Semester,: Second Year Semester Hours
LA. 701. Landscape Architecture Thesis .....................6
LA. 760. Landscape Architecture
Professional Practice Seminar...............................3
Elective .................................................. 3
12
Tbtal hours required for the two-year M.L.A. degree 64
COURSES
LA. 500-5. Landscape Architecture Design I. This initial studio in design focuses on the application of aesthetic principles which form the basis for landscape architectural design. Space, form, colors, texture, movement, and balance are explored in their application to design. Problem-solving process is introduced as a fundamental design tool as applied to basic site planning.
LA. 501-6. Landscape Architecture Design II. The second design studio attempts to apply the principles and experiences explored in the previous design studio to the site planning process. In a studio/lecture situation several problems are analyzed from site analysis through site design. The intent is to build design competence through application of design principles to solve site problems in an increasing level of complexity.
LA. 510-3. Graphic Communication. TVvo lecture/studio periods per week. Introductory graphics includes orthographic and isometric projections, and one two-point perspective, lettering, sheet layout, freehand sketching, useful equipment and materials, and reproduction techniques.
LA. 550-5. Landscape Architecture Engineering I. Three lecture/studio periods per week. An introduction to grading and earthwork as a technical skill as well as a design technique. Site development systems, including topographic surveying technique, horizontal and vertical curves for road alignment, comprehensive site grading, and drainage/sewage.
LA. 561-1. Synthecology Field Research I. A three-day intensive short course exploring on field location various aspects of the Rocky Mountain region ecological tolerances to development.
LA. 570-3. Landscape Architecture History and Theory Seminar. One lecture/seminar period per week. Design theory related to historical and contemporary placemaking provides a basis for exploring landscape architecture resolutions from prehistoric to modem times. Students are required to contribute knowledge/research to the seminar periods, as well as prepare a term paper.
LA. 580-3. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials. TVvo lectures or field trips per week. Deciduous trees and shrubs of the Rocky Mountain region. Identification, horticultural concerns, and planting design principles are explored.
LA. 581-3. Rocky Mountain Planting Design. TVvo lecture/ studios per week. Emphasis is on the design principles relating to Rocky Mountain plant material. Color, scale, form, orientation, sequence, and appropriateness are the principle concentrations.
LA. 590-3. Semi-Arid Region Ecology Seminar. This course has been especially designed to produce a working discipline
in the semi-arid region ecosystems for graduate level landscape architects. It is the first course in a sequence leading to Design Studio IV, Regional Design.
LA. 600-6. Landscape Architecture Design III. Design Studio III expands skills learned in Studios I and II. Small scale design problems build into medium scale using urban design, housing, and recreational site planning problems. These studio projects further emphasize design process and focus on the systematic description and interpretation of ecological, behavioral, and functional criteria for the built environment. These learned skills become a springboard for the large scale landscape planning projects in design Studio TV.
LA. 601-6. Landscape Architecture Design IV. The fourth design studio allows the students to work as a team to solve complex large scale/landscape planning related problems in both urban and rural areas of Colorado. With an environmental assessment previously completed in LA. 691, the students focus on synthesizing natural, cultural, and aesthetic information to develop plan frameworks for public or private clients. The results are packaged into a reproducible report that includes both narrative and graphic data, and becomes useful for the university, student, and client participants.
LA. 650-5. Landscape Architecture Engineering II. Explores the array of wood, steel and concrete structural systems encountered in landscape architectural design. Pedestrial and vehicular paving system and construction processes are also studied. The graphic systems for describing the assemblage of the engineering and construction parts in landscape architecture are working drawings. The comprehensive packaging skills for these systems as construction documents are developed.
LA. 660-5. Landscape Architectural Engineering III. Hydrology and Hydraulics for Designers. Water-related issues for site design and regional planning. The study of rainfall/runoff, storm water detention design and elementary open channel hydraulics. Water supply issues are also addressed: western water rights, and site development systems for potable supply and irrigation. Design of appropriate small scale systems for storm water management and arid region irrigation.
LA. 661-1. Synthecology Field Research II. A three-day intensive short course on field location exploring various aspects of Rocky Mountain region ecological tolerances to development. LA. 667-3. Computer Graphics/Micro. One seminar and lab per week. Introduction to computers and their architectural applications. Hands-on exercises with the School micro computer lab and the University Prime system.
LA. 685. Advanced Landscape Architecture Computer System. Provides the student with advanced techniques of landscape evaluation processes. Also, introduces the use of computers in the program management and administration of the contemporary landscape architectural office practice.
LA. 691-3. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation. Assists students to become familiar with large scale spatial analysis methods, techniques, and models. By means of course assignments, lectures, laboratories, and field trips, students apply skills and knowledge related to the description and interpretation of the physical environment. Students are assigned to a site and are required to complete an environmental assessment that ultimately becomes the framework for the LA. 601 studio. Knowledge of Colorado ecology and basic cartography will assist the student in this course.
LA. 700-5. Landscape Architecture Design V. An interdisciplinary studio involving teamwork with architects, planners, and interior designers. Projects are comprehensive case studies ranging from Center for Community Development and Design generated projects for small towns on the Western Slope to urban design projects on the Front Range. Projects


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often include emphasis on community development processes as well as traditional design production.
LA. 701-6. Landscape Architecture Thesis. This final semester in design is spent in the preparation of an independent thesis. Opportunity for students to bring together in one comprehensive project all of the relevant design tools and theories learned during their M.L.A. studies. The student may pick a design, research, community development, or natural resource planning type thesis. Each thesis candidate is asked to develop an innovative hypothesis which expands the research base of his/ her chosen thesis subject. A case study is then chosen to explore the application of the hypothesis. The thesis is evaluated by all LA. faculty.
LA. 760-3. Professional Practice Seminar. TWo lecture periods per week. Business and professional relations, landscape architecture and its relations with government, the ASLA and other professional organizations, professional ethics, general business practices, contracts, and specifications will be covered.
LA. 761-1. Synthecology Field Research III. A continuation of LA. 561 and 661.
LA. 790-4. Landscape Architecture Thesis Research. This is the second course in the thesis sequence. Thesis students are asked to use methods and techniques learned in LA. 690 and apply them to their thesis topic. A complete research package is expected before entering the final course, LA. 701.
Independent Study
LA. 9601-3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to landscape architecture.
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
Acting Program Director: Yuk Lee Secretary: Agnes Romero Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 556-3479
Faculty: Professors: Yuk Lee, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: Thomas A. Clark, David R. Hill,
Bemie Jones
Urban and regional planning is a profession involved with a variety of activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human settlements and providing housing, public services, employment opportunities, and other crucial support systems that comprise a decent urban living environment. Such planning encompasses not only a concern for the structure and image of the built environment, but also a desire to harness the social, economic, political, and technological forces that give meaning to the everyday lives of men and women in residential, work, and recreational settings.
Degree Offered
The urban and regional planning program provides a nationally accredited graduate education for persons
desiring to enter the professional field of planning. The degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning is offered after successful completion of a course of study normally requiring two years of course work and thesis. The objectives of the urban and regional planning program are:
1. Tb clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems.
2. lb foster appropriate policy, planning, legal devices, and resources for creating urban and regional environments responsive to human needs and ecological principles.
3. To develop methods for evaluating urban and regional programs, policies, and plans that have important human and natural environmental consequences.
Curriculum
The planning curriculum reflects the objectives of the program and has three basic components:
1. Planning theory, methods and practice, the basis of the planning discipline — including courses in planning, implementation and administration, decision making, and the institutional planning environment.
2. The behavioral and social sciences, as needed to analyze the dynamics and forces shaping community and regional systems.
3. Specific problem-solving skills essential for effecting purposive change and resolution of human, social, and physical problems of urban and regional systems.
Course work begins with intensive classroom instruction in the fundamentals of theory, methods, and practice of planning. It progresses into plan-making studios, emphasizing projects drawn from the real work problems of the Denver area, Colorado, and the Rocky Mountain Region. The program's location at the center of a capital city aids students in finding planning-related work experiences during their graduate education. Courses are scheduled during day-time and evening hours to provide considerable flexibility for both part-and full-time students.
An internship is required in which the student receives credit for working in one of many planning firms or agencies in the Denver area. During the final course of study, a thesis project provides an opportunity for in-depth study and mastery of a topic of special interest to the student. Throughout the program, the emphasis is on solving real world problems. The program is fully accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board, the Association of the Collegiate Schools of Planning and the American Institute of Certified Planners.
The two-year, 60-semester-hour curriculum consists of 36 hours of required core courses as well as 24 hours of electives which may be conveniently assembled from the elective courses in the program and School and from courses in other graduate programs at CU-Denver.


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Students, in consultation with faculty advisers, identify one or more of the following areas of concentration and then select electives reflecting this focus:
Community economic development Urban design and land use planning Natural resources and environmental planning Real estate development
Regional analysis, planning, and administration Small town and neighborhood planning
The complexity of the environments in the area served by the program provides a challenge for high quality research and planning experiences, lb meet this challenge and to provide students with enriched learning opportunities, the program draws on academic and professional resources and actively engages in research, policy making, and problem solving throughout the region. However, this valuable experience and constant emphasis on the fundamentals of planning enables graduates of the program to compete successfully for planning positions across the nation and in foreign countries.
Application and Admission
Applicants must submit complete application forms, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, and the nonrefundable application fee of $30. An Application Committee will review all materials and determine acceptance on the basis of academic performance, work experience, interest and motivation for study. International applicants see the School general information at the beginning of this section.
Students who wish to be admitted in the fall should submit their application by March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. On a space available basis, applications are accepted for individual semesters. Deadlines in these cases are July 10 for fall, December 1 for spring, and April 15 for summer.
For application forms and additional information please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 556-2755
The program is open to students with a bachelor's degree in architecture, landscape architecture, environmental design, arts and humanities, engineering, social and natural sciences with a grade-point average of 3.00. Students with a GPA of 2.75 will be included for admission but are required to submit GRE scores.
CORE COURSES
Required Courses: Semester Hours
Statistics and Computer Applications.................2
Fundamentals of Planning and CD (2 courses) ...........6
Planning and CD Methodology (including Econ. Analysis) 4 Studio I (Graphics, Cartography, Communications, and
Physical Planning Content) ..........................5
Studio II (Plan making)................................5
Legal Aspects of Planning..............................3
Environmental Form ....................................3
Experiential Learning (Professional Practice Internship, and seminar covering the philosophy, values and ethics
of Professional Practice)............................3
Studio III: Thesis ................................... 5
Total 36
COURSES
URR 500-3. Fundamentals of Planning/Policy. A basic course in the principles of urban and regional planning and community development. Theories of planning, community organization, basic techniques, changing philosophies in modem society, and the process of shaping community form. URR 505-3. Fundamentals of Community Development. A basic course in the theory and methodology of community development practice, with emphasis on principles and techniques of community work. The course includes reviews of the community, community development, community organization, and action strategies literature.
URR 518-2. Statistics and Computer Applications for Planners. Essential methods of statistical analysis for urban/ regional planning and policy development. Major topics include types of data, sampling strategies, hypothesis testing, parametric and non-parametric techniques for studying relations among variables, and an introduction to multivariate methods and computer technology.
URP. 520-4. Planning/Community Development Methodology and Techniques I. Teaches the basic analyses that are used in the comprehensive planning process and community development. General theoretical understandings, specific analytical methods and techniques, and available data sources are discussed in regard to economics, demography, urban activities, community and neighborhood organization, physical structures, land-form and natural features.
URP. 521-3. Planning/Community Development Methodology and Techniques II. Advanced analytical methods and techniques. Includes physical, social, and economic models, urban development models, decision-making techniques, linear and nonlinear programming. Prer., URP. 520.
URP. 530-3. Planning/Community Development Theory. Describes and critically evaluates contemporary theories and ideologies of the planning process and planned change. Aids the student in developing individual powers of critical theoretical analysis and positions on what planning community development is and should be.
URR 552-3. Transportation Planning. Principles of transportation planning. Regional and urban transportation problems and policy formation. Techniques and methods used in transportation planning. Prer., URP. 520 or consent of instructor. URR 558-3. Community Economic Planning. Examines the process of community/urban economic development and revitalization. Explores the means by which both the public and private sectors can foster economic changes which promote social justice, ensure environmental integrity, and sustain the capacity of the community to support essential functions and services. Case studies address development issues in central cities, smaller municipalities, and neighborhoods.
URR 560-3. Housing and the Social System. Designed to explore and define housing problems, to identify the actors


Urban and Regional Planning / 89
and institutions that have an impact on the supply and availability of housing, to review the past and present role of the federal government in housing programs, and to acquaint the student with housing design, residential development requirements, and the role of housing in urban development. URR 570-3. Development of Environmental Form. Describes and evaluates the history and present developments of the manmade environment. Western culture's town-planning traditions, American planning history, and selected schools of modem environmental design thought. Special attention is given to linking major traditions and trends with environmental design in the development of the Denver metropolitan area.
URR 578-3. Social Research Methods for Designers and Planners. Introduction to the knowledge and skills needed to conduct research relevant to the fields of planning and environmental design. Course content presentation parallels students' work in carrying out applied research projects.
URR 580-3. Ethnicity and the City. The purpose is to examine where minorities are spatially, culturally, socially, economically, and politically in American cities and to determine the effect these factors have on the minorities as well as on the future of society and cities.
URR 590-3. The Modern Metropolis. Provides a basic background in the structure and dynamics of the modem metropolis. Includes a review of the historical background of the metropolis, analysis of its economic, social, and political components; and consideration of various interpretations of its role in modem society.
URR 600-3. Social Policy Analysis and Planning. A critical review of the evolution of national, state, and local social policies with an emphasis on current social issues and programs. Special attention is given to the application of techniques and procedures of policy analysis to community and regional systems.
URR 610-3. Neighborhood Planning. An introduction to small area planning. Survey of neighborhood and community theory. Examines and critiques research and analytical techniques involved in neighborhood planning. Examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighborhoods.
URR 620-3. Rural and Small Town Planning. Provides knowledge and perspective on global changes in rural areas, with particular reference to the United States. Evaluates the issues of agricultural, rural, and small town development and interrelationships with the industrialization and urbanization processes. Develops knowledge and skills in program planning for rural and small town development.
URR 630-3. Regional Analysis. Analysis of spatial structure and location patterns of people and industry. Theory for location of economic activities, industrial and commercial site requirements, and supporting transportation systems. Techniques for the analysis of economics in space. Formulation of regional policy. Prer., URP. 520 or consent of instructor.
URR 640-3. Regional Policy Administration. Regional policy administration. Critically examines the institutional legislative foundations for regional planning at the multi-state, state, and substate (including metropolitan) level in the U.S. Emphasizes regional policies regarding investment strategy, resource sharing, and economics development as well as those concerning land use, energy exploitation, and the environment.
URR 650-3. Comparative International Planning. Designed to expand the student's knowledge and perspective of urban and regional planning and community development situations beyond those in this country. The purpose is to provide a sense of different planning situations throughout the world,
including an analysis of cultures, social and political organizations, types of urbanization, physical settings, and resource availabilities.
URR 660-3. Social Factors in Urban Design. A review and evaluation of major theories and empirical studies dealing with the impact of social forces on the design of the physical environment. Methods of studying and defining user needs. Projects aimed at improving the harmony between social life and its physical containers.
URR 672-3. Environmental Planning. A review of the basic principles of air, water, and energy systems and their politics with an emphasis on their relations to planning processes and aims.
URR 676-3. Modern Environmental Thought. In-depth analyses and evaluation of contemporary classics in environmental argument. Design, normative, economic, behavioral, and other approaches will be analyzed. Prer., URP. 570.
URR 680-3. Urban Market Analysis and Planning. Considers the function, structure, and evolution of cities and settlement systems, as well as the economic foundations of key urban markets including those for land/real estate, labor, housing, and public services. Procedures for market and economic impact analysis will be discussed.
URR 686-3. Special Topics. Various topical courses are offered in planning and community development that relate theory and methods to specific problems/issues in communities, society, and/or the professions.
URR 690-5. Planning Studio I. Includes fundamentals of graphics, mapping, and communication skills for planning: master plan projects aimed at expressing students' ability to apply the knowledge and experience gained in the program to specific problem areas and complex client situations; and, planning research, community relations, problem identification, program development, plan making, and plan evaluation.
URR 700-5. Planning Studio II. A continuation and expansion of Studio I, dealing with more complex problems in a team format. Projects are selected to provide options to relate to individual student interest and are usually practical in that they deal with an actual community or citizen organization. URR 710-3. Legal Aspects of Planning. A review of the legal framework within which planning operates and the current trends in the courts toward land-use regulations and housing law.
URR 720-3. Practical Growth Management. An examination of zoning, subdivision, growth management systems, and environmental regulations in the context of the society in which they function and the needs of that society. Students learn to read and to challenge intelligently statutes and ordinances and to help design better regulatory systems.
URR 730-3. Planning and Politics. A seminar designed to expose students to the realistic political facts ever present in the planning process and to prepare individuals to deal effectively with governmental operation at all levels of their professional careers.
URR 732-3. Planning and Public Finance. Seminar which covers the theory of municipal and state financing. Includes study of budget preparation, establishment and maintenance of tax base, financing of capital improvements, and the general importance of overall governmental finance to planning effectuation.
URR 740-3. Communities and the Federal System. This seminar is directed toward exploring the role played by the federal government and its programs and the effect which it has upon the local community. Federal grants-in-aid programs will be studied as well as the process for dealing with the federal bureaucracy.


90 / School of Architecture and Planning
URR 750-3. Planners and the Real World. In seminar format, the opportunity is provided for the student to come in contact with persons from the business world who are affected by planning requirements and restrictions. These include bankers, real estate brokers, developers, land subdividers, and local officials who must interpret land control provisions. URR 760-3. Experiential learning. Laboratory and internship. A series of designed and programmed experiences dealing with the particular aspects of urban planning and community development with emphasis on the interpersonal, group process, and organizational dimensions, together with real life experiences in the professional arena.
URR 770-3. Planning Practicum. This course is specifically designed to give experience to students interested in planning and community development. The emphasis is on actual work experience in community settings with client groups depending upon the students to assist them in determining solutions to their problems. Director's consent required.
URR 780-3. Planning Practice and Administration. Student exposure to the role of a professional planner in public agency, consulting office, private enterprise, community organization, and land development corporation planning. Relates the educational experience of the URP program to professional planning practice and administration.
URR 790-5. Planning/CD Thesis. This studio is used for the final individual project of the student for presentation to the faculty. This project should integrate the knowledge gained through the program, reflect the primary research, and advance a cohesive argument.
Independent Study
URR 970-variable credit. Independent Study. Permits the student to pursue independent research in a subject area of special interest, or engage in research efforts as a preface to or preparation of a thesis project. Advance approval by faculty adviser is required.
URBAN DESIGN
Coordinator: Harry L. Gamham Secretary: Annette Korslund Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 556-2877
Faculty: Professors: John M. Prosser, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: Paul J. Foster, Harry L. Gamham
The urban design program is an advanced professional degree program designed for students who wish to specialize in urban design. The field of urban design is a complex, interdisciplinary area of study which encompasses architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, real estate development, and several other support fields such as law, civil and transportation engineering, psychology, and other social sciences.
The objectives of the program are to develop:
Awareness of and sensitivity to the urban form, structure, and function.
Understanding of the complex nature and interdependence of the built, the human, and the natural environmental dimensions of urban design.
Understanding of the institutional framework within which urban design policies, plans, programs, and guidelines are evolved and implemented.
Analytic problem-solving competence for synthesis and urban design programming.
The program has three basic components:
1. Theories of urban form and structure.
2. Elements of urban design and its financial/institu-tional framework.
3. Methods of urban design programming and implementation.
Degrees Offered
The urban design program offers both a one-year post-professional Master of Architecture degree and a two-year program. The one-year Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree program is suited for students who have completed a five-year professional design degree, i.e., B.Arch., B.L.A., B.U.P., etc. The two-year Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree program is open to students with a four-year B.S. in architecture, environmental design, planning, landscape architecture, social and natural sciences, etc.
The one-year program requires completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours, and the two-year program, a minimum of 60 credit hours. A thesis is required of all M.A.U.D. candidates.
Application and Admission
In order for students to be considered for admission into the Master of Architecture in Urban Design program, they must submit application forms, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, a portfolio of academic, creative, and/or professional work and the nonrefundable admission fee of $30. All portfolio materials must be in 14 by 17 inch format or smaller. If slides are included, they must be in a loose-leaf slide holder and annotated. International applicants see the School general information at the beginning of this section.
The recommended minimum grade-point average for admission is 3.00 on a 4-point scale. If the student's grade-point average is below 3.00, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended as part of the application materials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the basis of all application materials and not on grade-point average alone.
lb be considered for fall admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. Ib be considered for spring admission, all application materials must be received by November 1. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to December 15.
For application forms and additional information, please write to:


Urban Design / 91
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 556-2755
COURSE REQUIREMENTS, ONE-YEAR PROGRAM
Semester Hours
Urban Design Stiidio................................5
Thesis Preparation .................................2
Environmental Analysis .............................3
Planning, Landscape Electives.......................6
Thesis Studio .. J..................................5
Urban Design Seminar ...............................3
Professional Electives............................. 6
TOTAL 30
RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES,
TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours
LA. 510. Graphic Communication......................3
URP 505. Fundamentals of Community Development_____3
URP. 570. Development of Environmental Form ........3
PAD. 532. Public Policy Analysis and Evaluation ....3
Electives ........................................ 3
15
Spring Semester, First Year
BAD. 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy
and Entrepreneurship .......................3
UD. 684. Urban Development Economics .................3
Electives ......[.....................................6
UD. 601. Design Studio I............................. 3
15
Fall Semester, Second Year
PAD. 521. Organization Theory and Administrative
Behavior.....................................3
UD. 722. Mainstreets Seminar............................3
UD. 700. Interdisciplinary Design.......................5
UD. 712. Thesis Preparation.............................2
MK. 330. Marketing Research............................ 3
16
Spring Semester, Second Year
PAD. 598. Special Tbpics in Public Administration
(Publio'Private Sector Linkages)............3
ACCT. 480. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit
Organizations..............................3
URP 710. Legal Aspects of Planning.....................3
UD. 701. Thesis . [,.................................. 5
14
TOTAL 60
Electives
The following courses will be considered as electives and will serve as substitutes for courses waived as a result of a student's prior education and/or experience.
Public Administration
PAD. 505. Economics of the Public Sector
Design Architecture
ARCH. 571.19th and 20th Century Architectural History ARCH. 670. American Architectural History ARCH. 672. European, Japanese, South American Architecture Now
ARCH. 678. Architectural Preservation Landscape Architecture
LA. 570. Landscape Architecture History and Theory Seminar
LA. 580. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials
LA. 691. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation
Urban and Regional Planning
URP. 520, 521. PCD Methodology and Techniques I and II URP. 600. Social Policy Analysis and Planning URP. 660. Social Factors in Urban Design URP. 672. Environmental Planning
Business/Economics
PAD. 501. Fundamentals of Public Administration BAD. 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship
ECON. 521. Public Finance I Budgeting and Expenditures
ECON. 621. Public Finance I
ECON. 626. Seminar: Urban Land Economics
COURSES
UD. 601-3. Design and Planning I. A studio course which includes study and application of the basic planning, architecture, landscape, and urban design elements in the cityscape and streetscape. Problems will utilize actual locations for team research leading to individual student solutions of specific preservation, rehabilitation, development, infill, and revitalization problems. Special consideration will be given to the effects of historical, social, economic, and political factors on Mainstreet environments.
UD. 684-3. Urban Development Economics. Lecture and casework study that analyzes critical urban neighborhood and small town development factors. Study covers financial aspects of land activity modules, construction, infrastructure elements, zoning, real estate, and public/private sector funding methods.
UD. 700-5. Interdisciplinary Design. Actual comprehensive Mainstreet problems from internship, School, or CCDD requests are studied in the studio by teams of three or more students from at least two different professional disciplines. Projects will be completed through schematic design and planning development and policy phases, including printed documentation for distribution and application of the proposal solution information to aid ongoing development efforts. Field involvement with the public is a primary part of the process.
UD. 701-5. Thesis. Each student completes a written paper and/or design solution to a compound, complex Mainstreet project that has been previously selected with the assistance of an advisor for research and evaluation during thesis preparation. The project can be a theoretical or an actual problem, but must address significant multiple aspects of community mixed-use corridors and centers. The work should encompass major challenged in the definition and solution of Mainstreet environments.


92 / School of Architecture and Planning
UD. 710-5. Urban Design Studio. A studio course to synthesize the studies of advanced architectural, urban design, landscape, and planning design problems that consider large scale organization and communication concepts of society. The program includes design studio and/or community action center study options. Studies cover particular aspects of urban design, with emphasis on economic, social, and political factors and design process determinants. Tbpics include the design, implementation, and evaluation of urban residential districts, urban cores, institutional centers, and circulation systems. (One year sequence.)
UD. 711-5. Urban Design Thesis. Studio and field trips. Focuses all of the student's graduate professional studies on completing a compound, complex thesis. The problem centers on an urban design project, but the work includes architecture and planning aspects with significant attention given to either one. The areas of concentration are in recreation, transportation, health, community action and development, preservation, and revitalization design. (One year sequence.)
UD. 712-2. Thesis Proposal and Preparation. Selection and proposal of a real world problem which allows students to integrate skills acquired in the program or to focus on design, business, policy, public administration, or development issues including data and analytical information needed for decision-making purposes. Proposal must be submitted the first month of fall semester by all students planning on completing their thesis the coming spring.
UD. 722-3. Mainstreets Seminar. A case study course which focuses on the heart of communities and neighborhoods. The course includes a balance between classroom and field presentations which cover the individual and combination, design and planning, physical and psychological aspects of living, working, shopping, and recreating on mainstreets. Faculty, student, and guest lectures and discussions are all a major part of the course sequence.
UD. 784-3. Urban Design Seminar. A case study course with classroom and field presentation. Emphasis is on particular human needs and responses to provide places for housing (individual and mass) industries, commerce, education, culture, recreation, health, defense, religion, transportation, politics, business, and necropolis, as well as combined activities. Consideration is given to the effect of each function on physical characteristics of domestic and foreign architecture, landscape, urban design, and planning complexes.
UD. 795-3. Experiencing the Cityscape. Students explore the scope of the city form as well as exploring individual examples to interpret urban architecture in its context. Special emphasis is placed on urban needs and quality of spaces for public and private uses. Relationships within activities, circulation, climate, and landscape are analyzed from an aesthetic viewpoint.
CENTER FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN
Director: T. Michael Smith Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 556-2816
Staff: Thomas G. Edmiston, Robert D. Horn, Bernie Jones, James A. Laurie, Martin R. Saiz, Jon Schler, George Weber
The Center for Community Development and Design is the research, community service, and student field
studies division of the School of Architecture and Planning. Building upon two decades of experience, the Center believes that the creative, synthetic processes of design and planning can reach appropriate solutions to community and environmental problems through active involvement of citizens and applied research. As the outreach unit of the School, the Center responds to and initiates a variety of opportunities for research and educationally oriented public service projects for faculty, staff, and students.
In undertaking project work, the Center organizes interdisciplinary research and assistance teams, capable of addressing complex policy, planning, design, and development problems and needs of Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West. Over one hundred requests for assistance and new research projects are handled annually. Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West provide a dynamic learning laboratory for applied research and service in such areas as: economic development, housing policy, neighborhood and small town planning, participatory design, park and open space design, and urban design. The Center offers field study opportunities in both urban neighborhoods and in rural communities.
Scope of Work
Solving urban and rural problems in the Rocky Mountain West means confronting both high plains semi-arid conditions and the fragile alpine environment. The sensitive development of human settlements in harmony with this delicate natural environment is an overarching goal of the School. This goal is realized through pragmatic service and applied research projects. Faculty and student research and assistance teams have conducted projects in such areas as:
Commercial Revitalization. The Center assists small and medium size towns, urban neighborhoods, and municipal agencies in developing comprehensive economic development plans for older commercial districts and downtown business areas. Working with community and merchant organizations, the Center helps develop public-private resources to implement strategic plans for the long-term diversification of local economies. Center staff assist twelve to fifteen communities a year, identify their unique competitive opportunities, develop design guidelines, prepare financing packages, provide designs for strategic parcels of land, and evaluating the success of the projects.
Housing Policy. In an era of fundamental shifts policies have drastically reduced resources for housing, especially for low and moderate income citizens. The Center has undertaken several research initiatives, to affect housing policies for those groups. The Center works with housing agencies to assess current conditions and to conduct research on and development of new policies and programs. Based on its research and work with constituent groups, the Center was instrumental in convincing city leaders to develop an $11 million Housing Trust Fund for Denver, developing city


Center Community Development and Design / 93
policies and plans to eliminate homelessness and is currently engaged in research to evaluate and modify private lending practices in inner-city neighborhoods, and housing needs assessment for the disabled.
Rural Community Assistance. The Rocky Mountain West is overwhelmingly rural in character and is often described as "the boom or bust" center of the United States, because of the historic instability of mineral and natural resources industries. Rural communities are pursuing opportunities for economic diversification in the hope of leveling out the "peaks and valleys" of their economies. In response to this need, the School of Architecture and Planning has teamed with the Colorado State Department of Local Affairs and with the Mountain Bell Corporation to form Colorado Initiatives. This program's purpose is to assist rural Colorado counties and municipalities in developing sound community economic strategies that improve local conditions. Each year ten communities are selected for specialized technical research, and financial planning assistance. In addition to this targeted assistance, the School works with other rural communities in a more broad based, developmental way on a variety of local issues. For example, the town of Burlington, Colorado requested assistance with a site plan for an old town museum. This one project led to six other projects over a two-year period in the town of 3,500 people: a site design for a 190-acre industrial park, a market study for the Old Town, a design for town entrance and unified public signage system and a main street revitalization study. These projects have culminated in a regional economic base study for the surrounding four-county area.
Minority Business Development. In responding to one of Denver's and Colorado Springs' urgent inner-city
needs, the Center has developed a program to strengthen minority and women-owned businesses. This program is designed to improve their access to capital and to provide better goods and services to inner-city neighborhoods. As these businesses become stronger, they hold the potential for creating new jobs for inner-city residents. Five corporations, three government agencies, two non-profit corporations, and the School provide support to this program which is operated and managed by the Center. Seventy-five individual businesses obtain management and technical assistance for building renovation each year.


"7 like working at an urban business school. The city around us is like a laboratory where we can explore the issues and concepts of business today, and the students bring a lot of experience into the classroom. It's a good place to blend teaching and research."
— Professor Peter Bryant


College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Dean: Donald L. Stevens Associate Dean: James D. Suver Assistant Dean: Linda S. Hull College Office: 1475 Lawrence St., Third Floor Telephone: 623-4436
Director of Undergraduate Programs: Edward J. Conry
Director of Graduate Programs: James R. Morris Director of Health Administration Programs: Bruce R. Neumann
Executive Board of the Business Advisory Council Bob Baker, Chairman, Columbia Savings Edward J. Baran, President, Capitol Life Insurance Kermit L. Darkey, President, Mountain States Employers Council
Thomas J. Gibson, Executive Vice President, Gates Corporation
N. Beme Hart, Chairman of the Board, United Banks of Colorado
Del Hock, President, Public Service Company Gail Schoettler, State Treasurer
Solomon D. Thijillo, Colorado Vice President and Chief Executive Officer, Mountain Bell
Advisory Board Members,
Health Administration Program
Sister Mary Andrew, President, St. Joseph Hospital Dale Baker, Partner, Ernst & Whinney Robert Dickler, Director, University Hospital Joel Edelman, President, Rose Medical Center Dr. Fred Graham, Associate Director, Medical Group Management Association
Dr. David Lawrence, Regional Director, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan
John McFettridge, Executive Director, Boulder Community Hospital
Dr. Joyce Neville, Manager, Department of Health and Hospitals
Lowell Palmquist, Executive Director, Swedish Medical Center
Dave Sheehan, Sr., Vice President for External Affairs, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Colorado Dr. Frank Traylor, Director, Department of Institutions Larry Wall, President, Colorado Hospital Association Dr. Jean Watson, Dean/Professor, CU-Health Sciences Center
Roger Weghorst, Partner, Arthur Young & Company
Advisory Committee for the Executive Program in Health Administration
Barbara J. Brown, Assistant Administrator, Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle, Washington Virginia Cleland, Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco
C. Michael Hutchens, Executive Director, Greeley Clinic, Greeley
John R. Johnson, Administrator, Palo Alto Medical Clinic, Palo Alto, California
Ralph Lawson, Partner in Charge, Management Advisory Services, Deloitte Haskins & Sells
Charles Madden, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Paragon Health Care Services, Inc., Costa Mesa, California
Roger S. Schenke, Executive Vice President, The American Academy of Medical Directors, T^mpa, Florida
Richard Singer, Director of Education, American College of Health Care Administrators, Bethesda, Maryland
Frank Traylor, Executive Director, Department of Institutions
Clyde E. TUcker, Director, Office of Educational Services, CU-Health Sciences Center
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment.
Our nation's business and corporate environment is experiencing dramatic and complex change. Your ability to understand these changes and function as a skilled manager in today's rapidly moving business world will depend to a great extent on the quality of your business education. Because of the dynamic changes in business trends and management, research in these areas is crucial to a successful transition. The business faculty of “research institutions" provide the most current knowledge, concepts, and advances in the field of business management. CU-Denver's College of Business is a "research institution," and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to scholarly research.
The information contained in university textbooks is first conceived through faculty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research-oriented faculty is writing and teaching-concepts years before they are typically seen in textbooks. Our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice.


96 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full- and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking higher levels of achievement, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today's challenging business environment.
At CU-Denver's College of Business, you can have the edge over your competition.
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their teaching and research. Recruited from the nation's leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale, many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment, unequalled in the region.
Students
Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, a large majority of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experiences enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are fulltime students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute a very high percentage of the student body. Since admission standards are among the most stringent in the region, the student body is highly motivated and talented.
This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students.
Accreditation
While there are approximately 800 recognized schools of business nationwide, there are only 237 that are accredited by the national accreditation agency for university schools of business — the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CU-Denver's College of Business is one of the few schools in the State accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently "Tbday, just having the degree isn't as important as where you get it ... As corporations become sawier buyers of... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal . . . Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program." In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs.
In a similar manner, our program in health administration is the only such program in the region accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area.
Academic Programs
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business management is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree.
Career Opportunities
Graduates occupy positions and perform widely varied functions in:
Advertising Auditing Banking Consumer credit Controllership Credit administration Entrepreneurship Financial accounting Financial management General management Health administration Industrial selling and
purchasing Information systems Insurance
International business Investments
Management accounting Management consulting
Others hold positions of responsibility in fields as diverse as business journalism, public relations, city planning, chamber of commerce and trade association management, college administration, and government.
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed information. In addition, the College of Business awards some departmental and general scholarships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business office, 623-4436.
Each year, a number of students are awarded Dean's Scholarships, Colorado Scholarships, and Regents Scholarships. These provide financial support for a portion of the students' tuition and fees.
The Purchasing Management Association of Denver awards an annual scholarship to students interested in
Marketing management Marketing research Mortgage finance Operations research Organization management Personnel/human resources management Operations management Public accounting Public administration Real estate Retailing
Selling and sales management Taxation
Traffic and distribution management Transportation Wholesaling


Full Text

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER 2'Y Undergraduate and Catalog of uwu-""'"" / Studies 1987-88

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ectory of Colleges and Schools U18701 7540142 Pages 74 94 124 152 186 280 284 292 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING Architecture Architecture in Urban D es ign Int e rior Design Landscape Ar c h itecture Urban and Regional Planning COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Accounting Busine ss Administration Business Admjnistration for Execut i ves Entrepreneurship and New Venture Dev e l opment Finance Health Administrati o n Health Admjnistr ation Executive Program Human Resources Manageme nt leacher Certification Progran1s Adminis tr atio n , Curri c ulum , and S u pervis i on Lnstructional lechnology Counseling and Per sonne l Ser v i ces Early Child h ood Education and Early C hil dhood Spe c ial Education Educational Psych o l ogy Elementary Education Foundations SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Inf ormatio n Systems l.nternational Business Man ageme nt M a n age ment Science and Inf orma tion Systems Marketing Operatjons Man agement Quantitat ive Met h ods R eal Estate 1tansportation and Distribution Management I n s tructional lechnology Corpora t e Ins t ructional Developmen t and 1tain i n g Ins tructio n a l Computing Specialist In st ructi onal lechnologist Library Medi a Specialist Language and Culture R eading and Writin g R esearc h and Eva l uation M e thodo l ogy Secondary Education Special Educa tion / Educationally Handicapped COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Applied Mathemati cs Civil Eng i neering Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience Mec hanical Eng ineering Engineering, Mas ter of COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Anthropology Basi c Science , Master o f Biolo gy C h emjstry Commu nication and Theatre Economics English Environmental Science , Mas t e r of Ethnic Studies Fine Arts Geography Geology Army ROTC Music MILITARY SCIENCE COLLEGE OF MUSIC History Humaniti es , Ma s t e r of M a thematics Modern Lang u ages Philosophy Physi cs Political Scie nce Psychology Social S c ience, Mast e r of Sociology lechnical Communication, Master of Air Force ROTC Performance Musi c GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS Criminal Just ice Public Administration Directory of Programs an d Degrees-Ins i de B ack Cover

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Legend A/P ....... School of Architecture and Planning BA ........................... Bachelor of Arts BFA ..................... B achelor of Fine Arts BS .... . . ................... Bachelor of Science BS (CSE) ................. .. Ba chelor of Scie nce in Compute r Scie nce and Engineering CB ......................... College of Business CLAS . . . . . College of LiberaJ Arts and Sciences e ...... . . .......... .......... ........ Emphasis ED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S chool of Education ED S . .....•••............. Education Speciali s t ENG R .................. College of Engi neering GSBA ...................... Graduate School of Bu siness Administration GSPA . . .... . . Graduate S c hool of Public Affairs m ..... . ............... ..... .... ...... . . . Minor MA ... . ....... . . .............. . . M aster o f Arts M.ARCH ............... Master of Architecture MAUD Master of Architecture in Urban Design MBA ....... Master of Business Administra ti o n MBS ....... . . . . . ....... Master of Ba s ic Scie nce MCJ ................ Master of Criminal Justice ME ...... . . . . ........... Master of Engi neering MH ..................... Mast e r of Humanities MID .... ............. Master of Interior Design MLA ........ Master of Landscape Architecture M .PA ..... . . ... Mas t e r of Publk Administration MS .......................... Master of Science MURP . Master in Urban and Regiona l Planning o ... .................... ......... . Option PH D .................... Doctor of Philosophy XMBA ......••............ Executive Master of Business Administration XMSHA ......•... . Executive Master of Science in Hc alth Administration Degree Programs Accounting ..................... .... .... ....... e (CB) Accounting ............................... MS (GSBA) Accounting and Information Sy stems ...... MS ( GSBA) Anthropology ........... ...... .......... . . BA ( CLAS) Anthropol ogy ............................ MA (CLAS) Applied Mathematics .....•• •• ............. BS (ENGR) Applied Mathema ti cs . . . . . . . . . . . .. MS (ENG R ) Applied Mathematics . . ................. PH D (EN GR) Architecture .......................... . M.ARCH (AlP) Architecture in Urban Desi g n ..... ....... MAU D (Al P) Bas ic Scie nce ............................ MBS (CL AS) Bilingual Education ............................ e (ED) Bio logy ............. ..... . . . . .............. BA (CLAS) Biology ..................... •....... ...... MA (CLAS) Biology .....................•....•...... PH D (CLAS) Business Administratio n . . . . . . MBA (GSBA) Busines Administration. Executive Program .... . ..... •... .... XMBA (GSBA) Chemistry ........ .... ..................... BA (CLAS) Chemistry ................................ MS (CLAS) Civil Engineering ......... . ........ . ....... BS ( ENG R ) Civil Engineering ......................... MS (ENGR) Communication a.nd Theatre .............. BA (CLAS) Communication and Theatre .............. MA (CLAS ) Conununica1 ion .................•....... PH 0 ( LAS) Computer Scie nce . . ......................... o (CLAS) Computer Scie nce ........................ M S (ENGR ) Computer Science and Engineering .. BS (CSE ) (ENG R ) Corporat e Instructional Development and ltain.ing ... e Counseling and Services ........... MA (ED) Crimin a l Jus tice ......................... MCJ (GS PA) Earl y Childhood Education ...... ............ MA (ED) Economics ............... ..........•...... BA (CLAS ) Economics . . .............................. MA (CLAS ) Education ... .............••••••. . ......... PH D (ED) Ed ucation Specialis t ............ . . .......... ED S (ED ) Education Technology ............ . ............. e (ED) Educati onaJ Administration .................... e (EO) Ed ucational Psychology ...... ................ MA (ED) Educationally Hanclicapped ......... ........... e (ED ) E lectrical Engineering .. ................... BS (ENGR ) Elect ric a l Engineering ..........•••••••.... MS (ENGR) E lementary Education ....•.•... . . ........... MA (ED ) Engineering .... ..........•............... ME (ENGR ) Englis h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BA (CLAS ) Englis h ...... . . ........................... MA (CLAS ) Englis h ..... . . . . ........................ PH D (CLAS) E nglis h as a Second Lan guage . ................. e (ED) Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development .......••.... . . . ... e (CB ) Environmental Science .................... MS (CLAS ) Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ............ . . e (CB) Fina nce ........ ..................... . . . ... MS (GSBA ) Fin e Arts ........•.••••••. • . ...... . ........ BA (CLAS ) Fine Arts ................................. BFA (CLAS) Foundations ...... ...........••••• • .••... . ... M A (ED) Fren c h ... . ........ ...•.••••••............. BA (CLAS ) Geography ......••... ..••.••... . . ....... . . BA (CLAS) Geograph y ..............•.••.••.. •• . . .... . MA (CLAS) Geology ........ . ..........••.............. BA (CLAS ) Gem1an ...................••.............. BA (CLAS) Health Administration .................... MS (GSBA) Health Administration, Executive Progra m ...... ........... XMS HA (GSBA ) Hi story ..................... .... .......... . BA (CLAS) His tory ................................... MA (CLAS) Huma n Resources Management ................ e (CB) Humanities . . . ........... ..... . ........... MH (CLAS) Industrial and Organizationa J P sychology . . . . . MB A/ BA (CLAS) , MBA/MA (CLAS ) Infant Specialization ........................... e (EO) lnformation Systems ........................... e (CB ) Lnstructional Computing Specialist . . . . . . . . ....... e Lnstructional Technologi s t ........................... e Instructional Technology ..................... MA (ED ) lnstructionallechnology ............ ....... PH D (ED ) Interior Design .................•.••••...... MlD (AlP ) Internation a l Affairs ............••••.•...... m (CLAS ) International Bu siness . ............ ........... , . e (CB ) Landscape Architecture ..............•.... MLA (AlP) Library Media Specialist .....••••.•............ e (E D ) Ma11agement ............. .................... . . e (CB) Manage ment .............................. MS (GSBA ) M anagement Science and Information Systems ......... . ...... .... MS (GSBA ) Marketing . .......... . . ...........• .••..... ..... e (CB) Marketing ... ............................. MS (GSBA ) Mathematics .............. . ......... . ..... BA (CLAS) Mathematics ....... .........•............. MA (CLAS) Mechanical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BS (ENGR ) Mechanical Engineering ........... • • • • .... MS ( ENGR ) Oper ations Management ....................... e (C B ) Philosophy .......................•.• ...... BA (CLAS ) Phys i cs ................... ................. BA (CLAS ) Politica l Science .... . ...................... BA (CLAS ) Political Sdence .....••••.. . . ....... ....... MA (CLAS) Psychology ......... ........ ............ ... BA (CLAS) Psychology ..... ...... ....•.•.......... . . . MA (CLAS) Public Administration ................... MPA (GSPA ) Public Administration ................... PH D (GSPA) Reading ..................•••• • •• ••......... . MA (ED) Real Est a t e .................... . •.•••........... e (CB) Secondary Education ....•••••.............. . MA (ED ) Socia l Science ............ ................ MSS (CLAS ) Socio logy .................................. BA (CLAS ) Socio logy ..... . . . . ...••••••............... MA (CLAS) Spanis h . . . . . . . ...... ... ................... BA (CLAS) Special Education . . . . . . . . . . ......... MA (ED) Teacher Certification Programs ......... ........ c (ED) Technical Communjcations ............... . MS (CLAS ) ltansportation and Di stribution Managem ent .. e (CB) Urba n and RegionaJ Planning .... ......... MURP (AlP) Writing .................................... BA (CLAS)

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of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street $3.50 Denver, Colorado 80202 2298 Telephone-303/556-2800 SECO OCLASS POSTAGE PAID ATTHE POST OFFIC E BOULDER , CO 8030 2

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s celebrating the 50th anniversary of its authorization by the Board o Regents educational presence within the city. Thday, CUDenver tljle city's only has become a leader in quality undergraduate, graduate, and professional new replacement facility-five stories high and totaling 250,000 square feet of largest higher education facility ever developed by the State of Colorado. Completion expected in early 1988.

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The University of Colorado had been offering special courses for Denverites since 1912, when the Extension Division was established. It was only in 1938 , however, that the Denver Center was formally organized as a permanent unit of CU in Denver with an office, an administrator, and one full-time faculty member. CU expected a couple of hundred Denverites to take advantage of college credit courses 1,500 showed up! The C.A. Johnson Building at 509 17th St., became the first "permanent" home of the DENVER CENTER in the winter of 1939. The DENVER EXTENSION CENTER leased the Fraternal Building, 1405 Glenarm Pl., in 1948. In 1957, a move was made to the former "framway Building at 1100 14th St. Frat""al Building

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Underladuate and Catalog 1987-88 of Colorado at Denver 1100 14th Stref>t Denver, 80202 (303) 556-28( 0 I I Although this bulletin was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic ca lendar, admission and grad u ation requirements, course offerings and course descriptions, and of tuition and fees) is subject to change witho ut notice or obliga tion . CUDenver is ad affirmative action/equal opportunity institut ion. For calendars, tuition rates requirements, deadlines, etc., st udents should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll. The courses listed in this bulletin are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are sub ject td modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every se mester , and the facult)l teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructo may alter the content of a co urse or program to meet particular class needs. Courses are liste d by college or school. University of Coloradc Bulletin. (USPS 65 1 060) 262 Stadium Buildinf, Campus Box 384, Boulder, Col orado 80!9. Volume 1987 , No.2, ay/J une Published 4 times a ar: March/April , May /June, August/Se tember, January / February . I Second class postage aid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Bulletin , l!00-14th St., Campus Box 167, De ver, Colorado 80202.

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4 I University of Colorado at Denver ACADEMIC CALENDAR, Summer 19872 May 27-29 June 1 July6 August 7 Fall19872 August 17-21 August 24 September 7 November 26-27 December 16 Spring 19882 January ll-15 January 18 March 21-25 May l3 Registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). End of term. Registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). Thanksgiving holidays (no classes) . End of semester. Registration. First day of classes. Spring vacation (no classes). End of semester. Summer 19882 June 6-10 June l3 July4 August 5 Fall19882 August 18-23 August 25 September 5 November 24-2 5 December 19 Spring 19892 January 16-20 January 23 March 20-24 May 19 Orientation and registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes) . End of term. Orientation and registration. First day of classes. Holiday (no classes). Thanksgiving holidays (no classes). End of semester. Orientation and registration. First day of classes. Spring vacation (no classes). End of semester. 1The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. 2Cons ult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates. deadlines for changing programs (dropping and adding classes). and procedures for registration.

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m the Chancellor Dear Student: Welcome to e University of Colorado at Denver. On ehalf of the faculty, staff, and students, I ffer to you the challeng ing environme t of one of Colorado's premier of higher education. Your decision tJ attend CU-Denver shows your willingner1s to learn at Colorado's only urban pull"c university. CU-Denver i one of the four campuses of the Universit 1 of Colorado system. As a vital part f that system, offering baccalaureate, and doctoral programs, we 9ave achieved distinction nationally anditemationally because of the high quali of our programs, faculty, and alumni. Lo ted in downtown Den ver , the Univers l ty challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual emyonment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination. A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Chancellor Glendon F. Drake Chancellor I 5 Denver is our ufrban perspective that is an integral theme fu our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Since enrollment has grown to approximately 10,617 students, including 5,790 undergraduates and 4,827 graduate students. The offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and deg ee option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you wifb a foundation on which to bul ld your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as and as citizens. Components of this educatiohal experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a to classroom study. The University's seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal i Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Scien ce, Music, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that . focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making a,vailable to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and We at the De ver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. T s is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as o 1 al issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. We look forw d to working with you as you join our community of scholars / teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a ri intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to see , g you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree. My best wis es to you and to your future. Glendon F. Dr e Chancellor University of C lorado at Denver

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6 I University of Colorado at Denver ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents CHARLES M. ABERNATHY, JR., M.D., Montrose, term expires 1988 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992 PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1990 LYNN J. ELLINS, Longmont, term expires 1990 HUGH C. FOWLER, Denver, term expires 1988 SANDY F. KRAEMER, Colorado Springs, term expires 1988 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1990 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term expires 1992 University-Wide Officers E. GORDON GEE, President of the University; Professor of Law. B.A., University of Utah; J.D., Columbia Univer sity; Ed.D., 'Teacher's College, Columbia University. HUNTER RAWLINGS, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Professor of Classics. B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Princeton University. C. WILLIAM FISCHER, Vice President for Budget and Finance; Professor Attendant Rank of Public Affairs. B.A., Muskingum College; M.P.A., Harvard University. THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State Univer sity; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., LL.B., University of Colorado. EDWARD W. MURROW, 1teasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado. CU-Denver Officers OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR Chancellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glendon R Drake Special Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Guyer Associate Director, Governmental and External Affairs . . . . . . . . . Mary T. Cramer Director, Public Relations and Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bob Nero Director, Campus Affairs . . . . . . . Barbara O'Brien DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs ..................... John S. Haller, Jr. Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Dean, The Graduate School . . . . . . . . David W. Greenfield Acting Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs . . . . . . . . Thomas A. Clark Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fernie Baca Dean, School of Architecture and Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hamid Shirvani Dean, College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration ............. Donald L. Stevens Dean , School of Education . . . . . William R Grady Resident Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paul E. Bartlett Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Ostheimer Acting Resident Dean, College of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roy Pritts Dean, Graduate School of Public Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marshall Kaplan Director, Auraria Library . . . . . . . Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Director .......... Jean R Hemphill Director, Division of Continuing Education .................. William D. Boub Acting Dean, Student Academic Services . . . . . . . . . . George H. Wayne Director, Academic Center for Enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . Kathy R. Jackson Director, Center for Internships and Cooperative Education Janet Michalski Director, Educational Opportunity Program . . . . . Cecil E. Glenn Director , Student Services and Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . Bruce E. Williams Director, Women's Resources . Pamela Kesson-Craig DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance . Jeffrey W. Konzak Director, Affirmative Action . . . . George Autobee Director, Budgets and Fiscal Planning ................... Julie 1brres Bursar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Norman Chandler Director, Computing Services . . George E. Funkey Director, Financial Aid/Student Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ellie Miller Director, Financial and Business Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kenneth E. Herman Acting Director, Personnel Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phillip H. Becker Director, Student Administrative Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . George L. Burnham DIVISION OF PLANNING Acting Vice Chancellor for Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce W. Bergland Director, Institutional Research and Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ralph Henard CU FOUNDATION Vice President, CU Foundation at Denver .................... Barbara S. Allar Assistant Director of Alumni and Annual Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beverly Brunson

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Chancellor's l dvisory Group VERONICA BARE ' , Executive Director NEWSED, Com munity Develop ent Corporation JACQUES W BE NIER, Manager, Personnel Administra tion, Program, Hughes Aircraft Company DIANA BOULTER, esident, The Denver Partnership THE HON. JEAN E FAATZ, Colorado State Representative WILLIAM W FLE CHER, President and General Manager, Rocky News DAVID Greenberg/Baron Associates THE HON. REGIS ROFF. Colorado State Senator JOHN KASSER, C liege Football Associates LEE LARSON, V ce President/General Manager, KOA Radio 85 J FRANK NEWMAJ, President, Education Commission of the States C. NEIL NORGREN Chairman of the Board and Chief Exec utive Officer, B tier Fixture Company Administration I 7 I THOMAS Publisher, Denver Business Journal BRUCE ROCKWELL, Executive Directo , The Colorado 'Dust HERRICK ROTH President, Herrick Rbth Associates ROBERT SCANilAN, Regional Manager, Coldwell Banker BILL SCHEITLER, President of the City Council, Denv er GAIL SCHOETTLER, Colorado State lteasurer JEROME SERACUSE, Fellow, American Institute of Architects TOM STRICKLAND, Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber & Madden KEN TONNING, Vice President/General Manager, KUSA TV, CH9 BEN TRUJILLO, President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce SOLOMON TRUJILLO, Colorado Vice President and Chief Executive Officer, Mountain Bell CLAIR VILLANO, Director, Consumer Fraud Division THE HON. WILMA WEBB, Colorado State Representative MICHAEL R. WISE, Chairman of the Board, Silverado Banking The University of Colorado seal, adoptedj in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning totch framed in laurel is placed besid e him. The Greek inscription means "Let your light shine." According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek b.vilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth oE the figure suggests the "morning of life," and scroll represents written language.

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8 I University of Colorado a t Denver Table of Contents Content s Page Contents Aca d emic Calendars ............... .... ... . Message from the C h ancellor .............. . Administration of the Univers i ty and of the CUDenver Camp u s ......... . . Chance ll or's Advisory Gro u p ... ........... . The University ............... . . . ....... . History ................. . ........... . . . . Academic Structure ...................... . Academic Programs ........ . ............. . Accreditation ................... ....... . . . Members h ips . .......................... . General Information ..... . ........ ...... . Weekend University ...................... . Student Organizations .................. . . . Faculty ......... ...... ... .............. . . Auraria Higher Ed u cation Cen ter ........... . Affirmative Action . . ................... .. . Research .... .... . . ..................... . Centers and Institutes for 4 5 6 7 ll 11 11-12 12 13 13 11-53 13, 53 13 14 16 17 17 Research, Service, and ll"aining . . . . . . . . . . 17-23 Admission Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . 25-31 Undergrad u ate Admiss ion Information ....... 25 29, 31 Freshmen Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-27 nansfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-28 Former Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Interna t ional Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Grad u ate Admission ..................... . . 'Jests ................... ................ . Tuition and Fees .. , ..................... . Residency Classification ............ . ...... . Financial Aid ..... ...... ......... .... ... . Registration ............................ . Academic Policies and Regulations ... .... . Family Educational R ights a n d Privacy Act ........................... . Student Services ....................... . Student Conduct Policies and S tandards ..... . Educational Opportunity Program ........ . . 'Jesting Center ........................... . Veterans Affairs . .......... . . . ........... . Women's R esources ...................... . Student Government ............ . ....... . . Special Programs and Facilities .......... . Alumni Association ........ . . . ........... . Book Center ..... ....................... . Computing Services .............. . . . ... .. . Divisio n of Continuing Edu cat ion ........... . Development Program .................. . . . International Education . .................. . 29 26-27 32-34 34 34-39 39-40 41-45 44 45-49 45-46 47 48 48 48 49 49-53 49 49 51 51-52 52 52-53 Library Services Media and Rlecommunication s ............ . Architectur e and Planning Library ......... . The Graduate School ........ ........... . Degrees Offered ......................... . Financial Aid ........................... . Admis sion Requirements ................. . Reg istration ........... .................. . Requirem e nts for Advanced Degrees . ....... . Campus Map . ................ ......... . School of Architecture and Planning ..... . Architecture ........... .... ....... ...... . Interior Design .......................... . Landscape Architecture .................. . Urban and Regional Planning ..... ........ . Urban Design ........................... . Center for Community Development and De sign . . ......................... . College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration .......... . ............ . Accounting ............................. . Business Administration .................. . Business Law .... ....................... . Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development ......................... . . Financ e ................................ . Health Administration .................... . Human R eso urces Management ......... . . . Information Systems ......... . . ... ....... . Information Systems, Management Science and ................. ......... . Insuranc e .............................. . International Bu s iness .................... . Management ......... ..... ............. . Management Science . ............... ..... . Marketing .............................. . Operation s Management ... ........... .... . Quantit ative Methods .................... . Real Estate ..... ..... ................... . nansportation and Distribution Management ............... ..... ..... . School of Education ......... ........... . Racher Certification Programs ........ ..... . Admini stratio n, Curriculum , and Supervision ... ........................ . Couns e ling and Personn e l Service .......... . Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education . ........... . Educational Psychology .... ............... . Page 5457 56 57 58-71 59 60 60-61 61-63 63 63-6 4 72-73 74-93 77-81 81-84 84-87 87-90 90-92 92-93 94-1 23 103 -107 1 07 -l 09 109 110 1 10-112 112 -115 115 115 -117 115-116 117 117 117-11 9 119 119 1 2 1 121 122 122 122-123 123 124 151 127 1 28 128-131 131-133 133-135 135 -136

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Contents Elementary Edu ation .................... . Foundations . . . ........................ . Instructional 1e o l ogy .................. . Language and C lture ................... . Reading and Wr ting ..................... . Research and E aluat i on Methodology . ..... . Secondary Educ tion ..................... . Special Educatio ducationally Handicapped ......................... . College of Engi eering and Applied Scie ce ...................... . Applied Mathe atics . .................... . Civil Engineeri ..................... ... . Electrical Engin ering and Computer Sci nee ..................... . Mechanical Engrneering .................. . Engineering-on-Departmental ......... . Master of Engin ering .................... . College of Arts and Sciences . .... . Anthropology . I ... .... .................. . Master of Basic : cience ................... . Biology .................... . .......... . Chemistry ............................. . Communication and Theatre .............. . Economics ........ . .................... . English ................. .... .......... . Master of Envir nmental Science .......... . Ethnic Studies . . ...... .................. . Fine Arts ... . . Geography .. . Page 136-138 138-139 139-143 144 146 146 -148 148 148-150 150-151 152 185 163-165 165 169 169-179 179 183 183-184 184 186-279 199203 203-204 204-208 208-211 211-217 217-222 222-228 228 228-231 231-234 234-236 Contents I 9 Contents Page Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236239 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239-244 Master of Humanities ........... . 1 . . . . . . . . . 244-245 Mathematics . 1............ .. .. .. . . ........ 246-255 Modem Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255-260 Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260-262 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263-264 Political Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264-269 Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269-272 Master of Socia l Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272-274 Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274278 Master of Rchhica l Communicati on . . . . . . . . . 278-279 Military Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280-283 Army ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Air Force ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282-283 College of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284-291 Music . ...... 1 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 288-290 Performance Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290-291 Graduate School of Public Affairs . . . . . . . . . 292-305 The Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Master of Public Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297-299 Doctor ?f Public Admm1stranon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299-303 Master of Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-305 Faculty Roster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306-319 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 324 Application Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325-326 Degree Progjams Inside back cover

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The Univers L of Colorado at Denver is one of the most import4 t educational resources in the Denver metrop o litan ar fa. CUDenver, one of four institutions in the University f f Colorado system, is an urban, non residential located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, and governmental activities are in dose proximity. CU-DenverE1 ffers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields d graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees e offered in public affairs, applied math ematics, eduicaonal administration, and education tech nology. Doct ral studies also are available in engineering d other fields in cooperation with CU Boulder. Sped emphasis is placed on programs that will help assu 1 e students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the student population. Classes are offered during r eekday and evening hours, and in CU Denver's Week
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12 I General Information Vice Chancellors is responsible for the essential compo nents of the campus enterprise. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs acts in the absence of the Chancellor, sets the highest standards in teaching, research, and service, and oversees all academic units, The Graduate School, the library, research administration, continuing education, and student services. Nine academic support programs are overseen by the Dean of Student Services: Counselor 'Raining, 'Iesting, Educational Opportunities Program, Student Activities, the Women's Resource Center, Veterans Affairs, Center for Academic Enrich ment, Legal Services, and Internships and Cooperative Education. Senior Citizens' programs also are available. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance manages admissions, student records, financial aid, computing services, and the campus budget. The Vice Chancellor for Planning oversees the ongoing process of strategic planning for campus initiatives. One element of this process is "enrollment management." Such man agement addresses the development and the implemen tation of a comprehensive strategy to promote the campus, build appropriate academic programs, and ensure an effective relationship with prospective and current students, and with graduates of CU-Denver. An Office of Public Relations reports directly to the Chancel lor and assists in orchestrating all promotional efforts and the external affairs of the campus. The CUDenver Graduate School is a component of the CU-System counterpart. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs. Academic Programs CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. But, with the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. 1bday CU Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units: School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Adminstration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Music Graduate School of Public Affairs These units now accommodate over 10,500 students -nearly half as large as CU-Boulder itself-taught by about 300 regular, full-time faculty members. The diver sity of the student body is a hallmark of CUDenver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older stu dents who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they've only lately rec ognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their apprecia tion of the world around them. The undergraduate colleges admit freshmen and transfer students and offer programs leading to the bac calaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, busi ness, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional train ing in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher certification. The Graduate School offers master's programs in the arts, sdences, human ities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administra tion, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doc toral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. And CU-Denver faculty also partici pate in a few other doctoral programs offered at CU Boulder. For a complete account of bachelor's and master's degree programs offered by CU-Denver, see the listing of degree programs on the inside back cover of this bul letin. The co llege and school sections of this bulletin describe specific policies on requirements for gradua tion, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information. CUDenver has kept pace with the demand for educa tion which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications , and all CUDenver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs. The Future CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. Not only has the academic reach extended to nights and weekends, but a significant new center for advanced studies is under way at Greenwood Plaza in the southern area of the metropolitan region. New, highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region's economy. And centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are generating important prac tical solutions to some of Colorado's and the nation's most

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serious social, economic, environmental, and tech nological problef11S. Through history, urban civilization and the arts arid humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-De , ver-an urban campus-is deeply involved in e ing the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly , th University of Colorado at Denver is on the move. Join s and share in an exciting adventure in learning. The Weeken The Spring lJ87 semester was the first term of CU Denver's Weeke d University. The Weekend University course offering 1 are part of the regular academic pro gram at CU-De ver. Students who apply for admission to the Weekend University are also eligible to take CU Denver classes hich meet during the week. All CU Denver students may choose to take Weekend University classes. Weeke d University courses appear in the Schedule of C1 S fes and are open for registration by mail. Accreditation and Memberships ACCREDITATION American As North Centr Secondary Accrediting mbly of Collegiate Schools of Business Association of Colleges and chools Services .A! rustration American So iety of Landscape Architects American Planning Association National for the Accreditation of Racher Ed cation National Accrediting Board See the Colle e of Engineering and Applied Science se ion of this bulletin for the pro rams accredited by the Engineering Accreditati n Commission of the Accreditation Board for gineering and Rchnology National Ass dation of Schools of Music National Ass iation of Schools of Public Affairs and Admi MEMBERSHIPS e the organizations affiliated with the various divisio and departments at CU-Denver: American lnstit e of Architects American of Planners American Instit e of Certified Planners American Socie of Landscape Architects American Societ of Interior Designers Association of CGllegiate Schools of Planning Association of C llegiate Schools of Architecture Council of Landtpe Architecture Educators College of Busin ss and Administration The Economic of Colorado School of Educat on Colorado Princip:ais Center National Educational Renewal Projects-Partnerships General Information I 13 College of Engineering and Applied Sdtmce Colorado Engineering Association Associated Engineering Students American soc ' ty of Civil Engineers American Soci ftY of Mechanical Engineers Institute of El
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14 I General Information FACULTY About 300 highly qualified faculty members teach full-time at CU-Denver; well over four in five have doc toral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student. Research Award Win ners for 1986-8 7 Gerald Audesirk, Biologytor significant research and sizable grants in the area of neurobiology and effects of trace metals on nervous system functioning. Mark Foster, History in recognition of his books, American 1Iansportation and The Denver Bears, a his tory of Denver's minor league baseball team. William Fowler, Music -for his series of textbooks on piano pedagogy and the importance of visualizing the keyboard before playing. Lynn Johnson, Civil Engineering in recognition of research on "Microcomputer Programs for Pavement Drainage" and "Flash Flood Forecasting," and for the sizeable grants he received for these projects. Yuk Lee, Urban and Regional Planning-in recognition of his consistently high level of research productivity. His research covers urban spatial analysis, urban eco nomic retaillocational analysis, spatial cognition, urban planning, and mathematical and quantitative analysis. Norma Livo, Education-for two decades of tremen dous creativity, productivity, and community involve ment in her field. She has helped revive storytelling through books and articles she has written, conferences organized, hundreds of school presentations, and through her own masterful storytelling. Eric Poole, Criminal Justice for his phenomenal research and publication record. A nationally recognized scholar, he has published more than 40 research articles and continues to publish an average of one article every two months. John Ruhnka, Business -for his published work on ventures capital, financing of new ventures, SEC regula tion of financial markets, and corporate disclosure. Recently he wrote articles on corporate disclosure for The Harvard Business Review and Securities Regulation Law Journal. Ruth Thorne-Thomsen, Fine Arts in recognition of her national reputation for photography exhibits. In the last two years her outstanding work has been displayed in major cities in the U.S.

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Teachers fessor Bryant ate, graduate, courses in the i s currently a Management tion Systems. Laura Goodwin (center), Associate Professor of Education, specializes in teaching and research related to s ta tistics, research methods, and evalua tion. She is very productive in research and writing, and present:ly coordinates the Educat i onal PsychGl ogy program. Professor Goodwin came to CU-Denver in 1983 from the CU Health Sciences Center. General Inf ormation I 15 John Mays (right), Professor of Civil Engineering, joined CU-Denver in 1967. As a struct ural engineer, he teaches an array of cla sses which are not only techp.ica l but remarkably well receive9. His classroom is character i zed by orderl y presenta tions and superior support materials inclu d ing innovative computer-based approaches.

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1 6 I General Information Auraria Higher Education Center The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered b y CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered. On the Auraria campus are administrative and class room buildings, the Auraria Library, the student center, book center, child care and development centers, phys ical education facilities, science building, and service buildings. The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver's past-historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli has been newly renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment .

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Affirmative ction/Equal Opportunity Title IX CU-Denver fi llows a policy of equal opportunity in education 1 employment. In pursuance of this pol icy, no Denver pus department, unit, discipline, or employee shall discriminate against an individual or group on the b is of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, or handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the Uni ersity affecting present and prospective students or em loyees. The educational programs, activities, and services offered o students and/or employees are admin istered on a non "scriminatory basis subject to the provi sions of the n s VI and vn of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of e Education Amendments of 1972, 504 of the Rehabili tion Act of 1973, Vietnam-Era Veterans Readjustment ct of 1974, and Age Discrimination in Employment A of 1967. A CU-Denve Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity program has b n established to implement this policy. For informatio about these provisions on equity, dis crimination, or fairness contact the Director of Affirm ative Action, 12 0 14th St., Suite 740, 556-2509. Research an Other Creative Pursuits CU-Denver i strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledg through the research of its fac;ulty. It is equally supportve of the other creative endeavors of its faculties in the ts, humanities, and design fields. These achievements t only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding ins ction in scholarship and professional practice. In add tion, these activities constitute an impor tant compone t of CU-Denver's service to the com munity at larg . An irnpor t thrust in research and other creative activities at C -Denver is the multidisciplinary and applied. Rese ch in every school and college at CU Denver addres es questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its position within a thrivi g metropolitan area serves, as. well, as a base for explor ng topics of national and even interna tional import. ut not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of i mediate practical significance. Major efforts now eXJJ. ore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines. Th se, of course, are carried out within the rich dialogue 1_ f scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the wa to practical applications in the next century. Research pr training, and public service pro grams at CU-r.enver encompass both traditional and nontraditional elds of study, with a focus on issues that relate to city, tate, national, and international issues. Funded researfu is a major priority at CU-Denver. Dur ing 1985-86, CU-Denver faculty and staff received exter nal grants contracts totalling $3,600,380 for research, trairling, and public service programs. All General Information I 17 signs point to r steady increase in funded research in the years ahead CUDenver. And the benefits for the cam pus will be Such research assists in sustain ing scholarly discourse, enables faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provides the foundation fo solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhances the education of students. Marry students actively participate in research activities by faculty members. Current dternally funded projects address such diverse topics as these: novel mechanisms in aqueous coal liquefaction; educational assistance to public schools, cities, counties, and local governments; training in health aqministration; education and applied research programs for field-based Service in rural Colo rado settings; minority business ddvelopment and tech nical assistance; development of curricula which use instructional video for teaching science to high school students; preparation of personnel to provide special education and related services to newborn and infant children; flash flood forecasting using radar sensing of rainfall; quantitative relationships for sporangiophore growth ofphycomyces; a cellular analy sis of lead effects on the nervous system; a pale oecological investigation of the Minturn Formation; acidification status of Colorado lakes; and algebraic mul tigrid and the fast adaptive composite multi grid method in large scale tomputation. Perspectives on public works decision making and provision of administrative and technical services in support of metropolitan air quality are additional externally funded activities. Much research, of course, goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty pub lication, exhibits, performances, and pro fessional activities. Many members of our faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the campus, and establish the credibility of its faculty and enhance the value of the degrees it confers. CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING School of Architecture and Planning CENTER FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN The Centef for Community Development and Design is the research, community service, and the student field studies of the School of .Nrchitecture and Plan ning. Buildihg upon two decades of experience, the Center believes that the creative, synthetic processes of design and planning can reach appropriate solutions to community (\Ild environmental problems through active involvement I of citizens and applied research. As the outreach unit of the School, the dnter responds to and

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18 I General Information initiates a variety of opportunities for research and edu cationally-oriented public service projects for faculty, staff, and students. In undertaking project work, the Center organizes interdisciplinary research and assistance teams, capable of addressing complex policy, planning, design, and development problems and needs of Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West. Over one hundred requests for assistance and new research projects are handled annually. Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West provide a dynamic learning laboratory for applied research and service in such areas as economic develop ment, housing policy, neighborhood and small town planning, participatory design, park and open space design, and urban design. The Center offers field study opportunities in both urban neighborhoods and in rural communities. Scope of Work Solving urban and rural problems in the Rocky Moun tain West means confronting both high plains semi-arid conditions and the fragile alpine environment. The sen sitive development of human settlement in harmony with this delicate natural environment is an over arching goal of the School. This goal is realized through pragmatic service and applied research projects. Faculty and student research and assistance teams have con ducted projects in such areas as: Commerdal Revitalization. The Center assists small and medium size towns, urban neighborhoods, and municipal agencies in developing comprehensive eco nomic development plans for older commercial districts and downtown business areas. Working with com munity and merchant organizations, the Center helps develop public-private resources to implement strategic plans for the long-term diversification of local econo mies. Center staff assist twelve to fifteen communities a year, identify their unique competitive opportunities, develop design guidelines, prepare financing packages, provide designs for strategic parcels of land, and evaluate the success of the projects. Housing Policy. In an era of fundamental shifts, pol icies have drastically reduced resources for housing especially for low and moderate income citizens. The Center has undertaken several research initiatives, to affect housing policies for those groups. The Center works with housing agencies to assess current condi tions and to conduct research on and development of new policies and programs. Based on its research and work with constituent groups, the Center was instruc tional in convincing city leaders to develop an $11 mil lion Housing 1hlst Fund for Denver, developing city policies and plans to eliminate homelessness, and is currently engaged in research to evaluate and modify private lending practices in inner-city neighborhoods, and housing needs assessment for the disabled. Rural Community Assistance. The Rocky Mountain West is overwhelmingly rural in character and is often described as "the boom or bust" center of the United States because of the historic instability of mineral and natural resources industries. Rural communities are pursuing opportunities for economic diversification in the hope of leveling out the "peaks and valleys" of their economies. In response to this need, the School of Archi tecture and Planning has teamed with the Colorado State Department of Local Affairs and with Mountain Bell Corporation to form Colorado Initiatives. This program's purpose is to assist rural Colorado counties and municipalities in developing sound com munity economic strategies that improve local condi tions. Each year ten communities are selected for specialized technical research and financial planning assistance. In addition to this targeted assistance, the School works with other rural communities in a more broad based, developmental way on a variety of local issues. For example, the town of Burlington, Colorado, requested assistance with a site plan for an old town museum. This one project led to six other projects over a two-year period in the town of 3,500 people: a site design for a 190-acre industrial park, a market study for the Old 1bwn, a design for the town entrance and unified public signage system, and a main street revitalization study. These projects have culminated in a regional eco nomic base study for the surrounding four-county area. Minority Business Development. In responding to one of Denver's and Colorado Springs' urgent inner-city needs, the Center has developed a program to strengthen minority and women-owned businesses. This program is designed to improve their access to capital and provide better goods and services to inner-city neighborhoods. As these businesses become stronger, they hold the potential for creating new jobs for inner-city residents. Five corporations, three government agencies, two non profit corporations, and the School provide support to this program which is operated and managed by the Center. Seventy-five individual businesses obtain man agement and technical assistance, loan packaging, mar ket research, or assistance for building renovation each year. School of Education THE COLORADO PARTNERSHIP FOR EDUCATIONAL RENEWAL The Colorado Partnership for Educational Renewal consists of the University of Colorado System, Metropol itan State College, and several Colorado School districts. The basic purpose of the Partnership is to stimulate change in the K-12 public school system and simul taneously in the education of educators. Serving as equal partners, the University and School have a stake in and responsibility for public school improvements, just as the public schools have a like interest in and responsibility for the education of those who staff the schools. More specifically, The Colorado Partnership seeks solutions to persistent "hard rock" issues such as minority achieve ment, at-risk youth, dropouts, teacher education, the common curriculum, research and evaluation, and edu cational leadership. Contact Lance V. wright, Executive Director, for more information.

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COLORADO PRI CIPALS' CENTER: ORIGIN AND DESCRIPTION During S er 1985, a group of Colorado principals spent ten days t the Harvard Principals' Center Summer Institute. Thei experience was so positive and renew ing, that they If.turned home with the question: "Why not a center in Colorado?" Several key people and two responded to the question . The of Colorado at Denver's School of Edu cation, headed by Dean Bill Grady , and the Colorado Association of chool Executives( CASE), headed by Dr. Gerald Difford formed a partnership to develop the idea into a reality. planning luncheon was attended by principals and ther school executives. Several superin tendents agree to enter the partnership by contributing funds for cente development. Thus began the Colorado Principals' Ce ter. The primary mission of the Colorado Principals' Cen ter is to enab principals to shape their professional intellectual de elopment. Activities related to this mis sion include topical seminars, panel discussions, round table discussiops , and ongoing special interest groups. lbpical semmars feature individual presenters (pri marily who provide information on promis ing or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and for participant interaction. Panel dis cussions high4ght current "high-relevance" topics, with panel and interaction in formal and informal settings. Sped interest groups facilitate exploration of relevant probL ms, and issues through brainstorming and idea shari g during a series of meetings. The oppor tunity for r efle ive writing is a major feature of Center events. The Center also focuses on conducting and dis seminating re arch. Current plans include the initiation of two resear projects, one of which will assess the needs and e ectations principals want their Center to meet. The oth project will study the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership. Ne sletters feature periodic current research abstracts. Graduate st dents are hired by the Center as research assistants. Ad , itionally, graduate students in the School of Education carrying 9 semester hours or more , or enrolled as a strative interns , are offered student membership t no cost. In addition to part-time research assistants, Center staff includes an executive director who is also an assistant profe sor, and a secretary, both shared with the Department f Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision . General Information I 19 L a nce Wright (left) directs T h e Colorado Principals' Center w hi c h provides inservice education for principals a n d other school sit e managers. William Grady (center), dean of education, visits a workshop.

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20 I General Inf ormation STORYTELLING CONFERENCE The School of Education sponsors an annual Storytell ing Conference. Presentors include poets, artists, and yarnspinners from throughout the U.S. In its llth year, the conference draws local school teachers as well as interested persons from the general public. YOU, ME AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECT This project in the School of Education is based on a curriculum of science, technology, and society that is being implemented by an instructional television series. Its purpose is to help students become effective citizens in our highly developed technological society. The proj ect is funded by the National Science Foundation. Currently five programs, with the appropriate teach ing materials and transparency masters, are available nationally from the Agency for lnstructional1echnology. The remaining seven programs are on schedule in design, production, and evaluation. A national team of highly competent educators, scientists, engineers, and television producers are contributing skills to assure a high quality of accomplishment for the project. Minaruth Galey, diredor of the national "!Vu, Me and Il!chnology Project, introduces an instructional television program to high school stude nts. High school students are tested after viewing an instructional television program produced by the "!Vu, Me and 'Jechnology Project.

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College of E gineering and Applied Science CENTER FOR URJrN TRANSPORTATION STUDIES The Center fo Urban 'fransportation Studies (CUTS) has as its respol}sibility: l. 1b assume tleading role in developing research and interdisdplinar programs in urban transportation. 2. 1b provide a central resource for information con cerning urban ansportation problems in the Rocky Mountain regiop, making available to outside organiza tions the expert se within the University. CUTS is interested in helping to optimize the quality of human life *concentration on research, service, and education in transportation sector of society. Particularly, CUTS s desirous of improving the movement of people and so as to provide enhanced safety, economy, effici ncy, and overall amenity. Administrati ely, the Center (CUTS) is a part of the Department of divil Engineering in the College of Engi neering and Apblied Science. The director of CUTS is a civil engineering faculty member representing the trans portation and planning disciplines. Recent and CWTent research include investigations of (1) the relation 1 hip between rutting of asphalt pave ments and trurn tire pressures, and (2) the performance of a new type of urban interchange in order to improve its design standpoint of safety and capacity. Service activiti . s have involved workshops and short courses to help dvance the state-of-the-practice relative to the state-ofe-art in transportation engineering. As an eleme t of the University, the fundamental thrust of CUTS is, and properly must remain, educa tional. The Cen er's emphasis is the broad field of transportation, and includes both urban and non-urban aspects of trans ortation. Since transportation concerns itself with the safe , efficient, and environmentally responsible m ement of people and goods, it either directly or indi ectly affects all citizens and many facets of their living. This breadth necessarily involves most f the disciplines within the University. The need for be er trained researchers and practitioners in all of the tr portation related disciplines is dearly evident. CUTS rovides "hands-on" experience within the traditional University structure, offering an oppor tunity for studts through research and service activities which e hasize these otherwise unavailable learning oppor;t ities. These activities take place under conditions of mpetent supervision that ensure the provision of so d advice and research results to those served by LAND INFORMAiiON SYSTEMS GROUP A Land Information Systems Group (LISG) has been formed at CU-Denver to provide opportunity for faculty and students to pursue interests in this multidisciplinary subject area. Housed in the College of Engineering and Applied the LISG is headed by Lynn Johnson, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. General Information I 21 The objectives of the LISG are to facilitate the educa tional, researcp, and public service mission of CU-Den ver in the subject areas of computer-aided planning and design, waterlesources planning, land records systems, geoprocessing and geographic information systems, facilities management and mapping, computer-aid design, and related legal and policy issues. LISG is multidisciplinary and provides an avenue for individuals to participate together on research and development projects, curriculum development, and to share hardware and software resources. For further information contact Professor Johnson at 556-2739 or 556-2871. The Graduate School CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The Center for Environmental Sciences conducts basic and applied research which focuses on understanding and providing solutions for environmental issues. The Center reports to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Aca demic Affairs and Dean of The Graduate School. The Center typically organizes faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students into interdisciplinary teams to study environmental concerns interest to the Den ver metropolitan area, Colorado, and the Rocky Mountain Region. 1)rpical projects in the past have involved studies of pollution resulting from oil shale production, coal mining, and uranium These projects have been funded by federal agencies, industry, and private foundations. In recent years the Center has had a major program dealing with acid rain. The Center has a state-of-the-art analytical chemistry laboratory. The Center has also been at the forefront in the application of artificial intel ligence methods to the interpretat"on of large environ mental databases. Approximately fifteen CUDenver faculty from ten different departments (and three colleges) have participated in Center projects. In addition, more than thirty faculty from other campuses of the University of Colorado, as well as other universities in Colorado, New Mexico, and South Dakota, have participated in these projects which have provided opportunities for theses and jobs to numerous students. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN RHETORIC The Center for Research in Rhet9ric began in 1984 for the purpose or conducting original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived. The Center engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. The interdisciplinary nature of the Center draws on the diverse strengths and unique perspectives of individuals from various disciplines in the University.

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22 I General Information Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office. COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS GROUP A particularly strong Computational Mathematics Group has made CU-Denver a regional center for com putational mathematics with a national and international reputation. Mathematics clinics investigate contempo rary societal issues through the application of mathe matical concepts to specific problems. Other research includes the development of fast algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations on super c omputers , the analysis and development of com binatorial algorithms used in scheduling artificial intel ligence, and the applications of discrete mathematics to problems in ecology, engineering, and computer science.

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Graduate Sc ool of Public Affairs THE CENTERS In just a few hort years, The Center for Public Private Sector Cooperat on and The Center for the Improvement of Public Mana ement have emerged as a highly effec tive force in hel ing to identify and solve some of Colo rado's and the ocky Mountain West's most pressing problems. Under the a pices of the Graduate School of Public Affairs, The Ce ters have taken a leadership role in a wide range of ublic policy arenas. Dean Kaplan, head of the Graduate School of Public Affairs, qstablished The Centers in 1981. The idea was to create a center that would take an active, hands-on approach to stving community, state, and regional problems, pro ide academic enrichment for students and faculty . d get results. The Centers are accom plishing these goals and will continue to do so. Founded with the support of the Piton and Gates Foundations, lj'he Centers are nonprofit units of the Graduate Schotof Public Affairs. They have a staff of skilled professi nals who are supplemented by faculty and students. T e Centers' Advisory Board consists of32 distinguished versity, public, and private sector lead ers who help ide the activities and counsel the staff of each center. THE CENTER FO THE IMPROVEMENT OF PUBLIC MAN GEMENT The under! g idea of this Center is simple the better our pub c officials are trained, the better will be the quality of li e for all residents of the Rocky Mountain Region. This Center focuses on management training and career develop ent for public officials. It provides excep tional educatio al and leadership programs that were not available in the Rock y Mountain West until the Cen ter was establi ed. At the heart of the Center's activities is the highly successful Ro y Mountain Program, an intensive 10day training se inar conducted twice yearly for mid-to upper-level pu lie managers. Some of the nation's most distinguished cholars, public administrators, and con sultants lead and discussion groups. The program relies n case studies and on developing prac tical, effective proaches to deal with real-world prob lems confronti g public managers. The Centers the desire of the Graduate School of Public Affairs tlj> take an innovative, highly active part in strengthening tpe abilities of business, nonprofit organi zations, commFty groups, and governments to deal with the compl,ex problems of today's society. While they w lcork together on many projects, each cen ter has its own mission. THE CENTER FOIR PUBLIC-PRIVATE SECTOR COOPERATION This Center pecializes in bringing together people from the privat , public, and nonprofit sectors in cooper ative efforts to the state's and region's needs in General Information I 23 areas such as ! housing, growth air pollu tion, public firance, social services, and capital invest ment. It serv 9 s as a catalyst for bonds between leaders common interests but different constituencies. As one businessman noted, the Center has helped build bridges of understanding and cooperation between governments and business. The Centeli helps organizations ! build skills in the areas of strategic planning, economic development, program management, financing, leadership training, public participation, concensus building, and conflict resolution. The Center has had a direct, major impact on improving life throughout Colorado. National Veterans Training Institute CU-Denver, working in cooperation with Colorado's Department of Labor and Employment, houses the nation's first National Veterans 'fraining Institute. The program provides skills development training to approximately 1,200 veterans' employment representa tives and employees of the Disabl d Veterans Outreach P,rogram. The program indirectly serves veterans, with an increased emphasis on impro 1 ing the quality and quantity of services for disabled veterans. The program is funded by the I U.S. Department of Labor Veterans Employment a d 'fraining Service (VETS).

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ADMISSION OLICIES AND PROCE URES . All questions and correspondence regarding admis sion to CU-De ver and requests for application forms should be dire ed to: ssions and Records University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 146 I Denver, CO 201-1469 (303) 556-26 0 CU-Denver s eks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an cademic program successfully. Admis sion decisions are based on many factors, the most important bein : l. Level of pr vious academic performance. 2. Evidence academic ability and accomplishment, as indicated by cores on national aptitude tests. 3. Evidence o maturity, motivation, and potential for academic succe s. CU-Denver r ! serves the right to deny admission to new applicants r readmission to former students whose total credential indicate an inability to assume those obligations ofp rformance and behavior deemed essen tial by the Uni ersity in order to carry out its lawful missions, proctses, and functions as an educational institution. Applicants w o request degree programs unavailable at CU-Denver I be considered for admission to the College of Li eral Arts and Sciences with an undetermined ajor. Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students \ RECEIPT OF DOC MENTS DEADLINES Undergradua e Fall Students 1986 New Students July 22 ltansfer Student July 22 Former Universit of Colorado Stud nts July 22 Intrauniversity Spring Summer 1987 1987 Dec. I May 3 Dec. I May 3 Dec. I May 3 ltansfer Stude ts 60 days prior to the beginning of the term International Stu ems Undergraduate July 22 Dec. 1 May 3 Graduat e: May 29 Oct . 30 March 12 The Universrs reserves the right to change documents / credenti s deadlines in accordance with enroll ment demands Applicants should apply as early as possible. Upd;fed information is available from the Office of Admis J ions (303) 556-2660. For an applicant to General Information I 25 be a specific term, ALL documents required for a ssion must be received by the Office of Admissions b the DEADLINE for fuat term. Applicants who are unat1le to meet the deadline rnaf elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. nansfer students are reminded that sufficient time should be allowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previously, and foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN New freshmen may apply for admission to the College of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Music. General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Edu cation Development (GED) Jest. Applicants who are high school graduates should have complet d a minimum of 15! units of acceptable secondary sd;1.0ol (grades 9-12) academic credit. Stu dents applying for admission to the Colleges of Engi neering and Business must have completed a minimum of 16 units of acceptable secondary school credit. A unit of credit is one year of high school course work. The under?raduate colleges Have the following reqmrementsl College of Business and Administration English (one of speech/debate an two years of composition are strongly recommended) ..................... 4 Mathematics (including at least two yt;ars of algebra and one year of geometry) ........ .... .................... .. 4 Natural sciences (laboratory type) . ..................... 2 Social sciences (including history) ..................... 2 Foreign language (both units in a singe language) ...... 2 Electives .... J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (Additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social sciences, not. to include business courses.) lbtal 16 College of Engineering and Applied S ence1 English (literature, composition, grammar) ............. 4 Mathematics distributed as follows: Algebra .......................................... 2 Geometry . . . ................... ! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Additional rrlathematics (trigonometry recomme ed) ................................... 1 Natural sciences (physics and chemistry recommended) . . 2 1See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this bulletin for mm;e specific information, and for new high school requirements effective Fall 1988.

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26 I General Information Social st udies and humanities (Foreign languages and additional units of English, history, and literature are included) .... .............. 3 Electives ........................................... ..1. 1btal 16 College of Musi c English ....................... ................. ... .. 3 Theoretical music ......................... . Physical science .......................... . Social science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Foreign langua ge ......................... . Mathematics ............................. . Additional high school academic units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1btal 15 All students are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area . 1Wo years of piano training are recommended. The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in l ength) and a statement of excellence from a qualified tea cher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Music , CU-Denver , for audition information and applicat ions. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Academic Units ................ ........... .......... 15 1btal 15 Beginning in the Fall Semester 1988, freshmen enter ing the University of Colorado will be required to meet the following University-wide minimum academic preparation: 4 years of English (with emphasis on com position), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics) , 3 years of natural science including one year of U.S. or world history , and 2 years of a s ingl e foreign language. The University of Colorado at Denver will require units of cred its indicated in the following chart: College English MatheNatural Soda! Foreign Other (total units) rna tics Science Science Language e Business 4• 4 3< 2 2 I r (16) Engineer ing 4 4b 3 d 2 2 1 8 (16) Liberal Arts and 4 3 3 Scien ces 2 2 (14) Music (15) 4 3 3 2 2 Jh • Includes two yea r s of composition and one year of oral comm un ications. b Includes at least two years of algebra, on e year of geometry, and one year of c ollege preparatory mathematics suc h as tri go n o m e try , ana l yt ical ge ometry , or elementary functions . c Includes two years of a laboratory science. d Include s one year of physics and one year of chemistry . e All units must be in a s ingle foreign language. r On e year of acad e mi c elec tive (not inductin g high school busin ess cours es ) . s One year of academi c elective . h One year in the arts. All applicants who meet the above requirements are classified in two ways for admission purposes: l. Preferred consideratio n is given to applicants who rank in the top 40% of their high school graduating class and hav e a composite score of 23 or higher on the Amer ican College lest (ACT), or a com bined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude lest (SAT); however , business and engineering applicants are expected to have strong mathematics and science background, higher class rank and higher test scores. Music appli can ts also must successfully pass a music audition. 2. Applicants who rank in the lower 60 % of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23 , and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit are reviewed on an individual basis . 1b be considered for admission, applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an aver age standard GED score of 45 with no score below 36 on any section of the test. Applicants who complete the Spanish Language General Educational Development lest also must submit scores from lest VI, "English as a Second Language." How to Apply l. Students should obtain an application for under graduate admission from a Colorado high school coun selor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. 2. The application must be comp leted in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to emoll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months , provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to emoll for a later term. 3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, includ ing class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official tran scripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried cop ies are not official. 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to send a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. 5 . Student s also are required to take either the Amer ican College lest (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude lest (SAT) and to request that test scores be sent to CU Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code R-4875). High school students may obtain information about when and where these tests are administered by contacting their cow1selor s .

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Applicants took one of these tests and did not designate CU-D nver to receive scores must request the testing agency t 1 send scores to CUDenver. Complete a Request for Aditional Score Report at test centers or from the offices "sted below. Registratio Department American C r liege 'Iesting Program (ACT) P.O. Box 414 Iowa City, twa 52240 College Ent ance Examination Board (SAT) P.O. Box 59 Princeton, ew Jersey 08540 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P.O. Box l0l5 Berkeley, 94704 All credentials p resented for admission become the property of the University of C lorado and must remain on file. ADMISSION REQU REMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS ltansfer may apply for admission to the Col leges of Businesrand Administration , Engineering and Applied Science Liberal Arts and Scien ces, and Music. Students interes ed in the field of education should con tact the School of Education office for information (556-2717). Inte ational students must submit proof of language proficili ncy. ltansfer stude ts are given priority consideration for admission as fo ows: 1. College of L_reral Arts and Sciences and College of Music. ltansfer must have at least a 2.0 cumu Lative college gr lie-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to all institutions pre ously attended. Course work in prog ress cannot be u ed in calculating the cumulative aver age. Music ap Licants also must pass an audition. Contact the Col ge of Music for audition information (556-2727) . 2. College ofB siness and Administration. 1b be con sidered for new ansfer admission, students must have completed at 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree , BacHelor of Science (Business). Applicants with an overall <1PA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, butt.ith a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable co se work attempted , will be automat ically admitted. Applicants w th at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 4 semester hours will be considered as space is Students with Jess than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semestr hours of applicable course work will be denied admilssion to the College of Business and referred to the q> llege of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consiOeration. No applicant Jill be accepted with less than a 2.0 GPA in all college levJI course work attempted. Similarly, no applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions p eviously attended. I G era/ Information I 27 3. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 ulative grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all w rk attempted, should )lave completed two semesters of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Important Note: Applicants wRo do not meet the above grade-point average or credit! hour requirements will still be considered for admission, but on an individ ual basis. The primary factors used when Cf?nsidering students individually are (1) probability of lsuccess in the aca demic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity , and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges. How to Apply l. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. 2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 non'refundable applica tion fee. 3. The student is required to have two official tran scripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each col Legiate instituqon attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Adrpissions. Hand-carried copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (ltanscripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original anguage and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.) Liberal arts and music applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) o college work com pleted also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores. ALL engineering applicants w"th fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit hi h school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores. Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school tiranscripts and ACT/ SAT scores. Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College t equires elementary proficiency in a foreign language fo graduation. Appli cants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modem foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verifi cation. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555. All credentials presented for admission become the property of the, University of Colorado and must remain on file. I Transfer of College-Level Credit After all transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the

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28 I General Information Office of Admissions and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions can be applied to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirements at CU-Denver. College-level credit may be transferred to the Uni ver sity if it was earned at a college or university of recog nized standing, by advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken Pass/Fail are transferred when a grade of C or higher is required to pass. The University may accept up to 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to lU semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious / doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester cred its of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. The College of Business and Administration generally limits transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward bac calaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence. The College of Music requires that 56 of the hours needed for graduation be completed in residence. This total may be reduced by the faculty on the basis of excellent work done at CU-Denver and high scholarship exhibited at institutions previously attended. In no case shall the minimum be fewer than 40 hours distributed over three semesters. READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmis sion. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions. Former students who have attended another co!Jege or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student Receipt of Documents deadlines. This requires payment of the $30 non-refundable application fee and submission of official transcripts from all co!Jeges and universities previously attended. nanscripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, P.O. Box 1469 , Denver, CO 80201-1469. Students who last attended less than one year ago but attended another college or university during the interim are required to pay a $30 transfer application fee. nan scripts must be requested by the student and sent by the registrar of the other institution(s) to CU-Denver, Admis sions Processing, P. 0. Box 1469, Denver, CO 80201-1469. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to under graduate and graduate programs. Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Den ver's schools and colleges vary, and international stu dents seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying . In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (lest of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Infor mation about requirements for each college and school can be found in this bulletin. Deadlines for receipt of documents have been estab lished to allow for the timely mailings of I20's. Fall Spring Summer 1987 1988 1988 Undergraduates : July 22 Graduates: May29 December 1 October 30 May3 March 12 Graduate. International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate pro gram to which they are applying . Applications are avail able from The Graduate School. Application and credentials should be received by The Graduate School six months prior to the term for which the student is applying. Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degree-seeking status. They may attend summer terms as a non-degree student. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms. CU-DENVER INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU Denver Intraunive rsity nansfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Sch edule of Classes. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are

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made by the c liege or school to which the student wishes to trans er. CU-Denver s udents may change University of Colorado campuses y applying directly to the Admissions Office of the c pus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Cam us applications and deadline informa tion also must b obtained from the campus to which the student is appl ing. HIGH SCHOOL C NCURRENT ENROLLMENT High school j ors and seniors with proven academic abilities may bf admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for o e term only. This approval may be renewed. Credi for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information an application instructions, contact the CU Denver Office o Admissions (303-556-2660). Admission o Graduate Degree Students All correspo dence and questions regarding admis sion to the gra uate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the ollowing: Programs t. Business Office of G actuate Studies Graduate S ool of Business Administration 623-4436 Programs Architecture and Planning School of chitecture and Planning 556-2755 Programs Public Affairs Graduate S l ool of Public Affairs 556-2825 All Other ograms The Gradu • te School 556-2663 GRADUATE PRO As a princip part of its mission, CU-Denver offers graduate and professional-level programs and during the 1986-1987 academic year, approximately 45 percent of the student was enrolled at the graduate level. Graduate programs are offered through The Graduate Scho I by its member schools and colleges (School of Ed . cation, College of Engineering and Applied SciencJ, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of and outside The Graduate School by the Graduate S ool of Business Administration, the School of Archi ecture and Planning and the Graduate School of Publi Affairs. The particular admission and graduation reqthrements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections of this bulletin . General Information I 29 GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND DEADLINES Admission requirements and a b plication deadlines vary accordin to the individual graduate program. The Graduate S ool has general admission requirements which are supplemented by requirements of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this bulletin as well as the college or school sections for and deadlines for specific programs. Admission of Non-Degree Students Persons who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a of Colorado degree may be admitted as non-degree students. In general, correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. rhose seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teachef certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each schooV college limits the number of semester hours transferable toward a degree program. Students should contact the schooVcollege to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the acceptable number of hours which may be taken as a non-degree student. Undergraduate. CU-Denver will enroll persons with out an undergraduate degree as non-degree students, but applicants are encouraged to apply to an under graduate program rather than to apply as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professioljlal improvement. Non-degree students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 at CU Denver. Note: International students are not admitted as non degree students, except for summer terms. Graduate. Students with the brccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific d ! gree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who have attained the degree or credential status they want, but who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before entering a specific program. Non-degree students should be aware that generally only a limited number of course credits taken by a non degree student may be applied toward a degree program at CUDenver. 1b permit c9ntinuing registration as a non-degree stu dent, a mini jum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained. Note: Interq.ational students are not admitted as non degree students, except for summer terms. HOW TO APPLi FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION 1b apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office

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30 I General Information of Admissions. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $101 nonrefundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space avail able basis. CHANGING STATUS FROM NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instruc tions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic cre dentials (i.e., and/or test scores) and a $30 nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Non-degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program, with the approval of the dean. Non-degree students should con sult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the fall semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.) Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate degree program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized gradu ate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program. Official Notification of Admission Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions on a Statement of Admission Eligibility Form. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular pro gram are pending subject to official notification of receive offidal notification of admission within a reason able period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after sub mitting application materials should , contact the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660. Ientative Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permit ted one term to submit the documents. Registration for subsequent terms will be denied when documents have not been received. UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT Ot:N VLit admission to the institution. Applicants who do not 1Subject to c hange

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I I l NDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION1 • 2 3 I 'JYpe of Applicant Criteria for Admission 1 Required Credentials When to Apply Notes I FRESHMAN IN GENERAL: Complet e application Not later th an: For specific requirement s refer (Student seeking ba h e l or ' s a) Ranks in top 40 % of $30 applicatio n fee J uly 2 1 for fall to the college sections of this degree who has ne er high sc h oo l graduating Official high sc h oo l tr a n script D ec . I or sprin g bulletin . For exa mpl e, Music a ttended a class. showing rank-in-class , date May 3 for summer requires an audition. institution ) b) Has 15 unit s of acceptof graduation, 7 th semester Seniors who meet or exceed ab l e hi gh school work . grades, 8t h semes ter courses all ad mis sio n criteria m ay c) lest scores : Official ACT or SAT score appl y as ear l y as Oct. I for ACT comp: 23 report . following fall. or SAT comb: 1000 Note: Business and F n gineering a pplicants are expecte d t o h ave hi gher test sco r es, class rank, an d number of academ i c unit s. TRANSFER IN GENERAL: Complete applica t ion Not later than : Liberal Arts and Musi c (Stude nt seeki n g a achelor ' s Must be in good standing $30 application fee July 22 for fall transfers with fewer than 12 deg r ee who has att .nded a and e ligibl e to return to all 'TWo official transcripts sent Dec. I for s pring sem. hrs. of college work , collegiate institutio other instit ution s previously from each college a tt ended. May 3 for summer Business transfers with fewer than CU) attended. than 24 sem. hr s., and Applica nt s must have miniEngineering transfers with mum 2.0 GPA on all work fewer than 24 sem . hrs . must attemp t ed. Busin ess and also submit all freshman Engineering applicants w ill credentials. be required to have a higher GPA. NON-DEGREE Must be high school gradComplete application Not l ater than : Non-degree students who have (Student who is not , eeking uate or have a G.E.D. $10 application fee July 22 for fall earned a baccal aureate degree a degree at thi s ins t itution) Dec. I for spring should see Graduate S c h ool May 3 for summer sectio1;1 for additi o n a l App licati ons will also be information. accepted afte r the se deadlines i f space allows. RETURNING CU STU'oENT Must be in good standing Former student application Not l ater than:3 Will be admitted to their (Returnin g non-deg ee and July 22 for fall previous major unless a new o r degree student " ro has Dec . I for spring major is requested . Students not attended ano th r instituMay 3 for summer under academic s u spension in t io n s in ce CU) cert ain sc hools or colle ges at the University of Colorado may enroll during th e summer terms to improve their gradepoint averages. FORMER CU STUDE liT S ame as for transfer Complete applicat ion Not later than: Will be admitted to previous (Degree student wh< has $30 application fee Jul y 22 for fall major unless a different ma jor attended another in t itution 'TWo offiical transcri pt s from Dec. I for spring is requested on applicat ion . si n ce a tt ending CU) eac h intervening college May 3 for s ummer CHANGE OF STATU , : Same as for tran sfer Complete application Not later than: Must meet the same c riteria NON-DEGREE TO $30 application fee Jul y 22 for fall as transfer s tud ent. (CU non -degree stu
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32 I General Information TUITION AND FEES All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tui tion and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and stu dents should contact the Office of Admissions and Rec ords for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1986-87 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost. Other Fees1 l. Student Activity Fee (required for all students): Fall semester 1986 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12.00 Spring semester 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12.00 Summer term 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8.00 2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required for all students): Each term ....................... .. $ 19.00 3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of all students each term) $ 3.00 4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term for all new students): ................. $ 15.00 This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student's first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts. 5. Health Insurance Fee (optional): Fall semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 64.50 Spring semester (includes summer) $109.00 Summer term only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 44.50 Students who wish health insurance coverage must complete and submit a request card with the Bursar's Office before the end of the drop / add period. The insurance program primarily subsidizes major medical expenses according to the schedule of benefits stated in the insurance brochure, which may be obtained from the Office of Student Academic Services. Depen dent coverage (spouse and/or children) also is available at an additional charge. Further information on health insurance is available from the Office of Student Aca demic Services, 556-2861. 6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doc toral dissertation). Students should contact The Gradu ate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment. 7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduat e School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Com prehensive Examination for a master's degree is com pleted. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as "Candidate for Degree." Students enrolled only as "Candidate for Degree" pay $97 in the Graduate School of Business, $87 in the College of Engineering and the Graduate School of Pub lic Affairs, $74 in the College of Liberal Arts and Sci ences, and $77 for all other programs. 8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course): Breakage deposit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20.00 An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the semester. 9. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses): Music fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 24.00 College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and elec tronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term. 10. Reinstatement fee: Students must pay a reinstate ment fee in addition to the original balance and interest before they may register for classes again or receive grades for completed work. Reinstatement fee .................. $ 25.00 Payment of Tuition and Fees All tuition and fees (except application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Arrangements may be made through the Bur sar's Office at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term. Students who register for courses are liable for pay ment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the Uni versity will not be permitted to register for any subse quent term, to be graduated, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only excep tion to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University obli gation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an additional service charge of $15. Audit 1b qualify as an auditor for Fall or Spring Semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The 1Subject to change .

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FALL 1986 AND SPRING 1987 TUITION UNDERGRADUATE ,EGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND CIENCES AND THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC and non-degree stu ents without an undergraduate degree (SO) Credit hours Resident Non-resident 0 1 $ 54 $ 246 2 108 492 3 162 738 4 216 984 5 270 1,230 6 324 1.476 7 378 2.455 8 432 2.455 9 486 2.455 10-15 543 2.455 each credit hour over 15 54 246 GRADUATE DEGREE TUDENTS: with programs in the College of Liberal Arts and ciences and in non-Denver campus programs: Nursing, M icine, Law, etc. Credit hours 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10-15 each credit hour over 15 Resident $ 74 148 222 296 370 444 518 592 666 741 74 Non-resident $ 258 516 774 1,032 1.290 1,548 2,584 2 ,584 2,584 2,584 258 GRADUATE DEGREE TUDENTS: with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs Credit hours 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10-15 each credit hour over 15 Resident $ 87 174 261 348 435 522 609 696 783 873 87 Non-resident $ 270 540 810 1,080 1.350 1,620 2,703 2.703 2,703 2.703 270 UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. Credit hours Resident Non-resident 0-1 $ 64 $ 256 2 128 512 3 192 768 4 256 1,024 5 320 1.280 6 384 1,536 7 448 2,555 8 512 2,555 9 576 2,555 10-15 643 2 ,555 each credi t hour over 15 64 . 256 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs i n the School of Education, (except Education Administratk:ln) the School of Architecture and Planning, the College of Music, and nondegree graduate students (SW) Credit hours Resident Non-resident 0-1 $77 $ 258 2 154 516 3 231 774 4 308 1,032 5 385 1.290 6 462 1,548 7 539 2,584 8 616 2,584 9 693 2,584 10-15 773 2,584 each credit hour over 15 77 258 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the Graduate School of Business Administration and Education Administration Credit hours Resident Non-resident 0 1 $ 97 $ 270 2 194 540 3 291 810 4 388 1 , 080 5 485 1,350 6 582 1,620 7 679 2,703 8 776 2,703 9 873 2.703 10-15 972 2 ,703 each credit hour over 1 5 I 97 270 Graduate degree ftudents who are registered as "candidate for degree" will assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System fee.

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3 4 I General Informatio n Records Office does not keep any record of cou rses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established . Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor's cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class . There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuit i on for the audited courses during the Fall or Spring Semes t er for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges. Residency Classification f o r Tuition Purposes Thition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher ed u ca tion are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth. The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginrling of the term for which the in-state classification is being so u ght. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian . An unemancipated minor's parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before t h e minor may be classified as an in-state s t udent for tui t ion purposes. Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent h ome and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domici l e on the per son seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado begins the day subsequent connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Colo rado; (2) change of automobile registration to Col orado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent emp l oy ment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed . Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroac tive to the time filed. In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term , the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one ' s 12-mo n th waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tui tion cannot be granted until the next semester. O nce the student's tuition classification is esta b lished, it rem ains unchanged unless satisfactory info rm at i on to the contrary i s p r esented . A stude nt who, due to subse quent events, becomes eligible for a change in classifica tio n from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records w i thin 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult st ud ent or emancipated minor who moves o u tside of C olo r ado m u s t send written notificat i on to the Office o f A dmis sions and Recor d s within 1 5 days of the change. Once a student is classified as non-resident for tuition purposes, the studen t m u st petition the Office of Admis sions and Records for a change in classification. P etitions must be submitted no later than two weeks bef ore the first day of classes of the term for which the st u dent wis h es to be classified as a non-resident so th at the classification will be determined prior to registration and payment of fees. It is preferred f o r petitio n s to be received 30 days prior to the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semeste r . Specific informa tion may be obtained from the Office of Admissi o ns and Reco r ds. Resident Tuition for Active Duty Mi l itary Personnel The Col orado Legislature approved reside n t tuition beginning w i th the Fal l 1 986 Semes ter for act iv e duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGI BLE STU DENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Stu dents obtain a completed verification form from the base edu cation officer, and submit the form with their mili t ary ID to the Record-Office after they have registered, before the end of the drop /add period. At that time the stu d ent's bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Stu dents who have been certified remain classified as non res id ents for tuition purposes and must pet ition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Col orado. FINANCIAL AID AT THE UNIVERSI TY OF COLORADO AT DENVER The financial aid program is designed to ass i st those st u dents who would be unable to attend the Un i versity without assistance . Whereas the primary respo n sibility for meeting the costs of education rests with the individ ual students and their families, financial aid funds are offered to supp l ement w h atever funds studen t s an d their famili es can provide. Because req u es t s general l y exceed the availablity of funds, students and the i r families should be aware of procedures and deadlines i n order to 1A copy of the C o lorado Revi sed Statutes (1973) , as amende d , is availabl e in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Offi ce .

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receive maxi urn consideration. Questions and requests for forrhs should be directed to the Office of Financial Employment at CU-Denver, Cen tral Classroom Building, Room 105, 556-2886. Estimated E x enses Ed u cational e enses at CU-Denver include tuition, fees, and the c st of books and related instructional mat erials . Stude t s who do not live with their parents also must the cost of housing and food expenses. All students sh 1 uld consider transportation and per sonal expendit es (i.e., clothing, entertainment, etc.) in determining the r expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/ Student establishes standard budgets for different types o students (dependent students living at home with par ts, single students living away from home, marrieds udents, etc.) to bring about consistency and equity in etermining the financial needs of all students. The standard budgets are established in line with parametefs set by the Colorado Commission on Higher EdJcation and the U.S. Department of Education. I For the academic year the standard budgets allowed $255 pe month living allowance for dependent students living t home, $565 per month for single stu dents not living at home, and $845 per month for mar ried students. allowance of $170 per month was added per depe dent child in the student's home. The living allowanc included amounts for rent, food, utilities, personal expenses, and transportation. The approximate -time cost of tuition, fees, and medical expenses for the 1986-87 academic year was $1,272 for a resi dent student and $5,115 for a non-resident student. Books and sup lies were estimated at $400 for the 1986-87 acade ' c year. All expenses ill increase slightly for the 1987-88 academic year. he State of Colorado and the Board of Regents usually set tuition guidelines and rates during the month of J e for the summer and academic year. The standards living allowances usually are set dur ing the spring s mester for the following summer and academic year. Students who have additional costs above the stand ard allowances c request a review of their situation by the Financial id Committee. The committee must receive docurne tation of extra expenses and can con sider an individ al exception to the standard allowances. Examples of the e kinds of exceptions are babysitting, medical, dental, d optical expenses. Determination of Financial Need an d Awa r d Financial nee 1 is defined as the difference between the cost of attendance as defined by the institution (tui tion and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and essential incidental expenses) and total resources available to the student. These resources include family contribution (summer savings, term General Information I 35 earnings, a spouse contribution, and a parental contribu tion) and awrurds from agencies outside the University. The family contribution is determined by a national uniform needs analysis system administered by agen cies such as the American College 'Jesting Program. This system analyzes income and assets, family size, number of children in post-secondary education, student inde pendence, etc., to determine a reasonable student and/or family contribution. After the financial need is determined and complete application materials have been received, students are ranked in order of financial need and are aided accord ingly until all funds are committed. The financial aid package normally consists of a self-help component (loans and/or employment) and a gift aid component (grants) proportionate to the availat)le funds and to the number of needy students applyin g . A small portion of Colorado work-study funds is available to interested students who do not document financial need. How to Ap,ly Application may be obtained by contacting the Office of Finaljlcial Aid/Student Employment. Students are asked to complete an institutional application and a need analysis form. The application includes a checklist of other documents to be submitted. Parents are expected to contribute toward a student's • educational costs . However, in certain cases students

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36 I General Information may be considered financially independent of their par ents. The need analysis form includes a complete expla nation of self-supporting status. Note: Requirements for receiving aid as a self-supporting student are subjea to change by the federal and state governments. Self-supporting students must document their status by providing income tax forms or other supporting doc uments to show sufficient income to be self-supporting during the appropriate period of time. In some cases, additional documentation from parents is required to complete a student's application. The information provided on the application for financial aid is analyzed according to the uniform needs analysis formula to determine the student's ability to contribute his or her educational costs during the academic year. 1b be eligible for financial aid, students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents or have a refugee visa. Eligible foreign students are advised to include a pho tocopy of their visa cards with their applications to facili tate processing. In addition, students who are required to register for the draft through Selective Service must be registered in order to be eligible for federal financial aid. All students must sign a Statement of Selective Service Registration Compliance, and proof of registration may be required. Application and Completion Dates A student may apply for a Pell Grant at any time up to May 1988. GSL, PLUS, and Supplemental Student Loan applications must be submitted approximately 55 days before the end of the academic term of the loan period. Other aid is offered on a first-come, first-served basis to needy students who have complete applications on file with the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Students should begin the application process by Feb ruary 1, 1987, and all materials should be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment and forms processed by ACT and the Pell Grant contractor by April1987. In every case, the aid offered depends upon the student showing financial need and funds being available. Special Note: An application for financial aid does not constitute an application for admission to the University. Please contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions and Records for application forms and procedures. Appli cants will not receive financial aid until they are enrolled in a degree program at the University. Non-degree stu dents are not eligible for most financial aid. Types of Aid Available The following information is subject to change by state and federal law and regulation. SCHOLARSHIPS Colorado Scholarships. Colorado Scholars Awards provide funds for resident undergraduate students and are funded by the State of Colorado. Information and application materials are available in the Office of Finan cial Aid/Student Employment. Regents Scholarships. Regents Scholarships, funded by the State of Colorado, provide tuition and regular student fees to new resident undergraduate students (freshmen and transfers). The CU-Denver Office of Admissions and Records should be contacted for further information. Deans Scholarships. Deans Scholarships , funded by the State of Colorado, provide funds for resident under graduate students. Contact your dean's office for further information. GRANTS Pel/ Grant. The Pell Grant is a source of federal grant aid for which all students pursuing their first under graduate degree may apply. Application can be made by submitting the FamHy Financial Statement or the sepa rate Federal Student Aid Application. Applications can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Grant amounts vary depending on finan cial need , costs at the institution, and Congressional allocation. Colorado Student Grant. The Colorado Student Grant is an undergraduate grant for Colorado residents. This grant is based on financial need and funds are allotted to the University by the State of Colorado. Amounts vary from approximately $100 to $1,000 per year. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University Application for Financial Aid, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant . Sup plemental Educational Opportunity Grants are under graduate federal grants varying in amounts from $100 to $2,000 per year. These grants are based on student need and availability of funds. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University application, the Fam ily Financial Statement, and other required documents. Colorado Student Incentive Grant. This is the name given in Colorado to the federal program known as State Student Incentive Grant. The program is for Colorado residents seek ing their first undergraduate degree and who show substantial financial need. Awards range from $100 to $2,000 per year and are funded one-half by the State of Colorado and one-half by the federal govern ment. Application for this grant is made by submitting the University application, the Family Financial State ment, and other required documents. Graduate Grant. Grants for graduate students are available on a limited basis and will be awarded to students as elig ibility and funds allow. App lication is made by submitting the University application, the Fam ily Financial Statement, and other required documents. The award is funded by the State of Colorado. Graduate Fellowships. Grants for graduate students are awarded based upon academic merit. Contact your graduate department for more information. LOANS Colorado Guaranteed Student Loan Program . The pri mary purpose of this program is to make low-interest ,

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long-term loans vailable to students to help them meet their post secon ary educational expenses. The student first must obtaif an application from a participating lending institutifn or the Colorado Guaranteed Student Loan Program o ce. Some lenders provide the Office of Financial Aid/S udent Empluyment with a supply of application form .. Arrangements for repayment must be made within foo/ months after graduation or other ter mination of at lit half-time studies. The student must contact the lend to arrange a repayment schedule. The interest rate r this plan is limited to 8 percent per annum simple terest for first-time borrowers (for pre vious borrowers the interest rate will be 7 or 9 percent). In return for its guarantee of a student's loan, CGSLP requires the stu ' ent to pay in advance a guarantee fee equal to one p rcent per annum on the outstanding principal balan e to cover the anticipated in-school period plus a six month grace period and a 5 percent (of the original prin ipal amount) origination fee. A financial n ed test must be done by the Office of Financial Aid/ tudent Employment. If the student shows financial need, then the student is eligible to borrow the loan All students should complete the need analysis form an submit it along with the regular Guar anteed Student oan application, the University GSL application, and opies of family tax returns to the Office of Financial Ai3Student Employment. The maxim a freshman or sophomore undergraduate student rna borrow is $2,625 a year. A junior or senior undergra uate may borrow up to $4,000 per year. A graduate or p ofessional student may borrow up to $7,500 a year.l total that may be borrowed for under graduate study i $17,250. The total for all undergraduate and graduates y is $54,750. The government pays the interest on loans until the repayment period begins, six months after the student ceases to be at least a half-time student. Repa ent is usually at the rate of $50 per month and c t exceed ten years. Carl Perkins oan Program (formerly National Direa Student Loan). he Carl Perkins Loan is a federal loan available to und rgraduate and graduate students with financial need. student may borrow up to (a) $4,500 during the fres an and sophomore years; (b) $9,000 total for undergdduate study; (c) $18,000 total for gradu ate and undergdduate study. Application for the loan is made by subm1tting the University Application for Financial Aid, the Family Financial Statement (FFS), and other requir d documents. Interest and payment on the loan are defe 1red while the borrower is enrolled on at least a at an approved institution of higher educatio . Interest at 5 percent per year begins to accrue 9 months ter the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time Repayment is due at that time usually at the rate of $5 per month plus interest, and cannot exceed lO years. Parents Loans o Undergraduate Students. This type of loan allows parents to borrow funds for their dependent children. begins 60 days after disbursement, at 12% Parents of dependent undergraduate students may borrow up to $4,000 per year . PLUS loan borrowers must p ay an insurance premium of up to I% General Information I 37 of the total loan, collected in advance. Refinancing at lower interest r ates may be possible. Colorado Alternative Student Loan Program (CASL). This loan allows students to borrow up to $7,000 per academic year for educatil r mal expenses and it also permits other individuals, such as parents, other relatives, or dose friends, to borrow on behalf of the student. The borrower must have sufficient income and credit to qualify to be eligible for The interest rate will probably be less than 13% pdr year and will be specified at the time private funds are committed for this loan program. Monthly of interest begins immediately and continues for up to four years if the student continues to be enrolled in college. Loan prin cipal repayment begins 120 days after the student ceases enrollment and the entire loan must be repaid within ten years. The student must be pursuing a degree at CU Denver in order to be eligible for CASL, but there is no minimum number of credit hours required. The pro gram is funded by private funds and is managed by the Colorado Student Loan Program. Supplemental Loans. Students who do not qualify for Guaranteed Student Loan may borro\v through the Sup plemental Loan Program. Students may apply for up to $4,000 per year with a cumulative limit of $20,000. Beginning with new or refinanced loans made on or after July l, 1987, the interest rate for both PLUS and Supplemental Loans will be variable, set annually at 3.75 percent above the T-Bill rate with a 12 percent cap. EMPLOYMENT College Work-Study Program. The College Work Study Program is designed to provide jobs to under graduate and graduate students. The program is funded by the federal government and the State of Colorado. Employment is arranged whenever possible in the stu dent's major area of interest, with job opportunities both onand off-campus. Students are permitted to choose their own job from the eligible posted. Awards average up to $2,800 per academic year. For details con tact the Office of Student Employment. Application for this aid is made by submitting the University Applica tion for Financial Aid, the Family Financial Statement, and other required documents. Students and employers in the Work-Study Program are expected to assume responsibilities considered normal in an employee employer relationship. Part-time Student Employment. 'I;he Auraria Student Assistance Center, Career Planning and Placement Office, and the CU-Denver Office of Student Employ ment assist students in obtaining part-time employment other than that based on financial need. Further informa tion and/or aJ?plication may be obtained from these offices. OTHER OF AID See the Of ce of Financial Aid for details of these programs:

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38 I General Information Bureau of Indian Affairs. Grants are available to Native American students. Short-'Ierm Loans. Small, temporar y loan s are made to students facing financial emergencies. These loans are to be repaid during the semester. Advantage Scholarship. CU-Denver funded this spe cial program during 1986-87 for the first time . The pro gram is designed to provide special services to minor ities or first generation college students, including finan cial aid counseling, admissions assistance, academic advising, part-time employment on-campus, and tuition assistance if no other grant or scholarship is available. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for application materials and information. Academic Requirements Students receiving financial aid must demonstrate that they are maintaining satisfactory acad emic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. The satisfactory academic progress stand ards have three sections: 1) A student must complete a minimum number of hours compared to hours attempted each term by obtaining a grade ofD or better if undergraduat e , or a grade of Cor better if graduate; 2) A student must maintain a cumulativ e grade-point average of2.0 for undergraduates and 3.0 for graduates; and 3) A student is eligible for financial aid only until a certain number of credit hours have been earned. Students should obtain a complete copy of the CU-Denver Satis factory Progress Policy fro m the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment to determine th eir eligibility for financial aid. Colorado Scholars, Regents Scholars, Deans Scholars, Pell Grant , Guaranteed Student Loan, Supplemental Loan, Advantage Scholar ship, and PLUS loans may be received by students who are enrolled at least halftime. Other aid may be received only by full time students. Duration of Aid Financial aid is offered for one year at a time. Students must reapply for surnrner and for each academic year, according to the established priority dates. Use of Funds All financial aid awards are to be used only for imme diate educational expenses. These expenses include tuition, fees, books, supplies, room and board, transportation, and essential miscellaneous expenses, such as clothing, medical, etc. Refunds The University tuition refund policy is published in the Schedule of Classes for each term. For the Fall1986 Semester, the policy for refunds upon complete with drawal from the University was 100% tuition and refun dable fees minus $25 refund if the student withdrew before the term began, 75% of tuition and refundable fees if the student withdrew by the third day of the third week of classes, and 50% of tuition and refundable fees if the student withdrew by the fourth week of classes. Students receiving financial aid may be required to return any refund to the University's financial aid accounts. Student Rights and Responsibilities Students have certain rights and responsibilities regarding financial aid and student employme nt. Stu dents may review applicable policies and procedures in the CU-Denver Office of Financial Aid/Student Employ ment. Specific application procedures and policies are subject to change. Further Information and Application Forms Further information and application forms may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment, Central Classroom Building, Room 105, on the Auraria campus, or by writing to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, University of C olorado at Denver, llOO Fourteenth Street , Campus Box 125, Denver , Colorado 80202. Persons in the Denver metro politan area are encouraged to visit the office to receive application forms and information. Peer counselors and

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Selecting a are available to discuss individual eligibility. review the following sections of this the academic programs available at provide information by school or majors available, course require load policies, and other pertinent .. ._. ... .,..,... during a particular semester or sum in the Schedule of Classes , published registration . These are available Admissions and Records. students who need assistance in plan in selecting courses should contact the they are enrolled to arrange for prior to registration. .,..,,,,-l.;, • ., should contact their graduate pro-ling and Abbreviations tnrm=•t.r•n on scheduling courses , students are advisor through their college or General Information I 39 school dean's o fice. In general, the abbreviation preced ing the course rumber identifies department offer ing the The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course: Level of Courses Student Cla s sification 100 Freshman 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Sophomore Junior Senior Graduate student s or qualified seniors who have the instructor's or dean' s permission Master and Ph.D. r raduate students Master's thesis Doctor's thesis Independent study The Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered conaurrently at the 400 and 500 levels. However, the evaluation and require ments for students enrolled at the ?[actuate (500) level will be different than those enrolled at the undergradu ate (400) level. It should be expected that work at the graduate level would involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the undergraduate level. The digit after the dash in the number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture / recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a student

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40 I General Information emolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 15-week term. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions. Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: Coreq. Corequisite Hrs. -Hours Lab. -Laboratory Lect. -Lecture Prer. Prerequisite Rec. Redtation Sem. Semester Wk.-Week Thus, the description of CHEM. 106-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit which is divided into 3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit. Further, the student must have completed CHEM. 103 (the prerequisite) before emolling. Orientation An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the Fall and Spring Semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation, conducted by the Office of the Dean of Student Academic Services and the various schools and colleges, introduces the academic programs, activities, and services available at CU-Den ver. Information on the registration process and on degree requirements also is provided. Registration CUDenver conducts common registration in coop eration with Metropolitan State College. Registration involves the following processes: (1) mail registration, (2) walk-in registration, and (3) course adjustment (drop / add). Students eligible for mail registration who choose to take advantage of this process may register and pay tuition and fees by mail. A walk-in registration will be available for students who do not wish to, or are not eligible to, register by mail. For complete instructions, students should refer to the Schedule of Classes published at the beginning of each semester and summer term. POOLED COURSES Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Met ropolitan State College. CU-Denver students may regis ter for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes. CUDenver students are expected to take at least half their hours in CUDenver courses each term. INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION CU-Denver degree students may emoll for courses offered by the various campuses of the Community College of Denver. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Regis tration is on a space available basis . CCD courses are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two Uni versity of Colorado campuses concurrently must contact the Office of Admissions and Records on their own campus. Course Loads Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. The student should obtain the dean's signature on the Regis tration Form or Course Change Form during Walk in Registration. Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed: Employed 40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week: 5-8 semester hours 20-29 hours per week: 7-11 semester hours 10-19 hours per week: 9-15 semester hours Students must weigh their capabilities against the demands of each course. DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING Undergraduates: Full time: 12 or more semester units Graduates: Summer Half time 6 or more semester units Full time: 8 or more hours Halftime: 4 or more hours Undergraduates: Full time: 8 or more semester units Half time: 4 or more semester units Graduates: Full time: 5 or more hours Halftime: 3 hours CCD courses are not considered for fullor half-time status . Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid pur poses by the Financial Aid Committee . Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid. SHORT-TERM COURSES Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars . Thpics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.

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ACADEMI C P rUCIES AND R E G ULATI ONS Advanced Standing and Advanced Pl,cement C redit may obtain credit for division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. y passing an the will be given for the to satisfy .dlVIsion requireme sand may be eligible to enroll m higher level courses th indicated by the student's formal aca demic experien e. Credit granted for courses by exam ination is as transfer credit without a grade but does count tow d graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below. Advanced PI cement Program The Placement Program of the College Entrance Examipation Board (CEEB) allows students to take a d vanced work while in high school and then be examined for dedit at the college level. Students who take advanced lacement courses and subsequently rece ive scores f 3, 4, or 51 on the CEEB Advanced P l acement Ex ination are generally given college credit for lower -eve! courses in which they have demon strated proficien and are granted advanced standing in those areas. S tu ' ents with scores below 34 may be con sidered for adv ced placement by the discipline con cerned. For mo information contact your high school counselor or the Director of Admissions for CU-Denver. D egree stude ts may take examinations for credit. Th qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working towar4 a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade point average least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations arranged through the Records Office, and a fee is charged. Students should contact the offillege Entrance Examination Board test ing service. The \ cost for a single examination is $30. For more information call 55 6-2861. S t u dents who are interested in CLEP examinations must contact th office of their school or college. General Information I 41 Credi t for ilit a r y Service and Schooling 1nd ROT C MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING Th have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (l) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295. Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Com mission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver. Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions. RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC pro grams should consult with their college or school regard ing the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements . The College of Business and tion stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree require ments in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed. Grading and Policies The following grading system and procedures for pass / fail registration, dropping and adding courses, .and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University. GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for whatever grade sym bol (A, B, C, D, F, IE rw, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (N C , w, and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor Pass/ I Students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science must receive scores of 4 or 5 for credit to be granted; students with scores of 3 may be considered by the department concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance.

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42 I General Information fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application sys tem, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure. A-superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour. B-good!better than average-3 points per credit hour. C--competenVaverage-2 credit points per hour. D-minimum passing-1 credit point per credit hour. F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour. Some schools and colleges have approved use of a PLUS/ MINUS grading system, where a B + corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B-corre sponds to 2. 7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors in those schools and colleges may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/ MINUS system, but are not required to do so. IF incomplete -regarded as F if not completed within one year maximum. IW -incomplete -regarded as W if not completed within one year maximum. IP-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only. An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student's completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Students should not re-register for courses for which they have received INCOMPLETE$. Students receiving INCOMPLETES: most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to "complete" the incomplete. PIPpass/failP grade is not included in the grade point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass / fail course work may be credited toward a bach elor's degree. HIPIF honors / pass / fail -intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average. Special Symbols NC -indicates registration on a no-credit basis. W-indicates withdrawal without credit. Yindicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 500 level of a slash course (400 / 500) will be expected to complete additional work and be evalu ated commensurate with graduate standards as specified by the course instructor. PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE I. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pass / fail basis should do so during the regular registra tion. Changes to or from a pass / fail basis only may be made during the regular drop /add period. 2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass /fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass /fail in any given semester. 3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass / fail registration. All students who register on a pass / fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass /fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P. 4. The record of pass / fail registration is maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records. 5. Exception to the pass / fail regulations is permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs. 6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P I F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of Pwill not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Grad uate School requirement. 7. If you register for a course on a pass / fail basis, you may not later decide that you want a letter grade. Each school or college limits the hours and courses for which you may register on a pass / fail basis. Please note: many colleges will not accept a "P" grade for transfer credit. GRADE-POINT AVERAGE The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours. Grades of P, NC, Y, W, IP, Iw, and IF are not included in the grade-point average. If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period. If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped. If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in The Graduate School. The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester. Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average. GRADE REPORTS Grade reports normally are available for students to pick up at the Information Center within two to three weeks after the end of the semester. Students must pre sent picture identification. Grade reports are not auto matically mailed; however, a self-addressed, stamped envelope may be supplied to the Records Office by indi vidual students who wish to have their grades mailed. Transcripts 1tanscripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by

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General Information I 43 PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONI S College Business and Adm nistration General Only non-business electives may be taken Pass/Fail Engineering and A plied Science Required courses may not be taken Pass/Fail. Courses must be designated by major department: students without major not eligible; recommended maximum -one course / semester. Graduate School Liberal Arts and S ences Not applicable t oward degree May be r estricte d in certain majors ; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more th a n 6 hours PIF any semester . 16 Hours I Maximum Includes courses taken in the honors program Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL. 100 Proficiency lest or MATH. 100 lest. Students I Maximum of l semester hour of Pass/Fail for every 8 semester hours completed and passed at the University Maximum of l semester hour of Pass/Fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semester hours taken in the college. May not be used by students graduating with only 30 semester hours taken at the University Music Only non-music electives may be Includes courses taken in the taken Pass/Fail. No more than 6 honors program hours PIF any semester. mail from the U I iversity of Colorado at Boulder, Records Office, Campu Box B-7, nanscript Section, Regent Administrative enter 125, Boulder, CO 80309. Official transcripts will ot be available until approximately five weeks after fin examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to b recorded will not be available until approximately ight weeks after final examinations. Requests shoul r include the following: l. Student's name (include maiden or other name if applicable). 2. Student n ber. 3. Birthdate. 4. The last te 5. Whether t included when term. and campus the student attended. e current semester grades are to be transcript is ordered near the end of a 6. Agency, coiege, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. omplete mailing addresses should be included. nans ipts sent to students are labeled "issued to student." 7. Student's s nature. (This is the student's authorization to release e records to the designee.) There is no cijarge for transcripts. nanscripts are pre pared only at the student's request. A student with finan cial the University that are due and unpaid will not be gr ted a transcript. Copies of transcripts sent to CU-De ver from other institutions cannot be furnished. Th . se transcripts should be requested directly from th1 issuing institution. Adding and Dropping Courses1 ADDING COURSES Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (7 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. DROPPING COURSES l. Students may drop courses without approvals dur ing the first 12 days of the fall or sprtng semester (8th day of the summet term). Thition will be charged for the dropped courses which are droppt1d as long as the stu dent is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record. 2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor's signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student's permanent record 1 For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate term .

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44 I General Information with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an F grade. No adjustment of tuition is made for courses which are dropped after the 12th day (8th day for the summer term) of full-term classes. 3. After the lOth week of a fall or spring semester (7th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances dearly beyond the stu dent's control. In addition to the instructor's certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses. Thition will be charged even though the drop is allowed. 4. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form. Withdrawal from the University 1b withdraw from the University, the student must obtain approval of the dean's office, Bursar's Office, and Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student's permanent record page.lfthe withdrawal date is prior to the l3th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the stu dent's permanent record. lf the withdrawal date is after the Uth day, the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the lOth week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances dearly beyond their control. Students who are receiving veteran's benefits or finan cial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices. A student who stops attending classes without offidally withdrawing from the University will receive grades ofF for all course work enrolled for during that term. 1b withdraw from the University, a graduate student must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term. For specific signatures, requirements, and tuition adjustment the student should refer to the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term. Originality of Work In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons' ideas or language . Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University. Inspection of Educational Records Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designated to pro tect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file com plaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act. Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provi sions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado. A directory of records, listing all educational records maintained on students by this institution, may be found in the Office of Admissions and Records on each campus. The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) con ferred, past and present participation in officially recog nized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This informa tion may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion. Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educa tional Rights and Privacy Act. 1b withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop /add period in each and every term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records. Students must request each term to have directory information withheld for that term. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld for that term, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of informa tion for that term and following terms until otherwise requested. Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Admis sions and Records. Good Standing 1b remain in good standing within a particular school or college, an undergraduate student must maintain a grade-point average of at least 2.0 (C) in all course work attempted. A graduate degree student must maintain a grade-point average of at least 3.0. Non-degree students must maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.0. Policies on academic probation, suspension, and dis missal vary by college or school, and students should

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refer to sections f this bulletin dealing with the colleges and schools for ormation . Students are classified according to the number of semester hours assed: Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior 0-29 hours 0-59 hours 0-89 hours 90+ hours All transfer s udents will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of C lorado. Student lnd btedness A student overdue financial obligations to the University will hot be permitted to register for any sub sequent term, graduate, or to be listed among those receiving a or credit from the University. "fran scripts will not e released for a student with an overdue financial obliga , on to the University. STUDENT SErVICES Dean of Stu ent Academic Services This office i responsible for providing student advocacy leader f hiP for the Student Academic Services programs and It also serves as a liaison with student goveiTlf.lent, provides CU-Denver representa tion in student services, and coordinates orientation pro ams for new students, commencement, the Senior Citi ens Program, the Ahlin Fund for dis abled students and student research programs. The office telephone is 556-8427. The Dean of S udent Academic Services office protects student rights responsibilities by administering the Standards of Student Conduct. When a student enrolls in the University, he or she agrees to participate mean ingfully in the life of the University and to share in the obligation to pr serve and promote his or her r i ghts as a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or to tolerat e any infr"ngement on the rights of others. Copies of the s t andard and information regarding all student grievance proce ures may be obtained in the Student Academic Servi es office. Student Conruct Policies and Standards Students should thoroughly familiarize themselves with the acadetmc and nonacademic student conduct stan dard s of University. Academic standards ques tions should be directed to the dean of the school or General Information I 45 college in wtV.ch the student is enrolled . Nonacademic conduct should be directed to the Office of the Dean of Student Academic Services. Your enroWoent in the University is voluntary. When you were admitted, you became responsible for appropriate perfo11mance and behavior as defined and described in this document. As a member of the Univer sity community, you are held accountable for civil and criminal laws as well as University Standards. Enroll ment in the University does not confer either immunity or special consideration with to civil and crirni nallaws. You are accountable to both civil and University authorities for acts which constitute violations of laws as well as violations of University ruiles and regulations. Disciplinary action by the will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the ground that crimi nal charges involving the same inddent have been dis missed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates standards as defined within this document and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final. All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution. All persons on CU-Denver / Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Standards of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations. The following guidelines attempt to balance your needs and the needs of the UniversitiY. If you are found in violation of one of the Standards of Conduct, one of the University's primary interests will be to help you avoid further inappropriate behavior and become a responsi ble member of the university community. However, if you fail to correct inappropriate behavior, or if you violate one of these Standards of Conduct, the University will consider taking disciplinary action that may, in some cases, lead to y our suspension or permanent expulsion from the University. The behavior outlined below will not be tolerated because they threaten the safety of indi viduals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedmps of its members. l. Intentionfi obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and adrninistllative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denve / Auraria premises. 2. Willful otistruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver / Auraria campus. 3. Physical Abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CUDenver / Auraria Higher Education

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46 I General Information Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person. 4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands on, treating with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. 5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver / Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University. 6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), altera tion, or use of University documents, records, or instru ments of identification with intent to defraud. 7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver / Auraria property and the private property of students, university officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CUDenver / Auraria buildings or facilities. 8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dan gerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU Denver / Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switch blades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the term firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.) 9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver / Auraria campus. 10. Off Campus: physical abuse of any person, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person, or conduct which interferes with the public or private rights of citizens, when it is determined that the continued presence of the student would clearly constitute a threat or danger to the CU-Denver / Auraria community. Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the redress of griev ances. For additional information, students shall refer to the University of Colorado Students' Rights and Respon sibilities Regarding Standards of Conduct , Discipline and Review. Student Activities The Office of Student Activities is the coordinating and resource center for student government, clubs, organizations, student programs, Greek social organiza tions, and academic honor societies. All student fee expenditures are monitored to assure that they meet all ASUCD, CU-Denver and state regulations and pro cedures. The Student Activities Officer also represents the Dean of Student Academic Services on a number of CU-Denver, ASUCD, and AHEC committees and main tains a good communication level with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. Student Activities is located in Room 153, Stu dent Center, 556-3399. Academic Center for Enrichment The Academic Center for Enrichment is a learning assistance center that provides the following types of services to the students at the University of Colorado at Denver: (l) instruction English-as-a-second-lan guage and study skills courses (math, reading, writing); (2) tutorial-individualized, group, and specialized; (3) diagnostic tests math, reading, spelling , vocabulary, study skills, and composition; (4) counseling coordina tion-personal, career, and academic; (5) workshopscollege survival skills and study skills; and (6) peer advocacy. Services are available to all students including return ing veterans, first generation college participants, teen agers, ethnic minorities, recipients of financial aid, phys ically handicapped, and working people. GRE and GMAT review courses are coordinated with the Division of Continuing Education. The center also operates an ethnic library from which students may borrow books for reports or leisure reading. For infor mation call 556-2802. Center for Internships and Cooperative Education The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education provides students with an opportunity to supplement

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their academic assroom learning with on the-job work expe ri ences or internships related to their academic studies. The ce ter is open to all students in the colleges and schools of CU-D enver who have c omp l eted their freshman year d h ave maintained a grade-poi n t aver age o f at least 2. . Students are placed either as paid Coop trainees or v unteer Co-op interns with corporations, businesses, or overnrnent agencies in positions that compl e m ent th ir academic course work. Co-op stu de n ts can wor * full time by alt ernating semesters of work with sen}esters of fuJI-time school, or they can work part time r ear around. The College of Liberal Arts an d S ciences aJ1d t h e College of Music award academic cre dit at the level for a Co-op or internship experi ence. S tudents by the cente r in paid or vol unteer assignments, we ll as stu d ents who have ob t ained their own jobs, may b e eligible to earn Co-op internship credit. For m e information contact the center at 556-2 8 92. Counselor Training Center Usin g the of students in master ' s level counse lin g h elp i s provide d t o deal with p ersonal meetings address topical issues and is available. Information an d appoint by contacting the center at 5 56-842 7. tunity Program Opportunity Program assists all eth at CU-Denver. Support programs Genera/Information I 4 7 include speci 1 ized recruiting, student advocacy , inten sive tutorial services , and c ommunity out reach programs. The program is designed to provide assistance to minority students and to acquaint students w it h the history and cultur e of Asian Amer i cans, Blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians. Student organiza tions provide assistance with recruitment, counseling, and tutoring; financial assistance is available through grants and the Work/Study Program. F or more informa tion call 556-8427. Legal Services The legal staff is available to as si st the students with off-campus legal problems through such services as legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, ass i stance in negotiation, and referral to private attorn eys at a reduced rate. The servi c e is a free , s tudent fee funded program; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as c opying , typ ing, et c . Contact the office for further details at 556-3333 , Room 255A , Stu dent Center. Nondegree S tuden t Advising All non-degree students who are undecided about a major ma y receive counseling about admission proced ures and academic advising during orientation. See Schedule of Classes under Ori e ntation . Non-degree stu dents who have decided on a major s hould contact the

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48 I General Information school or college offering that major. For information contact 556-2861. Student Health Insurance Program A student medical hospital-surgical plan is available for all students: dependent coverage also is available at an additional charge. For further information refer to the portion on Thition and Fees in the General Information section of this bulletin, or call 556-8427. Testing Center This multi-faceted assistance center provides various testing for all levels of postsecondary education, profes sional certification, accreditation, and academic and career planning evaluations. The center provides regis tration information concerning the following: ACT CAT CEil GRE GMAT GSFLT MAT MBTI TOEFL CLEP sen American College lest California Achievement lest Colorado Educational Interest Indicator Graduate Record Examination Graduate Management Admissions lest Graduate School Foreign Language lest Miller Analogy lest Myers-Briggs JYpe Indicator lest of English as a Foreign Language College Level Examination Program Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory For further information contact 556-2861. Office of Veterans Affairs The Office of Veterans Affairs is an initial contact point for veteran-students attending CU-Denver under their veterans benefits earned while serving in the Armed Forces. The office maintains proper certification for each vet eran-student so that the Veterans Administration is assured that veterans are, in fact, pursuing specific aca demic programs. In addition, the OVA provides Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, tutorial assistance, Colorado Thition Assistance Program, and work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information contact 556-2630. Women's Resources CU-Denver provides female students and prospective students with programming and various resources. Services offered include on-going workshops , student advocacy, seminars, support and educational groups as well as career and personal counseling. Referral sources related to family, health, legal, and financial matters are provided. Women's Resources also offers four schol arships to women, and has extensive scholarship and financial aid information available. For further informa tion contact 556-2815. A deaf student (right) learns some finer points of volleyball from his teacher (center) and a sign language interpreter.

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Associated tudents of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASUCS) Student gov rnment serves as a voice for students and provides activi ies and services not normally offered to students unde the formal University structure. Thus, student activit fees pay for a legal aid program, recrea tional activitie , women ' s resources, numerous student organizations, e Advocate (student newspaper), and numerous spe ial events and activities. Auraria Assistance Center The Aurari Student Assistance Center (ASAC) is composed offices offering specialized assistance to all present d prospective Auraria students. l. O ffice of ormation and Referral Services. This is a central infor ation source that provides objective assistance to p r ospective students desiring to enroll at CU-Denver or p ne of the other academic institutions on the Auraria 2. Office o Career Planning Placement Services. Assistance is o ered to students and alumni in planning their careers ' d seeking employment. 3. Office of isabled Student Services. This officer provides acad mic support of services to ensure pro grarnrnatic ace ss for students with disabilities. 4. Office of ocational Rehabilitation. Campus branch office of the ltate of Colorado Department of Social Services. This ffice assists disabled students in becom ing fully empl yable and self-supporting. 5. Office of I,nternational Student Services. The office assists international students on campus from 80 coun tries by providmg support services and aiding in bridg ing the culturcll gaps which many of them experience when entering the community to attend college. 6. Office of Off-Campus Housing Referral Services. Provides info ation on apartments and dormitory liv ing arrangem ts. SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Ass1ciation The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the University through a variety of net"forks and activities. Founded in 1976, students autolljlatically become members upon gradua tion. Friends and non-degreed former students are also welcome to PCifticipate. Horizons, published in the fall, winter , and spring of each year, is mailed to members of the association. lumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/ r activities on campus which might inter est them. The Mack Easton Award for Distinguished Service is bestowed each year at commencement and is sponsored by 1 the Association . A program of alumni access to the campus recreation center, library, and park ing lots has been recently instituted. General Information I 49 The board is compri,sed of alumn i repre senting all of the schools and colleges on campus . This group plans ! events, implements programs, and raises funds with fue goal of advancing the University and increasing the visibility of alumni. Auraria Book Center The Auraria Book Center carries a complete stock of academic , technical , reference, and e x amination prepa ration books. The Book Center atso stocks computers and peripherals, software, and supplies for office, art, and engineering. Special orders for books are wel comed, and a search for out-of-print books is available at no charge. Students should bring their priJiltouts to locate course books. Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves; the course call number is printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional book. When available, used books sel l for 75 percent of the new book p ce. A full refund is given for new and used books returned within the first three weeks of a regular semester ' s start. 1\vo ill' s are reqwted for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard and VISA. The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Center lower mall and offers e x tended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sun dries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from studedts throughout the year, and refunds and exchanges are handled here. Photocopying services are available in the Conven ience Store. nansparencies, reductions, and other options may be specified , and a self-serve copie r i s a v ail able for small orders. The Book Center is located in the Auraria S t ud e nt Center , lower level, 9th and Lawreq.ce Streets. For further information and hours , contact 55'6-3230.

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Auraria Chilf Care Center The Auraria fhild Care Center is a non-profit organi zation which rovides a high quality child care and preschool prog am for the children of students, faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center. The Center o erates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 dren at a time. It is divided into two toddler classro ms, three preschool classrooms, and one kindergarten/ er-school classroom. Children must be 18 months to e$ ht years of age to attend. The y of the Center is to foster the develop ment of compe ence in intellectual and social skills and to provide safi nurturing environment. The program involves the as essment of individual needs , establish ing goals and a ivities that are appropriate for develop ment. Close p ent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, dividually-oriented program provided at the Center. Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time or homly basis to accommodate students' vary ing class schetes. For additional information, please call 556-3188. Auraria Stu ent Center The Studen Center, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafet ria, the campus Book Center, a study lounge, game r1 om, offices for student government and organizations, a copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, meeting and c 1 nference facilities, and a tavern. Computing kervices The Computbg Services department supports com puter use by b h the academic and administrative communities at C -Denver. Currently there are several resources use to achieve this purpose. The Boulder General Information I 51 campus houses a Cyber non20 and an IBM 4381 systhrough the Denver campus or dial-in lines. The Denver campus maintains a PRIME 750-9950 computer network, a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX nn8o, a PYRAMID 'Jechnologies 90X, an Intel HyperCube, and a number of IBM and Apple Personal Computers. The PRIME system operates with 13.5 megabytes of memory and 2 5 50 megabytes of disk stor age; the VAX with 4 megabytes of memory and 822 megabytes of disk storage; the PYRAMID with 4 mega bytes of memory and 400 megabytes of disks; and the Intel with 16 megabytes of memory and 40 megabytes of disks . These systems are the ones primarily used for instructional purposes. Increasing emphasis is being placed on the use of the personal computers, and to that end Computing Services maintains five teach4tg labs. These are used in conjunction with regularly scheduled classes. Computing Services staff provides assistance to aca demic and administrative users on all computing sys tems available and on every phase of their use. Advisers assist students enrolled in computing courses with questions regarding programming and use of the com puter systems and software available. Administrative users are assisted in their duties by the data processing staff and a systems analyst. Computing systems at every location on campus are maintained by an operations supervisor and staff who assist faculty and staff with hardware questions and problems. The goal of the Computing Services department is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information call 556-2583. Division of Continuing Education Through its Division of Continuing Education (CE), the University of Colorado at Denver provides off-cam pus credit and noncredit educatiohal opportunities for

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52 I General Information the life-long learner and the non-traditional student. More than 7,000 employees of business, industry, and government, homemakers, senior citizens, and alumni participated in CE classes, workshops, and seminars during the past year. 1b provide easy access to as many students as possible, CE uses the city and its environs as its classroom. CU Denver's excellent faculty is teamed with highly talented part-time instructors from the Denver metropolitan area to ensure quality and excellence in instruction. Credit class offerings provide a linkage between CU-Denver's resident degree program on-campus and the part-time, off-campus student. Programs are specially designed to offer career updating for such professionals as teachers, engineers, attorneys, and architects. Off-campus credit classes at Lowry Air Force Base and Fitzsimons Army / Medical Center give the military student the opportunity to take core course requirements that will later lead to the completion of a degree. CE delivers a wide array of noncredit courses for those interested in career updating, personal enrichment, and intellectual stimulation. Specific programs are developed at the request of business and professional groups. These programs include licensing and refresher courses for engineers, accountants, life insurance agents, and architects. Seminars and certificate programs for business and industry are designed to help keep super visors and managers abreast of new technologies and their management. Courses in the arts and humanities explore such topics as parenting, self-awareness, music and art, photography, languages, and literature. Through these off-campus programs, and as part of its public service mission, CU-Denver seeks to extend its educational resources to the off-campus student. Indi viduals, groups, and organizations with special education interests are invited to call the Division of Continuing Education at 556-2735. Development Program In 1981-82 CUDenver established a development pro gram in conjunction with the University of Colorado Foundation Inc. The CU Foundation was established in 1967 at the direction of the Board of Regents of the University as a privately governed, non-profit corpora tion, chartered under the laws of the State of Colorado. It is operated exclusively for charitable, scientific, or educa tional purposes designed to promote the welfare of CU. The CU Foundation and its development offices are the approved agency to solicit, receive, and administer gifts from private sources for the benefit of all campuses. The Development Program also is integrally related to the Alumni Association and offers leadership to that group. International Education The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special rela tionships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships at CU-Boulder. The office also arranges study abroad programs and offers over 30 different programs around the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in these programs. Some of the study abroad programs are of the tradi tional junior year abroad variety, in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. Such programs are available at the Universities of Lancaster and Reading, England; the University of Bor deaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University ofRegensburg, West Germany; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and 'Iechnology in Monterrey, Mexico; Kanan University, Kobe, Japan; the University of Seville, Spain; and the National Thiwan University in Thipei. For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive language learning. Single semester programs are offered in Chambery and Rennes, France; Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico; London, England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Seville and Alicante, Spain. Summer programs are located in Kassel, West Germany; Perugia, Italy; and London, England. Special summer programs, e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific departments upon request. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these study abroad programs. A B

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credit. equi valent of two years of college level <>n•'*nnTi<>tP language is required for most of programs. Financial aid from CUto program costs in most cases, while abroad is considered resident torm!J:tion about study abroad programs is of International Educatio n, Boul-General Information I 53 A wide Valjiety of course options are offered to stu dents during 1 the weekend period fro m noon Fridays through Sundays. Some students will register as non degree studeq.ts those not seeking a degree -while others may already be enrolled in degree programs at CU-Denver, but desire the additional flexibility provided in the weekend offerings. der campus, -7741. Courses are drawn from all colleges and schools at CUDenver, and the number of offerings is expected to grow to accommodate an even wider variety of educational purposes. It will eventually include \l significant number of general education course requirements in the Univer sity's undergraduate programs. A wider array in gradu ate offerings will emerge as important certificate and degree programs are drawn into the weekend format. versity course offerings are part of the at CU-Denver. Students who • .., ... to Weekend University classes also CU-Denver classes which meet durFor admission information, students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll. a break to cheu the Denver Bronros t o victor y in the 1986 Championship. Beaming proudly a successful registration (left to right): Gwen Hill, acting director of admissions; George Burnham , director, student administrative services; Marti Barrett, registrar; and Arne Arnesen, assistant director of admissions.

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"The Library is both physically and intellectually the heart of the campus . It is a good place to think , to plan, and to learn. " -Patricia Senn Breivik, Director Auraria Library

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Auraria Lib ry Director: Patqcia Senn Breivik Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant ctor for Collection and Automation Services: ilyn J . Mitchell Assistant Di ector for Instruction and Research Services: y Lou Goodyear Assistant Dir ctor for Media and Telecommunications Servi es: Mrniel E. Woods Offices: A 'Jelephone: 'Jelephone: a Library, lOth and Lawrence Sts. Administration: 556-2805 Information: 556-2741 Faculty: Prot: ssor: Patricia Senn Breivik Associate ofessor: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant rofessors: Dene L. Clark , Patricia A. Eskoz, Elno a Mercado , Jerry Ann Mood, Martin A. Jessmer, Ro ert L. Wick, Mrniel E. Woods Instructor : Anneli Ahtola, Lori Arp , Anthony J. Dedrick, N' Dilgard e, Mary Lou Goody e ar , Eileen Guleff, Kat een Kenny , Marilyn J. Mitchell, Kay Nic hols, Elizab th Porter, Linda D. Ranson , Jay Schafer , Louise I S alley, Rutherford W. Witthus , Christina J. Woo, Ever e L. Yang Board of Dirrectors, Friends of Auraria Library Claudia Allen, Gannett Outdoor Robert Backus, Holme Roberts and Owen Patricia Breivik, Director , Arnaria Library Carol Chapman, Assistant to the Director, Arnaria Library lbm Clark, Forward Metro Denver Group, Denver Chamber of Commerce Lucy Creighton, First Interstate Bank of Denver Nancy Ellins Mark E. Jones, Merrill Lynch Michael R. Moore, Arthrn Young & Co. Darwin Niekerk, Modeling and Analysis, Adolph Coors Co. Christopher G. Nirns, Gensler & t ssociates Elizabeth Quinn, Fairmont Hotel Joan RingeL Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry Clair E. Villano, Consumer Fraud Division, District Attorney's Office Lester Woodward, Davis, Graham & Stubbs Students using the online Public Access Catalog find a wealth of information a t their fi ngertips.

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56 I Librar y Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus , provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is admin istered by the University of Colorado at Denver. The Collection The Auraria Library has a collection of over 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collec tion, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and news paper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U .S. government pub lications and a full depository for Colorado state docu ments. The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services. The Online Public Access Catalog Access to the Auraria Library ' s collection is through the online Public Access Catalog (PAC), a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state. The online Public Access Catalog, which was developed as a cooper ative project b y the Colorado Alliance of Research Librar ies, has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The online PAC system allows faster and more comprehensive searches than were possible w i th the traditional card catalog. In addition to using PAC at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; PAC also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer. Reference Services The Auraria Library ' s reference department stands ready to assist students and faculty in using the Library's resources. The reference department is staffed during all . times the Library is open. In addition, brief reference questions, such as whether or not the Library owns a particular item, can be answered over the phone. Media Services The Media and 1elecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services. The media distribution department manages the Library's media collection , which consists of videotapes, audiotapes, rec ords, l6mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online Public Access Catalog . This department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Library operates an 18-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; at a faculty member's request a film or videotape can be transmitted directl y into the classroom over this system. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan ' s , the Student Center, and the Library's television studio t o other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab is also available for student use in the Media and Jelecommunications Division and a professional graphic designer is available to assist users. S tud ents and faculty use the self -service gr aphics lab t o devel o p visual aids.

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Computer sisted Research Onli ne searching , f o r which there i s a fee, can s a v e many ours of researching printed abstracts and indexes . In so e cases, it provides the only access to cer tain materia1s . The Library has access to well over 200 d a t a b ases . In addi tion to bibliographic information, m any of the b siness databases also contain directory and fin ancial ormation. Questions about the Com p u ter Assisted esearch service should be directed to the Lib rary's refere ce department. Information Retrieval Service T h e on retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers. For a reasonable fee, Librar y staff ' assist patrons in locating and checking o u t the library aterials they need . Working from the patr o n's biblio raphy, staff can: locate and check out book s owned ll>y the Library; photocopy articles from journal s by t h e Library; submit interlibrary loan re qu ests for ma t erials which the Librar y does not own; and d eliver the materials to the patron's home or office. Inqu ir i es abo t this time-saving service should be dir ec ted to the eference department. Library lnstrlction T h e Library i l committed to educating people to meet the d emands o the Information Society. The Library of fers a wide ange of instru c tional programming, including a self paced audiocassette walking tour of the Libr ary, as wei as class s e ssions to tea c h information access skills an strategies. Libr ary I 57 Architectur e and P l anning Lib rary The Librar k s main collect ion is !suppl emented by the material housed at the nearby Arch i tecture and Planning Br anch LibrJ.y. With a collection of over 21,000 books, 120 periodical s u bscriptions, and 12,000 slides , this b r anch library offers specialized information to students of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design , and planning . This branch library is open to any student w h o needs access to these materials. Services for Persons with D i s abilities The Library is committed to making its resources an d services accessib l e to all st u dents; in addition to owning a variet y of adaptive equipment to assist persons with di s abilities, personal assistance in using the Library is available from the reference department. Additional Facilities Coin operated typewriters, a copy center, change machines, and study rooms are all available at the Library . Internships T he Library offers internships, practicums, and inde pendent studies to students interested in telecom munications or information management. Student s get experience in front of and behind the camera in the M edia a n d Ielecommuni cation s Division of the Library.

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"Graduate education is learning how to increase knowledge, and the focus of graduate education at CU-Denver is on the process of scholarship -not just on obtaining information. We hope that our graduates will become tomorrow's problem solvers." -Dean David W Greenfield The Graduate School ... --' •u ,. • •

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Dean: David . Greenfield Sch ool Office: 1250 14th St., Suite 700 'Ielephone: 556-2663 INF ORMATI(])N ABOUT THE SCHOOL The 1983 Br demas report on Graduate Education in America cone uded that "Graduate education and research are th bedrock of every important area of our national life." he report highlighted the fact that a strong nation security program, a healthy growing economy, and the prospects for improvement in the quality of life e all dependent upon high quality and vigorous gradu te programs in our universities. High quality raduate programs are synonymous with the of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in or creative activity in their disci plines and, are teacher / scholars who continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques and bring this cutttng edge knowledge to the classroom. Graduate at CU-Denver not only gain from interactions witp the graduate faculty but also gain from other studentsl'n the classroom. Because most of CU Denver's gradu te students are older and employed, they bring practical b xperience gained in the Denver com munity to the !classroom and are ready to relate the realities of to the models presented in the classroom. I The School is a University-wide body that authorizes progtams within its constituent c olleges and schools. At CU-benver, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Scien t es, and Music are colleges or schools whose are offered through The Grad uate School. ln oncept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of pus. ln practice, most Master's-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insor as particular options and advisers are concerned. Doctoral-leve programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibili y of the entire University community of that discipline. Doctoral-level programs on the CU-Den ver campus are 1 ither coordinated through the office of the system grad!Jate dean or through the corresponding Denver or department. The Ph.D. degrees in applied mathe111atics, educational administration, and educational technology are system degrees in which application is made to The Graduate School at CU-Den ver. ln a number of other disciplines with integrated degrees, most or all course work for the Ph.D. can be completed at Denver and the research adviser may be a member of the CU-Denver faculty, but the degree pro gram is administered by the Boulder department. ln other disciplines, a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph.D degree may be taken at CU-Den ver. Persons interested in pursuing doctoral level work should c onsult with the appropriate discipline graduate adviser. Anyone wishing further information not given in this bulletin should write to the dean of The Graduate School , University of Colorado at Denver, 1100 14th Street , Denver, CO 80202. Degrees Offered The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver. ln some cases, a specific required course may only be offered through the Univ e rsity of Colorado at Boulder in a given year. The Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthropology Biolog y History Mathematics Communications and theatre Political science Economics Psychology English Sociology Geography The Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Coun s elin g and p e rsonnel servic e s Early childhood education Educational administration Educational psychology Educational technology Elem e ntar y education Foundations , education Instructional technology (emphasis in corporate instructional development and training, instructional computing specialist, instruc tional technologist, library media specialist) Reading Secondary education Special educ ation The Master of Science (M.S.) in: Applied mathematics Electric 1 engineering Chemi s try Environplental science Civil e ngin e eri r g Mechanical engineering Comput e r scien c e lechnical c ommunications The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.) The Master of Engineering (M.E.) The Master of Humanities (M.H.) The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.) The Specialist in Education (Ed. S.)

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60 I The Graduate School Significant course work can be taken at the Denver campus in the following master's degree programs: Fine arts Geology Journalism Philosophy The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied mathematics Education (emphasis in education administration and educa tion technology) Significant course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Students can be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to take advantage ofthe multi-campus activities of The Graduate School. It is usually advised that a student complete some course work at another campus of the University. Biology Chemistry Civil engineering Communication Computer science Electrical engineering English Geography Mechanical engineering Psychology The Graduate School at CU-Denver An average of 3,180 students are emolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each Fall and Spring Semester, and an additional1,833 non-degree students take gradu ate courses. Of these, approximately 53 percent are part time students. Faculty The faculty teaching in these programs are headquar tered at CU-Denver, although resources of other Univer sity of Colorado campuses are used. Computing Services The Computing Services department supports com puter use by both the academic and administrative com munities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this bulletin. Financial Aid for Graduate Study COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Graduate School. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid. COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded pri marily to entering and continuing regular degree doc toral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise, and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. In order for fellowships to be renewed, students holding them must reapply each year to The Graduate School. GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part time instructors or teaching assistants. The instruc torship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appoint ments in 1986-87 was: one-half time instructor, $8,500 for the academic year; one-half time teaching assistant, $6,800 for the academic year. A half-time appointment for a instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensa tion is based on the number of hours per week. Nomesi dent students employed as assistants may or may not be eligible for the nomesident tuition differential stipend for their frrst-year appointment as an assistant only. Exceptions extending beyond the first year must be approved in advance by the respective dean. leaching assistants and instructors must be emolled students in good standing for the full period of their appointment. RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Nomesident students who are appointed as research assistants in nongeneral fund accounts may or may not be eligible for resident tuition rates. Assistants must be enrolled students. LOAN FUNDS Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work study program should submit an Application for Finan cial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March l. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to stu dents who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergen cies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Finan cial Aid. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.

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Students em loyed by the University are hired solely on the basis of rerit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discr ination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to pro pective employers in accordance with this policy. INTERNATIONAL DUCATION The Office Education expedites the exchange of stu ents and faculty, entertains foreign vis itors, promotes pedal relationships with foreign uni versities, and tts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships. The office als arranges study abroad programs. Stu dents remain eF,olled at the University of Colorado while taking retar courses in the foreign universities. A B average wit the equivalent of two years of college level work in e appropriate language is required. There also are \ ccasional summer programs offering academic credit. Peace may be obtained from the Office of Intern tional Education. For addition information contact the Office of Inter national Educafbn, Boulder campus, 492-7741. REQUIREME TS FOR ADMISSION General Req irements Students may e admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below. Admission to 'fhe Graduate School is not admission to candidacy for a!n advanced degree. A student who wishes to becorrle a candidate for a degree must make special at the time and in the manner pre scribed by the rel
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62 I The Graduate School student until the equivalent of the minimum require ments for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied. Applicat i on Procedures Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the CU-Denver Graduate School office concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications. An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the CU-Denver Graduate School office, and two official transcripts from each university attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many depart ments require scores from the Graduate Record Exam ination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation. When a prospective degree student applies for admis sion, the chairperson of each department or a committee named for the purpose shall decide whether the appli cant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to The Graduate School dean's office, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree stu dents (below). A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department. Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1987-88, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid). READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program but who did not complete that degree program and who have not been continuously registered at the University must: l. Clarify their status with the department to deter mine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree. 2. After receiving departmental approval, as indicated above, submit a former student application to The Grad uate School dean's office before deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University. Application deadlines are available from the department. Former students who wish to change from under graduate to graduate status or from one major to another must complete the appropriate forms at the time they apply for readmission. Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus. A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral program. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmis sion after one year. Approval or rejection of this applica tion rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee. FOREIGN APPLICANTS Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in The Graduate School office prior to February 15 for the Summer lerm, March 15 for the Fall Semester, and August l for the Spring Semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores , financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures. GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for assistantships, or of any student before his or her status is determined. Students who are applying for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee. Four to six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution. Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from The Graduate School office or the CU Denver lesting Center, or from The Educational lesting Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student lesting Center on the following examinations: Graduate Man agement Admissions lest (GMAT), Miller Analogies Jest (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions lest (LSAT). NON-DEGREE STUDENTS A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records, CU-Denver, llOO 14th Street, Denver, CO 80202. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted. Non degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and support ing credentials as soon as possible. A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 8 hours credit toward the

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requirements ' f a master's degree for courses taken ei ther as a stude tat another recognized graduate school, as a non-degre student at the University, or both. In addition, the may recommend to the gradu ate dean the ac ptance of credit courses taken as a non degree student at this University during the term for which the applied for admission to The Gradu ate S chool, pro)'_ided such admission date was delayed through no of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtain d in any course work transferred in this manner. REGISTRATION and Examinations On the re ar registration days of each semester, ave been admitted to The Graduate expect to study in The Graduate School are required t complete appropriate registration procedures. Students sho d register for classes the semester they are accepted The Graduate School. If unable to attend that se ster they must notify the department that has accepte them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of dmissions and Records at CUDenver in order to attend he following semester. Changes in egistration A student wh wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should fi ow the drop / add standard procedure (see current Schfdule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes a student may not drop, add, or change a course to no ere t without presenting a letter to the dean of The Graduat School, CU-Denver, stating the excep tional circumst ces that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by th , instructor of the course, must accom pany the proper}y signed and completed drop / add card or no-credit optton form. Withdrawal I A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University musf apply to the dean of The Graduate School for perrrussion to withdraw in good standing. A student who dikontinues attendance in a course with out official with awal will be marked as having failed the course. Master's Thesis Graduat e students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to [Present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 Graduate I 63 semester The student may repister for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number! of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be ;reported . (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.) Limitation of Registration FULL LOAD A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of deter mining residence credit if the student is registered for not fewer than 5 semester hours in work nwnbered 500 or above, or least 8 semester hours in a combination of undergraduate/graduate/ professional course work acceptable for graduate credit, or any number of thesis hours. A maximw:n of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work, or any number of thesis hours. For the number of hours required for financial aid see Fir)ancial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this bulletin. A grad uate student contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load require ment for financial aid purposes. MAXIMUM LOAD No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester. The maximum nwnber of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU Denver is 10 hours per 10-week sunnner term. A gradu ate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload. UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES Full-time employees of the University may not under take more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, take such work as is approved by the major department. TUITION AND FEES The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information of this bulletin. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work Although the work for advance ?.egrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an a&vanced degree will

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64 I The Graduat e S chool not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses . Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirements for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own ini tiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own c onclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, per spective, proportion. All studies offered for c redit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status. A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while emolled in The Graduate School. For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department. Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of The Graduate School. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major depart ment and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee. Repeating a Course A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree. In calculating a student's grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first and second year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the stude nt's transcript. Change of Department or Major A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recom mendations and credentials. Use of English A student who is noticeably deficient in the use and spelling of the English language may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. The satisfaction of this requirement depends not so much upon the ability to pass formal tests, although these may be demanded, as it does upon the habitual use of good English in all oral and written work. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be culti vated as an attainment of major importance. Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced stu dents in the use of English. Reports, exam inations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate's proficiency. MASTER'S DEGREE A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science , or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met. In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of gradu ate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses. The requirements stated below are minimum require ments; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules. Students planning to graduate should ascertain cur rent deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final exam inations, etc.). Departments or program committees may have addi tional deadlines that must be met by the graduate stu dents in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair. Minimum Requirement The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below. Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above. Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above. Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master's degree may be allowed to

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select Plan II o yon the recommendation of the depart ment conceme1 Graduate Cr dit Graduate crecht is given for courses that are listed at the 500 level or and that are offered by professors I who are memb rs of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will coUnt toward a higher degree unless the student has the of the department. Not all coursJs listed are available at any one time; some of them a.r!e given in alternate years. Courses takeh during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will graduate rank if they are taught by members of Th Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories: l. Courses Jthin the major department at the 500 level or above. 2. Courses o tside the major department at the 400 level and above, brovided they are approved for graduate rank for a spe&fic degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and the dean of The Graduate School. 3. The Maste of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 30 -and 400level courses if approved by the department d the dean of The Graduate School. This does not ange the minimum number of courses that must be tak nat the 500 level or above; however, as a result, most stu ents who include 400 level courses of other departm ts in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation. Field of Stud Studies learuJg to a master's degree may be divided between major minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of thJ degree-granting program. Status After studen$ave made a satisfactory record in this University for at east one semester or summer term and after they haver oved any deficiencies that were deter mined at the t' e of admission or by qualifying exam inations or oth rwise, they should confer with their major departmeJt and request that a decision be made on their status. his definite status must be set by the major departme t before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without eredjt toward a graduate degree all prere quisites required by the department concerned. Language Requirements Candidates m st have such knowledge of ancient and modem langua es as each department requires. See special deparrntal requirements, Credit by Graduate I 65 Resident work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be acceJ?ted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School. All work accepted by transfer must come within the 5-year time limit or be validated by Jpecial examination. The maximum amount of work that may be trans ferred to this University is 8 semester hours. Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this Univer sity, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. Work already applied toward a master's degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the Master's degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institu tion cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized. Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 8 semester hours) provided such work: l. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University. 2. Comes within the five-year time limit. 3. Has not been applied toward another degree. 4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the deari of The Graduate School. Requests fot transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact The Graduate School office. Th be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School. Continuing Education Course Work Students may use the resources of the Division of Continuing Education in the of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the graduate dean in advance. Residence In general, t he residence requirements can be met only by residence at this University for at least two

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66 I The Graduate School semesters or at least three summer terms. For full resi dence a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 500 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for gradu ate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the sum mer. A student who is noticeably deficient in his/her general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified. Assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than halftime. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters. Admission to Candidacy A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master's degree must file application in the dean's office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status. This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the stu dent's work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student. A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation. Thesis Requirements A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must: l. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field. 2. Be based upon independent study and investiga tion. 3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred. 5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehen sive final examination is given. 6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in University of Colorado Graduate School Spedfications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which is obtainable from The Graduate School. 1Wo weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or type written copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract. All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School. Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of resi dence, but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis. Comprehensive Final Examinations Each candidate for a master's degree is required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of the candidate's last semester of residence while he / she is still taking required courses for the degree , provided he / she is mak ing satisfactory progress in those courses. The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed: l. A student must be registered when he or she takes the examination. 2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination. 3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean. 4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field. 5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments. 6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or Jn!nor field . The exam ination on transferred work will be given by representa tives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.

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7. A student ho fails the comprehensive final exam ination may not attempt the examination again until at least three man s have elapsed and until such work as may be prescri ed by the examining committee has been completed The student may retake the examina tion only once. Supplemental Examinations Supplementa examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given imme diately. If the !dent fails the supplemental examina tion, three mon s must elapse before he or she may attempt the co . rehensive examination again. Course The regular .Jrritten examinations of each semester except the last [ust be taken. Course examinations of the last semeste , which come after the comprehensive final examinatio has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor. Every gradua student working toward a master's degree who e cts to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the req rements for the degree must register for thesis for a ' urn of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester h urs. The student may register for any specific number I of hours in any semester of residence, but the total nukber of hours for all semesters must equal the numfuer of credits the student expects to receive for the The final grade will be withheld until the thesis s completed. If the thesis is not com pleted at the en of the term in which the student is so registered, an progress (IP) will be reported . (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which IP grade has been submitted.) Time Limit All work, ind ding the comprehensive final examina tion, should be • ompleted within five years or six suc cessive summers Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree ess validated by a special examination. Candidates for e master's degree are expected to com plete their work 'th reasonable continuity. Master's Degree Candidates raduate During 1987-88 Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Gra uate School office, 556-2663. l. Last day for equesting transfer of credit. 2. Application for admission to candidacy. Applica tions must be s bmitted at least lO weeks before the Graduate I 67 student expects to take the comprehensive final exam ination. Stud+,ts are urged to submit this form by the beginning of. re semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The fonn may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.) 3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department. 4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination. 5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examina tion. 6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are recejved after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. 1b state the requirements for the degree in teJ;IJls of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can crit ically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribu tion of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minirnal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any depart ment may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules. Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related depart ments. The criterion as to what an acceptable field of study shall be that the sthdent's work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University. Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's respon sibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.). Department or program committees may have addi tional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is tl;le student's respon sibility to ascertain such requiremen t s and to meet them

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68 I The Graduate School as designated by the deparnnent or program chair. Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree. Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 500 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credit until the deficiencies have been removed. Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D. a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehen sives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student's grade-point average . Only the grades of A , B , C and IP shall be used. Course work and work on dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 500-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy. Quality of Work Students are expected to complete with distinction all work in the formal courses in which they emoll. A course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. Upon recommendation by the advisory com mittee and the chair of the department and with the approval of the dean, a student may be required to withdraw at any time for failure to maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree. Advisory Committee As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen , the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the candidate wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more others to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student's special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory commit tee is to be similarly reported. Residence The student must be properly registered to earn resi dence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attain ment of an acceptable bachelor's degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarl y research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado. As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three fourths to full-time work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified , a decision will be made by the chair of the student's advisory committee, the chair of the student's major department, and the dean of The Gradu ate School. 1Wo semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master ' s degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University. Preliminary Examination Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to under take study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each deparnnent makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements . Stu dents who are thus evaluated will be notified imme diately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted. Language Requirement Students are required to meet the following language requirements.

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Communicatio Requirement. All graduate students for whom English s the native language are required to demonstrate at ast second-year college proficiency in a foreign languag of their choice. This requirement may be satisfied in e following ways. 1. The studen 's undergraduate transcript may be pre sented, showin completion of grade C or better of at least 3 semester ours of a fourth-semester undergradu ate college cour . e in a foreign language. The transcript must accomp the student's Application for Admis sion to Candida when it is submitted to The Graduate School. 2. The studen may take The Graduate School Foreign Language 'lest GSFLT) at the Rsting Office before or after admission o The Graduate School. Students should check with The1 Graduate School for the passing score required for each language. 3. If the studeht wishes to demonstrate competence in a language for Jvhi ch the GSFLT is not available, a test designed and by the appropriate language department at of Colorado may be taken , with the passmp criterion to be set comparable to the above GSFLT cq.terion. 4. The student may register at the University for any fourth-semester i course in a foreign language and pass it with a Cor better. (Registration in such courses is con tingent upon language department's approval.) A student elects 2, 3, or 4 above must complete the before the Ph.D. comprehensive exam ination may Students wh se native language is not English will, by passing the' courses and completing their graduate work at the Uni ersity, demonstrate sufficient ability in English to meet the communication requirement. Special Languages. When special languages are needed as tools ,to read foreign literature in a particular field, the academic departments may require further training in foreign languages for all their Ph.D . graduate stude s. The choice and number of languages as well as the re uired levels of skill and the methods of testing these s s are determined by the individual departments. Credit by Tra Resident gra uate work of high quality earned in another instituqon of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the Doctorate until the student has established in this Graduate School a satisfactory reco d in residence, but such credit must be transferred bef?re the student makes application for admission to c4didacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this I University, may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal d ourses. The maxirmu h amount of work that may be trans ferred to this Upive rsity for the Ph.D. is 10 semester hours. I Application fpr Admission to Candidacy A student muSt make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D . degree on forms supplied by Graduat e I 69 The Graduate [ school office at least two weeks before the examination is attempted. A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, shall have passed the language requirements, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admissjon to candidacy for the degree. Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Stu dents admitted to "candidacy for degree" will register for and be charged for 10 hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enroll ment, students will be charged for 7 hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduat School for 3-credit hour status. Continuous registration during the aca demic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and adviser will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classifications identified above. If a student who is certified for the Ph.D. degree, or who has received permission to take the comprehen sives and passes them prior to meeting the language requirement must be continuously enrolled as stated above. This continuing registration is independent on whether the candidate is in residence at the University. (See also section on Residence.) Comprehensive Examination Befor e admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This exam ination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student's mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the fortnal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty. The student must be registered at the time the examination is attempted. The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department con cerned and be approved by the dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional mem bers as necessary to a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the membtjrs of the examination board. In case of failure, the e:xiDnination may be attempted once more after a period, of time by the examining board. Dissertation Requirements A thesis based upon original investigation and show ing mature scholarship and critical judgement as well as familiarity with tools and methods of research must be

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70 I The Graduate School written upon some subject approved by the student's major department. 1b be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. It must be finished and sub mitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final exam ination and must be formally approved and made avail able for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken. In mechanical features all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as out lined in the University of Colorado Graduate School Spedfications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which may be obtained from The Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the com mencement program. One formally-approved, typewritten copy of the dis sertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be pub lished in Dissertation Abstracts International. The deter mination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department. All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are reg ularly engaged in graduate instruction. All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library. When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms Inter national to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International; and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform. Final Examination After the dissertation has been accepted, a final exam ination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral part being open to anyone. The examina tion will be conducted by a committee appointed by the dean, which will consist of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candi date in the final examination. Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the dean's office at least two weeks in advance . The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination. Time Limit If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within four years of the date on which the com prehensive examination was passed, a second examina tion similar in extent to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. If the second comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work.

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CUDenver Offices Academic Affairs , YICC Chancclloc . . Academic Center for Enrichment .... Accounting/Accounts Payable . DR . . EC .. DR Administr31ion and Finance , YICC Chancclloc . . . . • • • • . . ... DR Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....••........ BR Affirmati"' Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • • • . . . . . DR Alumni... .. DR American Indian Education Program .....••............. . LIO\ Analytical Laboratory ............. .. ... . ......... ...... EC Architecture and Planning. School of . ............• ••..... DR Asian American Education Program ......•..•. . ......... LIO\ Ninth Street Park AR Arts Bldg. PS ....... AU Auraria Ubrary RO BR Bromley Building SA BU Business Services SE ....... cc Child Care Center SF ....... CD Child Development Center SJ ....... CN Centra l C l assroom so ...... DR . ...... Dra\10 ST ....... EC ....... East Classroom TE ....... EG . ..... Emmanuel Gal lery TV MR ...... Mercantile Restaurant UA PE ....... Physical Education we ...... pp ....... Physical Plant Black Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . LIO\ BudjJ'VFiscal Planning . . . . ..................... DR Bursar's Office ................................ . .. BR Business and Admini str31ion, College of. and Graduate School of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . BUS Business Services ...... . . ......... ............. m Centers. The . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIO\ Chancclloc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . DR Colocado Partnership f
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University of Colorado at Denver I Auraria Higher Education Center Conwnunity Col lege ol Donver Me 108 lduate Scrool , n., .... .... DR panic American Educatioo Program . . . . . . . . . . UA :ormat.ioo Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EC !rnship s arw:l Cooperati"' Educatioo . Center fcc . ...... 9th 5L td lnformaticll Systems Group . . . . . . . . .. UA ""''Arts arw:l Sciences. College of Office ... 9th 5L ldvising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ................. EC -ary. AUra ria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......•.... AJJ lfchitecturc and Planning Ubrary . . . . . . . . . . . . BR sic. College of . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. AR National \t!teram: Training Institute . f\!&lnl1d Services Public Affairs , Graduate School of . Public RelatiJns arw:l PublicatiJns ... RcconisiRegistral ioo Research Administratial . Research i n Rhetc.-ic. Center fcc ....... .. . Seni
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"Our approach to planning and design encompasses a broad array of educational approaches and professional perspectives. VI-i' seek not only to provide students with the skills which are essential for professional practice, but also to engender an appreciation of historical antecedents, modes of inquiry, and paradigms which inform the fields of architec ture, urban and regional planning , landscape architecture, and urban and interior design." Dean Hamid Shirvani School of Architecture and Planning

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Dean: Hamid hirvani Associate : M. Gordon Brown Assistant to t e Dean: Nancy Briggs School O ffice: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Jelephone: 55 -2755 Dean's Adviso y Council: Cabell Childres , FAIA, Cabell Childress Architects Rodney Cobi, ASLA, City of Boulder Planning Department David Daileda, !AlA, CHD Architects Vuginia Dubrutq, AlA, Consultant Curtis Fentress, j AIA, C.W. Fentress and Associates, P.C. Robert Fuller, .NIA, Fuller and Fuller Associates David HowlettEAICE Director , Economic Development City of Little n Dayl Larson, F , Haller and Larson Architects Jack Leaman, AICE Director of Planning, City of Colorado rings Jennifer Moult n, AlA, Anthony Pellecchia Architects William Much9 , FAIA, W.C. Muchow and Partners Jane Ries , FASLA, Jane Silverstein Ries Landscape Architects I Eugene Sternb 9rg, AlA, Consultant Ronald Straka, Office of Project Management City and County 9f Denver Jerome SeracuJ, FAIA, Seracuse, Lawler, and Partners INFORMATI N ABOUT THE SCHOOL The School o Architecture and Planning is nationally unique becau of its students and alumni, its faculty and staff, its mi sions, and its location. The School has been able high quality students with a strong professional car er orientation. Through their achieve ments, the al of our School are major contributors to its image. The chool of Architecture and Planning is committed to o[er professional and specialized degree programs thro gh rigorous instruction and research programs in th fields of architecture, landscape archi tecture, interior design, urban design, and urban and regional planni g. The School is committed to excellence in instruction artd research while providing a balance of design skills afd intellectual inquiry. As a graduate school with five ! degree offerings, and a part of a univer sity with a mapdate for excellence and national and international recognition, we are evolving as the intellec tual design forum in the Western region. The School of chitecture and Planning is devoted to "design" as its central intellectual concern. The term design is used ere in its broadest sense to include full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and meth ods. Students are introduced to fundamentals of design analysis and synthesis based on humanistic ideals as the means of meeting their personal aspirations. They learn how to think, analyze, synthesize, and be creative, and develop an intellectual framework in regard to design and planning. Our interest is to educate designers who are able to deal with a variety of issues, programs, and problems within their particular context and time frame. In other words, we are interested in educating designers with the capacity to think innovatively and to challenge each situation on its own merit. The School of Architec ture and Planning is dedicated to excellence in design education. SUPPORT FACILITIES Architecture and Planning Library The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library, serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture, design, and planning. It contains the following collections to support the curric ula of the School: Reference -technical materials selected to support design and planning studio projects. Cirrulating -material in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, interior design, urban design, and urban and regional Documentary-planning documents issued by local, regional, state, and national agencies with an empha sis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado com munities and concerns. Periodical-current materials relating to architecture, design, and planning. Reserve-resource materials for required and supplemental class reading. 1 Non print-media, including arohitectural slides and micro-computer software. The library is open 7l hours p,er week, including evenings and Sundays. The staff co:sists of a librarian, library assistant, and several student assistants. The library provides a number of services including refer ence and research assistance and library-use instruction. Additional se11vices, such as interliorary loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.

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76 I S clwol of Architectur e a nd Planning Computer Laboratory The Computer Laboratory of the School of Architec ture and Planning is equipped for upscaled computer aided design and drafting with a micro-computer based networking system. Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs in addition to four mM PC/XTs are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstations are linked through the addition of AutoCAD compatible software that extends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE /CADD. Now possible is: Auto Word-An interactive word processing package for editing and displaying text of drawings. Auto CoGo A coordinate geometry program that allows entry of survey and engineering data for site planning and engineering. LandSoft-A system for introducing landscape archi tectural symbols and drafting extension into the Auto CAD and AE /CADD utilities. Generic 1l:mplateA means of customizing or creat ing unique design and drafting templates. The six high resolution PC/ AT workstations also make use of the latest School CAD/D software, the computer Vision system which includes the Personal Architect and Personal Designer packages. Hardware in the School Laboratory CAD/D system therefore includes: 'len PC workstations (as mentioned above), eight with high resolution monitors and digitizing tablets. Novell NS68B Central File Server with two megabytes of memory, a Novell NPS2 120 megabyte drive , and ports to accommodate up to 24 workstations and five shared output devices. Zenith ZIOO PC with 'Iecmar 60MB magnetic tape backup system, used for systems operation and as a plot station with Gould Colorwriter 6320 and Hewlett/ Packard plotters. (Large format (24" x 36" ) plotting must be done at the University computing Center on a Calcomp Plotter.) Calcomp 9100 24" x 36 " Digitize r with 16 button cursor. With this very specialized equipment and software, st.udents and faculty can create computer-generated architectural plans; elevation and perspective drawings; interior design and landscape plans; drawings and ren derings; and flowcharts, charts, graphs, and organiza tional charts while storing specifications, information, and other data that can be used in creating architectural schedules, engineering, HVAC and lighting calculations, or for estimating. The network linked PCs mentioned above and an lliM/PC and Apple/PC may be used with a variety of software packages available through the Architecture and Planning Library to perform a variety of tasks such as word processing, spreadsheets , engineering , and energy calculations. Model Shop and Photo Laboratory The School maintains a darkroom for student use as well as a variety of camera and audiovisual equipment. These facilities are valuable aids in preparing class pre sentations, design projects, portfolios, and in learning multi-media techniques for presentations. The model shop is available for use in fabricating architectual mod els and in furniture design projects. A staff technician is on duty to assist students in the use of their facilities. NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS The School of Architecture and Planning at the Uni versity of Colorado at Denver actively seeks students from throughout the United States and abroad. Its faculty includes many whose work is nationally recognized. The curriculum in every academic professional program attempts to accommodate the variety of planning prob lems and design issues which arise across the nation. Each program's curriculum, of course, embodies a core of knowledge that underlies professional practice everywhere. "In-state" students are eligible for the lower tuition rates available to residents. An in-state student, under statutory provisions of the State of Colorado, is one who has established a legal domicile in Colorado for at least one year preceding the beginning of the term for which in-state classification is sought. Persons over 22 years of age and those who are otherwise emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. For further informat i on consult Residency Classification in the Gen eral Information section of this bulletin. Information regarding financial assistance for both in and out-of-state students will be provided in response to inquiries about the programs in architecture and plan ning at CU-Denver. A limited number of non-resident tuition differential awards are available each year. These are provided to non-resident students having research or teaching assistantships supported by state appropria tions. Additional support in the form of internships, fellowships, grants, and contract research with faculty members also is available. INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS General Information The University of Colorado at Denver Office of Admis sions requires that all applicants to CU-Denver meet certain qualifications. Your qualifications are deter mined by records and credentials that you are required to provide. It is important that all documents are received by the School of Architecture and Planning before the deadline date of the term that you plan to attend. If your documents are received later than our

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published dea e, you will be considered for the next available term. Admissions l. for admission. 2. $50 nonrefiJmdable application fee must accompany the application. 3. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources State ment. Statemen s used for other institutions will not be accepted. Phot copied documents are not acceptable unless signed j the originator; signatures must not be photocopies. 4. J\.vo certi ed copies of official academic records from each colleg1 you attended outside the United States. A certified lite*English translation must accompany documents that e not in English. 5. J\.vo offici transcripts of college studies from each United States c llegiate institution that you attended. Hand-carried copies are not acceptable. The transcript must be sent to ! this office by the issuing institution. 6. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish your higher to be con idered for admission by the University. 7. Four letter of recommendation. 8. Portfolio quired for the architecture, interior design, landsc pe architecture, and urban design programs. Additional su porting documents subsequently may be required by t e office of admissions. All international applicants whtEo admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and t enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a aster's degree. Financial You must prl de evidence that sufficient funds are available for yo to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. 1b provi e this evidence you should follow these instructions: l. Complete e "Financial Resources Statement." You must prove that you have sufficient money to pay your expenses by su rnitting the Financial Resources State ment as part of bur application. a. If you are cl.ing your own money, your bank must certify that ybu have the full amount of money on deposit to medt your tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement your bank must c rtify that the money you need is on deposit in yofu. account. b. If you are sponsored by a family member, or a friend, your s onsor must agree to provide the money, and sign the inancial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Yo sponsor's bank must certify that the sponsor has o deposit the amount of money you will need. All subs iptions of Section 2 must be completed and signed. Architecture I 77 c. If you ht,ve been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3, or the Financial Resour ces Statement must be completed. 2. An statement of Resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay yonr admission, or cause you to be denied admission, to the University. Be sure your Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete Application Deadlines Master of Architecture .. March Master of Interior Design . . . . .. . . . . .. .. March 15 Master of Landscape Architecture ......... March 15 Master of Urban and Fall term Fall term Fall term Regional Planning . . . March 15 Fall term (Priority deadline) May 1 Fall term Master of Archltecture (Space Available) in Urban Design . . . . . March 15 Fall term (Priority deadline) May 1 Fall term (Space ailable) September 1 Spring term Programs of Study ARCHITECTURE Program Director: Robert Kindig Secretary: Annette Korslund Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor 1elephone: 556-2877 Faculty: Professors: Eugene F. Benda , Davis C. Holder, Robert W. Kindig, Gary Long, John M. Prosser, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: M. Gordon Brown, Paul J. Foster Assistant Professors: Gary Crowell, Francine Haber, Bennett Neiman, Gail W. Karn, J:?iane L. Wilk Adjunct: Theodor Grossman, Marr Hatami, Anthony Pellecchia, John Shuttleworth Emeritus: G.K. Vetter The architecture program in the Shool of Architecture and Planning is a professional aesign curriculum focused on fot!tr major architectural components: archi tectural design; design technology; history, theory, and criticism of ardhitecture; and visual studies. The primary objective of df program is to prepare students to enter the professional practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods of planning and design architecture. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop:

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78 I School of A r c hitectur e a nd Planning Awareness of sensitivity to the quality of the physical environment. Intellectual understanding of the history, theory , and criticism of arts and architecture. Professional competence in design technology. Analytic, problem solving competence of synthesis and communication of the above knowledge into "phys ical form". Understanding of the institutional framework within which design takes place. Understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct. The ultimate goals of the program are to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of physical and environmental quality while acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architec ture, and design expertise. Degrees Offered The architecture program offers both first and post professional Master of Architecture degrees . The first professional M.Arch. degree requires three and one-half years of full time stud y . The first professional degree can also be completed in two years (by admission with advanced standing to the three and one-half year pro gram) . A thesis is required in each of these programs. Students holding a Bachelor's degree in fields other than architecture would enter the first professional M.Arch. program which typically requires 106 credit hours for completion. Admission with advanced standing is open to holders of a B.S. in Architecture or Environmental Design . This group of students would pursue the first professional M.Arch. degree, completing their program in two years with 7l credit hours of study. The architecture program also offers a one-year post professional Master of Architecture open only to appli cants alread y holding the first professional degree in architecture (B.Arch.) and entails a minimum of 30 credit hours. Individually organized studies focus on the student's specific interests in architecture and urban design. A thesis is required. The first professional M.Arch. degree program is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), the Association of the Collegiate Schools of Architecture, and the American Institute of Architects. Curriculum The curriculum includes studies in architectural design, graphics communication, history and theory, technology , and professional practice. Architectural design is the central focus of the curriculum and inte grates history and theory, technology and professional practice. Design studios function as a laboratory for syn thesis of the materials covered in lectures and seminars and for exploration into viable solutions to architectural problems. The design thesis is the culmination of the architecture curriculum. Communication courses provide students with essen tial skills for expressing their ideas and concepts acting as an essential medium for expression of the architect's thought processes. Using this fundamental architectural tool, students learn to make the connections between conceptual ideas and act u al image. The body of knowledge offered in history and theory courses forms a foundation of spiritual, emotional, institutional, and cultural meanings upon which archi tectural ideologies are based. The student acquires an intellectual framework and awareness of architecture as a manifestation of the society's sociop o litical and cultural change. Since architectural technology is essential knowledge for an architect, students also must become informed concerning structures, materials, environmental control, and all other technological aspects of architecture. Pro fessional practice courses expose the student to actual implementation of architectural projects and the intern ship program exposes them to real office practice. Application a n d Admission The complete set of materials for application for admis sion to all Master of Architecture programs includes: the application form, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, a portfolio of academic, creative and/or professional work and a non refundable application fee of $30. The portfolio must be no longer than 14 by 17 inches. International applicants see the section on Internati o nal Applicants at the begin ning of the School general information, for additional information. Th be considered for fall admission, all application materials must be received by March 15. Applications received after March 1 5 may be considered for non degree student status only . For application form and additional information please write to: Office of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Campus Box 126 Denver, Colorado 802 0 2 (303) 556-2755 Specific requirements, including prerequisites, for each of the master's degree programs are given below. An Admissions Committee will review the applica tion materials and select students to be admitted to programs. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May l. The recommended minimum grade-point average for admission is 3.00 on a 4-point scale. If the student's grade-point average is below 3.00, the Graduate Record

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Examination ( RE) is recommended as part of the application mat rials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the t asis of all application materials and not on grade-point l average alone. THREE-YEAR PRfGRAM The three-yefu program is open to students with a bachelor's degree. A particular program prerequisite is one year of college level physics and mathematics through beginhing calculus. The physics and mathe matics ents must be met before entering the program or c be obtained while registered at the School or Ar itecture and Planning by attending the summer term dnor to the fall entrance of first year. Three-Year Prog am Course Requirements: Semester Hours Architectural De ign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Graphics ............................................ 6 'R'chnologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Historyffheory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Professional Pra ice and Construction Documents . . . . . . . 6 Planning ............................................ 3 Electives ........................................... 15 Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 TOTAL 106 Fall Semester; 5 0 Level ARCH. 500. Des'gn .... .............................. 5 ARCH. 505. lntrpduction to Design and Planning . . . . . . . 1 ARCH. 510. Graphics I ............................... 2 ARCH. 551. Ma erials and Methods of Construction ..... 3 ARCH. 552 . BasiC Structures I ......................... 3 ARCH. 571. 1911 and 20th Century History ............ _l 17 Spring Semeste 500 Level ARCH. 501. De 1gn .................................. 5 ARCH. 511. II ............................... 2 ARCH. 553. Bas c Structures II ........................ 3 ARCH. 630. Sit Engineering ......................... 3 Theory Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _l 16 Summer Jenn, 00-600 Level ARCH. 502. Des'gn/Construction Drawings ............. 8 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 11 Fall Semester; 6 0 Level ARCH. 600. DeJign .................................. 5 ARCH. 650 . HV: C ................................... 3 ARCH. 665. Structures III ................. . . .......... 2 URP. 500. Fund entals Planning Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Architecture I 79 Spring Semesfr, 600 Level ARCH. 601. Design .................................. 5 ARCH. 651. and Acoustics .................... 3 ARCH. 666. Structures IV ............................. 2 Theory Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Fall Semester; '100 Level ARCH. 700. Design .................................. 5 ARCH. 712. Thesis I .................................. 5 ARCH. 660. Professional Practice ...................... 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Spring Semester ARCH. 701. Thesis II ................................. 6 ARCH. 713. Thesis Graphics .......................... 2 ARCH. 750. Systems Synthesis ........................ 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 14 THREE-YEAR PROGRAM WITH ADVANCED STANDING Advanced standing in the three-year program is avail able to students with a four-year Bachelor of Architecture or Environmental Design degree who seek the second professional degree in architecture. The minimum pro gram is a two-year, 71 semester-hour series of studies leading to the Master of Architecture degree. The physics and mathematics prerequisites stated for the three-year program (above) must be met prior to admission with advanced standing. Students from four-year design programs must have taken two semesters of architectural history, two semesters of basic structures (statistics and strength of materials), and must exhibit (in their portfolio) a graphics ability equivalent to that required in the school's two semester course in architectural graphics. Required courses in the two-year program that have been taken by the student m prior studies may be substituted if the grade received was B or above. The Master of Architec ture degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 71 semester hours, all required courses and a thesis. Minimum Course Requirements Semester Hours Architectural Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 'R'chnologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Theory .............................................. 3 Professional Practice and Construction Documents . . . . . . . 6 I Planning ............................................ 3 Thesis ............................................. 11 Thesis Graphks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 71 Recommended Order of Studies Fall Semester, 600 Level Semester Hours ARCH. 600. Design .................................. 5 ARCH. 605. ll;J.troduction to Arch. program .............. 1 ARCH. 650. HVAC ................................... 3

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80 I S chool of Architectur e a nd Planning ARCH. 665. Structures III ............................. 2 URP. 500. Fundamentals Planning Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Theory Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 17 Spring Semester, 600 Level ARCH. 601. Design .................................. 5 ARCH. 630. Site Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARCH. 651. Lighting and Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ARCH. 666. Structures IV ............................. 2 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Summer 1erm, 500-600 Level ARCH. 502-602 Design/Construction Drawings ......... 8 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ll Fall Semester, 700 Level ARCH. 700 . Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ARCH. 712. Thesis I ................... ............... 5 ARCH. 660. Professional Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Spring Semester, 700 Level ARCH . 70 l. Thesis II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ARCH. 713 . Thesis Graphics .......................... 2 ARCH. 750. S y stems Synthesis ....................... _l ll ONE-YEAR PROGRAM The one-year program is available only to students already holding the first professional degree, the Bach elor or Master of Architecture. This Master of Architec ture degree is awarded upon satisfactory completion of 30 semester hours of studio course work and a thesis. The program of study is flexible based on the student's background and area of interest. COURSES Architectural Design ARCH. 500-5. Architectural Design. Three studi o-seminar periods per week . Design theory , application, and methods . Design fundamentals , vocabulary, visual design , and intro ductory building design. ARCH. 501-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Scope of study expands in scale from a small social unit to a subcommunit y . Design parameters investigated are human needs and acti v ities , climate , pedes trian and vehicular circulation, sit e planning, structure , and materials. ARCH. 502/602-8. Architectural Design and Construction Drawings. Summer session . Four studio-seminar periods per week. First five weeks involves design of building with emphasis on design process. In the second five weeks the schematic design is taken through design development into working drawings . ARCH. 510-2, 511-2. Architectural Graphics I and II. 1\vo lec ture-studio periods per week. Graphic skills for design: diagramming, schematic sketches, communication, two and three-dimensional representation, shade and shadow, color. ARCH. 600-5 . Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Building design within the context of urban environments, site, climate, codes, utilities, and circula tion. Integration of architectural form and space with structure and environmental controls. ARCH. 601-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Four independent studios offered for diver sity of project scale, building type, and theoretical emphasis. Selection allows some degree of student initiative in explora tion of personal interests. ARCH. 700-5. Architectural Design. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Four studio selections organized as in ARCH. 601 above. ARCH. 601 and 700 studios include proj ects emphasizing urban design, urban context problems , major building complex problems, building type problems (e.g. , housing), and energy-conscious design. One studio is organized around projects from the Center for Community Development and Design and another is arranged with other divisions for interdisciplinary work. ARCH. 701-6. Thesis II. Three studio-seminar periods per week. The thesis is the final design product of the program and serves to integrate all prior archi t ectural learning. During this phase, the student must demonstrate the self-discipline and self-direction ne c essary to accomplish a complete archi tectual design project. The project must present a major design challenge to the student ; however , an area of i nterest may be selected by the student such as housing, health care facilities, recreational facilities , urban infrastructure, historic preserva tion , and architectural technology. ARCH. 710-7, 711-7. Research/Design. Advanced study and research for second professional degree. ARCH. 712-5. Thesis I. Three studio-seminar periods per week. Research and study leading to the development of a project program, including site selection and analysis. Projects may be developed for thesis work with the Center for Com munity Development and Design. Conceptual design may be commenced during this stage. ARCH. 713-2. Thesis Graphics. This course is taught con currentl y with ARCH. 701 and is intended to assist the stu dent in all phases of thesis presentation and reproduction . Technologies ARCH. 551-3. Materials and Methods of Construction. 1\vo lectures and one lab or field trip per week. Study of materials and components for construction and construction methods and techniques for residential and commercial buildings. ARCH. 552-3, 553-3. Basic Structure I and II. 1\vo lectures per week. Analysis of basic structures. Applications of structural systems. ARCH. 630 -3. Site Engineering. 1\vo lectures per week . Site analysis, legal description , topographic mapping, land use, drainage and site services. ARCH. 650-3. Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning, and Utilities. One lecture tutorial per week. Energy conscious design. Principles and application of HVAC systems. Water supply and sanitation systems. ARCH. 651-3. Lighting and Acoustics. 1\vo lectures per week. Illumination quantity and quality , daylighting and electric lighting , lighting design and application. Electrical distribu tion syst e ms. Principles of sound transmission and absorp tion, room acoustics , architectural acoustics problems. ARCH. 655-2. Acoustics. One lecture per week. Advanced problem s in noise c ontrol and room acoustics.

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ARCH. 656-2. M sonry Structures. One lecture per week. Design of maso5:: elements for buildings. ARCH. 658-1. Eleyators and Escalators. One lecture per week. Design and analx_sis of transportation systems. ARCH. 665-2, 66r,2. Structures Ill and IV. 1Wo lectures per week. Structural of buildings and building elements. Design with stee , timber, concrete, and other building mate rials. Advantages and disadvantages in application of various materials and burding systems. ARCH. 667-3 . Graphics/Micro. One seminar and lab per week. Intro ction to computers and their architectural applications. H ds on exercises with the school micro com puter lab and th University Prime system. ARCH. 668-3. C jomputer Applications in Architecture . One seminar lab per eek. Introduction to computers and applica tions in architec ural graphics, word processing, business management , corftputer-aided design, and database manage ment. Micro computer based . ARCH. 722-3. One seminar per week . Quan titative and qualifitive analysis of illumination from sky and sun and reflectiv surfaces, lighting and heat loss, heat gain. ARCH. 723 -3. Energy Audits. One seminar per week . Analysis of existing buildmgs for energy usage and design of retrofit options. ARCH. 750-3 . Synthesis . A synthesis of the preceding environmental systems and structures courses. Design of the structural frame the lighting and comfort control systems of the thesis bull g project. Th.ken concurrently with thesis. Professiona l Pr ctice ARCH. 660-3. Professional Practice. 1Wo lectures per week . Ethics, documents , organization, legal aspects, and production P,rocedures for a professional practice. ARCH. 66 1-3. Copstruction Documents . 1Wo labs per week. Construction communication techniques. Preparation of working and specifications for a small building designed by the student in ARCH. 600 (Design). ARCH. 663-2. Def igner and the Law. One lecture per week. Provides a basic pnderstanding of the designer's legal rights and responsibiliqes; covers basic legal concepts and their rela tion to the practi d e of the design professional. ARCH. 760-3, 76 t3. Internship. Eight hours per week. Work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semester. The stu ent is placed in an office by the School and receives academif b credit instead of pay. Student must have comp l eted Profes ional Practic e and Construct ion Documents and be in the las year of the program. History and Thbory ARCH. 505 / 605-1 Introduction to Architecture Program. One lecture per week. asic computer literacy and presentations by faculty member n design philosophy. ARCH. 540-1. De ign and P l anning Journalism. One seminar period per week Writing methods for architectural criticism; description and valuation of the built environment. ARCH. 571-3. Ni eteenth-and 20th-Century Architectural History. 1Wo teet es per week. The background for contem po r ary archite e . The development of the avant-garde from the late 19th cenq.uy to the international style. ltaditional and vernacular archit cture. Recent developments. ARCH. 670-3 . AJ1lerican Arch it ectural History. 1Wo lectures per week. European roots and colonial derivatives. Classicism and electicism in l the 19th century. The impact oftechnology and industrialization. Heritage and the development of new forms . Interior Design I 81 ARCH. 672-3. European, Japanese, South American Architec ture Now. 1W seminars per week. R search and discussion on contemporary design theories, concentrating on non American wor ,New Rationalism, regionalism, College City, high tech, and other topics. Prer., ARCH. 571 or equivalent. ARCH. 673-3. Designer Philosophies. 1Wo seminars per week. The ideas and contributions of key designers in history , style, culture and change. 1 ARCH. 675-3 . Post Modern Seminar.l\fo seminars per week. Readings of background sources, papers, and presentations. Pluralism and meaning in architecture today. Prer., ARCH. 571 or equivalent. ARCH. 678-3. Architectural Preservation. One seminar per week. Existing structures, documentation and historical research. Curatorial theory, strategies, and economics for historic buildings. ARCH. 679-3. Architectural Conservation. One seminar per week. lechnical analysis of existing buildings; materials; finishes, structures, mechanical and electrical systems. Stud ies in building stabilization, rehabilitation, and materials conservation. ARCH. 683-3. Teaching Methods in Architecture. Three lab sessions per week. Provides practical experience in teaching. ARCH. 684-3. Architecture One semi nar per week. Relationship of the architect to development and political processes. ARCH. 686-3. Special Topics. Various topical courses are offered in architecture history, criticism, technology, profes sional practice, and other related areas. Independent Study ARCH. 960-1-3.1ndependent Study. Studies initiated by stu dents or faculty and sponsored by a facUlty member to investi gate a special topic or problem related to architecture. INTERIOR DESIGN Program Director: Donald J. Sherman Secretary: Louise Garcia Department Office: 1250 14th SL, Second Floor Jelephone: 556-3475 Faculty: Professor: M.G. Barr Associate Professor: Donald J. Sherman Assistant Professor: Gail W. Kam The interior design program is tintended to prepare students to enter professional practice at the first profes sional level; to advance their professional standing through the postprofessional focus; and/or to prepare them to teach at the university The program has the following basic components: design theory, history and criticism, technology, visual studies, and professional practice. Degrees Offered The interior design program offers both first profes sional and postprofessional Maste;r of Interior Design degrees. The first professional masters degree program requires three years of full-time study and 96 credit

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82 I School of Architecture and Planning hours. It is suited for the student without an under graduate professional design degree. The postprofes sional M.I.D. degree emphasizes design theory and research and requires two years of fuJI-time study and a minimum of 64 credit hours. Students opting for this degree must already have a professional design degree, i.e., B.I.D., B.Arch., B.L.A., etc. A thesis is required of all M.I.D. candidates. Curriculum The basis of the interior design curriculum is philo sophical, scholarly, and practical. Using an integrated approach to design studio, the curriculum focuses on an advanced level of design process and problem solving producing creative and knowledgeable designers capa ble of thinking and designing comprehensively. The interior design program is different from tradi tional programs in the following ways: 1. Multidisciplinary Approach. Individualized instruction and guidance enable the student to integrate skills and knowledge from several related disciplines, i.e., architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design. This allows students to develop individualized and personal skills for the analysis, design, and evalua tion of appropriate interior environments. 2. Social and Beha viora l Base. Understanding the social, behavioral, and biological implications of man/ environment interaction is an integral part of research, design process, and problem-solving methods taught in design studios. 3. Coordinated University-Professional Practice Expe riences. Professionals and educators working together provide relevant training and educational enrichment for students in interior design in many ways. By invitation, practitioners in interior design and architecture lecture, serve as studio jurors and critics, and serve on thesis committees. Whenever possible, students serve as part time employees in design firms as another expression of the professional community's involvement and interest in the interior design student's education. Application and Admission The complete set of materials for application to the Master of Interior Design program includes the applica tion form, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommenda tion, statement of purpose, a portfolio of academic, cre ative and/or professional work, and a nonrefundable application fee of $30. The portfolio must be no larger than 14 by 17 inches. Slides are acceptable but must be annotated. International applicants see the School gen eral information at the beginning of this section. 1b be considered for admission in the fall term, the complete set of application materials must be received by March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. Applications received after March 15 may be considered for non-degree student status only. For application forms and additional information, please write to: Offic e of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Campus Box 126 Denver , Colorado 80202 (303) 556-2755 The three-year program is open to students with a bachelor's degree. A particular program prerequisite is comp leted course work in college physics and mathe matics through introductory calculus. For admission to the two-year program, applicants, in addition, must have a four-year degree in interior design, architecture, or environmental design. The recommended minimum GPA for admission is 3.0 on a 4-point scale. If the student's GPA is below 3.0, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recom mended as part of the application materials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the basis of all application materials and not on grade-point average alone. RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES, THREE-YEAR PROGRAM Fall Semester, First Year Semester Hours INTD. 500. Interior Des_ign Studio I .................... 5 INTD. 510 . Interior Design Graphics I ......... ..... .... 3 INTD. 530. Principles and Methods of Programming ..... 2 INTD. 551. Materials and Methods of Construction ..... . 3 ARCH. 552. Structures I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Spring Semester, First Year INTO. 501. Interior Design Studio II ................... 5 INTD. 511. Interior Design Graphics II ...... ........... 3 INTD. 552. Survey of Finish Materials .................. 2 INTD. 671. Color Theory .............................. 1 INTD. 672. Color Application .. .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . .. .. .. . . . 1 INTD. 673. Lighting Theory .......................... . INTD. 674. Lighting Application ....................... 1 ARCH. 571. 19th and 20th Century History ............ _l 17 Fall Semester, Second Year INTD. 600. Interior Design Studio III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 INTD. 620. History of Interiors ........................ 3 INTD. 650. HVAC ........ ............................ 3 ARCH. 653. Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 INTD. 681. Interior Construction Detailing . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 15 Spring Semester, Second Year INTD. 601. Interior Design IV ......................... 5 INTD. 620. History of Interiors I ....................... 3 INTD. 660. Furniture Design .......................... 3

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ARCH. 663. D es gner and the Law ................. .... 2 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 Fall Semester; Third Year I INTD. 700. Interior Design Studio V ...... . ........ .... 5 INfD. 702 . Preparation ......................... 3 INfD. 724 . Advahced Graphics ........................ 3 Electives / Sernin s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 17 Spring Semester, Third Year INTD. 701. Thesis .................................... 6 Electives / Semin 1 s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 15 'Ibtal hours requi ed, 3-year program: 96 RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES, TWO-YEAR PROGRAM Fall Semester; Fitjst Year Semest er Hours INTD. 600. Intenor Design Studio III . ................. 5 INfD. 620. Histo y of Interior s ........................ 3 INTD . 650 . .................................... 3 INTD. 681. Interior Construction Detailing .............. 3 ARCH. 653 . Aco sties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 15 Spring Semester; First Year INTD. 601. Inter r Design Studio IV ................... 5 INTD. 620. His to y of Interior s .... .......... .......... 3 INTD . 660. F4ture Design .................. ........ 3 ARCH . 663. Designe r and The Law .................... 3 INfD. 673. ughFg Theory ........................... 1 Ele
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84 I School of Architecture and Planning vocabulary necessary to the understanding and interpretation of lighting needs in design. INTO. 674-1. Lighting Application. Strategies and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course covering both the the oretical and practical issues of lighting . Hands-on experimen tation will lead to the discovery of the visual definitions of lighting vocabulary. INTO. 667-3. Computer Graphics/Micro. One seminar and lab per week. Introduction to computers and their architectural applications. Hands-on exercises with the School micro com puter lab and the University Prime system . INTO. 681-3. Interior Construction Detailing. Graphic repre sentation of building construction related to the interior en vi ronment. Various types of interior construction, finishing, and terminology will be explored and conventional methods of graphic representation for these methods will be taught. Lecture materiaVexercises that produce construction documents for interior construction. INTO. 686-3. Special Topics. Various topical courses are offered in Interior Design that relate theory and methods to specific problems / issues in the profession. INTO. 700-5. Interior Design Studio V. A studio emphasizing interdisciplinary teamwork with architects, landscape archi tects, and planners with community-oriented projects related to interior design. INTO. 702-3. Thesis Preparation. Independent study leading to the development of a finish project program. INTO. 701-6. Thesis. Approved professional research or design project concentrations in an area of interior design. Each can didate for the graduate degree is required to submit and defend a thesis project to demonstrate a high level of compe tence in solving problems through research, design, and plan ning. A thesis proposal must be submitted to the program chairman and thesis committee in the semester preceding the semester of thesis work. INTO. 724-3. Advanced Graphics. Programming and design development of sign systems and graphics as integral parts of total environments, with respect to information transfer and symbolic communication . Electives/Seminars. Electives and seminars are offered on topics pertinent to the interior design discipline, i.e., environ mental psychology, man-environment systems , sociology, environmental form, and research methods. Specific topics are listed in the Schedule of Classes for each semester. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Program Director: Harry L. Gamham Secretary: Louise Garcia Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Second Floor 'Ielephone: 556-3475 Faculty: Professor: Hamid Shirvani Associate Professor: Harry L. Gamham Assistant Professor: Lauri Johnson The landscape architecture program in the School of Architecture and Planning is a professional design pro gram. The primary objective is to educate students to be effective practicing landscape architects in both the pri vate and public sectors. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: Awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the landscape. Intellectual understanding of the social arts and of humanistic and environmental approaches to design. Analytic problem-solving competence of synthesis and communication of the above knowledge into physical form. lechnical competence for implementing the physical forms. Understanding of the institutional framework within which design is executed. Skills and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct. The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the landscape architecture student with a deep appreciation of landscape and environmental quality while acquiring critical capacity through comprehension of all facets of landscape architecture and design expertise. Degrees Offered The landscape architecture program offers both first and second professional Master of Landscape Architec ture degrees. The first professional M.L.A. degree requires three years of full-time study and a minimum of 96 credit hours. The first professional master's degree is suited for students without a professional design degree. The second professional degree requires two years of full-time study and minimum of 64 credit hours. Stu dents who enter this program must hold a professional design degree, i.e., B.L.A., or B.ARCH. A thesis is required of all M.L.A. candidates. The first professional Master of Landscape Architec ture (M.L.A.) degree is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board of the American Society of Landscape Architects, and is recognized by the Council of Landscape Architecture Educators. Curriculum The curriculum has been planned to develop awareness and skills considered essential to core and advanced professional training in the field of landscape architecture. Emphases include design, land and con struction technology, history and theory of the built en vi ronment, and a working knowledge of natural systems. The primary focus of the program is design of and on the landscape. Opportunities exist to develop complementary knowledge and skills through interdisciplinary projects involving the other programs in the School of Architec ture and Planning: architecture, interior design, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The hierarchy of courses from term to term for the most part is planned sequentially to lead to the thesis. a comprehensive individual experience under the guid ance of the L.A. faculty. The thesis itself requires two courses: Landscape Architecture Thesis Research and

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Landscape Ar "tecture Thesis. Either a design project or applied resekch may be the basis for the thesis. Application L d Admission 1b be for admission into the landscape architecture pr, gram, applicants must submit applica tion forms, a n nrefundable application fee of $30, two official transcri ' ts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation , statement of purpose and a portfolio of academic, creative, and/or professional w rk. The portfolio should be 14 by 17 inches or International applicants see the School general inform tion at the beginning of this section. For admissio to the fall term, these materials must be received by M ch 15. Applicants will be notified c on cerning their atceptance prior to May l. Applications received after Mai-ch 15 may be considered for non degree student t tatus only. For applicati n forms and information please write to: Office of the ean School of Ar itecture and Planning University o Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourtee th Street Campus Box 126 Denver, CO 0202 (303) 556-2 r 5 The minimum grade-point average for admission is 3 00 on a 4-point scale. If the student's grade-point av age is below 3.00, the Graduate Record Examination ( RE) is recommended as part of the application ma!trials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the asis of all application materials and not on grade-point verage alone. The three-ye program is open to students with a bachelor's deg ee. The program requires previous courses in coll ge mathematics , physical science, and English. Applicants t the two-year program having under graduate degre q s in urban and regional planning, archi tecture, environ1nental design, or other physical design degrees are corlsidered for admission upon individual evaluation of undergraduate curriculum , scholastic performance, professional experience. RECOMMEND ' D ORDER OF STUDIES, 3 -YEAR PROGRAM Fall Semester, Year Semester Hours LA. 500. Landsc e Architecture Design I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 LA. 505. Introdu on to Design and Planning ........... 1 LA. 510. Graphic Communication I ..................... 3 LA. 561. Synthec logy Field Research I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 LA . 580. Plant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 LA. 590. Serm-Ahd Region Ecology Sermnar .......... _l_ 16 Spring Semester, irst Year LA . 501. Landsca e Architecture Design II ............ . . 6 LA. 550. Landsca e Engineering I .......... ........... 5 L andscape Architectur e I 85 I LA. 570. Landscape Archi . tecture Hist p ry and heory Serrunar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 LA. 581. Mountain Plant Design ..... ........ ... .2_ 17 Fall Semester, Second Year LA. 600 . Landscape Architecture Design III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA. 650. Landscape Engineering II . . . . . . ............. . 5 LA. 661. Synthecology Field Research II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 LA. 667. Computer Graphics / Micro ................. . . . 3 LA. 691. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation . . . 3 18 Spring Semester, Second Year LA. 601. Landscape Architecture Design IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA. 660. Landscape Engineering III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 LA. 685. Advanced Landscape Architecture Computer Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 17 Fall Semester, Third Year Semester Hours LA. 700. Landscape Architecture Design V (Interdisciplinary) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA. 761. Synthecology Field Research III ................ 1 LA. 790. Landscape Architecture Thesis Research . . . . . . . 4 Elective . ............. ............... . . . ......... . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 16 Spring Semester, Third Year LA. 701. Landscape Architecture Thesis ......... . . . .... 6 LA. 760. Landscape Architecture Professional Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 12 lbtal hours required for three-year M.L.A. degree ...... 96 RECOMMENDED ORDER OF STUDIES, 2 -YEAR PROGRAM Fall Semester, First Year LA. 600 . Landscape Architecture Design III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA. 650. Landscape Engineering II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 LA. 661. Synthecology Field Research U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 LA. 667. Computer Graphics / Micro .. .................. 3 LA. 691. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation . . . _l_ 18 Spring Semester, First Year LA. 601. Landscape Architecture Design IV (Regional Design) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA. 660. Landscape Engineering III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 LA. 686. AdvaJ?.ced Landscape Architecture Computer Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . _l_ 17 Fall Semester, Second Year LA. 700 . Land cape Architecture Design (Interllisciplinary) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA. 761. Synthecology Field Research ID ............. ... 1

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86 I School of Architecture and Planning LA. 790. Landscape Architecture Thesis Research . . . . . . . 4 Elective ............................................. 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 17 Spring Semester, Second Year Semester Hours LA. 701. Landscape Architecture Thesis ................ 6 LA. 760. Landscape Architecture Professional Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 12 lbtal hours required for the two-year M.L.A . degree 64 COURSES LA. 500-5. Landscape Architecture Design I. This initial stu dio in design focuses on the application of aesthetic principles which form the basis for landscape architectural design. Space, form , colors, texture, movement, and balance are explored in their application to design. Problem-solving proc ess is introduced as a fundamental design tool as applied to basic site planning. LA. 501-6. Landscape Architecture Design II. The second design studio attempts to apply the prindples and experiences explored in the previous design studio to the site planning process . In a studio/lecture situation several problems are analyzed from site analysis through site design. The intent is to build design competence through application of design principles to solve site problems in an increasing level of complexity. LA. 510-3. Graphic Communication. 1Wo lecture / studio peri ods per week. Introductory graphics includes orthographic and isometric projections, and one two-point perspective, let tering, sheet layout, freehand sketching , useful equipment and materials, and reproduction techniques . LA. 550-5. Landscape Architecture Engineering I. Three lec ture / studio periods per week. An introduction to grading and earthwork as a technical skill as well as a design technique. Site development systems , including topographic surveying technique, horizontal and vertical curves for road alignment, comprehensive site grading, and drainage / sewage . LA. 561-1. Synthecology Field Research I. A three-day inten sive short course exploring on field location various aspects of. the Rocky Mountain region ecological tolerances to development. LA. 570-3. Landscape Architecture History and Theory Seminar. One lecture / seminar period per week. Design theory related to historical and contemporary placemaking provides a basis for exploring lands cape architecture resolutions from prehistoric to modem times. Students are required to contrib ute knowledge / research to the seminar periods, as well as prepare a term paper. LA. 580-3. Rocky Mountain Plant Materials. 1Wo lectures or field trips per week. Dedduous trees and shrubs of the Rocky Mountain region. Identification, horticultural concerns, and planting design principles are explored. LA. 581-3. Rocky Mountain Planting Design. 1Wo lecture / studios per week. Emphasis is on the design principles relat ing to Rocky Mountain plant material. Color, scale , form , orientation, sequence, and appropriateness are the principle concentrations. LA. 590-3. Semi-Arid Region Ecology Seminar. This course has been especially designed to produce a working discipline in the semi-arid region ecosystems for graduate level land scape architects. It is the first course in a sequence leading to Design Studio IV, Regional Design . LA. 600-6. Landscape Architecture Design Ill. Design Studio m expands skills learned in Studios I and n. Small scale design problems build into medium scale using urban design, housing, and recreational site planning problems. These stu dio projects further emphasize design process and focus on the systematic description and interpretation of ecological, behavioral, and functional criteria for the built environment. These learned skills become a springboard for the large scale landscape planning projects in design Studio IV. LA. 601-6. Landscape Architecture Design IV. The fourth design studio allows the students to work as a team to solve comp l ex large scale/landscape planning related problems in both urban and rural areas of Colorado. With an environ mental assessment previously completed in LA. 691, the stu dents focus on synthesizing natural, cultural, and aesthetic information to develop plan frameworks for public or private clients . The results are packaged into a reproducible report that includes both narrative and graphic data, and becomes useful for the university, student, and client partidpants. LA. 650-5. Landscape Architecture Engineering II. Explores the array of wood, steel and concrete structural systems encountered in landscape architectural design. Pedestrial and vehicular paving system and construction processes are also studied . The graphic systems for describing the assemblage of the engineering and construction parts in landscape architec ture are working drawings. The comprehensive packaging skills for these systems as construction documents are developed. LA. 660-5. Landscape Architectural Engineering Ill. Hydrology and Hydraulics for Designers. Water-related issues for site design and regional planning. The study of rainfall!runoff, storm water detention design and elementary open channel hydraulics. Water supply issues are also addressed : western water rights, and site development systems for potable supply and irrigation. Design of appropriate small scale systems for storm water management and arid region irrigation. LA. 661-1. Synthecology Field Research II. A three-day inten sive short course on field location exploring various aspects of Rocky Mountain region eco logical tolerances to development. LA. 667-3. Computer Graphics/Micro. One seminar and lab per week. Introduction to computers and their architectural applications. Hands-on exercises with the School micro com puter lab and the University Prime system. LA. 685. Advanced Landscape Architecture Computer System. Provides the student with advanced techniques of land scape evaluation processes. Also , introduces the use of computers in the program management and administration of the contemporary landscape architectural office practice. LA. 691-3. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation. Assists students to become familiar with large scale spatial analysis methods, techniq ues, and models. By means of course assignments , lectures, laboratories , and field trips, stu dents apply skills and knowledge related to the description and interpretation of the physical environment. Students are assigned to a site and are required to complete an environ mental assessment that ultimately becomes the framework for the LA. 601 studio . Knowledge of Colorado ecology and basic cartography will assist the student in this course. LA. 700-5. Landscape Architecture Design V. An inter disciplinary studio involving teamwork with architects, plan ners, and interior designers. Projects are comprehensive case studies ranging from Center for Community Development and Design generated projects for small towns on the Western Slope to urban design projects on the Front Range . Projects

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often include e basis on community development processes as well as tradi nal design production. LA. 701-6 . LandsFape Architecture Thesis. This final semester in design is in the preparation of an independent thesis. Opportunity for tudents to bring together in one comprehen sive project all o the relevant design tools and theories learned during their M. . A . studies. The student may pick a design, research, cornmE1 ty development, or natural resource plan ning type thesis. Each thesis candidate is asked to develop an innovative hypo esis which expands the research base of his/ her chosen thes s subject. A case study is then chosen to explore the application of the hypothesis. The thesis is evalu ated by all LA. dculty. LA. 760-3. Practice Seminar. 1Wo lecture periods per week. Busi ess and professional relations, landscape architecture and relations with government, the ASLA and other professionhl organizations, professional ethics, general business practi es, contracts , and specifications will be covered . LA. 761-1. Synth cology Field Research Ill. A continuation of LA. 561 and 661 LA. 790-4 . Landscape Architecture Thesis Research. This is the second in the thesis sequence . Thesis students are asked to use me ods and techniques learned in LA. 690 and apply them to th ir thesis topic . A complete research package is expected befo 1e entering the final course , LA. 701. Independent S udy LA. 960 1-3.1ndefendent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sppnsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or r1 oblem related to landscape ar c hitecture . URBAN AN9 REGIONAL PLANNING Acting Prograp Director: Yuk Lee Secretary: Romero Department ffice: 1250 14th St., Second Floor lelephone: 55 -34 79 Faculty: Yuk Lee, Hamid Shirvani Associate Pro essors: Thomas A. Clark, David R. HilL Bernie Jones Urban planning is a profession involved with a variety f activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human se ments and providing housing, public services, empl ent opportunities, and other crucial support syste s that comprise a decent urban living environm ent. Such planning encompasses not only a concern for the and image of the built environ ment, but also desire to harness the social, economic, political, and t chnological forces that give meaning to the everyday es of men and women in residential, work, and recr ational settings. Degree Offered The urban add regional planning program provides a nationally graduate education for persons Urban an d Region a l Planning I 87 desiring to ehter the professional field of planning. The degree of of Urban and Planning is offered after successful completiort of a course of study normally requiring two years of course work and thesis. The objectives of the urban and regional planning pro gram are: L 1b clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems. 2.1b foster appropriate policy, planning, legal devices, and resources for creating urban a!nd regional environ ments responsive to human needs and ecological principles. 3. To develop methods for evhluating urban and regional programs, policies, and plans that have impor tant human and natural environmental consequences. Curriculum The planning curriculum reflects the objectives of the program and has three basic components: L Planning theory, methods an9 practice, the basis of the planning discipline including courses in plan ning, imple111entation and admi,ll.istration, decision making, and the institutional planning environment. 2. The behavioral and social sciences, as needed to analyze the dynamics and forces shaping community and regional systems. 3. Specific problem-solving essential for effect ing purposive change and of human , social, and physical problems of urban and regional systems. Course work begins with intensive classroom instruc tion in the fundamentals of theory methods, and prac tice of plannil)g. It progresses into J?lan-making studios, emphasizing projects drawn from the real work prob lems of the Denver area, Colorado, and the Rocky Moun tain Region. program's at the center of a capital city ruds students in finding planning-related work experiences during their graduate education. Courses are scheduled during day-time and evening hours to provide considerable flexibility for both part and full-time students. An internship is required in which the student receives credit for working in one of many planning firms or agencies in the Denver During the final course of study, a thesis project provides an opportunity for in-depth study and mastery 6f a topic of special interest to the student. Throughout the program, the emphasis is on solving real problems. The pro gram is fully accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board , the Association of the Collegiate Schools of Plan ning and the American Institute of Certified Planners. The two-year , 60-semester-hour curriculum consists of36 hours of r equired core courses as well as 24 hours of electives which may be conveniently assembled from the elective in the program and School and from courses in other graduate programs at CU-Denver.

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88 I School of Ar chitecture and Planning Students, in consultation with faculty advisers, iden tify one or more of the following areas of concentration and then select electives reflecting this focus: Community economic development Urban design and land use planning Natural resources and environmental planning Real estate development Regional analysis, planning, and administration Small town and neighborhood planning The complexity of the environments in the area served by the program provides a challenge for high quality research and planning experiences. 1b meet this chal lenge and to provide students with enriched learning opportunities, the program draws on academic and pro fessional resources and actively engages in research, policy making, and problem solving throughout the region. However, this valuable experience and constant emphasis on the fundamentals of planning enables grad uates of the program to com pete successfully for plan ning positions across the nation and in foreign countries. Application and Admission Applicants must submit complete application forms, two official transcripts from each institution the appli cant has attended, three letters of recommendation, state ment of purpose, and the nonrefundable application fee of $30. An Application Committee will review all mate rials and determine acceptance on the basis of academic performance, work experience, interest and motivation for study. International applicants see the School general information at the beginning of this section. Students who wish to be admitted in the fall should submit their application by March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May l. On a space available basis, applications are accepted for indi vidual semesters. Deadlines in these cases are July 10 for fall, December 1 for spring, and April15 for summer. For application forms and additional information please write to: Office of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourteenth Street Campus Box 126 Denver, CO 80202 (303) 556-2755 The program is open to students with a bachelor ' s degree in architecture, landscape architecture, environ mental design, arts and humanities, engineering , social and natural sciences with a grade-point average of 3.00. Students with a GPA of 2. 75 will be included for admis sion but are required to submit GRE scores. CORE COURSES Required Courses: Semester Hours Statistics and Computer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Fundamentals of Planning and CD (2 courses) .......... 6 Planning and CD Methodology (including Econ . Analysis) 4 Studio I (Graphics, Cartography, Communications, and Physical Planning Content) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Studio II (Plan making) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Legal Aspects of Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Environmental Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Experiential Learning (Pr ofessional Practice Internship , and seminar covering the philosophy, values and ethics of Professional Practice) ............................. 3 Studio ill: Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1btal 36 COURSES URP. 500-3. Fundamentals of Planning/Policy. A basic course in the principles of urban and regional planning and com munity development. Theories of planning, community organization , basic techniques, changing philosophies in modem society, and the process of shaping community form. URP. 505-3. Fundamentals of Community Development . A basic course in the theory and methodology of community development practice , with emphasis on principles and tech niques of community work. The course includes reviews of the community, community development, community organi zation, and action strategies literature. URP. 518-2. Statistics and Computer Applications for Plan ners. Essential methods of statistical analysis for urban/ regional planning and policy development. Major topics include types of data, sampling strategies, hypothesis testing, parametric and non-parametric techniques for studying rela tions among variables, and an introduction to multivariate methods and computer technology. URP. 520-4. Planning/Community Development Methodology and Techniques I. 'leaches the basic analyses that are used in the comprehensive planning process and community development. General theoretical understandings, specific analytical methods and techniques, and available data sources are discussed in regard to economics, demography, urban activities , community and neighborhood organization , physical structures, land form and natural features. URP. 521-3. Planning/Community Development Methodology and Techniques II. Advanced analytical methods and techniques . Includes physical, social, and economic models , urban development models, decis ion-m aking techniques, linear and nonlinear programming. Prer., URP. 520 . URP. 530-3. Planning/Community Development Theory. Describes and critically evaluates contemporary theories and ideologies of the planning process and planned change. Aids the student in developing individual powers of critical the oretical analysis and positions on what planning community development is and should be. URP. 552-3. Transportation Planning. Principles of transporta tion planning. Regional and urban transportation problems and policy formation. 'Iechniques and methods used in trans portation planning. Prer., URP. 520 or consent of instructor. URP. 558-3 . Community Economic Planning. Examines the process of community / urban economic development and revi talization . Explores the means by which both the public and private sectors can foster economic changes which promote social justice, ensure environmental integ rity , and sustain the capacity of the community to support essential functions and services. Case studies address development issues in central cities, smaller municipalities, and neighborhoods. URP. 560-3. Housing and the Social System. Designed to explore and define housing problems, to identify the actors

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and institutions at have an impact on the supply and avail ability of housin , to review the past and present role of the federal governme t in housing programs, and to acquaint the student with h 'using design, residential development requirements, an the role of housing in urban development . URP. 570-3. Deve opment of Environmental Form. Describes and evaluates ;t,history and present developments of the manmade enviro ent. Western culture's town-planning tra ditions, Ameri planning history, and selected schools of modern enviro ental design thought. Special attention is given to linking major traditions and trends with environ mental design in e development of the Denver metropolitan area. URP. 578-3. Socia Research Methods for Designers and Plan ners. Introductio to the knowledge and skills needed to cond uct research relevant to the fields of planning and envi ronmental desig . Course content presentation paral l els students' work in rying out applied research projects. URP. 580-3. Ethni ity and the City. The purpose is to examine where minoritie are spatially , culturally , socially, econom ically, and politi y in American cities and to determine the effect these facto s have on the minorities as well as on the future of society and cities. URP. 590-3. The Modern Metropolis. Provides a basic back ground in the structure and dynamics of the modern metropo lis. Includes a of the historical background of the metropolis, analy is of its economic, social , and political com ponents ; and co sideration of various interpretations of its role in moderns iety. URP. 600-3. Social Policy Analysis and Planning. A critical review of the evplution of national , state , and local social policies with an emphasis on current social issues and pro grams . Special a tention is given to the application of tech niques and proctures of policy analysis to community and regional systems URP. 610-3. Neigh orhood Planning. An introduction to small area pl anning. of neighborhood and community theory. Examine s and critiques research and analytical techniq u es invol ed in neighborhood planning. Examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighborhoods . URP. 620-3. Small Town Planning. Provides knowl edge and perspe1Uve on global changes in rural areas, with particular referen e to the United States . Evaluates the issues of agricultural, rural, and small town development and inter relatio n ships wr, h the industrialization and urbanization processes. Devel s knowledge and skills in program plan ning for rural an small town development. URP. 630-3. Analysis. Analysis of spatial structure and location patt s of people and industry. Theory for loca tion of economi activities , industrial and commercial site requirements, an supporting transportation systems . 'Iech niques for the an ysis of economics in space. Formulation of regional policy. ITer., URP. 520 or consent of instructor. URP. 640-3. Regiqnal Policy Administration . Regional policy administration. ritically examines the institutional legis lative foundatiol for regional planning at the multi-state, state, and substat (including metropolitan) level in the U.S. Emphasizes regi nal policies regarding investment strategy, resource sharing and economics development as well as concerning land use, energy exploitation, and the enVIronm ent. l URP. 650-3. Comparative International Planning. Designed to expand the stude t's knowledge and perspective of urban and regional plannin and community development situations beyond those in this country. The purpose is to provide a sense of different planning situations throughout the world , Urban and Regional Planning I 89 including an analysis of cultures, social and political organiza tions , types of mbanization , physical settings , and resource availabilities. URP. 660-3. Sofial Factors in Urban Design. A review and evaluation of major theories and empirical studies dealing with the impact of social forces on the design of the physical environment. ethods of studying and defining user needs . Projects aimed at improving the harmony between social life and its physical containers. URP. 672-3. Environmental Planning. l A review of the basic principles of air, water, and energy systems and their politics with an emphasis on their relations to planning processes and aims. URP. 676-3. Modern Environmental Thought. In-depth ana lyses and evaluation of contemporary classics in environ mental argument. Design, normative, economic , behavioral, and other approaches will be analyzed. Prer., URP. 570. URP. 6803 . Urban Market Analysis and Planning. Considers the function, structure, and evolution of cities and settlement systems, as well as the economic foundations of key urban markets including those for land/real estate, labor, housing, and public services . Procedures for market and economic impact analysis will be discussed. URP. 686-3. Special Topics. Various topical courses are offered in planning and community development that relate theory and methods to specific problems / issues in communities, society , and/or the professions. URP. 690-5. Planning Studio I. Includes fundamentals of graphics , mapping, and communication skills for planning: master plan projects aimed at expressing students' ability to apply the knowledge and experience gained in the program to specific problem areas and complex client situations; and, planning research, community relations, problem identi fication , program development, plan making, and plan evaluation. URP. 700-5. Planning Studio II. A cont?7-uation and expansion of Studio I, dealing with more complex problems in a team format. Projects are selected to provide options to relate to individual student interest and are usually practical in that they deal with an actual community or citizen organization . URP. 710-3. Legal Aspects of Planning. A review of the legal framework within which planning operates and the current trends in the courts toward land-use regulations and housing law. URP. 720-3. Practical Growth Management. An examination of zoning, subdivision , growth management systems, and environmental regulations in the context of the society in which they function and the needs of that society. Students learn to read and to challenge intelligently statutes and ordi nances and to help design better regulatory systems. URP. 730-3. Planning and Politics. A seminar designed to expose students to the realistic political facts ever present in the planning process and to prepare individuals to deal effec tively with governmental operation at all levels of their profes sional careers . URP. 732-3. Planning and Public Finance. Seminar which covers the theory of municipal and state financing. Includes study of budgel preparation, establistuhent and maintenance of tax base, financing of capital improvements, and the gen eral importance of overall governmental finance to planning effectuation. URP. 740-3. Communities and the Federal System. This semi nar is directed tbward exploring the role played by the federal government anl;l its programs and the effect which it has upon the local commUnity . Federal grants-in-aid programs will be studied as well as the process for deiling with the federal bureaucracy.

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90 I School of Architecture and Planning URP. 750-3. Planners and the Real World. In seminar format, the opportunity is provided for the student to come in contact with persons from the business world who are affected by planning requirements and restrictions. These include bankers, real estate brokers, developers, land subdividers, and local officials who must interpret land control provisions. URP. 760-3. Experiential learning. Laboratory and internship. A series of designed and programmed experiences dealing with the particular aspects of urban planning and community development with emphasis on the interpetsonal, group proc ess, and organizational dimensions, together with real life experiences in the professional arena. URP. 770-3. Planning Practicum. This course is specifically designed to give experience to students interested in planning and community development. The emphasis is on actual work experience in community settings with client groups depend ing upon the students to assist them in determining solutions to their problems. Director's consent required. URP. 780-3. Planning Practice and Administration. Student exposure to the role of a professional planner in public agency, consulting office, private enterprise, community organization, and land development corporation planning. Relates the edu cational experience of the URP program to professional plan ning practice and administration. URP. 790-5. Planning/CO Thesis. This studio is used for the final individual project of the student for presentation to the faculty. This project should integrate the knowledge gained through the program, reflect the primary research, and advance a cohesive argument. Independent Study URP. 970-variable credit. Independent Study. Permits the stu dent to pursue independent research in a subject area of special interest, or engage in research efforts as a preface to or preparation of a thesis project. Advance approval by faculty adviser is required. URBAN DESIGN Coordinator: Harry L. Garnham Secretary: Annette Korslund Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor lelephone: 556-2877 Faculty: Professors: John M. Prosser, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: Paul J. Foster, Harry L. Garnham The urban design program is an advanced profes sional degree program designed for students who wish to specialize in urban design. The field of urban design is a complex, interdisciplinary area of study which encompasses architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, real estate development, and several other support fields such as law, civil and transportation engi neering, psychology, and other social sciences. The objectives of the program are to develop: Awareness of and sensitivity to the urban form, struc ture, and function. Understanding of the complex nature and interdepen dence of the built, the human, and the natural environ mental dimensions of urban design . Understanding of the institutional framework within which urban design policies, plans, programs, and guidelines are evolved and implemented. Analytic problem-solving competence for synthesis and urban design programming. The program has three basic components: l. Theories of urban form and structure. 2. Elements of urban design and its financial/institu tional framework. 3. Methods of urban design programming and implementation. Degrees Offered The urban design program offers both a one-year post-professional Master of Architecture degree and a two-year program. The one-year Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree program is suited for students who have completed a five-year professional design degree, i.e., B.Arch., B.L.A., B.U.P., etc. The two-year Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree program is open to students with a four-year B.S. in architecture, environmental design, planning, landscape architecture, social and natural sciences, etc. The one-year program requires completion of a mini mum of 30 credit hours, and the two-year program, a minimum of 60 credit hours. A thesis is required of all M.A.U.D. candidates. Application and Admission In order for students to be considered for admission into the Master of Architecture in Urban Design pro gram, they must submit application forms, two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended, three letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, a portfolio of academic, creative, and/or profes sional work and the nonrefundable admission fee of $30. All portfolio materials must be in 14 by 17 inch format or smaller. If slides are included, they must be in a loose leaf slide holder and annotated. International applicants see the School general information at the beginning of this section. The recommended minimum grade-point average for admission is 3.00 on a 4-point scale. If the student's grade-point average is below 3.00, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended as part of the application materials. However, evaluation for admission will be on the basis of all application materials and not on grade-point average alone. Th be considered for fall admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May l. Th be considered for spring admission, all application materials must be received by November l. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to December 15. For application forms and additional information, please write to:

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Office of the School of AI "tecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver 1100 Fourtee th Street Campus Box 126 Denver, CO 202 (30 3) 556-27 r 5 COUR S E REQUIRffMENTS, ONE-YEAR PROGRAM Semester Hours Urban D esign St dio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Thesis Preparat. d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Environmental alysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Planning, Lands pe Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Thes i s S tudio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Urban D esign Setllinar . . ............................ . 3 .............. . . . ............... RECOMMENDED RDER OF STUDIES, TWO-YEAR PRO RAM Fall Semester, t Year Semester Hours LA . 510. Graphic Communication ...................... 3 URP. 5 0 5 . Fun entals of Community Development .... 3 URP. 570. Develo ment of Environmental Form ......... 3 PAD. 532. Public olicy Analysis and Evaluation ........ 3 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 15 Spring Semester, f irst Year BAD. 452. Small Strategy, Policy and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 UD. 684 . Urban Development Economics ........ ....... 3 Electives ...... .\. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 UD. 601. Design Studio I ........................... _2 15 Fall Semester, Se ond Year PAD. 521. Organi tion Theory and Administrative Behavi f r .... . .......... . . . ..... ............ 3 UD . 722. Mainstr ets Seminar ........ . ........... ..... 3 UD. 7 00. Interdis iplinary Design . ........... ..... ... .. 5 UD. 712. Thesis I>feparation .................... ....... 2 MK. 330. Market g Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 16 PAD. 598. Sped Thpics in Public Administration Spring Year (Publi vate Sector Linkages) .............. 3 ACCT. 480. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Org zations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 URP. 710. Legal A pects of Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 UD. 701. Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 14 TOTAL 60 Electives The following courses will be considered as electives and will serve as substitutes for courses waived as a result of a stude t's prior education and/or experience. Public Adminil tration Urban Design I 91 PAD. 505. Eco 1 omics of the Public Sector Design Architecture ARCH. 571. 19th and 20th Century Architectural History ARCH. 670 . American Architectural History ARCH. 672. European, Japanese, South American Architecture Now ARCH. 678. Architectural Preservation Landscape Architecture LA. 570 . Landscape Architecture History and Theory Seminar LA. 580 . Rocky Mountain Plant Materials LA. 691. Ecological Systems Analysis and Adaptation Urban and Regional Planning URP. 520, 521. PCD Methodology and 'Iechniques I and II URP. 600. Social Policy Analysis and Planning URP. 660 . Soda! Factors in Urban Design URP. 672 . Environmental Planning Business/Economics PAD. 501. Fundamentals of Public Administration BAD. 452. Small Business Strategy, Policy and Entrepreneurship ECON. 521. Public Finance I Budgeting and Expenditures ECON . 621. Public Finance I ECON. 626 . Seminar : Urban Land Economics COURSE S UD. 601-3. Design and Planning I . AI studio course which includes study and application ofthe basic planning, architec ture, landscape, and urban design elements in the cityscape and streetscape. Problems will utilize actual locations for team research leading to individual student solutions of specific preservation, n ; habilitation, deve l opment, infill, and revitali zation problems . Special consideration will be given to the effects of historical, social, economic, and political factors on Mainstreet environments. UD. 684-3. Urban Deve lopm e n t E c onomics. Lecture and case work study that analyzes critical urbcb neighbor h ood and small town development factors. Study covers financial aspects of land activity modules, construction, infrastructure elements , zoning, real estate, and p u bliC/private sector funding methods . 1 UD. 700 5 . Interdiscip l i nary Design. A-ctual comprehensive Mainstreet problems from internshi p , Schoo l , or CCDD requests are studied in the studio by teams of three or more students from at least two different professional disciplines . Projects will be completed through schematic design and p l anning development and policy phases, including printed documentation for distribution and of the pro posal solution information to aid ongoing development efforts . Field involvement with the public is a primary part of the process . I UD. 701-5. Thesis. Each student completes a written paper and/or design sol u tion to a compound, complex Mainstreet project that has li>een previously selected with the assistance of an advisor for research and evaluation during thesis prepara tion. The project can be a theoretical or an actual problem, but must address significant multiple aspects of community mixed-use corridors and centers . The work should encompass major in the definition and solution of Mainstreet environments .

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92 I School of Architecture and Planning UD. 710-5. Urban Design Studio. A studio course to synthesize the studies of advanced architectural, urban design, land scape, and planning design problems that consider large scale organization and communication concepts of society. The pro gram includes design studio and/or community action center study options. Studies cover particular aspects of urban design, with emphasis on economic, social, and political fac tors and design process determinants. 1bpics include the design, implementation, and evaluation of urban residential districts, urban cores, institutional centers, and circulation systems. (One year sequence.) UD. 711-5. Urban Design Thesis. Studio and field trips. Focuses all of the student's graduate professional studies on completing a compound, complex thesis . The problem centers on an urban design project, but the work incl udes architecture and planning aspects with significant attention given to either one. The areas of concentration are in recreation, transporta tion, health , community action and development, preserva tion, and revitalization design. (One year sequence.) UD. 712-2. Thesis Proposal and Preparation. Selection and proposal of a real world problem which allows students to integrate skills acquired in the program or to focus on design, business, policy, public administration, or development issues including data and analytical information needed for decision-making purposes. Proposal must be submitted the first month of fall semester by all students planning on com pleting their thesis the coming spring. UD. 722-3. Mainstreets Seminar. A case stu dy course which focuses on the heart of communities and neighborhoods. The course includes a balance between classroom and field pre sentations which cover the individual and combination, design and planning, physical and psychological aspects of living, working, shopping, and recreating on mainstreets. Faculty, student, and guest lectures and discussions are all a major part of the course sequence . UD. 784-3. Urban Design Seminar. A case study course with classroom and field presentation. Emphasis is on particular human needs and responses to provide places for housing (individual and mass) industries, commerce, education, culture, recreation, health, defense, religion, transportation, politics, business, and necropolis, as well as combined activi ties. Consideration is given to the effect of each function on physical characteristics of domestic and foreign architecture, landscape, urban design, and planning complexes. UD. 795-3. Experiencing the Cityscape. Students explore the scope of the city form as well as exploring individual examples to interpret urban architecture in its context. Special emphasis is placed on urban needs and quality of spaces for public and private uses. Relationships within activities, circulation, climate, and landscape are analyzed from an aesthetic viewpoint. CENTER FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN Director: I Michael Smith Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor 'Jelephone: 556-2816 Staff: Thomas G. Edmiston, Robert D. Hom, Bernie Jones, James A. Laurie, Martin R. Saiz, Jon Schier, George Weber The Center for Community Development and Design is the research, community service, and student field studies division of the School of Architecture and Plan ning. Building upon two decades of experience, the Center believes that the creative, synthetic processes of design and planning can reach appropriate solutions to community and environmental problems through active involvement of citizens and applied research. As the outreach unit of the School, the Center responds to and initiates a variety of opportunities for research and edu cationally oriented public service projects for faculty, staff, and students. In undertaking project work, the Center organizes interdisciplinary research and assistance teams, capable of addressing complex policy, planning, design, and development problems and needs of Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West. Over one hUJ.ldred requests for assistance and new research projects are handled annually. Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West provide a dynamic learning laboratory for applied research and service in such areas as: economic develop ment, housing policy, neighborhood and small town planning, participatory design, park and open space design, and urban design. The Center offers field study opportunities in both urban neighborhoods and in rural communities. Scope of Work Solving urban and rural problems in the Rocky Moun tain West means confronting both high plains semi-arid conditions and the fragile alpine environment. The sen sitive development of human settlements in harmony with this delicate natural environment is an overarching goal of the School. This goal is realized through prag matic service and applied research projects. Faculty and student research and assistance teams have conducted projects in such areas as: Commercial Revitalization. The Center assists small and medium size towns , urban neighborhoods, and municipal agencies in developing comprehensive economic development plans for older commercial dis tricts and downtown business areas. Working with com munity and merchant organizations, the Center helps develop public-private resources to implement strategic plans for the longterm diversification of local econo mies. Center staff assist twelve to fifteen communities a year, identify their unique competitive opportunities, develop design guidelines, prepare financing packages, provide designs for strategic parcels ofland , and evaluat ing the success of the projects. Housing Policy. In an era of fundamental shifts pol icies have dras . tically reduced resources for housing, especially for low and moderate income citizens. The Center has undertaken several research initiatives, to affect housing policies for those groups. The Center works with housing agencies to assess current condi tions and to conduct research on and development of new policies and programs. Based on its research and work with constituent groups, the Center was instru mental in c onvincing city leaders to develop an $11 mil lion Housing 'Ilust Fund for Denver, developing city

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policies and to eliminate homelessness and is cur rently engaged m research to evaluate and modify pri vate lending pr ctices in inner-city neighborhoods, and housing needs assessment for the disabled. Rural Conu+unity Assistance. The Rocky Moun tain West is rural in character and is often describe as "the boom or bust" center of the United States, ecause of the historic instability of mineral and na al resources industries. Rural commu nities are purs 4i ng opportunities for economic diver sification in th 1 hope of leveling out the "peaks and valleys" of their economies. In response to this need , the School of and Plarming has teamed with the Colorado Department of Local Affairs and with the Mountain Bell Corporation to form Colorado Initiatives. This purpose is to assist rural Colorado counties d municipalities in developing sound community eco omic strategies that improve local con ditions. Each ye ten communities are selected for spe cialized techni1 al research , and financial planning assistance. In to this targeted assistance, the School works other rural communities in a more broad based , developmental way on a variety of local issues. For exarbple, the town of Burlington , Colorado requested assisfunce with a site plan for an old town museum. This ope project led to six other projects over a two-year in the town of 3,500 people: a site design for a l901acre industrial park, a market study for the Old Thwn, a design for town entrance and unified public signage and a main street revitalization study. These have culminated in a regional eco nomic base stu
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"I like working at an urban business school. The city around us is like a laboratory where we can explore the issues and concepts of business today, and the students bring a lot of experience into the classroom. Its a good place to blend teaching and research. " -Professor Peter Bryant

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College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration I Dean: Donald L. Ste vens Associate : James D. Suver Assistant De : Linda S. Hull College Office: 1475 Lawrence St. , Third Floor 1elephone: 62 -4436 Director of Un ergraduate Programs: Edward J. Conry J Director of Programs: James R. Morris Director of Health Administration Programs: Bruce R. Neumann I Executive BoJ.d of the Business Advisory Council Bob Baker , Columbia Savin gs Edward J . Bar , President, Capitol Life Insurance Kermit L. Dark y, President, Mountain States Employers Counc il Thomas J. Gibson, Executive Vice President, Gates Corporation N. Berne Hart, hairman of the Board, United Banks of Colorado Del Hock, Presi , ent, Public Service Company Gail Schoettler , }tate neasurer Solomon D . 'llujlllo, Colorado Vice President and Chief Executive 0 cer, Mountain Bell Advisory Boar Members, Health A tration Program Sister Mary An ew, President, St. Joseph Hospital Dale Baker, Par er, Ernst & Whinney Robert Dickler, IDirector, University Hospital Joel Edelman, ffisident, Rose Medical Center Dr. Fred Grah , Associate Director, Medical Group Management ssociation Dr. David Lawrehce, Regional Director , Kaiser Founda tion Health Plk John McFettrid ge, Executive Director, Boulder Com munity Hospital Dr. Joyce Nevill , Manager, Department of Health and Hospitals Lowell Palrnqui , Executive Director, Swedish Medical Center Dave Sheehan, r., Vice President for External Affairs, Blue Shield of Colorado Dr. Frank Director , Department of Institutions Larry Wall, Presi ent, Colorado Hospital Association Dr. Jean Watso Dean/Professor , CU-Health Scien ces Center Roger Weghorst, Partner, Arthur Young & Company Advisory Com.qtittee for the Executive Program in Hecllth Administration Barbara J. Assistant Administrator , Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle, Washington Vuginia Cleland Professor of Nursing, School of Nurs ing, Universit of California, San Francisco C. Michael Hutchens, Executive Director, Greeley Clinic, Greeley John R. Johnson, Administrator, Palo Alto Medical Clinic, Palo Alto, California Ralph Lawson, Partner in Charge, Management Advisory Services , Deloitte Haskins & Sells Charles Madden, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Paragon Health Care Services, Inc., Costa Mesa, California RogerS. Schenke, Executive Vice President , The Amer ican Academy of Medical Directors, Thmpa, Florida Richard Singer, Director of Education , American College of Health Care Administrators, Bethesda , Maryland Frank naylor, Executive Director , Department of Insti tutions Clyde E. Thcker , Director, Office of Educational Services, CU-Health Sciences Center INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business , at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its 1students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excel lence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly moti vated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment. Our nation's business and corporate environment is experiencing dramatic and complex change. Your ability to understand these changes and n'mction as a skilled manager in today's rapidly moving business world will depend to a great extent on the quality of your business education. Because of the dynamic dhanges in business trends and management , research in these areas is cru cial to a successful transition. The !busi ness faculty of "research institutions" provide the current knowl edge, concepts, and advances in the field of business management. CU-Denver's College of Business is a "research institution," and our faculty are nationally recognized for f heir contributions to scholarly research. The information contained in uniyersity textbooks is first conceived through faculty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research-oriented faculty is writing and teachingconcepts years before they are typically seen in text books. Our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice.

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96 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and eve ning classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking higher levels of achievement, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today's challenging business environment. At CU-Denver's College of Business, you can have the edge over your competition. Faculty Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their teaching and research. Recruited from the nation's leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale, many of them also bring years of valua ble experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, aca demic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment, unequalled in the region. Students Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, a large majority of our students are adult, working profes sionals who maintain full-time employment. Their suc cess and experiences enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percent age attend evening classes, a significant number are fulltime students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute a very high percentage of the student body. Since admis sion standards are among the most stringent in the region, the student body is highly motivated and talented. This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and per spectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excel lent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students. Accreditation While there are approximately 800 recognized schools of business nationwide, there are only 237 that are accredited by the national accreditation agency for uni versity schools of business-the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CU-Denver's College of Business is one of the few schools in the State accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently "Thday, just having the degree isn't as important as where you get it . . . As corporations become savvier buyers of ... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal ... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program . " In addi tion, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs. In a similar manner, our program in health admin istration is the only such program in the region accredited by the Accredi ting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area. Academic Programs A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business management is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. Career Opportunities Graduates occupy positions and perform widely var ied functions in: Advertising Auditing Banking Consumer credit Controllership Credit administration Entrepreneurship Financial accounting Financial management General management Health administration Industrial selling and purchasing Information systems Insurance International business Investments Management accounting Management consulting Marketing management Marketing research Mortgage finance Operations research Organization management Personnel/human resources ' management Operations management Public accounting Public administration Real estate Retailing Selling and sales management 'laxation naffic and distribution management nansportation Wholesaling Others hold positions of responsibility in fields as diverse as business journalism, public relations, city planning, chamber of commerce and trade association management, college administration, and government. Scholarships and Financial Aid Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed information. In addition, the College of Business awards some departmental and general scholarships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business office, 623-4436. Each year, a number of students are awarded Dean's Scholarships, Colorado Scholarships, and Regents Scholarships. These provide financial support for a por tion of the students' tuition and fees. The Purchasing Management Association of Denver awards an annual scho larship to students interested in

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careers in pur asing and the Colorado Chapter of the American Pro uction and Inventory Control Society awards up to rvyo annual scholarships to students inter ested in careers n operations management. For informa tion, contact th operations management faculty adviser in the College Business. The Colorad Venture Group, a non-profit Denver organization, p riodically awards $1,000 scholarships to small business and entrepreneurship majors at CU Denver. Opportunity for association with other Colleg e of Business and A inistration students, in varied activi ties intended t stimulate professional interests and to give recognitio to scholastic attainment, is provided by the following st dent organizations: Beta Gamma Sigma national honorary scholastic fraternity in bu iness CSPACol rado Society for Personnel Administra tion (student ch pter) for students interested in person nel or industri relations CUAMAs udent chapter of the American Market ing Association HASO -ealth Administration Student Organization ISC-Info3Ition Systems Club MBA Associ onUniversity of Colorado at Denver association of aster's students in business Phi Chi national professional business and economics frat d nity Sigma Iota Eplsilon-professional and honorary man agement fraternity GENERAL AClADEMIC POLICIES Academic pol cies which apply to all CU-Denver stu dents are descri ed in the General Information section of this bulletin. Th policies described below apply to both undergraduate tudents in the College of Business and Administration nd graduate students in the Graduate School of Busi ess Administration. Policies applying separately to mkiergraduate and graduate students are described unde separate headings. Each student s responsible for knowing and comply ing with the actemic policies and regulations established for the ollege. The College cannot assume responsibility fi r problems resulting from a student's failure to follow the policies stated in the bulletin. Sim ilarly, students e responsible for all de a dlines , rules, and regulations , tated in the Schedule of Classes. Academic Et lies Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance wi the highest standards of honesty and Bu s iness I 97 integrity. Ch J ating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and dispositibn of examinations, alteration, forgery , or falsification df official records, and similar acts or the attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspen sion or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process , such as mis representation of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. Any reported act of dishonesty may be referred to the College of Business Committee on Academic Policies and Procedures at the discretion of the dean, a member of the instructional staff, or other appropriate University representative. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act invqlving the offering of the work of someone else as the student's own. It is recommended that stu dents consult with their instructor s as to . the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses . College Advising and Records Students receive their academic c ounseling from a faculty member and a staff of advisers in the College of Business office. Advising is available throughout the semester by appointment, although individual appoint ments with the advisers are generally unavailable dur ing registrations. Students are encouraged to discuss with the faculty of the College the various majors avail able as well as career opportunities . Non-business and prospective students are encour aged to contact one of the advisers regarding admissions and academic information , requirep1ents, transfer pol icies, and unofficial transcript evaluations. Please call the College of Business at 623-4436 for more complete information. Career advising is available from the business faculty and through the Auraria Office of Career Planning and Placement Services, 556-3477. Admission to Business Classes Admission to business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to the business program, and to other students as described in the separate undergradu ate and graduate policy sections. T?,e c ourse admission criteria are deSigned to meet a number of objectiv es. 1. Th assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree . 1 2 . Th serve students in other who have busi ness-related educational objectives or requirements. 3. To serve non-degree student S who have sp e cific career or educational goals. Attendance Regulations Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor

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98 I Colle g e of Business and Administratio n and Graduate S c hool o f Business Admini stratio n and must conform with the instructor's policy on attendance. Adding and Dropping Courses See the General Information section of this bulletin for the University-wide drop /add policies. Withdrawal Students may withdraw without discredit within the first ten weeks of the semester. The signature of the instructor is required in addition to that of the dean. Withdrawals following the tenth week of the semester are permitted only for circumstances clearly beyond the student's control. Administrative Drop The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the College of Business and Administration office that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prere quisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tui tion refunds. Appeal Procedure Students should contact a business adviser in the College of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regula tions of the College. General Grading Policies Plus /Minus Grading. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus /minus grading. For example, B + corresponds to 3.3 credit points (for each semester hour), B-corresponds to 2.7 credit points. Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student's control prevent the student from completing course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Generally, students must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire course. Students should not register for the class a second time but should make up the work with the instructor giving the IF. All IF grades must be made up within one year, or the IF will be changed to a grade of F. All incomplete grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades. Grade Changes . Final grades as reported by instruc tors are to be considered permanent and final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors and must be approved by the dean . Academic Policies for Undergraduate Students Advising. To arrange an undergraduate advising appointment, call 623-4436. Admissions. Admission requirements to the College of Business and Administration for new freshmen and for transfer students are described in the General Infor mation section of this bulletin. Requirements for Univer sity of Colorado students seeking admissions to the College are in this section under Intra-University nansfer. Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Classes. That publication lists the times when registra tion occurs, the place, and the courses offered. Scholastic Load. The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours during the Fall/Spring Semesters and 12 hours during Surnrner 'Ierm . A max imum of 3 hours can be taken during the interim/vaca tion session. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student's load. Pass/Fail Option. Students in the College of Business and Administration may not take required business or non-business courses, or business elective courses, on a pass / fail basis. Only non-business electives may be taken pass / fail. A maximum of 16 hours of pass / fail credit may be applied toward the B.S. degree in business; transfer students may take 1 hour pass /fail for every 8 hours successfully completed at this institution. Pass / fail election must be made within the posted deadline and is irreversible. A maximum of 6 hours pass / fail may be taken in any one semester. Repeating Courses. A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated, and the F will be included in the grade point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D-or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the business adviser. Courses repeated without an adviser's approval may not be computed in the grade-point average calculation. Undergraduate Honors Program. Upon recommenda tion of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be consid ered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall grade point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be c onsidered for magna cum laude. Filing for Graduation. Students must file an Under graduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation senior audit from a busi ness adviser prior to registering for their final semester.

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Failure to do s may delay graduation. Also, students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for grad u a t ion mus1 have the change approved by the grad uation supervi or prior to registering for their final semes ter. after that time will delay graduation . Attendance b f Non-business Majors. Space in under graduate busi ess courses is reserved for students admitted to th College. Certain other students are admitted on a ace available basis at the discretion of the D i rector o the Undergraduate Program and the instructor. Academic Po ides for Graduate S tudents Advi sing. Pr spective graduate students are encour aged to discuss admissions and program requirements with an adviso . In addition, as soon as possible after admission, stu ents should schedule an appointment with a gradua e adviser to discuss general degree requirements . aster of Science students should consult with the advis r to determine any background course work that may lj>e required . All graduate students need to prepare a forrhal degree plan during their first term in residence. This Ian, with appropriate signatures, will be filed with the Graduate School of Business Admin i stration. Admission to Graduate Business Courses . Admission to grad u ate leve courses is reserved for students admit ted to the graduate program in business . Graduate studepts from other University of Colorado schoo l s may be admitted on a space available basis . Non degree student may be permitted to attend only with written perm ssion of the Director of Graduate Programs. Course Load. The normal course load for full-time graduate studepts is 9-15 semester hours. However , beca u se many students also are purswng a career, it is possib l e to attedd classes on a part-time basis at times convenient to of individual's work schedule. Graduate courses are offer f d in the evening hours to accommodate the working Itansfer of Crfdit. A maximum of 6 semester hours of grad u ate work dm be transferred from another AACSBaccredited mast J r's program. Time Limit . student must complete the curricu lum within five ears from the date of first enrollment in the program. C urses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree without permission of the Director of Graquate Programs. Stu d ents whd have not been enrolled for three con secutive rs must reapply for admission to the program. Rea itted students may be required to com plete their degr e requirements according to require ments in effect t the date of their readmission . Comprehensve Examinations. A comprehensive examination is pot required for students pursuing the M.B.A. degree. rA comprehensive examination may b e required of students pursuing an M.S. degree; the M.S. adviser should e contacted regarding this requirement. Students must , e registered for the semester in which Bu s iness I 99 the comprehensive is taken, normally the last semester of attendance. Graduation. Students must file an application for Admission to Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School of Business Administration prior to registering fm the term in which they intend to graduate. Minimum Grade-Point Average. A minimum cumu lative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved and maintained in courses taken for a graduate business degree. All graduate courses taken to meet the degree requirements and courses taken sin c e admission to the program are included in the grade-point average. If the student's cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation and given two semesters of attendance in which to achieve the required 3 . 0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the reqwred average within the allotted time period will result in suspension . The grade of D is not a passing grade for graduate students. Graduate students can repeat a course for which they have received a grade of D or F. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the grade-point average. Th earn a grade of W (withdrawal) in a course, a student must be earning a grade of C or better in the course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the semester without the approval of the dean. UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE P R OGRAM The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives: l. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying of those activities. 2. The ability to think through logically and ana lytically the kind of complex problems encountered by management. 3. Facility in the arts of communication . 4. A comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization. 5 . Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions. 6 . Skill in the art of learning that t"ill help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus. Graduation Requirements The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree requires : 1btal Credits. A total of 120 semester hours of credit. Area of Emphasis. Completion of at least 12 semester hours of approved courses in the area of emphasis. Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses must t>e complete after admission to the College . The 12 hours in the area of emphasis must also be completed after admission to the College .

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100 I College o f Business and Administratio n and Grad uate School of B u siness Administratio n Grade Average. A minimum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2 .0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 for the student's area of emphasis must be maintained. Area Requirements. Satisfaction of all of the following area requirements. Required Areas Semester Hour s Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Principles of economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Political science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Natural science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 General psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Social-humanistic elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Introductory sociology or cultural anthropology . . . . . . . 3 Communications and composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Business core requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Area of emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Electives Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Non business (to include 9 hours of upper division work) 15 Free electives (either business or non business electives _12 'Ibtal Semester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Detailed descriptions of courses which satisf y the area requirements are presented below . Courses Which Satisfy Area Requirements. Com pletion of the following course work is required for graduation. Area Requirement Semester Hours Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Required: One English Composition (ENGL. 102 or 103) and one speech course (CMMU. 202 or 210) Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Required: Algebra for Business and Social Science (MATH. 107). Note that college-level algebra will not satisfy this require ment. A college-level calculus course is required (MATH. 108 is recommended). Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Six hours of economics are required. When ECON. 201-202 are taken at CU-Denver for eight (8) hours , the additional two (2) hours apply as non business electives. Political Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Required: PSC. 100 and llO. The following courses also will fulfill the PSC. 100 requirement: PSC. 300 , 304, 306, 310, 340, 353, 355, 365. Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Select courses such as biology , chemistry, or physics. Astro geophysics , earth science, geography, and geological sci ence are also acceptable. Mathematics and psychology are not appropriate courses for this requirement. Introductory Sociology or Cultural Anthropology ........ 3 Socio-humanistic elective ............................. 3 Select from the foiJowing courses : Histor y course (100 or 200 level); a behavior psychology course (PSY. 315 or 499 are strongly recommended); PHIL. 101, 120 , or 220; Cultural Anthropology or SOC. 100, ll9, 250, 300, 301, 302 , 303, 305, or 384 (Sociology and Cultural Anthropology courses are only acceptable if they are not used to fulfill the Introductory Sociology or Cultural Anthropology requirement.) General psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PSY. 100 is recommended Ele c tives ........................................... 39 Free electives . . . . ........... . . . . . ................. 15 (may be either business or non-business undergraduate academic courses) Busin e ss electives .... . ............................. 9 (any undergraduate academic course offered by the Col lege of Business) Non business electives ............................ 15 (must include 9 hours of upper division (300or 400level work.) Guidelines for Elective Credits . Elective credits should be sele c ted carefully as not all classes are acceptable. Gener aiJy, to be acceptable , electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assess ment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational/ technical , and must be part of regular University offerings. Specifically , the College will accept: a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical educa tion , recr eation, and dance, and b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study , experimental studies, choir, band, music lessons, art lessons , and c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC providing student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program . The College will not accept: Physical education, activity classes, recreation, work shops , internships , orientations, dance, teaching methods, pra c ti cums , and c ourses reviewing basic skills in com puters , English composition , mathematics, and chemistry . Core Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Complete all of the following courses: ACCT. 200 IS. 200 Q M. 201 B L. 300 FIN. 305 MK. 300 MGT. 330 0 M. 300

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B AD. 410 or 41 MGT. 450 Areas of Emphasi ................................... 12 (See Areas of E phasis in this sec tion.) Summary Required Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Elective Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 lbtal Required Se ester Hours ...................... 120 Model Degrer Program The followin sequence of courses is a guide to registration. Freshman Year Semester Hours ENGL. 102 or 103. English Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CMMU. 202 or 21 . Communication Theory or Public Speaking..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MATH. 107. for Social Science and Business . . . 3 MATH. 108. Calculus for Social Science and Business . . . 3 P SC. 100. to Political Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 P SC. llO. American Political System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SOC. 100. lntrodu tion to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BAD. 100 ........................................... 3 Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 lbtal 30 Sophomore Year ECON. 201 and 2 2. Principles of Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 PSY. 100. Introduc 10n to Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Socio-humanistic Iective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I S. 200. Bus iness and the Computer . . . . . . . 3 Q M. 201. Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT. 200. Introd ction to Financial Accounting . . . . . . . 3 Nonbusiness elect ves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 lbtal 30 Junior Year M.K. 300. Principl s of Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FIN. 305. Basic Fi ance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGT. 330. Manag ment and Organizational Behavior . . . 3 Q M. 300. Operati ns Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B L. 300. Business Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Business electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Nonbusiness elect" e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Either bu siness or onbusiness electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 lbtal 30 Senior Year MGT. 450. Busine s Policy and Strategic Management . . 3 B AD. 411. Busine s and Societ y or B AD. 410. Business and Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Area of emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Business elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Either business or onbusiness electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 lbtal 30 Areas of Each candidat for the B.S. (Business) degree must complete the pre cribed courses in an area of emphasis Business I 101 comprising a uinimum of 12 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 average is required for e four required area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the "core" courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area. Available areas of emphasis are: Accounting Entrepreneurship and new venture development Finance Human resourtes management Information systems International business Management Marketing Operations management Real estate ltansportation and distribution management Students so desiring may complete a dual area of emphasis by careful selection of courses and use of elec tive hours for the second area. Information about each area of emphasis is given in this College of Business section of the bulletin. Undergraduate Admissions Admission of Freshman Students. See the General Information section of this bulletin a description of freshman admission requirements. Admission o{Itansfer Students. Applicants who have completed wo11k at other collegiate institutions should review the discussions of transfer students in the Gen eral Informatio,n section of this bulletin. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Admin istration evaluates course work to determine its appro priateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business). For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduate business adviser. Intra-university ItansfeL Students who want to trans fer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University must formall y apply at the College of Business office. A minimum grade-point average, and minimum number of academic hours (both established by the College) are required for consideration. [fransfer deadlines are July 15 for Fall Semester, November 15 for Spring Semester, and Aprill5 for the Summer term. The college will consider each application based upon the student's a
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102 1 College of Business and Administratio n and Graduate S c hool of Business Administration recent semester at the University. Students with pre vious course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evalua tions (advanced standings). Second Undergraduate Degree Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. The student who is accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a degree plan. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the stu dent will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records. Applicants for the second undergraduate degree are required to have a personal interview with a business adviser. Eligible students will be notified when their admissions file is complete and interviews are desired . If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies considera tion for the graduate program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master's programs. Double Degree Programs Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of d gree requirements concurrently in two fields. Such combined programs have been arranged for engineering and busi ness. It may be arranged for other professional combina tions as well. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business adviser at 623-4436. GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS The Graduate School of Business Administration offers programs leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) in specific fields of business and health admin istration. In addition, the Master of Business Admin istration for Executives (Executive M.B.A.) is offered as a multi-campus program of the Graduate School of Busi ness Administration, and the Executive Program in Health Administration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Health Administration Program. These programs are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB); and the M.S. in Health Administration is additionally accredited by the Accredit ing Commission on Education for Health Services Adm inistr ation (A.C.E.H.S.A.). Master of Science Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, accounting and information sys tems, management science and information systems, finance, health administration, marketing, and management. The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for spe cialization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed or required, a minor field. The specialization and expertise developed with the M.S. program prepares the student for more spe cialized staff positions in industry, the non-profit sector, and government. The course requirements for the M.S. degree in each of the fields are divided into two components-common background and graduate core requirements. The com mon background requires at least 21 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and compe tence in the fields of busin ess administration. These requiremen t s may differ among degree programs. The common background requirements may be satisfied by equivalent graduate level work, or through undergradu ate course work as approved by the adviser. Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration from an AACSB accredited university will meet those requirements . The graduate core requires at least 30 semester hours of grad uate level courses as prescribed by the different major programs. I Other Degree Programs JOINT MBAIBA This program enables qualified students to earn a bachelor's degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), and a Master of Business Administra tion from the Graduat e School of Business Admirustra tion in five years. The program com bines undergraduate general education with the graduate business curriculum. Bachelor's candidates may major in any CLAS field (English, political science, biology, or fine arts are exam ples), and they must fulfi ll all the requirements for grad uation from CLAS. During the senior year, the student begins taking graduate level courses in the M . B.A. pro gram; these courses count as electives in the bachelor's program. For further information about this program and the admission requirements, contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Adv ising Office, 556-2555. JOINT MBAIMA-INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY This program enables the student to earn two degrees an M.B.A. from the Graduate School of Business

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Administration d a Master of Arts (M.A.) in psychol ogy from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Requirement for Admission to the M.B.A. a d M.S. Programs Admission to graduate program in business admin istration (M.B. and M.S.) is granted only to students showing high p omise of success in graduate business study. Admissio is based on the following indicators of the candidate's I kelihood to succeed in the program. Academic Re rd. The bachelor's degree must be from a regionally ac edited university. The total academic record is consid red, including the grade-point average, the course of st dy, and the quality of the program. Testing. The c didate's performance on the Graduate Management A ssion Jest (GMAT). While other tests may be acceptab e, the GMAT is strongl y recommend e d since it is the best indicator of high promise of success in grad te schools of business . The GMAT test is given four t mes each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application fort e test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Jest , Educational Jesting Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New ersey, 08541. The code number for CU Denver's gradua e business program is 4819. Work-Experie ce. A record of appropriate employ ment at increasi g levels of responsibility is considered a positive the likelihood of suc c essful comple tion of graduate ork. Seniors in th's University who have satisfied the undergraduate r sidence requirements , and who ne e d no more than 6 emester hours overall to meet require ments for bach or's degrees, may be admitted to the Graduate Schoo of Business Administration b y special must meet reg ar admission criteria and submit com plete applicatio by deadlines listed below. Background Students applying for graduate prograps in business do not need to have taken their undergrad ate degrees in business. The M.B.A. program is spe ifically designed so that the required courses cover th . material needed for completion of the degree. There e no prerequisites needed to enter th e M.B.A. program and there is every reason to believe that students with n n-business backgrounds can complete the program su essfully. Applicants the M.S. degree, however, may be required to take rerequisite courses, depending on the individual's aca ernie and professional background. For more detailed i formation contact the graduate student adviser. THE ADMISSION Th be for admission, applicants for gradu ate than health administration and the Executive M.B. . must: A c counting I 103 l. Submit a crompleted application along with the non refundable application fee of $40 ($30 for M.S. appli cants) prior to l the application deadlines: April 1 for SUmmer Jerm admission. July 1 for Fall Semester admission. November 1 for Spring Semester Early applications are recommended; early applica tions can recefve early priority in registration and class enrollment. Applications received after these dates may not be able to be processed in time ror admission. 2. Have GMAT scores forwarded to the College by the Educational Jesting Service. The code for CU-Denver's graduate business program is 4819. 3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) sent from each college attended. Personal interviews are not required except for appli cants to the M.S. in health administration. Students applying to the accelerated M.B.A. program may be required to submit an additional non-refundable deposit after they have been accepted into the graduate program. This deposit serves to request consideration for admission into the accelerated program for the student already admitted to the graduate program. The deposit is applied against regular tuition fees at the time of regis tration. The mailing address for applications is: Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration University o f Colorado at Denver 1475 Lawrence Street Denver , CO 80202 Applicants for the Executive M.B.A . and health administration programs should oonsult the relevant sections for application information. Programs of Study ACCOUNTING Adviser: Bruce R. Neumann Office: 1475 Lawrence St., Third Floor Telephone: 623-4436 Faculty: Professors: Michael A. Firth, Bruce R. Neu mann , James D . Suver Associate Professors: Mark Dennis F. Murray Assistant Professors: Jean C. M. Virginia Parker Instructors: Steven Cutler, Cindy Undergraduate Accounting courses are offered several fields of professional acountancy at the inteljillediate, advanced, and graduate levels. They provide preparation for prac tice in one or r ore of the following fields: Accounting and management control systems Auditing Financial accounting Managerial accounting

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CU-Dmver Business Dean Donald Stevens (right) talks with Anne Moeller, Assistant Professor of Managmzmt , and Steven Hartley, Assistant Professor of Marketing, on Denver's 16th Street Mall.

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Thx accountin 'leaching and esearch In aU of thes fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, ec nomic, and political environment i s needed. A hig degree of analytical ability and com munication skil is indispensable. Courses in E glish composition, speech , ethics and logic are desirab e. Courses in statistics and information systems, beyon the required College of Business core courses, are recommended. The undergra uate area of emphasis in accounting consists of 15 ours beyond ACCT. 200. Accounting majors should n t take ACCT. 202. S e m es t e r H o urs Required Course ACCT. 322. Inter ACCT. 323. Inte ediate Financial Accounting I .... . . . . . 3 ediate Financial Accounting II ........ 3 ccounting I ............ . ..... .... ... 3 ccounting II . . ...................... 3 Accounting e lecti e (at the 400 lev el) ................... 3 Students pl g to pursue accounting as a career usually take m re than the required 15 hours. Many students take a otal of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking tw courses each semester in their junior and senior years Students should work closely with the accounting fa ty and business advisers in planning their accounting programs. Accounting s dents often specialize in a particular topical area of a counting beyond the core. Examples of these speeializ tions include the following recom mended courses Financial Accoun ing and Auditin g ACCT. 424 . Adv ced Financial Accountin g ACCT. 441. Inco Thx Accounting ACCT. 442. Adv ced Income Thx Accountin g ACCT. 462. Audit ng Managerial Acco ntin g and S ys tems ACCT. 433. Accounting Problem s and Cases ACCT. 441. lncom Thx Accounting ACCT. 442. Adv ced Income Thx A c countin g ACCT. 454. A c co ting Systems and Dat a Pr ocess ing ACCT. 462. Audit ng ACCT. 480. A c co ting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations Graduate stu y in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by pr fessional organizations and employers . Students meeti admission requirements should con sider continuin their education at the graduate level. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING Adviser: Neumann Jelephone: 6 lB-4436 Accountin g I 105 The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of both financial and managerial accounting. The combination of re .quired and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the approval, leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit accounting, or management accounting. The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of components A, B and C as shown below: A . Common Background Course Work Courses R e quired Semester Hours ACCT. 200 . Financial Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 602. Quantitative Business Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 600. Marketing Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B L. 300. Busin e ss Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 604. Human Behavior in Organi-tions . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 618. Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 614. Managerial Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1btal S e mester Hours 21 It may be possible to satisfy these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work with the approval of the adviser. It is recommended that students should have minimal competency in mathematics and computer software applications. Possible courses at CU-Denver are MATII. 107, 108, and ACCT. 3311332. The ;required courses in Parts B and C (below) will also help meet these objec tives. Self-stupy or review (workshops) also may be used to attain minimal competency levels. B . Background Accounting Courses Course s Required Semester Hours ACCT. 322 and 323. Intermediate Financial Accounting, I and II....... . ............. ........... ................ 6 ACCT. 331 and 332. Intermediate Managerial and Cost A cc ounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 or ACCT. 607. Management Accounting and Control Systems 3 lbtal Background Accounting Semester Hours 9 or 12 C. Graduate Core in Accounting Courses Required Semester Hours ACCT. 625. Seminar: Accounting Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT. 626. Seminar: Managerial Accounting . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT. " core" Any 2 advanced accounting courses (numbered higher than 626) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MGT. 681. Pers o nnel and Human Resource Management 3 BUS. 610. Management of Wormation Systems . . . . . . . . 3 Sub total 18 Electives (4) Four elective courses may be selected ...... l2 lbtal Graduate Core Semester Hours 30

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106 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration • Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be at the 600 level. • ACCI. 625 and ACCI. 626 are required courses. • No comprehensive examinations are required in the major field of accounting. Comprehensive examinations ma y be required for some minor areas. Certain graduate courses in accounting are offered only in the Fall Semest er or only in the Sprin g Semester or Summer Jerm. Consult a current Sch edule for infor mation about current course offerings. Note that ACCT. 554, 625, and 643, are usually offered in the fall and other advanced courses are usuall y offered in the spring or summer. COURSES ACCT. 200-3. Introduction to Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring . The preparation and interpretation of the principal financial statements of the business enterprise, with emphasis on asset and liability valuation probl ems and the determina tion of net income. Pr er., sop homor e standing. ACCT. 202-3. Introduction to Managerial Accounting. Fall, Spring. Th e analysis of cos t behavior and the r o l e of account ing in the planning and co ntrol of business enterprises, with emphasis on management decision-making u ses of account ing informat ion . Note: Finance majors must take this course and accounting majors may not take this course to satisfy degree requirements. Prer., ACCT. 200. ACCT. 322-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting I. Fall, Spring. Intens ive analysis of generally accepted accounting principles, acco untin g theo ry, and preparation of annual financial stateme nt s for public corporations. Prer., ACCI. 200 and junior standing. ACCT. 323-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting II. Fall, Spring. Continuation of ACCI. 322 . Prer., ACCI. 322 . ACCT. 331-3. Managerial Cost Accounting. Fall, Spring. Measurement and rep orting of manufacturing and service costs. Identifies and analyzes th e role of product costs in income det ermi nation. Includes computer processing of cost data . Non-m ajo rs may take ei th er ACCI. 202 or 331. Prer., ACCI. 200 and I S 200. ACCT. 332-3. Intermediate Cost Accounting . Fall, Spring. Cost anal ysis for purposes of control and decision making . Analysis of cost beh avior, role of accounting in planning and control, and managerial uses of cost accounting data. Incl u des use of computer assi sted decision models . Prer., ACCI. 331 and Q M. 201. ACCT. 425-3. Financial Accounting Issues and Cases . In-depth analysis of conte mporar y accounting issues and problems, the developm e nt of accounting thought and principles, and crit ical review of general l y accepted accounting principles . Prer . , ACCI. 323 . ACCT. 441-3. Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring. Provisions and procedur es of fed eral inco me tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and b u si n ess organizat i ons, includ in g the management probl ems of tax planning and compliance. Prer . , ACCI. 202 or 331. ACCT. 442-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting . Fall, Spring. Continuation of ACCI. 441, with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partnerships and corporations. Prer., ACCI. 441. ACCT. 495-3. Special Topics in Accounting. R esearch method s and results, special topics, and professional developments in accounting. Prerequisites vary accordi ng to topic and instruc tor requirements. Upper Division/Graduate Level ACCT. 424/5 24-31. Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, or Summer. Advanced financial accounting concepts and practice with emphas is on accounti ng for partnerships, business combinations, and consolidations . Prer. , for 400 level, ACCI. 322; prer . , for 500 level , ACCT. 322 or 624. ACCT. 433 / 533 -31. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases . Spring or Summer. Crit ical analysis of advanced topics in managerial accounting . Considerable us e of cases and cur rent readings . Prer., for 400 level, ACCI. 332; prer., for 500 level, ACCI. 332 or 607 or e qui valent. ACCT. 454/554 3 1 . Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall. The design and analys is of acco unting information sys tems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers an d computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process . Prer., for 400 level, ACCI. 331 and 6 additional semester hours of account ing; for 500 level, ACCI. 331 or 607 and 6 additional semester hours of accounting. ACCT. 462/562-31. Auditing. Fall, Spring. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supportin g them; auditing techniques ava ilabl e to the independent public accountant. Pertinent p ubl ications of the AICPA reviewed. Prer. , for 400 l eve l , ACCI. 323; prer., for 500 level, ACCI. 323 or 624. ACCT. 480 / 580-31. Accounting for Government and Non profit Organizations. Spring. Planning and control of govern ment and nonprofit organiza tion s . Incl udes program budgets, responsibility accounting , and fund accounting . Prer., for 400 level, ACCI. 202 or 331; prer . , for 500 level, ACCI. 202 or 331 or BUS. 606. 600 Level ACCT. 607-3. Management Accounting and Control Systems. Fall, Spring. This course is de signed to develop a conceptual foundation for the use of management accounting techniques in the management contro l process and for resource decisions. Management control systems, cost acco untin g systems, and account information requirements will be stressed through analysis of cases and class room discussion. Prer., BUS. 606. Students who have taken cos t accounting may take thi s course only with consent of instructor. ACCT. 624-3. Financial Accounting Issues and Cases . Fall. Accelerated analysis of co nt emporary accounting issues and prob l ems, the development of accounting thou gh t and princi ples, and critical review of generally accepted accounting prin ciples. Prer., ACCI. 200 . or BUS. 606. ACCT. 625-3. Seminar : Accounting Theory. Fall. Nature and origin of accounting theory and the development of postulates, principles, and practices. Methodology appropri ate to development and evaluatio n of accoun tin g theory, wit h spe cial emphasis on accepted r esearch standards and procedures. Prer. , ACCI. 323 or 624. I Students enro lled at the 500 l evel may expect additional work and evaluation commensurate wit h graduate standards.

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ACCT. 626-3. Sem nar in Managerial Accounting. Spring or Sununer. Th is intfrdi sciplinary course focuses upon the con ceptual foundatio of m anagerial accounting information in decision making, Ianning, control, and other issues. The role of managerial ac
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108 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate S c hool of Business Administration BUS. 620. Business Policy and Strategic Management . . . 3 Ibtal Required Core Semester Hours .................. 33 Electives: One graduate course from each of three of the four following areas: Accounting, Finance, Mru:keting, and Management . . . . . 9 Free electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Ibtal Ele c tive Semester Hours .................... . . . . . 15 Ibtal Required Semester Hours for M.B.A. d e gre e .. ... . 48 Notes and Restrictions Core. Depending on demonstration of a strong back ground in one area, a maximum of one cottrse may be waived in the core, reducing the total number of pro gram hottrs to 45. A maximum of 6 hours may be trans ferred from another AACSB accredited graduate school, also reducing the number of hours required. Electives. No more than nine hours of elective gradu ate courses may be taken in any one discipline or area of emphasis. Students may elect not to take any emphasis. Three hours maximum may be taken outside the Gradu ate School of Business Administration, but only with written approval of the Director of Graduate Programs. Subjed to the above distribution requirements, stu dents have a wide range of options available in seleding the 15 hours of eledives. No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree, permitting students to choose a combination of courses appropriate for their individual career needs . If a student wishes to pursue an area of emphasis, several are available including accounting, finance, management, marketing, information systems, and operations management. Areas of emphasis in accounting, finance, management, and marketing all require 9 semester hours of eledives (500 or 600 level) in addition to the area core course. All other areas of emphasis require 6 semester hours of electives (500 or 600 level) in addition to the area core course. No thesis is required for the M.B.A. program. For additional information about the M.B.A. program contad a graduate student adviser at 623-4436. MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FOR EXECUTIVES The Executive M.B.A. Program is a multi-campus program of the Graduate School of Business Administra tion. It provides executive-level students with a broad, rigorous two-year academic experience leading to the Master of Business Administration degree. The program is designed for persons who hold managerial positions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these executives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which can be pttr sued simultaneously with a management career. The Executive M.B.A. Program emphasizes corporate planning, the busines s/ government interface , and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of methods. Case studies, ledures, and computer simulation are combined with research projeds and other teaching methods to provide students with tools useful in their present positions and applica ble to more advanced responsibilities as they progress in their management careers. The Executive Program comprises four semesters over a twenty-two month time period. It begins the last week of August and runs through mid-June for two years. Classes meet for a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it possible for those who live outside the Denver area to participate. 1Wo courses are taken simultaneously throughout the program. The program is supplemented by intensive in residence orientation at the beginning, and a two-day retreat at the conclusion. Faculty and Resources The faculty for the program are members of the regular faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administra tion from all three of the University's campuses-Boul der, Colorado Springs, and Denver. They are selected to condud these courses because their backgrounds enable them to make the strongest contribution to the program. Many of the faculty members are nationally recognized, and all possess both practical managerial experience and a demonstrated ability to work effectively with executive level students. Admission Requirements The Executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have ten years of business or admin istrative experience, including at least three years in a managerial position. They should be part of senior man agement in a small organization or senior or middle management in a larger one, hold at least a baccalaureate degree, and have the ability to do graduate work. ln the seleoion process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate's man agerial experience, progression in job responsibility, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative classroom/work environment. The Admis sions Committee will base its decision on the applica tion , former academic record, relevant test scores , the employer's nominating letter, other letters of recommen dation, and if deemed desirable, personal interviews with the committee. For further information, contad the Program Director, Executive M.B.A. Program, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado, 7600 E. Orchard Dr., Suite 320, Englewood, CO, 80111-2521, telephone (303) 779-4488. BUSINESS (MBA CORE) COURSES The following graduate courses are open only to admitt e d graduate degree students.

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BUS. 600-3. Marketing Management. Fall, Spring. The course has two ajor objectives for the students: (1) under standing basic keting concepts involving buyer behavior, product plannin , pricing, channels for distribution and pro motion, and (2) developing marketing decision-making capabilities base on strategic management and analytical skills. The over 1 objective is to integrate all the functional aspects of mark ing with other functional areas of the firm and with the env ronment, particularly consumption markets, competition, the 1 conomy, legal and regulatory environment, and social Prer., BUS. 606. BUS. 602 -3. Qua titati v e Business Analysis. Fall , Spring. This course will provi e the student with basic quantitative analy sis tools and techpiques necessary for the analysis of business re l ated problems. Topics covered include statistics, proba bility, sampling, 1 egression , inference testing, and additional topics s u ch as co elat i on, contingency tables, non-parametric techniques, and ime series analysis. BUS. 604-3. Hu a n Beh avior in Organizations. Fall , Spring. This course focu son applications of behavioral science con cepts to the mana ement of organizations . This course empha sizes analysis a d understanding of human behavior in organizations, using the results of such analyses to select appropriate strat . gies for managing . The course includes top ics such as moti tioo, leadership, power and conflict, group dynamics, organizational design, and other fac tors affecting human performance. Special emphasis is placed on concepts used y managers in all functional areas of organi zation, including accounting, production, finance, marketing, eng i neering, an so on . BUS. 606 -3. Aciuntin g for Managers. Fall, Spring. This course focuses o the use of accounting information in man agerial decision aking. Primary emphasis for the first half of the course will on interpretation of financial statements , understanding a counting conventions and principles under lying t h e prepara ion of the statements, and current controver sies regarding g nerally accepted accounting principles. The remainder of t e course will stress managerial uses of accounting ques such as budgeting, cost, volume , profit mode ls, and per rmance measurement. Prer., BUS. 602. BUS. 608 -3. Lega a nd Ethical Environment of Business. Fall , Spring. This co se focuses on public, administrative, and regulatory law; 1 d on the relation of business to the legal structure and et ical value systems which determine the parameters of b siness decisions. 1bpics include litigation, domestic and m tinational trade regulation , the allocation of liability for prod cts and environmental injuries, consumer and empl oyee p tection, regulation of capital markets, and business torts. BUS. 6 1 0 -3. M a n gement Information Systems. Fall , Spring. This course prov des an introduction to information systems from a manageri perspective. 1bpics include basic computer concepts such as hardware, software, data file design, struc tured computer I guages, systems analysis and design, and decision suppor systems. Managerial, organizational, and decision-making implications are stressed . Prer., BUS. 604. BUS. 6123 . Manage m e n t of Operations. Fall, Spring. This course will study l the tools and techniques of the management of the productive process of business organizations. 1bpics covered will inc! de resource management , linear program ming, decision tr es, scheduling and control systems, quality assurance techni1ues, productivity measurement, simulation, and the internal 'Onal elements of the operations function. Significant atte tion will be devoted to the study of the Busin ess Law I 109 application of these tools to service and institutional organiza tions. Prer., BUS. 602. BUS. 614-3. Economics. Fall, Spring. This course I has two objectives. A primary objective is to expose the student to the us b fulness of microeconomlc theory at the firm level. Through economic analysis, output demand and cost. characteristics an be evaluated thereby allowing for produc tion and marketing decisions consistent with overall firm goals. 1bpics in cost and price theory and estimation, forecast ing, production theory, and pricing practices. The course is also designed to aid students' understanding of the business manager ' s role in light of organizational and societal objec tives. Thus, we will consider the martagerial implications of structure , regulation, antitrust policy, etc. Prer., BUS. 602 and 606. BUS. 616-3. Economic Environment of Business. Fall, Spring. The objective of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of how economic policy affects and is affected by the national and international economic environment of business. As such, it focuses on the interaction of business and government as it relates to broader societal objectives. Mea sures of aggre&ate economic activity cu;e introduced as a basis for discussion of monetary and fiscal policy. Concerns over economic growth, employment, prices, and interest rates are seen as motivations for stabilization and industrial policy. Market power, economic and other market failures are studied as motivations for antitrust policy and regulation of iljldustry entry conditions, product p r icing, and production methods. BUS. 618-3. Financial Management. Fall , Spring. The purpose of this c ourse is to introduce the student to the tools and techniques for making a firm's investment and financing deci sions. These tools and techniques include the mathematics of interest, risk analysis, financial theory of valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial analysis. The empha sis is on developing an analytic framework for financial deci sion making. The class utilizes current literature, text, and cases. Prer., Bqs. 602, BUS. 606, BUS. 614. BUS. 620-3. Business Policy and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring. The goal of this course is to develop a general manage ment on issues of management of the total enter prise. An important objective is the integration of knowledge acquired across functional area Objectives of the course include the introduction of strategic concepts, ana lytical tools, and methodology. The primary focus is to provide the student with both strategy formulation and implementa tion skills. Prer., BUS. 600, BUS. 604, BUS. 606, BUS. 612, BUS. 614 , BUS. 616 , BUS. 618. BUSINESS LAW COURSES B L. 300-3. Business Law. Fall, Spring. Provides an under standing of basic areas of law important to business transac tions and consumers. 1bpics include litigation, criminal law, torts, contracts , and sales with overviews of consumer and employment and government regulation, business organizations, and the ethical implications of business activi ties. Prer., junior standing. B L. 412-3. Advanced Business Law . Fall, Spring. Additional legal topics of importance to business, ipduding partnerships, corporations , bankruptcy, secured and real and personal prope;rty. Strongly recommended for accounting and entrepreneurship majors. Prer., B L. 300.

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110 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURE DEVELOPMENT Adviser: John L. Young 'Ielephone: 623-4436 The entrepreneurship and new venture development major is designed for students who wish to pursue careers as either owners of independent businesses, work in small independent businesses, or work for cor porations whose clients are primarily new businesses and entrepreneurs, such as CPA firms, underwriters, consultants, venture capitalists, and financial analysts. The program emphasizes understanding and acquiring skills in the broad range of activities required to become an effective entrepreneur in today's business environment. It is highly recommended that students majoring in entrepreneurship and new venture development also pursue a second area of emphasis in accounting, finance, or marketing. Course requirements of the second area can be included as part of the student's business or free electives. Additional courses in accounting, finance, or marketing should be planned in consultation with the adviser to serve individual career needs. Required Courses Semester Hours MGT. 452. Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGT. 470. New Venture Strategies ..................... 3 (1Wo of the following four courses) FIN. 401. Business Finance I .................. ........ 3 ACCT. 202. Introduction to Managerial Accounting ... . . . 3 MGT. 438. Human Resources Management : Employment 3 MK. 480. Marketing Strategies and Policies ............. 3 Recommended Electives ACCT. 322. Intermediate Financial Accounting I ..... .... 3 ACCT. 332. Intermediate Cost Accounting .......... .... 3 FIN . 402. Business Finance II ......... . . . ...... ....... 3 MK. 310. Salesmanship ..... . ......................... 3 MK. 330. Marketing Research ......................... 3 MK. 350. Principles of Advertising ................... .. 3 MGT. 412. Advanced Business Law .................... 3 MGT. 434. Labor and Employee Relations .............. 3 Q M. 440 . Planning and Control System ... ............. 3 FINANCE Office : 1475 Lawrence Street, Third Floor 'Ielephone: 623-4436 Faculty: Professors: James R. Morris, Myron B. Slovin Associate Professors: E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr., Gailen L. Rite Assistant Professors: Jean-Claude Bosch , Richard W. Foster, Nairn Sipra Unde r graduate The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, monetary policy, banking and invest ments . Finance is intended to give an understanding of fundamental theory pertaining to finance and to develop ability to make practical applications of the principles and techniques of sound financial management in busi ness affairs. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies. It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the functions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, prices, money markets, and financial instit u tions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis, and decision making. Numerous opportunities are to be found with financial institutions and in the field of business finance . ACCI 202 and FIN. 305 are prerequisites for this area. Required Courses Semester Hours FIN. 401. Business Finance I .......................... 3 FIN. 402. Busine ss Finance II ......................... 3 FIN. 433. Investment and Portfolio Management ..... ... 3 FIN . 455. Monetary and Fiscal Policy ............... . ... 3 Recommended Electives FIN. 440. International Financial Management .......... 3 FIN. 434 . Security Analysis ........................... 3 FIN. 463 . Bank Management .......................... 3 RES. 433 Real Estate Investments ..................... 3 RES. 454 . Real Estate Finance ........................ 3 INS. 484. Principles of Insurance ............ .......... 3 Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester. Finance majors are encouraged to take additional accounting courses as business electives. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCE 'Ielephone: 623-4436 The M.S. degree in finance provides the student with the necessary specialized expertise in the field to meet the need of businesses for s t aff specialists, and to prepare the student for further graduate work in the field of finance. The M.S. program in finance consists of two compo nents the common background and the graduate core required courses. A. Common Background Course Work Course s Required Semester Hours BUS. 600. Marketing Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 602. Quantitati ve Business Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 604. Human Behavior in Organizations . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 606. Accounting for Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 608. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business . . 3 BUS. 614 . Managerial Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 616. Economic Environment of Business . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total Semester Hours Required .................... 21 It may be possible to satisfy the common background re quirements by other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of the adviser . B . Graduate Core in Finance The M.S. finance core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements. At

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least six of these courses must be at the 600 level or higher. A minimum of 18 semester hours (6 courses) must be chosen from regularly s4heduled graduate finance courses (excluding independent study); the remaining l2 semes ter hours (4 courses) may be n finance or in related fields, as approved by the student's M. . adviser in finance. A student can elect to incl ude a single minor field with at lea st 9 semester hours approved by am nor field adviser, but a minor is not required . 18 hour requirement is met by the following requirements jk:i options: l. Required Cou ses BUS. 618. Fin ial Management FIN. 639. Adv ced Finance Seminar 2 . Choose at lea t 4 courses in finance from: ns and Poli cies in Financial Management FIN. 632. Sped Thpics in Finance FIN . 633. lnvesrent Management and Analysis FIN. 635. The F nancial System FIN. 540. Intern tional Financial Management FIN. 563. Bank anagement Notes and Res rictions If a student has taken at least 9 semester hours of upper divisio finance courses within the last 5 years from an AACSB accredited university, those courses may be substitluted for BUS. 618. However, the student must still take least 18 hours in finance at the graduate level. I The 12 semester hour (4 course) requirement can include coursetrelated to the finance major as approved by the M.S. ad iser. Areas of study that normally would enhance the st dy of finance would include economics, mathematics, tatistics, accounting, information sys tems, and comP.uter science. Other fields could also be approved base on the student's needs and objectives . All M.S. in finance must pass a comprehen sive exarninati n in finance during the last semester of their program. M.S. studen s may choose to complete a thesis that is original resear h as approved by a committee of faculty members ap ointed by the M.S. adviser. Up to 6 semester hour of credit of independent study could be earned from t esis work. COURSES FIN. 305-3. Basi Finance. Fall , Spring. Includes a study of the monetary syste and other institutions comprising the mone y and capital mar ets. Also includes a study of the financial manager's role i business , the investment of capital in assets, and financing asset requirements of business firms. Prer., ECON. 201 and 02; ACCT. 200; junior standing. FIN. 401-3 . Busi ess Finance I. Fall, Spring. Basic principles and practi ces go 1 erning management of capita l in the busi ness firm consti ute the core of this course. Determinants of capital requirem nts, methods of obtaining capital, problems Finance I Ill of internal fin L cial management, arid methods of financial analysis. Financing the business corporation given primary emphasis. Prer., FIN. 305; ACCT. 202. FIN. 402-3 . Business Finance II. Fall, Spring. Develops ana l ytical and dettsion-making skills of students in relation to problems that confront financial management. Areas include planning, con,trol, and financing of current operations and longer term capital commitments; management of income; evaluation of income-producing property; and expansion. Case method of instruction . Prer., FIN. 401. FIN. 433-3. Investment and Portfolio Management. Fall, Spring. Discusses investment problems and policies and the methodology for implementing them. Includes portfolio anal ysis, selection of investment media , aod measurement of per formance. Prer., FIN. 401. FIN. 455-3. Financial Markets and Institutions. Fall , Spring. This course focuses on the supply and demand for loanable funds, the process of money creation, the structure of interest rates, and the role of the central bank. Special attention is devoted to the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on inter est rates, the flow of funds , and economic activity. Prer., FIN . 401. Upper Division/Graduate Level FIN. 434 /53 4-3 1 . Security Analysis. Fall. Analysis of the finan cial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity sec urities, and the selection of investment media for port folios. Prer. , for 400 level, FIN. 401; prer., for 500 level, BUS. 618 . FIN. 440/540-31 . International Financial Management. Spring. Considers international capital movements and bal ance of payments problems. Problems of international opera tions as they affect the financial functions. Reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange proc ess. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., for 400 level, FIN. 305; prer., for 500 level, BUS. 618. FIN. 463/563-31. Bank Management. Spring. An analysis of structure, markets, regulation, and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and procedures , investment behavior, deposit and capital adequacy, liquidity , and solvency. Ana lytical methodology for these is developed. Prer., for 400 level, FIN. 401; prer., for 500 level, BUS. 618. 600 Level I FIN. 631-3. Decisions and Policies in Financial Management. (Formerly FIN. 60 I.) Fall , Spring. Emphasizes investment and financing decisions, and the analysis ofthe financial condition of the firm. Specific topics include capital budgeting, cost of capital, financing mix and strategy, firm valuation, and man agement of working capital. Prer. , BUS. 618. FIN. 632-3. Special Topics in Finance. (Formerly FIN. 602.) Fall , Spring. 'Jhis course will treat varying topics that are of special interest. Topics and emphasis could include subjects such as capital budgeting, capital structure theory, valuation of firms , bankruptcy, financial modeling, option valua tion , etc. Prer., BUS. 618. 1Studems enrolled at th e 500 level may expect additional work and eva luati on co mmen s urat e with graduate standa rds .

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112 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate S chool of Business Administration FIN. 633-3. Investment Management Analysis. Spring . The theory of investment management and security values; portfolio management, including the analysis of investment risks and constraints on investment poLicies and objectives; the analysis and use of investment information; and the develop ment and application of the tools for determining security values. Prer., BUS. 618. FIN. 635-3. The Financial System. (Formerly FIN. 655.) Fall. This course analyzes the role of financial institutions and financial markets in allocating credit to the various sectors of the economy. The course covers the financial system's respon siveness to economic activity and changing regulatory condi tions, the processes by which risk is assessed and priced, and the behavior of interest rates. Prer., BUS. 618. FIN. 639-3. Advanced Finance Seminar. Fall. This course is an advanced survey of the theory of finance and the empirical research developed from the theory. The student will study the quantitative models that are the basis for theory, and the empirical methods that have been used to confirm or disprove the hypotheses presented by the theory. The material will be presented through lectures and will be supplemented with student research, presentations, and recitation. Prer., BUS. 618. FIN. 695-3. Topics in Finance. Experimental course offered irregularly for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in finance. Prerequisites will vary, depending up on topics covered. FIN. 960-variable credit. Independent Study. With the con sent of instructor under whose direction the study is undertaken. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Adviser: Bruce R. Neumann Office: 1475 Lawrence St., Third Floor lelephone: 623-4436 Faculty: Professors: Bruce R. Neumann, James D. Suver Associate Professor: Leland R. Kaiser Assistant Professor: Richard W. Foster Research Associate: Jack Y. Krakower The goal of the Master of Science in health administration (M.S.H.A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in responsi ble managerial positions, are capable of assuming posi tions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex, multi-service health care organizations. The curriculum is a synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization and tools that can be specifically applied to health and health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which heighten basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top level managers in selecting broad strategies for their institutions and by junior managers in administering sub-units of their organizations. The faculty guide the students in their mas tery of theoretical, conceptual, and quantitative topics. The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission of Educa tion for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970. The typical course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supplemented by several core health administration courses. The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration. Within the 57 semester hours, the student must choose 9 semester hours of elective courses. Required Courses Semester Hours H A . 601. Medical Care Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 602. Health Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 620. Health Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 621. General Systems Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 622. Strategic Planning and Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 644. Legal and Ethical Problems in Health Care Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 664. Health Care Management Accounting . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 670. Institutional Management I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 H A. 671. Institutional Management II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 600. Marketing Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 602. Quantitative Business Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 606. Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 610. Management Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 612. Management of Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 614. Managerial Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 618. Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Total Semester Hours ......... ................... 57 Electives. Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, human resources man agement, organizational development, health policy and planning, and community health. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings such as hospital administration> ambulatory care administration, or long-term care administration. Management Residency. A management residency is optional, but recommended for all students, especially those with limited health care experience. The faculty of the program provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consultation during the residency period. Information on the full range of local, regional, and national residencies is available in the program office. Durations of 3 months to 2 years are offered, mostly on a competitive basis. Comprehensive Examinations. Each candidate must pass a comprehensive examination covering the health administration field. Length of Program . The didactic portion of the degree will take at least two academic years since H.A. courses are offered only once each year and many require prere quisites. Part-time study is facilitated by many courses being scheduled for late afternoon or evening hours. Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the M.S.H.A., candidates should send their applications to:

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Graduate Pro ram in Health Administration Gra d uate of Business Administration University at Denver 1475 Lawren ; e Street Denver, CO 80202-2219 Credent i als r Requirements l. Complete Application for Graduate Admission Parts I and II. 2. Four letters of recommendation from professional or academic acquClj.ntances who are familiar with the appli cant's competence. 3. SatisfactorY test score Graduate Management Admission lest GMAT) preferred. When registering for the GMAT, use ode #4819 (Denver, MBA) to have score report sent to University of Colorado at Denver Grad uate School of Business Administration. 4. fee. 5. 1\vo (2) o f ficial transcripts from each college or university attl! ded. Minimum baccalaureate degree required. 6. A well fo ulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and s+arizing the applicant's reason(s) for seeking the 7. A person interview with members of the Health Administration Student Selection Committee may be scheduled. 8. Experienc t in the field of health services admin istration (prefe ed but not absolutely necessary). Admission t the M.S.H.A. degree program is on a competitive bJis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent mii.. urn entrance qualifications expected of all students. After the apwlications, recommendations, and essay have been evalJated, the candidate may be scheduled for a personal inte tv iew with the Student Selection Com mittee. The pe t sonal interview addresses motivation , potential leadetship capacity, experience in the field, maturity, and j dgement of each applicant. The appli cant will be no ified of the Student Selection Commit tee's decision afjter the interview. D eadlines. Ail credentials should be submitted at the latest by April 1 for Fall Semester and October 1 for Spring Semest r. Applications will be reviewed in the order they are Early application increases the probability of a t ceptance. For further ormation, brochures , and application materials cont ct the Graduate Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Admin istration, Unive sity of Colorado at Denver, 1475 Law rence St . , Denv r, CO 80202-2219 (303) 623-4436 . Scholar ships Loans Financial is available for continuing stu dents directly from the Graduate Program in Health Administration Each year the following scholarships / loans are awar ed: Health Admini stration I 113 Eugene Sontag Award KaiserPerrpanente Scholarship Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Loan Fund Foster G. McGaw Scho l arship Federation of American Hospitals' Foundation Colorado Health Administration Alumni Association Scholarship Fund for Students in Graduate Health Admini stration Programs EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMIN ISTRATION Program Sponsors . The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative program of the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver and the Western Network for Education in Health Administration. The of Colorado at Denver serves as the degree-granting institution for the Executive Program. The University of Colorado's Graduate Program in Health Administration is located in the Graduate School of Business Administration. The Western Network for Education in Health Admin istration is a regional educational consortium represent ing health care executives and academic faculty from major health administration graduate programs in the western United States , including the University of Cal ifornia at Berke l ey, University of California at Los Angeles, San Diego State University, University of Washington, Arizona State University, and University of B rit ish Columbia . Funding for the development of the Executive Pro gram has been provided by grants from the W.K. Kellogg foundation of Battle Creek, Michigan. Distinct ive Features of the Executive Program l. Drawing on the expertise represented by the fac ulties of consortium of western universities, the program offers the highest quality course content and instructors that typically is not available from a single university . 2. The Executive Program facilitates learning for pro fessionals who have continuing career and family responsibilities. The program is especially tailored for working individuals, allowing students to remain on their jobs while completing their educational program. 3. The program employs innovation in the technology of educational delivery. Learning methods include: • Computer-assisted instruction and self-paced learning packages. • Computer conferencing and electronic case analyses. • On-campus sessions.

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114 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration For Application and Additional Information: Executive Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado at Denver 1475 Lawrence Street Denver, CO 80202-2219 COURSES H A. 601-3. Medical Care Organization. Fall. An introduction to the structure and function of the medical care delivery system. Includes basic concepts and measures of health, dis ease, quality, values, needs, and utilization; issues in health care manpower, institutions, and system organization; general issues in policy, reimbursement , and regulation; and broad community and organizational considerations in medical care organization. H A . 602-3. Health Economics. Fall. An intensive analysis of issues in health economics. Particular attention is given to "market failure" in health insurance and to alternative meth ods of containing health care costs, including both regulatory and market approaches. Prer., BUS. 614 or consent of the instructor. H A. 620-3. Health Sciences. Fall. This course introduces the student to principles of epidemiology. The student will dem onstrate the application of epidemiology analyses to the pre diction of health care service needs of a population: to identify and integrate contemporary service delivery issues such as access, quality of care, cost of care, program and system development, and evaluation. The course will assist the student in the development of program planning and evaluation skills. Prer., H A. 601, BUS. 602. H A. 621-3. General Systems Theory. Fall. General systems theory is presented as a conceptual tool in health administra tion. Health is viewed as a subsystem of society, and interfaces among health and other social subsystems are analyzed. Broad social and cultural issues form a context for meaningful dis cussion of health planning and administration in the current and future decades. H A. 622-3. Strategic Planning and Policy. Spring. The pri mary focus of this course is on strategy formulation and implementation skills. Objectives include the introduction of strategic concepts, analytical tools, and methodology. Prer., H A. 601, 602, 620, 621, 664, 670. H A. 644-3. Legal and Ethical Problems in Health Care Admin istration. Spring. Designed to acquaint the student with legal issues experienced by the health administrator. Special emphasis is placed on issues such as malpractice, informed consent, medical staff appointments, directors' and admin istrators' liability, medical records, and refusal of treatment. The course should make the student aware of the multitude of legal and ethical problems which confront the health admin istrator on a daily basis. Prer., H A. 601. H A. 662-3. Financial Management for Non-Profit Organiza tions. An introduction to the financial management function in non-profit organizations. It includes a discussion of basic accounting requirements, managerial accounting techniques, working capital requir ements, and capital investment. This survey course will primarily focus on non-profit organiza tions. Problems and cases will be used to emphasize the deci sion-making point of view. H A. 663-3. Management Control in Non-profit Organiza tions. This course is designed to dev elop a basic understanding of the management control process and the unique characteristics of non-profit organizations. 1bpic areas include budgeting, programming, operational control, and pricing policies. Cases will be the primary means to integrate didactic materials with practical applications. Prer., H A . 664 or equiv alent or consent of instructor. H A. 664-3 . Management Accounting for Health Care Organ izations. Spring. Designed to build on the accounting con cepts introduced in BUS. 606 and to develop proficiency in the decision-making process of health care providers. Problems, cases, and computer software programs will be used to develop the practical application of management accounting techniques such as cost/volume / profit and standard cost mod els, budgeting, and analysis of variances. Prer. , BUS. 602 and 606 or consent of instructor. H A. 665-3. Advanced Topics in Health Care Financial Man agement. The primary focus of this course will be an in -depth research report on a current problem. Students will be respon sible for identifying their own research area and will brief both the client and the class on the interim progress and the final recommendations . A health care simulation exercise will be utilized to integrate the financial management concepts introduced in the preceding accounting and finance courses. Prer., H A. 664 or consent of instructor. H A. 670-3. Institutional Management I. Fall. This course is the study of human actions in organizations. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of both individual and group processes and characteristics in organization settings. The course includes topics such as organization structure and culture; task and job design; individual behavior; motivation; stress; group formation, development, structure, and dynamics; com munications; decision making; conflict; influence and power; leadership; and organizational change. H A. 671-3. Institutional Management II. Spring. A collo quium designed to integrate major topics in the general management curriculum into relevant health administration issues. Current policies, problems, and issues across the broad spectrum of health service administration are covered. Prer., H A. 601, 602, 620, 621, and 670. H A. 672-1. Ambulatory Care Administration. The health administration student is exposed to the rapidly developing field of ambulatory care and HMO management. By examina tion of various ambulatory care and HMO settings, problems in the planning, implementation, administration, and evalua tion of ambulatory care are developed. Prer., H A. 601, 670 or consent of instr uctor . H A. 674-1. Multi-institutional Management. Multi-institu tional management is a developing trend in health admin istration. Students are exposed to both profit and non-profit hospital, nursing home, etc., networks . Shared services, merger, management contracts, hospital acquisitions, and satellite are studied and discussed. Prer., H A. 601, 670 or consent of instructor. H A. 676-3. Rural Health Systems I. Introduces the student to the history and evolution of rural health care in the United States. Also to be examined are past attempts to improve rural health and the impact of past national programs affecting rural health. The present status of rural health in the U .S. will be explored. The course will end with a review of private, local, state, and federal programs directed toward solutions for rural health problems. Prer., consent of instructor. H A . 678-2. Health Care Marketing. The application of mar k et ing concepts and techniques to health care delivery. Discussion will focus on the implications of a changing regulatory / competitive env ironment for marketing health

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services. The use f spe cific concepts and tools, and an under standing of the v iety of marketing applications to the plan ning of he alth de very systems. Prer. , BUS. 600 or consent of ins tru c tor . H A. 695-3. Speci I Topics in Health Administrat ion. Resear ch methods and res ts, special topics , and prof essio nal develop ments in health dministration. Offered irregularly. Prer eq uisites vary acco r ng t o topic s and instructor requirem ents . HUMAN MANAGEMENT Adviser: F. Cascio lelephone: 623-4436 Human resmhces management offers opportunities for students evelop professional competence in the areas of perso el administration and labor relations. Students acq u e a n understanding of and skills in developin g human resources systems including recr itment, selection, evaluation, training , motivation, and union-management relations. Required Course l Semester Hours MGI 434. Labor and Employee Relations .............. 3 MGI 438. Hum R esources Management: Emp l oyment 3 MGI 439 . Hum R esources Management: Legal and Social Issues . MGI 441. Hum Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R eso u rces Management : dministration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R ecommended E(ectives MGI 335. Work Groups ... ................. 3 MGI 435. Confl"tt and Change in Organization s ........ 3 MGI 437. Org ization Desi g n .......... .......... ... 3 PSY. 485. Princip es of Ps ychological 'Jesting ............ 3 PSY. 487 . Person ity Assessment ...................... 3 Q M. 444. Qualit and Pr oductivity .................... 3 ACCI 202. lntro uction to Managerial Accounting ...... 3 IS. 350. Logical ata Structur es and Data B ase Management stems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Q M. 300 . Inte ediate Statistics ...................... 3 SOC. 305. Sociol 1 gy of Work .......................... 3 ECON . 461. Lab Economics .................... . ..... 3 Adviser: Peter . Bryant Office : 1475 La ence Street, Third Floor lelephone: Faculty: Assoc ate Professors: Peter G. Bryant, Richard D. ckathom Assistant Profrssors: James H. Gerlach, Jeff E. Hey!, Jahangir Kartrni, Bob Kuo I The informat on systems area is designed for those who wish to p . epare themselves for careers as profes sional adrninisttive data processing managers in busi ness and gove nrnent. The student develops those technical skiUs d administra tiv e insights req uired for Information Systems I 115 analysis of information systems, the design and imple mentation of sys tems, and the management of data proc essing operahons. The emphasis is on management information s{rstemssystems for the collection, organ ization , accessing, and analysis of information for the plarming and control of operations. The automation of data processing is also studied extensively. Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. Required Prerequisite Courses Semester Hours I S . 200. Business Information Systems and the Computer (formerly B AD. 200) ........... .................... 3 Q M. 201. Business Statistics .......... . . . . ............ 3 I S. 220. Business Programming I: Stru ctured COBOL ... 3 I S. 221. Business Programming II: Structured COBOL and Phy sical File Organization 'Iechniques ................ 3 Required Courses (The following two courses) I S . 465. Systems Analysis and Design I ................ 3 I S. 466. Systems Analysis and Design II ............... 3 (1\vo of the follow in g five courses) Q M. 300. Intermediate Statistical Anal ysis for Decisi on Support (inf requentl y offered) ....................... 3 IS. 330. Operations Res earch for Deci sion Support ...... 3 I S. 350. Logical Data Structures and Database Management Systems .............................. 3 IS. 470. ComptJter and Information 'Iechnology ......... 3 0 M. 440. Planning and Control Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS Adviser: Professor Peter Bryant lelephone: 623-4436 The Master of Science degree in management science and information systems (M.S . in IS) prepares students for management roles in the information systems field and for such careers as systems analysts, software engi nee rs, data base administrators, and data processing managers. The curriculum emphasizes the application of computer technology within the b siness context. The M.S. in I S requires the to complete the common background courses and the graduate core described below. A. Common Background Course Work Courses Required Semester Hours BUS. 600. Marketing Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 602. Quahtitative Business Analrsis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 604. Human Behavior in Organi zations . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 606. Accounting for Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 608. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business . . 3 BUS. 614 . Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 618. Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1btal S emester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

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116 I College o f Business and Administratio n and Graduate S chool of Business Admini stratio n It may be possible to satisfy the common background requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of the adviser. B. Graduate Core in Information Systems Thirty semester hours of approved graduate work are required. Each student's plan of study is developed by the student and the faculty adviser, considering the student's interests and background . The 30 semester hours may be taken entirely in information systems and closely related areas or may be divided between a major field (21 hours) and a minor field (9 hours). Courses available for the information systems major include: I S. 602. Business Programming and Data Structures I S. 604. Information Systems in Organizations I S. 606. Systems Analysis I S. 608. Data Base Management Systems I S. 610 . Computer Jechnology I S. 612. Data Communication I S . 614. Systems Design I S. 616. Decision Support Systems/Expert Systems I S. 618. Information Systems Policy I S. 620. Special Projects I S. 622 . Independent Studyffhesis I S. 680. Special topics (All are 3 semester hours except I S . 622 , which is variable credit.) Minor fields may be chosen from a variety of business and non-business areas, in consultation with the student's adviser. A maximum of 6 semester hours of approved graduate work at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours . For business related courses, the program must be accredited by the AACSB. Candidates for the M.S . degree must pass a comprehensive examination over their entire pro gram during the last semester of study. COURSES I S. 200-3. Business Information Systems and the Computer. A study of business information systems focusing upon com puter hardware and software as they relate to business infor mation. Includes computer programming, computer systems, and computer applications . The purpose of the course is to introduce the students to the concepts, vocabulary, and func tion of business information systems and the computer. Prer., MATH. 107 and 108 or 6 hours of nonremedial college mathematics. I S. 220-3. Business Programming 1: Structured COBOL. An introductory course intended to provide the student with a thorough programming foundation in COBOL using struc tured programming concepts and techniques. The basic elements of the language are discussed and demonstrated through applications in a business environment. Prer., IS. 200 or consent of instructor. IS. 221-3. Business Programming II: Structured COBOL and Physical File Organization Techniques. This course is a con tinuation of I S. 220. The student is introduced to advanced topics in COBOL and their application in business. Special emphasis is placed upon alternative physical data and file structures, their implementation in COBOL, and their use in a business setting. The use of system software and utiliti e s will be integrated with the topics. Case studies may be used to illustrate applications of the material. Prer., IS. 220 or consent of instructor; Q M. 201 is recommended. I S. 330-3. Operations Research for Decision Support. Fall. Objectives and models of operations research and their application in a managerial setting. Includes topics such as inventory models and control, simulation, linear program ming topics, network models. Prer., Q M. 201. I S. 350-3. Logical Data Structures and Database Manage ment Systems. Spring. This course is an introduction to database management s y stems , on-line query, and manage ment control systems. It is concerned with database structure and design and the integration of the logical view of the data with its physical storage. Extensive use may be made of a commercial DBMS in student projects to develop an apprecia tion of the use and organizational issues as well as the tech nical considerations . Prer., I S . 221 or consent of instructor. I S. 465-3. Systems Analysis. Spring. This course introduces the student to basic system analysis tools and the procedures for conducting a system analysis. lbpics to be covered ma y include system requirements, the initial analysis, the general feasibility study, structured analysis, detailed analysis, logical design, and general system proposal. The student will gain practical experience through projects and/or case studies . Prer., I S . 221 or consent of instructor. I S. 466-3. Systems Design. Fall. This course is a continuation of I S. 465 and discusses topics such as structured design; physical system design; detailed feasibility analysis ; specifi cation of input-output methods and formats ; design of files, programs , and procedures; system testing; implementation procedures ; and system life cycle management. The student will implement these concepts through case studies and/or projects. Prer., I S. 465 or consent o f instructor. I S. 470-3. Computer and Information Technology. Fall. This c ourse provides the I S student with a conceptual foundation in the areas of computer architecture, operating systems, pro gramming translators , and telecommunications. It is intended to serve as a facilitating course to allow the I S student to more readily communicate with other technical members of the data processing community. Prer., IS. 221 or consent of instructor. 600 level I S. 602-3. Business Programming and Data System. Fall, Spring. An accelerated introductory course on programming business a pplications , with emphasi s on file processing. lbpics include the COBOL and PASCAL programming languages. I S. 606-3. Systems Analysis. Sprin g . This course emphasizes information systems analysis and the logical specification of the system . The life cycle concept is used as the basic frame work for development , but there is a recognition of alter natives in this development process. Management, organ ization , technology, and economic perspectives are consid ered. Prer. or coreq. , I S. 602 and BUS. 610. I S. 608-3. Database Management Systems. Spring. The database management course focuses on the analysis , design, and implementation of database systems to support today ' s business operations. Current database models and database administration issues will be discussed in detail. Prer. or coreq., I S. 602. I S. 610-3. Computer Technology. Fall. This course provides a conceptual foundation in the areas of computer architecture , operating systems, programming translators, and fourth-gen eration languages. Students will study various computer architectures ranging from microcomputers to minicomputers to mainfram e computers and operating systems such as Unix, VMS, DOS, and OSN S. Prer. or coreq., I S. 602 .

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I S. 612-3. Data Communications. Spring. Develops skill and knowledge for ommunication system design, dealing with network proto ols, wide-area network, local-area network, and manageme t implications. Course has a project orienta tion. Prer., I S . 610. I S. 614-3. Systbms Design. Fall. This course integrates the areas of technology, systems analysis, and systems design in desi . ning l arge-scale application or decision sup port systems. T e course emphasizes modem techniques for the measureme t, specification, design, implementation , and testing of systems. Prer., I S . 606. I S. 616-3. Deci ion Support Systems/Expert Systems. Fall. An introductor course in how to design and construct deci sion support s terns and expert systems. Knowledge repre sentation and d,ecision-making techniques will be discussed along with artificial intelligence language s such as Lisp and Prolog. Prer., I 602. I S . 618-3. Information Systems Policy. Spring. Capston e course to und s rstand the overall information needs of an organization d the role of the computer-based information systems. lbpics considered are strategic planning of informa tion systems, anagement of computer center and technical personnel, syst ms development management, the informa tion systems usive , and social and legal issues. Prer., BUS. 610. I S. 620-3. I S Projects. Fall. Students work on particular projects in the information systems area. 'JYpical projects include the and implementation of an application pro gram or survey of the managerial, behavioral!technical issues in a particular ea. Prer., consent of instructor. I S. 680-3. Spec al Topics in Information Systems. A variety of advanced topic are offered in this course . Consult the area coordinator for rent offerings. Upper Divisio /Graduate Level INS. 484/584-31 Principles of Insurance. Fundamental princi ples of insuran and their application to life, disability , prop erty, and liabili y insurance. Provides the basic knowledge for intelligent solu ion of personal and business insurance prob lems as well as r further specialized study of insurance . Prer., for 400 level, F N. 305 ; for 500 level, BUS. 618. INTERNATI I NAL BUSINESS Adviser: H. chael Hayes 'Ielephone: 6 3-4436 Increasingl , businesses are reorienting their think ing, planning and operations to capitalize on opportunities that e ist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is ected by this reorientation. For individ uals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, internationa business provides excellent career opportunities The interna ional business curriculum is designed to enhance and on thorough training in basic business skills an to provide students with additional skills and knowled e appropriate to international business. Management I 117 Students electing this area of concentration must co m plete 15 semester hours as follows: Required Courses Semester Hours FIN. 440. International Financial Management .......... 3 TRMG. 458. International 'fransportation ............... 3 MK. 490. International Marketing .1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ECON. 441. International 'frade and Finance (applies as a non-business e lective) .............................. 3 Students should see an academic adviser for course scheduling. A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for a second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. In addition, serious consideration should be given to either a minor or a certificate in international affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sci ences, and to the study of a foreign language. MANAGEMENT Adviser: Raymond F. Zarnmuto Office: 1475 Lawrence St., Third Floor 'Ielephone: 623-4436 Faculty: Professor: Wayne F. Cascio, Associate J;rofessors: Edward). Conry, Raymond F. Zarnmuto Assistant Professors: Rajendra P. Khandekar, Anne Moeller , John D . Ruhnka, Marilyn Sargent, John E. Young Undergraduate The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variet of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and and human resources management. Required Courses Semester Hours MGT. 335 . Managing Work Groups .................... 3 MGT. 435. Conflict and Change in Organizations ........ 3 MGT. 437. Organization Design ....................... 3 MGT. 438. Human Resources Management: Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recommended Electives MGT. 434. Labor and Employee Relations .............. 3 MGT. 439. Human Resources Management : Legal and Social Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGT. 440. International Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGT. 452. Entrepreneurship and Small Business Manag eme nt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I Students enrolled at the 500 level may t;xpec t additional work and eva lu a ti on cor(lmensurate with graduate standards.

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118 I College of Business and Administratio n and Graduate School o f Business Administration MGl: 470. New Venture Strategies .... . . ............... 3 MGl: 495. Thpics in Business .......................... 3 MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT Adviser: Raymond R Zamrnuto 1elephone: 623-4436 The objective of the Master of Science in management program is to prepare individuals with prior work expe rience for significant managerial responsibilities in pri vate and public sector organizations. The degree is particularly appropriate for students having an under graduate degree in a functional area of business, such as accounting, finance, information systems, or in a tech nical area, such as engineering or computer science. The Master of Science in management consists of two components: the common background and the spe cialized courses that constitute the graduate core of the M.S. in management. A. Common Background Course Work Students in the M.S . in management program c an satisfy the common background requirements by taking the follow ing courses: Semester Hours BUS. 600. Marketing Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 602. Quantitative Business Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 606. Accounting for Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 608 . Legal and Ethical Environment in Business . . 3 BUS. 610. Management Information S y stems . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 614. Managerial Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUS. 618. Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1btal Semester Hours . . . ......... ................. 21 It may be possible to satisfy the common background requirements b y other graduate or undergraduate c ourse work, with the approval of the adviser. B. Graduate Core in Mana g ement The management core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements. At least six of these courses must be 600-level courses. A minimum of 21 semester hours must be chosen from regular l y scheduled management courses (excluding independent study). The remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in management or in related fields, as approved by the student's M.S. adviser in management. A student can elect to include a single minor field with at least 9 semester hours appro v ed by a minor field adviser, but a minor is not required . The 21-hour management requirement is met by th e follow ing requirements and options: Required Courses Semester Hours BUS. 604 . Human Behavior in Organizations .......... . . 3 MGl: 632. Organizational Development ................ 3 MGl: 636. Designing Effective Organizations ........... 3 MGl: 681. Human Resources Management ............. 3 C. Management Electives Choose at least 9 hours of course work from the selections offered under the course designation MGl: 695, Special1bpics in Management. Usually, two MGl: 695 sections will be offered each semester. Consult with the management area coordinator for the year's special offerings. Students can substitute a 600-level MGl: course for BUS. 604 if they have taken an equivalent upper division organiza tional behavior course within the last five years from an AACSB accreditied university. In that case, students must complete 21 hours of management courses . The nine hour minor, if a student should choose to complete a minor, may be taken in another functional area of business, such as marketing, finance, or information systems or in another related discipline, such as psychology, socio log y or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved based on a student's needs and career objectives . Students are not required to take a comprehensive exam ination or complete a thesis in the major field. COURSES MGT. 330-3. Management and Organizational Behavior. Fall, Spring. Emphasizes the application of behavioral science knowledge to understanding people and organizations. Motivation , authority, politics, and the role of groups in con temporary organizations are some of the topics covered. Stu dents are urged to complete PSY. 203 and SOC. 100 before taking this course. Prer . , junior standing. MGT. 335-3. Managing Work Groups. Fal l , Spring. Examines what makes small groups effect ive in organizations . Develop s the ability to analyze interpersonal and group behavior, and improve group functioning. Build s interpersonal and small group leadership skills . Prer., MGl: 330. MGT. 434-3. Labor and Employee Relations. Fall, Spring. Analysis of legal, political, social, and managerial aspects of collective bargaining and employee relations . Prer., MGl: 330. MGT. 435-3. Conflict and Change in Organizations. Spring. This course is designed to help students understand common types of conflict within organizations and the strategies useful for resolving conflict . lechniques for managing change also are stressed . Prer., MGl: 330. MGT. 437-3. Organization Design. Fall. Examines how to structure organizations to perform effectively. Emphasis is placed on the role ofthe task, technology, and environment as constraints on organization design . Prer., MGl: 330. MGT. 438-3. Human Resources Management: Employment. Fall , Spring. Study of the development and implementation of personnel systems for recruiting, selecting, placing, develop ing , and e v aluating human resources. Prer., Q M. 201 and MGl: 330. MGT. 439-3. Human Resources Management: Legal and Social Issues. Fall. Study of legal issues related to equal employment opportunity, occupational safety and health, and compensation, with emphasis on program implementation and evaluation. Reviews legal questions, guidelines and pro cedures, and regulatory agencies . It is recommended that stu dents take MGl: 434 and 438 before this course. Prer., MGl: 330 .

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MGT. 440 3. lnt r rnational Management. Spring. Examines the b u si n ess environme n t as it affects company policies and pri cedures. Integrates all the functio n s under t ake n in intern t iona! operations th ro ugh in-depth analysis and comprehen ive case studies. Prer., MGT. 450 a n d any two of the following ECON. 441, FIN. 440, MK. 490, TRMG. 458. MGT. 4413 . Hu an Resources Management: Compensation Administrat ion. Sprin g. Study of p lanning and admi n i stra tion of compens t ion systems, incl u ding governme nt, union, and labor mark t infl u ences on pay; deve l opment o f pay sys tem s a n d emplo . ee benefits for no n -managerial, managerial, an d overseas e p l oyees. Prer., Q M . 201 and M GT. 438. MGT. 450-3. Policy and Strategic Management. Fall , Spring . Empha is is on integrati n g the economic, m arket, sociaVpolitical, t chno l ogical, and com petition com po n ents of the external env ronme n t with the internal characteristics of t h e firm ; and de i ving through analys i s the approp riat e inter action between the firm and its environment to faci litate accomplishmen of the firm's object i ves. Open only to s t udents in th eir senior y . ar. Prer., ACCT. 20 0 , I S . 200, FIN. 3 0 5, MK. 300, MGT. 330, p M. 300 , and Q M. 201. MGT. 452-3. Ent repreneurship and Small Business Manage ment. Fall, Utilizing theories and concepts deve l oped in al l functional areas, students wiU address the differences be tween small u siness management and large cor porate management. problems of "lifestyle" as well as hig h potential r owth-oriented firms will be exam i ned. A majo r portion o the course includes the deve l opment of a business plan fo an existing business or an actual new ven ture . Prer . , AC . 200, FIN . 305, MK . 300; coreq., M GT. 450. MGT. 470-3. Ne Venture Strategies. Fall. Examines both the pe r s onal and c mmercial strategies which can be used to effectively begi}new business ventures. The course focuses upon t h e phase f ent r epreneurship that occurs between the ge n e ration of t e i n i tial new venture idea th ro u g h the entrepeneur ' s commercial sale . Growth-oriented firms with high growr potential are the primary focu s of a tt ention as opposed to " I fest y le" businesses. Prer., B AD. 100, ACCT. 20 0. MGT. 495-3 . Top1cs in Management. Fall, Spring . A number of differen t curren topics in management will be offered under this course n ber. Consult the Schedule of C lasses or the area coordinator for each semester's t opics. 600 Level anizational Development . Introduction in th e anal ysis, dia nos is, and reso l utio n of problems in o r ganiz ing people at ork. Models of organizational change are exam ined. Grou experiences, ana l yses of cases and readings are stressed. Pre ., BUS . 604. MGT. 636-3 . De igning Effective Organizations. Examines how to design rganizations w i thin th e context of environ mental, techno! gical, and task constraints. The emph asis is on l ear ni ng ho to recognize and correct structural p r oblems thro u gh t he an ysis of existing organizations in w h ich the st udents are inv l ved . P rer . , BUS. 604. MGT. 681-3 . Hu an Resources Management. This course focu ses o n the anage ment of human resources in organ i zed settings . It is o iented toward the practical application of h u man resourc s man agement princip l es in the following areas: equal e p loyment opportunity /affirmati ve action, human resource planning , recruitment, managerial se l ection, comp e n sation a d be n efits, labor r e l at i ons , trai n i n g, career management, pe ormance appraisal, and occupatio n a l health and safety. Marketin g I 119 MGT. 695-3. Special Top i cs i n Management. A number of dif f e r ent t opics in management will be offered eac h semester undJr t h is course n u m ber. The following topics have b een schedulJd f or the 1987-88 year, and more topics will be a d ded. ConsJlt th e Schedule of Classes for specific cou r se offerings and hmes, or contact t h e area coordinator for further information. Power and Politics i n Organizations. Fall. P olitical proc esses are exam in ed : how peop l e in organizations get power, k eep power, and use power. This c ourse is designed to i nc r ease st ud ents' capacity to analyze, unders t and, and use power effec t ive l y in organiza t ions. Partic ipat ion of class member is stressed. Turnaround Management. Fall. Examines w h y organiza tions exper ience performance downturns and how to reverse the m . Thpics incl u de: causes of and strategies for reversing decline , improving decision making under crisis conditions, avo iding dysfunctional organ izational and i nterpersonal dynamics, and techniques for m a n aging c ut backs in opera t ions and personnel. Entreprenuership and New Business Formation . Spring. This course examines characteristics of the successfu l entrepeneur, exp l oration of e nt repreneurial opportunities with in large orgaruzations, t r a ining in t h e m otives of s uc cessful entrepeneurs, exploring the decision to go into busi n ess for one's self, and deve lopment of a procedural system for establishing a new business. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE COURSES MGSC. 601-3 . Deterministic Models . Linear programming and its appliqlti o n, n etwork analysis, incl udin g scheduling models, dynarn k programmjng, integer programming, non lin ear prog r amming. Prer., BUS. 602 and 6U. MGSC. 602 3. Stochastic Models. P robabili t y t h eory, queui n g theory, inventory t h eory , Markov decision processes, simula tio n , decision analysis. Prer., B US. 60!2 and 612 . MGSC. 675-3. Seminar : Management Science. Application of o p erations research methods to problems of b u siness and i nd ustry , with emphasis on t h e functional fiel ds of marketing, financial management, and produ ction. Prer., MGSC. 601 and 60 2 or consent of instructor . One of the prerequisite courses may be taken as a corequisite. MARKETING Adviser: H . Mic h ael Hayes Office : 1475 L awrence S t., Third Floo r lelephon e: 6 23 -4436 Faculty: Professors : Gor d o n G. Barnewall, H. Michael Hayes A ssociat e Professors : Rex 0 . B ennett, Lawrence F. Cunningham A s si stant Prof e ss o rs: Nancy L. Frontczak, S teven W. Hartley Undergraduate Marketing is con cerned w i th difFcting t h e activities of t h e organization toward the satisfaction of customer

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120 1 College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration wants and needs. This involves understanding custom ers, identifying those wants and needs which the organ ization can best serve, guiding the development of spe cific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer's order, and, finally, monitoring customer response in order to guide future activities. In most organizations, marketing is a major functional area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, mar keting research, physical distribution, product manage ment, market management, marketing information systems, and retail management. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in service businesses and not-for profit organizations. Required Courses Semester Hours (The following two courses) MK . 330. Market Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MK . 480. Marketing Strategies and Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 (Choose two of the following courses) MK. 310. Personal Selling ............................. 3 MK. 320 . Consumer Behavior ......................... 3 MK. 350. Principles of Advertis in g ............ ......... 3 MK. 450. Advertising Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MK. 460. Business Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MK. 4 70. Sales Force Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MK. 485. Physical Distribution Management ......... . . 3 MK. 490. International Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 In addition to the four requjred courses, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing adviser can assist the stu dent in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit the career objectives. COURSES Note: MK. 300 or BUS. 600 or an equivalent course in basic marketing is a prerequisite for all marketing courses except MK. 310. MK. 300-3. Principles of Marketing. Fall, Spring. Provides a marketing management approach to the consideration of product planning, pricing , promotion , and distribution of goods and services. Emphasizes the role of the consumer and the social responsibility of marketing . Prer. , ACCT. 200 and junior standing. MK. 310-3. Personal Selling. Fall , Spring. Principles and methods of personal selling , with attention to development and demonstration of effective sales pr ese ntation techniques. MK. 320-3. Consumer Behavior. Fall , Spring. Focuses on improving the student's understanding and ability to predict consumer behavior. Studies research techniques and contri butions from the behavioral sciences in the context of the marketer's efforts to satisfy customer wants and needs. Prer., MK. 300. MK. 330-3. Marketing Research. Fall , Spring. Provides prac tical experience in research methodologies, planning the investigation, designing the questionnaire, selecting the sam ple, interpreting results, and making a report. lechniques focus on product analysis, motivation research, cost analysis, and advertising effectiveness. Students will incur project expenses. Prer., M.K. 300 . MK. 340-3. Marketing Institutions and Retailing. Fall. A study of the macroeconomic foundations of marketing inter mediaries, middlemen, and institutional alignments. Empha sis placed on development and change of institutional structures and functions and roles played by participants in moving goods to ultimate consumer, focusing on retailing functions and strategies. Prer., MK. 300. MK. 3S0-3. Principles of Advertising . Fall, Spring. Analyzes principles and practices in advertising from a managerial viewpoint. Considers the reasons to advertise, product and market analysis as the planning phase of the advertising pro gram , media selection, creation and production of advertise ments, copy testing , and development of advertising budgets . Prer., MK. 300. MK. 46U-3. Business Marketing. Considers the problems of marketing goods and services to organizations buying for their own use or for incorporation in an end product. Focuses heavily on organizational buying behavior and analysis of demand for goods and services in both profit and not-for profit organizations . Emphasizes development of marketing programs in the context of organizational demand for goods and services. Prer., MK. 300 MK. 470-3. Sales Force Management. Spring. Focuses on issues in managing the field sales force. Deals with organizing the field sales force , sales analysis, forecasting, budgeting , and operat in g with particular emphasis on recruiting, selection, training , compensation, supervision, and motivation. Prer., MK. 300. MK. 480-3. Marketing Strategies and Policies. Fall , Spring. Focuses on the process of formulating and implementing mar keting channels and product analysis. A case approach is utilized to deve lop the student's analytical ability to integrate all major areas of marketing. Prer. , MK. 300 and six additional hours in marketing. MK. 485-3. Physical Distribution Management. Investigation and analysis of logistics of distribution systems for firms engaged in manufacturing and marketing. Component parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting alternatives which will attain distribution goals of the firm . Prer., MK. 300. Upper Division/Graduate Level MK. 450/550-31. Advertising Management. Spring. Studies advertising problems from a management point of view. Con siders issues of stimulating primary and selective demand, media selection, developing the advertising program or cam paign , establishing the advertising budget, evaluating results , and managing agency relations. Prer. , for 400 level, MK. 350; prer. , for 500 level, BUS. 600 or equivalent. MK. 490/590-31. International Marketing. Fall. Studies man agerial marketing policies and practices of firms marketing their products in foreign countries. Analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies ; and practices in international marketing. Relates marketing activities to market structure and environment. Pr e r., for 400 level, MK. 300 ; prer. , for 500 level, BUS. 600 or equivalent. 1Stud e nt s enrolled atlhe 500 l e v e l m ay ex pect a dditional work and ev alu a tion commensurate with graduate standa rd s .

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600 level MK. 601-3. Mar eting Strategy, Evaluation , and Develop ment. Fall , Spri g. Focuses on marketing strategy and mar keting planning . Addresses the formulation and implementa tion of marketiqg plans within the context of the overall strategies and 9 bjectives of both profit and not for-profit organizations. THere is heavy emphasis on group projects and presentations. Prbr . , BUS. 600. MK. 603-3. Sale Force Management. Spring . Focuses on issues in managing the field sales force. Deals with organizing the field sales for e , sales analysis , forecasting, budgeting and operating, with , articular emphasis on recrujting , selection, training, compe sation, supervision, and motivation. Prer. , BUS. 600. MK. 605-3 . Marl
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122 I College o f Busine s s a n d Admini stratio n and Graduate S c hool o f Business Administratio n control. Organizations studied inclu de manufacturing, serv ice, and public sec tor. Prer. , for 4 00 l evel, 0 M . 30 0; preL, for 500 level, BUS. 612. 0 M. 444/544-31. Quality and Productivity . Stud y of the vari ous techniques to measure quality and produc tivit y in organi zations and the practical ma nagement issues related to implementing quality and productivity systems. Topics include statistica l quality control, total factor productivity, quality circles, total quality control, work desig n and measure ment, and quality and productivity management systems. Prer. , for 400 level, 0 M. 300 , MGT. 330; prer . , for 500 level, BUS. 612, MGT. 604. 0 M. 447 / 547-31. Strategic Analysis i n Operations Manage ment. Study of the analysis and formulation of operations management strategy and policy. Emphasis will be on the ro l e of the operations function in the strategic processes of the organization. Decision making will be stressed through the use of case studies and the analysis of actual business situa tions . Prer. , for 400 l evel, 0 M . 440 a n d 444; prer . , for 500 level, 0 M . 540 and 544. 0 M. 460/ 560-31. Purchasing, Materials Management, and Negotiation. Study of the purchas in g function in manufactur ing, service, and public organizations. Topics include source selection , make-b u y analysis, material quality standards and specifications , val u e analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects . Prer. , for 400 level, 0 M . 300; prer . , for 500 level, BUS. 612. 600 Level 0 M. 695 variable credit. Topics in Operations Management . A number of diffe rent current topics in ope rati ons manage ment will be discussed in this course. Consult the Schedule of Classes or contact the area coordi n ator for furt h er information . QUANTITATIVE METHODS COURSES Q M . 201-3. Business Statistics. Statistical applications in business. Includes descriptive statistics , time series analysis , index numbers , probability and sampling distr i butions , sta tistical inference, simple regress i on, and decision analysis without sampling. Pr er., MATH. 107 and 108 and IS. 200. Stu dents are encouraged t o take Q M . 201 in the semester follow ing completion of I S. 200. Q M. 300-3 . 1ntermediate Statistics. Intermed i ate treatment of regression and forecasting mode l s in business and research , statistical quality control in manufacturing, sampling and analysis of variance , parametric and non parame tri c statistical inferences , decision analysis with sampling . Prer., Q M. 201. Q M. 620-3. Multivariate Analysis. lbpics in multivariate data analysis of particular interest to those engaged in business research . Includes techniques such as multivariate discrimi nate analysis, factor analysis , and multiple regression, and the use of standard multivariate statistical packages such as the SPSS package. Prer., BUS. 602. REAL ESTATE Telephone: 623-4436 Real estate caree r s require knowledge of real estate investment, urban land economics, real estate law, ap praising, finance, taxes, management, sales, and accounting. Real estate is one segment of the economy in which it is st ill possible for p ersons to b e their own bos s whet h er as a broker, apprai ser, developer, syndicato r or property manager. RES. 300 (Princip l es of Real Estate Practice) is a prerequisite for the area. Required Courses Semester Hours R ES. 430. Residential and Income Property Appraising .. 3 R ES. 454. Real Estate Financing ...................... 3 RES. 473 . Legal Aspects of Real Estate .. ....... ........ 3 R ES. 401. Real Estate Development or R ES. 433. Real Estate Investments .... ............. .. .. 3 It is strong l y r ecommended that any student planning to sit for the Colorado broker's examinat ion take al l six of the real estate courses. Additional preparatory courses for a real es t ate career are: Suggested Cour ses Semester Hours ACCT. 441. Income Thx Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 INS . 484. Princip l es of Insurance .. ... ... .............. 3 FIN. 455. Financial Markets and Institutio n s ............ 3 FIN . 433. Investment and Portfolio Management ... ..... 3 MK. 310. Salesmanship ................. .............. 3 MK. 320. Consumer Behavior ......................... 3 MK. 470. Sales Management ............. ............. 3 COURSES R ES. 300-3. Principles of Real Estate Practice. Fall, Spring. Act i vities in the current field of real estate practice . Prer., junior standing. Upper Division/ Graduate Level RES. 401/501-31. Real Estate Development. Fall. Methods of analyzing real estate investment opportunities are studied. These methods include urban economic, market , and location analyses . Loca l government controls are studied from the deve loper' s viewpoint. Managerial methods of controlling deve l opment also are studied. Prer., for 400 l evel, R ES. 300; prer., for 500 l evel, R ES. 300 . RES. 430 / 530-31. Residential and Income Property Apprais ing. Spring. Principles and techniques of estimating the value of l and , residences, and inco m e property are studi ed. Princi p l es and techniq u es are applied by a field problem in apprais ing. Prer. , for 400 level , R ES. 300 ; prer . , for 500 level , R ES. 300. R ES. 433/ 533-31. Real Estate Investments . Spring. Em phasizes problems and methodology for making the real estate investment decis i on . Includes real estate versus other invest ments; real estate user and investor requirements, decision models; local , state, and federa l regulations; tax factors; and syndication . Prer., for 400 l eve l , R ES. 300 and FIN. 305 or c onsent of ins tru ctor; prer., for 500 level, R ES. 300 and BUS. 618. R ES. 454/ 554-31. Real Estate Finance . Fall . Functions and practices of various real estate financing institutions. Embraces mortgage lending, servicing, and mortgage bank ing relative to all types of uses of real estate. Prer., for 400 l evel , R ES. 300 and FIN. 305 ; prer., for 500 l evel, R ES. 300 and BUS. 618. 1Students enrolled at the 500 l eve l ma y e x pect additio nal work and evalu ation commensurate with gradu ate s t andar ds.

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R ES. 473 /573-31 Legal Aspect s of R eal Estate Transactions. Fall. B usiness ;;egal aspects. Estates in land, purchase and sales contracts, c ' nveyances, mortgage and trust deed transac tions, property t es, landlord and tenant , wills and inheri tance. Prer., for 4! level, B L. 300 andRES. 300; prer., for 500 level, BUS. 608 d R ES. 300. TRANSPOR JION A ND DISTRIBUTIO N MANAGEMENT Adviser: Lawr\ nee E Cunningham "''eleph one: 62B-4436 The curric .. llum in transportation management includes the rdle of transportation in society and the problems of tr#,fic management within specific indus tries as well as management of firms in the transpor tat i on industrY! such as airlines, trucking firms, rail roads, and urban transit firms. International transporta tion managem nt problems and policies are analyzed. One of the r ecommended elective courses ma y be substituted wift consent of the adviser for one of the required cours s if there is a schedule conflict, if the course is not available, or if a student demonstrates a career need for such a course. Required Cours Semester Hours (Any four of the ollowing six courses) TRMG . 450. Operation and Management . . 3 i.n. . . . . . . . . . 3 TRMG. 456. Air ansportation ........................ 3 TRMG. 457. Urban nansportation ..................... 3 TRMG. 458 . Intdrnational nansportation ............... 3 MK . 485. Physichl Distribution Management ........... 3 MGT. 434. Labo and Employee R e lation s .............. 3 .......... 3 0 M . 460. Purchksing, Materials Management and Negotiati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MK. 490. Intern tional Marketing .. ................... 3 GEOG. 461. Urban Geography: Economic ........ ....... 3 GEOG. 463. narisportation Geography ................. 3 COURSES TRMG. 4S2-3. Pr b lem s i n Surface Transportation Manage men t. Spring . ffi l alysis of surface modes with emphasis on the motor carrie industry. lbpics include carrier operations, regulatory struct e, pricing , market structure , design of serv ices, routes and t rminals, equipment, and private fleets. Case analyses and fiej studies will be used to develop decisi on making skills. P er., TRMG. 450 or consent of the instructor. TRMG. 456-3. Ai Transportation. Spring . Particular reference to operating and methods , passenger and cargo rates , air routes, schedules safety, reg ulation, and airport management. Prer., senior stan ing. TRMG. 4 57-3. Urfan T ra nsportation. Fall. Analysis of the two aspects of urban ransportation-freight and people. Issues in policy, modes governmental actions and structure, investIransportation and Distribution Management I 123 ment and cos l s, and effect upon urban environment. Prer., senior standi"!? . TRMG. 458-3. 1 1nternational Transportation . Fall. Analysis of international lfansportation (primarily sea and air) in world economy. Detailed study of cargo documentation and freight rate patterns. Included are liability patterns, logistics, econom ics, and national policies of transportation. Prer., senior standing . Upper Division/Graduate Level TRMG. 450 /550-31. Transportation Operation and Manage ment. Fall, Spring. Economics of transportation service and rates. History and patterns of regulation. Explanation of vari ous forms in common use in freight and passenger transporta tion. Introduction to tariffs and their use. Service and management problems of industrial traffic managers. Prer., for 400 level, ECON. 201 and 202 ofinstru<;:tor; prer., for 500 l evel, ECON. 201 and 202 or ECON . 300 or BUS. 616. 600 Level TRMG. 650-3. Seminar: Issues in Transportation Policy and Management. Spring . Public policy issues affecting the trans port sector including exarrunatio n of regulation and public promotion of in relation to efficient allocation of national resources , and interests of consumers, investors, and employees. Management issues include decision making in a deregulated environment, collective bargaining, facilities location, financial planning , and problems / opportunities of intermodal transportation services. Prer. , TRMG . 550 . I Students enrolted at th e 500 level may expect additiona l work and evaluati o n commensurate with g raduate

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Housed in the School of Education, the national You, Me and Iechnology project tests high school students after they have seen its video series. "The melting pot is a myth. 1bday s teachers must be prepared to meet the challenges of a linguistically and culturally diverse society. " -Mark A. Clark Associate Professor, Language and Culture A CU-Denver intern (left) in the infant intervention program at United Cerebral Palsy Center works with a mother and her son.

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Dean: William . Grady Assistant Duane K. 'Itoxel School Office: U50 14th St., Second Floor 'Ielephone: 55 -2 717 Dean's Advisory Council Paul Albright, Director of Communications, WICIIE Dr. Pat Callan , President, Education Commission of the States Dr. Roscoe Da idson, Superintendent, Englewood School Distri # 1 Dr. Gerry Diffo d, Executive Director, C.A.S.E. Ed Gamer , Me j ber, Board of Education, Denver Public Schools Jack Hale, Execptive Director, BOCES Dennis Jones, Ifresident, NCHEMS Dr. Richard Koeppe, Superintendent , Cherry Creek i innenbrink , Executive Director, Adult Learning So ce Russell Loftho se, Holly Ridge Center The Hon. AI M iklejohn, Colorado State Senate Rachel Noel, Chair, African American Studies, MSC, and FoFer Member , CU Board of Regents Dr. John Pepe , Superintendent, Jefferson County Schools Bea Romer William G. Ros , Sweeney and Ross Dr. James Sctan, Superintendent, Denver Public Schools Steven Seay, President, International Bank of Englewood Ken 'Ibnning, neral Manager, KUSA CH 9 J. Ben 'Itujill , President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Richard Walke Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Public Servic Company INFORMATI N ABOUT THE SCHOOL The primary oal of graduate programs in the School of CU-Denver is to produce the best qualified and ost effective personnel who can serve with distinctio the nation's schools, businesses, gov ernmental agen ies, and industries. Qualification J and effectiveness require appropriate knowledge, and attitudes to fulfill the goals of the instructional pr?cess. Graduates should be knowledge able in their chosen subject matter disdplines and pos sess accurate current information on the psychology of learning , as Well as various theories of learning. Necessary skills include teaching methodologies and the ability to function effectively within an organiza tional system which includes students, parents, fellow teachers , and administrators. Appropriate attitudes include acceptance of learners from a wide spectrum of ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, as well as those whose physical and mental abilities may vary across a broad range. Quality graduate education includes enthusiasm for learning and the maintenance of high standards of excel lence in one's chosen field. Graduate educators should be capable of conducting research to answer important educational questions. They also should possess valu able human qualities such as honesty and integrity, as well as the genuine desire to be service to their stu dents, their community, and mankind as a whole. The School of Education at the University of Colorado at Denver is committed to finding the best candidates and designing experiences that will produce individuals who are committed to quality in the teaching-learning process at all [evels. The University of Colorado at Denver is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The 'Ieacher Education Program is fully accredited by the Colorado State Board of Educa tion and the National Council for the Accreditation of 'Ieacher Education. The 'leacher Certification Program is a graduate level program designed to prepare elementary and secondary teachers for urban school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teaching experi ences, and conununity field experiences. 'Ieacher Cer tification Programs are available at CU-Denver in: Elementary Education (Kindergarten-6th grade) Secondary Education (7th-12th grade) (English, Ger man, French, Spanish, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies) Bilingual Education Endorsement English as a Second Language Endorsement CU-Denver offers a certification program for students with a baccalaureate degree and for seniors earning degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Sdences. All certification course work is at the graduate level. Much of the work is accepted toward a master's degree in education. ADMISSION A prospective master's candidate should request application forms from the dean's office, School of Edu cation, UniveJ1Sity of Colorado at Denver. The completed

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126 I S c hool o f Educatio n form should be returned to the Dean, School of Educa tion, CUDenver, together with a $30 application fee. The fee should be in the form of a check or money order payable to the University of Colorado. 1Wo copies of official transcripts of all previous college and university study should be ordered by the applicant to be sent to the dean. Four recommendations on the forms provided, or by letter, should be furnished. It is preferred that at least two of these should be from college or university pro fessors who can write with assurance about the appli cant's academic and professional achievement promise. One or two recommendations from supervisors or employers are acceptable with reference to an applicant's ability and contribution to the enterprise with which he / she was or is associated. Application papers and all supporting documents (including GRE scores or MAT scores, see below) must be in the dean's office on March l for summer , May l for fall, and October l for spring admission. Applicants should request the Educational 'Jesting Service to send their scores on the aptitude test (verbal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or scores from the Miller's Analogy 'lest, to the dean's office. Han applicant has not taken the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller's Analogy 'lest, he / she should arrange to do so. The GRE or MAT is admin istered at many centers throughout the country. Informa tion about the GRE may be obtained from The Graduate School office, the Student Academic Services office at CU-Denver, the Educational 'Jesting Service, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or the graduate office of a university in the applicant's area. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 1Wo Master of Arts degree plans are available, each comprising one academic year or more of graduate work beyond the bachelor's degree. The minimum residence requirement for any master's degree is one academic year or the equivalent, and it may be satisfied by two semesters in residence, or three full summer sessions, or any combination equal to two semesters. l. M.A. -Plan I (With Thesis) . The program consists of 36 semester hours or more, including 4 semester hours for the master's thesis. While the inclusion of a minor field is not required by The Graduate School, a student and adviser may agree on a minor, in which 4 to 8 semester hours can be applied toward degree requirements. The M.A. thesis is written in accordance with the specifications set by The Graduate School and under the supervision of the student's adviser. When a complete first draft is ready for final typing, the thesis must be read by a second reader appointed by the dean's office. H the second reader approves the thesis, both the reader and the adviser will sign it when it is presented for filing with The Graduate School. If the reader does not approve, the reader and the student's adviser will confer and suggest appropriate changes. 1\vo copies are required by The Graduate School. 2. M.A. -Plan II (Without Thesis). The Plan II pro gram includes 36 or more semester hours of graduate credit, and may include 4 to 10 hours for a minor. The minor is highly recommended in some fields of study. Transfer Credit Credit earned before formal admission is transfer credit. Nine transfer hours may be counted toward the M.A. degree. Education as a Minor Field ln M.A . programs for majors outside the School of Education, students may include education as a minor if both their major department and the dean's office of the School of Education approve. For master's degrees, a minor in education consists of at least 6 semester hours of study in related courses. Not more than 2 semester hours may be transferred from another institution. Students who propose to minor in education must have had sufficient undergraduate work in education to prepare them for graduate study in the field. Appraisal of undergraduate preparation will be made by the dean's office and the coordinator of the program area in which the proposed minor courses will be taken. Degrees and Areas of Specialization The following programs, offered by the School of Edu cation, cover a wide range of professional and academic interests. M.A. Administration, curriculum, and supervision Counseling and personnel services (elementary, secondary, agency settings, and col lege student personnel services) Early childhood education Early childhood education/special education (infant specialization track) Educational psychology (school psychology certification) Elementary education (bilingual education, English as a Second Lan guage, language and culture) Foundations Instructional technology (corporate instructional development and training, instructional computing specialist, instruc tional technologist, library media specialist) Reading and writing Secondary education (bilingual education, English as a Second Lan guage, English education, language and culture,

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education, science education, social studies edu tion, technology in education) Special educa 'on (education ly handicapped) Ed.S. curriculum, and supervision Ph.D Administratio , curriculum, and supervision Instructional Outlines of eafb graduate program are listed in the following pages of the School of Education section. Since many of the graduate degree plans are flexible and can be designed ar* d individual student needs, it is highly desirable at the prospective candidate discuss tentative progr s of studies with appropriate faculty members prior t submitting applications. Programs o Study TEACHER CE iTIFICATION PROGRAMS Elementary E , ucation The faculty of he School of Education at CU-Denver advocates that appropriate education for a pro fessional educato is based upon the liberal arts tradi tion. They also b eve that preparation for the teacher of young children ust be conceptualized differently from the preparation fdr the subject specialist in the secondary school. The teacHer in the elementary school is truly a generalist and mbst be aware of the basic structure of a wide variety of disciplines. Students who elementary certification and do not have a baccalaur ate degree should obtain a B.A. from the College of Arts and Sciences (CLAS) in a major of their c oice. Some certification courses are accepted by CLA . These courses may be taken in the senior year. Specffic information can be obtained from the advisers in CLAS. Program Coordinator: William A. Juraschek Program Direct1 r: Royce Forsyth Office: 1250 l4t St., Second Floor 'Ielephone: 556-717 REQUIREMENTS 1 General Education 1. B.A. or B.S. egree from an accredited institution of higher education. 2. Course war must include arts and humanities, science, mathem ics, social science, health and physical education. Ieacher Certification I 12 7 If students not have a bachelor's degree from an accredited insljitution, they must be enrolled in a pro gram leading to a B.A. degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Professional Sequence MATH . 304. Mathematics for Elementary 'Ieachers II. TED. 575 . Field Experience: Exploring Education1 FNDS . 500. 'leaching as a Profession EPSY. 500 . Psychological Foundations of Education SPED . 500. Education of Exceptional Children or SPED 501. Mainstreaming the Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom ELED. 517. Community and Interpersonal Relations ELED. 521. Models of 'leaching ELED. 513. Microteaching2 ELED. 518 . Instructional'Iechnology ELED. 514. Elementary Curriculum (Language Arts, Child ren's Literature) RDG. 500. Effective Reading and Writing Instruction: Basal Reader Programs and Thematic Units. ELED. 515. Elementary Curriculum (Science , Mathematics , Social Studies) ELED. 516. Expressive Arts (Art, Music, Health, P.E.) TED. 570. Student 'leaching in the Elementary School Secondary Education Students preparing for certification in the secondary school should acquire a broad liberal arts background and specialize in the discipline area in which they plan to be endorsed. This specialization must meet the Col lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements for a major and may include additional spec ified by state certification standards. Advisers in the College and in the School of Education should be con sulted on a regular basic. Some certification courses, taken during the senior year, are accepted by CLAS toward the baccalaureate degree. Consult CLAS advisers for specific information. (For bilingual education and English as a Second Language requirements, see Lan guage and Culture.) REQUIREMENTS1 1. B.A. or B.S. from accredi ted institution of higher education . 2. A major in the discipline of endorsement. 3. Additional courses as prescribed by state certifica tion standards. If students not have a bachelor's degree from an accredited they must be enrolled in a pro gram leading to a B.A. degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 1Subject to change to meet modifications in State standard s . 2Includes extensive work in metropolitan schools .

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128 I School of Education Professional Sequence TED. 575. Field Experience: Exploring Education' FNDS. 500. 'leaching as a Profession EPSY. 500. Psychological Foundations of Education SPED. 500. Education of Exceptional Children or SPED. 501. Mainstreaming the Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom SECE. 517. Community and Interpersonal Relations SECE. 521. Models of 'leaching SECE. 513. Microteaching2 SECE. 518. Instructional'Iechnology A content -area methods course TED. 571. Student 'leaching in Secondary Schools ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES A check list that outlines the steps necessary for admission into the 'Ieacher Certification Program is available in the Education office. Students must obtain and follow the procedures as listed. For further informa tion contact the School of Education, 556-2717. COURSES These courses may not be applied toward a graduate degree. TED. 570-8. Student Teaching-Elementary School. Kinder garten and grades one through six. Student teacher attends an elementary school in Denver metropolitan area. TED. 571-8. Student Teaching-Secondary School. Student teacher attends a senior or junior high school in Denver metro politan area. TED. 575-2. Field Experience: Exploring Education. 'leaching experience in small groups in a school setting. Observations in various school settings. ADMINISTRATION, CURRICULUM, AND SUPERVISION Program Coordinator: Russell W. Meyers Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Jelephone: 556-2717 Faculty: Professor: Bob L. Thylor Associate Professors: W. Michael Martin, Russell W. Meyers Assistant Professors: Jo Roberts, Lance V. Wright Emeritus: Myrle Hemenway, Robert C. McKean, Hazlett H. Wubben The major responsibility of the administration, curric ulum, and supervision (ACS) program faculty is to pre pare administrators for Colorado public schools. In addition, the ACS programs may help individuals pre pare for other education related administrative and aca demic positions. Currently, the 1YJ>e D Administrator Certificate is required for people seeking building-level and district-level administrative positions. The School of Education offers three degree programs in ACS in addition to, or as a part of, the 1YPe D certifica tion program: l. M.A. degree-designed for those with no graduate degree who seek administrator certification. 2. Ed.S. degree-available only to those who hold an M.A. but who now seek administrator certification. 3. Ph.D. degree-available to those holding a graduate degree and who wish to pursue further graduate study in educational leadership or instructional tech nology. This is not a certification program degree, although limited hours of such program courses may be included in the doctoral degree plan. TypeD Administrator Certification Course Requirements The following courses, or equivalents, must be com pleted as a part of the certification process: FOUNDATIONS COURSES EPSY. 502. Advanced Psychological Foundations: Theory and Research in Education FNDS. 541. History and Philosophy of Modem Education GENERAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES EDUC. 510. Curriculum and Program Development EDUC. 585. Governance and Administration of Education EDUC. 586. School Law EDUC. 587. Individual and Group Behavior in Organizations ADMINISTRATIVE SKILLS AREAS EDUC. 505. Computer Applications to Educational Management EDUC. 591. Educational Supervision EDUC. 588. School Business Management EDUC. 642. Personnel Management EDUC. 643. School and Community Relations EDUC. 589 Seminar in Administration (or other seminar) BUILDING LEVEL SPECIALIZATION Senior High School EDUC. 509. Curriculum of the Senior High School EDUC. 637. Administration and Supervision of the Senior High School EDUC. 980. Internship Middle Level School EDUC. 612. Curriculum of the Middle Level School EDUC. 650. Administration and Supervision of the Middle Level School EDUC. 980. Internship Elementary School EDUC. 507. Curriculum of the Elementary School 1Includes extensive work in metropolitan schools. 2Includes extensive field work in metropolitan schools .

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EDUC. 635. E lerDfntar y Pr i n cipals hip In t ensive E D UC. 636. Adrnf n is t r a tion and Su p ervision of the E l emen tary Sch ool . 1 E D UC. 980. Inte r s hi p In addition t holdin g or satisfying the req u irements o f a building leve l certi ficate, the follow i ng are minimum add i t onal r e q uire m e nt s for recommen d ation f or super in t e n d nt e n d or sement : E D UC. 6 4 0 . Scho I Fi n ance E D UC. 641. Educ t io na! Facilities P l anning E D UC. 980. Inte rthip Doctoral De ree Program Requirements Ph.D. p rogr a s t end to b e h ig hl y individua li zed, d e v e loped by t e s tud e n t and t h e student's a d viser. Howev e r , cert ge ne ral gui d eli n es do exist. research methodo l ogy and statistics c our ses . 2 . F iv e s p ec c all y -do ctoral cour ses and!or seminars in a dmini stratio , c urri culum, and s u pervision. 3. Thirty ( 30 ) di sse r tation h ours are require d . Program lnf rmation 1eres ted in any of the ACS programs are enc our aged to n tact program area faculty to d iscuss th e s e pro grams C onfe r ences prior to applicatio n are enc ouraged and welc o med. Following admission, students ar e expeqted to m aintain frequent conferences wi th assigned advise rs to plan and develop programs of s tudi es. COURSES puter Applications to Educational Man agement. Microc , mpu ter app l ications to edu c ational man age m e nt. Stude ts shoul d be familiar with basic micro co mm an d s and s tern operation . EDUC. 507-3. Ele entary School Curriculum. An integrating co ur se d ealing wi h the history, deve l opment , problems , and p r actices o f the r icul um of the eleme n tary school. EDUC. 5093 . Ju ior and Senior High School Curriculum. Pr inci pl e s , trends, prob lem s, and practices in the curriculum of t h e j uni or and nior hi gh school. EDUC. 510-3. Curri u lum/Program Development. Fundamen tals o f curr iculum and program deve l opment , including the ore t ical f oundatio s of U.S. curriculum, practical criteria to g uid e d ecis i o nm i ng, specific models and processes for cur riculum/program deve lopment and appraisal, emerging issues, pr o bl ems d tre n ds. EDUC. 585-3. and Administrat ion of Education. Deve l opment of struCTures and of administration as a field of study education. In11uence of governance and views of administ atio n on edu cational organizations' goals , functio n s, and pe sonnet. Required for Master s and l}rpe D Certification stud nt s . Administratio n , Curriculum, and Supervision I 129 EDUC. 586-3. chool Law. Recent developments including administrative I mplications of significant court decisions per taining to scho 9 I operations. For superintendents, principals, school board embers, prospective administrators, and teachers. EDUC. 587-3. Group Devel opment . Organizational theory and practice for school l eadership personnel with emphasis on gro u p developme nt, group prob lem identification and solu tions, and confl,ict management skills and processes. EDUC. 588-3. School Business Manage m ent . Emphasizes school-site level management. Incl u des instruction in plan ning , budgeting, evaluation , and management. EDUC. 5892 Seminar: School Admi nistration . Knowledge and insight into organizational be h avior using case studies . EDUC. 591-3. Educational Supervi s i on. Stimulation and guid ing the in-service professional growth of teache r s . Evaluation of teacher activities in relation to pupil growt h . S u pervisory procedures and techniques . EDUC. 593-1-4 . Administ r ation Curriculum and Supervision. EDUC. 6123 . Curriculum of Middle L evel School. D evelop ment of knowledge, skills , and attitudes for youth enrolled in middle level soh ool. Focus is on student characteristics -rel at i onship to curriculum , guidance , instruCTion and student activit i es. EDUC. 614-2. Student Activi t ies Curriculum. Princip l es , prob lems, and procedures for improvement of extraclass activities, student c ouncils, home rooms in the secondary school, etc. EDUC. 615-3. Curricular Theories. Intensive study of current theories of public school curriculum related to trends in aCTual practices in elementary and seco n dary schools. EDUC. 616-3. Processes and Materials in Curr i culum Appraisal. Designed to provide curriculum workers with skills in the process of assessment of curriculum programs and skill in the appra i sal of curriculum materials. Incl u des work in the theory of evaluation , the methodology of evaluation , and practicum in evaluation of curricula . Prer. , one course in curriculum . EDUC. 6342 . Problems and Trends in Education. A broad overview of current problems in schools and schoo l systems and consideration of praCTices and poli G ies in U.S. schools for solution of such problems . Evaluates ry ocedures for solving ed u cational prob l e m s. EDUC. 6352 . Elementary Principalshlp I ntensive. Offered sununers only. TWo-week in depth examination of the ele mentary schoo l principalship. Required for l}rpe D admin istrative c ertification, elementary school Consent of instructor required. EDUC. 636-3. Administrat ion and Supervision of the Elemen t ary School. For administrators and teachers . Purposes , practices, and trends in administration and educational leadership. EDUC. 637-3. Administration of Supervi s ion o f Senior High School. Current administrative principles and practices essen tial to effective o r gan i zation and management, with emphasis on the educational leadership of t h e prlfcipal . EDUC. 6382 . Theory of Educational Admi n i stration. Study of organizational mode l s, theories, and communica t ion patterns; leadership rol es and behavior; and O{ganizational change . Attention to rec b nt research in administrative theory. EDUC. 640-3. School Finance. For adyanced graduate stu dents . Problems of educational finance; theory, practice, and contro l ; equalization funds , federal-stat e -local rel ations in finance, budgeting, salary schedules , retirement, and school bonds. EDUC. 641-3. Educational Facilities Planning. Alternate years. Determination of school plant needs; relation of ed u cational and architeCTural services ; criteria of schoo l p l ants ,

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130 I School of Education site development, building operation and management; financial problems. EDUC. 642-3. Personnel Management. Management of human resources in educational organizations. Deals with shared roles between site and central administration. Major topics include selection, staffing, evaluation, development, and collective bargaining in education. EDUC. 643-3. School-Community Relations. Examines inter actions of schools and their comm unities; citizen role / involve ment in governance of education, internal and external communication concepts and practices , politics of education, and community power and pressure groups. EDUC. 656-3. Administration and Supervision of the Junior High School/Middle School. Purposes, practices, and trends in administration of the middle level school. Current admin istrative principles and practices essential to effective organi zation and management. Emp hasis is on leadership of the principal of the middle level school. EDUC. 663-2. Seminar: Junior and Senior High School Educa tion. For advanced students. Problems, theories, and trends in secondary education. Includes field work and individual projects. EDUC. 680-3. Administration, Curriculum and Supervision. A required seminar in educational research for all Ed.D. and Ph.D . students in curriculum, administration, and supervi sion. The seminar focuses on doctoral research study in these areas of educational research. EDUC. 681-3. Advanced Seminar: School law. An in-depth examination of the American legal process as it pertains to administration, planning, and deliver y of educational pro grams. Involves self-selected research followed by individual or group presentations. EDUC. 682-2. Doctoral Seminar: Curriculum. Advanced semi nar relating to theory and practice in curriculum building. Includes both elementary and secondary levels. EDUC. 684-2. Seminar: Educational Supervision. Students work on individual topics and report orally and in writing. EDUC. 68S-2. Seminar: Educational leadership. Seminar dealing with processes and patterns of educatio nal leadership in the schools. Various theories ofleadership are considered in relation to students' lead ers hip behavior s . May be taken more than one semester for credit with adviser's approval. EDUC. 700-4. Master's Thesis. EDUC. 750-1 to 4. Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision. EDUC. 755-1 to 4. Practicum in Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum. EDUC. 800-1 to 10. Doctor's Thesis. EDUC. 801-1 to 10. Doctor of Education Dissertation. EDUC. 980-1 to 6. Internship in Administration and Supervision. EDUC. 985-1 to 6. Internship in Curriculum . EDUC. 999-0. Candidate for Degree. Independent Study EDUC. 951-1 to 4. Administration, Curriculum and Supervi sion Master's. EDUC. 961-1 to 4. Independent Study in Administration, Cur riculum and Supervision Doctor's. INSTRUaiONAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM Program Coordinator: David H. Jonassen Office: U50 14th St. , Second Floor Telephone: 556-2717 Faculty: Professor: Minaruth Galey Associate Professor: Duane noxel Assistant Professor: Martin Jessmer Emeritus: Bettie R. Helser The Ph.D. track in instructional technology is designed for advanced graduate study in this field. The program is intended for students who are professionally committed to the field, as evidenced by previous profes sional experience in public or higher education, corpo rate training and development, or educational technology. The program will stress collegial and collab orative relationships with faculty in designing and car rying out research and development programs. Graduates will assume leadership roles in business, uni versities, or other agencies committed to the meaningful application of various technologies to instruction. Admission Requirements These criteria will be used to evaluate your applica tion. No single criterion is necessary or sufficient for admission. l. At least three years of successful, relevant profes sional experience (teaching or other). 2. Master's degree in a related field from an accredited institution with a grade-point average of 3.2 or higher. 3. Graduate Record Examination completed within the past five years (verbal + quantitative) with a com bined score of 1000 or higher. 4. Foreign students: Jest of English as a Foreign Lan guage score of 550. 5. Grade-point average of 2.9 in last 60 hours of the bachelor's degree. 6. Evidence of scholarly writing ability to be submit ted with the application (for example, master's thesis, project report, published article(s), or technical report). 7. Three letters of recommendation from individuals capable of evaluating your potential for graduate study. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Course Work 66 or more semester hours beyond the master's minimum 36-48 hours of course work 30 hours or more of dissertation credit Residency Enrollment in 8 or more semester hours for three consecutive semesters OR

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Enrollment i 24 semester horns within any 18-month period. Additional r sidency experiences will be defined for the individual by his/her committee. Examples include graduate / tea g assistantships and internships. Languag e Proposed ubstitutes for foreign language competence: l. Proficien in two or more computer languages OR 2. P roficien in research techniques , including multi variate statisti al techniques and advanced measure ment and eval l ation design. Preliminary .f!ualifying Examination. Thken after 8 -12 semester ' orns of cornse work: written paper plus oral exarninati n. C omprehens ve Examination. After 40 semester hours of cours work. D isse rtation Study and Oral Examination of Disser tatio n Study. Program of tudy GENERAL EDUC JION TECHNOLOGY CORE EPSY . 524-3. Co8nition and Instruction IT. 511-3. Instructional Design: Front End Analysis IT. 512.3. Instru ional Development: Strateg y Selection and Development IT. 513.3. Instruqional Message Design REM. 530-3. mqoduction to Measurement REM. 540-3 . In oduction to Evaluation of Programs and Persons REM. 510.3. Bas c Statistics REM. 610 3. Int rmediate Statistics IT. 692.3. Resear in Instructionallechnology INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRACK IT. 611-2. Manag ng Instructional Development IT. 612-2. Instru ional Development Consultation IT. 619-3 . Advan ed Seminar in Instructional Design/ Development IT. 795-2 to 6. In emship in Instructional Development/ 1taining PSY. 515-3. Semi ar in Organizational Psychology INSTRUCTIONAL OMPUTING TRACK IT. 561-3 . Interactive Computer-Based Instructional Program IT. 662-3 . Intelli ent Computer-Based Instruction IT. 661-3. Advan d Courseware Design Semin ar Competence in 3 computer languages Counseling and, Personnel Service I 131 HIGHER EDUCbiON TRACK PSY. 671-3. Qpantitative Methods II lWo or more from: EPSY. 502 Advanced Psychological Foundations: Theory and Research in Education EPSY. 512-3. Behavior Analysis EPSY. 511-3. Human Learning EPSY. 600-3. Proseminar in Educational Psychology IT. 691-3. Theoretical Bases for Instructionallechnology leaching assistant in two or more courses Refer to the Instructional lechnology section for IT course descriptions. The popular Stor'Ytelling Conference is held annually. COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICE Program Coordinator: Mark A. Clarke Office: 1250 !1.4th St., Second Floor Jelephone: 556-2717 Faculty: Associate Professors: Andrew Helwig, William A. Sease Assistant Professors: Lynette Allen, Walter L. Strandbrng CU-Denver offers an M.A. appropriate for school and college counseling, work in community agencies, and other areas of personnel service where professional counselors are employed. Candidates seek ing certificati
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132 I School of Education in the School of Education. Students should select from the following courses and fit them into the schedule as available. REM. 510-3. Data Analysis I (Required in the counseling program) CURR. 504-3. Multicultural Education EPSY 502 -3. Advanced Psychological Foundations of Educa tion (Theory-Research) or EPSY . 520-3. Social Psychology of Learning (Agency) FNDS. Any course at the 500 level, except specifically FNDS. 500 (for teachers) Since REM. 510 is required of counseling majors, and is also a prerequisite for REM. 530 which follows, stu dents should register for that course and later select two from the remaining three core areas above. Major Field Since major field courses are normally offered only once per year, and each is a prerequisite to the following courses in the sequence, it is important that these courses be scheduled first with other requirements fitted around them. Students who get out of sequence in the major field will find their programs delayed by a year . All major field courses are prefixed CPS., core and related courses with other prefixes may require consent of the program area designated by the prefix. Fall CPS. 501-3. Foundations (501 and 502 are offered together in a lecture-lab format and must be taken concurrently) #1 CPS. 502-3. Lab in Personal Appraisal REM. 510-3 . Data Analysis I Spring CPS. 533-3. Professional Seminar (pick up Prac ticurn Manual in the Book Center) #1 CPS. 510-3. Theory and Jechniques of Counseling CPS. 503-3. Pre-Practicurn Laboratory (this course may b y taken either Spring #1, Summer #1, or Fall #2, but must be completed prior to Field Practicum) REM. 530-3 . Introduction to Measurement Students may include a core or elect ive course if schedule permits. Summer CPS . 511-3 . Advanced Theory and Jechniques: Group Process #1 CPS. 503-3. Pre-Practicurn Laboratory (if not taken previously) Core or elective course Fall CPS. 540-3. Career Development #2 CPS. 542-3. Organizational Development in Coun seling Practice Spring #1 CPS. 503-3. Pre-Practicum Laboratory (if not taken previously) CPS. 570-6.1 Practicum (designate elementary, sec ondary, college, or agency) File application for graduation Register for Graduate Comprehensive Examination CPS. 570-6 . Practicum (practicurn placement is by advance application. It consists of a minimum of 300 supervised clock hours in an approved setting and includes a class meeting) Core requirement or elective COURSES Note: During the regular academic year the following courses are open to graduate degree students only and to those admitted for the purpose of pursuing professional counselor certification. Special service sections may be offered from time to time and are indicated as open. Non degree students may be admitted with permission. See the current Schedule of Classes. CPS. 501-3. Foundations of Guidance, Counseling, and Per sonnel Service. Overview of the field. History, philosophy, introduction to theory. Legal and ethical considerations, spe cial problems, and professional outlook. Role and function of counselors in schools and agency settings. 1b be taken con currently with CPS. 502. CPS. 502-3. Personal Appraisal. Personal appraisal taken con currently with CPS. 501, overview of the field. Emphasizes small group laboratory method and experiential learning designed to foster self exploration and interpersonal skill development relevant to personal and professional goals. Because of the experiential nature of the course the grading is undifferentiated with pass / fail orB as the expected maximum grade. CPS. 503-3. Pre-Practicum Laboratory. Supervised counsel ing practice in a college counseling center. Emphasis on coun seling techniques and therapeutic intervention strategies. Prer., CPS. 501, 502, or consent of instructor. CPS. 510-3. Theory and Techniques of Counseling. Com parative examination of counseling theories and approach strategies . Pre-practicurn experience in counseling and inter viewing techniques. Prer., CPS. 501, 502. CPS. 511-3. Advanced Theory and Techniques of Counseling: Group Process. Utilization of group process. Advanced counseling skill development. The counselor as consultant. Facili tation skills. Prer., CPS. 510. CPS. 512-3. The Student in Higher Education. Overview of college student personnel work. Special problems in college counseling. Group facilitation and values clarification skills. Consulting in higher education . CPS.' 51S-3. Marital and Family Counseling. Marital and fam ily conflicts and counseling intervention strategies. (Open.) CPS. 516-3. Marriage and Family II. Advanced intervention strategies with families. Prer., CPS. 515. CPS. 533-3. Professional Seminar in Counseling. An in-depth examination of special prob l ems and topics in the field with 'The Pra c ticum is offered either fall or spring of the second year.

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emphasis upon project investigation and report ing. Prer., CPS. 5 1 and 502. CPS. 540-3 . Caree Development. D evelopment of competen cies in career development counseling. Theories, information systems, decision;aking, awareness of self, and the world of educational and ork opportunities. Prer., CPS. 501, 502, or consent of instru or. CPS. 542-3. Organizational Development. Organizational development and J theory . The development and implementa tion of and human resource development programs in variour settings. Individual projects required for course compl tion. Prer . , CPS. 501, 502, or consent of instructor. CPS. 570-6. in Counseling. Supervised practice counseling in elerpentary and secondary schools, college stu dent personnel, ard agency setting. By advance application and arrangement . Application should be made during the preceding semest r. Obtain materials and instructions from the Book Center. er., all required CPS courses. Section sub titles indicate sch ol or community service placement. CPS. 580-3. Strat gies in Elementary Counseling. Role and function of the co selor at the elementary school level. Uti lization of group rocess in relation to guidance objectives . Child growth an development stages. Communication and consultation skill . CPS. 582-3. Stra*ies in Agency Counseling . Role and func tion of the couns lor in agency settings. Group work . Intervention s with agency clientele. Exploration of commumty reso ces. CPS. 584-3. Readipgs in Counseling and Personnel Services Development. on spedal problems in development and delivery of pesolel services. Directed readings and small group activities. CPS. 585-3. Cou seling Strategies. Individually directed investigation of tr nds and contemporary problems and issues in the field. the field practitioner and spedal needs of differential wo settings . (Open . ) CPS. 586-589-3. S ecial Topics in Counseling and Personnel Services. Specific opics vary from semester to semester. Inter vention strategies "th children; issues in violence-incest , battering, and sex equality in education; problems and issues depress on and learned helplessness; counseling and corrections; a ing, dying, and grief. (Open.) CPS. 678-3 to 6. A vanced Practicum in Counseling. CPS. 700-4. Mastl's Thesis. CPS. 701-2. Maste of Education Report. Independent St dy CPS. 950-1 to 4. f.dependent Study. Individually directed research activity o , special topics not covered by course offer ings. Degree stud nts only, with advance approval by major professor and dep trnent. EARLY CHILD OOD EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILD OOD SPECIAL EDUCATION Program Coor ator: Laura D. Goodwin Office: 1250 14t St., Second Floor 'Ielephone: 556-2717 Faculty: Profes or: William L. Goodwin Associate Profe sor: Anne H . Widerstrom Early Childhood Education I 133 The early education program is a graduate program to a master's degree or certification in early special education, or a master's degree in early childho
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134 I School of Education The early childhood/regular education program provides specialized training in: Language acquisition and development Reading and writing instruction Early childhood administration Infant Specialization Track Coordinator: Laura D. Goodwin Faculty: Associate Professors: Barbara A. Mowder, Anne H. Winderstrom Assistant Professor: Susan Sandall The program is designed to provide students with the background and skills necessary for working with handicapped or at-risk infants and their families. The specialization is available to students in the early child hood/special education certification and master's degree programs, and the school psychology certification and master's degree programs. It also is available to inter ested graduate students in related fields, such as nurs ing, occupational and physical therapy, and social work. The program is interdisciplinary in focus. University and community resources in communication disorders, counseling, nursing, occupational and physical therapy, pediatrics, school psychology, social work, and special education are utilized. Field work and site visits are planned in both medical and educational settings. The specialization consists of four courses and two practica: Medical aspects of developmental disabilities Assessment of handicapped and at-risk infants Intervention strategies for handicapped and at-risk infants Family dynamics Medical and educational practica Students in the early childhood/ special education master's degree program would take these courses by advisement as part of their program requirements of 3 7 semester hours of course work and 6 hours of practicum. Students in the school psychology certification would take these courses by advisement, primarily as their electives. The certification program in school psychology requires 60 semester hours of course work, including 8 hours of field work. COURSES ECE. 501-3. Curriculum and Program Development in Early Childhood Education. Principles of early childhood program development are reviewed in the areas of curriculum, staff development, and parent involvement. lbpics include physical space, environments, materials and methods from a develop mental perspective. Curriculum areas considered include lan guage, preacademics, motor, social-emotional, science, social studies, and creativity. ECE. 502-3. Approaches to Young Children's Learning. Review of approaches for facilitating the learning and development of young children. Examined are programs for children (infancy through age 8), including those developed under federal auspices, such as Home Start, Head Start, Follow Through, and First Chance programs funded by B.E.H. Approaches are considered in terms of (1) their differing views of intellectual, socia l , and physical development of young children; (2) their operation as program activities and procedures; and (3) their effects on children's learning. ECE. 503-3. Directing Programs for Young Children. Analysis of organizational factors and instructional events in the class room. Facilitation of teacher effectiveness through supervisory feedback and inservice development. Special attention is given to supervisor-teacher relationships, parent-school-com munity relationships, and processes for feedback. ECE. 504-3. Administrative Seminar: Selected Topics in Early Childhood Education. Emphasis on those topics required of administrators in E.C.E . programs in day-to-day operations (philosophy, finance, programming, management, com munity / parent relations, etc.). Special attention given to unique administrative concerns in programs for special cate gories of children such as toddlers, developmentally delayed children, etc. ECE. 506-3. Working with Parents and Families. Review of historical factors and research related to current trends in working with parents in the regular classroom and with par ents and families of exceptional children . The course presents content concerning family systems theory, various community services available to families, abused and neglected children, and an overview of successful programs that serve parents and families in the educational setting. ECE. 507-3. Cognitive/Emotional Development and Disor ders in Young Children. The primary focus of this course is the cognitive and social development of infants and young chil dren, and problems that may occur during the process. Equally emphasized are intervention approaches for pre school children with cognitive and social/emotional hand icaps. Implications for intervention from current research are considered. ECE. 508-3. Language Development and Disorders in Young Children. Overview of normal language development, lan guage components, and pertinent research relating to lan guage acquisition. Emphasis is placed on language problems commonly demonstrated by young exceptional children and intervention strategies. ECE. 509-3 . Neuromotor Development and Disorders. This course provides an overview of normal and abnormal motor and neurological development in the infant and yo ung child . Current treatment approaches for children with neuromotor disorders are examined, with emphasis on sensory integra tion and neurodevelopmental treatment. Also reviewed are sensory deficits: hearing and visual impairment . ECE. 514-3. Measurement and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education. This course provides classroom and field-based experience in basic measurement concepts and in the screen ing and assessment of young children's cognitive, affective, language and psychomotor capabilities and characteristics. naditional measurement techniques as well as nonreactive measures, human and video-observational methods are included. Evaluation of programs and persons in early child hood education settings is examined. ECE. 520-3. Screening and Assessment of Young Children. A field-based course providing experience in the administration and scoring of a sampling of the most widely used screening and assessment instruments designed for use in preschool classrooms. Students will have the opportunity to administer a variety of formal and informal tests including the Bayley and McCarthy Scales.

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ECE. 570-3. Educa ional and Observational Practicum in Early Childhood Includes planned experiences built around the clinic and E. C. E. classroom in operation . Students observe in Head Start, day care, and private preschool progr s. The practicum will require 30 to 40 clock hours of field pi cement experience with concurrent class room meetings. for observation in special education classes are rovided. ECE. 591-1 to 4. R adings in Early Childhood Education. ECE. 610-3. Medi al Aspect of Developmental Disabilities: Birth to Three. A eview of the major risk factors and develop mental disabiliti s encountered in young children birth through three ye s. Medical, educational, genetic, and envi ronmental factors e discussed. Special attention is given to recent innovatio s in identification and treatment of very young children. ECE. 611-3. lntervrntion Strategies for Handicapped and At Risk Infants . In3d pth study of intervention strategies , curric ula, and progr models for young children birth to three years. lbpics inc! de selection , implementation, and evalua tion of the differerh techniques. The course will have an inter discipli n ary focu J . ECE. 669-3. Semirlar in Research and Current Issues in Early Childhood Edudtion. Selected topics with emphasis on research findings !md current issues ofimportance to teachers , administrators, and researchers in early childhood and early childho d special education . ECE. 675-1 to 6. Practicum in Infancy. Field-based experiences in settings for h 1dicapped and at-risk infants, toddlers, and their families. ECE. 678-2 to 4. Practicum in Early Childhood Education. Fie ld-b ased expe iences in settings for young children (pre schoo l adrninistr tion, day-care center management, parent program director ip, etc.) that are closely linked to the stu dent's profession goals. Requires a minimum of llO, 165, or 220 clock hours der supervision (2,3, or 4 credit hours , respectively). ECE. 679-1 to 4 . P acticum in Early Childhood Special Educa tion. Fie ldbased xperiences in settings for young handicapped children inc! ding diagnostic clinics, Project Child Find , hospital and/or d ssroom. The practicum requires 300 clock hours under ECE. 700-4. Mast r's Thesis. Prer., REM. 510 and 520, plus 20 credits in E . C . E. , rogram. Independent St dy ECE. 950-1 to 4. Independent Study in Early Childhood Education. EDUCATION L PSYCHOLOGY Program Coor ator: Laura D. Goodwin Office: 1250 141 St., Second Floor Telephone: 55 -2717 Faculty: Profes or: William L. Goodwin Associate ssors: Laura D. Goodwin, Barbara A. Mowder, H. Widerstrom Assistant Prot: ssor: W. Grant Willis The M.A. pr gram in educational psychology pre pares students t facilitate the teaching/learning process. Thus, many stu ents pursue the degree to enhance their Educatio n a l Psychology I 135 skills as profe sional classroom teaci)ers. The degree also provides necessary for a Valjiety of roles where knowledge o learning , development, and research is essential. Other students seek the M.A. as preparation for certification in school psychology or for doctoral study in education. (Students planning to continue graduate work beyond the M.A. level should become familiar, before enrolling, with certificate, specialist, or doctoral degree program prerequisites and requirements so that their master's program can be tailored to assure a smooth transition to such advanced work.) Because the field of educational psychology and the course of are broad, the M.A. degree program is not focused on the preparation of students for specific jobs. At the same time, it may qualify the student to teach at the junior college level, to engage in consulting, eval uation, data analysis, and teaching in occupations which require specialized training, or to u.ndertake advanced job-related study. However, the impact of the M.A. pro gram is to provide insight and llljlderstanding of the teaching/learning process in its broadest sense. Areas of Concentration Five major of concentration are available -human child growth and development, research and evaluation, preparatioi) for school psychol ogy, and individualized programs (such as adult learn ing). of the concentration area selected, all students must: l. Thke 9 hours of core courses reduired by the School of Education. 2. Demonstrate competence in educational psychology by successfully completing a minimum of 36 hours of relevant course work (9 of which are the core). 3. Complete either a master's thesis (4 semester hours, M.A. Plan I) or an independent study project (3 to 4 semester M.A. Plan II), the latter involving the collection of data bearing on a given problem and its analysis and interpretation in writing. 4. Perform satisfactorily on a four-hour written com prehensive examination (typically taken during the last term enrolled in regular courses) . 5. Complete the degree on a timely basis, usually within three years. COURSES EPSY. 500-3. Psychological Foundation of Education. A survey of results of psychological with emphasis on applications to educational practices. Major topics are motiva tion , behavior , learning, development, and characteristics of teachers and students. EPSY. 502-3. Advanced Psychological Foundations of Educa tion. An exami9ation of selected topics in the field of educa tional psychology; theoretical issues and current research assume the primary emphasis. The course is intended pri marily for students who have had prior professional experi ences in teachin,g and psychoeducational settings. lbpic areas

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136 I S chool of Education addressed include research on intelligence and child develop ment, motivation, objective analyses of behavior, and learning. EPSY. 505-3. Children's Thinking. A review of the psychology of thinking with emphasis on developmental changes in modes of thought. lbpics include conceptual behavior, prob lem solving, creativity, humor, play, and others. EPSY. 510-3. Advanced Child Growth and Development. A systematic study of the major theories of child growth and development. The course focuses on current research regard ing children and the implications of research for education. EPSY. 511-3. Human Learn ing. A review of the research meth ods and results of the study of human learning, including related topics such as memory, retention, and transfer. Various theories of learning are examined in depth, and their applica tions to teaching and practices in schools (and in other educa tional settings) are considered . EPSY. 512-3. Behavior Analysis. A systematic survey of current theory in motivation, learning, and behavior. The course emphasizes analyses of behavior and behavior change. EPSY. 514-3. Advanced Adolescent Growth and Develop ment. A systematic study of the major theories of adolescent growth and development. The course focuses on current research regarding adolescents and the implications of research for education. ESPY. 516-3. Behavior Disorders in Exceptional Children. An in-depth study of the psychological, social, and behavioral problems of exceptional learners. lbpics to be discussed include identification, etiology, educational assessment and strategies, non-educational intervention, parent program ming, and evaluation. Special attention is given to current research and its application for education . EPSY. 518-3. Psychology of Gifted, Talented, and Creative Children. An examination of the nature of gifted, talented, and creative children from an educational psychology perspective. Thpics addressed include historical antecedents, identifica tion, and characteristics of such children, research efforts and measurement issues, and relevant programs and teaching strategies. EPSY. 520-3. Social Psychology of Learning. Analysis of social-psychological concepts, such as self-concept, attitude development, person perception, group processes, and related phenomena. Applications to education and other settings are considered. EPSY. 522-3. Adult Learning and Education. Survey of theo ries and principles of adult learning and adult education with emphasis on practical applications and design of programs of instruction for adult learners. EPSY. 524-3. Cognition and Instruction. Exploration of recent developments in cognition and the implications for instruc tional practices. Includes theory and research in cognitive psychology and educational practices resulting from it. EPSY. 580-1 to 4. Workshop : School Applications of Educa tional Psychology. Research, development, and other schol arly activities in educational psychology are studied and reviewed; applications are then made to school settings with student practice and utilization of techniques emphasized . EPSY. 591-1 to 4. Readings in Educational Psychology. EPSY. 600-3. Proseminar in Educational Psychology. Exam ination of current and classic research in educational psychol ogy. Consideration of personalities in the field, likely trends, and related topics . Prer., consent of instructor. EPSY. 610-3. School Psychology Seminar. An introductory seminar in school psychology. The seminar covers theories and models of school psychological services, legal , legislative, and ethical concerns, as well as other current topics in the field. EPSY. 612-3. Family Dynamics. Review and analysis of issues related to families with handicapped or at-risk infants. lbpics include coping skills, family involvement , parent-child inter action, and sources of support. Special attention is given to current research and its application to early intervention. EPSY. 615-4. Psychoeducational Assessment I. This course focuses on the assessment of child and adolescent psycho educational skills . Primary emphasis is directed toward cog nitive / intellectual evaluation in clinical and school settings. Thpics include selection, administration, and interpretation of individual intelligence tests; an introduction to psychological report writing and historical, theoretical, and psychometric issues associated with intelligence. Jest administration is required. Prer., EPSY. 502, REM. 530. EPSY. 616-4. Psychoeducational Assessment II. In-depth study of the major techniques of psychodiagnosis and achievement assessment and their applicability to problems found in psychoeducational settings. Administration and interpretation of individual intelligence, special ability, per sonality, and achievement tests with attention to case study integration is required . Prer., EPSY. 502, REM. 530, EPSY. 615. EPSY. 617-3. Assessment of Handicapped and At-Risk Infants. This course provides classroom and field-based experience in the assessment of young children birth to three years. lbpics include selection, administration, and interpretation of a vari ety of tests . Norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests and observational methods will be included. EPSY. 620-4. School Psychology Practicum. The practicum allows students to integrate theory with school psychology practice. Consultation , psychoeducational assessment, and other school psychological services are stressed . Prer. , admis sion to school psychology program. EPSY. 621-4. School Psychology Internship. The internship stresses the professional practice of school psychology in a psychoeducational facility. Field experiences will encompass an array of school psychological services. Prer., admission to school psychology program. EPSY. 700-4. Master's Thesis. EPSY. 701-2. Master of Education Report. Independent Study EPSY. 950-1 to 4.Jndependent Study in Educational Psychology. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Program Coordinator: William A. Juraschek Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor lelephone: 556-2717 Faculty: Professors: Norma J. Livo, Glenn E. McGlathery Associate Professors: William A. Juraschek, Milton Kleg 1Wo master's degrees in elementary education are offered. l. Master of Arts (M.A.), Plan I, requiring a minimum of 36 semester hours including 4 hours for a thesis and 4 to 8 semester hours in a minor field. 2. Master of Arts (M.A.), Plan II, requiring a mini mum of 36 semester hours with or without a minor (most popular plan). (For bilingual education and English as a Second Language requirements see Language and Cultirre.) Core Courses -12 Semester Hours ELED. 521-3. Models of 'leaching and Obs ervation(cross listed with SECE. 521-3)

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REM . 500-3. 0 enta ti on to Research and Eval u ation in Education Six h ours from: E PSY . 502-3. va nced Psychol ogical Foundations of Edu cation LC. 504-3. M ul ti tural Educat i o n FNDS. Any fo ndations course is acceptable except FNDS. 500 Area Coursej -15 Semester Hours One c o urse in each o f the foll owing areas: LANGUAGE ART ELED. 5 32-3. Ad ance d Language Ar t s in the Elementary Sch o o l ELED. 5343 . Lartg u age Arts in Urban Schools SOCIAL STUDIES ELED. 54 5 -3 . So ial Stu dies in the Elementary Schoo l SCIENCE EDUCA"J10N ELED. 53 5 -3 . in the Eleme nt ary School CHILDREN'S ELED . 5 31-3 . Literature ELE D . 53 3 -3. Curre n t Literature for Children ELED . 5 7 3 -3 . Cr tive Experience in Literature MATH E MATICS EIDUCATION ELE D . 540-3. coltem p orary Mathematics in Eleme n tary Schoo l s ELE D . 5 44-3 . Pr l e m S olving and G eometry in Elementary School s Electives -9 Hours Note: Electives ay be any grad u ate education courses and/ or undergra u a t e c o urses o u ts id e the S ch o o l of Edu catio n that are g aduate rank. (An up per division course is gr ad ua t e r if it is ta u ght b y a mem b er o f the graduate faculty ) Al l courses offere d toward a master's d egr ee must be e n within five years of one's g r a d ua tion d ate. COURSES ELED. 505-3. Ma tery Learning. (SECE. 505 . ) Stresses the theory and resear t h at support the concept of mastery l earn ing an d assists e pro f essional educa t or in developing the skills necessary fbr imp l ementatio n of the theory into classroom practice . j ELED. 506-3. Improvement of Instruction . (SECE . 506. ) D esig ned to assist l the edu cator in the systematic improvement of instruction. E 1 phasis will be on emergent knowledge E lementary Education I 13 7 related to successf u l classroom practices, techniques of assess me nt, analysis, land action related t o the improvement of pro fessional skills . ELED. 508-3. Teaching Strategies: Varied Goal Structures. (SECE. 508 . ) Designed to explore the research as it re l ates to compe ti t i ve, cooperative, and individualistic goal structures and to assist the teacher in selecting and imple menting the appropriate structure in the classroom . ELED. 511-3. Supervision of Student Teachers. (SECE. 511.) D esigned to deve l op competency in the supervision of student teachers , incl u ding building a t h eoretical framework and deve l oping skills in practical application . ELED. 5132 . Microteaching . (SEC E . 513.) Thken after or con currently with ELED./SECE. 521, Models o f Teaching. Cannot be taken during first semester in program . Provides extensive clinical supervis i on through analysis of peer teaching and videotaped presentations in schools. E x t e nsive field pla c e me nt required . ELED. 514-3. Elementary Curriculum: Integrating the Lan guage Arts with Literature. In t egrating the l anguage arts (reading, writing, listening , speaking ) with children's lit er ature . Selectio"l of materials and d evelopment and presenta tion of ways to u se children ' s literature in teachin g the language arts . Required for post-baccalaureate pre-s e rvice teac her. ELED. 5156 . Elementary Curriculum: Teaching Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. Emphasis will be on the role of the classroom teacher in deve l opment, implementation , and evaluation of conte m porary curricula . The c ourse will demon strate the relatio n s hi p between edu cational theory and class room pedagogy and is required for the post-baccalaureate p r e-se r vice teacher. ELED. 517-3 . Commun it y and Inte r personal Rela ti o n s . (SECE . 517.) Provides an opport uni ty for students to develop communication, and interpersonal s kills that will enable them to facilitate student self-concept and intera c tion among professional educators , the community and social gro u ps. Exposes st ud ents to urban environment. ELED. 518-3 . Instructional Technology. (SECE . 518.) D esigned to acquaint students with basic procedures to select ing , producing , evaluating , and utilizing instructional m e dia/ technology, includi n g microcomp ut ers and tel ev i sion , in the instructional process . ELED. 520-3. Classroom Management. (SECE . 520.) Instru c tional management, physical management, and behavior management are studied as interactive components i n the es tablishment and maintenance of an effective learning environment . ELED. 521-3. Models of Teaching. ( S ECE. 521.) Designed for elementar y and secondary teache rs. leachers are given oral an d descriptive introduction to social, academic, and personal mo d els of teachi n g . ELED. 531-3. Children' s Literature . R eading and evaluat i on of books for c hildren, information abou t children's b o oks , chil dren's interest in reading, important authors and illustrator s, and problems in t he guidance of reading. ELED. 532-3. Ad.Vanced Language Arts in E l ementary School. Current thought, as determined by research and practice in the vario u s areas of the l anguage arts: listening, speaking , read ing, and writing . Issues , trends, and innovative practic e s are examined . ELED. 5333 . Current Literature for Children. Current b o oks, trends, and media material in children ' s literature. This c our s e is for people who have not had a co ur se in this area within the past five years . Prer., ELED . 531 or surve y course in children's lite r ature.

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138 I School of Education ELED. 535-3. Science in Elementary School. Emphasis on experimental programs and implementation of the newer pro grams. Supervision and curriculum development considered . ELED. 540-3. Contemporary Mathematics for Elementary Schools. Survey of contemporary content and methodology with emphasis on interrelations between topics and tech niques of providing active learning. ELED. 543-3. Topics in Mathematics Education. An in-depth study of topics such as mathematics and learning , geometry, testing, arithmetic, mathematics labs , calculators, and com puters. May be repeated as topics vary . ELED. 544-3. Problem Solving and Geometry in the Elemen tary School. Covers problem solving, spatial visualization , informal geometry, and turtle geometry with emphasis on incorporating these topics into the elementary curriculum. ELED. 545-3. Social Studies in Elementary School. Review and analysis of current innovations and concept formation in the social studies. Involves student development and imple mentation of materials for trial in classroom instruction. ELED. 547-3.1ntroduction to the Middle School. (SECE. 547.) Covers history and philosophy of the middle school, organiza tion plans, team teaching, integrating content areas, charac teristics of the early adolescent, and classroom management. ELED. 548-3. Museums in Education . (SECE . 548.) For ele mentary and secondary teachers, this course acquaints teach ers with the educational resources extant in public institutions such as museums, zoos, historical societies, etc. ELED. 549-3. The Middle School Curriculum. This course will explore the unique curriculum requirements of transescent youth. 'Ibpics to be addressed include team teaching, inter disciplinary curricula, flexible scheduling, basic skills development, guidance functions, fine arts, practical arts, industrial arts, career education, teaching strategies, and man agement techniques. ELED. 550-2. Kindergarten Education . History of the kinder garten. Characteristics of young children. Daily and weekly program and planning. Jesting and evaluation , and parent teacher cooperation. ELED. 566-3. Energy Education. (SECE. 566.) Explores cur rent energy problems. Students will examine such topics as fuels from plants, fuels from wastes, fossi l fuels, nuclear energy, wind ene rgy , geothermal energy, solar energy, and energy conservation . Included will be a demonstration of available educational resources for grades K-12. The purpose of the course is to make technical aspects of energy accessible to the lay person . ELED. 57().1 to 4 . Advanced Practicum in Teaching. (SECE. 570. ) This course is not to be used as independent study, but is to be used by students approved in advance by the dean of the School of Education. Prer., consent of instructor. ELED. 571-1 to 8. Internship in Elementary Education. ELED. 573-3. Creative Experience in Literature. Will include selection of materials and development and presentation of storytelling, puppetry, flannel board storytelling, choral read ing, slide / tape programs, movie making, creative dramatic music, movement, and art. Prer., any two of the following courses: ELED. 531, 532 , 533, or consent of instructor. ELED. 574-3. Newspaper in Curriculum. Designed to simulate the purposeful use of newspapers to enrich the instructional program in all of the content areas of the school curricula. The course will include an in-depth study of se l ection, develop ment, and presentation of newspaper material with implica tions for teaching methods and techniques. ELED. 580-1 to 4. Curriculum Workshop for Elementary School Teachers. Opportunity to work on projects and prob lems in the school in which the student in employed: con ferences, study groups, discussion, and work in curriculum construction. 'Ibpics vary. Prer., 18 semester hours in education and teaching experience or consent of instructor. ELED. 591-1 to 4. Readings in Elementary Education. ELED. 610-3. Seminar: Elementary Education. Students work on individual topics and report orally and in writing. ELED. 631-2. Seminar: Children's Literature. In-depth study of topics such as development of a literature program, banning books, bibliotherapy, appropriateness of award-winning books, books relating to minority groups, and trends in chil dren's literature. Prer., course in children's literature . ELED. 700-4. Master's Thesis. ELED. 701-2. Master of Education Report. Independent Study ELED. 95().1 to 4. Independent Study in Elementary Education. FOUNDATIONS Program Coordinator: William A. Juraschek Faculty: Professor: Marie E. Wirsing Office: 1250 14th St. , Second Floor lelephone: 556-2717 The program in foWldations consists of interpretive study of educational beliefs and practices. It combines the scholarly traditions of academic disciplines with the study of educational institutions and problems. Courses are offered in the historical, philosophical, sociological, eco nomic, political, religious, and comparative foWldations of education. Program Requirements The total minimum preparation for an M.A. degree in foWldations of education is 36 semester hours of course work (30 semester hours with thesis). Programs are mutu ally determined by adviser and student, and each course of study differs as a whole from others. COURSES FNDS. 500-3. Teaching as a Profession (Foundations of Amer ican Education). A general foundations of education course for preservice candidates. Provides a broad overview of the his torical, sociological, philosophical and legal foundations of education. Includes an exami nation of contemporary issues in schooling, schooling organizational patterns, and the profes sional rights and responsibilities of the teacher. (Graduate credit, but does not apply toward master's degrees.) FNDS. 505-3. Critical Issues in American Education. An exam ination of the social values and forces in American society which shape or influence the aims, philosophies, methods, content, and problems of the American educational enterprise. FNDS. 510-3. Education in Other Countries. A comparative examination of the political, historical, philosophical, socio logical, economic, religious and other foundational aspects of education in several selected countries.

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FNDS. 520-3 . of Education . An exam i nation of s our ces of eco norrc s u pport for education and the impact of educat ion on the atio nal economy. FNDS. 530-3 . Sociology of Education . A sociological appraisal of th e sc h ool in Atner i can society wi th r eference to t h e status, ro l e, act ivities, anl:t relat i onships within the school and of the s chool t o other so bal in s t itutions . FNDS. 540-3 . and Philosophy of Early E ducation . An examina t ion intellectual heritage as it was shaped during the anderlt and medieval periods; trac e s correspond i n g d e v e l opment j of educational theory and prac tice and its con tin uin g irnpa on modem society FNDS. 541-3. History and Philosophy of Modern Education. An Western intellectual heritage from the 16th to the 2 0 th cen ; traces corresponding development of e ducatio n al theory d practice and its continuing impact on mo d e m society . FNDS. 542-3 . Hisl:l ory and Phi losophy of Education : 20t h Century America An examination of educational theory and practice bac k drop of selected themes from 20th cen tury and history. FNDS. 550 3 . Co"\temporar y Philosophies of Education . An exami n a t ion of selected contemporary philosophies and th eir im pact o n thought and practice. FNDS. 560-3. Poli ics and Education. An examination of the po liti cal f o r ces aff; ctin g American e d uca t ion; includes a study of th e f the political and ed u cational areas . FNDS. 570-3. Reli ion and Education . An in-depth study of the cons ti t u tional d l egislative provis i ons and judicial deci sions r egarding r . ligion and the American public school. FNDS. 580 3 . Foundations of Educat i on . An in dep th exp l oration f topics , issues, and ideas largely generated by s tud e n ts throu h their other c ourse experien c es in found a ti on s . Prer. , at lea $ t o n e graduate level course in foundations an d c on sent of in $ tr u ctor . FNDS. 590 3 . Rea ings in Foundations of Education . A critical examin a ti o n of ve rece n t publications in the field of founda tions: books and professional journal publications. Prer., at l eas t on e graduat level course in foundations and consent of ins tru c tor. FNDS. 595 to 598, -3. Special Topics in Contemporary E duca tion. Variable ere " t cour ses designed to deal with specifi c areas o f content n; covered in depth in other program offer ings, e . g., the soc structure of the classroom . FNDS. 635-3 . Se inar: Foundations of Educat i on . FNDS. 636 3 . R search Methodology in Foundati o n s of Education. FNDS. 637-1. Dissertation Sem i na r . FNDS. 670-3. Teaching Internship in Founda t ions of Education . I FNDS. 693-3 . Rea1.ings in Foundations of Educa t ion . FNDS. 700-4 . Thesis in Foundations o f Edu cation. FNDS. 800-3 to 1u. Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation. FNDS. 801-3 to 10 Doctor of Education Dissertation . Independent St t dy FNDS. 950-1 to . Independent Study in Foundations o f Education . FNDS. 960-1 to 1 . Independent Study in Foundations o f Education . In s tructional Iechnol o g y I 139 INSTRUCTINAL TECHNOLOGY Program coJ rdinator: David H. Jonassen O ffice: 1250 14th St., Second Floo lelephone: 556-2717 Faculty: Professor: Minaruth Galey Ass ociate Pro fess o r: Duane 'froxel Assistant Profess o r: Martin lessmer Emeritus: Bettie R. H e lser The library media degree is currently awarded for study in the area of instructional technology (change in degree title being sought). There are four program tracks under this degree program. The Library Media Special ist Certification track is designed to prepare library medi a specialists (school librarians) for elementary and secondary school library media centers. Upon comple tion of the program, graduates meet the requirements for K -12 endorsement as library media specialists by the Colorado Department of Education. In addition, an 18-hour program of study meets the requirements for endorsement as an elementary library media specialist. The Corporate 1Iaining/Development track is designed to prepare trainers in corporate, agency, and military settings. The program of study is based upon nationally defined competencies and a regional needs assessment . This program track requires study in the College of Business in addition to education. The Instructional Computing Specialist track is designed to prepare instruc tional computing specialis t s in schools. These individuals will consult with school$ and teachers in the utilization of compute r technologies and their mean ingful into the educatio d al process as well as designing and. producing computer-based instruction. The Instructionaliechnologist track provides the oppor tunity for students to work with a faculty committee in defining an individual program of study in the area of instructional technology. The student needs to have a dear purpose and direction before electing this track . Consultation with a committee is essential . Curriculum, The M.A. degree in education is conferred upon com p l etion of a minimum of 36 semester hours of course wo r k and successful c ompletion of a written four-hour comprehensive e x amination. COURSES REQUIRED FOR STATE ENDORSEMENT IT. 5013 . Instructional Role of Library Media Specialist IT. 502-3 . of Educational Media 1Prog r a m require ment s a r e unde r r evis ion and a re ex p ec ted t o be finaliz e d b y fall 1987 . C o nt ac t th e S c hool o f Education offic e for furth e r inform a tion.

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140 I School of Education 11: 503-3. School Reference Service IT. 504-3. Cataloging/Classification of Educational Media IT. 505-3 . Administration of Library Media Programs IT. 531-3. Production of Instructional Media Materials ELED . 531-3. Children's Literature SECE. 538-3. Adolescent Literature IT. 601-1 to 4. Field Experience in Library MediaElementary COURSES OFFERED AS ELECTIVES TO COMPLETE THE 36-SEMESTER-HOUR PROGRAM OR FOR RECERTIFICATION CREDIT FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENTS: IT. 534-3. Photography in Education IT. 555-2. Information Storage and Retrieval IT. 950-1 to 4. Independent Study in Instructional Technology . In addition, some or all of the following courses may be required, depending on the student's background, and consultation with an adviser: REM. 500-3. Orientation to Research and Measurement ESPY. Any course 502 or above L C. 501-3 . Curriculum Development FNDS . Any course 505 or above Corporate Instructional Development and Training Track This program has been designed to meet the specific instructional needs of trainers in corporate settings. The competencies taught are based upon three separate needs assessments conducted by and with three major professional associations in the field. The program leads to a Master of Arts degree in instructional technology and is designed to prepare graduates for working in the corporate or agency training environment as a trainer or instructional developer. In addition to traditional admis sion requirements, we intend to accept only outstanding individuals with a professional commitment and outstanding written and interpersonal communication skills. Graduates of this program will be prepared to assume positions as trainers and/or instructional developers in business, industry, government agencies, military, or other training facilities. Admission Requirements In order to be admitted to this program you need to provide evidence of each of the following: l. Bachelor's degree in a relevant field from an accredited institution of higher education with a grade point average of 2.85 or higher. 2. Graduate Record Examination score (combined ver bal + quantitative) of 950 or higher OR Miller Analo gies Jest score of 50 or higher. 3. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate your professional com petence as well as your potential for graduate study. 4. Jest of Written Comprehension from the Educa tional Jesting Service with an acceptable score. 5. A letter of application detailing your educational . and professional experiences, your reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the professional contributions which you believe that you will be able to make after completing the degree. There is no interview require ment for this program, so this may be your only oppor tunity to convince the faculty of your commitment. 6. After admission you will be asked to complete the Survey of Interpersonal Values and the Hill Interaction Matrix-B. This test will not be used in making the admission decision, but rather is intended to assist the faculty in advising you. Program Requirements PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION CORE Semester Hours MGT. 681. Human Resource Management .............. 3 BUS. 604. Human Behavior in Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGT. 632. Organizational Development ............... :...1. 9 LEARNING FOUNDATIONS CORE EPSY. 524. Cognition and Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EPSY. 522. Adult Learning and Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 REM. 530 . Introduction to Measurement ............... 3 REM. 540. Introduction to Evaluation of Programs and Persons ...................................... :...1. 12 INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT CORE IT. 511. Instructional Design: Front End Analysis ........ 3 IT. 512. Instructional Development: Strategy Selection and Development .................................. 3 IT. 515. Analyzing Learner Character istics ............... l IT. 611. Managing Instructional Development ............ 2 IT. 612. Instructional Development Consultation ......... 2 IT. 613. Formative Evaluation of Instructional Materials . :....1 13 PRODUCTION CORE (8-9 SEMESTER HOURS) IT. 541. Designing Instructional Textual Materials ........ 3 IT. 561. Developing Interactive Computer Based Programs 3 IT. 531. Production of Instructional Media Materials ..... 3 IT. 537 . Portable Video Production for Instruction!D'aining 2 IT. 532. Audio Production for Instruction ............... 1 IT. 533. Developing Slide Th.pe Presentation ............. 2 1btal Semester Hours-42-43

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Internship The interns p i s the culmination of your program and is c omp l e ted i lie u of a comprehensive examination and a thesis. It is esigned to provide you with the oppor tunity to appl what you have learned and to develop a portfolio of rel vant experience and products that should assist you in p acement. Instruction I Computing Specialis t Track This track is , intended to develop personnel in schools who are able fo administer and meaningfully apply rnicrocompute technology in various schooling proc esses. The cialist has responsibilities that include comp u ter skill ; curriculum planning and implementa tion; staff dev . Jopment; hardware and software selec tion, evaluatio , and integration; design, production, and evaluatio of courseware; and management of per sonnel and fac 'ties. Admission Re u irements l. Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution of hig h er educati n with a grade-point average of 2.85, or hig her. 2 . Graduate Examination score (combined ver bal + quantidtive) of 950 or higher OR Miller Analo g i e s Jest score ! of 45 or higher. 3. Three lett rs of recommendation from individuals who are in a pq>sition to evaluate your professional competence as well as your potential for graduate study. 4. A letter your application which details your and professional experiences, your r pursuing graduate study, and the pro fessional which you hope to make after comp l eting th degree. There is no interview require me n t so this ay be your only opportunity to convince the faculty of your verbal fluency and your professional commitment. Note: U you ar seeking a position in the public schools, a C o l orado 1YJi>e A teaching certificate is required. A teaching certifiCate from another state may be accepted, but the Colora o cer tificate must be acquired prior to completing 12 emester hours of instruction. Program Requ rements l. 36 semest r hours from the following program of stu d y . D evelopment and Foundations (12 semester hour. from courses below) n: 511-3. Instru ional Design: Front End Analysis n: 512-3. Instru tional D evelopment: Strategy Selection and Development REM . 540-3. Introduction to Evaluation of Programs and Persons I EPSY. 524-3. Copnition and Instruction EDUC. 585-3. Gpvernance and Administration of Education LC. 504-3. Mult cultural Education OR Foundations course Instructional Iechnology I 141 I COMPUTER CLORE (15-18 SEMESTER HOURS) n: 5 52-3. Ed cational Application of ComputerBased Utility Programs n: 561-3. Developing Interactive Computer-Based Programs 1\vo of the following: n: 551-3. Selection, Evaluation, and Integration of Microcomputer Courseware n: 557-3. BASIC for Educators n: 558-3. Pascal for Educators IT. 559-3. Logo: Programming and 'Iechniques n: 555-2. Information Storage and Retrieval IT. 651-3. Computer Graphics Systems ELECTIVES (6-9 SEMESTER HOURS SELECTED FROM BELOW) IT. 5 31-3. Prod u ction of Instructional Materials n: 534-3. Photography in Education n: 562-3. Authoring Systems and Languages n: 563-2. Designing Computer-Based Sim ul ations EDUC. 636-3 . Administration and Supervision of Elementary School EDUC. 637-3. Administration and Supervision of Secondary School IT. 653-3. Miqocomputer Interactive Video 'Iechnologies IT. 661-1 to 3. Advanced Courseware Design Seminar IT. 662-3. Inte11igent Computer-Based Instruction Comprehen s ive Res e ar c h Project In order to fulfill the comprehensive examination requirement, students will be required to fulfill a Com prehensive Research Project . D uring the final semester of instruction, you will design, develop, and evaluate alternative versions of a computer-based i n s tr u ctio nal system . This might entail deve l oping courseware, a sup port system, computer concept instruction, or anothe r topic. With the assistance and approval of your project adviser, you will identify a problem, two or more sol u tions to that prob l em, and systems for so l ving the pro b lem. You will implement each version and evaluate its effectiveness. You will report the results of your study in a standard research report format . The faculty w ill emphasize the dissemination of this report in a journal or local, regional, or national conference . Instructional Technologist T rack This track is provided to permit students to specialize in an area instructional not described i n the other three tracks. Possib l e specializations includ e : Instructional television product'on Instructional materials production Computer-pased instructional system design Health sciences education Admission Requirement s l. Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a grade-point average of 2.85 or higher.

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142 I School of Education 2. Graduate Record Examination scores (verbal + quantitative) of 950 or higher OR Miller Analogies 'lest score of 45 or higher. Note: This requirement may be waived if you have completed a master's degree in a related field prior to application to the program. 3. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate your professional com petence as well as your potential for graduate study. 4. A letter accompanying your application which details your educational and professional experiences, your reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the pro fessional contributions which you hope to make after completing the degree. There is no interview require ment, so this may be your only opportunity to convince the faculty of your verbal fluency and your professional commitment. Program Requirements Before taking any courses, the student must consult with an adviser, who will identify career aspirations of the student. Based upon those aspirations, the student and adviser will identify a program committee of two faculty members specializing in the area of the aspira tions, then design a program of course work. l. 36 semester hours of course work: CORE REQUIREMENTS (15 SEMESTER HOURS) EPSY. 524-3 . Cognition and Instruction IT. 511-3. Instructional Design: Front End Analysis IT. 512-3. Instructional Development: Strategy Selection and Development REM. 530-3. Introduction to Measurement REM. 540-3. Introduction to Evaluation of Programs and Persons L C. 504-3. Multicultural Education or Foundations course Thtal Semester Hours -15 ELECTIVES 21 semester hours of course work selected by the student in consultation with the student's committee. 2. Comprehensive Examination. During the final year of emollment, the student will complete a four-hour written examination covering the curriculum studied. The comprehensive examination may be repeated once. 3. Master's Research Project. During the final semester the student will design, develop, and evaluate an instructional system which reflects the student's spe cialization. This might entail developing instructional materials, a support system, instruction/training, or another project. With the assistance and approval of the program committee, the student will identify a problem, two or more solutions to that problem, and systems for solving the problem. The faculty will emphasize the dissemination of this report in a journal or local, regional, or national conference. Library Media Specialist Tra c k This track is designed to prepare library media spe cialists (school librarians) for elementary and secondary school media centers (libraries). On completion of this program, graduates meet the requirements for endorse ment as media specialists by the Colorado Department of Education. This program is accredited by the North Cen tral Association and the National Council for Accredita tion of 'Ieacher Education . Th be endorsed as a library media specialist, an appli cant shall hold or be eligib l e for a lYPe P or equivalent certificate and shall have completed the following requirements: .l. Hold a master's or higher degree from an accredited institution of higher education and have comple ted an approved graduate program in educational media in an accepted institution of higher education . 2. Have completed three years of teaching experience and/or school media experience whil e holding a valid Colorado lYPe P or equivalent certificate. 3. Have knowledge and skills in the following areas: • Administration of a media program • Media cataloging and classification • Media production and design • Reference services • Media selection, evaluation, and utilization • Research and evaluation • Media materials for children and youth • Curriculum development and instruction design 4. Have completed a supervised practicurn or intern ship in an elementary and/or secondary school at the appropriate grade level(s) for endorsement (elementary, secondary, or K -12). The practicurn or internship may be waived upon comparable media experience. Admission Requ i rements l. Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a grade-point average of 2.75 or higher. 2. A Colorado lYPe P teaching certificate . A teaching certificate from another state may be accepted for admis sion, but the Colorado certificate must be acquired prior to completing 12 hours of instruction. 3 . Graduate Record Examination scores (verbal and quantitative) of 950 or hig her OR Miller Analogies 'lest score of 45 or higher. Note: This requirement may be waived if you have comp l eted a master's degree in a related field prior to application to this program. 4. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate your professional com petence as well as your potential for graduate study. 5. A letter accompanying your application which details your educational and professional experiences, your reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the pro fessional contribution which you hope to make after completing the degree. There is no interview requi r e ment, so this may be your only opportunity to convince the faculty of your verbal fluency and your professional commitment.

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Program Req irements l. 3 7 semest r hours of course work : COUR SES REO IRED FOR K-12 STATE ENDORSEMENT IT. 501-3. Instru1 tio na! Role of the Media Specialist IT. 502-3. Selecr on/Evaluation of Educational Media IT. 503-3. S choo Refe r ence S e rvice IT. 5043 . Catal ging/Ciassification of Educational Media IT. 505 -3 . of Library Media Programs IT. 531-3. of Instructional Media Materials ELED. 5 31-3. C ildren's Literature S E CE. 538-3. Literature IT. 60 1-2. Field in Library Media-E l ementary IT. 6 0 2 -2. Field in Library Media-Secondary 1btal S emester Hours 28 IT. 552-3. Educa ional Application of Computer-Based Utility P rograms (ore 1 ivalent experience) E du cation Core R eq u irement (6-9 semester hours ma y be r eq ui red) REM . 5 20-3. Introd u c t ion to Research Methods LC. 504 3 . Mult"cult ural Education C our se from Fofdations area 2. Comp r eliensive Examin a t io n. During the final se m es ter of erJ.ollment, you will complete a four-hour writt e n exarn.ida t io n covering the c u rriculum. The exam in a tion may b repeated once. COURSES IT. 501-1. lnstruc ional Role of the Media Specialist. Analysis of th e i n structioq.al an d curricular ro l e of the media specialist in s e lecting, identifying, and producing instructional resources and l . 1teracting with faculty . Emphasis on instru c tion al d esign an c urr iculum deve l opment . IT. 502-3 . Sele on/Evaluat i on of Educat i o nal Media. Pol icie s , p rocedur1 s, se lection aids, and evaluation criteria n ee d e d to deve l and maintain a school library media colle c tio n are studied. IT. 503 -3. School Reference Service. Analysis and evaluation of re f e r ence resources and the provision for reference services in a media center . IT. 504-3 . Catal g i ng-Classificat i on of Educat i onal Media . lermin o l ogy, p osop hy, and practice in the application of cat alogi n g , clas ification, and filing pertaining to various types of m edia . IT. 505-3. Admin stration of Library Media Programs . Prob l e m s i n the org ization and administration of educational m e di a pr ograms t h at are an integral part of the teaching and l earn in g process in t h e public schoo ls. IT. 511-3. lnstruc ional Design : Front E nd Analysis. Instruc tio nal d esign pr" cip l es and procedures, including perform ance an alysis, ne ds assessment , objectives, task analysis, and cr it erio n t est des J gn. R equired for all instructional technology st u de nts. IT. 512-3. lnstruc ional Development : Strategy Selection and Development . I , structional development principles and pro ced ur es f or deve oping instructional sequences for facts , con cep ts, procedur s, and principles . Application of different inst ru c t ional an development models. Instr ctional 7echnology I 143 IT. 513-3. Inst ructiona l Message Design . Principles and prac tices for textual, visual, and auditory i nstructional messages based upon the behavioral sciences . IT. 515-1. Anal y zing Learner Character i s tics. An introducti9n t o the analysl of l earner characteristics and styles and how they impact n learning, with emphasis on instructiona l design impli ations. For students in the corporate training and instructional technologist t racks. IT. 532 1 . Audit> Product i on for Instruct i o n. An introduction t o so unding recording, reproduction , editing, and mi xing to support audiovisual productions . IT. 533-2 . Developing Slide Tape Program s . Design, script , and develop an instructional slide / tape presentation with an emphasis on the visualization of instructional content. IT. 5361 . E valuating a n d Utili zing Instructional Telev i s i on. Pr