Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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Full Text


.
University of Colorado at Denver
Undergraduate and Graduate Studies 1988-89


tory of Colleges and Schools
83
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
Architecture Interior Design
Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Urban and Regional Planning
110 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Accounting
Business Administration Business Administration for Executives Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development Finance
Health Administration
Health Administration Executive Program
Human Resources Management
Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Operations Management Quantitative Methods Real Estate
Transportation and Distribution Management
144
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Teacher Certification Programs Counseling and Personnel Services
Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
Educational Administration
Educational Psychology
Elementary Education
Foundations
Instructional Technology
Corporate Instructional Development and Training Instructional Computing Specialist Instructional Technologist Library Media Specialist Language and Culture Reading and Writing Research and Evaluation Methodology Secondary Education
Special Education/Educationally Handicapped
180 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Applied Mathematics Mechanical Engineering
Civil Engineering Engineering, Master of
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
218
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology
Basic Science, Master of
Biology
Chemistry
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
Environmental Science, Master of Ethnic Studies Fine Arts Geography
Geology
History
Humanities, Master of Mathematics Modern Languages Philosophy Physics
Political Science Psychology
Social Science, Master of Sociology
Technical Communication, Master of
332
MILITARY SCIENCE
Army ROTC
Air Force ROTC
336
COLLEGE OF MUSIC
Music
Performance Music
344
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Criminal Justice
Public Administration
Directory of Programs and Degrees — Inside Back Cover


Legend
A/P ........ School of Architecture and Planning
BA ............................ Bachelor of Arts
BFA ...................... Bachelor of Fine Arts
BS ......................... Bachelor of Science
BS (CSE) ................... Bachelor of Science
in Computer Science and Engineering
CB ........................ College of Business
CLAS ....... College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
CM ........................... College of Music
e ................................... Emphasis
ED ........................ School of Education
ED S ...................... Education Specialist
ENGR ................... College of Engineering
GSBA ........................ Graduate School of
Business Administration
GSPA ......... Graduate School of Public Affairs
m ...................................... Minor
MA ............................. Master of Arts
M.ARCH .................. Master of Architecture
MAUD . Master of Architecture in Urban Design
MBA ......... Master of Business Administration
MBS .................... Master of Basic Science
MCJ ................. Master of Criminal Justice
ME ...................... Master of Engineering
MH ....................... Master of Humanities
MID .................. Master of Interior Design
MLA ........... Master of Landscape Architecture
MPA ........... Master of Public Administration
MS .......................... Master of Science
MURP . Master in Urban and Regional Planning
o ..................................... Option
PH D ...................... Doctor of Philosophy
XMBA .............. Executive Master of Business
Administration
XMSHA .............. Executive Master of Science
in Health Administration
Degree Programs
Accounting .................................... e (CB)
Accounting ................................... MS (GSBA)
Accounting and Information Systems ......... MS(GSBA)
Anthropology ................................. BA (CLAS)
Anthropology ................................. MA (CLAS)
Applied Mathematics .......................... BS (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics .......................... MS (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics ........................ PH D (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics/Physics .................. BA (CLAS)
Architecture ............................. M.ARCH (A/P)
Architecture in Urban Design ............... MAUD (A/P)
Basic Science ............................... MBS (CLAS)
Bilingual Education ........................... e (ED)
Biology ...................................... BA (CLAS)
Biology ...................................... MA (CLAS)
Business Administration ..................... MBA (GSBA)
Business Administration,
Executive Program ....................... XMBA (GSBA)
Chemistry .................................... BA (CLAS)
Chemistry .................................... MS (CLAS)
Civil Engineering ............................ BS (ENGR)
Civil Engineering ............................ MS (ENGR)
Communication and Theatre .................... BA (CLAS)
Communication and Theatre .................... MA (CLAS)
Computer Science .............................. o (CLAS)
Computer Science ........................... MS (ENGR)
Computer Science and Engineering ..... BS (CSE) (ENGR)
Corporate Instructional Development and Training .. e (ED)
Counseling and Personnel Services ............ MA (ED)
Criminal Justice ............................ MCJ (GSPA)
Early Childhood Education .................... MA (ED)
Economics .................................... BA (CLAS)
Economics .................................... MA (CLAS)
Education Specialist ....................... ED S (ED)
Educational Administration,
curriculum, and supervision ............. MA (ED)
Educational Administration,
curriculum, and supervision .............. ED S (ED)
Educational Administration,
curriculum, and supervision ............. PH D (ED)
Educational Psychology ..................... MA (ED)
Educationally Handicapped ................... e (ED)
Electrical Engineering ..................... BS (ENGR)
Electrical Engineering ..................... MS (ENGR)
Elementary Education ....................... MA (ED)
Engineering ................................ ME (ENGR)
English .................................... BA (CLAS)
English .................................... MA (CLAS)
English as a Second Language ................ e (ED)
Entrepreneurship and
New Venture Development .................. e (CB)
Environmental Science ...................... MS (CLAS)
Finance ..................................... e (CB)
Finance .................................... MS (GSBA)
Fine Arts .................................. BA (CLAS)
Fine Arts ................................. BFA (CLAS)
Foundations ................................ MA (ED)
French ..................................... BA (CLAS)
Geography .................................. BA (CLAS)
Geography .................................. MA (CLAS)
Geology .................................... BA (CLAS)
German ..................................... BA (CLAS)
Health Administration ...................... MS (GSBA)
Health Administration,
Executive Program .................... XMSHA (GSBA)
History .................................... BA (CLAS)
History .................................... MA (CLAS)
Human Resources Management .................. e (CB)
Humanities ................................. MH (CLAS)
Industrial and Organizational
Psychology ..... MBA/BA (CLAS), MBA/MA (CLAS)
Infant Specialization ....................... e (ED)
Information Systems ......................... e (CB)
Instructional Computing Specialist .......... e (ED)
Instructional Technologist .................. e (ED)
Instructional Technology .................... MA (ED)
Instructional Technology ............... e PH D (ED)
Interior Design ........................... MID (A/P)
International Affairs ....................... m (CLAS)
International Business ...................... e (CB)
Landscape Architecture .................... MLA (A/P)
Library Media Specialist .................... e (ED)
Management .................................. e (CB)
Management ................................ MS (GSBA)
Marketing ................................... e (CB)
Marketing ................................. MS (GSBA)
Mathematics ............................... BA (CLAS)
Mathematics ............................... MA (CLAS)
Mechanical Engineering .................... BS (ENGR)
Mechanical Engineering ................. MS (ENGR)
Music ...................................... BS (CM)
Nursing Administration .................. MBA/MS (CB)
Operations Management ....................... e (CB)
Philosophy ................................ BA (CLAS)
Physics ................................... BA (CLAS)
Political Science ......................... BA (CLAS)
Political Science ......................... MA (CLAS)
Psychology ................................ BA (CLAS)
Psychology ................................ MA (CLAS)
Public Administration .................. MPA (GSPA)
Public Administration .................. PH D (GSPA)
Reading and Writing ........................ MA (ED)
Real Estate ................................. e (CB)
Secondary Education ........................ MA (ED)
Social Science ............................ MSS (CLAS)
Sociology ................................. BA (CLAS)
Sociology ................................. MA (CLAS)
Spanish ................................... BA (CLAS)
Special Education .......................... MA (ED)
Teacher Certification Programs .............. e (ED)
Technical Communications .................. MS (CLAS)
Transportation and Distribution Management ... e (CB)
Urban and Regional Planning .............. MURP (A/P)
Urban Design ................................ e (A/P)
Writing ................................... BA (CLAS)


Sj? University of Colorado at Denver SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT THE POST OFFICE
n% % -% $3.50


CU-DENVER AND THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN METROPOLIS
A few golden crumbs washed out of Cherry Creek and the South Platte River sparked the mass migration that gave birth to Denver. Following Green Russell's discovery in the summer of 1858, 100,000 gold seekers crossed the previously shunned Great American Desert to prospect America's highest mountain barri-
er. The Colorado Rockies suddenly became a goal, a granite-lined treasure chest of gold and silver.
Auraria, the initial town company, soon succumbed to a rival across Cherry Creek — Denver City. Named for the governor of what was then Kansas Territory, Denver was founded on a jumped claim by real estate speculators. Denver was gambling that America's second great gold rush was no humbug.
The Golden Gamble
Before the great Colorado gold rush of 1858-59, the Rockies offered little to attract settlers, except the "hairy bank notes," the beaver pelts prized by fur trappers, traders, and fashionably-hatted gentlemen in Eastern America and Europe. The gold rush changed that, as the rudely dispossessed Cheyenne and Arapaho soon discovered.
Denver City was a long shot. Most of the gold rush "cities" would become ghost towns. In the struggle to become the county seat, the state capitol, and the regional metropolis, there would be many losers and only one winner. Denverites determined early to mine the miners, to relieve prospectors of whatever wealth they might find up in the mountain mining camps.
On the mining frontier, everyone was gambling on the riches of the earth. In the instant city of Denver, folks gambled with cards and dice, with mining stock, and real estate. Such speculation was easier work than wading around in icy mountain streams with picks and pans. Townsfolk bet on everything from dog fights to snow fall. City fathers amused themselves with card games, using town lots as poker chips. Whole blocks of Denver City changed hands of an evening.


Mining Minds
Town characters included Professor Oscar J. Gol-drick, who astonished Coloradans by swearing at his oxen in Latin. This shaggy Irishman also opened the first school. In this windowless, doorless, mud-roofed log cabin, Professor Goldrick accepted all students — red, white, black, yellow, and brown. Foreseeing a need for higher education, a Denver legislator introduced a bill to create a public university in Denver. This led to a squabble in the territorial legislature about where the university should be.
A Prison or a University?
Legislators eventually designed a compromise. Denver received the state capitol. Boulder and Canon City, two other ambitious towns, also sought state institutions. Canon City, at least in legend, was given a choice between the state university and the state penitentiary. City fathers in the southern Colorado town reckoned that the prison would be better attended. Prisoners, they figured, would be better behaved than university students and, in those days, prisoners could be hired as cheap labor. Furthermore, college professors were a poor and strange lot, sometimes as dissipated as their students. So Canon City chose the prison and Boulder received the state university as a consolation prize. Not until 1876 would an embryo university actually open its doors in Boulder.
Photo by Roger Whitacre
Boom and Bust
Meanwhile Denver throve. Gold proved to be only one of the riches of the Colorado earth. Fortunes in silver and coal, in zinc and lead, molybdenum and oil, helped make Denver a major city. By 1890, the Mile High metropolis had a population over 100,000. In a single generation the gold rush crossroads had emerged as the second largest city in the American West, second to San Francisco but larger than Los Angeles or any town in Texas.
Colorado's mineral boom burst with the Depression of 1893. Flush times did not return until after the even bleaker Great Depression of the 1930s. World War II, however, triggered a new bonanza. Since 1940, a million newcomers have settled in the 3,497 square mile metropolis of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, and Jefferson counties.
Photo by Tom Noel


Fraternal Building
The Denver Extension Division acquired a new home in 1956, when the university paid $687,500 for the Denver Tramway Company Building. This brick and terra cotta Renaissance Revival style structure, with marble and brass interior trim, had housed the corporate offices and streetcar barns of a huge streetcar system discontinued in 1950. A million-dollar face lift converted car barns to classrooms in this National Register landmark, where the first floor served as drive-in parking.
Education to a Higher Degree
Pursuing public education to a higher degree in the Rocky Mountain metropolis, the University of Colorado began offering extension courses in 1912. The Extension Division spent its early years shuffling from one building to the next, finding space in Trinity United Methodist Church, the Golden Eagle Department Store, the New Customs House, Barnes Business School, the Federal Center, and on the CU Medical School Campus in Denver.
Not until 1939 did the Extension Division acquire “permanent" quarters in Denver, a suite of offices in the C.A. Johnson Building at 509 17th Street. A single full-time faculty member ran the school with the help of part-time teachers. Several hundred students were expected to enroll for credit college courses in 1940 — 1,500 showed up.
After World War II, former military personnel swamped CU's Denver Extension for its continuing education and correspondence courses, workshops, and vocational training programs. In 1948, the Denver Extension Division moved into the Fraternal Building, a fading but once grandiose five-story Victorian showpiece with an elegant Mansard roof. Conveniently, the ground floor harbored Collins Finer Foods, a corner tavern offering 25-cent hamburgers and a 75-cent pitcher of beer.
Denver Tramway car bams. Photo courtesy Denver Public Library, Western History Department


CU-Denver Graduates from Extension Division to Independent Campus
Students and faculty celebrated the 1957 promotion of the Denver Extension Division to the Denver Center with authority to grant undergraduate and some graduate degrees. Full independence came in 1973, when the Denver Center became the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado. Over 17,000 students a year enrolled at CU-Denver, confirming the need for the new campus. Then and now the CU-Denver student tended to be unique. The average age is 27, 70 percent are employed, 55 percent are married. Over half the students and many of the faculty are part time, enabling them to bring work experiences into the classroom.
Between 1973 and 1976, the state approved and built the Auraria Higher Education Center on a 169 acre campus shared by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Community College at Denver. Auraria — from the Latin word for gold — has evolved from a gold rush boom town to a booming campus, the largest in the state with approximately 30,000 students enrolled each semester. The campus is a unique experiment in higher education; its shared facilities include a library, student center, and recreation complex. Each institution maintains a different academic role; CU-Denver is charged with emphasizing upper division and graduate programs.
CU-Denver Finds a Home
After decades in recycled downtown buildings, CU-Denver in 1988 moved into its first custom-made new home. This $27,000,000, 257,000-square-foot building occupies two full blocks between Speer Boulevard and Twelfth Street, Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoover, Berg, Desmond, a Denver architectural firm, designed this post modern brick structure with distinctive and generous glass brick atriums. From a five-story frontage facing downtown, the CU-Denver classroom, laboratory, and office complex steps down to two-stories facing the athletic facilities and library at the heart of the campus. Today, CU-Denver offers graduate and undergraduate programs in Business Administration, Architecture and Planning, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts, Music, and Public Affairs. Ninth Street Historic Park, in the center of the campus, survives as a reminder that CU-Denver occupies the creek bank where Denver — and Colorado — began. CU-Denver flourishes today on that Auraria site where prospectors once panned for gold and founded what is now a metropolis of 1.9 million people.
...Tom Noel, CU-Denver History Department
Photo by Tom Noel


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1988-89
University of Colorado at Denver
1200 Larimer Denver, Colorado 80204
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. CU-Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
University oil Colorado Catalog.
(USPS 651-060)
262 Stadium Building, Campus Box 384, Boulder, Colbrado 80309-0384 Volume 1988, No. 3, May/June Published 4 times a year: January/February March/April, May/June, August/September Second class1 postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.


6 / University of Colorado at Denver
Table of Contents
Contents Page
Academic Calendar .................................. 8
Message from the Chancellor ........................ 9
Chancellor's Advisory Group ....................... 10
Administration of the University
and of the CU-Denver Campus .................... 11
Campus Map ..................................... 12-13
The University .................................... 15
History ........................................... 15
Academic Structure ............................. 15-16
Academic Programs ................................. 16
Accreditation ..................................... 17
Memberships ....................................... 17
General Information ............................ 15-52
Student Organizations ............................. 17
Auraria Higher Education Center .................. 18
Affirmative Action ................................ 18
Research .......................................... 18
Centers and Institutes for
Research, Service, and Training ............. 19-22
Faculty ........................................ 23-24
Admission Policies and Procedures .............. 25-32
Undergraduate Admission Information ...... 25-30, 32
Freshmen Requirements .......................... 25-27
Tests .......................................... 27-28
Transfer Students .............................. 27-29
Former Students ................................... 29
International Students ......................... 29-30
Graduate Admission ................................ 30
Tuition and Fees ............................... 33-34
Residency Classification .......................... 35
Financial Aid .................................. 36-39
Registration ................................... 39-42
Academic Policies and Regulations .............. 42-48
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act .................................... 48
Special Programs and Facilities ................ 49-52
Alumni Association ................................ 49
Book Center ....................................... 49
Computing Services ................................ 50
Division of Continuing Education ............... 50-51
Foundation ........................................ 51
International Education ........................ 51-52
Student Services ............................... 54-61
Student Government ............................. 55-56
Academic Center for Enrichment ................. 56-57
Internships and Cooperative Education,
Center ......................................... 57-58
Educational Opportunity Program ................ 58-59
Contents Page
Women's Resources ................................. 59
Testing Center .................................... 60
Veterans Affairs .................................. 60
Student Conduct ................................... 61
Library Services ............................... 62-65
Media and Telecommunications ...................... 64
The Graduate School ............................ 66-80
Degrees Offered ................................ 67-68
Financial Aid .................................. 68-69
Admission Requirements ......................... 69-71
Registration ................................... 71-72
Requirements for Advanced Degrees .............. 72-73
School of Architecture and Planning ........... 83-109
Built Environment Studies ...................... 86-87
Architecture ................................... 90-94
Interior Design ................................ 95-97
Landscape Architecture and Urban Design ... 98-103
Urban and Regional Planning .................. 104-108
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business
Administration ............................... 110-143
Accounting .............................. 119, 131
Business Law ..................................... 123
Entrepreneurship and New Venture
Development ...................................... 119
Finance ................................. 120, 131-132
Health Administration ................... 132-134, 137
Human Resources Management ....................... 120
Information Systems ..................... 120, 134
International Business ....................... 120-121
Management .............................. 121, 134-135
Marketing ............................... 121, 135-136
Operations Management ........................ 121-122
Quantitative Methods ............................. 127
Real Estate ...................................... 122
Transportation and Distribution
Management .................................... 122
Business Administration, Master .............. 129-130
School of Education .......................... 144-179
Teacher Certification Programs ............... 148-151
Counseling and Personnel Service ............. 156-159
Early Childhood Education and Early
Childhood Special Education ............... 159-161
Educational Administration ................... 151-156
Educational Psychology ....................... 161-163
Elementary Education ......................... 163-165
Foundations .................................. 165-166
Instructional Technology ..................... 166-171
Language and Culture ......................... 171-173


Contents / 7
Contents Page
Reading and Writing ........................ 173-175
Research and Evaluation Methodology ........ 175-176
Secondary Education ........................ 176-178
Special Education/Educationally
Handicapped .............................. 178-179
College of Engineering and Applied
Science .................................... 180-217
Applied Mathematics ........................ 193-194
Civil Engineering .......................... 195-200
Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science ......................... 201-211
Mechanical Engineering .............. 212-216
Engineering — Non-Departmental ................. 216
Master of Engineering ...................... 216-217
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ....... 218-331
Anthropology ............................... 232-237
Master of Basic Science .................... 237-239
Biology .................................... 240-243
Chemistry .................................. 244-247
Communication and Theatre .................. 248-254
Economics .................................. 254-259
English .................................... 260-266
Master of Environmental Science ................ 267
Ethnic Studies ............................. 268-270
Fine Arts .................................. 271-274
Geography .................................. 275-277
Geology .................................... 277-280
History .................................... 281-285
Contents Page
Master of Humanities ........................ 286-287
Mathematics ................................. 287-297
Modern Languages ............................ 298-306
Philosophy .................................. 306-309
Physics ...J................................. 309-311
Political Science ........................... 311-317
Psychology .................................. 318-321
Master of Social Science .................... 322-324
Sociology .[................................. 324-330
Master of Technical Communication ............... 331
Military Science ............................ 332-335
Army ROTC ....................................... 333
Air Force ROTC .............................. 334-335
College of Music ............................ 336-343
Music ....................................... 341-343
Performance Music ............................... 343
Graduate School of Public Affairs ........... 344-359
The Centers ..................................... 348
Master of Public Administration ............. 350-351
Doctor of Philosophy, Public
Administration .............................. 352-353
Master of Criminal Justice ...................... 358
Faculty Roster .............................. 361-373
Index ....................................... 377-382
Application Form ............................ 383-384
Degree Programs ......................... Inside back
cover


8 / University of Colorado at Denver
ACADEMIC CALENDAR1
Summer 19882
Summer 19892
April 18-22 May 30 May 31 July 4 August 5
Orientation Holiday (no classes) First day of classes3 Holiday (no classes) End of term
May 22-26 May 29 May 30 July 4 August 4
Orientation Holiday (no classes) First day of classes3 Holiday (no classes) End of term
Fall 19882
Fall 19892
August 8-12 August 22 September 5 November 24-25 December 16
Orientation First day of classes Holiday (no classes) Holidays (no classes) End of semester
August 14-18 August 21 September 4 November 23-24 December 15
Orientation First day of classes Holiday (no classes) Holidays (no classes) End of semester
Spring 19892
January 9-13 January 16 January 17 March 20-24 May 13
Orientation Holiday (no classes)
First day of classes Spring vacation (no classes) End of semester
Spring 19902
January 8-12 January 15 January 16 March 22-26 May 12
Orientation Holiday (no classes)
First day of classes Spring vacation (no classes) End of semester
1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time.
2 Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.
3 Consult the Schedule of Classes for dates 10-week and 8-week classes begin for Summer Terms.


Chancellor / 9
Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado'^ premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Colorado's only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni.
Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body.
Since 1972, enrollment has grown to approximately 10,455 students, including 5,741 undergraduates and 4,714 graduate students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University's seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing ypu at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
Glendon F. [Drake
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver
Chancellor Glendon F. Drake


10 / University of Colorado at Denver
Chancellor's Advisory Group
VERONICA BARELA, Executive Director NEWSED, Community Development Corporation JACQUES W. BERNIER, Manager, Personnel Administration, Aerospace Systems Program, Hughes Aircraft Company
DIANA BOULTER, President, The Denver Partnership THE HON. JEANNE FAATZ, Colorado State Representative
WILLIAM W. FLETCHER, President and General Manager, Rocky Mountain News DAVID GREENBERG, Greenberg/Baron Associates THE HON. REGIS GROFF,Colorado State Senator JOHN KASSER, College Football Associates LEE LARSON, Vice President/General Manager, KOA Radio 85
FRANK NEWMAN, President, Education Commission of the States
C. NEIL NORGREN, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Butler Fixture Company THOMAS PECHT, Publisher, Denver Business Journal BRUCE ROCKWELL, Executive Director, The Colorado Trust
HERRICK ROTH, President, Herrick Roth Associates ROBERT SCANLAN, Regional Manager, Coldwell Banker
BILL SCHEITLER, President of the City Council, Denver
GAIL SCHOETTLER, Colorado State Treasurer JEROME SERACUSE, Fellow, American Institute of Architects; Seracuse Lawler & Partners TOM STRICKLAND,Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber & Madden
KEN TONNING, Vice President/General Manager, KUSA-TV, CH 9
BEN TRUJILLO, President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
SOLOMON TRUJILLO, Colorado Vice President and Chief Executive Officer, Mountain Bell CLAIR VILLANO, Director, Consumer Fraud Division THE HON. WILMA WEBB, Colorado State Representative
MICHAEL R. WISE, Chairman of the Board, Silverado Banking
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means "Let your light shine."
According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the "morning of life," and the scroll represents written language.


Administration /II
ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents
CHARLES M. ABERNATHY, JR., M.D., Montrose, term expires 1988
RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992
PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1990 LYNN J. ELLINS, Longmont, term expires 1990 HUGH C. FOWLER, Denver, term expires 1988 SANDY F. KRAEMER, Colorado Springs, term expires 1988
NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1990 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term expires 1992
University-Wide Officers
E. GORDON GEE, President of the University; Professor of Law. B.A., University of Utah; J.D., Columbia University; Ed.D., Teacher's College, Columbia University.
HUNfER RAWLINGS, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Professor of Classics. B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Princeton University.
C. WILLIAM FISCHER, Vice President for Budget and Finance; Professor Attendant Rank of Public Affairs.
B.A., Muskingum College; M.P.A., Harvard University.
THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., LL.B., University of Colorado.
EDWARD W. MURROW, Treasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance.
B.S., University of Colorado.
CU-Denver Officers
OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR
Chancellor..!.................... Glendon F. Drake
Special Assistant............. Susan Guyer
Director, Public Relations and
Publications.................. Bob Nero
Director, Campus Affairs......... Barbara O’Brien
DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Vice Chancellor for Academic
Affairs....................... John S. Haller, Jr.
Assistant to the Vice Chancellor.. Rosemary Kirmaier Acting Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs;
Dean, The Graduate School .... Thomas A. Clark Assistant Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs.......... Charles G. Schmidt
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative
Activities.................... Fernie Baca
Dean, School of Architecture and
Planning...................... Hamid Shirvani
Dean, College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business
Administration................ Donald L. Stevens
Dean, School of Education........ William F. Grady
Dean, College of Engineering and Applied
Science..}.................... Paul E. Bartlett
Dean, College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences.................. John Ostheimer
Acting Resident Dean, College
of Music...................... Roy Pritts
Dean, Graduate School of
Public Affairs................ Marshall Kaplan
Director, Auraria Library........ Patricia Senn Breivik
Associate Director............ Jean F. Hemphill
Director, Division of Continuing
Education..................... William D. Boub
Dean, Student Academic
Services,..................... Mary Lou Fenili
Director, Academic Center
for Enrichment.............. Kathy R. Jackson
Director, Center for Internships and Cooperative Education... Janet Michalski Director, Educational
Opportunity Program......... Cecil E. Glenn
Director, Student Services and
Veterans Affairs............ Bruce E. Williams
Director, Women’s Resources.. Pamela Kesson-Craig
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance...
Special Assistant...............
Director, Affirmative Action....
Director, Budgets and Fiscal
Planning.....................
Bursar..........................
Director, Computing Services....
Director, Financial Aid/Student
Employment...................
Director, Financial and Business
Services.....................
Acting Director, Personnel
Services.....................
Director, Student Administrative Services........................
DIVISION OF PLANNING
Vice Chancellor for
Planning.....................
Director of Alumni..............
CU FOUNDATION
Vice President, CU Foundation at
Denver.......................
Director, Annual Fund...........
Jeffrey W. Konzak Julie Carnahan George Autobee
Julie Torres
George E. Funkey
Ellie Miller
Kenneth E. Herman
Kenneth Tagawa
George L. Burnham
Bruce W. Bergland Beverly Brunson
Barbara S. Allar Nancy Rettig


CAMPUS
MAP
AR ... .... Arts Bldg. PP .... Physical Plant
AU .... .... Auraria Library PS .... Public Safety
BR .... Bromley Building RO .... .... Rectory Office
BU .... .... Business Services SA .... St. Cajetan's Center
cc .... .... Child Care Center SE .... St. Elizabeth's Church
CD .... .... Child Development Center SF .... St. Francis Center
CN .... .... Central Classroom SI .... Science Building
DR .... .... Dravo SO .... .... South Classroom
EC .... East Classroom ST .... Student Center & Book Center
EG .... .... Emmanuel Gallery TE .... Technology Building
MR .... .... Mercantile Restaurant TV .... Tivoli
NC .... .... North Classroom WC ... .... West Classroom
PE .... Physical Education
CU-Denver Offices
Academic Affairs, Vice Chancellor...............DR
Academic Center for Enrichment .................NC
Accounting/Accounts Payable ...................DR
Administration and Finance, Vice Chancellor ..DR
Admissions .....................................NC
Affirmative Action .............................DR
Alumni .........................................DR
American Indian Education Program...............NC
Analytical Laboratory ..........................NC
Architecture and Planning, School of................DR
Asian American Education Program....................NC
Black Education Program.............................NC
Budget/Fiscal Planning..............................DR
Bursar's Office ....................................NC
Business and Administration, College of, and Graduate School of Business Administration ... BU
Business Services...................................DR
Centers, The .......................................NC
Chancellor ..........................
Colorado Partnership for Educational
Renewal ...........................
Colorado Principals' Center .........
Graduate School, The ................
Hispanic American Education Program


^jj University of Colorado at Denver & Auraria Higher Education Center
Community College of Denver Metropolitan State College University of Colorado at Denver
CV
01965 AHEC
itemships and Cooperative} Education,
Center for .................................9th St.
and Information Systems Group ...................NC
iberal Arts and Sciences, College of
Dean's Office...............................9th St.
Advising .........................................NC
ibrary, Auraria ..................................AU
Architecture and Planning Library ................BR
lusic, College of.................................AR
National Veteran's Training Institute ............. DR
Personnel Services .................................DR
Public Affairs, Graduate School of................. NC
Public Relations and Publications ..................DR
Records/Registration ...............................NC
Research Administration.............................DR
Research in Rhetoric, Center for ...............9th St.
Senior Citizen Program .........................1 NC
Student Academic Services ..........................NC
Student Government ..............................ST
Urban Transportation Studies, Center For.........NC
Veteran's Affairs................................ST
Women's Resources ..............................NC




General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver is one of the most important educational resources in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in thfe University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields and graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, educational administration, and education technology. Doctoral studies also are available in engineering and other fields in cooperation with CU-Boulder. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and on weekends.
Students' ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 27. Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 53 percent attend part time. Sixty-five percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels.
CU-Denver's faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and advances (j»f the urban environment and responsible to the needs of students and the community. The combination of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine "real world" experience with academic excellence.
History
Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876. In 1912, the University of Colorado's Department of Correspondence and Extension, was established in Denver, to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course bfferings expanded, so did the demand for degree-granting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver's current site. And in this same year the Denver "Center" was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses — Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 22,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,500 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver's role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system.
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System — Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver — has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources across campuses, the System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters. A system-wide Faculty Council is the major component of faculty governance. It is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver, as well, has its own faculty governance structure. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Den-ver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. Three Vice Chancellors assist the Chancellor in the fields of Academic Affairs, Administration and Finance, and Planning and Enrollment Management. Each of these Vice Chancellors is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs acts in the absence of the Chancellor, sets the highest standards in teaching, research, and service, and oversees all


16 / General Information
CU President E. Gordon Gee makes frequent visits to the Denver campus to meet with faculty, staff, and student groups
academic units, The Graduate School, the library, research administration, continuing education, and student services. Nine academic support programs are overseen by the Dean of Student Services: Counselor Training, Testing, Educational Opportunities Program, Student Activities, the Women's Resource Center, Veterans Affairs, Center for Academic Enrichment, Legal Services, and Internships and Cooperative Education. Senior Citizens' programs also are available. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance manages admissions, student records, financial aid, computing services, and the campus budget. The Vice Chancellor for Planning oversees the ongoing process of strategic planning for campus initiatives. One element of this process is "enrollment management." Such management addresses the development and the implementation of a comprehensive strategy to promote the campus, build appropriate academic programs, and ensure an effective relationship with prospective and current students, and with graduates of CU-Denver. An Office of Public Relations reports directly to the Chancellor and assists in orchestrating all promotional efforts and the external affairs of the campus.
The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU-System counterpart. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. But, with the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Music Graduate School of Public Affairs
These units now accommodate approximately
11,000 students — nearly half as large as CU-Boulder itself — taught by about 300 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they've only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges admit freshmen and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher certification. The Graduate School offers master's programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. And CU-Denver faculty also participate in a few other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
For a complete account of bachelor's and master's degree programs offered by CU-Denver, see the listing of degree programs on the inside back cover of this catalog. The college and school sections of this bulletin describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at


Memberships / 17
once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region's economy. And centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are generating important practical solutions to some of Colorado's and the nation's most serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver — an urban campus — is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the1 University of Colorado at Denver is on the move. Join us and share in an exciting adventure in learning.
Accreditation and Memberships
ACCREDITATION
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration American Society of Landscape Architects American Planning Association Colorado State Board of Education National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Architectural Accrediting Board See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for the programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology National Association of Schools of Music National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
MEMBERSHIPS
Listed below are the organizations affiliated with the various divisions and departments at CU-Denver:
School of Architecture and Planning
American jlnstitute of Architects American Institute of Planners American | Institute of Certified Planners American Society of Landscape Architects American | Society of Interior Designers Architectural Research Centers Consortium Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Council of Landscape Architecture Educators Society of Architectural Historians
College of Business and Administration The Economic Club of Colorado
School of Education Colorado Principals Center
National Educational Renewal Projects-Partnerships U.S. Department of Education, Project L.E.A.D.
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Colorado Minority Engineering Association Associated Engineering Students American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society of Women Engineers
Graduate School of Public Affairs
Colorado Municipal League
American Society for Public Administration
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and
Administration
Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management Pi Alpha Alpha, Public Affairs Honorary Association Western Executive Seminar Center Metro Air Quality Council
Institute for Nonprofit Organization Management
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Denver Natural History Museum Denver Art Museum Mesa Verde National Park Denver Zoological Garden Denver Public School System
Colorado Chapter of the American Chemical Society Psi Chi
College of Music
Colorado Choir, Inc.
Sigma Alpha Iota
Continuing Education
Rocky Mountain Chapter of Chartered Life Underwriters Colorado Chapter: Purchasing Management Association Colorado Department of Labor and Employment League of Women Voters
Student Academic Services Alpha Kappa Delta American Planning Association Venture Network Apartheid Awareness Group Associated Engineering Students
Big Mountain Support Group
Central American Support Alliance
Chinese Student Association Delta Sigma Phi Entrepreneur's Club Fine Arts Club Geology Club Green Coalition Tau Beta Phi Iranian Cultural Club Mexico Information Committee
Musicians Association Phi Chi Theta Pre-Law Club Second Stage Society of Women Engineers Venture Network Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Vietnamese Students Association American Marketing Association
American Society of Civil Engineers
Amnesty International Associated Black Students Auraria Peace Council Black Student Planners Association Chemistry Club Deezine Club Economics Club Etta Kappa Nu Forensics Team Golden Key National Honor Society
Health Careers Club International Christian Fellowship MBA Association Mineral Landsmen Native American Student Organization Phi Sigma Alpha Psi Chi
Sigma Alpha Iota Sociology Club


18 / General Information
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student center, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver's past—historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli has been renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment.
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Title IX
CU-Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and in employment. In pursuance of this policy, no Denver campus department, unit, discipline, or employee shall descriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees.
The institution's educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject to the provisions of the Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vietnam-Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, and Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.
A CU-Denver Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity program has been established to implement this policy. For information about these provisions on equity, discrimination, or fairness contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1250 14th St., Suite 740, 556-2509.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research of its faculty. It is equally supportive of the other creative endeavors of its faculties in the arts, humanities, and design fields. These achievements not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver's service to the community at large.
An important thrust in research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its position within a thriving metropolitan area serves, as well, as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines. These, of course, are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study, with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. Funded research is a major priority at CU-Denver. During 1986-87, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $5,434,132 for research, training, and public service programs. All signs point to a steady increase in funded research in the years ahead atCU-Denver. And the benefits for the campus will be substantial. Such research assists in sustaining scholarly discourse, enables faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provides the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhances the education of students. Many students actively participate in research activities overseen by faculty members.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary, economic, political, educational, engineering, and environmental needs, minority small business management, and economic development in Colorado communities. Financial support in program and service development has been obtained for activities related to health administration, international affairs, executive seminars, special education, as well as veterans' employment and training. Flash flood forecastaing, air quality control, acidi-faction of Colorado lakes, and lead effects on the nervous system are being investigated as well. Computer-related projects include optical symbolic computing mathematical programming, and fast alogorithyms on advanced computers. Much research, of course, goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publication, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities.
Many members of our faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the campus, and establish the credibility of its faculty and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.


Centers and Institutes / 19
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
School of Architecture and Planning
CENTER FOR BUILT ENVIRONMENT STUDIES
The Center for Built Environment Studies (CBES) is the research and service arm of the School of Architecture and Planning. The center has been established in 1987 as a replacement for the Center for Community Development and Design and builds upon a decade of community service and outreach programs. The new Center is committed to serving Denver and Colorado and providing a significant educational opportunity for students and faculty.
The Center provides an interdisciplinary research and assistance team capable of addressing a variety of built environment issues. The specific focus areas of research and service are: Architecture and Building Science, Economic Development, Natural Resource Planning, Space and Facility Design, and Urban Desigh. Faculty and students from various programs in the School participate in research projects along with the regular CBES research and service staff. This association provides a broad-based competence which reaches into the studios and lecture halls as well as communities, professions, and user groups.
Delta City Manager Steve Schrock (right) seeks counsel on his city's future from Jon Schler, who works in the Grand Junction office of di-Denver's Center for Built Environment Studies.
School of Education
THE COLORADO PARTNERSHIP FOR EDUCATIONAL RENEWAL
The Colorado Partnership for Educational Renewal consists of the University of Colorado System, Metropolitan State College, and several Colorado School districts. The basic purpose of the Partnership is to stimulate change in the K-12 public school system and simultaneously in the education of educators. Serving
as equal partners, the University and School have a stake in and responsibility for public school improvements, just as the public schools have a like interest in and responsibility for the education of those who staff the schools. More specifically, The Colorado Partnership seeks solutions to persistent "hard rock" issues such as minority achievement, at-risk youth, dropouts, teacher education, the common curriculum, research and evaluation, and educational leadership. Contact Lance V. Wright, Executive Director, for more information.
COLORADO PRINCIPALS' CENTER
During Summer 1985, a group of Colorado principals spent ten days at the Harvard Principals' Center Summer Institute. Their experience was so positive and renewing, that they returned home with the question: "Why not a principals' center in Colorado?" Several key people and two institutions responded to the question.
The University of Colorado at Denver's School of Education, headed by Dean Bill Grady, and the Colorado Association of School Executives (CASE), headed by Dr. Gerald Difford, formed a partnership to develop the idea into a reality. A planning luncheon was attended by principals and other school executives. Several superintendents agreed to enter the partnership by contributing funds for center development. Thus began the Colorado Principals' Center.
The primary mission of the Colorado Principals' Center is to enable principals to shape their professional intellectual development. Activities related to this mission include topical seminars, panel discussions, roundtable discussions, and ongoing special interest groups.
Topical seminars feature individual presenters (primarily principals) who provide information on promising or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and opportunities for participant interaction. Panel discussions highlight current "high-relevance" topics, with panel and participant interaction in formal and informal settings. Special interest groups facilitate exploration of relevant problems, and issues through brainstorming and idea sharing during a series of meetings. The opportunity for reflective writing is a major feature of Center events.
The Center also focuses on conducting and disseminating research. Past projects included a study of administrator role perceptions in school reform and a study of the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership. A current study, conducted in cooperation with Dr. Gene Hall, University of Florida, is examining the developing professional identity of first year high school principals.
Graduate students are hired by the Center as research assistants. Additionally, graduate students in the School of Education carrying 9 semester hours or more, or enrolled as administrative interns, are offered student membership at no cost.


20 / General Information
Lance Wright (left) directs the Colorado Principals' Center which provides in-service education for principals and other school site managers. William Grady (center) Dean of the School of Education, visits a workshop.
to school administrators through a LEAD Technical Assistance Center;
• the improvement of quality of the administator training programs at CU-Denver, University of Northern Colorado, and Colorado State University;
• the strengthening of leadership skills of administrators in education and in the private sector by providing opportunities for mutual professional growth.
Dick Koeppe is the Director of Project LEAD. Gerry Difford of CASE, Rich Laughlin of CDE, and Mike Martin of ACS serve as the managers of those components for which their organizations have responsibility-
In addition to part-time research assistants, Center staff includes an executive director who is also an assistant professor, and a secretary, both shared with the Department of Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision.
PROJECT LEAD
Project LEAD (Leadership for Educational Administration Development) is a federally funded project which provides coordination of various school leadership efforts throughout the state. Through Project LEAD, a coalition involving the Colorado Department of Education (CDE), the Colorado Association of School Executives (CASE), and the ACS Department at CU-Denver has been developed.
The CASE-based components of this project involve:
• the improvement of leadership processes used in continuing education programs for administration.
• the increased accessibility of the principalship to talented, aspiring individuals not in the "mainstream” or traditional channels of administration preparation;
• improvement of the quality of leadership provided by practicing administrators by improving training activities offered by Project Leadership and in numerous partnership management training centers.
The CDE-based component involves:
• the improvement of achievement and expansion of diversity of learning opportunities in small rural school districts with limited resources, programs and achievement.
The ACS-based components involve:
• the collection of information regarding effective leadership and making such information available
College of Engineering and Applied Science
CENTER FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION STUDIES
The Center for Urban Transportation Studies (CUTS) has as its responsibility:
1. To assume a leading role in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation.
2. To provide a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region, making available to outside organizations the expertise within the University.
CUTS is interested in helping to optimize the quality of human life by concentration on research, service, and education in the transportation sector of society. Particularly, CUTS is desirous of improving the movement of people and goods so as to provide enhanced safety, economy, efficiency, and overall amenity.
Administratively, the Center (CUTS) is a part of the Department of Civil Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The director of CUTS is a civil engineering faculty member representing the transportation engineering and planning disciplines.
Recent and current research include investigations of (1) the relationship between rutting of asphalt pavements and truck tire pressures, and (2) the performance of a new type of urban interchange in order to improve its design from the standpoint of safety and capacity. Service activities have involved workshops and short courses to help advance the state-of-the-practice relative to the state-of-the-art in transportation engineering.
As an element of the University, the fundamental thrust of CUTS is, and properly must remain, educational. The Center's emphasis is the broad field of


Centers and Institutes / 21
transportation, and includes both urban and non-ur-ban aspects of transportation. Since transportation concerns itself with the safe, efficient, and environmentally responsible movement of people and goods, it either directly or indirectly affects all citizens and many facets of their day-to-day living. This breadth necessarily involves most of the disciplines within the University. The need for better trained researchers and practitioners in all of the transportation related disciplines is clearly evident. CUTS provides "hands-on" experience within the traditional University structure, offering an opportunity for students through research and service activities which emphasize these otherwise unavailable learning opportunities. These activities take place under conditions of competent supervision that ensure the provision of sound advice and research results to those served by CUTS.
LAND INFORMATION SYSTEMS GROUP
A Land Information Systems Group (LISG) has been formed at CU-Denver to provide opportunity for faculty and students to pursue interests in this multidisciplinary subject area. Housed in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the LISG is headed by Lynn Johnson, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering.
The objectives of the LISG are to facilitate the educational, research, and public service mission of CU-Denver in the subject areas of computer-aided planning and design, water resources planning, land records systems, geoprocessing and geographic information syjstems, facilities management and mapping, computer-aid design, and related legal and policy issues.
LISG is multidisciplinary and provides an avenue for individuals to participate together on research and development projects, curriculum development, and to share hardware and software resources. For further information contact Professor Johnson at 556-2739 or 556-2871.
The Graduate School
CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
The Center for Environmental Sciences conducts basic and applied research which focuses on understanding and providing solutions for environmental issues. The Center reports to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of The Graduate School. The Center typically organizes faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students into interdisciplinary teams to study environmental concerns of interest to the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado, and the Rocky Mountain Region. Typical projects in the past have involved studies of pollution resulting from oil shale production, coal mining, and uranium tailings. These projects have been funded by federal agencies, industry, and private foundations.
In recent years the Center has had a major problem dealing with acid rain. The Center has a state-of-the-art analytical chemistry laboratory. The Center has also been at the forefront in the application of artificial intelligence methods to the interpretation of large environmental databases. Approximately fifteen CU-Denver faculty from ten different departments (and three colleges) have participated in Center projects. In addition, more than thirty faculty from other campuses of the University of Colorado, as well as other universities in Colorado, New Mexico, and South Dakota, have participated in these projects which have provided opportunities for theses and jobs to numerous students.
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN RHETORIC
The Center for Research in Rhetoric began in 1984 for the purpose of conducting original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived. The Center engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. The interdisciplinary nature of the Center draws on the diverse strengths and unique perspectives of individuals from various disciplines in the University. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office.
COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS GROUP
A particularly strong Computational Mathematics Group has made CU-Denver a regional center for computational mathematics with a national and international reputation. Mathematics clinics investigate contemporary societal issues through the application of mathematical concepts to specific problems. Other research includes the development of fast algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations on super computers, the analysis and development of combinatorial algorithms used in scheduling artificial intelligence, and the applications of discrete mathematics to problems in ecology, engineering, and computer science.
Graduate School of Public Affairs
THE CENTERS
The Graduate School of Public Affairs coordinates three centers — the Center for the Improvement of Public Management, the Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation, and the Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The Centers provide students and faculty with opportunities to engage in strategic multi- disciplinary policy research, secure internships, and develop and participate in training and technical assistance


22 / General Information
Graduate School of Public Affairs Professor Sam Overman lectures to participants in the Rocky Mountain Program, a semi-annual residential seminar for elected and appointed public officials across the country. The seminar is sponsored by the Center for the Improvement of Public Management.
problems. The objective of the Centers is to help the public and private sectors respond to grown and revitalization programs. Their respective programs help translate classroom education into real world public policy and public management experiences.
Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The newest of GSPA's centers conducts policy research on health issues, studies the ethical problems surrounding areas of health policy, and provides technical support to those addressing these problems in the state and nation.
Center for the Improvement of Public Management. This center focuses on efforts to increase the planning and management capacity of state, county, and local government officials and staff. Its functions are oriented toward developing puglic sector management and analytical skills.
Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation. Activities are directed toward increasing understanding between the public and private sectors. Its agenda is aimed at fostering a range of collaborative efforts between state/local government and private firms.
National Veterans Training Institute
CU-Denver, working in cooperation with Colorado's Department of Labor and Employment, houses the nation's first National Veterans Training Institute. The program provides skills development training to approximately 1,200 veterans' employment representatives and employees of the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program. The program indirectly serves
veterans, with an increased emphasis on improving the quality and quantity of services for disabled veterans.
The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS).


Faculty / 23
FACULTY
About 300 highly qualified faculty members teach full-time at CU-Denver; well over four in five have doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student.
RESEARCH/CREATIVE ACTIVITIES AWARDS
CU-Denver presented Research/Creative Activities Awards in 1988 to the following faculty (1-r): 1st row -Harvey Greenberg, Department of Mathematics; Zoe Erisman, College of Music; Kenneth Ortega, College of Engineering and Applied Science. 2nd row - Diane Wilk, School of Architecture and Planning; David Jonassen, School of Education; Peter deLeon, Graduate School of Public Affairs; and Lorna Moore, Department of Anthropology. Not shown: Rex Bums, Department of English, and Woodrow Eckard, Jr., College of Business and Administration.
SERVICE AWARDS
Service Awards for 1988 were awarded to the following CU-Denver faculty (1-r): 1st row - Jana Everett, Department of Political Science; Bennett Neiman, School of Architecture and Planning; and Janis Driscoll, Psychology. 2nd row - William Goodwin, School of Education; Thomas Arnberg, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Michael Hayes, College of Business and Administration; and Cecil Glenn, Educational Opportunity Program. Not shown: Mark Emmert, Graduate School of Public Affairs.


24 / General Information
STAFF HONORS
Each year in late spring, staff employees are honored for their years of service — for five years and in increments of five thereafter. Also, four outstanding staff members are selected, representing general administration, academic affairs, student academic services, and library.
Recipients of 1987 Outstanding Staff Awards: (back row, left to right) Gail Losh, Joan Turner, Martha Barrett; (front row, left to right) Nancy Wolff, Margaret Benjamin, Bellverie Ross.
TEACHING AWARDS, 1987-88
Faculty Awards for Teaching were presented to the following faculty in 1988 (1-r): 1st row - William Briggs, Department of Mathematics; Jean Cooper, College of Business and Administration; and Nancy Shanklin, School of Education. 2nd row - Mark Gelernter, School of Architecture and Planning; John Trapp, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Lloyd Burton, Graduate School of Public Affairs; Robert Wick, Library; and Richard Van De Weghe, Department of English. Not shown: Wanda Griffith, Department of Sociology. Professor Van De Weghe was selected Teacher of the Year.


Admission / 25
ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions and Records
University of Colorado at Denver
1200 Larimer St.
Denver, CO 80204
(303) 556-2660
General Policies
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment, as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success.
CU-Denver reserves the right to deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs unavailable at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have 60 hours toward graduation completed.
Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students
RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES
Undergraduate Fall Spring Summer
Students 1988 1989 1989
New Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 1
Transfer Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 1
Former University of July 22 Dec. 1 May 1
Colorado Students
Intrauniversity 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
Transfer Students International Students
Undergraduate: July 22 Dec. 1 May 1
Graduate: May 26 Oct. 27 March 10
The University reserves the right to change docu-ments/credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the
Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, ALL documents required for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions by the DEADLINE for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that sufficient time should be allowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previously. Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
New freshmen may apply for admission to the College of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Music.
General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Beginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado will be required to meet the following University-wide Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS): 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural sciences, 2 years of social science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language.


26 / General Information
Specific College Requirements:
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION English (one year of speech/debate and two years of compo-
sition are strongly recommended) .................. 4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one
year of geometry) ................................. 4
Natural sciences (laboratory science) ................ 2
Social sciences (including history) .................. 2
Foreign language (both units in a single language) ... 2
Academic electives ................................... 2
(Additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.)
Total 16
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE1
English (literature, composition, grammar) .......... 4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra .......................................... 2
Geometry ......................................... 1
Additional mathematics (trigonometry
recommended) ................................. 1
Natural sciences including one year of physics
and one year of chemistry ........................ 2
Foreign language (both units in a single language) .. 2
Academic electives .................................._3
Total 16
COLLEGE OF MUSIC
English ............................................. 4
Natural sciences .................................... 3
Social science ...................................... 2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language) ................ 2
Mathematics ......................................... 3
Academic electives ................................. 1
Total 15
All students are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Music, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
English (literature, composition, grammar) ............. 4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics) ............................ 3
Natural sciences ....................................... 3
Social science ......................................... 2
1 See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for more specific information.
Foreign language
(both units in a single language ................ 2
Academic elective .................................. 1
Total *15
Beginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado will be required to meet the following University-wide minimum academic preparation: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language.
MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS)
Success in undergraduate study is directly related to high school preparation. Sufficiently prepared students have a better probability of success. The MAPS focus on what the student has studied in preparation for college. Admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both what the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University.
Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other standards of the University (e.g., test scores, class rank) and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation. Credits so taken will count toward graduation provided the CU college normally accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. In some cases, a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements either by 1) courses taken at CU, 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education, 3) completion of additional high school credits, 4) credit-by-examina-tion programs, or 5) other ways as approved by each college.


Admission / 27
All applicants who meet the above MAPS requirements are classified in two ways for admission purposes:
1. Preferred consideration is given to applicants who rank in the top 40% of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business and engineering applicants are expected to have strong mathematics and science background, higher class rank, and higher test scores. Music applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.
2. Applicants who rank in the lower 60% of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit are reviewed on an individual basis.
To be considered for admission, applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an average standard GED score of 45 with no score below 36 on any section of the test. Applicants who complete the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test also must submit scores from Test VI, "English as a Second Language."
HOW TO APPLY
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official.
4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to send a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Apti-
tude Test (SAT) and to request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain information about when and where these tests are administered by contacting their counselors.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver to receive scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. Complete a Request for Additional Score Report at test centers or from the offices listed below.
Registration Department
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717). International students must submit proof of language proficiency.
Minimum admissions have been developed for all public four-year institutons in Colorado. However, transfer applicants who meet these standards are not guaranteed admission. They also must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado and its individual colleges. To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions.
1. Have earned fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and meet the first-time FRESHMAN standards for the institution.
2. Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaranteed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qualifications of that agreement.


28 / General Information
3. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.0 GPA if transferring for Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, or the University of Northern Colorado.
b. 2.5 GPA if transferring from any other postsecondary institution.
Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Music. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the College of Music for audition information (556-2727).
2. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be denied admission to the College of Business and referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration.
No applicant will be accepted with less than a 2.0 GPA in all college level course work attempted. Similarly, no applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
3. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will still be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are (1) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
HOW TO APPLY
1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 nonrefundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
4. Students who have attended a two-year school or community college and were enrolled in the Guaranteed Transfer Program to transfer to CU-Denver, should submit a copy of the Guaranteed Transfer "contract" with their application.
Liberal arts and music applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
All engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at


Admission / 29
other institutions can be applied to a degree program at CU-DenVer. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken Pass/Fail are transferred when a grade of C or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept up to 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious/dbctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits tfansfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from | a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Music requires that 56 of the hours needed for graduation be completed in residence. This total may be reduced by the faculty on the basis of excellent; work done at CU-Denver and high scholarship exhibited at institutions previously attended. In no case shall the minimum of fewer than 40 hours distributed over three semesters.
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Former students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 non-refund-
able application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204.
Students who last attended less than one year ago but attended another college or university during the interim are required to pay a $30 transfer application fee. Transcripts must be requested by the student and sent by the registrar of the other institution(s) to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204..
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver's schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Information about requirements for each college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of I-20's.
Fall Spring Summer
1988 1989 1989
Undergraduates:
July 22 December 1, 1988 Mayl
Graduates:
May 26 October 27,1988 March 10


30 / General Information
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. Applications are available from The Graduate School six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degree-seeking status. They may attend summer terms as a non-degree student. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms.
CU-DENVER INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intrauniversity Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applications and deadline information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying.
HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
High school juniors and seniors with proven academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (303-556-2660).
Admission of Graduate Degree Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following:
Programs in Business
Office of Graduate Studies
Graduate School of Business Administration
623-4436
Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-2755
Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 556-2825
All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
As a principal part of its mission, CU-Denver offers graduate and professional-level programs and during the 1987-1988 academic year, approximately 45 percent of the student body was enrolled at the graduate level.
Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schools and colleges (School of Education, College of Engineering and Applied Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of Music), and outside The Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Architecture and Planning, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. The particular admission and graduation requirements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections of this catalog.
GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES
Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specific requirements of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this catalog as well as the college or school sections for requirements and deadlines for specific programs.


Admission / 31
Admission of Non-Degree Students
Persons who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree may be admitted as non-degree students. In general, correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification! should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours transferable toward a degree program. Students should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the acceptable number of hours which may be taken as a non-degree student.
Undergraduate. CU-Denver will enroll persons who are at least (20 years of age without an undergraduate degree as hon-degree students, but applicants are encouraged; to apply to an undergraduate program rather than to apply as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Non-degree students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 at CU-Denver.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer terms.
Graduate. Students with the baccalaureate degree who are noij accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who have attained the degree or credential status they want, but who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a itieed to make up deficiencies before entering a specific program.
Non-degijee students should be aware that generally only a limited number of course credits taken by a non-degreei student may be applied later toward a degree program at CU-Denver.
To permit continuing registration as a non-degree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer terms.
HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION
To apply! f°r admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions. Return completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $10' non-refundable application fee is required. No additional credentials qre required. Applicants who seek teacher 1
1 Subject to change
certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Nondegree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
CHANGING STATUS FROM NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Non-degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program, with the approval of the dean. Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the fall semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.)
Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program.
Official Notification of Admission
Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions on a Statement of Admission Eligibility Form. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after submitting application materials should contact the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660.
Tentative Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. Registration for subsequent terms will be denied when documents have not been received.


UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION1’2’3
Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission1 Required Credentials When to Apply Notes
FRESHMAN (Student seeking bachelor’s degree who has never attended a collegiate institution IN GENERAL: a) Ranks in top 40c/c of high school graduating class. b) Has 15 units of acceptable high school work. c) Test scores: ACT comp: 23 or SAT comb: 1000 Complete application $30 applicable fee Official high school transcript showing rank-in-class, date of graduation, 7th semester grades. 8th semester courses Official ACT or SAT score report. Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Seniors who meet or exceed all admission criteria may apply as early as Oct. 1 for following fall. For specific requirements refer to the college sections of this bulletin. For example: Music requires an audition.
Note: Business and Engineering applicants are expected to have higher test scores, class rank, and number of academic units.
TRANSFER (Student seeking a bachelor’s degree who has attended a collegiate institution other than CU) IN GENERAL: Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants must have minimum 2.0 GPA on all work attempted if they have completed 30 or more semester hours. Business and Engineering applicants will be required to have a higher GPA.4 Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts sent from each college attended. Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Liberal Arts and Music transfers with fewer than 13 sem. hrs. of college work. Business transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs.. and Engineering transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs. must also submit all freshman credentials.
NON-DEGREE (Student who is not seeking a degree at this institution) Must be high school graduate or have a G.E.D. Must be at least 20 years old Complete application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Applications will also be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Non-degree students who have earned a baccalaureate degree should see Graduate School section for additional information.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Returning non-degree and or degree student who has not attended another institution since CU) Must be in good standing Former student application Not later than:3 July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Will be admitted to their previous major unless a new major is requested. Students under academic suspension in certain schools or colleges at the University of Colorado may enroll during the summer terms to improve their grade-point averages.
FORMER CU STUDENT (Degree student who has attended another institution since attending CU) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts from each intervening college Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
CHANGE OF STATUS: NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE (CU non-degree student who wishes to enter a degree program) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee CU transcript Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Applications will be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Must meet the same criteria as transfer student.
CHANGE OF STATUS: DEGREE TO NON-DEGREE (Former CU degree student who has graduated and wishes to take additional work) Must have completed degree Non-degree student application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Only students who have completed and received degrees are eligible to change to non-degree status.
INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER (Student who has been enrolled on one CU campus and wishes to take courses on another) Must be in good standing Former student application Transfer to Denver, not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 1 for summer Transfer from Denver: refer to the bulletin for other campus. Transfers from Denver to another campus of CU should refer to the bulletin of the campus to which they are applying for additional requirements. Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER (Students who wish to change from one CU college to another. e.g.. from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the College of Business) Same as for transfer. Must be a continuing student enrolled on the campus to which you are applying. Intrauniversity transfer application CU transcript 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
'Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary. 2Foreign students should see International Students in the Admissions section of this bulletin. 'Preferred deadline. 4Applicants who have earned 12-29 semester hours must meet freshman standards or have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.5. (Applicants transferring from Colorado School of Mines. CSU. UNC. UCB. or UCCS must have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.0.)


Tuition and Fees / 33
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Office of Admissions and Records for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1987-88 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
Other Fees1
1. Student Activity Fee (required for all students):
Fall semester 1987 ............... $ 12.00
Spring semester 1988 ............. $ 12.00
Summer term 1988 ................. $ 8.00
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required for all students:
Each term ........................ $ 19.00
3. Student Information System Fee (a
non-refundable fee required of all students each term) ....................... $ 5.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term
for all new students): ........... $ 15.00
This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student's first registration to cover costs of generating tran-
scripts.
5. Health Insurance Fee (optional):
Fall semester ....................... $ 109.00
Spring semester (includes summer) . $109.00 Summer term only ..................... $ 57.00
Students jWho wish health insurance coverage must complete and submit a request card with the Bursar's Office before the end of the drop/add period.
The insurance program primarily subsidizes major medical expenses according to the schedule of benefits stated in the insurance brochure, which may be obtained from the Office of Student Academic Servic-
es. Dependent coverage (spouse and/or children) also is available at an additional charge. Further information on health insurance is available from the Office of Student Academic Services, 556-2861.
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment.
7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master's degree is completed. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as “Candidate for Degree." Students enrolled only as "Candidate for Degree" pay $124 in the Graduate School of Business,
1 Subject to change.
$102 in the School of Education, $111 in the College of Engineering and the Graduate School of Public Affairs, $94 in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and $98 for all other programs.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit ................. $ 20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
9. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses):
Music fee ........................ $ 24.00
College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Arrangements may be made through the Bursar's Office at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term. Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an additional service charge.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student's control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will not be considered for a student's failure to comply with published deadlines, or changes in employment under the student's control.
Please note: tuition appeals must be filed within four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed.


FALL AND SPRING 1987-1988 TUITION
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES AND THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree (SO)
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 69 $ 312
2 138 624
3 207 936
4 276 1,248
5 345 1,560
6 414 1,872
7 483 2,602
8 552 2,602
9 570 2,602
10-15 576 2,602
each credit hour over 15 69 312
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 82 $ 325
2 164 650
3 246 975
4 328 1,300
5 410 1,625
6 492 1,950
7 574 2,708
8 656 2,708
9 675 2,708
10-15 682 2,708
each credit hour over 15 82 325
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with
programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 94 $ 329
2 188 658
3 282 987
4 376 1,316
5 470 1,645
6 564 1,974
7 658 2,739
8 752 2,739
9 778 2,739
10-15 785 2,739
each credit hour over 15 94 329
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with
programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $111 $ 344
2 222 688
3 333 1,032
4 444 1,376
5 555 1,720
6 666 2,064
7 777 2,865
8 888 2,865
9 916 2,865
10-15 925 2,865
each credit hour over 15 111 344
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning, the College of Music, and NON-DEGREE GRADUATE STUDENTS (SW) and non-Denver campus programs: Nursing, Medicine, Law, etc.
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 98 $ 329
2 196 658
3 294 987
4 392 1,316
5 490 1,645
6 588 1,974
7 686 2,739
8 784 2,739
9 811 2,739
10-15 819 2,739
each credit
hour over 15 98 329
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the
School of Education
Credit hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $306 344
2 306 688
3 306 1,032
4 408 1,376
5 510 1,720
6 612 2,064
7 714 2,865
8 816 2,865
9 918 2,865
10-15 918 2,865
each credit
hour over 15 102 344
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the
Graduate School of Business Administration
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 124 $ 344
2 248 688
3 372 1,032
4 496 1,376
5 620 1,720
6 744 2,064
7 868 2,865
8 992 2,865
9 1,020 2,865
10-15 1,030 2,865
each credit
hour over 15 124 344
Graduate degree students who are registered as “candidate for degree” will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System fee.
NOTE: THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME.


Residency Classification / 35
Audit
To qualify as an auditor for Fall or Spring Semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor's cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the Fall or Spring Semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101,
et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor's parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado begins the day subsequent connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evi-
1A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.
dence one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one's 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student's tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as non-resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition the Office of Admissions and Records for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted no later than two weeks before the first day of classes of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a nonresident so that the classification will be determined prior to registration and payment of fees. It is preferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Record-Office after they have registered, before the end of the drop/add period. At that time the student's bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.


36 / General Information
FINANCIAL AID
Director:Ellie Miller
Office:North Classroom Building, Room 1030 Telephone:556-2886
The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment considers qualified students for financial aid awards. If the student's application materials are received before the April 29, 1988, priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment), and/or longterm loan funds. For the past several years, these packages have consisted of approximately 45% grant funds and 55% of self-help funds (work-study, loan, unmet need). (Graduate students have only been receiving approximately 12% in grant funds.) If applications are recieved after the April 29 priority date, the student is usually considered only for Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Guaranteed Student Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students). These funds are not allocated to CU-Denver; they are available throughout the year to students who qualify. There are three separate deadlines for applying for Advantage Schloar-ship; refer to the separate brochure for further information.
Applicants for Colorado Fellowship, Deans Scholars, and Regents Scholars are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (The Graduate School, undergraduate dean's office, and the Office of Admissions and records respectively). All other students are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid.
Eligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Fellowship).
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student (except for students applying for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certification students are eligible to apply only for outside student loans (Guaranteed Student Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, or Supplemental Loan for Students).
3. Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of credits.
4. Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs.
5. Document financial need by completing the entire need-based application (except for the following programs which are not need-based: Colorado Fellowship, Advantage Scholarship, Colorado Scholars, Deans Scholars, Regents Scholars, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, Supplemental Loan for Students, Colorado No-Need Work-Study, Short Term Loan, Lind Scholarship, and many outside scholarships).
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes (except for the following programs: Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Advantage Scholarship, Perkins Loan, College Work-Study, Guaranteed Student Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students).
7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
8. Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service (required for all males who are at least 18 years old and born after December 31, 1959).
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the financial aid counselors before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds. The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document financial need and complete their application process as soon as possible after January 1, 1988. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement or CSS Financial Aid form) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year. If you complete your file after April 29, 1988, your awards will probably be limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate students only) and/or outside student loans (Guaranteed Student Loan, Supplemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year.
It is the student's responsibiliy to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and students are referred to the Financial Aid Handbook for complete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
ON-LINE APPLICATION INFORMATION
Please try the new on-line Financial Aid Information System. This system will help you complete the ACT Family Financial Statement, provide you with important financial aid information and current news, and produce a printed copy of your institutional financial aid application for you to turn into the Office of Financial Aid. To use the system, go to a CU-Denver computer lab (North Classroom Bldg., Rooms 1206 or 2206), sign on to the CU-Denver vax computer and enter "money" (in small letters) when prompted


Financial Aid / 37
for a login. The system will take you to a self-explanatory menu. If you have any questions about how to use the system, ask one of the computer advisers.
Qualification
Financial Need. Most financial aid is based on the concept of financial need. Your financial aid counselor calculates financial need as: 1) cost of attendance, minus family contributon which is 2) Student/spouse contribution, and 3) Parents' contributon (for dependent students only).
The cost J of attendance is the cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment determines standard budgets for students based upon actual tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
Independent Student. The federal government has specific guidelines that must be followed to define a self- supporting student (one who reports only his/her own income and assets when applying for aid). For 1988-89, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old of older as of December 31, 1989. If you are under 24, you are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories:
1. Single undergraduate student with no dependents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1986 and 1987 federal income tax returns. Also, you must demonstrate that you are self- sufficient by having total income (including financial aid) or at least $4,000 annually in 1986 and 1987 (or during 1985 and 1986 if you received federal financial aid during 1987-88).
2. Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1988 federal income tax return.
3. Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1988 federal income tax return.
4. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse.
5. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces.
6. Orphan or ward of the court.
7. Appeal to the Financial Aid Committee for an exception to these guidelines and be approved by the Committee because of your unusual circumstances.
If your student/spouse contributon plus your parents' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, you will not qualify for need-based financial aid. For 1987-88, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses per month: single students living with parents $285/month; single students not living with parents $645/month; for each dependent child add $175/month for child care. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $750 per semester, and non-resident tuition ranged from $1687-$2750 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by about 5% for the 1988-89 school year.
The contributions from the student/spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other factors. You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases the standardized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Financial Aid Committee. FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLEMENT (NOT REPLACE) FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS.
Course Loads. General financial aid (work-study, grants, Perkins Loans) undergraduate recipients usually must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semester during the academic year (fall/spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check your award letter for the exact number of hours required). Pell grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients must carry at least six credits per semester for undergraduates and three graduate credits for graduates. Summer term minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time: undergraduate — 8 hours, graduate — 3 graduate hours; Half-time: undergraduate — 4 hours, graduate — 2 graduate hours. Higher or lower standards may be required for individual awards. For further information contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Satisfactory Academic Progress. CU-Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students are referred to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree Students. Non-degree students are not pursuing a degree in a technical sense and, therefore, are only eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time — Advantage Scholarship.
Continuing Education/Community College of Denver Courses. Some courses cannot be included when minimum course loads and satisfactory academic progress are determined. Classes offered through the CU-Denver Division of Continuing Education or through the Community College of Denver cannot be included.
Residency Status. You are required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident student, you are potentially eligible for more financial aid programs since you can be considered for the State of Colorado aid funds.
Refunds and Repayments. Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the reci-


38 / General Information
pient's financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
Appeals. Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee reviews most appeals for exceptions to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy and the Financial Aid Committee reviews all other appeals.
Reapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all application documents have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If the student is not eligible for any awards, a notification of non-award is mailed with an explanation of the reasons for non- eligibility. If awarded, an award letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s).
Types of Aid
The federal government funds the following programs:
1 .Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree.
2.Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5%
and no payments are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time.
3.College Work-Study. A program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the following programs.
1 .Colorado Student Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study. A program similar to the College Work-Study program, but limited to resident undergraduate students.
Pell Grant. Your elibibility for the Pell Grant (federally funded) is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict formula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student's eligibility index, enrollment status, residency classification, and living status. Students are eligible for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor's degree by June 1, 1988.
Outside Student Loans. Your eligibiity for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The GUARANTEED STUDENT LOAN (GSL) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify. Most students who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for GSL. The primary purpose of this program is to make low-interest, long-


Registration / 39
term loans available to students to help them meet their postsecondary educational expenses.
The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term loan program for students who do not document financial need for the GSL. Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the same terms. The! program for parents is called the PARENTS LOAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assistance Center, and the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. Full-time undergraduate resident studerits who apply for College Work-Study and who do not document sufficient financial need may be considered for Colorado No-Need Work-Study. Scholarship information can be found in the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section of the Library. Handicapped students should inquire about the Ahlin Scholarship in the Auraria Student Assistance Center (556-3474). Application information about the Lind Scholarship is released each May and publicized on campus and in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. All applicants for need-based financial aid are automatically considered for the Arnold Scholarship. Minority applicants and students whose parents did not graduate with a bachelor's degree are encouraged to apply for the Advantage Scholarship. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of aid through the Graduate School and their academic department. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are availably as well as Financial Aid Advances. American Indian students should inquire in the office for Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships.
REGISTRATION
Selecting a Program and Courses
Students should review the following sections of this catalog, that describe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information.
Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes, published several weeks before registration. These are available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning a program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration.
Graduate students should contact their graduate program for assistance.
Course Scheduling and Abbreviations
For information on scheduling courses, students are encouraged to contact an advisor through their college or school dean's office. In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the course. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course:
Level of Courses 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000
Student Classification Lower division Lower division Upper division Upper division
Graduate students or qualified seniors who have the instructor’s or dean’s permission
Master and Ph.D. graduate students Master’s Thesis Doctor’s Thesis
7000
7000
8000
The Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 4000 and 5000 levels. However, the evaluation and requirements for students enrolled at the graduate (5000) level will be different than those enrolled at the undergraduate (4000) level. It should be expected that work at the graduate level would involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the undergraduate level.
The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long.


40 / General Information
Hence a student enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 15-week term. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions.
Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are:
Coreq. — Corequisite Hrs. —Hours Lab. —Laboratory Led. —Lecture
Prer. —Prerequisite Rec. —Recitation Sem. —Semester Wk.-Week
Thus, the description of CHEM. 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit which is divided into 3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit. Further, the student must have completed CHEM. 1010 (the prerequisite) before enrolling.
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation, conducted by the Office of the Dean of Student Academic Services and the various schools and colleges, introduces the academic programs, activities, and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and on degree requirements also is provided.
POOLED COURSES
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College. CU-Denver degree students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes. CU-Denver students must complete 15 semester hours in CU-Denver courses before registering for courses in the common pool. After that time, students are required to take at least half their hours in CU-Denver courses each term.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll for courses offered by the various campuses of the Community College of Denver. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitution-ally. Registration is on a space available basis. CCD courses are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average.
Metropolitan State College courses taken while the student is enrolled at CU-Denver will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and may be used as elective credit. MSC courses will not meet major requirements or core requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Registration
Beginning with the summer 1988 term, CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time.
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of College campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus.
Note: Degree students may register concurrently for the fall and spring semesters only (not summer). Each campus may further limit concurrent registration


Registration / 41
by resident students if the campus enrollment cap is reached.
A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean, and
2. the course is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver, and
3. the student obtains approval from the academic dean, and
4. there is space available at the other (host) campus, and
5. the student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU- Denver rates, and
6. the home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes, and
7. the concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses.
Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for “no-credit" through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences Center students: please note the restrictions above. Also, students from other CU campuses cannot register concurrently for MSC courses.
Course Loads
Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. The student should obtain the dean's signature on the Registration Form or Course Change Form during Walk-In Registration.
Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three-semester-hour course during a summer term will require nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class.
Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed:
Employed40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week: 5-8 semester hours
20-29 hours per week: 7-11 semester hours
10-19 hours per week: 9-15 semester hours
Students must weigh their capabilities against the demands of each course.
No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree.
No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given summer term can be applied to a graduate degree.
DEFINITION OF FULL- AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirments for financial aid will be listed in the student's financial aid award letter.
Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time 12 or more semester hours
Half-time 6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number — 5000)
8 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports, or thesis preparation)


42 / General Information
Half-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number - - 5000)
4 or more hours of mixed level classes Summer
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time 8 or more semester hours
Half-time 4 or more semester hours
Full-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number - - 5000)
5 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports, or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number - - 5000)
3 or more hours of mixed level classes
Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop/add period.
These hours do not include interinstitutional hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Students receiving Veteran's benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of fulltime status for summer terms.
CCD courses are not considered for full- or halftime status. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
SHORT TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit
Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. By passing an examination, the student will be given credit for the course to sat-


Academic Policies / 43
isfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student's formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 3, 4, or 51 * * on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 34 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. For more information contact your high school counselor or the Director of Admissions for CU-Denver.
Credit By Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. [Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged. Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.
College-level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. For more information call 556-286l|.
Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
To have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD
1 Students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science must
receive scores of 4 or 5 for credit to be granted; students with
scores of 3 may be considered by the department concerned. All
credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance.
Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS’ TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and procedures for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass-/Fail Procedure.
A—superior/exceUent—4 credit points per credit hour.
B—good/better than average—3 points per credit hour.
C—competent/average—2 credit points per hour.
D—minimum passing—1 credit point per credit hour.
F—Failing—no credit points per credit hour.
Beginning with the Spring 1984 Semester, the University approved use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per


44 / General Information
credit hour, and a B - corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors in those schools and colleges may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF—incomplete—regarded as F if not completed within one year maximum.
IW—incomplete—regarded as W if not completed within one year maximum.
IP—in progress—thesis at the graduate level only.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student's completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Students should not re-register for courses for which they have received INCOMPLETES.
Students receiving INCOMPLETES: most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to “complete" the incomplete.
P/F—pass/fail—P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor's degree.
H/P/F—honors/pass/fail—intended for honors
courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
SPECIAL SYMBOLS
NC — indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
W — indicates withdrawal without credit.
Y — indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 500 level of a slash course (400/500) will be expected to complete additional work
and be evaluated commensurate with graduate standards as specified by the course instructor.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pass/fail basis should do so during the regular registration. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis only may be made during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester.
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register on a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of d and above convert to grades of P.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records.
5. Exception to the pass/fail regulations is permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. If you register for a course on a pass/fail basis, you may not later decide that you want a letter grade. Each school or college limits the hours and courses for which you may register on a pass/fail basis. Please note: many colleges will not accept a "P" grade for transfer credit.
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken Pass/Fail Maximum of 1 semester hour of Pass/Fail for every 8 semester hours completed and passed at the University
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken Pass/Fail. Upper division socio-hu-manistic electives are acceptable, otherwise major department approval is required; students without a major are not eligible to take courses Pass/Fail. Recommended maximum one course/semester. Includes courses taken in the honors program Maximum of 1 semester hour of Pass/Fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semester hours taken in the college
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester. Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL. 1002 Proficiency Test or MATH. 1002 Test May not be used by students graduating with only 30 semester hours taken at the University
Music Only non-music electives may be taken Pass/Fail. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester Includes courses taken in the honors program.


Academic Policies / 45
NO CREDIT
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not letter decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades of P, JVC, Y, W, IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average.
If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in The Graduate School.
The grade-point average does not appear on official
transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester.
Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such students will be notified by their school or college.
GRADE REPORTS
Grade reports normally are available for students to pick up at the Records Office within two to three weeks after the end of the semester. Students must present picture identification. Grade reports are not automatically mailed; however, a self-addressed, stamped envelope may be supplied to the Records Office by individual students who wish to have their grades mailed.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation.


46 / General Information
CU-Denver Chancellor Glendon F. Drake (left) and CU President E. Gordon Gee (right) share a moment together prior to the 1987 commencement ceremonies.
Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement.
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Boulder,


Adding/Dropping/Withdrawing / 47
Records Office, Campus Box B-7, Transcript Section, Regent Administrative Center 125, Boulder, CO 80309. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately five weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following:
1. Student's full name (include maiden or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded
6. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student."
7. Student's signature. (This is the student's authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office. Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution.
Adding and Dropping Courses1
ADDING COURSES
Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instructor approval will be required after the first week of classes.
DROPPING COURSES
1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the dropped courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor's signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student's permanent record with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an F grade. No adjustment of
1 For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Classes for the appro-
priate term.
tuition is made for courses which are dropped after the 12th day (8th day for the summer term) of full-term classes.
3. After the 10th week of a fall or spring semester (7th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student's control. In addition to the instructor's certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses. Tuition will be charged even though the drop is allowed.
4. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University, the student must obtain opproval of the dean's office, Bursar's Office, and Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student's permanent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student's permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran's benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term.
To withdraw from the University, a graduate student must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
For specific signatures, requirements, and tuition adjustment the student should refer to the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons' ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.


48 / General Information
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
A directory of records, listing all educational records maintained on students by this institution, may be found in the Office of Admissions and Records on each campus.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in each and every term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records.
Students must request each term to have directory information withheld for that term. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld for that term, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Admissions and Records.
University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records
STUDENTS:
DO have the right to view and inspect theireducation records (excluding any financial records of their parents).
DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University.
Directory Information includes:
name, address, telephone number date and place of birth class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activites
physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes
DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone.
PARENTS:
DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is financially dependent upon them. The Record Office, in NC 1003, 556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL:
DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties.
DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-educational interests, without consent of the student.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS:
DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid.
PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY:
Do have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and others, but such information will only be released by the Dean of Student Academic Services, 556-8427.
These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556- 2389.
Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed:
Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90 + hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.


Special Programs and Facilities / 49
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the University through a variety of networks and activities. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degreed former students are also welcome to participate.
Horizons, a newspaper published in the fall, winter, and spring of each year, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities on campus which might interest them. The Mack Easton Award for Distinguished Service, The Outstanding Alumnus Award, and the Legislative Recognition Award are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association. A program of alumni access to the campus recreation center, library, and parking lots is also available through the Association..
The governing board is comprised of alumni representing all of the schools and colleges on campus. This group plans events, implements programs, and raises funds with the goal of advancing the University and increasing the visibility of alumni.
Auraria Book Center
The Auraria Book Center carries a complete stock of academic, technical, reference, and examination preparation books. The Book Center also stocks computers and peripherals, software, and supplies for office, art, and engineering. Special orders for books are welcomed, and a search for out-of-print books is available at no charge.
Students should bring their printouts to locate course books. Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves; the course call number is printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional book.
When available, used books sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books returned within the first three weeks of a regular semester's start.
The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Center lower mall and offers extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and refunds and exchanges also are handled here.
Photocopying services are available in the Convenience Store. Transparencies, reductions, and other options may be specified, and a self-serve copier is available for small orders.
Two ID's are required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard and VISA.
The Book Center is located in the Auraria Student Center, lower level, 9th and Lawrence Streets. For further information and hours, contact 556-3230.
Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center is a non-profit organization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center.
The Center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time. It is divided into two toddler classrooms, three preschool class-


50 / General Information
rooms, and one kindergarten/after-school classroom. Children must be 18 months to six years of age to attend.
The philosophy of the Center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide safe, nurturing environment. The program involves the assessment of individual needs, establishing goals and activities that are appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually-oriented program provided at the Center.
Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time or hourly basis to accommodate students' varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188.
Auraria Student Center
The Student Center, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, the campus Book Center, a study lounge, game room, offices for student government and organizations, a copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, meeting and conference facilities, and a tavern.
Computing Services
Computing Services supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. Most administrative processing is done in the office of Management Systems in Boulder with data entry, output processing, and user support provided by Computing Services in Denver. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through Computing Services.
The Denver campus maintains a PRIME 9950 under PRIMOS, a VAX 8700 under VMS, and a series of computers (Pyramid 90X, 8- processor Sequent B21000, Intel 16-processor Hypercube) under the UNIX operating system. Access to all machines is through a communications network that allows connection to the campus libraries' on-line card-catalog (CARL-PAC) as well as to any of the other CU campuses. The VMS and UNIX machines are all connected over the ethernet which also is a node on the growing Colorado SuperNet network. This net provides access to many academic computing networks (ARPANET, NSFNET, JVNCNET, CSNET, etc.) as well as high-speed connections to the Colorado School of Mines, University of Denver, Colorado Springs and Boulder CU campuses, and Colorado State University. CU-Denver also is a BITNET site. A significant amount of computing also is accomplished on the campus' 520 personal computers both in laboratories (7 teaching labs and 3 public labs are available) and in offices.
Computing Services staff provides assistance to academic and administrative users on all computing systems available and on every phase of their use. Advisers and a full-time academic user services staff assist faculty as well as students enrolled in courses using computing with questions regarding programming and the use of computer systems and software available. Administrative users are assisted by a data processing staff as well as user services personnel. Computing systems on the campus are maintained by an operations staff who also assist faculty and staff with hardware planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems.
The goal of Computing Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583.
Division of Continuing Education
Through its Division of Continuing Education (CE), the University of Colorado at Denver provides off-campus credit and noncredit educational opportunities for the life-long learner and the non-traditional student. More than 7,000 employees of business, industry, and government, homemakers, senior citizens, and alumni participated in CE classes, workshops, and seminars during the past year.


Special Programs and Facilities / 51
To provide easy access to as many students as possible, CE uses the city and its environs as its classroom. CU-Denver's excellent faculty is teamed with highly talented part-time instructors from the Denver metropolitan area to ensure quality and excellence in instruction. Credit class offerings provide a linkage between CU-Denver's resident degree program on-campus and the part-time, off-campus student. Programs are specially designed to offer career updating for such professionals as teachers, engineers, attorneys, and architects.
CE delivers a wide array of noncredit courses for those interested in career updating, personal enrichment, and intellectual stimulation. Specific programs are developed at the request of business and professional groups. These programs include licensing and refresher courses for engineers, accountants, life insurance agents, and architects. Seminars and certificate programs for business and industry are designed to help keep supervisors and managers abreast of new technologies and their management. Courses in the arts and humanities explore such topics as parenting, self-awareness, music and art, photography, languages, and literature.
Through the off-campus programs, and as part of its public service mission, CU-Denver seeks to extend its educational resources to the off-campus student. Individuals, groups, and organizations with special education interests are invited to call the Division of Continuing Education at 556-2735.
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
In 1981-82, the University of Colorado Foundation established a Denver office. The CU Foundation was established in 1967 at the direction of the Board of Regents of the University as a privately governed, non-profit corporation, chartered under the laws of the State of Colorado. It is operated exclusively for charitable, scientific, or educational purposes designed to promote the welfare of CU. The CU Foundation is the approved agency to solicit, receive, and administer gifts from private sources.
International Education/Study Abroad
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships at CU-Boulder. The office also arranges study abroad programs and offers over 30 different programs around the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in these programs.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety, in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. Such programs are available at the Universities of Lancaster and Reading, England; the


52 / General Information
University of Bordeaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, West Germany; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technology in Monterrey, Mexico; the University of Seville, Spain; and Tunghai University in Taiwan.
For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive language learning. Single semester programs are offered in Chambery and Rennes, France; Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico; London, England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Seville and Alicante, Spain; and Taipei, Taiwan. Summer programs are located in Kassel, West Germany; Perugia, Italy; and London, England. Special summer programs, e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific departments upon request.
Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these study abroad programs. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for most of the academic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to program costs in most cases.
More information about study abroad programs is available in the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741.
Auraria Student Assistance Center
The Auraria Student Assistance Center (ASAC) is composed of five offices offering specialized assistance to all present and prospective Auraria students.
1. Office of Information and Referral Services. This is a central information source that provides objective assistance to prospective students desiring to enroll at CU-Denver or one of the other academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
2. Office of Career Planning Placement Services. Assistance is offered to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment.
3. Office of Disabled Student Services. This officer provides academic support of services to ensure programmatic access for students with disabilities.
4. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. Campus branch office of the State of Colorado Department of Social Services. This office assists disabled students in becoming fully employable and self-supporting.
5. Office of International Student Services. The office assists international students on campus from 80 countries by providing support services and aiding in bridging the cultural gaps which many of them experience when entering the community to attend college.
6. Office of Off-Campus Housing Referral Services. Provides information on apartment and dormitory living arrangements.




"Student Academic Services strives to create a University environment which enables students, faculty, and staff to be colleagues in the lifelong process of learning and which provides students with a satisfying total educational experience."
— Mary Lou Fenili
Dean, Student Academic Services


Student Academic Services
Dean: Mary Lou Fenili
Assistant Dean: George H. Wayne
Staff Assistant: Bellverie E. Ross
Offices: North Classroom Bldg., Room 2012
Telephone: 556-8427
Directors:
Diane Fries, Testing Center Cecil Glenn, Educational Opportunity Program Kathy Jackson, Academic Center for Enrichment Pam Kesson-Craig, Center for Women's Resources Jan Michalski, Center for Internships and Cooperative Education
Bruce Williams; Student Activities and Veteran Affairs
Student Life
In 1983 The College Board published Today's Urban University Students: Part 1, Profile of a New Generation, which studied ten urban universities including CU-Denver. This report emphasized that significant percentages of the students at urban universities reflected the diversities of their environments: they are older than those considered to be traditional college students; have employment and family responsibilities in addition to their academic programs; include substantial numbers of minorities, women, and single parents; and ale more often than not enrolled part-time.
To meet the needs of this diverse student population, CU-Denver provides student life programs and activities designed to complement students' academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. Student life programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership through opportunities to practice leadership, decisionmaking, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for self-realization and growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing institutional spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community.
Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the division of Student Academic Services of CU- Denver, and the Auraria Student Assistance Center contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
Dean of Student Academic Services
The dean's office provides vision, leadership, influence, and advocacy on behalf of students and supervises the provision of programs and services for students by Student Academic Services offices. The Dean serves as liaison with the Associated Students of CU-Denver and its clubs and organizations; coordinates orientation and commencement, the Senior Citizens Program, and the Ahlin Scholarship Fund for disabled students; administers the Student Code of Conduct and student grievance procedure; and assures CU-Denver representation in Auraria-shared student services and activities. For the convenience of CU-Denver students, all Student Academic Services offices, including the dean's office are open until 7 p.m. two evenings a week. The dean's office is located in Room 2012 of the North Classroom Building, telephone 556-8427.
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCUD assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, issues concerning student status and other information of interest to students in general. ASCUD further provides students with assistance with grievances and with the opportunity to become more intimately involved with the University community through


56 / Student Academic Services
Students elected to run student government gain valuable leadership experience.
active participation in student government itself or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning ASCUD services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Center, Room 340, 556-2510
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Contact the office for further details at 556-3333, Student Center, Room 255A.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper is to advocate and provide a marketplace of ideas from which students may make an impartial judgment of their own. The newspaper strives to include a combination
Students gain valuable journalism experience working on the Advocate, CU-Denver's student newspaper.
of good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is to be a tool to assist in the encouragement of and development for writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff.
Student Activities
The Office of Student Activities is the coordinating, resource, and general information center for student government, student clubs and organizations, student programs, Greek social organizations, and the academic honor societies. All student fee expenditures are monitored by this office to assure compliance with CU-Denver, ASCUD, and state regulations and procedures. The Student Activities Officer represents the Dean of Student Academic Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, ASCUD, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The Office of Student Activities is located in the Student Center, Room 153, 556- 3399.
Through the Center for Academic Enrichment students receive tuitorial assistance in specific subjects from their peers.
Academic Center for Enrichment
The Academic Center for Enrichment is a learning assistance center designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Services are available to all students. The Center's services include: tutoring, workshops, credit courses, consulting, and a minority resources library.
Tutoring.Free tutoring is available in many subject areas. Individual or group sessions are held on weekdays/evenings.
Workshops. Free study skills and computer workshops are provided on such topics as test-taking,


Study Skills Courses / 57
memory techniques, notetaking, introduction to the personal computer, and word processing.
Courses. Credit courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of 1) college survival skills (study skills and computer word processing); 2) English as a second language; 3) developmental composition and reading; and 4) developmental math and problem solving. These courses may be used as electives in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Consulting.Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy also is available to students eligible for the federally-funded Student Support Services Program.
Library.The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
The Academic Center for Enrichment is located in the North Classroom Building, Room 2004, telephone 556-2802.
STUDY SKILLS COURSES
CMMU. 1400-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. For example, students will learn to skim and scan, summarize, increase their reading speed, and make inferences. Coreq., CMMU. 1410, STSK. 0806 and 0807.
CMMU. 1410-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level work and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students' needs will be incorporated into this class. Coreq., CMMU. 1400, STSK. 0806 and 0807.
CMMU. 1420-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Second term course. Continued work on grammar, syntax, and the mechanics of writing. Special attention is given to those aspects of the English language which pose problems for the non-native speaker, e.g., article usage, verb forms, and idioms.
CMMU. 1430-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. Designed as a transition course for ESL students in preparation for ENGL. 1010 or 1020. Emphasis is placed on the clarification of grammar and/or punctuation problems that individual students may have and on development of longer compositions.
STSK. 0700-1. Developmental Composition. This course is offered to reactivate and improve academic writing skills. Areas in which the student feels a need for growth are explored, and a program for improvement is then determined for each individual. The mechanics of writing and essay form are reviewed as a general guide for composition growth. Open to all students.
STSK. 0702-1. Developmental Reading. This course is offered as a means of enhancing general reading habits and improving study reading techniques. Comprehension and retention, vocabulary development, skimming, scanning, critical reading, and graphic reading are among the topics that will be explored.
STSK. 0703-1. College Preparatory Math I. This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in
fundamental mathematics skills. Students will study numbers and their properties, integers, rational numbers, fractions, and decimals. Simple linear equations and basic geometry also will be presented.
STSK. 0704-3. College Preparatory Math II. This course prepares students for MATH. 1010 by reviewing math concepts. Students will learn and practice linear equations, inequalities and sets, systems of equations, and polyno-mials/functions.
STSK. 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investigative and problem solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics investigation will be assigned. Open to all students.
STSK. 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and notetaking, study and memory techniques, test- taking skills, time management, library research strategies, word processing, and simple computer graphics.
STSK. 0800-1. Developmental Composition for ESL. This class meets for two hours each week. The course is taught in a small group format (limit 10) with attention given to sentence-level development and beginning paragraph development based dn Western thought patterns. Students also work on the mechanics of writing.
STSK. 0801-1. Communication Skills. This course meets for two hours each week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills to be emphasized include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communication, and pronunciation.
STSK. 0802-1. Improving Academic Reading Skills for ESL.
This class is designed to improve students' reading of academic texts. Students will work on skills such as comprehension, retention, skimming, scanning, and critical reading.
STSK. 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL. The primary focus of this class is to teach ESL students techniques for listening to and taking notes from college lectures. The class also will deal with the spoken English necessary to function in the classroom situations. Coreq., CMMU. 1400/1410 and STSK. 0807.
STSK. 0807-1. College Survival Skills for ESL. This course will cover topics such as college resources, time management, study and memory techniques, test anxiety, and testtaking skills. The goal of this course is to help students acquire skills which will enable them to "survive" in an academic setting. Coreq., CMMU. 1400/1410 and STSK. 0806.
Center for Internships and Cooperative Education
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with the on-the-job work experiences or internships related to their academic studies. Students are placed either as paid Co-op trainees or non-paid interns for credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in positions that complement their academic course work. Co-op students can work full time by alternating semesters of work with semesters of full-time school, or they can work part time year around.


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Staff of the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education enjoy their office space in Historic Ninth Street Park.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT
The Center is open to all students enrolled at least half- time in any CU-Denver college or school who have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5 and have completed at least 12 semester hours in residence (6 sem hrs. for graduate students).
BENEFITS OF A CO-OP/INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE
• early exposure to your chosen profession
• opportunity to apply classroom learning to a work situation
• gain valuable work experience that can lead to a permanent career position upon graduation
• earn academic credit for work experience
• earn money to help pay for college expenses
ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR WORK EXPERIENCE
Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non- paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, can apply to earn credit through courses in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Music. These courses are offered in all departments and students can earn up to 9 semester hours of credit for qualifying work experiences.
Pre-med student Karen Toth works as an intern at Webb-Waring Lung Institute. Approximately 80 percent of CU-Denver's pre-med students are accepted into medical schools.
Graduate students in some colleges and schools can earn internship experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose. Graduate students seeking credit for work experience should ask their faculty adviser for details. No credit is given for work experience in the College of Business and Administration or the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the present time.
For more information contact the Center at 1047 9th St. Park, 556-2892.
Educational Opportunity Program
The Educational Opportunity Program promotes the academic and personal growth and development of ethnic and racial minority and international students. The program's goals include promoting and enhancing majority students' understanding of minority and international cultures and heritages; promoting and enhancing minority and international students' understanding of their own cultures and heritages; orienting minority and international stu-


Women's Resources / 59
Students listen attentively to orientation for the Minority Early Enrollment Program at CU-Denver. They are among 50 minority high school students selected each semester for the program which pays for their tuition, fees, and books.
dents to the mission of CU-Denver and the values of higher education; providing leadership training and other personal, and social skills; and promoting the students' intellectual, social, professional, and moral development.
Among the programs offered are: Asian American Education, American Indian Education, Black Education, Hispanic American Education, Pre-Collegiate Development, Minority Early University Enrollment. Also, the program sponsors monthly ethnic cultural celebrations, human relations programming for the CU-Denver cofnmunity, and minority and international student Organizations.
The office is located in the North Classroom Building, Room 1028, telephone 556-2726.
Center for Women's Resources
The Center provides to CU-Denver students various services and programs aimed at enhancing students' academic experience.
A Re-Entry Program for Women who are returning to school after an interruption is offered each fall and spring semester. Part of the Re-Entry Program is included in the Student Orientation sessions offered the week before registration. In addition, the Center offers the following services: skill-building work-
shops, ongoing support groups, and referrals for services such as child care and career guidance.
The Center also provides: professional counseling to all CU-Denver students at no cost, support groups, educational programming, an extensive resource and referral bank for community services such as legal assistance, medical care, child care and professional organizations. The Center maintains a small lending library on various topics relevant to women, and publishes a quarterly newsletter containing campus and community events.
The Center sponsors several scholarships yearly, including the Patricia Schroeder Scholarship for Women, the Women's Center Scholarship, and the Joan Smith Memorial Scholarship.
The Center for Women's Resources at CU-Denver strives to provide support, advocacy, and professional service to the entire CU- Denver community. Stop by and see us in the North Classroom Building, Room 2013, or call 556-2815.
Ahlin Fund Scholarship
Applications for Ahlin Fund Scholarships to assist handicapped persons with education expenses at CU-Denver are available through the Dean of Student Academic Services office. Deadlines for application are July 1, November 1, and April 1.
The Constance Ahlin Fund provides full- or part-time tuition scholarships as well as transportation, assistance with child care, a work-study program, and other types of financial assistance. Students need to apply to and be accepted by the University. For more information call 556-8427.
Pam Kesson-Craig (right) and Melody Swan (center), director and program coordinator for the Center for Women's Resources, enjoy a light moment with Christina Dalpiaz, 1987 recipient of CU-Denver's Patricia Schroeder Scholarship. In addition to awarding scholarships, the Center offers counseling, workshops, and support groups for students.


60 / Student Academic Services
Non-degree Student Advising
All non-degree students who are undecided about a major may receive counseling about admission procedures and academic advising during orientation. See Schedule of Classes under Orientation. Non-degree students who have decided on a major should contact the school or college offering that major. For information contact 556-8427.
Orientation
ORIENTATION, ADVISING, REGISTRATION, AND SERVICES (OARS), an orientation program for new freshman and transfer students and students returning to CU-Denver after an absence, is held prior to the first day of classes at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters and the summer term. This program is conducted by Student Academic Services in conjunction with the schools and colleges within the University and is divided into separate sessions for undergraduate students, for graduate students, and for parents and spouses of students. OARS introduces and describes academic programs, activities, and services available at CU-Denver, and provides opportunities for students to receive academic advising, to resolve questions and concerns regarding registration, financial aid, and payment of fees.
Student Health Insurance Program
A student medical hospital-surgical plan is available for all students: dependent coverage also is available at
an additional charge. For further information refer to the portion on Tuition and Fees in the General Information section of this catalog, or call 556-8427.
Testing Center
This multi-faceted assistance center provides various testing for all levels of postsecondary education, professional certification, accreditation, and academic and career planning. The center provides registration information concerning the following:
ACT American College Test
CAT California Achievement Test
CEII Colorado Educational Interest Indicator
GRE Graduate Record Examination
GMAT Graduate Management Admissions Test
GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test
LSAT Law School Admission Test
MAT Miller Analogy Test
MBTI Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
MCAT Medical College Admission Test
TOEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language CLEP College Level Examination Program
SCII Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory
For further information contact 556-2861, North Classroom Building, Room 2006.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students attending CU-Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for each eligible student to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements of attendance, course load and content, and other regulations critical to the receipt of educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, VA tutorial assistance, the Colorado Tuition Assistance Program, and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, North Classroom Building, Room 4015.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
When a student enrolls in the University, he or she agrees to participate meaningfully in the life of the University and to share in the obligation to preserve and promote his or her rights as a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or tolerate any infringement on the rights of others.
Students should thoroughly familiarize themselves with the academic and nonacademic student conduct


Student Code of Conduct / 61
standards of the University. Academic standards questions should be directed to the dean of the school or college in which the student is enrolled. Nonacademic conduct questions should be directed to the assistant dean of Student Academic Services. Copies of the standards and information regarding all student grievance procedures may be obtained in the office of the Dean of Student Academic Services
You are accountable to both civil and University authorities for
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
A student is accountable to both civil and University authorities for acts which constitute violations of laws as well as violations of University rules and regulations. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the ground that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue [disciplinary action if a student violates standards as defined within this document and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posting a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The following guidelines attempt to balance a student's needs and the needs of the University. If a student is found in violation of the Code of Conduct, one of the University's primary interests will be to help the student avoid further inappropriate behavior and become a responsible member of the university community. However, if a student fails to correct inappropriate behavior, or violates the Code of Conduct, the University will consider taking disciplinary action that may, in some cases, lead to the student's suspension or permanent expulsion from the University.
Because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members, the following behaviors will not be tolerated.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, University officials,
faculty, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or any conduct that threatens or endangers the health, safety, or welfare of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands on, treating with violence, or threatening to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature.
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to defraud.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the private property of students, university officials, faculty, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denve-r/Auraria buildings or facilities.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the term firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Off Campus: physical abuse of any person, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person, or conduct which interferes with the public or private rights of citizens, when it is determined that the continued presence of the student would clearly constitute a threat or danger to the CU-Denver/Auraria community.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the redress of grievances. For additional information, students shall refer to the University of Colorado Students' Rights and Responsibilities Regarding Standards of Conduct, Discipline and Review.


"The Library is both physically and intellectually the heart of the campus. It is a good place to think, to plan, and to learn."
— Patricia Senn Breivik, Director Auraria Library


Library Services
Auraria Library
Director: Patricia Senn Breivik
Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill
Associate Director for External Affairs: Margie Shur-got
Assistant Director for Collection and Automation Services: Marilyn J. Mitchell
Assistant Director for Instruction and Research Services: Mary Lou Goodyear
Assistant Director for Media and Telecommunications Services: Muriel E. Woods
Offices: Auraria Library, 11th and Lawrence Sts.
Telephone: — Administration: 556-2805
Telephone: —Information: 556-2741
Faculty: Professor: Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Professor: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Elnora Mercado, Terry Ann Mood, Martin
A. Tessmer, Robert L. Wick, Muriel E. Woods Instructors: Anneli Ahtola, Lori Arp, Julie A. Brewer, Diana L. Brice, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dil-garde, Joan B. Fiscella, Mary Lou Goodyear, Eileen Guleff, Kathleen Kenny, Marit S. MacArthur, Marilyn J. Mitchell, Kay Nichols, Elizabeth Porter, Linda D. Ranson, Jay Schafer, Louise T. Stwalley, Rutherford W. Witthus, Eveline L. Yang
Board of Directors, Friends of Auraria Library
Tom Clark, Forward Metro Denver Group, Denver Chamber of Commerce
Lucy Creighton, First Interstate Bank of Denver Claudia Allen Dillman, Gannett Outdoors Nancy Ellins
Mark E. Jones, Merrill Lynch Richard H. Miller, Price Waterhouse Darwin Niekerk, Adolph Coors Co.
Christopher G. Nims, Gensler & Associates Joan Ringel, Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Stuart C. Rogers, S.C. Rogers, Inc.
Clair E. Villano, Consumer Fraud Division, District Attorney's Office
Terry M. Wicker, Wicker-Works Video Productions, Inc.
Joan Wohlgenant
Lester Woodward, Davis, Graham & Stubbs
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Collection
The Auraria Library has a collection of over 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government publications and a full depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally though inter-library loan services.
The Online Public Access Catalog
Access to the Auraria Library's collection is through the online Public Access Catalog (PAC), a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state. The online Public Access Catalog, which was developed as a cooperative project by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The online PAC system allows faster


64 / Library Services
and more comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. In addition to using PAC at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; PAC also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer.
Reference Services
The Auraria Library's reference department stands ready to assist students and faculty in using the Library's resources. The reference department is staffed during all times the Library is open. In addition, brief reference questions, such as whether or not the Library owns a particular item, can be answered over the phone.
Media Services
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services. The media distribution department manages the Library's media collection, which consists of videotapes, audio-tapes, records, 16mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online Public Access Catalog. This department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Library operates an 18-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; at a faculty member's request a film or videotape can be transmitted directly into the classroom over this system. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan's, the Student Center, and the Library's television studio to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab is also available for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division and a professional graphic designer is available to assist users.
Students get experience in front of and behind the camera in the Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library.


Library / 65
Computer Assisted Research
Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many j hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, many of the business databases also contain directory and financial information. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the Library's reference department.
Information Retrieval Service
The information retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers. For a reasonable fee, Library staff cah assist patrons in locating and checking out the library materials they need. Working from the patron's bibliography, staff can: locate and check out books owned by the Library; photocopy articles from journals owned by the Library; submit interlibrary loan requests for materials which the Library does not own; and deliver the materials to the patron's home or office. Inquiries about this time-saving service should be directed to the reference department.
Library Instruction
The Library is committed to educating people to meet the demands of the Information Society. The Library offers a wide range of instructional programming, including a self-paced audiocassette walking tour of the Library, as well as class sessions to teach information access skills and strategies.
Architecture and Planning Library
The Library's main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Branch Library. With a collection of over
13,000 books, 120 periodical subscriptions, and 14,000 slides, this branch library offers specialized information to students of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and planning. This branch library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
Services for Persons with Disabilities
The Library is committed to making its resources and services accessible to all students; in addition to owning a variety of adaptive equipment to assist persons with disabilities, personal assistance in using the Library is available from the reference department.
Additional Facilities
Coin-operated typewriters, a copy center, change machines, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
Internships
The Library offers internships, practicums, and independent studies to students interested in telecommunications or information management.


"CU-Denver is emerging as a remarkably strong University with an unusual array of superior graduate programs. Graduate education at CU-Denver not only imparts knowledge which is frequently multi-disciplinary and applied, but also helps students to master the processes of inquiry that generate new knowledge and that yield solutions to pressing societal problems."
— Acting Dean Thomas A. Clark The Graduate School


The Graduate School
Acting Dean: Thomas A. Clark School Office: 1250 14th St., Suite 700 Telephone: 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The 1983 Brademas report on Graduate Education in America concluded that “Graduate education and research are the bedrock of every important area of our national lif^." The report highlighted the fact that a strong national security program, a healthy growing economy, and the prospects for improvement in the quality of life are all dependent upon high quality and vigorous graduate programs in our universities.
High quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity in their disciplines and, thus, are teacher/scholars who continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques and bring this cutting edge knowledge to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver not only gain from interactions with the graduate faculty but also gain from other students in the classroom. Because most of CU-Denver's graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom.
The Graduate School is a University-wide body that authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. Atj CU-Denver, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts an<3 Sciences, and Music are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through The Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice, most Master's-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisers are concerned.
Doctoral-level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that discipline. Doctoral-level programs on the CU-Denver campus are either coordinated through the office of the system graduate dean or through the corresponding Denver or Boulder department. The Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics, educational administration, and educational technology are system degrees in which application is made to The Graduate School at CU-Denver. In a number of other disciplines with integrated degrees, most or all course work for the Ph.D. can be completed at Denver and the research adviser may be a member of the CU-
Denver faculty, but the degree program is administered by the Boulder department. In other disciplines, a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph.D. degree may be taken at CU-Denver. Persons interested in pursuing doctoral level work should consult with the appropriate discipline graduate adviser.
Anyone wishing further information not given in this bulletin should write to the dean of The Graduate School, University of Colorado at Denver, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver. In some cases, a specific required course may only be offered through the University of Colorado at Boulder in a given year.
The Master of Arts (M.
Anthropology
Biology
Communications and theatre Economics English
The Master of Arts (M.
Counseling and personnel services
Early childhood education Educational administration Educational psychology Educational technology Elementary education Foundations, education Instructional technology
) in:
Geography
History
Mathematics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Education) in:
(emphasis in corporate instructional development and training, instructional computing specialist, instructional technologist, library media specialist) Reading
Secondary education Special education
A.
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied mathematics Chemistry Civil engineering Computer science1
Electrical engineering Environmental science Mechanical engineering Technical communication
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.) The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1 The Master of Humanities (M.H.) The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.) The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
Significant course work can be taken at the Denver campus in the following master's degree programs: Fine arts i Journalism
Geology Philosophy
'Awarded through (tU-Boulder.


68 / The Graduate School
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in:
Applied mathematics Educational Administration
Educational Administration (emphasis in educational technology)
Significant course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Students can be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School. It is usually advised that a student complete some course work at another campus of the University.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Graduate School.
Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
Biology Chemistry Civil engineering Communication Computer science
Electrical engineering
English
Geography
Mechanical engineering Psychology
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 3,335 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each Fall and Spring Semester, and an additional 1,379 non-degree students take graduate courses. Of these, approximately 48 percent are part-time students.
Faculty
The faculty teaching in these programs are headquartered at CU-Denver, although resources of other University of Colorado campuses are used.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise, and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. In order for fellowships to be renewed, students holding them must reapply each year to The Graduate School.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appointments for 1987-88 is: instructor (20 hours per week), $8,670; teaching assistant (20 hours per week), salary range $5,239 - $6,938 for the academic year.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Nonresident students employed as assistants may or may not be eligible for the nonresident tuition differential stipend for their first-year appointment as an assistant only. Exceptions extending beyond the first year must be approved in advance by the respective dean. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Nonresident students who are appointed as research assistants in nongeneral fund accounts may or may not be eligible for resident tuition rates. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation).


Requirements for Admission / 69
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March
1. This office ajso provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the baisis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as adviser for Fulbright and other scholarships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level! work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741, or the Office of International Programs, Auraria Higher Education Center, 556- 3660.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
Admission to The Graduate School is not admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree must make special application at the time and in the manner prescribed by the requirements for the degree sought.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, an applicant for admission as a regular degree student must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have done work equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by his or her previous scholastic record.
3. Have had adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Pass/Fail Grades. In order to permit a meaningful evaluation of an applicant's scholastic record, not more than 10 percent of those credit hours that are relevant to the intended field of graduate study shall have been earned with pass/fail grades, nor more than 20 percent overall. Applicants whose academic record contains a larger percentage of pass/fail credits must submit suitable additional evidence that they possess the required scholastic ability. If the applicant does not submit satisfactory additional evidence, he or she can be admitted only as a provisional student.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term, which may not exceed two consecutive calendar years. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.


70 / The Graduate School
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance, will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Den-ver should contact the CU-Denver Graduate School office concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the CU-Denver Graduate School office, and two official transcripts from each institution attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a committee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to The Graduate School dean's office, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree students (below).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1988-89, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid).
READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program but who did not complete that degree program and who have not been continuously registered at the University must:
1. Clarify their status with either the department or The Graduate School to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
2. After receiving departmental approval, as indicated above, submit a new application Part I to The Graduate School office before deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University. A $30 application fee is required unless an exception is given by The Graduate School. Application deadlines are available from the department.
Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must complete the appropriate forms at the time they apply for readmission.
Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in The Graduate School office prior to February 15 for the Summer Term, March 15 for the Fall Semester, and August 1 for the Spring Semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
Effective Spring 1989 applicants to degree programs within The Graduate School at CU-Denver must achieve a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 550 if English is not their native language or if they have not attended a British or American college or university for at least one year with at least a 3.0 average or its equivalent. Applicants whose TOEFL score falls between 500 and 550 may secure provisional admission to these programs upon


Registration / 71
the recommendation of the graduate program and approval of the dean of The Graduate School. Those admitted provisionally must achieve a 3.0 in the first 12 credits of graduate course work taken within the degree program during their first two semesters of study at CU-Denver. These students will be advised to seek further instruction in English as a second language at the University.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program, assistantships, or of any student before his or her status is determined.
Students who are applying for assistantships for the fall semester take the GRJE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awatds selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from The Graduate School office or the CU-Denver Testing Center, or from The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records, CU-Denver, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 9 hours credit toward the requirements of a master's degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University, or both. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no
fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any course work transferred in this manner.
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes a graduate student may not drop,


72 / The Graduate School
add, or change a course to no credit without presenting a letter to the dean of The Graduate School, CU-Denver, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course. The withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass/fail must be indicated with the instructor's initials.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergradua-te/graduate/thesis or dissertation hours..
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work, or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this bulletin. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take such work as is approved by the major departments.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advance degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of The Graduate School. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.


Master's Degree / 73
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
In calculating a student's grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a nondegree student, as well as grades earned in first and second year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student's transcript.
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of good English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate's proficiency.
GRADUATE APPEALS
Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Executive Committee of The Graduate School, unless such appeal involves a matte r affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of The Graduate School.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirement
The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 500 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master's degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories:


74 / The Graduate School
1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000- and 4000- level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School.
4. Courses outside the major program provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 500 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 400 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master's degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See special departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School.
All work accepted by transfer must come within the 4-year time limit or be validated by special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master's degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the Master's degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the four-year time limit.
3. Has not been applied toward another degree.
4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School.
Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact The Graduate School office. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School.


Master's Degree / 75
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use the resources of the Division of Continuing Education in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the graduate dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. A student who is noticeably deficient in his/her general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than halftime. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master's degree must file application in the dean's office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student's work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in University of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which is obtainable from The Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.
Comprehensive Final Examination
Each candidate for a master's degree is required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of the candidate's last semester of residence while he/she is still taking required courses for the degree, provided he/she is making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. A student must be registered when he or she takes the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essen-


76 / The Graduate School
tially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before he or she may attempt the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master's degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Time Limit
All work, including the comprehensive final examination, should be completed within four years or five successive summers. Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special
examination. Candidates for the master's degree are expected to complete their work with reasonable continuity.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1988-89
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Applications must be submitted at least 10 weeks before the student expects to take the comprehensive final examination. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what consti-


Doctor of Philosophy / 77
tutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student's work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.)
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum.
At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D. a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student's grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B, C and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Quality of Work
Students are expected to complete with distinction all work in the formal courses in which they enroll. A course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. Upon recommendation by the advisory committee and the chair of the department and with the approval of the dean, a student may be required to withdraw at any time for failure to maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more others to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student's special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.


78 / The Graduate School
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor's degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to full-time work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student's advisory committee, the chair of the student's major department, and the dean of The Graduate School.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University.
A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or if field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student's program director and provided that the student's registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
Students are required to meet the following language requirements.
Communication Requirement. All graduate students for whom English is the native language are required to demonstrate at least second-year college proficiency in a foreign language of their choice. This requirement may be satisfied in the following ways.
1. The student's undergraduate transcript may be presented, showing completion of grade C or better of at least 3 semester hours of a fourth-semester undergraduate college course in a foreign language. The transcript must accompany the student's Application for Admission to Candidacy when it is submitted to The Graduate School.
2. The student may take The Graduate School Foreign Language Test (GSFLT) at the Testing Office before or after admission to The Graduate School. Students should check with The Graduate School for the passing score required for each language.
3. If the student wishes to demonstrate competence in a language for which the GSFLT is not available, a test designed and administered by the appropriate language department at the University of Colorado may be taken, with the passing criterion to be set comparable to the above GSFLT criterion.
4. The student may register at the University for any fourth-semester course in a foreign language and pass it with a C or better. (Registration in such courses is contingent upon the language department's approval.)
A student who elects 2, 3, or 4 above must complete the requirements before the Ph.D. comprehensive examination may be scheduled.
Students whose native language is not English will, by passing their courses and completing their graduate work at the University, demonstrate sufficient ability in English to meet the communication requirement.
Special Languages. When special languages are needed as tools to read foreign literature in a particular field, the individual academic departments may require further training in foreign languages for all their Ph.D. graduate students. The choice and number of languages as well as the required levels of skill and the methods of testing these skills are determined by the individual departments.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the Doctorate until the student has established in this Graduate School a satisfactory record in residence, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes


Doctor of Philosophy / 79
application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at; this University, but it may reduce the amount of woijk to be done in formal courses.
The maximujn amount of work that may be transferred to this ijJniversity for the Ph.D. is 10 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shpll have earned at least three semesters of residence, shall have passed the language requirements, and slfiall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, jstudents must register continuously. Students admitted to "candidacy for degree" will register for and be charged for 10 hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment students will be charged for 7 hours of dissertation Credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for 3-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during th^ academic year will be required until completion of tjhe dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and adviser will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
If a student who is certified for the Ph.D. degree, or who has received permission to take the comprehen-sives and passes them prior to meeting the language requirement rujist be continuously enrolled as stated above. This continuing registration is independent on whether the candidate is in residence at the University. (See also section on Residence.)
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student mqst pass a comprehensive examination in the field of Concentration and related fields. This examination mjay be oral, written, or both, and will test the student's mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merejly the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty. The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department
concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation and showing mature scholarship and critical judgement as well as familiarity with tools and methods of research must be written upon some subject approved by the student's major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the University of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student's responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program.
Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International; and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.


80 / The Graduate School
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee appointed by the campus graduate dean, which will consist of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the dean's office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.
Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within six years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this six-year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement why the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student's thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the program.


Photo by Tom Noel


"Our approach to planning and design encompasses a broad array of educational approaches and professional perspectives. We seek not only to provide students with the skills which are essential for professional practice, but also to engender an appreciation of historical antecedents, modes of inquiry, and paradigms which inform the fields of architecture, urban and regional planning, landscape architecture, and qrban and interior design."
—Dean Hamid Shirvani School of Architecture and Planning


School of Architecture and Planning
Dean: Hamid Shirvani
Associate Dean : Yuk Lee
Assistants to the Dean: Denise Hall, Donna Lee
School Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor
Telephone: 556-2755
School Advisory Council:
Chairman: Jerome Seracuse, FAIA, Principal, Sera-cuse, Lawler & Partners, Denver Members:
John Anderson, FAIA, Anderson Mason Dale, Denver John W. Bright, FASLA, National Park Service, Denver
John C. Brokaw, AIA, NBBB Associates, Boulder Rodney Davis, FAIA, Partner, Davis Partnership, Denver
Stewart O. Dawson, FASLA, Principal, Sasaki Associates, Watertown, MA
Virginia Dubrucq, AIA, Interior Design, Denver Thomas J. Eyerman, FAIA, General Partner, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Chicago Larry Gibson, Director of Urban Design, CRSS Inc., Denver
Lynne Hada, ASID, CKD, NHFL, Linteriors, Denver Mimi L. Hillen, ASID, Principal, Hillen Design Associates, Golden
Jack Leaman, FASLA, AICP, Director of Planning, City of Colorado Springs
John Madden, President, John Madden Company, Denver
Jennifer Moulton, AIA, Principal, Anthony Pellecchia Architects, Denver
Clifford S. Nakata, AIA, Clifford S. Nakata Associates, Colorado Springs
Maxwell L. Saul, AIA, FCSI, DMJM, CCS, Denver Herb Schaal, ASLA, ED AW, Inc., Ft. Collins, CO Jane Silverstein Reis, FASLA, Landscape Architect, Denver
Charles Sink, FAIA, Sink Combs Dethlefs, Denver Diane M. Smucny, President, Colorado Chapter of the American Planning Association Eugene Sternberg, AIA, Architect, Evergreen, CO Harry Teague, AIA, Architect, Aspen, CO William Turnbull, FAIA, Principal, William Turnbull and Associates, San Francisco Joseph Wells, AICP, Principal, Doremus and Wells, Aspen, CO
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Architecture and Planning is nationally unique because of its students and alumni, its faculty and staff, its missions, and its location. The School has been able to attract high quality students with a strong professional career orientation. Through their achievements, the alumni of our School are major contributors to its image. The School of Architecture and Planning is committed to offer professional and specialized degree programs through rigorous instruction and research programs in the fields of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The School is committed to excellence in instruction and research while providing a balance of design skills and intellectual inquiry. As a graduate school with five degree offerings, and a part of a university with a mandate for excellence and national and international recognition, we are evolving as the intellectual design forum in the Western region.
The School of Architecture and Planning is devoted to "design" as its central intellectual concern. The term design is used here in its broadest sense to include full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. Students are introduced to fundamentals of design analysis and synthesis based on humanistic ideals as the means of meeting their personal aspirations. They learn how to think, analyze, synthesize, and be creative, and develop an intellectual framework in regard to design and planning.
Our interest is to educate designers who are able to deal with a variety of issues, programs, and problems within their particular context and time frame. In other words, we are interested in educating designers with the capacity to think innovatively and to challenge each situation on its own merit. The School of Architecture and Planning is dedicated to excellence in design education.
Mission and Organization
The School is composed of five graduate degree programs in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning and a research and service division, the Center for Built Environment Studies. As a unit of graduate professional education with five professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training studies in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School's overall mission is to develop


84 / School of Architecture and Planning
the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design.
Considering this mission, the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focuses on research and specialization.
The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research concerning the planning and design of the built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as business, engineering, and public affairs.
In the programs, various design and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting and this examination is combined with critical reviews of design work, dialogues, and methods to form the essential ingredient of design education. Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing, students gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the design and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal aspirations.
The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern and is evolving as a design center for the western region. Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. The School's ultimate mission is to play a leading role in design education and research.
Academic Programs
The School of Architecture and Planning offers academic programs leading to master's degrees in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The programs are interdisciplinary and, in the design fields, both first and post-professional degrees are offered. In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two degrees, M.Arch. and M.U.R.P. for example, and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs.
The first professional degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part time.
Within any of the programs, the School or Architecture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, interior design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from an other school in the University with the approval of the student's advisor.
The School maintains membership in:
Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Architectural Research Centers Consortium Society of Architectural Historians Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Council of Landscape Architecture Educators
Academic Environment and Student Body
In addition to its regular curricular programs, the School supports or sponsors a variety of events and activities that enlarge and broaden the learning environment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year. Field trips in connection with courses are routinely organized and a summer foreign study program is available. On Friday afternoons the School sponsors its beer and hot dog reviews and the student organizations run a brown-bag seminar series in connection with the local professionals. Finally, the School sponsors three receptions, at the beginning of the academic year, before Christmas, and at the end of the academic year along with two parties, in the fall and the spring, for students and the local professional community.
There are about 350 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many academic disciplines and nearly 100 previous academic institutions.
Lecture Series
Guest critics are periodically brought to the School and two lecture series are held. One is for the School's faculty, the other invites distinguished practitioners, critics, and scholars to the School. Recent speakers in the lecture series include:
1987-88
John R. Stilgoe Professor, Harvard University Anne Vernez-Moudon Professor, University of Washington
William Turnbull Principal, William Turnbull Associates, Architects, San Francisco George Hoover Principal, Hoover Berg Desmond, Architects, Denver
Nader Ardalan Principal, Jung/Brannen, Architects, Boston
Frank E. Sanchis Vice President National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.
Hamid Shirvani Professor and Dean, School or Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver
Peter Eisenman Principal, Eisenman, Robertson, Architects, New York
1986-87
Orlando Diaz-Azcuy Principal, Gensler and Associates Architects
Daniel Urban Kiley Landscape Architect


Support Facilities / 85
Mark Mack Mark Mack, Architects, San Francisco Professor, University of California at Berkeley Thom Mayne Partner, Morphosis, Santa Monica Professor, Southern California Institute of Architecture
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
The academic policies and procedures of the School of Architecture and Planning supplement those of the University. The Academic Affairs Committee of the School determines academic polices, procedures, and guidelines. Details are available in the Office of the Dean.
Academic Standing. The School requires a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 to remain in good standing and for graduation. If a student's GPA for a semester is below 3.0, the student will be placed on probation beginning the following semester. If the student's overall GPA is below 3.0 following the probationary semester, the student may be dismissed from the School. A student who has two consecutive terms with a GPA below 3.0 may be dismissed from the School. Each of the School's programs may designate certain key courses to require minimum academic performance levels of B-. Students who receive less than a B- in any of these courses will be required to retake the course to complete their program. Students may retake a course at any time. The grade for the retaken course will replace the earlier grade in determining eligibility to progress in a program.
Time Limit. There is a limit of seven years from the time a student enters a master's degree program for completing all the requirements for the degree.
Advanced Standing. Applicants may be granted advanced standing on admission to a program only on the basis of transfer credit, professional experience, or by examination. Requirements for granting transfer credit 'are:
1. The course(s) must be at the graduate level or upper division undergraduate level.
2. The course(s) must have been taken within the past seven years.
3. The grade for the course(s) must be at least a B or equivalent..
4. The course must have equivalent content. Students may be required to provide a course syllabus and sample of work to demonstrate equivalent content.
In addition, programs may offer examinations in particular courses which students must pass to receive advanced standing. Such examinations are ordinarily conducted prior to the beginning of classes. If an applicant is to be granted advanced standing in a program, the courses that the applicant will be exempt from taking will be listed in the student's advising sheet or program of study.
Regardless of the level of advanced standing granted, students are required to take a minimum of 24 semester hours in their program to receive a master's degree.
Course Waivers. Once enrolled in one of the School's programs, a student may, by request, waive a required course and substitute another. Granting a waiver does not reduce the student's credit hour requirements or give advanced standing.
Advising. An advisor is responsible with the student for a student's academic program of study including course waivers and electives and is the student's primary resource for all academic matters including grievances. Advisors need to ensure that their advisees make appropriate academic progress and that their files and paperwork are complete.
Thesis. It is the intent of each academic program to support thesis work which demonstrates 1) an understanding of both the particular problem under investigation and the means of inquiry in relation to it as well as 2) an ability to design and document a creative and relevant response. In short, students in thesis are expected to demonstrate an ability to articulate and integrate research and/or design in the specific area they choose to investigate. A thesis should make a contribution either by advancing or clarifying the state of the art in the proposed subject area.
Students may propose thesis work in any area of their discipline in which they have interest, competence, and support from faculty to undertake the investigation. Competence will be demonstrated through a thesis proposal which will be evaluated for approval or disapproval by a committee of the faculty. Each thesis proposal must identify the student's three person thesis committee.
Theses submitted must be in an approved format and meet an approved schedule for review. The School's thesis guidelines must be followed. To receive credit for a thesis accepted by the School, the student must place on file in the School library two copies of the thesis text and non-text materials. Nontextual materials; - models must be recorded in the form of 35mm slides - at least 5 separate views on slides per model. Selected drawings are to reproduces in 3-1/2 x 11 Kodak PMT format. Computing and videotape media may also be provided.
SUPPORT FACILITIES
Architecture and Planning Library
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library, serves as a learning resource center for the School's programs. It contains a reference, circulating, documentary, periodical, reserve, and nonprint, including slides and computing software, and collections to support the School's programs. Students also have access to any of the materials in the University of Colorado library system.
The library is open 71 hours per week, including evenings and Sundays. The staff consists of a librarian, library assistant, and several student assistants.


86 / School of Architecture and Planning
The library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as interlibrary loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.
CENTER FOR BUILT ENVIRONMENT STUDIES
achieve a balance of design and intellectual inquiry. In this regard, the Center's resources and expertise include researchers, community service specialists, a majority of the School's faculty and many students. This integration of research and service into professional graduate education makes the Center unique. The Center comprises an interdisciplinary team of educators, designers, and planners working in a collaborative manner to serve the professions and the community.
Acting Director: Phillip B. Gallegos Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Second Floor Telephone: 556-2817 Staff:
Associate Director for Research: Frederick R. Steiner Acting Associate Director for Service: Robert D. Horn Community Service Specialist: Jon Schler Secretary: Annette Korslund
Associate Research Faculty: M. Gordon Brown, Thomas A. Clark, Frances Downing, Paul J. Foster, Harry L. Garnham, Mark Gelernter, David R. Hill, Lauri Macmillan Johnson, Bernie Jones, Gail Whitney Kam, Yuk Lee, Bennett R. Neiman, John Prosser, Peter V. Schaeffer, Hamid Shirvani, Diane Wilk Shirvani
The Center for Built Environment Studies (CBES) is the research and service arm of the School of Architecture and Planning. The Center has been established in 1987 as a replacement for the Center for Community Development and Design and builds upon a decade of community service and outreach programs. The new Center is committed to serving Denver and Colorado and providing a significant educational opportunity for students and faculty.
The Center provides an interdisciplinary research and assistance team capable of addressing a variety of built environment issues. The specific focus areas of research and service are: Architecture and Building Science, Economic Development, Natural Resource Planning, Space and Facility Design, and Urban Design. Faculty and students from various programs in the School participate in research projects along with the regular CBES research and service staff. This association provides a broad-based competence which reaches into the studios and lecture halls as well as communities, professions, and user groups.
The Mission
As the research and service unit of the School of Architecture and Planning, the Center for Built Environment Studies is committed to making significant contributions to the fields of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The mission of the Center is to be a leader in built environment research and service in Colorado and in the nation. The Center plays a significant role in supporting the educational mission of the School of Architecture and Planning to
Statement of Purpose
"Democracy depends on people being well informed," observed Denver council member BUI Roberts when describing the mission of the Center for Built Environment Studies. Originally established as the Bureau of Community Services in 1966, the Center has two decades of experience in providing information through design and planning research and service to the citizens of Colorado.
The Center provides multidisciplinary research and assistance teams capable of addressing a variety of built environment issues. Faculty and students from architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and planning participate in research projects, along with Center research and service staff. When needed, consultants from other academic disciplines and the private sector complete our problemsolving teams. This association provides a broad-based design and planning competence which reaches from the studios and classrooms of the School of Architecture and Planning into communities throughout Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region.
Currently, the Center is involved in a broad range of buUt environment research and service project in housing, rural and small town design and planning, economic development, minority business develop-
Architecture and planning faculty, professionals, and students critique student projects requested by Colorado towns through the Center for Built Environment Studies. A student explains a drawing of Telluride she developed to provide the town with a cohesive and appropriate visual identity and gateway.


Admissions / 87
merit, architectural education, Native American land planning, migration, landscape planning, residential foreclosures in metropolitan Denver, civic architecture, homelessness, urban design, community artists programs, spatial planning, transportation planning, the design of public places, and national urban policy.
COMPUTER LABORATORY
The Computer Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning, located adjacent to the library, is equipped for upscaled computer-aided design and drafting with a micro-computer based networking system which is being modified and expanded. Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs in addition to four IBM PC/XTs with high resolution monitors and digitizing tablets are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstations are linked through the addition of AutoCAD compatible software that extends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE/CADD.
Additional capabilities are offered through Auto-Word, an interactive word processing package for editing and disiplaying text of drawings, Auto Co GO, a coordinate geometry program that allows entry of survey and engineering data for site planning and engineering, LandSoft, a system for introducing landscape architectural symbols and drafting extension into the AutoCAD and AE/CADD utilities, and Generic Template, a means of customizing or creating unique design and drafting templates.
Also available are the ComputerVision system which includes the Personal Architect and Personal Designer packages, Gould Colorwriter 6320 and Hew-lett/Packard plotters, (Large format [24" x 36"] plotting must be done at the University Computing Center on a Calcomp Plotter.) Additional computing facilities are also available at CU- Denver.
PHOTO LABORATORY
The School maintains a darkroom for student use as well as a variety of camera and audiovisual equipment for preparing class presentations, design projects, portfolios, and in learning multi-media techniques for presentations.
ADMISSIONS
General Requirements
Each applicant for admission into any of the programs of the School of Architecture and Planning must submit:
1. The University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended.
3. Three letters of recommendation.
4. A statement of purpose.
5. A portfolio of academic, creative, and/or professional work except for Urban and Regional Planning.
6. The application fee.
Special requirements for international applicants are described in a following section.
All portfolio materials must be in 8-1/2 x 11 (or equivalent A-4) format. If slides are included, they must be in a loose-leaf slide holder and annotated. The School of Architecture and Planning will return portfolios if supplied with appropriate postage-paid, preaddressed mailing materials. Portfolios may be picked up in person from the offices.
In general, a 3.00 grade-point average(GPA) on a
4.00 scale (or equivalent) in the prior undergraduate or graduate degree is required for admission. Applicants with a GPA under 3.00 may be reviewed for admission; in such cases, submission of strong supporting materials is advised. For applicants with a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are required for the Urban and Regional Planning Program and strongly recommended for applicants to the other programs.
The admissions decision is made weighing a variety of factors including academic preparation, quality of work experience and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant's purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as nondegree students or with special conditions. Because of space limitations, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for each program are listed below.
ARCHITECTURE
Master of Architecture
(first professional degree; three and one-half year program)
The three and one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor's degree and no prior training or background in architecture or related field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calculus. For those without these prerequisites, courses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester. No other specific preparation is required, although applicants should be able to demonstrate an aptitude for the study of architecture.
Master of Architecture
(first professional degree: three and one-half year program with advanced standing)
Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a non-professional bachelor's degree in architecture or a bachelor's degree in a related field (engineering, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate


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record, qualified applicants with a non-professional architectural degree (the first part of a 4 -I- 2 program) would ordinarily be admitted to the final two years of the first professional degree program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence.
Master of Architecture
(post-professional degree: one year program)
The one-year (36 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first professional degree or diploma in architecture.
INTERIOR DESIGN
Master of Interior Design (first professional degree)
The three-year (96 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor's degree and no prior training or background in interior design or a related design field. Applicants with background and training in interior design or a related field may be considered for admission with advanced standing. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the interior design sequence.
Master of Interior Design (post-professional degree)
The two-year (60 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for those with a Bachelor of Interior Design, an equivalent of the first professional degree or diploma in interior design, or
B.I.D., B.F.A., B.S.L.A., B.S. in Design, B.S. in Architecture.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Master of Landscape Architecture (first professional degree)
The three-year (96 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor's degree and no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field.
Master of Landscape Architecture (post-professional degree)
The two-year (60 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., B.L.A., B.Arch., for example. Applicants with the B.L.A. and work experience by receive advanced standing. Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture
degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Landscape Architecture History and Plant Materials.
URBAN DESIGN
Master of Architecture in Urban Design (two-year degree)
The two-year (48 semester hours) urban design program is appropriate for applicants with a non-professional bachelor's degree in architecture, environmental design, landscape architecture, or planning.
Master of Architecture in Urban Design (one-year post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (e.g. B.Arch., M.Arch, B.L.A., M.L.A.).
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
Master of Urban and Regional Planning
The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with bachelor's degrees in either design, humanities, social, or physical sciences.
International Applicants
Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. Students without sufficient competence in English in an academic context may be required to enroll in English language courses before proceeding with their program.
In addition, The University of Colorado at Denver, Office of Admissions, requires that all applicants to CU-Denver meet certain qualifications. Qualifications are determined by records and credentials that each applicant is required to provide. It is important that all documents are received by the School of Architecture and Planning before the deadline date of the semester or term the applicant plans to attend. If application documents are received later than the published deadline, the applicant will be considered for the next available term.
Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit:
1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended.
3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applicant has attended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany documents that are not in English.
4. Four letters of recommendation.
5. A statement of purpose.


International Applicants / 89
6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work for application to the Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Design programs.
7. A nonrefundable $50 application fee.
8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies.
9. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish English language proficiency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. TOEFL score must be 500 or higher to be considered for admission by the University.
Additional supporting documents may subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a masters degree.
Financial Requirements. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence each international applicant should follow these instructions:
1. Complete the Financial Resources Statement. Applicants must prove that they have sufficient money to pay expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of the application.
a. If applicants are using their own money, their bank must certify that they have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, the bank must certify that the money the applicant needs is on deposit in the applicant's account.
b. If the applicant is being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, the sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. The sponsors bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money the applicant will need.
c. If the applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed. 2
2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay or cause the denial of the applicant's admission to the University. Be sure the Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete.
Dates and Deadlines
The programs in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture and urban design admit for the Fall and Spring Semesters normally. The program in urban and regional planning admits normally for the Fall Semester, but will admit on a space-available basis for both the Fall and Spring Semesters and the Summer Term. See the Calendar in this catalog for specific dates.
To be considered for Fall Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be considered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous November 1. Applications received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status only.
Deadlines for submission of application materials:
March 15 — for Fall Semester regular admission April 15 — for Summer Term space-available admission to urban and regional planning July 10 — for Fall Semester space-available admission to urban and regional planning November 1 — for Spring Semester regular admission
December 1 — for Spring Semester space-available admission to urban and regional planning
Persons interested in any of the programs or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture Program at (303) 556-2877, Interior Design Program at (303) 556-2294, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-3475, and Urban and Regional Planning Program at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an appointment. For application forms or additional information, please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1200 Larimer Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, Colorado 80204
(303) 556-2755


90 / School of Architecture and Planning
Programs of Study
ARCHITECTURE
Program Director: Robert W. Kindig Secretary: Rose Hill
Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 556-2877
Faculty: Professors: Robert W. Kindig, Dwayne C.
Nuzum, John M. Prosser, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: M. Gordon Brown, Frances
Downing, Mark Gelemter
Assistant Professors: Gary Crowell, Bennett Neiman,
Diane Wilk Shirvani
Adjunct: Cahell Childress, Phillip Gallegos, Theodor
Grossman, Marvin Hatami, William C. Muchow,
Anthony Pellecchia Emeritus: G.K. Vetter
Visiting Faculty: M.H. Huwaldt, K.E.A. Vragel
The Architecture Program offers curricula leading to the Master of Architecture as part of a National Architecture Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited first professional degree program and as a post- professional degree program. The curricula are based on a core of five component areas: Architectural Design; History and Theory; Environmental Context; Science and Technology; Professional Practice.
The program has four primary objectives: preparing architecture students for professional careers; extending the knowledge base of architecture; enhancing the capabilities of practicing professionals; increasing the general public's awareness of architecture. The program prepares students to enter the professional practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods of planning and design in architecture. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; environmental context and interrelationships between human behavior and the physical environment; understanding of the history, theory, and criticism of architecture; professional competence in architectural technology; analytic problem-solving competence of synthesis and communication of the above knowledge into physical form; understanding of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place; skills and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goals of the program are to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of physical and environmental quality, while acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architecture.
The above objectives are achieved in five groups of courses, organized in sequences within five coordinated modules.
Three areas of concentration are offered: Built Environment Studies; Computer Aided Design; History,
Theory and Criticism; Urban Design. There are not set requirements in each of the above areas. Students are required to develop a plan of study with their advisor at the beginning of the course of study.
Master of Architecture (First professional degree)
Three and one-half year program. The first professional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration.
The program is taught at three levels each with a theme. The first level involves the theme - principles, definitions, and communication - and takes the first two semesters. The next level takes three semesters and involves a dual theme - architecture in context and applications of methodologies. The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis and professional competency.
THE CURRICULUM - THREE AND ONE-HALF YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN: 48 semester hours
ARCH. 5500 (6)
ARCH. 5501 (6)
ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6700 (6)
ARCH. 6701 (6)
ARCH. 5510 (3)
ARCH. 5511 (3)
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II
Architectural Design Studio III Architectural Design Studio IV Architectural Design Studio V Advanced Architectural Design Studio
VI
Advanced Architectural Design Studio
VII
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II


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HISTORY AND THEORY: 15 semester hours
UD. 6610 (3) Urban Design Theory and Methods
ARCH. 5520 (3)
ARCH. 5521 (3) ARCH. 6620 (3)
ARCH. 6621 (3)
ARCH. 6660 (3)
Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism
Survey of Architectural History Architecture in the 15th through 18th Centuries
Architecture in the 19th and 20th Centuries
Human and Social Dimension of Design
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT: 6 semester hours LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning
COURSE SEQUENCE: FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 18 semester hours
ARCH. 5530 (3) Structures 1
ARCH. 5531 (3) Structures II
ARCH. 5532 (3) Building Technology
ARCH. 5533 (3) Environmental Control Systems I
ARCH. 6630 (3) Structures III
ARCH. 6631 (3) Environmental Control Systems II
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 6 semester hours
ARCH. 6750 (3) Professional Practice I ARCH. 6751 (3) Professional Practice II
ELECTIVES: 21 semester hours
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY ENVIRON- MENTAL CONTEXT SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFES- SIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR 1 FAL L ARCH.5500 (6) ARCH. 5510 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) ARCH. 5530 (3) 15
SPRING ARCH. 5501 (6) ARCH.5511 (3) ARCH. 5521 (3) ARCH. 5531 (3) 15
SUMMER ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 5532 (3) ARCH. 5533 (3) 12
YEAR II FALL ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) LA. 5530 (3) ARCH. 6630 (3) 18
SPRING ARCH. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6621 (3) UD. 6610 (3) ARCH. 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18
FALL ARCH. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 18
SPRING ARCH. 6701 (6) ARCH. 6751 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 18
48 15 6 18 6 21 114
Master of Architecture (First professional degree)
Advanced Standing in the three and one-half year program. Each student admitted with advanced standing in the above curriculum follows a course of study based on credentials evaluated during the admissions process. STudents who have completed an architectural bachelor's degree in a 4 + 2 program would ordinarily enter in the second level of the three and one-half year curriculum. Students who have degrees in related fields may be exempt form certain required courses. The exact point of entry is determined by a credentials evaluation.
Master of Architecture (Post-professional degree)
The post-professional degree program is a 36 semester hour program requiring one year of full-time or two years of part-time study. The program offers design or thesis options as a part of the core requirements. This program is open only to applicants already holding a first professional degree (B.Arch. or M.Arch.).
The Core Curriculum. The core curriculum consist of five groups: Design or Thesis, 12 credit hours; Theory, 6; Environmental Context 6, totaling 24 credit hours. The core curriculum is an absolute requirements, regardless of any individual's educational background. The thesis option is available only by petition to and approval by the Program Director and upon his/her approval. The core curriculum consists of the following:
DESIGN or THESIS: 12 semester hours
ARCH. 6700 (6) Advanced Architectural Design Studio
VI
ARCH. 6701 (6) Advanced Architectural Design Studio
VII
ARCH. 6950 (6) Thesis Research and Programming ARCH. 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis
THEORY: 6 semester hours
ARCH. 6622 (3) Theory and Analysis of Architecture ARCH. 6623 (3) Modem Architecture
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT: 6 semester hours
UD. 6601 (3) The Architecture of the City
UD. 6610 (3) Urban Design Theory and Methods
ELECTIVES: 12 semester hours


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COURSE SEQUENCE: POST-PROFESSIONAL DEGREE
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR 1 FALL ARCH. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6622 (3) UD. 6601 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18
SPRING ARCH. 6701 (6) ARCH. 6623 (3) UD. 6610 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 18
12 6 6 12 36
ARCHITECTURE ELECTIVES:
ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3) ARCH. 6640 (3) ARCH. 6641 (3) ARCH. 6661 (3) ARCH. 6683 (3) ARCH. 6686 (3) ARCH. 6740 (3) ARCH. 6930 (3) ARCH. 6931 (3) ARCH. 6900 (3)
Theory and Analysis of Architecture Modem Architecture Introduction to Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Architecture Design Methods
Teaching Methods in Architecture Special Topics in Architecture Computer Aided Design Architecture Internship Architecture Internship Independent Study
COURSES
ARCH. 5050-3 (formerly ARCH. 440). Applied Mathema-tics/Designers I. This class is designed for the student with little or no college mathematics experience. It begins with arithmetic skills and shortcuts, continues through college level algebra, and ends with trigonometry. This class is part of the required mathematics for students of architecture. ARCH. 5051-3 (formerly ARCH. 441). Applied Mathema-tics/Designers II. A continuation of ARCH. 5050, this class begins with analytical geometry and continues through differential and integral calculus. The course completes the mathematics requirement for students of architecture and is open to those who have credit for or feel competent in ARCH. 5050.
ARCH. 5052-3 (formerly ARCH. 442). Environmental Science for Designers. This course is designed to meet the requirements for entrance into the graduate program in architecture. The basic principles of physics will be covered in a practical way. The course includes the mechanics of bodies at rest, dynamics, electricity, heat, light, and sound. ARCH. 5500-6 (formerly ARCH. 500). Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I. The introductory design studio focuses on basic architectural design. Students are introduced to architectural analysis, design criticism, and significance of the elements of architecture. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process.
ARCH. 5501-6 (formerly ARCH. 501). Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and environmental context. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to problem solving involving socio-cultural, environmental and pragmatic concerns, while simultaneously dealing with development of theory and intellectual inquiry.
ARCH. 5502-6 (formerly ARCH. 502). Architectural Design Studio III. The first intermediate studio sequence focuses on development of basic skills in formal composition, program organization, and building construction. The emphasis is placed on development of a building as a material construct, the investigation of the building fabric and the relationships between space, form, and technique. The studio covers programming, design process, budgeting, working drawings, and construction.
ARCH. 5510-3 (formerly ARCH. 510). Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers freehand drawings of various subjects from still-life compositions to buildings and settings in downtown Denver. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of light, shade, and shadow. Basic principles dealing with orthographic projection, perspective, and isometric projection are examined. Techniques for representing human figures, trees, shrubs, and other elements of the landscape are studied.
ARCH. 5511-3 (formerly ARCH. 511). Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course emphasizes mechanical drawing means of design articulation. Students are introduced to wide ranges of techniques, methods, and means and in the design fields, as well as the selection of drawing instruments and surface, typography, and organization of graphic material to achieve the most effective presentation. The subjects covered are: principles of graphic communication; lettering and orthographic projection; axo-nometric, oblique, and perspective projection; three-dimensional forms employing light, shade, and shadow; gradation/value distinction in flat and curved surfaces, and graphic reproduction.
ARCH. 5512-3. Drawing and Color. This course focuses on
architectural rendering methods and techniques through exploration and use of color media and theory, with an emphasis on both the process and product of architectural presentation. The course format will combine demonstration, slide lectures, class critiques, desk crits, and studio. ARCH. 5520-3 (formerly ARCH. 520). Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism. This course examines the evolution of ideals and principles in modern architecture, design, landscape, and urbanism and traces the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writing. The course provides an overview of the literature in design theories and explores the relationship between design and the writings that include its interpretation and production.


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ARCH.5521-3 (formerly ARCH. 521). Architectural History: Antiquity through the 14th Century. The second course in history/theory sequence beginning with architecture and urbanism in antiquity stresses the origin and interpretation of built form as symbol, and the problems of early building technology and development of tradition in European architecture and urbanism. It examines the emergency of building types and settlement patterns and their relationship to social institutions. Case studies are drawn from preclassical, classical, and late antiquity through the 14th century. Emphasis is placed on examination of the social function of architecture and its spatial articulation and structural treatment.
ARCH. 5530-3 (formerly ARCH. 530). Structures I. The
course introduces the analysis and design of structural elements and focuses on fundamental principles of statics and strength of material. Areas covered are: equilibrium; movement; trusses; three-force members; properties of structural materials including wood and steel; stress- strain relationship; an introduction into the design and analysis of structural elements made of wood and steel in tension, shear, and bearing.
ARCH. 5531-3 (formerly ARCH. 531). Structures II. The
course is a continuation of Structures I, focusing on study of stress determination of structures, and general principles involved in the design of wood, steel, and concrete members. Problems in design of building elements subjected to direct stress, beveling, and combined stress, deflection, methods of fabrication, and details of connections are explored.
ARCH. 5532-3 (formerly ARCH. 532). Building Technology.
This course address issues in building construction and focuses on interrelationships between architectural concepts and objectives and building construction techniques through lectures, case study presentations, and exercises. Construction communication techniques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered. ARCH. 5533-3 (formerly ARCH. 533). Environmental Control Systems I. This course focuses on study of environmental control systems in buildings, including the thermal behavior of buildings, climate as a major determinant of building design, energy use in buildings, strategies for designing buildings as complete environmental control systems, mechanical means of environmental controls, heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, plumbing, electrical, and communication systems, water supply, and sanitation systems. ARCH. 5540-3. Architecture Photography. This course offers basics of photography and introduces architectural photography. Class will be a combination of lecture/demon-stration and student assignments followed by evaluation.
ARCH. 5541-3. Modelmaking. This course is intended for those engaging in studies of architecture and related fields. It will present the scale model as a tool in accomplishment, an instrument of demonstration, and a vehicle for promotion in the relevant stages from concept to marketing. ARCH. 6600-6 (formerly ARCH. 600). Architectural Design IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on exploration of architecture in the urban context and examination of topological form and cultural constructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city. Emphasis is placed on methodological study of site, program, and elements of architecture which are used to facility work.
ARCH. 6601-6 (formerly ARCH. 601). Architectural Design Studio V. The final intermediate studio sequence focuses on examination of impacts of large-scale urban projects that include commercial, office, and residential uses in an existing urban fabric. Issues such as topology, character, and monumentality are considered in relation to the design of buildings of civic significance. Emphasis is placed on relationship of the role of the building to the morphology of the city and the building's expression in architectural form. ARCH. 6620-3 (formerly ARCH. 620). Architecture in the 15th through 18th Centuries. The third course in the history/theory sequence covers architecture and urbanism from the early 15th to the early 18th centuries. Late Gothic architecture and the Italian Renaissance, as well as the impact of the Renaissance and subsequent development of Baroque Architecture in Europe and the Colonies, are covered. Emphasis is placed on major architects and significant buildings and the changing concepts of urban space. The sociopolitical context, role of patrons, and architectural theory and practice are examined.
ARCH. 6621-3 (formerly ARCH. 621). Architecture in the 19th and 20th Centuries. The last course in the history-/theory sequence focuses on the breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and the coming of classical and romantic histori-cism in architecture and the birth of modem architecture. The impact of technology, industrialization, and social changes on architecture and urbanism, changing attitudes toward the treatment of architectural space and the formation of new critical concepts, and the emergency of Art Nouveau and the roots of the "Modern Movement" in architecture are examined.
ARCH. 6622-3 (formerly ARCH. 622). Theory and Analysis of Architecture. This course focuses on examination of the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writings and the evolution of ideas and design principles in architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism. It explores the pedagogic relationship between design and the cultural roots that influence its interpretation and production.
ARCH. 6623-3 (formerly ARCH. 623). Modern Architecture.
This course focuses on the origin and evolution of modem architectural theory through an examination of selected theoretical and critical precedents in architecture from the end of the 17th century to present. Emphasis is placed on thematic studies from fundamental roots of Modern Architecture and Bauhaus School, to Art Nouveau and post World War II in Europe and the United States.
ARCH. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I. This course intends to broaden the students' perspective by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.


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ARCH. 6625-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II.
Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective.
ARCH. 6626-3. American Architecture. This course focuses on study of the history of American architecture from the pre- Columbian settlements to recent work by contemporary architects. It examines the social and philosophical forces which interacted with the creation of architectural forms, as well as the formal and constructional problems which the builders and architects addressed.
ARCH. 6630-3 (formerly ARCH. 630). Structures III. This course examines theoretical and conceptual bases for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of indeterminate structures. Course topics include continuity, movement distribution, reinforced concrete elements, precast and prestressed elements, walls, columns, footings, earthquake loads on buildings, and detailing of structural systems.
ARCH. 6631-3 (formerly ARCH. 631). Environmental Control Systems II. The course focuses on lighting and acoustics. Illumination quantity and quality, day-lighting and electric lighting, lighting design, and applications are covered. The behavior and effect of daylight are studied through the construction of models. Techniques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered.
ARCH. 6640-3 (formerly ARCH. 640). Introduction to Computer Graphics. The course explores the fundamental algorithms of computer graphics, from point to line, plane, and symbols. The 2D and 3D operations - move scale and rotate - using matrix transformation are introduced. 3D database structures and projections for axonometric, isometric, and perspective also are covered.
ARCH. 6641-3 (formerly ARCH. 641). Computer Applications in Architecture. The course introduces problem-solving methods and the relationship between those methods and the application of the computer to design problems. Introductory problems are given in BASIC using the graphics package. A high-level language such as Pascal is used to explore language in more depth, and to conclude, a series of assignments introduces graphics with a high-level language. Assignments in programming CAD problems are required. ARCH. 6642-3. Architectural Design with Macintosh. This course intends to build upon the basic principles of drawing and composition presented in ARCH. 5510/5511 by introducing graphic reproduction methods with the Macintosh computer. Emphasis is on craft and precision will be stressed.
ARCH. 6660-3 (formerly ARCH. 660). Human and Social Dimensions of Design. This course focuses on the introduction of basic social and psychological processes relevant to changing environmental conditions, human factors, and problems of the built environment. Emphasis is placed on techniques of interface problems in design, the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping, preferences and attitudes toward environmental settings, the evaluation of particular built environments, and developing architectural programs.
ARCH. 6661-3 (formerly ARCH. 661). Design Methods. This course focuses on a systematic review and critique of the major philosophical frameworks for decision making in design. Models and theories of methods prevalent in the design world will be explored, relevant to the applicability and adequacy to current design and planning. Emphasis is placed on a broad understanding of a full range of models and the awareness of advances in social survey, data collection, and analysis techniques.
ARCH. 6683-3 (formerly ARCH. 683). Teaching Methods in Architecture. This course is designed to develop teaching and academic capabilities in the context of architecture. The student works with a faculty member in an instruction context eight hours per week.
ARCH. 6686-3 (formerly ARCH. 686). Special Topics in Architecture. Various topical concerns are offered in architecture history, theory, elements, concepts, methods, and implementation strategies and other related areas.
ARCH. 6700-6 (formerly ARCH. 700). Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI. The studio focuses on students' elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercises and by critically addressing the status of contemporary architectural theory. Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive design project that is structured to test students on integration of structural aspects,, mechanical systems, site planning, and climate considerations within their design solutions.
ARCH. 6701-6 (formerly ARCH. 701). Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII. The final design studio continues the comprehensive approach through a full range of design investigation and strategies at all scales from program and conception to construction detail. Students must demonstrate abilities to synthesize all previous work through an application of a complex architectural design project.
ARCH. 6950-6 (formerly ARCH. 702). Thesis Research and Programming.
ARCH. 6951-6 (formerly ARCH. 703). Architecture Thesis. ARCH. 6740-3 (formerly ARCH. 740). Computer-Aided Design. The course explores the relationship between design, mathematics, and computation. The concepts of finite mathematics will be introduced using building design examples. Problem-solving methods in design and computation will be explored. The analysis of plan types will be related to topology and geometry; symmetry and combinatorial groups will be introduced. Computer projects and readings will be assigned to explore the concepts.
ARCH. 6750-3 (formerly ARCH. 750). Professional Practice
I. This course introduces the student to the essential elements of professional practice through subject areas such as internship, licensing, services, modes of practice, fees, marketing, documents, specifications, and production procedures. One three-hour lecture per week. Prer., final year in program or consent of instructor.
ARCH. 6751-3 (formerly ARCH. 751). Professional Practice
II. This course addresses managerial issues that stem form architecture as a professional service activity. It addresses the economic environment of architectural practice, the relationship of management and design, the resources and functions of the architecture firm, and problems and opportunities in the profession. It presents several methods and techniques involved with solving problems typically encountered by architects and introduces new developments and approaches which have a bearing on practice. ARCH. 6930-3 (formerly ARCH. 770); ARCH. 6931-3 (formerly ARCH. 771). Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an architectural and/or design office by the School and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course. ARCH. 6900-3 (formerly ARCH. 960). Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to architecture.


Interior Design / 95
INTERIOR DESIGN
Program Director: Donald J. Sherman Secretary: Cathy Reed
Department Office: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 556-2294 Faculty: Professor: M. G. Barr Associate Professor: Donald J. Sherman Visiting Faculty: D. Ballast, C. Lanier, M. Watts
Interior Design Program
Interior Design is an interdisciplinary design field concerned with the creation, development, and completion of space for human use. The graduate program in Interior Design in the School of Architecture and Planning emphasizes awareness, understanding, and explorative application of conceptual aspects of the design process, as well as the development of the necessary technical, theoretical, and psychological skills required Master of Interior Design (first professional degree)
Three year program. The first professional Master of Interior Design degree is a 96 semester hour program requiring three years of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of four related course components and 24 semester hours of electives.
Major groups: Design, 36 credit hours; History and Theory, 12; Science and Technology, 21; Professional Practice, 6; total: 75 credit hours.
The core curriculum is an absolute requirement, regardless of any individual's educational background. The core curriculum consists of the following courses:
THE CURRICULUM - THREE YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN: 36 semester hours
ID. 5500 (6) Introduction to Interior Design Studio
I
ID. 5501 (6) Introduction to Interior Design Studio
II
ID. 6600 (6) Interior Design Studio III
ID. 6601 (6) Interior Design Studio IV
ID. 6700 (6) Advanced Interior Design Studio V
ID. 6701 (6) Advanced Interior Design Studio VI
HISTORY AND THEORY: 12 semester hours
ID. 5521 (3) History of Interior Design I
ID. 6620 (3) History of Interior Design II
ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism
ARCH. 6660 (3) Human and Social Dimensions of Design
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 21 semester hours
ID. 6630 (3) Finish Materials and Textiles
ID. 6631 (3) Construction Detailing
ID. 6632 (3) Interior Lighting
ID. 6633 (3) Advanced Interior Lighting Design
ARCH. 5530 (3) Structures I
ARCH. 5533 (3) Environmental Control Systems I
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours
ARCH. 6750 (3) Professional Practice I ARCH. 6751 (3) Professional Practice II
COURSE SEQUENCE
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFES- SIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL ID. 5500 (6) ARCH. 5520 (3) ARCH. 5530 (3) ARCH. 5533 (3) 15
SPRING ID. 5501 (6) ID. 5521 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15
YEAR II FALL ID. 6600 (6) ID. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) ID. 6630 (3) ID. 6632 (3) 18
SPRING ID. 6601 (6) ID. 6631 (3) ID. 6633 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18
YEAR III FALL ID. 6700 (6) i U1CH. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15
SPRING ID. 6701 (6) t >iRCH. 6751 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15
36 12 18 6 24 96


96 / School of Architecture and Planning
Master of Interior Design (Post-professional degree)
Two year program. The post-professional Master of Interior Design degree requires a minimum of two years of full-time study and 60 credit hours.
The core curriculum consists of four groups: Design, or Design and Thesis 24 credit hours; History and Theory, 6; Science and Technology, 9; Professional Practice, 3; totaling 45 credit hours. The core curriculum is an absolute requirement, regardless of any individual's educational background. Thesis is available only by petition to the Program Director and upon his/her approval.
THE CURRICULUM - TWO-YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN OR THESIS: 24 semester hours
HISTORY AND THEORY: 6 semester hours
ID. 6600 (6) ID. 6601 (6) ID. 6700 (6) ID. 6701 (6) ID. 6950 (6) ID. 6951 (6)
Interior Design Studio III Interior Design Studio IV Advanced Interior Design Studio V Advanced Interior Design Studio VI Thesis Research and Programming Interior Design Thesis
ARCH. 6660 (3) Human and Social Dimensions
ARCH. 6661 (3) Design Methods
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 9 semester hours
ID. 6630 (3) Finish Materials and Textiles
ID. 6632 (3) Interior Lighting
ID. 6633 (3) Advanced Interior Lighting
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours ARCH. 6751 (3) Professional Practice II
COURSE SEQUENCE
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFES- SIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL ID. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6660 (3) ID. 6630 (3) ID. 6632 (3) 15
SPRING ID. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6661 (5) ID. 6633 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 15
YEAR II FALL ID. 6700 (6) or ID. 6950 (6) ELECTIVES (9) 15
SPRING ID. 6701 (6) or ID. 6951 (6) ARCH. 6751 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15
24 6 9 3 18 60
AREAS OF CONCENTRATION AND ELECTIVES
Four areas of concentration are offered in the Interior Design Program: Facilities Management; History, Theory, and Criticism; Interior Design Education; Lighting Studies.
There are no set requirements in each of the above areas. Students are required to develop a plan of study with their advisor at the beginning of the course of study.
ELECTIVES
ID. 6640 (3)
ID. 6641 (3)
ID. 6650 (3)
ID. 6686 (3)
ID. 6930 (3)
ID. 6900 (3)
COURSES
ID. 5500-6 (formerly ID. 500). Introduction to Interior Design Studio I. This introductory studio focuses on the analysis of two-and three-dimensional design principles, and basic and interior design fundamental theories. Emphasis is placed on concept and elements of proportion, balance, rhythm, color, movement, form, and light. A modular component of the course consists of mechanical graphics tools used to illustrate the design studio projects.
IN. 5501-6 (formerly ID. 501). Introduction to Interior Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the fundamental theories and design principles explored in the first semester, and applies them to objective interior design projects. Emphasis is placed upon anthropometries and aesthetics, as related to the design of furnishings and interior spaces. A modular component of the course consists of basic freehand graphics tools used to illustrate the design studio projects.
Facilities Management I Facilities Management II Furniture Design Special Topics in Interior Design Interior Design Internship Independent Study


Full Text

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Pages 83 110 144 180 218 332 336 344 tory of Colleges and Schools SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING Architecture Int erior Design Landscape Architecture and U r ban D esign Urban and R egiona l P lannin g COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Accoun tin g Business Administration Business Admini stration for Executives Entrepreneurship and New Venture Deve lopment Finance H ea lth Administration H ea lth Administration Executive Program Human Resourc es Management Inf orma tion Systems International Business Management Marketing Operations Management Quantitative Method Real Estat e Transportation and Distribution Management SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Teacher Certification Program s Cou n seling and Personne l Services Early C hildh ood Education and Early Ch ildhood Specia l Education Educational Administration Educational Psychology Elementary Education Foundations Inst ru c tional T ec hnolog y Corporate Instru ctiona l Deve lopment and Training Instructional Computing Specia l ist Instructional Technologist Library Media Specialist Language and Culture Reading and Writing Research and Evaluation Methodolog y Secondary Education Specia l Education / Educationally Handi capped COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering and Compute r Science Mechanical Engineering Engineering, Master of COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Anthropology Ba ic Scien ce, of Biology C h e mistr y Communication a nd Theatr e Economics English Environmental Science, Master of Ethnic Studies Fine Arts Geography Army ROTC Music Geology His t o r y Humanities , Master of Mathematics Mode rn Lan guages Philosophy Phys i cs Pol itical Science Psyc ho l ogy Social Science, Master of Socio l ogy Technical Communication , Master of MILITARY SCIENCE Air Force ROTC COLLEGE OF MUSIC Performance Music GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS C rimin a l justice Pub lic Administration Directory of Programs and Degrees Inside Back Cover

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NP BA BFA BS ... BS (CSEl Legend Sc h ool of Arc hit ec ture and Planning .............................. Bache lor of Arts B ac helor of Fin e Art s B ache lor o f Science Bach e l or of Scie n ce in Computer Scie nce and E n g in ee rin g CB College of Business CLAS College of L i beral Arts and Scie n ces C M . . ........................ ........... College of Music e ....................... . ..................... .. .. .. En1p h asis ED Sc h oo l o f Educatio n ED S ENGR GSBA Educati o n Speci alis t College of E n gineerin g ......... Graduate Schoo l of Bus iness Administration GS P A ..... . . . . .. Graduate Sc h ool of Publi c Affa i rs 111 MA . ... . M .ARCH MAUD .................. .... .. Minor Master of Art s Master of Arc h itecture Master o f Arc hit ec ture in Urba n D es i g n MBA Master of B u s iness Admini stration MBS Master of Basic Science MCJ ...................... Master of Criminal jus ti ce ME ........... Master of E ngin ee rin g M H MID Master of Humanities Master of Interior Design l\ •1LA ......... . Master of Landscape Arc hit ecture MPA . ............ Master of Public Administration MS .. Master of Sc i e n ce MURP Master in Urban and Regional Planning o ..................................................... . Option PH D ........................ . ... .. Doctor of Philosophy XMB A Executive Master of Bus iness XMS HA Adminis trat io n Exec uti ve Master of Science in Health Administration Degree Programs Accounting ....................... e ((B ) Accounting MS (GSBA) Accounting and Jnfonnation Sys t e m s ........ .. . .. MS(GSBA) Anthropo logy .. ......... BA (CLASl Anthropology ........... ................. MA (CLASl Applied Ma th e m a tic s .........................••......... B S (ENGR) Appl ied Mathema ti cs . . ........ MS (ENGRl Applied Math ematics ......................... . ... PH D IENG R l Applied Math e mati cs/ Physics .... .. . ............. . . .. B A (C L AS) Architecture ....................... .. ................. M.ARCH (AlP) Archi t ect u re in Urban De s i g n ....................... MAUD (A/P) B asic Sc i ence .... ................................... MBS (CLAS) Bilingual Education ........ .. .. .. .............. .. .... .. .. e (ED) Biology ................... .... . ................... BA (C L AS) Biology ............................ MA (C L AS) Business Admini s trati o n .......................... MBA (GSBA) Business Admini st r ation, Executive Program ......... ................... XMBA (GSBA) C hemi s t ry .................... B A (C L AS) C hemi s t ry .........• .. ................... MS (CLASJ Civil E n g in eering ..................... B S (ENG R ) Civil E n g ineering . ............... MS (ENGR) Communication and Theatr e .................. BA (CLAS) Communication and T h ea tr e M A (C L AS) Computer Sc i e n ce .......................................... o (CLAS) Computer Sc i e n ce . . . ................... MS (ENG R ) Computer Scie n ce and Engi neerin g B S (CSE) (ENG R ) QJrporat e In s t r u ctio n a l Deve lopment and Training .. e (ED) Counse lin g and P ersonnel Servi ces ........... ...... MA
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of Colorado at Denver I 7ff 'B'" -7f 7 $3.50 SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT THE POST OFFI C E BOULDER, COLORADO

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1 CU-DENVER AND THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN METROPOLIS A few gold n crumbs washed out of Cherry Creek and the South / Platte River sparked the mass migration that gave birtf to Denver. Following Green Russell's discovery in t e summer of 1858, 100,000 gold seekers crossed the previously shunned Great American Desert to prospect America's highest mountain barri er. The Coloido Rockies suddenly became a goal, a granite-lined reasure chest of gold and silver . Auraria, th initial town company, soon succumbed to a rival aero s Cherry Creek-Denver City. Named for the gover or of what was then Kansas Territory, Denver was f unded on a jumped claim by real estate speculators. was gambling that America's sec ond great god rush was no humbug. The Golden Gamble Before the great Colorado gold rush of 1858-59, the Rockies little to attract settlers, except the "hairy banlf notes," the beaver pelts prized by fur trappers, traders, and fashionably-hatted gentlemen in Eastern America and Europe. The gold rush changed that, as the rudely dispossessed Cheyenne and Arapaho soon discovered. Denver City was a long shot. Most of the gold rush "cities" would become ghost towns. In the struggle to become the county seat, the state capitol, and the regional metropolis, there would be many losers and only one winner. Denverites determined early to mine the miners, to relieve prospectors of whatever wealth they might find up in the mountain mining camps. On the mining frontier, everyone was gambling on the riches of the earth. In the instant city of Denver , folks gambled with cards and dice , with mining stock , and real esta te. Such speculation was easier work than wading around in icy mountain streams with picks and pans. Townsfolk bet on everything from dog fights to snow fall. City fathers amused them selves with card games, using town lots as poker chips. Whole blocks of Denver City changed hands of an evening .

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M i ning Minds Town characters included Professor O scar J . Gol drick, who astonished Coloradans by swearing at h is oxen in Latin. This shaggy Ir ishman also opened the first school. In this windowless, doorless, mud-roofed log cabin, Professor Goldrick accepted all students red, white, black, yellow, and brown. Foreseeing a need for higher education, a Denver legis l ator introduced a bill to create a public universi t y in Denver . This led to a squabble in the territorial l egislature about where the university shoul d be. A Prison or a University? Legislators eventually designed a compromise. Denver received the state capitol. Boulder and Canon City, two other ambitious towns, also sought state institutions. Canon Cit y, at least in legend, was given a choice between the state university and the sta t e penitentiary. City fathers in the southern Colorado town reckoned that the prison would be be tt er attend ed. Prisoners , they figured, would be be t ter behaved than university students and, in those days, prisoners could be hired as cheap labor. Furthermore, college professor s were a poor and s t range lot, sometimes as dissipated as their students. So Canon City chose the prison and Boulder received the state university as a consolation prize . ot until 1876 would an embryo university actually open its doors in Boulder. Photo by Tom Noel Photo b y Roger Whitacre Boom and Bust Meanwhile Denver throve . Gold proved to be only one of the riches of the Co l orado ear t h . Fortunes in silver and coal , in zinc and lead, molybdenum and oil, helped make Denver a major city. By 1890 , the Mile High metropolis had a population over 100,000. In a single generation the go l d rush crossroads had emerged as the second largest city in the American West, second to San Francisco but larger than Los Angeles or any town in Texas. Colorado's mineral boom burst with the Depression of 1893. Flush times did not return until after the even bleaker Great Depression of the 1930s. World War II, however, triggered a new b onanza. Since 1940, a million newcomers have se ttled in the 3,497 square mile metropolis of Adams, Arapahoe, Bou lder, De n ver, and Jefferson counties.

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Fraternal T h e Extension Division acquired a new home in 195tp, when the university paid $687,500 for the Denver iamway Company Building. This brick and terra co a Renaissance Revival style structure, wi t h marble and brass interior trim , had housed the corporate of ces and streetcar barns of a huge street car system discontinued in 1950. A million-dollar face lift converte4 car barns to classrooms in this National Register landmark , where the first floor served as drtve-in parking. Education /to a Higher Degree Pursuing public education to a higher degree in the Rock y Mountain metropolis, the University of Colo rado began offering extension courses in 1912. The Extension Division spent its early years shuffling from one buildinp to the next, finding space in Trinity United Metnodist Church , the Golden Eagle Department Store, the New Customs House, Barnes Busi ness School, the Federal Center, and on the CU Medical School Campus in Denver . Not until 1939 did the Extension Division acquire "permanent'' quarters in Denver , a suite of offices in the C.A. Johnson Building at 509 17th Street. A single full-time faoulty member ran the school with the help of part -time teachers. Several hundred students were expected to enroll for credit college courses in 1940 1,500 showed up. After World War IT, former military personnel swamped CU's Denver Extension for its continuing education and correspondence courses, workshops, and vocatio.nal training programs. In 1948, the Denver Extension Division moved in t o the Fraternal Building, a fading but once grandiose five-story Victorian show piece with an elegant Mansard roof. Conveniently, the ground floor harbored Collins Finer Foods, a cor ner t avern offering 25-cent hamburgers and a 75-cent pitcher of beer. Denver Tramway car barns. Photo courtesy Denver Public Library , West-em Histor y Department

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CU-Denver Graduates from Extensio n Division to Independent Campus Students and faculty celebra ted the 1957 promotion of t he Denver Extension Division to the Denv er Center wi t h authority to grant undergraduate and some grad u a t e degrees . Full independence came in 1973, when the Denver Center became the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado. Over 17,000 students a year emolled at CU-Denver , confirming the need for the new campus . Then and now the CU-De n ver sh1dent tended to be unique. The average age is 27, 70 percent are employed , 55 percent are married. Over half the students and many of the faculty are part time, e n abling them to bring work experiences into the classroom. B etween 1973 and 1976, the state approved and built the Auraria Higher Education Center on a 169 acre campus shared by the University of Colorado at Den v e r, Metropolitan State College, and the Community C ollege at Denver . Auraria -from the Latin word for gold -has evolved from a go l d rush boom town to a b ooming campus, the largest in the state with approx imately 30,000 students emolled each semester. The campus is a unique experiment in higher education; it s shared facilities include a librar y, student center, a n d recreation complex. Each institution maintains a different academic role; CU-Denver is charged with e mphasizing upper division and graduate programs. II CUDen ve r F ind s a Hom e After decades in recycled downtown buildings , CU Denver in 1988 moved into its first custom-made new home. This $27,000,000, 257,000-square-foot building occupies two full blo cks between Speer Boulevard and Twelfth Street , Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoo ver, Berg, D esmond, a Denver architectural firm , designed this post modern brick s tructure with dis tinctive and generous glass brick atriums. From a five story frontage facing downtown, the CU-Denver classroom, laborator y, and office complex steps down to t wo-s to ries facing the athletic facilities and library at the heart of the campus. Today, CU-Denver offers graduate and undergraduate programs in Business Administration, Architecture and Planning , Educa tion, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts, Music, and Public Affairs. Ninth Street Historic Park, in the center of the campus, survives as a reminder that CU-Denver occupies the creek bank where Den ver -and Colorado began . CU-Denver flourishes today on that Auraria site where prospectors once parmed for go ld and founded what is now a metrop olis of 1. 9 million people . ... Tom Noel, CU-Denver History Department

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Universtt y of Colorado at Den v er 1200 Larim r Denv er, Co orado 80204 I U ndergraduate and Graduate Catalog 1988-89 Although thi s catalo g was prepared on the bas i s of the be s t information available at the time , all inform ation ( including the aca demic calendar, a dmi ssion and gradua tion requirements , course offerings and cour e descriptions , and stateme nt s of tuition a nd f ees) is s ubjec t to change without noti ce or obligation . CU-Denve r is an affirmative action/equa l opportunity ins titution. For c urrent calendar , tuition rates, requirem e nt s, d eadli n es, etc ., s tudent s s hould refer to a co p y of the S ch e dule of Cl asses for the semes ter in whic h they inte n d to enroll. The courses lis ted in this catalog are intended as a g eneral indicatio n of the Univer s it y of Colorado a t Denver curriculum . Courses a nd pro wams are s ubje c t to modifi ca tion at a n y time. Not all cour es are offe red every seme ; t e r , a nd the faculty t eac hin g a particular course or program may vary from time t o tim e. Th e instructor may alter the co ntent o f a course or pro g ram to meet particular cla s need . Courses are listed b y co llege or school. University o Co l orado Catalog. (USPS 651-0 0) 262 Stadium Building , Campus Box 384, Boulder, Col rado 80309-0384 Volume 19&j, o. 3, May/June Published 4 times a year: January/February March/April , May/June, August/Sep t e mber Second class1 postage paid a t Boulder , Colorado . Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog , CU-Denver Publications Boulder, Colorado 80302.

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6 I University of Colorado a t Denver Table of Contents Contents Academic Calendar Message from the Chancellor ........ . ...... . .... . Chancellor's Advisory Group ... ..... ........ ... . . Administration of the University and of the CU-Denver Campus .............. . Campus Map ..... . ..... ... . .................... .... . . . . The University ......... .... .... ... ............. .... . . History . .... .......................... . .... . .... ......... . Academic Structure .............................. .... . Academic Programs ................................. . Accreditation ........ . ........ . . . . ..................... . Memberships ..... .......................... . .. ...... .. . General Information ............................. . Student Organizations .............................. . Auraria Higher Education Center ..... .... . . : ... . Affirmative Action . . ... . . . ..... .... . . ... .......... ... . R esearch ........ .... .. .................................. . Centers and Institutes for Research , Service, and Training .............. . Faculty .... . .... ... ........ . .... . ........ . .... ............ . Admission Policies and Procedures ...... . Undergraduate Admission Information ..... . . . Freshmen Requirements ...... ..... . . . ........ . .. .. . Tests . . ... . . . . . ... . .. ..... . ... .... ......................... . Transfer Students .... .................... ........... .. Former Students ................................... ... . International Students . ............................ .. Graduate Admission ................................ . Tuition and Fees .... .............................. .. Residency Classification .................. ......... .. Financial Aid . . ....................................... . Registration ............... . ............... . ...... . ... . Academic Policies and Regulations ...... . Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act . ...... . . .... . . ........ ..... ..... . . ...... .. Special Programs and Facilities ....... .... .. Alumni Association .... ........ . . ........... ........ . Book Center ... ... ................... ................... . Computing Services ....... ..... . . ..... .. ......... ... . Division of Continuing Education .............. . Foundation ...................... .......... ............. . In t ernational Education .... ....................... .. Student Services ................ ........... ........ . Student Government ................................ . Academic Center for Enrichment ............... . Internships and Cooperative Education, Center ............................ ......... .... .......... . Educational Opportunity Program ....... . .. ... . Page 8 9 10 11 12-13 15 15 15-16 16 17 17 15-52 17 18 18 18 19-22 23-24 25-32 25-30, 32 25-27 27-28 27-29 29 29-30 30 33-34 35 36-39 39-42 42-48 48 49-52 49 49 50 50-51 51 51-52 54-61 55-56 56-57 57-58 58-59 Contents Women's Resources ................................. . Testing Center ........................... . ...... . .... . . Veterans Affairs ........ . ................... . . ... ..... . Student Conduct ..................................... . Library Services . . ............ . . . .... . .......... .... . Media and Telecommunications ................ . The Graduate School ........................ .... . Degree s Offered ...................................... . Financial Aid ....... ........ . ..... ................. .... . Admission Requirements .......................... . Registration .................... . ....................... . Requirement s for Advanced Degrees . .... . .... . School of Architecture and Planning .... . Built Environment Studies .................... . ... . Architecture .......................................... . . . Interior Design ................ ........................ . Landscape Architecture and Urban Design .. . Urban and Regional Planning .................... . College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration .... ... .............. ... .... ....... . .. Accounting ....... ....... ... ........................... .. Business Law . ... . ..................................... . Entrepreneurship and ew Venture De ve lopment .......................................... . Page 59 60 60 61 62-65 64 66-80 67-68 68-69 69-71 71-72 72-73 83-109 86-87 90-94 95-97 98-103 104-108 110-143 119, 131 123 119 Finance ..................................... ..... ........ . 120, 131-132 Health Administration ...... ........................ 132-134, 137 Human Resources Management ..... ... . ....... . Information Systems ... ........................ . . ... . International Business .............................. . 120 120, 134 120-121 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 121, 134-135 Marketing ........................................... .... 121, 135-136 Operations Management .......................... . Quantitative Methods . ........................ ..... . Real Estate .. . ......... .................................. . Transportation and Distribution Management ....... ................... ..... . .... . . . . . Business Administration, Master ..... ...... . . . .. School of Education ............................. . Teacher Certification Programs .................. . Counseling and Personnel Service ... . . . . . .... . . Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education ................. .. Educational Administration ...................... . Educational Psychology ........................ .... . Elementary Education .............................. . Foundations ........ ................................ ... . Instructional Technology . . ... ..... ... . ...... ... ... . Language and Culture ............................. .. 121-122 127 122 122 129-130 144-179 148-151 156-159 159-161 151-156 161-163 163-165 165-166 166-171 171-173

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Contents Reading and riting .................. . . ........ ... .. Research and valuation Methodology ....... . Secondary Ed cation .............................. .. Special Educa 'o n/Educationally Handicapp d ... ....... . ........... .... ............ .. College of E gineering and Applied Science . .............. . ........... ............. ....... .. Applied Mat .................... .. ........ .. .. ... ........................ . Mechanical Efgineering ............ ... . . .......... . Engineering Non-Departmental ............ .. Master of En . ineering .... ..... . .................... . College of iberal Arts and Sciences .... . Anthropolo Master of Ba c Science ............................ .. Biolo gy ............ ....... .......................... . . . . . Chemistry ..... . . ........ ...... ... ... .... . ........... . . . Communicat on and Theatre .................... .. Economics ................. ........... . ... ... . . . . . .. ... . English ..................................... ............ . Master of En onmental Science . ... . ...... . ... . Ethnic Studi s ......................................... . Fine Arts ....................................... ........ . Geography . . ......................... . ....... .......... . Geology .................................... ... .... ..... . History .... .......................................... ... . Page 173-175 175-176 176-178 178-179 180-217 193-194 195-200 201-211 212-216 216 216-217 218-331 232-237 237-239 240-243 244-247 248-254 254-259 260-266 267 268-270 271-274 275-277 277-280 281-285 Contents I 7 Contents Master of H,umanities ... .............. ............. . . Mathematics ........................................... . Modern Languages ....... . .. . ........... . .... . ..... . . Philosoph y .................. . . . ........................ . Physics ....................... .................. ......... . Political Science ......... ......................... ..... . Psychology ..... . . ..... ........... .... ... ............... . Master of Social Science ............................ . Sociology . ................. .............................. . Master of Technical Communication ...... .... . Military Science ................. . .... . ............. . Army ROTC ............ . .............................. . Air Force ROTC ................... ............. ...... . College of Music .................................. . Music ................................................... .. Performance Music ............................. .... .. Graduate School of Public Affairs .. ..... .. The Centers ........ ........................ ............ . Master of Public Administration ................ . Doctor of Philosophy , Public Administration . .... . ...... ........................... .. Master of Criminal Justice ..... .................... . Faculty Roster ....... ............. .................. . Index ........................... . ..... ... . ............... . Application Form ... . . ... ... ........ ....... ........ . Page 286-287 287-297 298-306 306-309 309-311 311-317 318-321 322-324 324-330 331 332335 333 334-335 336-343 341-343 343 344-359 348 350-351 352-353 358 361-373 377-382 383-384 Degree Programs .. .. .. .. . ....... .................. Inside back cover

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8 I University of Colorado a t Denver ACADEMIC CALENDAR1 Summer 19882 April 18-22 Orientation May 30 Holiday (no classes) May 31 First day of cia ses 3 July 4 Holiday (no classes) August 5 End of term Fall 19882 Augu t 8-12 Orientation Augu t 22 First day of clas es Sept ember 5 Holiday (no cia es) November 24-25 Holiday (no cia ses) Decemb er 16 End of seme ter Spring 19892 January 9-I 3 Orientation January 16 Holiday (no cia es) January 17 First day of clas es March 20-24 Spring vacation (no classe ) May 13 End of semes ter 1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. 2 Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates , deadlin es for changing programs and registration dates and procedures. 3 Consult the Schedul e of Classes for dates 10-week and 8-week classes begin for Summer Terms. Summer 19892 May 22-26 May 29 May 30 July 4 August 4 Fall19892 August 14-18 August 21 September 4 November 23-24 December 15 Spring 19902 January 8-I 2 January 1 5 January 16 March 22-26 May 12 Orientation Holiday (no classes] First day of classes Holiday (no cla sses) End of term Orientation First day of classes Holiday (no cla sses) Holida y (no etas es) End of semes ter Orientation Holiday (no clas ses) Fir t day of cia se Spring vacation (no cia es) End of erne ter

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Message Fr m the Chancellor Dear Studen : Welcome the University of Colorado at Den ver. On behcili of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver s how s your willin ess to learn at Colorado's only urban public university. is one of the four campuses of th e University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, j offering baccalaureate , master's, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationall y arjtd internationally because of the high quality of otir programs, facu l ty, and alumni. Located in owntown Denver , th e University challenges i students both academically and per sonally in a intellectual environment that encourages ommitment, curiosity, and imagina tion. A distin 'shing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban p rspective that is an integral theme in our programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Since 1972, nrollment has grown to approximat ly 10,455 students, including 5,741 Chancellor Glendon F. Drake Chancellor I 9 undergradu te s and 4,714 graduate student s . The Univ 1 rsity offers some 40 degree and degree option programs a t th e baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs a t the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which t build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process comp lement to classroom study. The University's seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Arts and Sciences , Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Architecture and Planning) and The Gduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the oppor nities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and which will enhance your economic and person lives . We at th Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their var ied needs. rhis is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national is ues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. We look orward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a E ' ch intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all , I look forward to seeing y u at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree. My best 'shes to you and to your future. Glendon F. rake Chancellor University of Colorado at Denver

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10 I University of Colorado a t Denver Chancellor's Advisory Group VERONICA BARELA, Executive Director NEWSED, Community Development Corporation JACQUES W. BERNIER, Manager, Personnel Administration, Aerospace Systems Program, Hughes Aircraft Company DIANA BOULTER, President, The Denver Partnership THE HON. JEANNE FAATZ, Colorado State Represen tative WILLIAM W. FLETCHER, President and General Man ager , Rocky Mountain News DAVID GREENBERG , Greenberg/Baron Associates THE HON. REGIS GROFF , Colorado State Senator JOHN KASSER, College Football Associates LEE LARSON, Vice President/General Manager, KOA Radio 85 FRANK NEWMAN, President, Education Commission of the States C . NEIL NORGREN , Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Butler Fixture Company THOMAS PECHT , Publisher, Denver Business Journal BRUCE ROCKWELL, Executive Director , The Colorado Trust HERRICK ROTH, President, Herrick Roth Associates ROBERT SCANLAN, Regional Manager, Coldwell Banker BILL SCHEITLER , President of the City Council, Denver GAIL SCHOETILER , Colorado State Treasurer JEROME SERACUSE , Fellow, American Institute of Architects; Seracuse Lawler & Partners TOM STRICKLAND, Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber & Madden KEN TONNING , Vice President/General Manager, KUSA-TV, CH 9 BEN TRUJILLO , President, Hispanic Chamber of Com merce SOLOMON TRUJILLO , Colorado Vice President and Chief Executive Officer , Mountain Bell CLAIR VILLANO, Director, Consumer Fraud Division THE HON. WILMA WEBB, Colorado S tat e Representa tive MICHAEL R . WISE, Chairman of the Board, Silverado Banking The University of Colorado seal, adop ted in 1908, der,icts a male Greek classical figure seated agains t a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laur el is placecf beside him. The Greek inscriptio n means "Let your ligM shine." According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "s t ands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or s u ccess , the youth of the figure suggests the " morning of life," and the scrofl represents written language .

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ADMINIST f ATION Board of Regents CHARLES M I . ABERNATHY , JR., M.D., Montrose, term expires 988 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. I CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992 PETER C. Boulder, term expires 1990 LYNN J. Longmont, term 1990 HUGH C. FOr.LER, Denver, term exprres 1988 SANDY F . KRAEMER, Colorado Springs, term expires 1988 NORWOOD . ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1990 ROY H. SH,RE, Greeley, term expires 1992 _ Officers E. GORDON GEE, President of the University; Profes sor of Law. .A., University of Utah; J.D ., Columbia University; d.D., Teacher's College, Columbia Uni versity. HUNTER R ' WLINGS, Vice President for Academic Affairs; of Classics. B . A., Haverford College; Ph.D., Prin eton University. C. WILLIAM FISCHER, Vice President for Budget and Finance; Pr0fessor Attendant Rank of Public Affairs. B .A., Musigum College; M.P.A., Harvard Univer sity. THEO. VOL KY, JR., Vice President for Adminis tra tion; Profe sor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State Unive sity; Ph.D., University of Minnesota . H.H. ARNdLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regent s an1 of the University. B .A., LL.B., University of EDWARD VI/. MURROW, Treasurer for the University and Assistaht Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., of Colorado. CU-Denv I r Officers OFFICE 0 THE CHANCELLOR Chancellor............................. Glendon F . Drake Special A sistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Guyer Dire ctor, Pu lie R elations and Publi catio s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bob Nero Dir ector, C pus Affairs ........... B arbara O'Brien DIVISION F ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Vic e Chane llor for Academic Affairs ........................... . . John S . Haller, Jr. Assi tant to the Vice Chancellor . . Ro emary Kirmaier Acting Ass ciate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affair ; D ean, Graduate School .. . . Thoma A. Clark Assistant Vtce Chancellor for Academic Affairs............. Charles G . Schmidt Assistant Vice Chancellor for R esearch and Creative Activitie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fernie Baca Administration I 11 D ean, School of Architecture and Plannin g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hamid Shirvani D ean, College of Business and Administratio n a n d Graduate School of Busines s Admini tration..................... Donald L. Stevens Dean , School of Education ...... .. . William F . Grady Dean , College of Engineering and Applied Science ............... ... . ........... Paul E . Bartlett D ean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Ostheimer Acting R eside nt D ean, College of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roy Pritt s Dean , Graduate School of Public Affairs...................... Mar hall Kaplan Director , Auraria Library ........... Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Director ........... ..... Jean F. Hemphill Director , Divi ion of Continuing Education ........................... William D . Boub Dean , Stude n t Academic Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Lou Fenili Director , Academic Center for Enrichment ................. Kathy R. Jack son Director , Center for Internships and Cooperative Education . . . Janet Michalski Director , Ed u cational Opportunity Program ....... . . . Cecil E. Glenn Dir ec tor , Student Services and Veterans Affair s .. .............. Bruce E . Williams Director , Women's Re sources .. Pamela Kesson-Craig DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIO N AND FINANCE Vice Chancellor for Administrat i on and Finance..... Jeffrey W. Konzak Special Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julie Carnahan Director , Affirmative Action....... George Auto bee D irector, Bud gets and Fiscal Planning ............................ Julie Torres Bur sar ................................. . Dir ector, Computing Service ..... George E . Funkey Director , Financial Aid/Student Employment.. . .. ....... ............ Ellie Miller Dir ector, financi a l and Bu s ine ss Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kenneth E. Herman Acting Director, Per onnel Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kenneth Tagawa D irector, Student Administrative Services..... . ............ ........... George L. Burnham DIVISION OF PLANNING Vice Chancellor for Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce W. Bergland Director df Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beverly Brun s on CU FOUNDATION Vice Pre side nt , CU Foundation at Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara S. Allar Dire ctor, Annual Fund.............. ancy Rettig

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CU-Denver Offices Academic Affairs , Vice Chancellor ....................... DR Academic Center for Enrichment ................ .. ...... NC Accounting/Accounts Payable ........ .... .. ...... .. ...... . DR Administration and Finance, Vice Chancellor ....... DR Admissions .......... .... . . . . .... . .... ....... . . .... . .... . .... .. NC Affirmative Action ...................................... ...... DR Alumni ........................ .... ....... .. ...................... DR American lndian Education Program .... .... .. ......... NC Ana l ytical Laboratory .. .... .... .............................. NC AR AU BR BU cc CD CN DR Ninth Street Park Arts Bldg. PP Phys•cal Plant Auraria Librar y PS .......... Public Safety Bromley Building RO Rectory Office Business Services SA St . Cajetan ' s Center Child Care Center SE St. Elizabeth's Church Child Development Center SF St. Francis Cent e r Central Classroom 51 .. ... . . .... Science Building Dravo SO . . . . . . . . . South Classroom CAMPUS MAP EC Eas t Classroom ST Student Center & Book Center EG Emmanue l Gallery TE Techno l ogy Buildin g MR Mercantile Restaurant TV .......... Tivoli NC orth Classroom WC .... .. .. West Classroom PE .......... Physical Education Architecture and Planning, School of .... .............. DR Chancellor ....... . ...... . .... .. .... . .. . .. ... .. ................. . Asian American Education Program .................... NC Colorado Partnership for Educational Black Education Program .............................. NC Renewal ........ . .. . ......... . .. . ... . ... .. ...... .. .... . . . ..... . Budget/Fiscal Planning .................... .. ................. DR Colorado Principals ' Cent er .............................. . Bursar's Office ...... .... .... .......... .. .. ........ ...... .... .. NC Graduate School. The ...... .. ............................. .. Business and Administration , College of , and Hispani c American Education Program .............. . Graduate School of Busine ss Administration ... BU Business Services ............................ .... .. .. .. ........ DR Centers , The .................................. .. .... ............ NC

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I of Colorado at Denver 1 Auraria Higher Education Center Community College of Denver Metropolitan State College UntverSiry of Co6orad0 at Denver Vtanor Parl
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The Univ rsity of Colorado at Denver is one of the most iml?o f lant educ ati onal resources in th e Denver metropolitan area . CUDenver, one of four institu tions in Uni vers ity of Colorado sys tem , is an urban , non residential campus l ocated in downtown Denv er. jor civic, cultural, business , and govern mental a c ti ties are in close proximity. offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fieltls and graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. de es are offered in public affairs, applied mathemati s, educational administration, and educa tion t echn ogy. Doctoral s tudie s also are available in engineerin and other fields in cooperation with CO Boulder. S ecial emphasis is placed on programs that will help a sure students professional opportunities after gradu tion. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of t 1e diverse student population . Classes are offered du ing weekday and evening hours, and on weekends. Students ages range between 17 and 75. The aver age age is 27 . Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 53 penl:ent attend part time. Sixty-five percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels. CU-Den er's faculty actively promote the special role of an rban institution in meeting th e needs of students. any faculty bring their work experiences to the clas room . They are alert to the challenges and advances f the urban environment and responsible to the ne ds of students and the community. The combinati n of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly mo ivated students creates a vi t al and exciting education I environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine "real world" ex 1 erience with academic excellence . History Just ove a century ago the University of Colorado was foun 1ed in Boulder , in 1876. In 1912, the Univer sity of Col rado's Department of Correspondence and Exten sion was es tab lished in Denver , to meet the needs off.e burgeoning population . As the breadth of course fferings expanded, so did th e demand for degree-gr nting sta tu s. The Denver Extension Center was rena ed the University of Colorado Denver Cen ter in 196$, and by 1969 , 23 fields of undergraduate study andlll of graduate study were offered. In 1972 the Color'ldo General Assembly appropriated support to build bhe Auraria Campus, CU-Denver's curren t si te . this same year the Denver " Center " was renamed FU-Denver. Two years later the University of was reorganized into four campuses Denver , Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder. University of Colorado System As one of four campuses of the University of Colo rado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher educat ion . The University of Colo rado at Boulder now serves about 22,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and profe ss ional The Health Sciences Center in Denver proVIdes education and training to medical, dental , nurs ing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,500 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergrad uat e, gra duate, and professional programs. CU-Den ver' s role within the University system is primar ily to the. needs for undergraduate and graduate m s truct10n m the Denver metropolitan area. Empha sis is given to professional , preprofessional , and lib eral . in the context of a s trong mult1diSc1plinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system. Academic Structure Each of the four campuses of th e University of Col orado System Denver , Boulder , Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver ha s its own Chan cellor and campus administration. The Chancellor s, in tum, report to the President of the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided b y the Presi dent of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System , apportionment of resources across campuses, the System-wide Gradu ate School , and general polic y regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives , and faculty and persoru:el matter s. A system-wide Faculty Coun cil 1s the maJOr component of faculty gove rnance . It is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Den ver, as well, has its own faculty governance structure. Students a l so have their own governance institutions. The Ohancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Den ver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic a ffairs, and budget and financial matters ; Three Vice Chancellors assist th e Chancellor in the fields of Academic Affairs, Administration and Finance, and Planning and Enrollment Management. Each of these Vice Chancellors is responsible for the essen tial components of the campus enterprise. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs acts in the absence of the Chancellor, sets the highest standards in teaching, research , and service, and oversees all

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16 I General Information t visits to the Denver campus to meet with faculty, staff, and s tudent groups academic units, The Graduate School , the library, research administration, continuing education, and student services. Nine academic support programs are overseen by the Dean of Student Services: Coun selor Training, Testing, Educational Opportunities Program, Student Activities, the Women's Resource Center , Veterans Affairs, Center for Academic Enrich ment, Legal Services, and Internships and Coopera tive Education. Senior Citizens' programs also are available. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance manages admissions, student records, finan cial aid, computing services, and the campus budget. The Vice Chancellor for Planning oversees the ongoing process of strategic planning for campus initia tive s. One element of this process is "enrollment management." Such management addresses the development and the implementation of a compre hensive strategy to promote the campu s, build appro priate academic programs, and ensure an effective relationship with prospective and current students, and with graduates of CU-Denver. An Office of Public Relations reports directly to the Chancellor and assists in orchestrating all promotional efforts and the exter nal affairs of the campus. The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU-System counterpart. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs. Acad emic Programs CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. But, wit h the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units: School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Music Graduate School of Public Affairs These units now accommodate approximately 11,000 students nearly half as large as CU-Boulder itself taught by about 300 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hall mark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional student s who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family com mitments or because they 've only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them. The undergraduate colleges admit freshmen and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering , and music. The College of Lib eral Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher certification . The Graduate School offers master's programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning , the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU Boulder. And CU-Denver faculty also participate in a few other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder. For a complete account of bachelor's and master's degree programs offered by CU-Denver, see the list ing of degree programs on the inside back cover of this catalog. The college and school sections of this bulle tin describe specific policies on requirement s for grad uation , course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and simila r information. CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for edu cation which leads to improved professional opportu nity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications , and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer sci ence (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs . The Future CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs th e vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast , perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate s tudie s are at

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once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New ljtighly innovative applied and professional graduate de19'ees are being developed that address the emerging nTeds of the region's economy. And centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are gener ating practical solutions to some of Colorado's and t e nation's most serious social, economic, environrnefltal, and technological problems . Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and hurnanlities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU Denver n urban campus is deeply involved in enriching e cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move. Join us and share in an exciting adventure in learning . Accredit tion and Memberships ACCREDIT TION Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business orth C ntral Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Servic s Administration America Society of Landscape Architects Planning Association Colorad State Board of Education ation Council for the Accreditation of Teach r Education National) Architectural Accrediting Board See the
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18 I General Information Aurar i a Higher Education Cente r The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College , and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered. On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Librar y, the student center, book center, child care and development cen ters, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings. The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver's past-historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli has been renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment. Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Title IX CU-Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and in employment. In pursuance of this policy, no Denver campus department, unit, disci pline , or employee shall descriminate against an indi vidual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, co lor , age, national origin, or individual handicap. This pol icy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees. The institution's educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminator y basis subject to the provisions of the Titles VI and VII of t he Civil Rights Act of 1964 , Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 504 of t he Rehabili tation Ac t of 1973, Vietnam-Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, and Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 . A CU-Denver Affirmative Action/Equal Opportu nity program has been established t o implement this policy. For information about t hese provisions on equity, discrimination, or fairness contact the Dir ector of Affirmative Action , 1250 14th St., Suite 740, 5562509. Research and Other Creative Pursuits CU-Denver is strongly commi tted to the pursui t of new knowledge through the research of its faculty. It is equally supportive of the other creative endeavors of its faculties in the arts, humanities, and design fields. These achievements not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional prac t ice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver's service to the community at large . An important thrust in research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nature. Re searc h in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great signifi cance for the welf are of Denver and the larger region. It s position within a thriving metropolitan area serves, as well, as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yie lds solutions of immediate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topic s on the cutting edge of the ba sic disciplines. These, of course, are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century. Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both tradit ional and nontraditional fields of study, with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. Funded research is a majo r priority at CU Denver. During 1986-87, CU-Den ver faculty and staff received external grants and co ntracts totalling $5,434,132 for research, training , and public service programs. All signs point to a steady increase in funded research in the yea rs ahead atCU-Denver. And the benefits for the campus will be substantial. Such research assists in sustaining scholarly discourse, enables faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provides the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhances the education of students. Many students actively participate in research activi ties overseen by faculty members. Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary, economic, political, educa tional , engineering, and environmental needs , minor ity small business management, and economic d evelopment in Colorado communities. Financial support in program and service development has been obtained for activities related to health administra tion , international affairs, executive seminars, specia l education, as well as veterans' employment and train ing. Flash flood forecastaing, air quality control , acidi faction of Colorado lakes , and lead effects on the nervous system are being investigated as well. Computer-re lated projects include optical symbolic computing mathematical programming, and fas t alogorithyms on advanced computers. Much research, of course, goes on without substantial exter nal support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through fac ulty publication, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activi tie s. Many members of our fac ulty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits brin g recognition to the campus, and establish the credibility of its faculty and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.

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CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, rND TRAINING School Architecture and Planning CENTER F I R BUILT ENVIRONMENT STUDIES The for Built Environment Studies (CBES) is the researc and service arm of the School of Architec ture and Plf:tnning. The center has been established in 1987 as a replacement for the Center for Community Developm"t and Design and builds upon a decade of communi service and outreach programs. The new Center is cP.mmitted to serving Denver and Colorado and proviTng a significant educational opportunity for stu den s and faculty. The Ce11ter provides an interdisciplinary research and assistance team capable of addressing a variety of built issues. The specific focus areas of research d service are : Architecture and Building Science, 1 onomic Development, Natural Resource Planning, Space and Facility Design, and Urban Desigh. Faculty and students from various programs in the participate in research projects along with the CBES research and service staff . This provides a broad-based competence which the studios and lecture halls as well as professions, and user groups. Ste v e Schrock (right) seeks counsel on jon Schier , who works in the Grand of CU-Den v er's Center for Built Environment THE , RADO PARTNERSHIP FOR EDUCATI RENEWAL The Co orado Partnership for Educational Renewal consists of the University of Colorado System, Metro politan State College, and several Colorado School districts. / The basic purpose of the Partnership is to stimulate change in the K-12 public school system and simultaneously in the education of educators. Serving Centers and Institutes I 19 as equal partners, the University and School have a stake in and responsibility for public school improve ments , just as the public schools have a like interest in and responsibility for the education of those who staff the schools . More specifically , The Colorado Partner ship seeks solutions to persistent "hard rock " issues such as minority achievement , at-risk youth, drop outs, teacher education, the common curriculum, research and evaluation, and educational leadership. Contact Lance V . Wright, Executive Director , for more information . COLORADO PRINCIPALS' CENTER During Summer 1985, a group of Colorado princi pals spent ten days at the Harvard Principals ' Center Summer Institute . Their experience was so positi v e and renewing, that they returned home with the ques tion : "Why not a principals' center in Colorado?" Sev eral key people and two institutions responded to the question. The U,niversity of Colorado at Denver's School of Education, headed by Dean Bill Grady , and the Colo rado A s sociation of School Executives (CASE) , headed by Dr. Gerald Difford , formed a partner s hip to de v elop the idea into a reality . A planning luncheon was attended b y principals and other school execu tives . Several superintendents agreed to enter the partnership by contributing funds for center development. Thus began the Colorado Principal s' Center. The primary mission of the Colorado Principal s ' Center is to enable principals to shape their profe s sional intellectual development . Activities related to this mission include topical seminars, panel discus sions, roundtable discussions , and ongoing special interest groups . Topical seminars feature individual presenters (pri marily principals) who provide information on prom ising or successful practices , demonstrations or models, and opportunities for participant interaction . Panel discussions highlight current " high-relevance " topics, with panel and participant interaction in for mal and informal settings . Special interest groups facilitate exploration of relevant problems , and issues through brainstorming and idea sharing during a s eries of meetings . The opportunity for reflective writ ing is a major feature of Center events. The Center also focuses on conducting and dissem inating research . Past projects included a study of administrator role perceptions in school reform and a study of the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership . A cur rent study, conducted in cooperation with Dr. Gene Hall , University of Florida, is examining the develop ing professional identity of first year high school prin cipals. Graduate students are hired b y the Center as research assistants . Additionall y, graduate students in the School of Education carrying 9 semester hours or more , or enrolled as administrati v e interns , are offered student membership at no cost.

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20 I General Information Lance Wright (left) directs the Colorado Principals ' Center which provides in-service education for principals and other sc h oo l si te managers . William Grady (center) Dean of the School of Education , visi t s a wor kshop. In addition to part-time research assistan t s, Center staff includes an executive director who is also an assistant professor , and a secre tar y, both shared with th e Department of Administration, Curriculum , and Supervision. PROJECT LEAD Project LEAD (Leadership for Educational Admin istration Development) is a federally funded project which provides coordination of various sc hool l eader ship effor t s throughout the s tate . Through Project LEAD , a coalitio n involving th e Colorado Department of Education (CDE), the Colorado Associa t ion of School Executives (CASE), and th e ACS Department at CU-Denver has been deve loped . . The CASE-based components of this project mvolve : • the improvement of leadership proce sses used in continuing education programs for administration. • the increased accessibility of th e principalship to talented , aspiring individuals not in the "main stream" or traditional channe l s of administration preparation; • improvement of the quality of le adership provided b y practicing administrators by improving training activities offered by Project L eadership and in numerous partnership management training cen ters. The CDEba se d component involves: • the improvement of achievement and expansion of diversity of le arning opportunities in small rural school districts with limited resource s, pro grams and achieve ment. The ACS -ba se d components involve: • th e collection of information regarding effective l eadershi p and making s u ch information available to school administrators through a LEAD Technica l Assistance Center; • the improvement of quality of the administator training programs at CU-Den ver, University of Northern Colorado, and Colorado S t a t e Universi ty; • the s trengthenin g of leadership skills of adrninis t ra in education and in th e pri va te sector by pro VIding opportunities for mutual professional growth . . Dick Koeppe is th: Director of Project LEAD. Gerry Difford of CASE, R1ch Laughlin of CDE, and Mike Martin of AC:S serve as the managers of t hose compo nents for wluch their organizations have responsi bili ty. of Engineering and Applied Sc1ence CENTER FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION STUDIES The Center for Urban Transporta tion Studies (CUTS) has as its responsibility: 1. To assume a leading ro le in developing researc h and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation. 2. To provide a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rock y Mountain region, making availab le to outside organizations the exper t ise wi thin the University. CUTS is interested in helping to optimize the qual ity of human life b y conce ntration on research, ser vice, and education in the transporta tion sec tor of society. Particularly, CUTS is desirous of improving th e movement of people and goods so as to provide enhanced safety, economy, efficiency, and overall amenity . Administratively, the Center (CUTS) is a part of the Department of Civil Engineering in th e College of Engineering and Applied Science. The director of is a civil engineering faculty member representmg the tran sportation enginee ring and planning dis ciplines . Recent and current research include investigations of (1) the relationship between rutting of asphalt pave ments and truck tire pressures, and (2) the perfor mance of a new type of urban interchange in order to improve its design from the standpoint of safety and capacity. Service ac ti vities ha ve involved workshops and shor t courses to help advance the s t ate-of-the practice relative to the state-of -th e-art in trans porta tion engineering. As an element of the University , the fundamental thrust of CUTS is , and properly must remain, educa tional. The Center's emphasis is the broad field of

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and includes both urban and non-urban aspec of transportation . Since transportation concerns with the safe, efficient, and environ mentally r sponsible movement of people and goods, it ei ther dfrectly or indirectly affects all ci t izens and many face s of their day-to-day living. This breadth necessaril involves most of the disciplines within the University The need for better trained researchers and practi ioners in all of the transportation related disciplines is clearly evident. CUTS provides "handson" experi nee within the traditional University struc ture, offerr,g an opportunity for student s through research a ' d service activities which emphasize these otherwise unavailable learning opportuni t ies. These activities place under conditions of competent supervisi11 that ensure the provision of sound advice and resea h results to those served by CUTS. LAND INF RMATION SYSTEMS GROUP A Lani Information Systems Group (LISG) has been form d at CU-Denver to provide opport unity for faculty an s tudents to pursue interests in this multi disciplina!cy subject area. Housed in the College of Engineer" g and Applied Science, the LISG is headed by L_Ynn j ohnson, Associate Professor of Civil Engi neermg. The objectives of the LISG are to facilitate the educational, esearch, and public service mission of CU Denver in the subject areas of computer-aided planning nd design, water resources planning, land records geoprocessing and geographic informations terns, facilities management and mapping, design, and related legal and policy LISG i multidisciplinary and provides an avenue for indivi uals to participate together on research and develop nt projects, curriculum development, and to share ardware and software resourc es. For further informati n contact Professor Johnson at 556-2739 or 556-2871. The Gr l duate School CENTER OR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The C nter for Environmen t al Sciences conducts basic research which focuses on under s tanding and providing solutions for environmental issues. T e Center reports to the Associate Vice Chan cellor for cademic Affairs and Dean of The Graduate School. ;e Center typically organizes faculty, gradu ate stud ts, and undergraduate student s into inter disciplin ry teams to study environmental concerns of interest to the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado, and the focky Mountain Region . Typical projects in the past involved studies of pollution resulting from oil production, coal mining, and uranium tailings. hese projects have been funded by federal agencies industry, and private foundations. Centers and Institutes I 21 In recent years the Center has had a major problem dealing with acid rain. The Center has a state-of-the art analytical chemistry labor atory. The Center has also been at the forefront in the application of artificial intelligence methods to the interpretation of large environmental databases. Approximately fifteen CU Denver faculty from ten different departm ents (and three colleges) have participated in Center projects. In addition, more than thirty faculty from other campuses of the University of Colorado, as well as other universities in Colorado, New Mexico, and South Dakota, have participated in the se projects which have provided opportunities for the ses and jobs to numer ous students. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN RHETORIC The Center for Research in Rhetoric began in 1984 for the purpose of conducting original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived. The Center engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research s tudie s that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. The interdisciplinary nature of the Center draws on the diverse s trengths and unique perspectives of individuals from various disciplines in the Uni v ersity. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office. COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS GROUP A particularly strong Computational Mathematics Group has made CU-Denver a regional center for computational mathematics with a national and inter national reputation. Mathematics clinics investigate contemporary societal issues through the application of mathematical concepts to specific problems. Other research includes the development of fast algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equa tions on super computers, the analysis and development of combinatorial algorithms used in scheduling artificial intelligence, and the applications of discrete mathematics to problems in ecology, engineering, and computer science. Graduate School of Public Affairs THE CENTERS The Graduate School of Public Affairs coordinates three centers the Center for the Improvement of Public Management , the Center for Public-Private Sec tor Cooperation, and the Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The Centers provide students and faculty with opportunities to engage in stra tegi c multidisciplin ary policy research, secure internships, and develop and participate in training and technical assistance

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22 I General Information Graduate School of Public Affairs Professor San1 Overman lectures to participants in the Rocky MoLmtain Program , a semi-annual residential seminar for elected and appointed public officials across the country. The se minar is spo n sored by the Center for the Improvement of Public Management . problems. The objective of the Centers is to help the public and private sectors respond t o grown and revi talization programs. Their respective programs help translate classroom education into real world public policy and public management experiences. Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The newest of GSP A's centers conducts policy research on health issues, studies the ethical problems surrounding areas of health policy, and provides t echnical support to those addressing these problems in the state and nati on. Center for the Improvement of Public Management. This center focuses on efforts to increase the p lanning and management capacity of s t ate, county, and local government officials and staff. Its functions are ori ented toward developing puglic sector management and analytical skills. Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation. Activ ities are directed toward increasing understanding between the public and private sec t ors. Its agenda is aimed at fostering a range of collaborative efforts between state/local governmen t and private firms. National Veter ans Training Institute CU -Denver , working in cooperation with Colora do's Department of Labor and Employment, houses the nation's first National Veterans Training Institute . The program provides skills development training to approximately 1 ,200 veterans' employmen t represen tatives and employees of the Disabled Veterans Out reach Program. The program indirectly serves veterans, with an increased emphasis on improving the quality and quantity of services for disabled veter ans. The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS).

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FACULJ About 31 highly qualified faculty members teach full-time at CU-Denver; well over four in five have doctoral de ees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urba environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter s tudent. ted Research/Creative Activities to the following faculty (1-r): 1st row -Department of Mathematics; Zoe of Music; Kenneth Ortega, College and Applied Science. 2nd row-Diane of Architecture and Planning; David of Education; Peter deLeon , Gradu Public Affairs; and Lorna Moore, Depart . Not shown: Rex Burns, and Woodrow Eckard, Jr., Faculty I 23 SERVICE AWARDS Service Awards for 1988 were awarded to the fol lowing CjU-Denver faculty (1-r): 1st row Jana Everett, Department of Political Science; Bennett Neiman, School of Architecture and Planning; and Janis Dri scoll , Psychology. 2nd row-William Goodwin , School of Education; Thomas Arnberg, College of Engineer ing and Applied Science; Michael Hayes, College of Business and Administration; and Cecil Glenn , Edu cational Opportunity Program. ot shown : Mark Emmert , Graduate School of Public Affairs.

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24 I General Information STAFF HONORS Each year in late spring , staff employees are hon ored for their years of service for five years and in increments of five thereafter . Also, four outstanding staff members are selected, representing general admilli.stration, academic affairs, student academic services, and library. Recip ients of 1987 Outstanding Staff Awards: (back ro w, left to right) Gail Losh , joan Turner , Martha (front ro"':', left to right) Nancy Wolff, Margaret BenJamm , Bellvene Ross. TEACHING AWARDS , 1987-88 Faculty Awards for Teaching were presented to the following faculty in 1988 (1-r): 1st row William Briggs, Deparhnent of Mathematics; Jean Cooper, College . of Busine ss and Admilli.stration; and ancy Shanklin , School of Education. 2nd row Mark Gelernter, School of Architecture and Planning; John Trapp , College of Engineering and Applied Science; Lloyd Burton , Grad uate School of Public Affairs; Robert Wick , Library; and Richard Van De Weghe, Deparhnent of English. Not shown: Wanda Griffith , Deparhnent of Sociology . Pro fessor Van De Weghe was selected Teacher of the Year.

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ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROICEDURES All quest"ons and correspondence regarding admis sion to CU-Penver and requests for application forms should be directed to: Office of fdmissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver 1200 Larimer St. Denver , CO 80204 (303) 556-2660 General J olicies CU-Den er seeks to identify applicants who are likely to co plete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors , the most irnpo tant being : 1. Level f previous academic performance. 2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment, as ndicated by scores on national aptitude tests. 3. Evide ce of maturity , motivation , and potential for acaderrvc success. reserves the right to deny admission to new applifants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed e sential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes , and functions as an institution. Applicants who request degree programs unavail able at CU Denver will be considered for admission to the Colleg T of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an unde termined If'ajor. Students admitted with an undeter mined maJor are expected to declare a major by the time they have 60 hours toward graduation completed. Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES Undergradu te Student ew Studen Tran s fer Stupent Fonner Uni J ersity of Fall 1988 July 22 July 22 July 22 Spring 1989 Dec. I Dec . I Dec . I Summer 1989 May I May I Ma y I Colorado tudent lntrauni v ersi 60 day s prior to the beginning of the term Tran fer Student s International Student Undergraduate : Graduate : July 2 2 May 26 Dec . I Oct. 2 7 May I Mar c h 10 The University reserves the right to change docu ments / cretlentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment Applicants should apply as early as possible . ) Updated information is available from the I Admission I 25 Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, ALL documents required for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions by the DEADLINE for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that sufficient time should be allowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previousl y . Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN New freshmen may apply for admission to the Col lege of Business and Administration , Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences , or Music. General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the Gen eral Education Development (GED) Test. Beginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado will be required to meet the following University-wide Minimum Aca demic Preparation Standards (MAPS): 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 y ears of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural scienc es , 2 years of social science including one year of U.S . or world history , and 2 years of a single foreign lan guage .

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26 I General Information Specific College Requirements : COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION English (one year of speech/deba te and two years of compo-sition are strong l y recommended) ........................... 4 Mathematics (including at least two yea r s of a lgebra and one year of geometry) ............................................... .. 4 Natural sciences (labora tor y science) ........ . ... . . ............. 2 Social sciences (including history) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Foreign language (both unit s in a single language) ....... 2 Academic electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (Adclitional courses in English, foreign l anguage, mathem a tic s, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.) Total 16 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIE D SCIENCE1 English (literatw-e, composition, grammar) .......... . . . ..... 4 Mathematics distributed as follows: Algebra .. ... . . . ...................... . . . .......................... .... 2 Geometry ............................................................ 1 Adclitional mathematics (trigono m e tr y recommended) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 1 a tural sciences including one year of physics and one year of chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Foreign language (both units in a single language) ....... 2 Academic electives ............................... . . . .... ...... ... ... 2 Tota l 16 COLLEGE OF MUSIC Engli h ........... ........................... ..... ..... . . . ... ... . .. ....... 4 atural sciences .. .. . ............................. . . ...... .... . ........ 3 Social science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Foreign language (both units in a single language) ... .... . . ... . ... ............. 2 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Academic electives .................................................. :__l Tota l 15 All students are expec ted t o have had p revious experience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recommended. The College of Music requires an audi tion of all ent ering freshmen and undergraduate transfer s tu dents. Applican t s may subs titut e tape recordings (about 10 minu t es in length) and a s t atemen t of exce l l ence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal a udit ion. Interes ted student s s hould write to th e Col lege of Music, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications. COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES English (lite rature, composition, grammar) .................. 4 Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics) ... .............. .................. 3 a tural sciences .......................... ..... ..... .............. .. ... 3 Social science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1 See the CoUege of Engineering and Applied Science se ction of this cata l og for more specific inf or mation. Foreign l anguage (both units in a single language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Academic e lecti v e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B eginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado will be required to m ee t the following University-wide minimum aca demic preparation: 4 yea rs of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory math ematics (excluding business and consumer mathemat ics), 3 years of natural science includin g one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a si n gle foreign langua ge . MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS {MAPS) Success in undergraduate study is directly re l a ted to high sc hool preparation. Sufficientl y prepared students have a better probability of s ucce ss. The MAPS focus on what the student has s tudied in preparation for college. Admission standards define th e level of success and achievement nece ssary t o be admitted to th e University of Colorado and include factors that predic t aca demic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high schoo l course work, and th e grade poin t average. Both what the student ha s s tudied and ho w th e student has achieved will be factors th at determine admission to the Universit y. Stu dents with MAPS deficiencie s may be admitte d to the University provided the y meet the other admis sion s tandards (e.g., test scores, rank in high schoo l class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior t o graduatio n from th e University. Two level s of deficienc y will be recognized . 1. One unit of deficienc y will be allowed provide d th e student meet s other standards of th e University (e.g., t es t scores, class rank) and p rovi d e d th e student m akes up the deficiency before graduation. Credits so tak e n will count toward graduation provided the CU college normally accepts those course credits toward graduatio n. 2. In so me cases, a student havin g more than one unit of deficienc y may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of th e University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before gradua tion b y taking an expanded program of stud ies . The student may satisfy the MAPS requ irements either by 1) courses taken at CU, 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher educat ion, 3) completion of addi tional high school credit s, 4) credi t b y-examina tion programs, or 5) other ways as approved by eac h college.

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All appli!nts who meet the above MAPS require ments are assified in two ways for admission pur poses: 1. Prefer ed consideration is given to applicants who rank the top 40% of their high school graduat ing class an have a composite score of 23 or higher on the Americ n College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business and engineering applicants are expected t 1 have strong mathematics and science backgroun , higher class rank, and higher test scores. Music app cants also must successfully pass a music audition. 2. Appli ants who rank in the lower 60% of their high schoo graduating class, and/or have combined SAT score below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, nd/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high schoo credit are reviewed on an individual basis. To be co sidered for admission , applicants with a High Scho l Equivalency Certificate must have an average sta dard GED score of 45 with no score below 36 on any section of the test. Applicants who com plete the Spanish Language General Educational Developm t Test also must submit score s from Test VI, "Englis as a Second Language." 1. Stude ts should obtain an application for under graduate dmission from a Colorado high school counselor r from the CU-Denver Office of Admis sions. 2. The plication must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) n ' n-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted aqmission but are unable to enroll for that term , the application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed f the intent to enroll for a later term . 3. Stud nts are required to have their high school send an o ' cial transcript of their high school grades, including lass rank, to the Office of Admissions . Offi cial trans 'pts are those sent by the issuing institution directly t the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carr ed copies are not official. 4. Stud . nts who did not graduate from high school are requir . d to send a copy of their GED test scores and certificate to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions . 5. Stud 1 nts also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Apti-Admission I 27 tude Test (SAT) and to request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High sch6ol students may obtain information about when and where these tests are administered by con tacting their counselors. Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver t o receive scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. Com plete a Request for Additional Score Report at test centers or from the offices listed below . Registration Department American College Testing Program (ACT) P.O . Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P . O. Box 592 Princeton, New Jersey 08540 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704 All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music . Students interested in the field of educa tion should contact the Schoo l of Education office for infor mation (556-2717). International students must submit proof of language proficiency. Minimum admissions have been developed for all public four-year institutons in Colorado. However, transfer applicants who meet these standards are not guaran teed admission. They also must meet the admissions standards of th e University of Colorado and its individual colleges. To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver , , stu<;lents must meet one of the following conditions. 1. Have earned fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and meet the firsttim e FRESHMAN standards for the institution. 2 . Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaranteed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qualifica ions of that agreement.

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28 I General Information 3. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average: a. 2.0 GPA if transferring for Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder , University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, or the University of Northern Colorado. b. 2.5 GPA if transferring from any other postsecondary institution. Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows: 1 . College of Liberal Arts and Science s and College of Music. Transfer applicants must have a t least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible t o return to all institutions previously attended. Course work i n progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the College of Music for audit io n information (556-2727). 2. College of Bus ine ss and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission , students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will appl y to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automaticall y admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicabl e course work attempted, will be automatically admitted. Applican ts with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with Jess than a 2.6 GP A in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be denied admission to the College of Bu si ness and referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration. No applicant will be accepted with l ess than a 2.0 GPA in all college level course work a ttempted. Simi larl y, no applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. 3. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should h av e at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4 . 0 scale) for all work attempted, should h ave completed two semesters each of calculus and physics , and must be eligible to return to all institutions previous l y attended. Important Note: Applicants who do not m ee t the above grade-point average or credit hour req uirements will still be considered for admission , but on an indi vidual basis . The primary factors used when considering s tu dents individually are (1) probability of succ ess in the academic program to which admission is desired ; (2) the quality of prior academic work ; (3) age , m aturity, and noncollegiate achievements ; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges. HOW TO APPLY 1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. 2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 nonrefundable application fee. 3. The student is required to have two official tran scripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directl y to the CU Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried cop ies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after comple tion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English transla tion.) 4. Students who have attended a two-year school or community college and were enrolled in the Guaranteed Transfer Program to transfer to CU-Denver , should submit a copy of the Guaranteed Trans fer "contract " with their application. Liberal arts and music applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores . All engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school tran scripts and ACT/SAT scores. Business applicants with fewer than 24 se mester hours also must submit high school transcript s and ACT/SAT scores . Applicants to the College of Liberal Art s and Sci ences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if the y have completed thr ee years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript t o the College Advising Office for verification . For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office , 556-2555 . All credentials presented for admission become the property of the Univer sity of Colorado and must remain on file. TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT After all official transcripts have been received and th e applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions and the appropriate aca demic unit will determine which courses taken at

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other instihltions can be applied t o a degree program at CU-Denver. In general, tr ansfer credi t will be accepted in ofar as it meets th e degree , grade, and residence r quirements at CU-Denver. Colle ge1 vel credit may be tr ansferred t o the Uni versity if i t was earned at a college or university of reco gnize d tandin g, b y advanced placement exami nation s, or militar y service or schooling as recommended b the Commission on Accredi t a tion of Service Exp riences of the American Council on Edu cation; if a ade of C or higher was at t ained; and if the credit rs for courses appropriate to the degree sought a t t s institution. Courses taken Pass/Fail are transferred hen a grade of C or higher is required to pass . The Univ rsity ma y accept up t o 72 semes ter credits (108 quarte t h ours) of work from a two-year institu tion towar! the baccalaureate degree requiremen t s and may ad:ept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) frorh a four-year college or university. No credit is all wed for voca ti onal/ t echnical, remedial , or religiou s/d ctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semes ter credits of ex t ension and correspondence work (not to includ e more than 30 semes ter credits of correspon dence) ma 1 be allowed if the above conditio n s are met. The Coli ge of Business and Administration gener ally limit s t ansfer credit for business courses taken a t the lo wer fuvision level. All courses in the area of emphasis u s t be taken a t the University of Colorado. A maxim of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year ins t itution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All corre spondence courses are evalua ted t o determine their accept abili , and busines s courses may not be taken through co respondence. Th e Coll1ge of Music requires that 56 of the hours needed for gradua t ion be completed in residence. This tot al ay be reduced b y the faculty on the basis of excellent work done at CU-Denver and high scholarship exhi ited at institutions previously a ttend ed. In no case hall the minimum of fewer than 40 hours di s tributed over three semesters. READMISS ON REQUIREMENTS FOR FOR MER AND RETURNIN CU STUDENTS students who have not regis tered and attended clrsses a t CU-D e n ver for o n e year or longer , and who hfve not a ttended anoth er institution since CU , are returning students and must for m ally apply for readmis ion. Application forms are available at the Office of Former s dents who have a ttended ano th er college or uni versi since last a ttending th e University of Colorado nrust apply as transfer students and meet the t ransfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 non-refund-Admission I 29 able application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previ ously a tt e nded. Tran s cripts mus t be sent dire ct l y from the issuing ins titution to CU-Denver , Admissions Pr o cessing , 1200 Larimer St. , Denve r , CO 80204. Students who la s t attended l ess than one year ago but a tt ended another college or university during the interim are required to pay a $30 transfer application fee . Transcripts mus t be requested b y the student and sen t b y the registrar of the other institution(s) to CU Denve r , Admissions Processing , 1200 Larimer St., Den ver, CO 80204 .. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR I NTERNATION AL STUDENTS The University of Colorado at D enver encourag es international students to appl y for admission to undergraduate and grad uate programs. Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU Denver's sc hools and colleges vary, and international students se eking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which the y are applying. In addition , all intern a tional students whose first lan guage is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Tes t of English as a Foreign Language ) score of 525. Prospective s tudents should request an Inter national Studen t Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Information about requirements for each college and school can be found in this catalog. D eadlines for receipt of documents have been es tablis hed t o a llo w for the timely mailings of I-20's. Fall Spring Summer 1988 1 989 1989 U ndergradu ates: July 22 D ecember 1. 1988 Mayl Graduates: May26 October 27, 1 988 March 10

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30 I General Information Graduate: International students who wish to pur sue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are app l ying. Applica t ions are available from The Graduate School six months prior to the term for which the student is applying. Note: Except for summer terms, interna tional stu dents must be in a degree-seeking status. They may attend summer terms as a non-degree student. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms. CU-DENVER INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS CU-Denver student s may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intrauniversity Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indica t ed in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intrauni versity transfers are made by th e college or school to which the student wishes to transfer. CU-Denver students may change University of Col orado campuses by applying directly to the Admis sions Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applications and dead line information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying. HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT High school juniors and seniors with proven aca demic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses t aken may subse quently be applied toward a University degree pro gram. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admis sions (303-556-2660). Admission of Graduate Degree Students All correspondence and questions regarding admis sion to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following: Programs in Business Office of Graduate Studies Graduate School of Business Administration 623-4436 Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-2755 Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 556-2825 All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663 GRADUATE PROGRAMS As a principal part of its mission, CU-Denver offers graduate and professional-level programs and during the 1987-1988 academic year, approximately 45 per cent of the student body was enrolled at the graduate level. Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schoo ls and colleges (School of Education, College of Engi neering and Applied Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of Music), and outside The Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, th e School of Architecture and Planning, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. The particular admission and graduation requiremen ts established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections of this catalog. GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual gradua te program. The Graduate School has general admission require ments which are supplemented by specific require ments of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, e t c.). Applicants should consul t the genera l information section of The Graduate School portion of thi s cata log as well as the college or school sec tions for require ments and deadlines for specific progra ms .

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Admiss i o I of Non Degree Students Persons ho want to take University co urses but do not plan t work toward a University of Colorado degree rna be admitted as non-degree students. In general , co respondence and questions reg . arding non-degree student be to the Offic of Admissions. Those seeking adrmsswn as non-de ee students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. ch schooVcollege limits the number of semester ha rs transferable toward a degree program . Students st.uld contact the sc hooVcollege to the y will b applying (as a degree student) for mf?r mation abo t the acceptable number of hours which may be tak n as a non-degree student. CU-Denver will enroll persons who are at least t W years of age without an undergraduate degree as t on-degree student s, but applicants are encouraged to apply to an undergraduate program rather than o apply as a non-degree student . Courses taken as a , on-degree student are for credi t and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for profes sional improvement. on-degree students must main tain a grad -po int average of 2.0 at CU-Denve_r. Note: In rnational students are not adtmtted as non-degree students, except for summer terms . Graduate Students with the bacc a laureate de gree who are no accepted to specific de gree programs may enroll for c urse work as non-degree students. There are severa l I:J'pes of these s tudent s. Among them are t eachers wfto seek renewal of certification; students who have the degree or credential status they want, but ho wish to take additional course work for professiona or personal improvement ; and students who feel a ee d to make up deficiencies before enter ing a specif}c program. Non-de1S!Jee students should be that gener ally onl y a E ted number of course credits taken by a non-d egree student ma y be applied later toward a degree pro ram at CU-Denver. To permir registration as a non-degree student, a grade-point average of 2.0 must students are not admitted as non-degree students , except for summer terms. HOW TO A PLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSIO To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a N n-degree Student Application form fr.om the Office f Admissions. Return completed applica tion by the . eadline for the term d.esired. A . non refundable applica tion fee is requrred . o additional credentials 1 re required. Applicants who seek teacher 1 Subject to c h n ge Admission I 31 certificati J n must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials . on degree students are registration for courses is on a space available basts . CHANGING STATUS FROM NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available the of Admissions . Academic credentials (t.e., transcnpts and/or te s t scores) and a $30 nonrefundable applica t ion fee also must be s ubmitted . on-degree students who are accepted as undergraduat e degree students ma y gen erally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an under graduate degree program , with the approval of the dean. on-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying the first semester of their enrollment for the maxrrnum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the fall semester of 1970 a re subject to the policies in effect between Janu ary of 1969 and August of 1970.) Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate program by completing the application required by the particular program . The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department , ma y accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at recognized graduate school, or some combmation thereof . l'he department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student quring the semes ter the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program . Official Notification of Admission Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as a n undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions on a Staten:ent of Admissio n Eligibility Form . Letters from vanou s sc hools and colleges indicating acceptance into a par ticular program are pending subject to official notifi cation of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after s ubmitting application materials should contact the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2660. Tentative Admission. Students who are admitted pending J;eceipt of additional documents will be . per mitted one term to submit the documents . Regtstra tion for s ubsequent terms will be denied when documents have not been received.

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UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION1 • 2 • 3 Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission 1 R equired Credential s When t o Apply otes FRESHMAN IN GENERAL : Comple t e a ppli cation Not l a t e r than : For spec ific requirement s refer (Student seeki ng bachelor's a) R anks i n t o p 40 % of hig h $30 a pplicable fee July 22 for fall to the college sec t ions of t his degree who has never auended sc hool grad u a tin g class. Official high school t ranscrip t Dec . I for spring bulle t in. For example : Music a collegiate in titution b ) H as 1 5 unit s of acceptab l e s howing rank-i n -c l ass. date of May I for summe r requires a n audition. high sch ool work. graduatio n. 7th semester Seniors who m ee t or exceed all c) Te s t sco r es: grades. 8th se m es ter co urse s admissio n cri t eria may a ppl y ACT com p : 23 ACT o r S AT score as early as O ct. I for followor repor t. ing fall. SAT comb: 1 000 Note: Bu siness and Engineering applican t s a r e expec t ed 1 0 have h igher t e 1 sco res. c l ass rank. and number of academic units. TRANSFER IN GENERAL : Complete a pplicat i on Not l a ter than : Liber a l Arts and Mu sic tr ans(Student seeking a bachelor's Mu s t be in good s t a ndi ng and $30 applicatio n f ee Jul y 22 for fall fers with fewer than 13 sem. degree who has auended a e l igib l e t o r e turn to all ins titu Two officia l tr a n sc ript s sent Dec . I for s pring hr s . of college work . Business collegiate institution other t ions previously a u ended. from each college auended . May I for s ummer tran fers w ith fewer than 24 than CU) Appli cants must have minimum sem . hrs .. and Engineering 2.0 G PA o n all work a u e mpl transfers with fewer than 24 ed if they have compl e t ed 30 sem. hrs . mus t a l so submi t all or more semes t er hours . Bus i freshma n c redenti als . ness and Engineering applicants will be requ ired to have a higher G P A4 NON-DEGREE Mus t be high sch ool grad u a t e Complete a ppli cation No t l ater than : Non-degree s tud ents who have (Student who is not seeking a or have a G.E.D. $ 1 0 applicatio n fee Jul y 22 for fall earned a baccalaur eate degree degree at this institution) Must be a t least 20 years old Dec. I for spring should see Graduate chool May I for ummer section for additional informaApplications will also be ac lion . ce pted after the se deadli n es i f pace allows. RETURNING CU STUDENT Mu s t be in good standing Former s tudent application o t later than : ' Will be admiued to their previ( R eturni n g n o n -deg ree and o r Jul y 22 for fall ous major unles s a new major degree s tudent who has not D ec. I for s pring i s reques t ed . Stu dents under a u ended ano ther ins titut ion May I for s ummer academic s uspension in certain since CU) school s o r co lle ges at the University of Colorado may enroll during t he summer term s to improv e their grade point averages. FORMER CU STUDENT Same as for tran sfer Complete application Not later than : Will be admi u ed to pre ious (Degree s tudent who has $30 a pplicat ion fee July 22 for fall major unless a different major auended ano ther i n stitu t ion Tw o officia l tr anscript s from Dec . I for s prin g is reques t ed o n application. s ince a u e ndin g CU) each interve nin g college May I for s umm e r CHANGE OF STATUS : Same as for t ransfer Complete applica t ion Not later than : Must meet the same criteria as NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE $30 a pplication fee July 22 for fall tran sfer s tudent. (CU non-degree s tudent who CU transcrip t De c. I for sp r i n g wishes to enter a degree May I for s umm er program) Applicati o n s will be accepted after the s e deadlines if p ace allows . CHANGE OF STATUS : Mu s t have completed degree N on-degree s tud ent application Not l ater than : Onl y s tud ents who hav e comDEGREE TO NON-DEGREE $ 1 0 applica t io n fee Jul y 22 for fall pleted and received degrees (Former CU degree s tud ent Dec . I for spring are eligib l e t o change to non-who has grad uated and wishes May I for urn mer degree s tatu s. t o take additio nal work) INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER Mu st be in good s t anding F ormer s tud ent application Tran sfe r 10 D e nver , n o t l ater Transfers from D enver t o a n (Student who has been enrolled than : other ca mpus of CU s hould on one CU campus and wishes July 22 for fall refer to the bulletin of the t o tak e courses on another) Dec. I for s pr ing campu to which t hey are May I for s ummer applying for additional requireTransfer from Denver : r e f e r to ments . Will be a dmiu ed to the bulletin for other previou s major unle ss a differca mpu s . ent major i s reque sted on application . INTRAUNIVERSITY Same as f o r tran sfer. l ntrauniversi t y t ran sfer 60 day s prior t o the begin nin g TRANSFER Mus t be a con tin uing s tudent applicatio n o f t h e term (St udents who wish t o c han ge enrolled o n the campus t o CU transcript from one CU college to anoth which you are a ppl ying . er. e.g .. from the College of Liberal Ar t s and Science s to the College of Bus ine ss) 'Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary. 'Foreign s tudent s s h ould see Internati ona l Students in the Adm i ss i o n s section of thi s bulletin. ' Preferred deadline . "App licant s who have earned 12-29 semes ter h o u rs must meet freshman sta n dards or hav e a minimum transfer GPA of 2 . 5. ( Applicants tran sfe rrin g from Colorado School of Mines. CSU. UNC. UCB . o r UCCS must have a minimum tran s fer GPA of 2.0.)

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All tuitio and fee charges are e s tablished b y the Board of R gents, the governing body of the Univer sity of C orado, in accordance wi th legislation enacted ually (usually in the s pring ) b y the Colo rado G e ne r Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change t " tion and fee rates at any time . A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and s tudents should contact the Office of Admission and Records for further information on t he tuition 11nd fee charges for a particular term . The following rates are for the 1987-88 academic ye ar and are provided to assist prospect ive students in anticipating Other Fe. s1 1. Stude t Activity Fee (required for a ll students): F semester 1987 . . ... . .. ........... . .. .. $ 12.00 Spr g s emester 198 8 . . ... ... . .. . . ... . .. . $ 12.00 Su er term 1988 ........... .. . .. . .. ... . $ 8.00 2. Aura a Bond R e tirement Fee (required for all students: Eac term ....... . . . ...... . ... . ...... ... ..... $ 19.00 3. Stude f t Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of all s tudents eac term) ...... .... . ........ ................ $ 5.00 4. Matri ulation Fee (mandatory for the first term for new students) : ....... . ...... . . ... . $ 15.00 This is a on-refundable fee charged at the student's first regis tion to cover costs of genera t ing tran scrip ts. 5. Healt Insurance Fee (o ptional): semes ter ... . ........ ............... . . . $ 109 .00 Sprfg semester (includes summer) . $109.00 Surpmer term only ..... .................. $ 57.00 Students F, ho wish health insurance coverage must complete aljld submit a request card with the Bursar ' s Office befo e the end of the drop/add period. The insu ance program primaril y subsidizes major medical exF1enses according to the schedule of benefits stated in he insurance brochure, w hich may be obtained fr m the Office of Student Academic Servic es . coverage (spouse and/or children) also is available at an additional charge . Further informa tion on he th insurance is available from the Office of Student Ac demic Services , 556-2861. 6. Docto a1 dissertation fee (mandatory for all student s certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation) . Students s hould contact The G r aduate S hool for guidelines established for charges for enrollment. 7 . Comp ehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School , the Graduate School of Business Administra tio n, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Com prehensive for a master's degree is com p l eted . who are not taking regular courses during term must enroll as " Candidate for Degre e . " S dents enrolled only as " Candidate for Degree " pa $124 in the Graduate School of Business , 1 Subject to c h ge. Tuition and Fees I 33 $102 in the School of Educa t ion , $111 in t h e College of Engineering and the Graduate School of Pub lic Affairs , $94 in the College of Liberal Art s and Scienc es , and $98 for all other programs. 8. Laborator y breakage fee (manda t ory for stude n ts enrolled in a chemi stry laborator y course): Breakage deposit ... ....................... $ 20.00 An $8 deduction is assessed for e x pendable ite m s. The unuse d portion is returned at the end of t he semester. 9 . Music laborator y fee (mandator y for College of Mu sic students and others enrolled in certain m u sic courses): Music fee ..... . . . ... . ........ . ...... . ........ $ 24 .00 C o llege of Music students and others enrolled in piano , sound recording and reinforcement , and elec troni c mus ic must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term . Payment of Tuit i on and Fees All tuition and fees (except application fee) are asse ssed and pay able when th e student registers for the term , according to guideline s in the current Sched ule of Classes. Arrangements may be made thro ugh the Bur sa r's Office at the time of reg is tration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred pa yment is included in the Schedule of Classes publi shed before each semester or summer term . Students who fail to complete payment by the publi shed deadlines , or who fail t o file t he req u ire d promissory note , will be assessed a $50 penalty . Students who register for courses are liable for pa y ment of tuition and fees even tho u gh the y ma y dr op out of school. Refund policies for student s who withdraw from the University are included in t h e Sche d ule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to t he University will not be permi t ted t o register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued tran scripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate . The only e x ception to this r e gu lation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation . Any student who pays with a check tha t is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an addi tional service charge . Tuition Appeals Except ions to financial obligations incurred may be granted b y t he Tuition Appea l s Commi tt ee. T h e Com mittee will onl y consider appeals when a student h as been medicall y disabled , has experienced a dea t h in the famil y, or has a change in employment hours or location be y ond the student's control. Documentation of these condit i ons will be required . Excep t ions will not be considered for a student's failure to comply with published deadlines , or changes in employ ment under the student's control. Please note: tuition appeals must b e filed wi t hin four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed.

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FALL AND SPRING 1987-1988 TUITION UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES AND THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree (SO) Credit Hrs . Resident Non-res ident 0-1 $ 69 $ 312 2 138 624 3 207 936 4 276 1,248 5 345 1,560 6 414 1 , 872 7 483 2 , 602 8 552 2,602 9 570 2 , 602 10-15 576 2 , 602 each credit hour over 15 69 312 UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Credit Hrs . Res ident Non-resident 0-1 $ 82 $ 325 2 164 650 3 246 975 4 328 1 , 300 5 410 1 , 625 6 492 1 , 950 7 574 2 , 708 8 656 2 , 708 9 675 2 ,7 08 10-15 682 2,708 each credit hour over 15 82 325 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Credit Hrs . Resident Non -resident 0-1 $ 94 $ 329 2 188 658 3 282 987 4 376 1 , 316 5 470 1 , 645 6 564 1 , 974 7 658 2,739 8 752 2 ,7 39 9 778 2 , 739 10-15 785 2 ,7 39 each credit hour over 15 94 329 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS : with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs Credit Hrs . 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10-15 each credit hour over 15 Res ide nt $111 222 333 444 555 666 777 888 916 925 111 Non -resident $ 344 688 1 , 032 1 , 376 1 ,7 20 2 , 064 2 , 865 2 , 865 2 , 865 2 , 865 344 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning, the College of Music, and NON-DEGREE GRADUATE STUDENTS (SW) and non-Denver campus programs: Nursing , Medicine , Law, etc. Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $ 98 $ 329 2 196 658 3 294 987 4 392 1,316 5 490 1,645 6 588 1,974 7 686 2 , 739 8 784 2 , 739 9 811 2,739 10-15 819 2 ,7 39 each credit hour over 15 98 329 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education Credit hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $306 344 2 306 688 3 306 1,032 4 408 1,376 5 510 1 , 720 6 612 2 , 064 7 714 2 , 865 8 816 2 , 865 9 918 2 , 865 10-15 918 2 , 865 each credit hour over 15 102 344 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $ 124 $ 344 2 248 688 3 372 1 , 032 4 496 1,376 5 620 1,72 0 6 744 2 , 064 7 868 2 , 865 8 992 2,865 9 1 , 020 2 , 865 10-15 1,030 2,865 each credit hour over 15 124 344 Graduate degree students who are registered as "ca ndidate for degree " will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System fee . NOTE: THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANYTIME.

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Audit To qu as an auditor for Fall or Spring Semester, a s t be 21 years of age or older or approved b y the Regi trar. Auditors may not be registered for any other niversity of Colorado courses during the time they auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if tt'fey are under suspension from the Univer sity or outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Record s Office does not keep any record of c urses audited; therefore , credi t for these courses ca ot be established. Auditors may attend as many cours s as the y wish (except those courses with lab oratories or where equipment is used), provided they have eceived permission from each instructor. Auditor's c ds are issued after classes begin. This card shoul be presented to the instructor when requesting errnission to attend a class. There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether re dent or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the au 'ted courses during the Fall or Spring Semester f r class instruction and library privileges only . Auditors do not receive student parking privi leges. Residenc Classification for Tuition Purposes Tuition c assification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1f3) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education e bound to the provisions of this statute and are no free to make exceptions to the rules set forth. The statue provides that an in-state student is one who has be f n a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or moxr immediately preceding the beginning of th e t erm for which t he in-s t ate classifica tion is being sought. Per k ons over 22 years of age or who are eman cipated est"blish their own legal Those who are under 2 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. fn unemancipated minor's parent must, therefore, ave a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or mo before the minor may be classified as an in-state stu ent for tuition purposes. Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of ha itation in Colorado and the intent ion of making Co ora do one's true, fixed, and permanent home of habitation. The tuition statu t e places the urden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the per on seeking to establish the domicile. The question o intent is one of documentable fact and need s to b shown by substantial connections with the state sUfficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado begins the day subsequent con nections wfth Colorado are made sufficient to evi-1 A copy of t l Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office . Residency ClassiEcation I 35 dence one's intent. The most common ties with the sta te are (1) change of driver's license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado ; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident b y one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution : payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed . In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one's 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semes ter. Once the student' s tuition classification is estab lished, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory infor mation to the contrar y is presented. A student who, due to s ubsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresiden t or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 da ys after such a change occurs . An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notifi cation to the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days of the change . Once a student is classified as non-resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition the Office of Admissions and Records for a change in classifica tion. Petitions must be submitted no later than two weeks before the first da y of classes of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a nonresident so that the classification will be determined prior to registration and payment of fees . It is pre ferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the term. La t e petitions will not be considered until t he next semes ter . Specific information ma y be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records . Residen j t Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STU DENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM . Students ob t ain a completed verification form from the base education officer , and submit the form with their military ID to the Record -Office after they have regis tered , before the end of the drop/add period. A t that time the student' s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.

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36 I General Information FINANCIAL AID Director:Ellie Miller Office : orth Classroom Building, Room 1030 Telephone:556-2886 The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment considers qualified students for financial aid awards. If the student's application materials are received before the April 29, 1988, priority date , then the stu dent is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment), and/or long term loan funds . For the past several years, these packages have consisted of approximatel y 45% grant funds and 55% of self-help funds (work-stud y, loan, unmet need). (Graduate students have only been receiving approximately 12% in grant funds.) If appli cations are recieved after the April 29 priority date , the student is usually considered onl y for Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Guaranteed Student Loan , Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students , and Supplemental Loan for Students). These funds are not allocated to CU-Denver ; the y are available throughout the year to students who qualify. There are three sep arate deadlines for applying for Advantage Schloar ship; refer to the separate brochure for further information. Applicants for Colorado Fellowship , Deans Schol ars, and Regents Scholars are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed b y other CU-Denver departments (The Graduate School, undergraduate dean' s office , and the Office of Admissions and records respectivel y ) . All other students are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility Each student must qualify for CU Denver financial aid as follows: 1. Be a U . S . citizen or be admitted to the U . S . b y the INS on a permanent basis (ex cept for Colorado Fel lowship) . 2 . Be classified as a degree-seeking student (ex cept for students applying for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certification students are eligible to apply onl y for outside student loans (Guaranteed Student Loan , Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, or Supplemental Loan for Students). 3. Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of credits. 4. Maintain satisfactor y academic progre ss as defined for the financial aid programs . 5 . Document financial need by completing the entire need based applicat ion (ex cept for the following programs which are not need-based: Colorado Fellow ship, Advantage Scholarship , Colorado Scholars, Deans Scholars, Regents Scholars, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, Supplemental Loan for Stu dents, Colorado No-Need Work-Stud y, Short Term Loan, Lind Scholarship, and many outside scholar ships). 6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes (except for the following programs: Pell Grant , Sup plemental Educational Opportunity Grant , Advan tage Scholarship, Perkins Loan, College Work-Study, Guaranteed Student Loan, Parents Loan for Under graduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Stu dents) . 7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant. 8. Be regis ter ed for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service (required for all males who are at least 18 years old and born after December 31, 1959). Application Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be avail able to the financial aid counselors before eligibility can be determined. Limited Funds. The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document financial need and complete their application process as soon as possible after January 1, 1988. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement or CSS Financial Aid form) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General finan cial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year. If you complete your file after April 29, 1988, your awards will proba bly be limited to th e Pell Grant (for firs t undergradu ate students only) and/or outside student loans (Guaranteed Student Loan, Supplemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year. It is the student's responsibiliy to be sure applica tion materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and s tudents are referred to the Financial Aid Handbook for com plete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state law s , regu lations , and guidelines. ON-LINE APPLICATION INFORMATION Please try the new on-line Financial Aid Informa tion System. This system will help you complete the ACT Family Financial Statement, provide y ou with important financial aid information and current news, and produce a printed copy of your institutional financial aid application for you to turn into the Office of Financial Aid. To use the system, go to a CU Denver computer lab (North Classroom Bld g., Rooms 1206 or 2206), sign on to the CU-Denver vax computer and enter "money" (in sma ll letters) when prompted

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for a login. e system will take you to a self-explan atory menu If you have any questions about how to use the sys em, ask one of the computer advisers. Financial / Need . Most financial aid is based on the concept of qnancial need. Your financial aid counselor calculates financial need as: 1) cost of attendance , minus contributon which is 2) Student/spouse contribution., and 3) Parents' contributon (for dependent stude ts only). The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU Denver, in uding tuition and fees , room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employme t determines standard budgets for stu dents base upon actual tuition and fees charged and other budg t items established by the Colorado Com mission on Education. Indepen,nt Student . The federal government has specific gui elines that must be followed to define a self-suppo ting student (one who reports only his/her own incom and assets when applying for aid). For 1988-89 , a student is one who is 24 years old older as of December 31, 1989. If you are under 24, are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories: 1. Single undergraduate student with no depen dents who as not claimed as a dependent on your parents' 19 6 and 1987 federal income tax returns. Also, you 1 ust demonstrate that you are selfsuffi cient by ha g total income (including financial aid) or at least ,000 annually in 1986 and 1987 (or during 1985 and !986 if you received federal financial aid during 198 -88). 2. Gradu te or professional student who will not be claimed as dependent on your parents' 1988 federal income tax 1 eturn. 3 . Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your p ents' 1988 federal income tax return. 4. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse. I 5 . Veterap of the U.S. armed forces. 6. Orphar, or ward of the court. 7. Appe1 to the Financial Aid Committee for an excep t ion t these guidelines and be approved by the Committee because of your unusual circumstances. If your student/spouse contributon plus your parents' co tribution is equal to or greater than the cost of you will not qualify for need-based financial aid!.. For 1987-88, t he following budgets were used for rdom and board, transportation , and per sonal expenses per month: single students living with parents $285/month; single students not living with parents $645/month; for each dependent child add $175/mont1for child care. Resident tuition and fees for a full-t me student was approximately $750 per semester , nd non-resident tuition ranged from $1687-$2750 per semester. These amounts will proba bly increase by about 5 % for the 1988-89 school year . Finandal Aid I 37 The contributions from the student/spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formu la that is required by federal law . The formula considers income , savings and other assets, family size , number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other factors . You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases the standardized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Financial Aid Committee. FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLEMENT (NOT REPLACE) FINANCIAL CON TRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS. Course Loads. General financial aid (work study, grants, Perkins Loans) undergraduate recipients usu ally must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semester during the academic year (fall/spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check your award letter for the exact number of hours required). Pell grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients must carry at least six credits per semester for undergraduates and three graduate credits for graduates . Summer term minimum course loads are as follows : Full-time: under graduate 8 hours, graduate 3 graduate hours; Half-time: undergraduat e -4 hours, graduate -2 graduate hours. Higher or lower standards may be required for individual awards. For further informa tion contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Satisfactory Academic Progress. CU-Denver stu dents must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligi ble for financial aid. Students are referred to the Sat isfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid. Non-Degree Students. Non-degree students are not pursuing a degree in a technical sense and, therefore, are onl y eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time Advantage Scholarship. Continuing Education/Community College of Den ver Courses. Some courses cannot be included when minimum course loads and satisfactory academic progress fire determined. Classes offered through the CU-Denver Division of Continuing Education or through the Community College of Denver cannot be included . Residency Status . You are required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident sta tus. As a resident student, you are potentiall y eligible for more financial aid programs since you can be con sidered for the State of Colorado aid funds. Refunds and Repayments. Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the reci-

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38 I General Information pient's financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver. Appeals. Students may appeal all decisions of the O ffice of Financial Aid/Student Employment by com pleting a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee reviews most appeals for exceptions to the Satisfac t ory Academic Progress Policy and the Financial Aid Committee reviews all other appeals. Reapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each y ear. Award Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all applica tion documents have been received in the Office of F i nancial Aid. If the student is not eligible for any awards, a no t ification of non-award is mailed with an explanation of the reasons for noneligibility . If awarded, an award letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours t h a t are required for the award(s). Types of Aid The federal government funds the following pro grams: !.Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor ' s degree . 2.Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5 % and no payments are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time. 3. College Work-Study. A program that allows stu dents to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their edu cational costs . The State of Colorado funds the following pro grams. 1. Colorado Student Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students. 2 . Colorado Student Incentive Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree . Thi s grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado. 3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A n e ed-based grant for resident graduate students . 4 . Colorado Work-Stud y . A program similar to the College Work-Study program, but limited to resident undergraduate students. Pell Grant. Your elibibility for the Pell Grant (feder all y funded) is determined before any other aid is awarded . A w ards are defined b y a s trict formula pro vided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student' s eligibility index , enrollment status, residenc y classification , and living status. Students are eligible for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor's degree by June 1, 1988. Outside Student Loans. Your eligibiity for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans . The GUARANTEED STU DENT LOAN (GSL) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify . Most students who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for GSL. The primary pur pose of this program is to make low-interest, long-

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term loans available to students to help them meet their postse ondary educational expenses. The LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term program for students who do not document need for th e GSL. Undergraduate dependent tudents may not borrow the SLS bec ause their paren s are eligible to borrow under the same term s. The program for parents is called the PAR ENTS LO FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS. Other So'urces of Financial Aid. There are several other sourcrs of financial aid for students. Employment are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/Studen Employment, the Auraria Student Assis tance Cent r, and the Center for Internships and Cooperativ Education. Full-time undergraduate resident studeits who apply for College Work-Study and who do not document sufficient financial need may be considered or Colorado o -eed Work Study. Schol arship inf rmation can be found in the Auraria Library InfoBank in the reference section of the Libr 4ry. Handicapped students should inquire about the 4\hlin Scholarship in the Auraria Student Assistance tenter (556-3474). Application information about the Lind Scholarship is released each May and publicized n campus and in the Office of Financial Aid/Studen Employment. All applicants for need based fina cial aid are au tomaticall y considered for the Arnold Scholarship . Minority applican t s and s tu dents who e parents did not graduate with a bache lor' s degree are encouraged to appl y for the Advantage I Scholarship. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of aid through the Graduate sf:hool and their academic department. Students be aware that Emergency Student Loans are as well as Financial Aid Advances. Amer ican India . 1 students s hould inquire in the office for Bureau of I dian Affairs or tribal scholarships. Selecting a Program and Courses Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs avail able at CU i Denver , and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available , course reqJurements b y major, course load policies, and other gertinent information. Courses bv ailable during a particular semester or summer teb are listed in the Schedule of Classes , published sk;eral weeks before registration. These are available from the Office of Admissions and Records. Undergr duate students who need assistance in planning a program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange or an advising appointment prior to regis tration. Graduat students should contact their graduate program fo assistance. Re gis trati on I 39 Course Scheduling and Abbreviations For information on sc heduling courses, students are encouraged to contact an advisor through their college or school dean's office. In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the cour se. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course: Level of Cour ses 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 7000 8000 Student Classification Lower division Lower div i s ion Upper division Upper division Graduate tudent s or qualified eniors w ho h ave the instructor ' s or dean's permis ion Mas ter and Ph . D. g radu ate s tudent s Maste r ' s Thesis Doctor's Thesis The Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 4000 an 5000 levels. However, the evaluation and requirements for students enrolled at the graduate (5000) l evel will be different than those enrolled at the undergraduate (4000) level. It should be expected that work at the graduate le ve l would involve demonstra tion of greater maturity and critical skills than at the undergraduate level. The digit after the da s h in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long .

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40 I General Information Hence a student enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a IS week term. A laboratory credi t includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory , drafting room, or field. Unless the course descriptions specify labora tory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions. Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are : Coreq . -Corequisite Hrs.-Hours Lab. -Laboratory Lect. -Lecture Prer. -Prerequisite Rec. -Redtation Sem . -Semester Wk .-Week Thus, the description of CHEM. 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit which is divided into 3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of labo rator y credit. Further, the student must have com pleted CHEM. 1010 (the prerequisite) before enrolling. Orientation An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation , conducted by the Office of the Dean of Student Academic Ser vices and the various schools and colleges, introduces the academic programs, activities, and services avail able at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and on degree requirements also is provided . Registration Beginnin g with the summer 1988 term , CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and ma y register at or after their assigned tim e . POOLED COURSES Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with simila r courses at Metropolitan State College. CU-Denver degree stu dents may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes. CU-Denver students must complete 15 semester hours in CU Denver courses before registering for courses in the common pool. After that time , students are required to take at least half their hours in CU-Denver courses each term. INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION CU-Denver degree stude nts may enroll for courses offered by the various campuses of the Community College of Denver. Students must be enrolled at CU Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitution ally . Registration is on a space available basis. CCD courses are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average. Metropolitan State College courses taken while the student is enrolled at CU-Denver will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and may be used as elective credit. MSC courses will not meet major requirements or core requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of College campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus. Note: Degree students may register concurrently for the fall and spring semesters only (not summer). Each campus may further limit concurren t registration

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by resident students if the campus enrollment cap is reached. A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever s greater) on another CU campus if: 1. The obtains a Concurrent Registration form from he office of the academic dean, and 2. the co se is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver, and 3. the srudent obtains approval from the academic dean, and 4 . there i space available at the other (host) campus , and 5. the student pays tuition at CU Denver (home) campus at Denver rates , and 6. the hdme campus school or college arranges for space in host campus classes, and 7. the cdncurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. ) Students may not register for an independent study course thr9ugh concurrent registration . Students may not take c urses pass /fail or for "no-credit " through concurrent registration. To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/ dd period, arrange the drop at the home campus sc]jlool or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, op the course at the host campus Records Office. Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences Center s dents: please note the restrictions above. Also, sjtu nts from other CU campuses cannot register con ently for MSC courses. ads wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 i,p the summer term) must have the overload approved oy the dean of their college or school. The student obtain the dean's signature on the Form or Course Change Form during Walk-In R'gistration. Rememqer that a three-semester-hour course dur ing a fall cbr spring semester will require six to nine hours of Jvork each week outside of class; a three course during a summer term will require e to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class. Suggest . d maximum course loads for the fall and spring se I esters for undergraduate students who are employed : Employed40 or more hours per week : 30-39 hours per week : 20-29 hours per week: 1 -19 hours per week: 3-6 seme s ter hour s 5-8 s eme ter hours 7 -II s eme ter hour s 9 -15 emester hours must weigh their capabilities against the demands of each course. Registration I 41 No more than 15 semester hours taken by a gradu ate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree. No more than 10 semester hours taken by a gradu ate student during a given summer term can be applied to a graduate degree. DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those lis t e d below. The exact requirments for financial aid will be listed in the student's financial aid award letter. Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987 Undergr a duat es and non-degree s tudents: Full-time Half-time Gr aduate degree students : Full-time: 12 or more semester hours 6 or more semester hours 5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number 5000) 8 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports , or thesis preparation)

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42 I General Information Half-time: 3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number -5000) 4 or more hours of mixed level classes Summer Undergraduates and non-degree students : Full-time Half-time Full-time: 8 or more semester hours 4 or more semes ter hours 3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number -5000) 5 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports, or thesis preparation) Half-time : 2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number -5000) 3 or more hours of mixed level classes Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop /add period. These hours do not include interinstitutional hours from CCD or hours at MSC , nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration. Students receiving Veteran's benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full time status for summer terms. CCD courses are not considered for fullor half t ime s t atus. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for finan cial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Studen t s must file a written appeal with t he Office of Financial Aid . SHORT TERM COURSES Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-con t ained unit s designed to cover specific problems or issues in sci ence. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semes t er. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit Undergraduate students may obtain credit for low er-division courses in which they demonstrate profi ciency by examination. By passing an examination, t he student will be given credit for the course to sat-

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isfy lower 'vision requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated b y the student's fqrmal academic e x perience . Credit granted for courses examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but doe s count toward graduation and other r equirements for which it is appropriate. There are t hree type s of examinations as described below. I Placement Program The Placement Program of the College Entrance E r amination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advt;tced work w hile in high school and then be examinl for credit at the college level. Students who take dvanced placement courses and subse quently re eive scores of 3, 4, or 51 on the CEEB Advanced lflacement E x amination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demqnstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in tho s e areas . Students with scores 34 may be considered for advanced placement y the discipline concerned . For more informatio contact your high school counselor or the Director of drnission s for CU-Denver. Credit By Examination Degree stjudents may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination , the student must be formally w king tow ar d a degree at CU-Denver , have a t a v erage of at least 2 . 0 , and be currentl y registered. x aminations are arranged through the Records Of ce, and a nonrefundable fee is charged. Students s uld contact the office of the dean of the academic J t in which the y are enrolled . Examination Program Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credi t by e ation in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency . Interested students ar . encouraged to take appropriate subject examinati;t1s provided in the College-Level Examinations Progr (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Bo testing service . For more information call 556-286 . Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinatio s must contact the office of their school or college. Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC MILITARY SERVICE A N D SCHOOLIN G To have credit for educational experiences evaluat ed, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD 1 Student s in the College of Enginee r ing and Ap plied Science mu s t receive sco r es o f 4 o r 5 for creclit t o be grante d ; s tudent s wi th scores of 3 m y b e consid e r e d b y th e departm ent co nc erne d . All creclit mus t b d v alidat e d b y s ub se quent a c ad emic p e r f ormance. Academic Polides I 43 Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service . USAF personnel may present an official tran script from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295. Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experi ences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver. Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions. RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC pro grams should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements . The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semes ter hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Fur ther more, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then onl y if the ROTC program is com pleted. System and Policies The following grading system and procedures for pass/fail registration , dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been s tan dardized for all academic units of the University. GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol ( A, B , C , D , F , IF, IW, or IP) is to b e assigned. Special s y mbols (NC , W , and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigne d b y the instructor. Pass / fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application s y stem, explained under Pass /Fail Procedure. A -superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour . B-good/better than average-3 points per credit hour. C-competent/average-2 credit points per hour . D-minimum passing-1 credit point per credit hour . F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour . Beginning with the Spring 1984 Semester, the Uni versity approved use of a PLUS/MINUS grading sys tem , where a B + corresponds to 3 . 3 credit points per

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44 I General Information credit hour, and a B -corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructor s in those schools and col leges may , at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system , but are not required to do so . IF-incomplete-regarded as F if not completed within one year maximum. IW-incomplete-regarded as W if not completed within one year maximum. !P-in progress-thesis at the graduate level onl y . An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a studen t's completing a course during the term. Students have one y ear to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP FAILING . Students should not re-register for course s for which the y have received INCOMPLETES. Students receiving INCOMPLETES: most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to " com plete " the incomplete . PIPpass /failP grade is not included in the gradepoint average; the F grade is included ; up to 16 hours of pass/ fail course work may be credited tow ar d a bachelor's degree. HIPIP-honors/ pass lfail-int ended for honors cour s es; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average. SPECIAL SYMBOLS NC-indicates registration on a no-credi t bas is . W -indicates withdrawal without c redit. Y -indicates the final grade roster was not recei ve d b y the time grades were processed. Graduate students enroll e d at the 500 l evel of a slash course (400 / 500) will b e expected to complete additional work and be evaluated commensurate with graduate standards as specified by the course instructor. PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE 1. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pass/fail basis should do so during the regular registration. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis only may be made during the regular drop/add period. 2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/ fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work ma y be taken pass /fail in any given semester . 3 . Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/ fail registration . All students who register on a pas s / fail appear on the regular class roster , and a nor mal letter grade is assigned by the professor . When grades are received in the Records Office, those regis trations with a pass/ fail designation are automatically con verted b y the grade application system. Grades of d and above convert to grades of P. 4 . The r ecord of pass/ fail registration is maintained b y the Office of Admissions and Records . 5 . E x ception to the pass/fail regulations is permitted for s pecified courses offered by the School of Educa tion , the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs. 6. Graduate degree students can exercise the PIP option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement. 7 . If you register for a course on a pass/ fail basis, you may not later decide that you want a letter grade. Each s chool or college limits the hours and courses for which you may register on a pass/ fail basi s. Please note : many college s will not accept a "P" grade for tran s fer credit. PASS / FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS College Business a n d Ad min istratio n En gineering and A p plied S c i e n ce Liberal Arts and S c i e n ces Mus i c General Onl y n o n -business electives may be take n P ass/Fail 16 Hours Maximum Requir e d co u rses ma y n o t be take n In cludes courses take n in the honors P ass/FaiL Upper divi s i o n soc i o-hupr ogram mani stic e l ectives a re acce pt able, otheiWise m a j o r department a pproval i s requir e d ; s tud ents w ith out a m a j o r are not e)jgible t o take courses P ass/Fail . R ecommende d maximum o n e co urse /semes t er. Ma y be r es trict e d in c er tain majo r s ; n o t included in 30 hou rs of C or better work required f o r major. N o mor e tha n 6 h o u rs P/F a n y semes t er. D oes not include co u rses t ake n in h o n or , p h ysica l educatio n , coo per ative educatio n a n d ce rt ain t eac h e r certificatio n courses; a l so d oes not include EN G L. I 002 P rofic i ency T est or MA TH . 1002 T e t Onl y n o n -m u sic electives may be Include course take n in the h o n ors taken P ass/Fail . o more than 6 pr ogram. hours P/F a n y se m es t e r Transfer Students Maximum of I se m es t e r h our o f P ass/Fail for every 8 semester h o u rs co mpl e t e d a nd p as ed at the Univer s it y Maximum of I se m ester h o u r of Pass/Fail m a y be a ppli e d towar d g radu atio n for every 9 semes t e r h o u rs t ake n in the c ollege May n o t be u s ed by s t ude nt s g radu a tin g with only 3 0 seme te r h o u rs t ake n a t the Univ e r s ity

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NO CREDI Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with e consent of their instructor and the dean of their schoo l or college. File the no credit form in the Record s Ofjfice before the end of the drop/add period . Students register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students clay not register again for a course whlch has alreadJ1 been taken on a no credit basis. GRADE-P INT AVERAGE The gra e-point average is computed by multipl y ing th e 't points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the numb r of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by t . e total hours. Grades f P , NC Y, W IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average. If an IF has not been completed within one year, the c<;>urse is regarded as failed and a grade ofF is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end the one-year grace period. If an grade has not been completed within one year, the is regarded as dropped. If a is repeated , all grades earned are used in cteterffilmrl!g the grade-point average. The University grade-point average does not include at other institutions. average of graduate students courses , credit hours, and credit points while enrolled in The Graduate School. average does not appear on official Academic Polides I 45 transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester. Students should consult with the dean of their col lege or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average. Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such students will be notified b y their school or college. GRADE REPORTS Grade reports normally are available for students to pick up at the Records Office within two to three weeks after the end of the semester. Students must present picture identification . Grade reports are not automatically mailed; however, a self-addressed , stamped envelope ma y be supplied to the Records Office by individual students who wish to have their grades mailed. Graduation Undergraduates. Students who have comple ted 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation.

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46 I General Information CU-Denver Chancellor Glendon F. Drake (left) and CU President E. Gordon Gee (right) share a moment together prior to the 1987 commencement ceremonies. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been eval uated. After students have been certified to gradua t e they must reapply to return to CU-Denver Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated . After students have been certi fied to graduate they must reapply to return to CO Denver. Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to part icipate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided abou t ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and tran scripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring com mencement. Transcripts Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Boulder,

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Records Of ce, Campus Box B-7, Transcript Section, Regent Center 125, Boulder, CO 80309. transcripts will not be available until approximate y five weeks after final examinations . A transcript o which a degree is to be recorded will not be available ntil approximately eight weeks after final Requests should include the following: 1. Studenf's full name (include maiden or other I name if 2. Student number. 3. Birthdate. 4. The las term and campus the student attended. 5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included wh n a transcript is ordered near the end of a term. the request should be held until a degree is recbrded 6 . Agency college, or individuals to whom tran scripts are t be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled "iss u f1 d to student." 7. Students signature. (This is the student's authorization tore ease the records to the de signee.) There is n charge for transcripts. Transcripts are prepared onl at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Unofficial copies of tr
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48 I General Information Family Educat i onal Rights and Privacy A c t Periodically, but not less than annually, the Univer sity of Colorado informs student s of the Family Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the ins t itution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review t heir educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also h ave the right to file complaints with the Family Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERP A) con cerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act. Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provi sions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in t he library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado. A directory of records, listing all educational records maintained on students by this institution, may be found in the Office of Admissions and Records on each campus. The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical fac tors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the Uni versity for any purpose at its discretion. Currently enrolled students may withhold disclo sure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold dis closure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in each and every term. Forms requesting the withhold ing of directory information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records . Students must request each term to have directory information withheld for that term. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld for that term, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested. Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Admissions and Records . University of Colorado at De n v er Confident i ality of Academic Records STUDENTS: DO have the right to view and inspect theireducation records (excluding any financial records of their parents). DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University. Directory Information includes: name, address, telephone number date and place of birth class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recog nized sports and activites physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone. PARENTS: DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child o nly if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is financially dependent upon them. The Record Office, in NC 1003, 556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student. UNIVERSITY OF COLORAD O PERSONNEL: DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal e x ercise of their duties. DO OT have the right to use educational records of stu dents for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-educational interests , without consent of the student. PERS O NS OR O RGANIZATI O NS PROVIDING FINAN GAL AID TO STUDENTS: DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid. PERS O NS IN AN EMERGENCY: Do have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and others , but such information will onl y be released by the Dean of Student Academic Services, 556-8427. These regulations are required by the Family Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 5562389 . Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested. S tudent Classif icat i on Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior 0-29 hours 30-59 hours 60-89 hours 90+ hours All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.

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SPECIAL PRI GRAMS AND FACILITIES A l umn i Ass1ociatio n The CU-Dtver Alumni Association supports the development nd awareness of the University through a variety of n tworks and activities. Founded in 1976, students autmratically become members upon gradu ation. Friends and non-degreed former students are also welcome to participate. Horizons , published in the fall, winter, and sprin of each year, is mailed to members of the associatio . Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions an l or activities on campu s which might interest them. The Mack Easton Award for Distin guished Servife, The Outstanding Alumnus Award, and the Legislative Recognition Award are bestowed each year at c9mmencement and are sponsored by the of alumni access to the campus recreatio center, library, and parking lots is also available thro gh the Association .. The gove g board is comprised of alumni repre senting all of the schools and colleges on campus. This group p1ns events , implements programs, and raises funds "th the goal of advancing the Universit y and increasin the visibility of alumni. A u raria Book Center The Auraria \ Book Center carries a complete stock of academic, tee cal, reference, and examination prep aration books. The Book Center also stocks computers and periphera s, software, and supplies for office , art , and engineer g. Special orders for books are wel comed, and a earch for out-of-print books is available at no charge . Special Programs and Facilities I 49 Students should bring their printouts to locate course books . Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves ; the course call number is printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional book. When avapab l e, used books sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books :returned within the first three weeks of a regular semester ' s start. The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Cen ter lower mall and offers extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks , mag azines , sundries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and refunds and exchanges also are handled here . Photocopying services are available in the Conve nience Store. Transparencies, reduc t ions, and other options may be specified, and a self-serve copier is available for small orders. Two ID's are required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts Mas t erCard and VISA. The Book Center is loca t e d in the Auraria Student Center , lower level , 9th and Lawrence S t reets. For further information and hours, contact 556-3230. Auraria Child Care Center The Auraria Child Care Cen t er is a non-profit orga nization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, facul ty, and staff of t he Auraria Higher Education Center. The Center operates from 7 a.m. t o 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time . It is divided into two toddler classrooms, three preschool class-

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50 I Gene ral Inf orma t ion rooms, and one kindergar t en/after-school classroo m. Children must b e 18 months to six y ears of age t o attend. The philosophy of the Cent er is to foster the development of compe t ence in int ellectual and social skills and to provide safe, nurturing environment. The pro gram involves the assessment of individual needs, establishing goals and activities that are appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communica tion is a key to t he responsive, individually-oriented program provided at the Cen t er. Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time or hourly basis to accommodate students' varying class sc h edules. For additional information , please call 556-3188. Auraria Student Center The Student Center, located at 9th and Lawrence , houses a cafeteria, t he campus Book Center, a study lounge, game room, offices for student goverrunent and organizations, a copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, meeting and conference facilities , and a tav ern. C o m p u ting Services Computing Services supports computer u se by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. Most administrative processing is done in the office of Management Systems in Boulder with data entry, output processing, and user support pro vided by Computing Services in Denver . Most aca demic processing is either done on campus or through one of severa l networks available through Computing Services . The Denver campus maintain s a PRIM E 9950 under PRIMOS , a VAX 8700 under VMS, and a series of computers (Pyramid 90X, 8-processor Sequent B21000, Intel 16-processor Hypercube) under the UNIX operating system. Acce ss to all machines is through a communications network that allows con nection to the campus librarie s' on-line card-catalog (CARL-PAC) as well as to any of the other CU cam puses. The VMS and UNIX machines are all con nected over the ethernet which also is a node on the growing Colorado SuperNet network. This net pro vide s access to many academic computing networks (ARPANET, NSF ET, JVNCNET , CSNET , etc.) as well as high-speed connections to the Colorado School of Mines, University of Denver , Colorado Springs and Boulder CU campuses, and Colorado State University . CU-Denver also is a BITNET site. A significant amount of computing also is accomplished on the campus' 520 personal computers both in laboratories (7 teaching labs and 3 public lab s are available) and in offices. Computing Services staff provides assistance to aca demic and administrative users on all computing sys tems available and on every phase of their use. Advisers and a full-time academic user services s t aff assist faculty as well as students enrolled in courses using computing with question s regarding program ming and the use of computer systems and sof t ware available. Administrative users are assisted by a data processing staff as well as user services personnel. Computing systems on the campus are maintained by an operations staff who also assist faculty and staff with hardware planning, acquisitions , questions , and problems. The goal of Computing Service s is to assist all mem bers of the CU-Denver community in using comput ing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver , please call 556-2583. Division of Cont i nuing Educ atio n Through its Division of Continuing Education (CE), the University of Colorado at Denver provides off campus credit and noncredit educational opportuni ties for the life-long learner and the non-traditional student. More than 7,000 employee s of business , industry, and government, homemaker s, senior citi zens, and alumni participated in CE classe s, work shops, and seminars during the past year.

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Special Programs and Facilities I 51 october 4 1 0 continuing education week in colorado To provide asy access to as many student s as pos sible, CE uses the city and its environs as its class room. C U-De ver's excellent faculty is teamed with highly talente1part-time instructors from the D enver metropolitan a ea to ensure quality and excellence in instruction. C edit class offerings provide a l inkage between CU-Denver's resident degree program on campus and t 1 e part-time , off-campus student. Pro grams a r e spe ially designed to offer career updating for such prof .ssionals as teachers, engineers, attor ne ys, and arc 'tec ts. CE de livers wide array of noncredit courses for those int erestetl in career updating, personal enrich ment, and int llectual stimulation. Specific programs are de veloped at the request of business and profes sional groups . These programs include licensing and refresher for engineers , accountan t s , life insurance age ts, and architects . Seminars and certif icate pro grams for business and industry are designed to help keep and managers abreas t of new technolo gies ahd their management. Courses in the arts and humanities explore such topics as parenting, self-awareness ] music and art, photography, languag es, and literatJre. Through th off-campus programs, and as part of its publi c service mission, CU-Denver seeks to extend its education resources to the off-campus student. Individu als , gJ[Oups, and organizations with special education inte ests are invited to call the Division of Continuin g E ucation at 556-2735 . University of Colorado Foundation , Inc. In 1981-82, the University of Colorado Foundation es t ablished a Denver office. The CU Foundation was established in 1967 at the direction of the Board of R egents of the University as a privately governed, non-profit c6rporation, chart ered under the laws of the State of Colorado. It is operated exclusivel y for charitable , scientific , or educational purposes designed to promote the welfare of CU . The CU Foun dation is the approved agency to solicit, receive , and administer gif t s from private sources. International Education/Study Abroad The Office of International Education on the Boul der campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty , ente ' t ains foreign visitors, promotes special re l ationship s with foreign universities , and act s as adviser for Fulbright and o th er scholarships at CU Boulder. The office also arranges study abroad pro gram s and offers o v er 30 different programs around th e globe . Students on any CU campu s can pa r ticipate in these programs. Some of the study abroad programs are of the tradi t ional junior year abroad variety , in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an aca demic y ear. Such programs are available at the Univer sities of Lancaster and Reading , England ; the

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52 I General Information University of Bordeaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose ; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, West Ger many; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technology in Monterrey, Mexico; the University of Seville, Spain; and Tunghai University in Taiwan. For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive language learning. Single semester programs are offered in Chambery and Rennes, France; Guadala jara and Monterrey, Mexico; London, England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Seville and Alicante, Spain; and Tai pei, Taiwan. Summer programs are located in Kassel, West Germany; Perugia, Italy; and London, England. Special summer programs , e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific departments upon request. Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these study abroad programs. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate langua ge is required for most of the aca demic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to program costs in most cases. More information about study abroad programs is available in the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741. Auraria Student Assistance Center The Auraria Student Assistance Center (ASAC) is composed of five offices offering specialized assis tance to all present and prospective Auraria students. 1. Office of Information and Referral Services. This is a central information source that provides objective assistance to prospective students desiring to enroll at CU-Denver or one of the other academic institutions on the Auraria campu s. 2 . Office of Career Planning Placement Services . Assistance is offered to students and alumni in plan ning their careers and seeking employment. 3 . Office of Disabled Student Services. This officer provides academic support of services to ensure pro grammatic access for students with disabilities. 4. Office of Vocationa l Rehabilitation. Campus branch office of the State of Colorado Department of Social Services. This office assists disab led students in becoming fully employable and self-supporting. 5. Office of International Student Services. The office assists international students on campus from 80 countries by providing support services and aiding in bridging the cultural gaps which many of them experience when entering the community to attend college . 6. Office of Off-Campus Housing Referral Services. Provide s information on apartment and dormitory liv ing arrangements.

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" Student Academic Services strives to create a University environment which enables s tudents, faculty, and staff to be colleagues in the lifelong process of learning and which provides stu dents wit h a satisfying total educational experience." Mary Lou Fenili Dean , Student Academic Services

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Dean: Mary L u Fenili Assistant De, : George H. Wayne Staff Assistan , : Bellverie E. Ross Office s: North Classroom Bldg. , Room 2012 Telephone: 55 -8427 Directors: Diane Fries , T sting Center Cecil Glenn , E ucational Opportunity Program Kath y Jackson Academic Center for Enrichment Pam Kesson-C[aig, Center for Women's Re so urces Jan Mich alski, enter for Internships and Cooperative Education Bruce William s Student Act ivities and Veteran Affairs Studen t Lif In 1983 The o llege Board published Today's Urban University Stu ents : Part 1, Profile of a New Genera tion, which ten urban universities including CU-Den ver. report emphasized that significant percent ages o the students at urban universities reflected the di ersities of their environments: th ey are older than tho e considered to be t raditiona l college students ; have empl oyment and family responsibili t i es in additio to th eir academic programs; include substantial nu bers of minorities, women, and single parents; and e more often than not enrolled parttime. To meet the needs of this diverse student popula tion , provides student life programs and activiti es desi ed to complement students' academic pro grams and o enhance their total educationa l expe rience . Studen s are provided opportunities to devel op, experie e, and participate in student government , s cia ! , cultural, intellectual, and recre ational progra s. Student life programs create an environment which student s are: • As s i s ted in eve lopin g leadership through opportu nities t o pra tice le adership, decisionmaking , man agement an] marketing , interpersonal and group communicat on, and relationship skills. • Encoura ged nd aided in developing socia l , cultur al , intell ectu I , recreation and governance programs that volvement wi th the campus commu nity and soc ety and lead to mature appreciation of these pursui s . • Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide op or tuniti es for self-realiza tion and growth in in "vidual and group settings . • Expose d to various cultures and experiences , ideas and issues, art and musica l forms , and styles of life . • Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities. • Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities aljld other resources . • Assis ted in developing institutional spirit through crea t ive interaction among s t aff, faculty , students, and members of the local community. Programs and ser vices provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the di vision of Student Aca demic Services of CUDenver, and the Aurari a Student Assistaljlce Center contr ibute to the fulfillment of this philosophy . Dean of Student Academic Services The dean's office provides vision , leadership , influ ence, and advocacy on behalf of students and super vises the provision of programs and services for students by Student Aca demic Services office s. T he Dean serves as liaison wi th the Associated Student s of CU -Denver and its clubs and organizations; coordi nates orien tation and comme ncement , the Senior Cit izens Program, and the Ahlin Scholarship Fund for disabled stude nts; adminis ter s the Student Code of Conduct and student grievance procedure; and assures CU-Denver represen tation in Auraria-shared student seryjces and act ivities. For the convenience of CU-Denver s tudents , all S tudent Academic Services offices, including the dean's office are open until 7 p.m. two eve nings a wee k . The dean's office is locat e d in Room 2012 of the Nor th Cla ssroom Building , t e le phone 556-8427. Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) The Associa ted Students of the University of Colo rado at Denve r (ASCUD) serves as a voice for s tu dent s and provide s ac tivitie s and services not normally offered to s tudents under the formal Univer sity s tructure. ASCUD assis t s student s wi th informa tion concerning student club s and organizations, issues conce rning student status and other informa tion of intere s t to students in general. ASCUD further provides stude nts with assis tance with grievances and wi th the ORportuni ty to become more intimately involved wit h the Univers ity community through

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56 I Student Academic Services Students elected to run student government gain val uable lead ership experience. active participation in student government itself or through service on University , tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning ASCUD services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Center , Room 340, 556-2510 Student Legal Services Student legal services are available to ass i st students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation , document inter pretation, and assistance in negotiation . The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CO Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Cont act the office for further details at 556-3333, Student Center, Room 255A. The Advocate The purpose of the student newspaper is to advo cate and provide a marketplace of ideas from which students may make an impartial judgment of their own. The newspaper strives to include a combination Students gain valuabl e journalism experience working on the Advocate, CU-Denver 's sh1dent newspaper. of good inves tig a t ive reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is to be a tool to assist in the encouragement of and development for writers, jour nalists, artists, and other student members of its gen eral management and production s taff. Student Activities The Office of Student Activities is the coordinating, resource, and general information cen ter for student government , student clubs and organizations, student programs , Greek social organizations, and the aca demic honor societies. All student fee expenditures are monitored by this office to assure compliance with CU-Denver, ASCUD , and s tate regula tions and proce dures . The Student Activitie s Officer represents the Dean of Studen t Academic Services on selected CO Denver, tri-institutional, ASCUD, and AHEC commit tees and main tain s effec tiv e lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The Office of Student Activities is located in the Student Center , Room 153, 556-3399. Through the Center for Academic Enri chment students receive tuitorial assistance in specific subjects from their peers . Academic Center for Enrichment The Academic Center for Enrichment is a learning assistance center designed to promote student success in the academic setting . Services are available to all students. The Center's services include: tutoring, workshops, credit courses, consulting, and a minority resources library. Tutoring.Free tutoring is available in many subject areas. Individual or group sessio n s are held on weekdays/evenings. Workshops.Free study skills and computer work shops are provided on such topics as test-taking,

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memo ry t ecl}niques, not e t aking, t o the per sonal CO!f.J?ute r, and word courses are offered m a sn:all form a t in t e a r eas of 1) college surviVa l skills ( s tud y skill and compu t er word processing); 2) E n glish as second language; 3) developmental comp osition and reading; and 4) developmental math and p ob lem solving. These courses may be u se d as elec ives in the College of Liberal Ar t s and Sci e n ces. C o n sul t ing. cademic, financial aid, and P . erson .al con s ult ing at av ail able . Peer advocacy also 1s avail abl e t o stu ent s eligible for the federally-funded Student Sup or t Services Program. Libr ary. The Cen te r maintains a small periodica_l an? book aut hored b y, an?lor about, Inmon ties; t hese resources are available for student r e search an leisure. The Aca d e c Cent er for Enrichment is loca ted in the North Cl as roo m B uilding , Room 2004, telephone 556-2802. STUDY SKI LS COURSES CMMU. 1400-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languag es. Thi s c ourse J S des i gned for ESL students who n eed to improve t heir r!ding and vocabu l ary skills. student s will to skim and scan, summanze, mcrease the ir reading peed, and make inferences. Coreq ., CMMU . 1410, S SK. 0806 and 0807. CMMU. 1410-3. Composition for of Other guages I. This s the first course m the ESL composition s equ e n ce . Wri g begins with sentence-level work and con tinue s with the develo pment of paragraphs based on Westem rhe t ori c al p t tems. Grammar appropriate to s tu dents' needs will be incorporated into this class. Coreq. , CMMU . 1400, 0806 and 0807. CMMU. 1420-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Seco d t er m course . Continued work on mar , syn tax, an the m echanics of ':"riting. Specia l a.tt ention is gi ve n t o those spec t s of the English language which pose problem s for th non -native speaker, e.g., article usage, v erb form s, and dio m s. CMMU. 1430 -3. ESL Writing as a tran s it ion courSe for ESL students m prepara ti on for ENGL. 1010 or i20. Emphasis is placed on the of gramm ar an or punctuation problems that mdiVIdual student s may h e and on development of longer composi tions . STSK. 0700-1. Developmental Composition . This course is offered t o reacti1 ate a n d improve academic writing skills . Area s in which the student feels a need for growth are e x plored , and a program for improvem.ent is deter mined for each divi d ual . The mecharucs of wnting and e s s ay form are review ed as a general guide for composition gro w th . O pen to all students. STSK. 0702-1. Developmental Reading . This course is offer e d as a mea s of enhancing general reading habits and impro vin g stud rea din g techniques. retention, vocalJ.ulary development , skimming, critical reading, nd graphic reading are among the topic s that will b e expl red . STSK. 0703-1. College Preparatory Math I. This course is des igned to prolvide s tu dents with a solid foundation in I S tudy Skills Cour ses I 57 fundamental.fathematics skills. S tu dents w ill study n um bers and rational . numb ers, tion s, and decimals . Srmple linear equations and bas i c geometr y also 1 will be presente d . STSK. 0704 -3. College Preparatory Math II. T hi s c o urse p re pares students for MATH. 1010 by math .co n cepts . Students will learn and practice . linear equatio n s, inequalities and sets, systems of equations, and polyn o mials/functions . STSK. 0705 -1. Problem Solving. This course is designed t o improve investigative and problem solving skills. theor y, empirical methodology , and research me t hods w ill b e utilized . Individual topics inves t igation will b e assigne d . Open to all student s. STSK. 0707 1 . College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in t he academic se tt ing .. Topics covered will include uni v ersity resources, conquenng the univer sity system, listening and notetaking, study and mem ory techniques, testtaking skills, librar y research strategies, word processmg , and srmpl e computer graphics. STSK. 0800 1. Developmental Composition for ESL. T his class meets two hours The c?urse . is taught in a small group format (limit 10) With attention given to se n tence-level de y elopment and b eginning paragrap h develo p ment based on Western tho u ght patterns. Student s a l s o work on the n,1echanics of writing. STSK. 0801-1. Commun i cation Skills. This course meets for two hours each week to improve the oral communication sk ill s of students whose first l an guage is not Englis h . S kills to be emphasized include use of idiomatic English , cross cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communica tion , and pronunciation. STSK. 0802-1. Improving Academic Reading Skills for ESL. This class is designed to improve students' reading of aca demic te x ts . Students will work on skills such as compr e hension , retention, skimming, scanning, a n d critic al reading . STSK. 0806-1 . Study Skills for ESL. The primary focus o f this class is to teach ESL students techniques for listening t o and taking notes from college l ectures. The als? will d ea l with the spoken English necessary t o fu ncti o n m t he classroom si tuations . Coreq., CMMU . 1400/1410 an d STSK. 0807. STSK. 0807 -1. College Survival Skills for ESL. This cours e will cover topics such as college resources, t im e manag e ment , study and memory techniques, test anxiety, and testt aking skills. The goal of this course is to h e l p student s acquire skills which will enab l e them to "survive" in an academic setting. Coreq., CMMU . 1400/ 1 410 and STSK. 0806. Center for Internships and Cooperative Education The Center for Internships and Cooper ati ve Educ a tion provides s tu dents with a n t o ment their academic classr oom learnmg With the on-the-job work experiences or internshi p s to th eir academic s tu dies. Stu d ents are p l ace d e1ther a s paid Co-op or nonp a id interns for corporations , businesses, or m positions that complemen t t herr academic cour se work. Co-op students can work full time b y altern at ing semes t ers of work w ith semes t ers o f full time school, or they can work par t t ime year around.

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58 I Student Academic Services Staff of the Center for Internships and Cooperative Educa tion enjoy their office space in Historic Ninth Street Park. ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT The Center is open t o all students enrolled at least halftime in any CU-Den ver college or school who have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5 and ha ve completed at least 12 semester hours in residence (6 sem hrs. for graduate students) . BENEFITS OF A CO-OP/INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE • ea rl y exposure to y our chosen profession • opportunity to apply classroom learning t o a work situation • g ain valuable work experience th a t can lead to a permanent career position upon graduation • earn academic credit for work experience • earn money to help pay for college expenses ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR WORK E XPERIENCE Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or nonpaid positions , as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, can apply to earn credi t through courses in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Music. These course s are offered in all departments and students can earn up to 9 semes t er hours of credit for qualifying work experiences. Pre-med student Karen Tot h works as an intern at Webb Waring Lung Institute . Appmximately 80 percent of CUDen ver's pre-med students are accepted into medical schools. Graduate stud ents in so m e colleges and schoo l s can earn internship experiential learning, field study, or practicurn credit through courses established for thi s purpose. Grad u ate student s seeking credit for work experience should ask their faculty adviser for details. No credit is given for work experie nce in the College of Business and Adminis tr ation or the College of Engineering and Applied Science a t the present time . For more information contact the Center at 1047 9 th St. Park, 556-2892. Educational Opportunity Program The Educational Opportunity Program promotes the academic and personal growth and development of e t hnic and racial minority and international stu dents . The program's goa l s include promoting and enhancing majority students' understanding of minority and international cultures and heritages; promoting and enhancing minority and international students' understanding of their own cultures and heritages; orienting minority and international stu-

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ttentively to orientation for the Minority Program at CU-Denver . They are among school students se l ected each semester for pays for their tuition , fees , and books. of CU-Denver and the values of providing leadership training and and social skills; and promoting the social, professional , and moral JPr<)grarrts offered are : Asian American Indian Education , Black Educa American Education , Pre-Collegiate Early University Enrollment. sponsors monthly ethnic cultural relations prograrrtming for the rni'nl'Y\111"\ and minority and intema-Center for in the North Classroom Build te l ephone 556-2726. en's Resources to CU-Denver students various ,..,,,,.,...,,.,.,, c aimed a t enhancing students' l-lrr,n-r<>rn for Women who are returning ption is offered each fall and Part of the R e-Entr y Program is Student Orienta t ion sessions offered registration. In addition, the Center services: skill-building work-Women's Resources I 59 shops, ongoFg support gro u ps, and referrals for ser vices such ap child care and career guidance. The Centelr also provides: p r ofessional counseling to all CU-Denver students at no cost, support groups, educational programming, a n extensive resource and referral bank for community services such as legal assistance, medical care, child care and professional organizations. The Center maintains a small lending librar y on various topics relevant to women, and pub lishes a quarterly newsletter containing campus and community events. The Center sponsors several scholarships year ly, including the Patricia Schroe der Scho l arship for Wom en, the Wolillen's Center Scholarship, and the Joan Smith Memorial Scholarship. The Center for Women's R esources a t CU-Denver strives to provide support, advocacy , and professional service to the entire CUDenver community. Stop by and see us in the North C l assroom Building , Room 2013, or call 556-2815. Ahlin F und Scholarship Applications for Ahlin Fund Scholarships to assist handicapped persons with edu cation expenses at CU Denver are available throug h the Dean of Student Academic Services office. Deadlines for application are Jul y 1, Npvember 1 , and Aprill. The Cons t ance Ahlin Fund provides fullor part time tuition scholarships as well as transportation, assistance with child care, a work-study program, and other types of financial assis t ance . Students need to apply to and be accepted by the University. For more information call 556-8427 . Pam (right) and Me lody Swan (center), direc tor and program coordinator for the Center for Women's Resources, enjoy a light moment with Christina Dalpiaz , 1987 recipient of CU-Denver 's Patricia Schroeder Scholar s hip . In addition to awarding scho l arships , the Center offers counseling , wor kshop s , and support groups for students.

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60 I Student Aca d emic Services Non-degree Student Advising All non-degree students who are undecided about a major may receive c o u nseling about admission procedures and academic advising during orient ation. See Schedu l e of Classes under Orientation . Non-degree students who hav e d ecided on a major should contact the schoo l or college offering that major. For informa tion contact 556-8427. Orientation ORIENTATION, ADVISING, REGISTRATIO I AND SERVICES ( O ARS) , an orientation program for new freshman a n d t ransfer students and student s returning to CUD enver after an absence, is held prior to the first day o f classes at t h e beginning of the fall and spring semes te rs and th e summer term. This program is conducted by Student Academic Services in conjunction with the schools and colleges within the University and is divided into separate sessions for undergraduate stud ents, for graduate students, and for parents and spouses of students. OARS intro duces and describes academic programs, activities, and services availab l e at CU-Denver , and provides opportunities for st udents to receive academic advis ing, to resolve q u estions and concerns regarding reg istratio n , financia l aid, and payment of fees. Student Health Insurance Program A student medi cal hospi t al-surgical plan is availab l e for all students: dependent coverage also is available at an additional charge. For further information refer to the portion on Tuition and Fees in the General Information section of this catalog, or call 556-8427. Testing Center This multi-faceted assis t ance center provides various te sting for all le vels of postsecondary education, professional certification, accreditation, and academic and career planning. The center provides registration information concerning the following: ACT CAT CEil G R E GMAT GSFLT LSAT MAT MBTI MCAT TOEFL CLEP SCII American College Te t Ca lifornia Achievement Te t Co l orado Educa t ional Interest Indicator Graduate Recor d Exami n atio n Graduate Management Admissions Test Graduate Schoo l Foreign Language Te t Law School Admission Te t Miller Analogy Te t Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Medical College Admission Test Te s t of English as a Foreign Language College Level Ex aminatio n Program Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory For further information contact 556 -286 1 , North Classroom Bui l ding , Room 2006. Office of Veterans Affairs The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students a ttending CU-Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related benefits . The OVA maintains proper cer t ification for each eligible student to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements of attendance, course load and content, and other regulations critical to the receipt of educational benefits payments. In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Reha bilitation referrals, VA tutorial assistance, the Colo rado Tuition Assistance Program, and VA work/study positions for qualified ve t erans. For further informa tion contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, North Classroom Building, Room 4015. Student Rights and Responsibilities When a student enrolls in the University, he or she agrees to participate meaningfully in the life of the University and to share in the obligation to preserve and promote his or her rights as a ci tizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or tolerate any infringement on the rights of others. Students should thoroughl y familiarize themse l ves with the academic and nonacademic s tudent conduct

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standards of the Univer sity. Academic standards questions sho I d be directed to the dean of the school or college in w 'ch the student is enroll ed. Nonacade mic conduct qJestions should be directed to the as sis tant dean of Academic Services. Copies of the standards anq information regarding all student grievance procedures may be obtained in the office of the Dean of Stydent Academic Services You are acluntable t o both civil and University authoritie s for STUDENT C DE OF CONDUCT A student is accountable to both civil and University authorities for cts which constitute vio lat io ns of laws as well as of University rules and regula tions. Disciplin, ery action b y the Univer sity w ill not be subject to ch enge or postponement on the ground that criminal c arges involving the same incident have been dismi sse , reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court . n addition , the Uni ve rsi ty reserves the right to pursue disciplinar y action if a student violates standards as d . fined within this document and with draws from e Univer sity befor e adminis trati ve action is final. All persons Universi ty property are required, for reasonable ca se, to identify them se l ves when requested by Ujniversity or Auraria Public Safety offi cials acting in tpe performanc e of their duties. Acting through it s aq.rninistrative officers, the University reserves th e riglt to exclud e those pos tin g a danger to University pers nne! or p roperty and tho se w ho inter fere with its fu ction as an educational ins titution . All persons n CU-Denv e r /A uraria property who are not studen s or empl oyees of the University are required to a
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"The Library is both physically and intel Jechlally the heart of the c ampus. It is a good place to think , to plan, and to Jearn." -Patricia Senn Breivik , Director Auraria Librar y

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Director: Senn Breivik Uireli'tor: Jean F. Hemphill ..... 3 ........ T for External Affairs: Margie Shurfor Collection and Automation J. Mitchell for Instruction and Research Ser Goodyear VI : retttor for Media and Telecommunica Muriel E. Woods Library , 11th and Lawrence Sts. : 556-2805 556-2741 Faculty: P.-,,f"''"""' ... Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Jean F . Hemphill Assistant Dene L. Clark , Patricia A. Eskoz, Mercado, Terry Ann Mood, Martin A. Tessmer , bert L. Wick, Muriel E. Woods Instructors: Ahtola, Lori Arp, Julie A. Brewer, Diana L. , Anthony J . Dedrick , Nikki Dilgar de, Joan Fiscella , Mary Lou Goodyear, Eileen Guleff, Ka Kenny, Marit S. MacArthur , Marilyn J. Kay Nichols , Elizabeth Porter , Linda D. Jay Schafer, Louise T. Stwalle y, Rutherford Witthus, Eveline L. Yang Board of Directors, Friends of Auraria Library Tom Clark , Forward Metro Denver Group, Denver Chamber of Commerce Lucy Creighton, First Interstate Bank of Denver Claudia Allen Dillman, Gannett Outdoors Nancy Ellins Mark E . Jones, Merrill Lynch Richard H. Miller, Price Waterhouse Darwin Niekerk, Adolph Coors Co. Christopher G. Nirns, Gensler & Associates Joan Ringel, Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry Stuart C. Rogers, S.C. Rogers, Inc. Clair E. Villaro, Consumer Fraud Division, District Attorney's Office Terry M . Wicker, Wicker-Works Video Productions, Inc. Joan Wohlgenant Lester Woodward, Davis, Graham & Stubbs Access to information is essential to academic suc cess. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Librar y is adminis tered by the University of Colorado at Denver. The Collection The Aurari"' Library has a collection of over 600,000 vo lumes . In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collec tion. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government pubfications and a full depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library's col lection is sup:J?lemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally though inter library loan seyvices. The Online Public Access Catalog Access to the Auraria Library's collection is through the online Pmblic Access Catalog (PAC), a user friendly syste:t;n that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state . The online Public Access Catalog, which was developed as a cooperative project by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of informa tion technology. The online PAC system allows faster

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64 I Librar)'Services and more comprehensive searches than were possible with th e traditional card catalog. In addit ion to using PAC at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; PAC also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe comput er. Reference Services The Auraria Librar y's reference department stands read y to assist students and faculty in using the Library's resources. The reference department is s taffed during all times the Library is open. In addi tion, brief reference questions, such as whether or not the Library owns a particular item , can be answered over the phone. Media Services The M e dia and Telecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services. The media distribution depar tment manages the Library's media collection, which consists of videotapes, audio tapes, records, 16mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online Public Access Catalog. This department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Library operates an 18-channel televi sion distribu tion system which is wired into all class rooms on campus; at a faculty member's request a film or videotape can be transmitted directly into the class room over this system. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan 's, the Student Center, and the Library's television studio to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab is also available for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division and a professional graphic designer is avail able to assis t users. Studen t s get experience in front of and behind the camera in the Media and Telecom munications Division of the Librar y.

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Computer A sisted Research Online searching, for which there is a fee , can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. I some cases , it provides the only access to certain mat rials. The Library ha s access to well over 200 datab9ses. In ad?-ition to bibliographic info . r mation, many bf the busmess databases also contam directory and financia l information. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the s reference department. eval Service retrieval service was instituted as a researchers. For a reasonable fee, assist patrons in locating and checkmaterials the y need. Working from staff can: locate and check Library; photocopy articles by the Library; submit interli for materials which the Library deliver the materials to the patron's Inquiries about this time-saving ser to the reference department. committed t o educating people to of the Information Society. The range of instructional program a self-paced audiocassette walking , as well as class sessions to teach skills and strategies . Library I 65 Architecture and Planning Library The Library's main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Branch Library . With a collection of over 13,000 books , 120 periodical subscriptions, and 14,000 slides, this branch library offers specialized informa tion to students of architecture, interior design, land scape architecture, urban design, and planning. This branch library is open to any student who needs access to these mat erials. Services for Persons with Disabilities The Library is committed to making its resources and services accessible to all students; in addition to owning a variety of adaptive equipment to assist per sons with disabilities, personal assistance in using the Library is availab le from the refer ence department. Additional Facilities Coin-operated typewriters, a cop y center, change machines, and study rooms are all availa ble at the Librar y. Internships The Librar y offers internships, practicums, and independent studies to students interested in telecom munications or information management.

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" CU-Denver is emerging as a remarkably strong University with an unusual array of s upe1jor g raduate programs. Grad uate educatio n at CU-Denver not only imparts knowledge which is frequentl y multidi sci plinar y and applied, but also helps students t o master the proce sses of inquiry that gen erate new knowledge and that yield so lutions to pressing societal proble ms." Acting Dean Thomas A. Clark The G r a du ate School

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Acting Dean : homas A. Clark School Office : 250 14th St., Strite 700 Telephone : 556 2663 INFORMATiqN ABOUT THE SCHOOL The 1983 Brabemas report on Graduate Education in America that "Gra duate educa tion and research are th bedrock of every importan t area of our nationallif ."The report highlighted the fact that a strong nation I security program, a healthy growing economy, and he prospects for improvement in the quality of life ate all dependent upon high quality and vigorous programs in our universities. High quality graduate programs are syno n y mou s wi th th e Uni 1ersity of Colorado. Professors are active l y in research or creative acti vity in th eir disciplin e and, th us, are t eacher/scholars who continue to s dy and absorb new data, ideas, and technique s and bring thi s cuttin g edge knowledge to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver not on l y gain from " nteractions with the graduate faculty but a l so gain from other s tudents in the classroom. Because most df CO-Denver's graduate stude nts are older and emp ye d, the y bring practical experience gained in the D nver community to the classroom and a r e ready to the realities of practice to the m od e l s presented i the classroom. The Graduat School i s a University-wide body th at authorizes pro rams within its constituent colleges and schools. At CU-Denver, Education, Engi neering , Libera l Arts an Sciences, and Music are coJJeges or schoo l s whose gJraduate programs are offered throu gh The Graduate ln concep t , there is a single Graduate Scho 1 1 regardless of campus. ln practice , most Master's-l
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68 I The Gradua t e School The Doctor of P hilosophy ( Ph .D.) in: Applied mathematics Educational Administration Educational Administration (emphasis in educational technology) Significant course work is available a t the Denver campus in the programs listed b elow. Students can be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to t ake advant age of the multi-campus activi t ies of The G raduate Sch ool. It is usually advised that a student com p l ete so m e c ourse work at ano t her campus of the University . Biology Chemistry Civil engineering Communication Computer science Electrical engineering English Geography Mechanical engineering Psychology The Graduate School at CU-Denver An average of 3,335 students are enrolled in gradu ate programs a t CUD e n ver each Fall and Spring Semester, and an additiona l 1,379 non-degree stu dents take graduate courses. O f these, approximately 48 percent are part-time students. Faculty The faculty t eaching in these programs are head quartered at C U D enver, a lthough resources of other University of Colorado campuses are used. Comput i ng Services The Computing Services departmen t supports computer use by both t he aca d emic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete descrip tion of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this cat alog. Financial Aid for Gradua t e S tudy COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Graduate School. Competition for these funds is based on demon strated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado . Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester. Applications are availab l e from the Office of Financial Aid. COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded prima rily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students . These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise, and to continuing stu dents on the basis of academic success. In order for fellowships to be renewed, students holding them must reapp l y each year to The Graduate School. GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced gradu ate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course . Payment for these t eaching appointments for 1987-88 is: instructor (20 hours per week), $8,670; teaching assistant (20 hours per week), sa l ary range $5,239 $6,938 for the aca demic year. A half-time appointment for an instructor is consid ered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Nonresident students employed as assistants may or may not be eligible for the nonresident tuition differential stipend for their first-year appointment as an assistant only. Excep t ions extending beyond the first year must be approved in advance by the respec tive dean . Teaching assis t ants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate / thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment. RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS Research activities provide opportunities for gradu ate students t o obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments . Nonresident stu dents who are appointed as research assistants in nongeneral fund accounts may or may not be eligible for resident tuition rates. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate / graduate/thesis or dis sertation).

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LOAN FUNDS Graduate wis h i n g to apply for long-term l oans and for p rt-time jobs throu g h the co llege workstudy progra s hould submi t an Application for Financial Aid t the Offic e of Financial Aid b y March 1. This office a so provid es s hort term loan assistance t o s tudents w o have completed one or m o re se m es ters in reside ce. Short-term loan s are designed to supplement in deq uate personal funds and to provide for emergencie . Applicants s hould go directly t o the Office of Finan ial Aid . EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES T h e University maint ai n s an e mpl oyme nt se rvic e in th e Offic e of inancial Aid to help s tud ents obt ai n part-time wor e ither throu g h conventional e mploy-ment or throu the coll ege work-study program . Students e ployed by the University are h ired so l e l y on the b sis of merit and fitness , a policy which avoids favor or discrimination b ecause of race, color , creed, sex , age, handicap , or national origin. Students are a l so referr d t o prospective employers in accor dance with this policy . The Office of Internat iona l Education expe di t es th e excha n ge of s dents and fac ult y, entertains foreign visitors, special re lation ships wi th foreign universitie s, a11d acts as a d vise r for Fu lbri ght and o th er sc h o l arships. The office al o arranges study abroad programs . Students remai e nrolled at the University of C o l o rado w hil e taki g re g ula r courses in the foreig n univer s iti es. A B a erage with th e e qui va l en t of two years of college-leve l work in th e appropriate langua ge is required. There a l so are occas i o nal summer programs offer in g acade c c redit. Peace Corps nformation may be obtained from the Office of Intern1 tion a \ Education . For additiona l inf o rm ation contact the Office of International E ucation , Boulder campus, 492-7741 , or the Office of Inte rnationa l Programs , Auraria Higher EducatiGm Center, 5563660. REQUIR E ME TS FOR ADMISSION Ge n eral Req { i rements Students rna be admitted to The Graduate School in eith er of the wo categories described be l ow. Admission to I The Gradu a t e School i s not admission to candidacy fof a n advanced degree . A student who wis h es t o beco111e a candidate for a degree must m ake specia l applicatibn at the tim e and in the manner pre scr ib e d b y th e r quirements for th e degree sou ght. R e quirement s for Admission I 69 The Unive sity re serves the right to deny admission t o applicants whose t o t a l credentials reflec t an inability to assume tho se obligations of perfor man ce and beha vior deemed essential b y th e Univers it y and rele vant t o a n y of its lawful mi ssions , processes , and functions as an educational in s titut io n . REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS Qualified students are admitted to regular degree s t a tu s b y the appropriate department. In addition to d e partm enta l approva l , an applicant for admission as a re g ular degree student must: 1. Hold a baccalaure a te degree from a college or uni versity of recognized s tandin g, or have done work e qui va lent to that required for such a degr ee and e qui va lent to the degree g iven a t thi s univer sity . 2. Show promise of a bilit y t o pursu e advanced study and research, as judged b y his or h er previous sc hol astic r eco rd. 3. Have had adequate preparation to ent er gradu ate study in the field chosen. 4 . Have a t lea s t a 2 .75 undergradua t e grade-poin t ave r age on all work taken . 5. Meet a ddition a l requirements for admission as established b y major departments. Regular degree students must ma i ntain at l eas t a 3 .0 gra d e-poin t average each semes t er or summer term o n all work t ake n , whether it is to b e applied toward t h e intended adva nced degree or not. Student s w h o fail to maint ain this standard of p e rform ance will be subjec t t o s u spensio n from T h e Graduate School. P ass/Fai l Grades. In ord e r t o permi t a meaningful eva lu ation of an applicant's scholastic record , not mor e than 10 percent of tho se credit hours that are r e levant t o the intended field of grad u a t e study shall have been earned with pass/fai l grades, nor more than 20 p ercen t overall. Applicants whose aca d e mic record contains a lar ge r percent age of pass/fail credi t s must s ubmit sui table additio n a l evi d ence tha t th ey possess the required sc holastic ab ility. If th e applicant does not s ubmit satisfac tor y additional evidence, he or she can be admitted onl y as a provisional s tudent. PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS Appli can t s who do not meet th e requirements for a dmi ssion as regular deg ree students may be admitt e d as provis ional degree student s u pon th e recom mendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of th e Admissions Committee and co ncurr ence of the dean of The Gradua t e School , a department may admit provisional students for a pro bationar y term , which ma y not exceed two consecu tive calendar yea r s . A t th e end of the probationar y p er iod , provisio nal degree students must either be admitt ed t o r eg u l ar degree s tatu s or be dropped from th e graduate program . Credit earned b y persons in provisio nal degree sta tu s m ay count toward a de g r ee at th is University.

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70 I The Graduate School Provisional degree students are required to main tain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semes ter or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied to ward the advanced degree so ught. Students who fail to maintain such a s tandard of per formance , will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School. Note: All provisional applicants must have com pleted a minimum of six semester hours of gradua te level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the applica tion. SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to The Grad uate School by special permission of the dean. A University of Colorado senior enro lled in the Col lege of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 creclit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholars hip s, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of th e minimum requirements for the bache lor's degree have been sat isfied. Application Procedures Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Den ver should con t act the CU-Denver Graduate School office concerning procedures for forwarcling com pleted applications. An applicant for admission must present a com pleted Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the CU-Denver Graduate Schoo l office, and two official transcripts from each institu tion attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application wil l be processed unless this fee is paid . Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation. When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a committee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to The Graduate School dean's office , which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree students (be low) . A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sough t or earlier as may be required b y the major department . Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1988-89, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc. , must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous sec tion on financial aid) . READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS Students who were previously admitted to a gradu ate degree program but who clid not complete that degree program and who have not been continuously registered a t th e University must: 1. Clarify their status with either the department or The Graduate School to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree . 2. After receiving departmental approval , as indicated above, submit a new application Part I to The Graduate School office before deadlines are passed for th e term in which they expect to return to the Univer sity. A $30 application fee is required unless an excep tion is given by The Graduate School. Application deadlines are available from the department. Former students who wish to change from under graduate to graduate s tatu s or from one major to another must complete th e appropriate forms at the time they apply for readmission . Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accep ted to the new campus. A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral pro gram. A suspended student is eligible to appl y for read mission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of l ack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the E x ecutive Committee. FOREIGN APPLICANTS Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in The Graduate School office prior to February 15 for the Summer Term, March 15 for the Fall Semester, and Augus t 1 for the Spring Semester . The applica tion packet s hould include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financia l documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, officia l English transla tion of all sc h ool records, and other documents as noted in the previous sec t ion on Application Proce dures. Effective Spring 1989 applicants to degree programs within The Graduate School at CU -Denver must achieve a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a For eign Language) score of 550 if English is not their native language or if they ha ve not attended a British or American college or university for at least one year with at least a 3.0 average or its equivalent. Applicants whose TOEFL score falls between 500 and 550 may secure provisional admission to these programs upon

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the recommen)dation of the graduate program and approval of th dean of The Graduate School. Those admi t ted provipionally must achieve a 3.0 in the first 12 credits of graduate course work taken within the degree during their first two semes t ers of study at CU-D n ver. Thes e s tudents will be advised to seek further struction in English as a second lan guage at the U versity. I GRADUATE R CORD EXAMINAT I ONS A t the opti n of any department, the Graduate Record Exa tion may be required of applicants for admission tot e graduate program, assistantships, or of any student before his or her s t atus is determined. Students wh' are appl ying for assistantships for the fall semester ta e the GRE no later than the December testing date so hat their scores will be available to the graduate awa ds selection committee. Six weeks should be allo ed for GRE scores to be received by an institution. Information egarding these examinations may be obtained Graduate School office or the CU Denver Testin Center, or from The Educational Test ing Service, Bo 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Prince]ton, New Jersey 08540 . OTHER GRAD ATE QUALIFYING E XAMIN ATIONS Students entf' ring professional schools and special programs may btain information at the Student Test ing Center on he following examinations: Graduate Management dmissions Test (GMAT) , Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Doppl 11t , and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). NON-DEGREE TUDENTS A student no wishing to earn an advanced degree from the Univ1sity of Colorado should appl y t o the Office of Admi sions and Records, CU-Denver, 1200 Larimer St., De ver, CO 80204. Non-degree stu dents will be allowe to register only on the campus to which the y hav been admitted. Non-degree s udents desiring to pursue a graduate degree at this University are encouraged to submit the col'I}plete graduate application and supporting credeniails as soon as possible. A departme t ma y recommend to the graduate dean the accep ance of as much as 9 hours credit toward the ements of a master's degree for courses taken ither as a student at another recog nized graduate . chool, as a nondegree student at the University, or bbth. In addition, the departmen t ma y recommend t o the graduate dean the accep t a n ce of credit cour ses as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, pro vided such adnlission date was delayed through no Registration I 71 fault of th e s tudent. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any course work tr ansferred in this man ner . REGISTRATI O N Cours e W o rk and Examinations On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and w ho expect to study in The Graduate School are required to comp lete appropriate registra tion procedures. Student s sho uld register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the neces sary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Den ver in order to attend the following semester. Change s in Registration A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit shoul d follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes a graduate student may not drop,

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72 I The Graduate School add, or change a course to no credit without present ing a letter to the dean of The Graduate School , CU Denver, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter , endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the proper l y signed and comp l eted drop/add card or no-credit option form . Withdrawal A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. A s t udent who discontinues attendance in a course without official witl1drawal will be marked as having failed the course. The withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass /fail must be indicated with the instmctor ' s initials. Master's Thesis Graduate students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in par t ial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours . The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal t he number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If t he thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (JP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted . ) Limitation of Regis tration FULL LOAD A graduate student will be considered to be carry ing a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is regis tered for at leas t 5 credit hours of mixed undergradua te/graduate/thesis or dissertation hours .. A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work, or any number of thesis hours. For the number of hours required for financial aid see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this bul letin. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes. MAXIMUM LOAD No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 h ours in a regular semester. The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term . A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding an over load. UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, incl u ding assistants, may take such work as is b y the major departments. TUITION AND FEES The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work Alt hough th e work for advance degrees is specified part ly in terms of credi t hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred mere l y for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. S tudents should not expect to obtain all t he training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to mee t t he requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initia t ive, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching th eir own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of val u es, perspective, proportion. All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except t hose in deficiencies) must be of grad uate status. A student is expected to maintain at least a Baver age in all work attempted while enrolled in The Grad uate School. For the Ph. D., a course mark below B is unsatisfac tory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requiremen t s for the degree. A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department. Appeal may be made to t he Executive Committee of The Gradua t e School. T h e committee's decision shall be final. A suspended s tudent is eligible to apply for readmission af t er one year . Approval or rejection of this application rests join tly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the fina l decisio n will be made by t he Execu t ive Commi tt ee.

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Repeating a Course A graduate stude nt who receives a grade of C, D, or Fin a course rr1ay repeat the course once, upon writ ten to the dean by the chairman of the student's a visory committee and major depart ment, provide the course has not previously been applied toward a degree. In a student's grade-point average for Graduate Scho 1 I purposes, the grade for a repeated course will su b titute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses as an undergraduate or as a non degree student as well as grades earned in first and second year f reign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; howe r, all grades received will appear on the student's tr nscript. Change of epartment or Major A graduate s udent wishing to change department or major must ubmit a new Part I and Part II of the gra duate applic tion to the new department or school and requ est th former department to forward recom mendations an cre dentials . A student w o is noticeably deficient in the use of goo d English i all oral and written work may not obtain an adv need degree from the University of Colorado. Abilf" y to use the language with precision and distinction should be c ultivated as an attainment of major impor ance. Each departn)lent will judge the qualifications of its advanced stu&nts in th e use of English. Reports , examinations, nd speech will be considered in esti mating th e can idate's proficiency. Final action 1 n appeals submi tted by graduate stu dents concerni g action taken by faculty members, programs, or dministrative officials rests with the camp us Execut ve Committee of The Graduate School , unless such ap eal involves a matte r affecting two or more campu se . In such a case, the final action rests with the Ex]utive Committee of The Graduate School. MASTER'S EGREE A s tudent egu larl y admitted to The Graduate School and accepted as a candidate for the Mas ter of Arts , Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be ecommended for the degree on l y after the following T uicement s have been met. Master 's Degree I 73 In general, only graduates of an approved institu tion who have a thorough preparation for their pro posed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality 1are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All stud ies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank . Necessary addi tional work required to make up deficiencies or pre requisites may be partl y or entirel y undergraduate courses. The requirements s tated below are minimum requirements ] additional condi tion s set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further reg ulations not inconsistent with th e general rules. Students to gradua te shou ld ascertain cur rent deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the grad uate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc .). Department s or program committees ma y have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascer tain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the deparhnent or program chair. Minimum Requirement The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled b y following either Plan I or Plan II below . Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis . At least 12 semester hours of thi s work must be at the 500 level or above . Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a th esis. At lea s t 16 semes ter hours of thi s work must be at the 500 level or above. Plan II not represen t a free option for the student. A candidate for the master's degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned. Graduate Credit Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 or above and that are offered by profes sors who are [members of the graduate facu l ty, or that have otherwise been approved b y the dean of The Graduate School. o assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degre e unless th e student has the approval of the department. Not aU courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate ye ars . Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and there after will have graduate rank if the y are taught by member s of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories:

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74 I The Graduate School 1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 le vel or above. 2 . Courses out side the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the fac ulty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean. 3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000and 4000level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School. 4. Courses outside the major program provided they are a pproved for a specific degree plan b y the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean. This does not change the minimum number of cour ses tha t must be taken at the 500 level or above; ho wever, as a result , most students w ho include 400 le ve l cour ses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation. Field of Study Studies l eading to a master's degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program. Status After students have made a satisfactory record in thi s University for a t least one semester or summer term and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifyin g exa minations or otherwise , the y should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status mus t be se t by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. Students w ho are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a gradua te degree all prerequisites re quired b y the department concerned . Language Requ i rements Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires . See special departmental requirements. Credit by Tran sfe r Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended b y the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School. All work accepted by transfer must come within the 4-year time limit or be validated by special examina tion. The maximum amount of work that may be trans ferred to this University is 9 semester hours. Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in resi dence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for thi s purpose and submitted to The Graduate School b y the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. Work already applied toward a master's degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the Master's degree at the Univer sity of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recog nized. Excess undergraduate credits from another institu tion may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work: 1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University . 2. Comes within the four-year time limit. 3. Has not been applied toward another degree. 4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form spec ified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the sh1dent will be graduated. For more information contact The Graduate School office. To be eligib l e for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the Univer sity of Colorado in The Graduate School.

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Continuing Education Course Work Students may use the resources of the Division of Continuing Et. ucation in the pursuit of g raduate study only if ey obtain proper academic approval from th e major department and the graduate dean in advance. Residence In general, t e residence requirements can be met only by a t th e University for at least two emesters or least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the time designated at tte beginning of a semester and must carry th e equi alent of not fewer than 5 semes ter hours of work n courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combi ation of other course work accep t able for graduate c edit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load , fotequirements for full residence credit during the su er. A student who is noticeab l y deficient in his/he general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite t o grad ate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the inimum time specified. Assis tants a d o ther employees of the University may fulfill the esidence requirements of o n e year in two semesters, provided their duties do n o t require more than half 'me. Full -time empl oyees may not sat isfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four seme ters. Admission to Candidacy A student wis hes to become a candidate for a master's must file application in the dean's office n o t later han 10 weeks prior t o the completion of th e compreh nsive final examination. The number of hours to be resented for the degree must be determined before application may be filed . See previ ous section on Status. This must be made on forms obt ainable at th e dean's o fice and in vario u s departments and must be signe by the major department, cer ti fying that the student's work is satisfactory and that the program outlin 1 d in the application meets the requirements set for tHe student. A student o1Graduate Sc hool probation is not eli gib l e to be a arded a degree until he o r she is removed from robation. Thesis Requirements A th esis , whl ch may be of a research , exposi tory, critica l , or crea9ve type, is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfi)lment of the requirements for an advanced must: 1. D eal with a d efin it e topic related to the major fie ld . Master's Degree I 75 2. Be based upon independent study and investiga tion. 3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. R eceive the approval of th e major department not l a ter than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred. 5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given . 6. Comply in mechanical feature s with specifications outlined in University of Colorado Gradu ate School Specifica tions for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctora l Dissertation, which is obtainable from The Graduat e School. Two week prior t o the date on which the degree is to b e conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract. All theses must be signed by the thesis adviser and the second rea d er. All approved these s are kept on file in the library . The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School. Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master's degree must register for th esis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence , but th e total registered credit for th esis must t otal a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is t o be give n for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is compl e ted. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is regis tered for thesis prior to compl e tion of the thesis. Comprehensive Final Examination Each candidate for a master' s degree i s required to take a comprehensive fina l examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. T hi s examination may be given near the end of the candidate's last semester of residence whi l e he/she is s till taking required courses for the degree, provided h e/she is making satisfactory progress in those cours es. The following rules appl yi n g t o the comprehensive final examination must be observed: 1. A student must be registered when he or she takes the examination. 2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination. 3. The examination is to be given b y a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean. 4. The examin a tion, which may be ora l or written, o r b o th , must cover the thesis, which should be essen-

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76 I The Gradua t e School tially complete at the time, as well as other wo:k do':le in the University in formal courses and semmars m the major field. 5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments . 6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representat ives of the corresponding fields of study in this University . 7 . A student who fails t he comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by th e examining committee has been compl e t ed. The s t udent may retake the exam ination only once . Supplemental Examinations Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before he or she may attempt the comprehensive examination again. Course Examinations The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed , may be omitted with the consent of the instructor. Master's Thesis Credit Every graduate sh1dent working toward a master's degree who expects to present a thesis in partial ful fillment of the requirements for the degree mu s t reg ister for th esis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may re g ister for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, b u t the tota l number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final gra de will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not comp l eted at the end of the term in which th e student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on w h ich an IP grade has been s ubmitted.) Time Limit All work , including the comprehensive final exami nation , should be completed within four years or five successive summers. Work done earlier will not be accepted for the degree unl ess validated by a special examination. Candidates for the master's degree are expected to complete their work with reasonable con tinuity . Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expect ing to Graduate During 1988-89 De ad line dat es for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663. 1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit. 2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Appli cations must be submitted at least 10 weeks before the student expec ts to take the comprehensive final exam ination. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semes ter prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office .) 3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department. 4. Last day for sche duling of comprehensive final examination. 5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examina tion. 6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing , the the sis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indi cated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which t he deadline i s indicated. DOCTOR OF PHI LOSOPHY The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest acade mic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credi t hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the sa tisfactor y comple tion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree mu s t demonstrate that th ey are proficient in some broad subject of learn ing and that the y can critically evaluate work in thi s field; furthermore , the y must have shown the ability to work independently in t heir chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowl edge. The technical require ments state d below are minim a l requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these genera l rules. Studies leading to the Ph .D. degree must b e chosen so as to co ntribute to special competence and a high order of scho lar ship in a broad field of knowledge . A field of study chosen by the student ma y be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what consti-

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tutes an accep able field of study shall be that the student's workl must contribute to an organized pro gram of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the Uni versity. Students pi g to graduate should obtain cur-rent deadline ates in the office of The Graduate School. It is t e graduate student's and the department's respons bility to see that all requirements and deadlines are et (i.e., changing of IW grades, noti fying The Grad ate School of final examinations, etc.) Department r program committees may have addi tional deadline that must be met b y graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's respo sibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet th m as designated by the department or program chair. rse/Dis s ertatio n of 30 semester hours of graduate semester hours of dissertation credit the Ph.D. degree. Requirement. A minimum of 30 of courses numbered 5000 or above is degree, but the number of hours of ordinarily exceed this minimum. Doctor of Philosophy I 77 At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken a t this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficien cies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed. Dissertation Hours Requirement . To complete the requirements for the Ph.D. a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required cou11se work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student's grade-point average. Only the grades of A , B , C and IP shall be used. Course work and work on dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; how ever, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses . Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy. Quality of Work Students are expected to complete with distinction all work in the formal courses in which they enroll. A course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. Upon recommendation by the advi sory committee and the chair of the department and with the approval of the dean, a student may be required to withdraw at any time for failure to main tain satisfactory progress toward the degree. Advi s o ry Committ e e As soon as the field of specialization has been cho sen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee . The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more others to serve on the commit tee, so that the several fields related to the student's special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisor y committee (beyond guiding the student through graduat e study) is to ensure against special ization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signi fying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be simi larly reported.

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78 I The Graduate School Residence The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scho l arly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor ' s degree . Mere attendance shall not consti t ute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Col orado. As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to full-time work that does not contrib ute directly to their program t oward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one fourth time and less than t h ree-fourths time in work that does not contribute direct l y to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time empl oyment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clari fied, a decision will be made by the chair of the student' s advisory committee, the chair of the student's major department, and the dean of The Graduate School. Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master ' s degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of res idence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year , must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University. A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in anoth er graduate institution, or if field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student's program director and provided that t he student 's registration is maintained for that period away from the campus). Preliminary Examination Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) t hat students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results . The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate Schoo l office on the Application for Candi dacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted. Language Requirement Students are required to meet the following lan guage requirements . Communica t ion Requirement. All graduate stu dents for whom English is the native language are required to demonstrate at least second-year college proficiency in a foreign l anguage of their choice. This requirement may be satisfied in the following ways. 1. The student's undergraduate transcript may be presented, showing comp l etion of grade Cor better of at least 3 semester hours of a fourth-semester under graduate college course in a foreign language. The transcript must accompany the student's Application for Admission to Candidacy when it is submitted to The Graduate School. 2 . The student may take The Graduate School For eign Language Test (GSFLT) at the Testing Office before or after admission to The Graduate School. Students should check with The Graduate School for the passing score required for each language. 3. If the student wishes to demonstrate competence in a language for which the GSFLT is not available, a test designed and administered by the appropriate language department at the University of Colorado may be taken, with the passing criterion to be set comparable to the above GSFLT criterion. 4. The student may register at the University for any fourth-semester course in a foreign language and pass it with a C or be tt er. (Registration in such courses is contingent upon the language department's approval.) A student who elects 2, 3, or 4 above must complete the requirements before the Ph.D . comprehensive examination may be scheduled . Students whose native language is not English will, by passing their courses and completing their gradu ate work at the University , demonstrate sufficient abil ity in English to meet the communication requirement. Special Languages. When special languages are needed as tools to read foreign literature in a particu lar field, the individual academic departments may require further training in foreign languages for all their Ph . D . graduate students. The choice and number of languages as well as the required levels of skill and the methods of testing these skills are determined by the individua l department s. Credit by Transfer Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer t o apply toward the Doc t orate until the student has es t ablished in this Graduate School a satisfactory record in residence, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes

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applicati o n for a d mission to candidacy for the degree. Suc h tr a n sfer i U n o t reduce the minimum res i dence r e quirement a t th is U niversity, but it may red u ce the amount of wo t o b e done in formal courses. Th e m axim u a m o u n t of work that may be t rans ferred to t his nive r si t y for th e Ph.D. is 10 se m ester hours . Applicat ion or Admiss ion to Candidacy A s tudent m 1 s t m ake forma l application for admis s ion t o c a n di d cy f o r th e Ph.D. degree on forms suppli e d b y T h e G adua t e Schoo l off i ce at l east two weeks before th e com reh e n sive examination is att e m p t ed. A s tu d ent s h ll ha ve earned at l east three se m es t ers of resid e n ce, s all ha ve passed th e language req u irements, a n d sljlall h ave passed the compre h ensive examina t ion before admission to candidacy for the degree. 1 Continuous Requirements for Doctoral ca t didates Follo wi n g s u1ccessf ul compl etion of compreh ensive ex aminati o n s, tud ents must register continu ously. Students admit e d t o "candidacy for degree" will reg i s ter for a n d be c h a r ged for 10 ho ur s of credit for each full tim e t erm f doct oral work. For each term of part tim e enrollme , s tudents will be charged for 7 hours of di sserta t io n redi t , except that students not making use of cam p u s f ac iliti es may pe t ition T h e Graduat e Sch oo l f o r 3-c r dit h o u r s t a tu s. Contin uous registra tion during th aca d emic year will be required unti l compl eti o n of di ssertation defense. It is expected that th e s t udellt a nd adviser will consult each semes t e r a s t o t he nmmb e r of hours for which the s tudent will re g i s t e r , c n s i s t ent with t h e classificatio n i dentifie d ab ove . If a s tudent ho i s certified for the Ph.D . degree , or w ho h a s receiv d p ermission to take the comprehen s ive s and pass s th e m prior to meeting the l a n guage req uir em ent m 1 s t b e con t in u o u sly enrolled as stated above . This co t tinuin g registration is independent on w hether th e ca didate is in residence at the Universi t y. ( Se e a l so se t io n on Residence.) Comprehen ive Exami nation Befor e admis io n t o candidacy for the Ph .D. degree , th e student m st p ass a comprehensive examination in th e fie l d of o n centration and related fiel ds. This ex a min ati on mty b e oral, writ t e n , or both, a n d will te s t th e st uden 's m as t ery of a broad fiel d of knowl e d g e , n o t me r!y th e formal course work compl eted . Th e o r a l part i o p e n t o members of the faculty. The student m ust b reg i s t ered at the time the comprehen s i ve examination i s a ttempt ed. T h e exa mina io n s h all be cond u cted by an examin ing board app 1in t e d b y t h e c h a i r of the depa r tment Doctor of Philosophy I 79 concerned amd be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall co n s i s t of th e advisory commi t tee and members as n ecessary to a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmativ e votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failur e, the examination ma y be a tt empted once more after a period of time determin ed by th e examini n g board. D i s sertation R e q uire ments A th esis ba sed upon or iginal investigation and showing matpre scholarship and critical judgement as well as famili,arity with tools and methods of research must b e writiten upon so me subject approved by the tudent's major department. To be acceptable, this di sser t ation s hould be a wo rth while co ntribution to knowledge im the student's special field. It must be finished and s ubmitted in t ypewri tten form at least 30 days (in so me departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining co mmitt ee before th e final exa minati on may be taken. In mechanical featur es all dissertations must com ply with the specifications of The Graduate School a outlined in the Universitv of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for P/eparation of Master's The ses and Doctoral Dissertation, which may b e obtained from The Graduate School. It is th e student's responsibility to notify The Grad u a t e School of the exact title of the dissertation at leas t six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program. Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation , including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least t wo wee ks before the date on whicb the degree is to be co nferred. The abstract, not t o excee d 350 words, will be pub lished in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determinatior of what constitutes an adequa t e abstract s hall rest with the major department. All dissertations must be s igned by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly e ngaged in graduate in s truction . All approve d dissertation s are kept on file in the library . When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts and to g rant University Microfilms Internation a l the right to reproduce and sell (a) cop ie s of th e manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manusc ript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publi s h and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from n ega tiv e microform.

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80 I The Graduate School Final Examination After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related t opics will be conducted. This examina tion will be wholly or par tially oral, the oral part being open to anyone .. The examination will be conduc ted by a comnuttee appointed by the campus graduate dean, which will consist of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination. Arrangements for the final examination must made in the dean's office at least two weeks m advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be regis tered at the time of the final examination. Time Limit If a student fails to com plete all requirements for the degree within six years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second exam ination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. If the com prehensive examination is failed, may be attemp ted once more after not fewer than etght months of fur ther work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this six-year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual state.ment the program direc t or believes th e student 1s quate progress and should be allowed. to contmue m the program. This reques t must be stgned by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student's thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the pro gram.

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" Our approach to planning and design encomp asses a broad arra y of educational approaches and profe ss ion a l per spectives . We seek not only to provide s tudent s with the skills which are essential for professional pra c tice , bu t a l so to engender an appreciation of histori cal ant ece d ents , modes of inquiry, and paradigms which inform the field s o f architecture , urban and regional plannin g , l andscape archi tecture , and IJiban and interior design. " -Dean Hamid Shir vani School of Archite c hrre and Plannin g

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Dean: Hamid lhrrvani Ass o ciate Dean : Yuk Lee Assistants to the Dean: Denise Hall , Donna Lee School Office 1 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 55p-2755 Sch o ol Advisclry C o uncil: Chairman : Je me Seracu se, FAIA, Principal, Seracuse, Lawle & Partners , Denver Members: John FAIA , Anderson Mason Dale , Denver John W . Bright, FASL A, National Park Service , Denver John C. Brokaf, AlA, NBBB Associates, Boulder Rodne y Davi , FAIA , Partner, Davis Partnership , Denver Stewart 0. Darson, FASLA, Principal, Sasaki Associ ates, MA Virginia Dubrucq , AlA, Interior Design , Denver Thomas J. FAIA, General Partner, Skid more, owh,.gs and Merrill, Chicago Larry Gibson, I Director of Urban Design , CRSS Inc. , Denver Lynne Hada, ASID, CKD, NHFL, Linteriors, Den ver Mimi L. Hillen, ASID, Principal, Hillen Design Asso ciates, Golden Jack Leaman, FASLA, AICP , Director of Planning , City of Colo ado Springs John Madden President , John Madden Company, Denver Jennifer Moulton, AlA , Principal, Anthony Pellecchia Architects, IDenver Clifford S. Na!kata , AlA, Clifford S. Nakata Associates, Springs Maxwell L. AlA , FCSI, DMJM, CCS, Denver Herb Schaal , SLA, EDAW, Inc ., Ft. Collins, CO Jane Silverste Reis , FASLA, Landscape Architect , Denver Charles Sink, :fAIA, Sink Combs Dethlefs, Denver Diane M. Smutny, President , Colorado Chapter of the American Pl b nning Association Eugene Sternb , brg, AlA, Architect, Evergreen, CO Harry Teague, AlA, Architect, Aspen, CO William Turnbull, FAIA, Principal, William Turnbull and Associates, San Francisco Joseph Wells, AICP, Principal , Doremus and Wells, Aspen, CO INFORMATION ABOUT TH E SCHOOL The School of Architecture and Planning is nation ally unique because of its students and alumni , its faculty and staff, its missions, and its location. The School has been able to attract high quality students with a strong professional career orientation. Through their achievements, the alumni of our School are major contributors to its image. The School of Archi tecture and Planning is committed to offer profes sional and specialized degree programs through rigorous instruction and research programs in the fields of architecture, interior design, landscape archi tecture , urban design , and urban and regional plan ning. The School is committed to excellence in instruction and research while providing a balance of design skills and intellectual inquiry. As a graduate school with five degree offerings, and a part of a university with a mandate for excellence and national and international recognition, we are evolving as the intellectual design forum in the Western region. The School of Architecture and Planning is devoted to " design" as its central intellectual concern. The term design is used here in its broadest sense to include full range of philosophies , ideologies, theo ries , and methods. Students are introduced to funda mentals of design analysis and synthesis based on humanistic ideals as the means of meeting their per sonal aspirations. They learn how to think, analyze, synthesize, and be creative, and develop an intellec tual framework in regard to design and planning . Our interest is to educate designer s who are able to deal with a variety of issues, programs , and problems within their particular context and time frame . In other words, we are interested in educating designers with the capacity to think innovatively and to chal lenge each situation on its own merit. The School of Architecture and Planning is dedicated to excellence in design education. Mission and Organization The School is composed of five graduate degree programs in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design , and urban and regional planning and a research and service division , the Cen ter for Built Environment Studies. As a unit of gradu ate professional education with five professional degree programs and a mandate for national excel lence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training studies in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School's overall mission is to develop

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84 I School of Architecture and Planning the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design . Considering this mission, t he School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first profes sional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed t oward pro fessionals at various career s t ages and focuses on research and specialization. The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research concerning t he planning and design of the built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach , it recognizes the professional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as business, engineering, and public affairs. In the programs, various design and planning ide ologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting and this examination is combined with critical reviews of design work, dialogues , and methods to form the essential ingredient of design education . Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing, s tudents gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the design and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing persona l aspirations. The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern and is evolving as a design center for the western region. Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies, ideolo gies , theorie s, and methods. The School's ultimate mission is to play a leading role in design education and research . Academic P r ograms The School of Architecture and Planning offers aca demic programs leading to mas t er's degrees in archi tecture , inter ior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The pro grams are interdisciplinary and, in the design fields, both first and post-professional degrees are offered . In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two degrees , M.Arch. and M.U.R.P. for example , and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs. The first professional degree programs are struc tured for full time graduate study. For student s with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part time. Within any of the programs , the School or Architec ture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in archi t ecture , l andscape architecture , urban design, interior design, and urban and regional planning . Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from an other school in the University with the approval of the student's advisor. The School maintains membership in: Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Architectural Research Cen t ers Consortium Society of Architectural Historians Association of Collegiate Schools of P l anning Council of Landscape Architecture Educators Academic Environment and Student Body In addition to its regular curricular programs, the School supports or spo nsors a variety of events and activities that enlarge and broaden the learning envi ronment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year . Field trips in connection with courses are routinely organized and a summer foreign study program is available . On Friday afternoons the School sponsors its beer and hot dog reviews and the student organizations run a brown bag seminar series in connection with the local profes sionals . Finally, the School sponsors three receptions , at the beginning of the academic y ear, before Christ mas, and at the end of the academic year along with two parties, in the fall and the spring, for students and the local professional community. There are about 350 fullt ime students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many aca demic disciplines and nearl y 100 previous academic institutions. Lecture Series Guest critics are periodically brough t to the School and two lecture series are held. One is for the School's faculty, the other invites distinguished practitioners , critics, and scholars to the School. Recent speakers in the lecture se ries include: 1987-88 John R. Stilgoe Professor, Harvard University Anne Vernez-Moudon Professor, University of Washington William Turnbull Principal, William Turnbull Associ ates, Architects, San Francisco George Hoover Principal, Hoover Berg Desmond, Archit ec t s, Denver Nader ArdaJan Principal, Jung!Brannen, Architects, Boston Frank E. Sanchis Vice President National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D .C. Hamid Shirvani Prof esso r and Dean, School or Archi tecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver Peter Eisenman Principal, Eise nman, Robert s on, Architects, New York 198 6 -87 Orlando Diaz-Azcu y Principal , Gensler and Associ ates Architects Daniel Urban Kile y Landscape Architect

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Mark Mack Mark Mack, Architects, San Francisco Pro fessor, Uni frsity of California at Berkeley T horn Mayne artner, Morphosis, Santa Monica Pro fessor , Sout ern California Institute of Architecture ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The acade c policies and procedures of the School of and Planning supplement those of the Uruverstty. THe Academic Affairs Committee of the Schoo l deternunes academic police s, procedures , and gui delin es. D d tails are available in the Office of the Dean. Academic tanding . The School requires a minimum overall Q;PA of 3.0 to remain in good standing and for grad u A tion. If a student's GPA for a semester is below 3.0, t e student will be placed on probation beginning the following semester . If the student's overall GPA i below 3.0 following the probationary semes t er, the student may be dismissed from the School. A stu ent who has two consecutive terms wi th a GPA qe low 3.0 may be dismissed from the Sch o?l. Each 9 f the School's programs may designate cer tam ke y coqrs es to require minimum academic per formance levels of B-. Students who receive less than a B-in any of courses will be required to retake the course to their program . Students may re t ake a c?ursJ at any time . The grade for the retaken course will rep lace the earlier grade in determining eligibility to p ogr ess in a program . Time Limit. here is a limit of seven years from the time a a master's degree program for comp l e ting all the requirements for the degree . A d vanced tanding . Applicants may be granted advanced stan ng on admission to a program only on the basis 4 f professional experi ence, or b y ex!ammatwn. Requrrements for granting tr ansfer credit k re : I 1. The cour e(s) must be at the graduate l evel or upper division undergraduate level. 2. The cour e(s) must have been taken within the pas t seven ye s. 3. The grade for the course(s) must be at least a B or equivalent. . 4. The cour e must have equivalent content. Stu dents ma y be required to provide a course syllabus and sample o work to demonstrate equivalent con tent. In addition, programs may offer examinations in particular cour . es which students must pass to receive advanced stanfung. Such examinations are ordinarily conduc ted prihr to the beginning of classes. If an applicant is t 1 be granted advanced standing in a program, the c urses that the applicant will be exempt from taking be listed in the student's advising shee t or progra m of study. R egardless the level of advanced standing grant ed, s tudent s are required to take a minimum of 24 se me s ter hour in their program to receive a master's de gree. Support Facilities I 85 Course raivers. Once enrolled in one of the School ' s programs, a student may, by request, waive a req_uired coUrse and substitute another. Granting a watver does not reduce the student's credit hour requirements or give advanced standing. Advising. I An advisor is responsible with the stu ?ent a academic program of study mcludmg course wruvers and electives and is the stu dent's primary resource for all academic matters including grievances . Advisors need to ensure that their advisees make appropriate academic progress and that their files and paperwork are complete . Thesis. It is the intent of each academic progra m to support thesis work which demonstrates 1) an under standing of both the particular problem under inves tigation and the means of inquiry in relation to it as well as 2) an ability to design and document a creative and relevant response. In short, students in thesis are expected to demonstrate an ability to articulate and integrate research and/or design in the specific area they choose to investigate . A thesis should make a contribution either by advancing or clarifying the state of the art in the proposed subject area . ?'aY. thesis work in any area of thetr dtsctplme m which they have interest, compe tence, and support from faculty to undertake the inves t igation. Competence will be demonstrated through a thesis proposal which will be evaluated for approval or disapproval by a committee of the faculty . Each thesis proposal must identify the student's three person thesis committee . Theses submitted must be in an approved format and meet an approved schedule for review. The School ' s thesis guidelines must be followed. To receive credit for a thesis accepted by the School , the student must place on file in the School librar y two copies of the thesis text and non-text materials . Non textual mate r ials;.models must be recorded in the form of 35mm shdes -at least 5 separate views on per model. Selected drawings are to reproduces 3-1/2 x 11 !
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86 I Schoo l of A rchit ecture and Planning The library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as interlibrary loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library. CENTER FOR BUILT ENVIRONMENT STUDIES Acting Director: Phillip B. Gallegos Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Second Floor Telephone: 556-2817 Staff : Associate Director for Research: Frederick R. Steiner Acting Associate Director for Ser vice: Robert D . Horn Community Service Specialist: Jon Schier Secretary: Annette Korslund Associate Research Faculty: M. Gordon Brown , Thomas A . Clark, Frances Downing, Paul J. Foster, Harry L. Garnham, Mark Gelernter , David R. Hill , Lauri Macmillan Johnson , Bernie Jones, Gail Whit ney Karn, Yuk Lee, Bennett R. Neiman, John Pros ser, Peter V. Schaeffer, Hamid Shirvani , Diane Wilk Shirvani The Center for Built Environment Studies (CBES) is the research and service arm of the School of Architec ture and Planning. The Center has been established in 1987 as a replacement for the Center for Community Development and Design and builds upon a decade of community service and outreach programs. The new Center is committed to serving Denver and Colorado and providing a significant educational opportunity for students and faculty. The Center provides an interdisciplinary research and assistance team capable of addressing a variety of built environment issues. The specific focus areas of research and service are: Architecture and Building Science, Economic Development , Natural Resource Planning, Space and Facility Design , and Urban Design. Faculty and students from various program s in the School parti cipate in research projects along with the regular CBES research and service staff. This association provides a broad-based competence which reaches into the studios and lecture halls as well as communities, professions, and user groups. The Mission As the research and service unit of the School of Architecture and Planning, the Center for Built Envi ronment Studies is committed to making significant contributions to the fields of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The mission of the Cen ter is to be a leader in built environment research and service in Colorado and in the nation. The Center plays a significant role in th e educa.tional mission of the School of Architecture and Planrung to achieve a balance of design and intellectual inquiry. In this regard, the Center's resources and expertise include researchers, community service specialists, a majority of the School's faculty and many students. This integration of research and service into profes sional graduate education makes the Center unique. The Center comprises an interdisciplinary team of educators, designers, and planners working in a col laborative manner to serve the professions and the community. Statement of Purpose " Democracy depends on people being well informed," observed Denver council member Bill Roberts when describing the mission of the Center for Built Environment Studies. Originally established as the Bureau of Community Services in 1966, the Center has two decades of experience in providing informa tion through design and planning research and ser vice to the citizens of Colorado. The Center provides multidisciplinary research and assistance teams capable of addressing a variety of built environment issues. Faculty and students from architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and planning participate in research projects, along with Center research and service s taff. When needed, consultants from other academic disci plines and the private sector complete our problem solving teams. This association provides a broad-based design and planning competence which reaches from the studios and classrooms of the School of Architecture and Planning into communities throughout Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region. Currently, the Center is involved in a broad range of built environment research and service project in housing, rural and small town design and planning, economic deve lopm ent, minority business develop-Architecture and plamting faculty , professionals , and students critique student projects requested by Colorado towns through the Center for Built Environment Studies . A stu dent explains a drawing of Tell. uride she developed to pro vide the town with a cohesiVe and appropnate v1sual identity and gateway .

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ment, architetal education, Native American land planning , mi ation, landscape planning, residential foreclosures metropolitan Denver, civic architec ture , homeles ness, urban design, community artists programs , sp ial planning, transportation planning, the design of ublic places, and national urban policy. COMPUTER LABORATORY The Computer Laboratory of the School of Architec ture and Piarukng, located adjacent to the library, is equipped for upscaled comput er-aided design and drafting with a micro-computer based networking system which is bein g modified and expanded. Six Zenith 2200 P fATs in addition to four IBM PC/XTs with high res lution monitors and digitizing tabl ets are now Iinke with a Novell central file server and 120 megab yte ard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstatio n s are linked throug the addition of AutoCAD compatible software that xtends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD a d AE/CADD . Additional apa bilitie s are offered through Auto Word, an int ractive word processing package for editing and displaying text of drawings, Auto CoGO , a coordinate g ometry program that allows entry of survey and data for site planning and engineering , L dSoft , a system for introducing land scape architec ual symbols and drafting extension into the Aut CAD and AE/CADD utilities, and Generic Tempi te, a means of customizing or creating unique designind drafting templates. Also availa e are the ComputerVision system which include the Personal Architect and Personal Designer Gould Colorwriter 6320 and Hewlett/Packard pi tters, (Large x 36" ] ting must be done at the Uruvers1ty Computmg Center on a C camp Plotter.) Additional computing facilities "'e ai T avaHable at CUDenve<. PHOTO LABORATORY The School R aintains a darkroom for student use as well as a varie of camera and audiovisual equipment for preparing class presentations, design projects , portfolios , and n learning multi-media techniques for presentations. General Reql.irements Each applicaljlt for admission into any of the pro grams of the School of Architecture and Planning must submit: 1. The Unive sity of Colorado Application for Grad uate Admissio forms. Admissions I 87 2. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. 3. Three letters of recommendation. 4. A stater,ent of purpose. 5. A portfolio of academic, creative, and/or profes sional work excep t for Urban and Regional Planning. 6 . The applica tion fee. Special requirements for international applicants are described in a following section . All portfolio materials must be in 8-1/2 x 11 (or equivalent A-4) format. If slides are included , they must be in a loose -leaf slide holder and annotated. The School of Architecture and Planning will return portfolios if supplied with appropriate postage-paid , preaddressed mailing materials. Portfolios may be picked up in person from the offices. In general, a 3.00 grade-point average(GPA) on a 4.00 scale (or equivalent) in the prior undergraduate or graduate degree is require d for admission. Appli cants with a GPA under 3.00 may be reviewed for admission; in such cases, submission of strong supporting materials is advise d . For applican t s with a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are required for the Urban and Regional Planning Program and strongly recommended for applicants to the other programs. The admissions decision is made weighing a variety of factors including academic preparation, quality of work experience and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant's purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as non degre e students or with special conditions. Because of space limitations, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for each program are listed below. ARCHITECTURE Master of Architecture (first professional degree ; three and one-half year program) The three and one-half yea r (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bache lor's degree and no prior trainin g or background in architecture or related field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calculus. For those without these prerequisites , courses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester. No other specific preparation is required, although applicants should be able to demonstrate an aptitude for the study of archi tecture. Master of Architecture (first professional degree : three and one-half year program with advanced standing) Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a non-professional bachelor's degree in architec ture or a bachelor's degree in a related field (engineer ing, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate

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88 I School of Architecture and Planning record, qualified applican t s with a non-professional archi t ectural degree (the first part of a 4 + 2 program) would ordinarily be admitted to the final two years of the first professional degree program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence . Master of Architecture (post-professional degree : one year program) The one-year (36 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first profes sional degree or diploma in architecture. INTERIOR DESIGN Master of Interior Design (first profess ional degree) The three-year (96 semester hours) first profes sio nal degree program is appropria t e for those with a bache lor's degree and no prior training or background in interior design or a related design field. Applicants wi t h b ackground and training in interior design or a related field may be considered for admission with advanced standing. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to t ake all the courses in the interior design sequence. Master of Interior Design (post-professional degree) The two-year (60 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for those with a Bach elor of I nterior Design , an equivalent of the first pro fessional degree or diploma in interior design, or B . !. D., B.F.A., B . S . L.A., B .S. in Design , B .S. in Archi tecture . LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Master of Landscape Architecture (first profess i onal degree) T h e t hree-year (96 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bache lor's degree and no training or background in land scape architecture or a related design field. Master of Landscape Architecture (post-professional degree) The two-year (60 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., B.L.A., B.Arch., for example. Applicants with the B.L.A. and work experience by receive advanced standing. Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Landscape Architecture History and Plant Materials. URBAN DESIGN Master of Architecture in Urban Design (two-year degree) The two-year (48 semester hours) urban design pro gram is appropriate for applicants with a non-profes sional bachelor's degree in architecture, environ mental design, landscape architecture, or planning. Master of Architecture in Urban Design (one-year post-professional degree) The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appro priate for applicants with a first professional design degree (e.g. B .Arch., M.Arch, B.L.A., M . L.A.) . URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING Master of Urban and Regional Planning The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appro priate for applicants with bachelor's degrees in either design, humanities, social, or physical sciences. International Applicants Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. Students without sufficient competence in English in an academic conte xt may be required to enroll in English language courses before proceeding with their program. In addition, The University of Colorado a t Denver, Office of Admissions, requires that all applicants to CU-Denver meet certain qualifications . Qualifications are determined b y records and credentials that each applicant is required to provide. It is important that all documents are received by the School of Architecture and Planning before the deadline date of the semester or term the applicant plans to attend. If application documents are received later than the published dead line, the applicant will be considered for the next avail able term. Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit: 1. An International Student application and Gradu ate Admission forms . 2. Two official transcrip t s from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended. 3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applican t has attended outside the United States . A certified literal English translation must accompany documents that are not in English. 4. Four letters of recommendation. 5. A statement of purpose.

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6. A portfo o of academic, creative, and profes sional work f r application to the Architecture, Inte rior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Design prografs. 7 . A $50 application fee. 8. A curren CU-Denver Financial Resources State ment. used for other institutions will not be accepted . documents are not accept able unless by the originator; signatures must not be photoc pies. 9. Offi cial T EFL Score Report to establish English language profibency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable TOEFL score must be 500 or higher to be considered or admission by the University. Additional supporting documents may subse quently be re uired b y the office of Admissions. All international a plicants who are admitted to CU-Den ver must have a valid visa and mus t enroll for and maintain a f course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a masters degree. Financial R quirements . International applicants must provide vidence that the y have sufficient funds available to att nd the University of Colorado at Den ver . To pro vi d this evidence each international appli cant s houl d follow these instructions: 1. the Financial Resources Statement. Applicants must prove that they have sufficient money to pay expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Stat ment as a part of the application. a. If applic ts are using their own money, their bank must that they have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs . In Par 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement , t e bank must certify that the money the applicant ne ds is on deposit in the applicant's account. b. If the ap licant is being sponsored b y a family member , or a friend , the sponsor must agree to provide the ] oney and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2 . The sponsor;s bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of ney the applicant will need. c. If the apphcan t has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Sectiln 3 of the Financial Resources State ment must b completed. 2. An incom lete statement of finan cial resources or to prove J the of the money will del ay or cause the derual of the applicant's admis sion to the Be sure the Financial Resource s Statement is ad:urate and complete. International Applicants I 89 Dates and Deadlines The programs in architecture, interior design, land scape archi tecture and urban design admit for the Fall and Spring Semesters normally . The program in urban and regional planning admits normally for the Fall Semester, but will admi t on a space-available basis for both the Fall and Spring Seme s ters and the Sum mer Term. See the Calendar in thi s catalog for specific dates . To be considered for Fall Semester admission, all application materials must be recei ved by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be considered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials must be received b y the previous November 1. Appli cations received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status only. Deadline s for submission of application materials: March 15 for Fall Semes ter regular admission April15-for Summer Term space-available admission to urban and regional planning Jul y 10 for Fall Semester space-available admis sion to urban and regional planning November 1 for Spring Semester regular admis sion December 1 for Spring Semester space-available admission to urban and reg ional planning Person s interested in any of the programs or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture Program at (303) 556-2877, Interior Design Program at (303) 556-2294, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-3475, and Urban and Regional Planning Program at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an appointment. For application forms or additional information, please write to : Office of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University b f Colorado at Denver 1200 Larimer Street Campus Box 126 Den ver, Colorado 80204 (303) 556-2755

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90 I School of Architecture and Planning Programs of Study ARCHITECTURE Program Director: Robert W . Kindig Secretary: Rose Hill Department Office: 1250 14th St. , Second Floor Telephone: 556-2877 Faculty: Professors: Robert W. Kindig , Dwa y ne C. Nuzum, John M. Prosser, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: M. Gordon Brown , Frances Downing, Mark Gelemter Assistant Professors: Gary Crowell , Bennett Neiman , Diane Wilk Shirvani Adjunct: Cahell Childress , Phillip Gallegos, Theodor Grossman , Marvin Hatami, William C. Muchow, Anthony Pellecchia Emeritus: G .K. Vetter Visiting Faculty: M . H. Huwaldt , K.E . A . V rage l The Architecture Program offers curricula leading to the Master of Architecture as part of a National Archi tecture Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited firs t pro fessional degree program and as a postprofe ssio nal degree program . The curricula are based on a core of five component areas : Architectural Design ; Histor y and Theory; Environmental Conte x t ; Science and Technology; Professional Practice. The program has four primary objectives : preparing architecture students for professional careers; e x tend ing the kno w ledge base of architecture ; enhancing the capabilities of practicing professionals ; increasing the general public's awareness of architecture . The pro gram prepares students to enter the professional prac tice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods of plan ning and design in architecture . More specifically , the objectives of the program are t o develop: an aware nes s of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; environmental context and interrela tionships between human beha vior and the physical environment ; understanding of the histor y, theor y, and criticism of architecture; professional competence in architectural technology ; analytic problem-solving competence of synthesis and communication of the above knowledge into physical form; understanding of the institutional framework within which ar chitec ture take s place; skills and understanding of profes sional practice including management and prof ess ional conduct. The ultimate goals of the program are to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of phys ical and environmen tal quality, while acquiring critical capacity , through comprehension of all facets of archi tecture . The above objectives are achieved in five groups of courses , organized in sequences within five coordi nated modules. Three areas of concentration are offered: Built Envi ronment Studies; Computer Aided Design; His tory , Theor y and Critic ism; Urban Design. There are not set requirements in each of the above areas . Students are required to develop a plan of study with their advisor at the beginning of the course of study. Master of Architecture (First professional degree) Three and one h alf y ear program. The first profes sional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring th ree and one-half years (six semesters and a summer t erm) of full-time study. The curriculum con sists of a core of five rela ted course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a con centra t ion. The program i s t aught at three l eve l s each wi th a them e . The first l evel involve s the th e me princip l es, definit ions, and communication -and takes the first two semesters. The next l evel takes thr ee semes ter s and invo l v es a dual theme architecture in con te x t and applications of me thod ologies. The theme of the final l eve l in the third year is synthesis and profes sional compe ten cy. THE CURRICULUM -THREE AND ONE-HALF YEAR PROGRAM D ES IGN: 48 semester hours ARCH . 5500 (6) ARCH . 5501 (6) ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH . 6600 (6) ARCH . 6601 (6) ARCH. 6700 (6) ARCH . 670 1 (6) ARCH . 5510 (3) ARCH . 5511 (3) Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I Intro duct ion to Architectural Design Studio II Architectural Design Studio ill Arc hitect ural Design Studio IV Archi t ectural Design Studio V Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI Adva nced Architectural De s i gn Studio VII Element s of De sign Expression and Presenta t ion I Elements of Design Expression and Presen tat ion II

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1\rcJUtecture I 91 HISTORY AND 'HEORY: 15 semest er hours UD. 6610 (3) Urban Design Theory and Methods ARCH . 5520 (3) Int roduction to Design Theor y and SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 18 semes t er h ours Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of ArchitectUial Histor y ARCH. 5530 (3) StructUies I ARC H . 6620 (3) Architecture i n t he 15th through 18th ARCH. 5531 Structures II C entUiies ARCH. 5532 (3) Building Technology ARCH. 6621 (3) Architecture in t he 19th and 20th CenARCH. 5533 (3) Environme n tal Contro l Sys t ems I t uries ARCH. 6630 (3) Structures III ARCH. 6660 (3) Human and Social Dimension of ARCH. 6631 (3) Environmen t al Control Systems IT Design PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE : 6 semester hours ENVI RONMEM :AL CONTEXT: 6 semester hour s ARCH. 6750 (3) Professiona l P ractice I LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning ARCH . 6751 (3) Professional Practice II ELECTIVES: 21 semester hours COU RSE SEOl ENCE : FIRST PROFESSIO N AL DEGREE E V IRON PROFESCOURSE HISTORY / ME TAL SCIE CE& SIONAL CREDIT SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY CONTEX T TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE ELECT IVES HRS . F4 ARCH.5500 ( 6) ARCH . 5520 (3) ARCH . 5530 (3) 15 ARCH . 5510 (3) YEAR I ARCH . 5501 (6) ARCH. 5521 (3) ARCH . 553 1 (3) 15 ARCH . 5511 (3) ARCH . 550 2 (6) ARCH . 553 g (3) 1 2 ARCH . 5533 (3) F 4 ARCH . 6600 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) LA. 5530 (3) ARCH . 6630 (3) 1 8 YEAR II ARCH . 6660 (3) ARCH . 6601 (6) ARCH . 6621 (3) UD . 6610 (3) ARCH . 663 1 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18 YEAR III ARCH . 6700 (6) SPRII ARCH . 6701 ( 6) 48 1 5 Master of A!rch1tecture (First profeslsional degree) Advanced nding in the three and one-half year program. Ea s tudent admitted with advanced standing in th. above curriculum follows a cour se of study based l:m credentials evaluated during the admissions pr cess. STudents who have completed an archi t ectural bfch e l or' s degree in a 4 + 2 program woul d ordinarfy enter in the second level of the three and one-half curricul u m. Students who have degrees in fields may be exempt form certain required The exact point of entry is deter mined by a creden t ials evaluation. Master of J chitecture degree) T h e post-professiona l degree program is a 36 semes ter hour program r equiring one year of full-time or two years of partt ime study. The program offers design or thests options as a part of the core require ments. This rogram is open onl y to applicants already holdin a first professional degree (B. Arch. or M.Arch.) . 6 ARCH . 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 18 ARCH . 675 1 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 1 8 18 6 21 114 The Core Curnculum. Th e c o re curnculu m cons1 st of five groups: Design or Thesis , 12 credi t h o u rs; T he ory, 6; Environmen t al C o nte x t 6, to talin g 24 cre dit hours . The core curriculum is an a b so l u t e require ments, regardless of any individual's education al background. The thesis op ti o n is availa bl e only b y petition to and approval by th e Program D irector and upon his/her approval. The core curricu lum consists o f t he following: DESIGN or THESIS: 12 s emester hours ARCH . 6700 (6) ARCH . 6701 (6) ARCH. 6950 (6) A RCH . 6951 (6) Advanced ArchitectUial Design Studio VI Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII Thesis Research and Programming Architecture Thes is THEORY: 6 se mester hours ARCH. 6622 (B) ARCH. 6623 (B) Theory a n d Analysis of Architecture Modem Arc h itectUie ENVIRONMB,NT AL CONTEXT : 6 semes t er ho u rs UD. 6601 (3) The Archi t ectUie of the City UD. 6610 (3) Urban Design Theory and Methods E LECT IVES: 12 se mester hours

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92 I School of Architecture and Planning COURSE SEQUENCE: POST-PROFESSIONAL DEGREE COURSE HISTORY/ ENVIRONMEN-CREDIT SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY TAL CONTEXT ELECTIVES HRS. FALL ARCH. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6622 ( 3 ) UD. 6601 (3) ELECTIVES ( 3 ) 18 YEAR I SPRING ARCH. 6701 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6623 (3) UD. 6610 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 1 8 12 6 ARCHITECTURE ELECTTVES: ARCH. 6622 (3) Theory and Analysis of Architecture ARCH . 6623 (3) Modem Architecture ARCH . 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer Graphics ARCH . 6641 (3) Computer Applications in Architecture ARCH. 6661 (3) Design Methods ARCH. 6683 (3) Teaching Methods in Architecture ARCH. 6686 (3) Special Topics in Architecture ARCH. 6740 (3) Computer Aided Design ARCH. 6930 (3) Architecture Intern ship ARCH. 6931 (3) Architecture Internship ARCH . 6900 (3) Independent Study COURSES ARCH. 5050-3 (formerly ARCH. 440). Applied Mathema tics/Designers I. This class is designed for the student with little or no college mathematics experience. It begins with ari thmetic skills and shortcuts, continues through college level algebra, and ends with trigonometry. This class is part of the required mathematics for students of architecture . ARCH. 5051-3 (formerly ARCH. 441). Applied Mathema tics/Designers II. A continuation of ARCH. 5050, this class begins with analytical geometry and continues through dif ferential and integral calculus. The course completes the mathematics requirement for students of architecture and is open to those w ho have credit for or feel competent in ARCH. 505 0 . ARCH. 5052-3 (formerly ARCH. 442). Environmental Sci ence for Designers. This course is designed to meet the requirements for entrance into the graduate program in architecture . The basic principles of physics will be covered in a practical way . The course includes the mechanics of bodies at rest, dynamics , electricity, heat, light, and sound. ARCH. 550Q-6 (formerly ARCH. 500). Introduction to Archi tectural Design Studio I. The introductory design studio focuses on basic architectural design. Students are intro duced to architectural analysis, design criticism, and signif icance of the elements of architecture. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process . ARCH. 5501-6 (formerly ARCH. 501). Introduction to Archi tectural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and environmental context. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to problem solving involving socio-cultural, environmental and pragmatic concerns , while simultaneously dealing with development of theory and intellectual inquiry. ARCH. 5502-6 (formerly ARCH. 502). Architectural Design Studio Ill. The firs t intermediate studio seque nce focuses on development of basic skills in formal composition , program organization, and building construction . The emphasis is placed on development of a building as a material construct , the investigation of the building fabric and the relationships between space, form, and technique . The studio covers pro gramming, design process, budgeting , working drawings, and construction. 6 12 36 ARCH. 5510-3 (formerly ARCH. 510). Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers freehand drawings of various subjects from still-life compositions to buildings and settings in downto w n D enver. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in t erms of light , shade, and s hadow. Basic principles dealing with orthographic projection , perspecti ve, and isometric projec tion are examined. Techniques for representing human fig ures, trees , shrubs, and other elements of the landscape are studied . ARCH. 5511-3 (formerly ARCH. 511). Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course emphasize s mechanical drawing means of de sign articulation . Student s are introduced to wide ranges of techniques, methods , and means and in the design fields, as well as the selection of drawing instruments and surface , typography, and organi zation of graphic material to achieve the most effective pre sentation. The subject s covered are : principles of graphic communication ; lett ering and orthographic projection ; a x o nometric , oblique, and perspecti ve projection; three-dimen sional forms employing light , shade, and shadow ; gradation/ v alue distinction in flat and curved surface s, and graphic reproduction. ARCH. 5512-3. Drawing and Color. This course focuses on architectural rendering methods and t echniques through exploration and use o f color media and th eory , with an emphasis on both the process and product of architectural presentation . The course format will combine demonstra tion , slide lectures, class critiques, desk crits, and studio . ARCH. 552Q-3 (formerly ARCH. 520). Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism. This course examines the evo lution of ideals and principles in modem architecture , design , landscape , and urbani sm an d traces the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writing. The course pro vides an overview of the literature in design theories and explores the relationship between design and the writings that include its interpreta tion and producti on.

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ARCH. 5 30 ) . S tructures I . The ntTnrlnn*: the analysis and design of structural ele on fundamental principles of sta tics and Areas covered are: equilibrium; movenrf•e -r nrce members; properties of structural u"'u'.u,t''"' wood and steel; stressstrain relation into the design and analysis of struc of wood and steel in tension, shear, ARCH. 531) . S tru ctures II. The course is a of Structures I, focusing on study of stress , ,,.,,.,,..." ' "T''"n of structures, and general principles involved in the of wood, steel, and concrete members . Problems of building elements subjected to direct stress , and combined stress , deflection, methods of tion , and details of connections are explored. ARCH. 5532 3 ttn1rm,•rlv ARCH. 532) . Building Technology . in building construction and between architectural concepts construction techniques case study presentations, and exercises. techniques such as prepara and specifications are covered. rmerly ARCH. 533). Envir o n mental Con course focuses on study of environmenin buildings, including the thermal climate as a major determinant of use in buildings, strategies for ..,..., • ......, 1.n" as complete environmental control sys tems, means of environmental controls, heating , ventilation, air-c nditioning , plumbing, electrical, and com munication syst ms, water supply , and sanitation systems . ARCH. 5540 -3. Architecture Photog r aphy. This course offers basics of hotography and introduces architectural photography. Class will be a combination of lecture/demon stration and stu ent assignments followed b y evaluation . Architecture I 93 ARCH. 5541-3 . Modelmaking . This course is intended for those engaging in studies of architecture and related fields. It will present the scale model as a tool in accomplishment, an instrument of demonstration, and a vehicle for promo tion in the relevan t stages from concept to marketing. ARCH. 6600-6 (formerly ARCH. 600) . A r chitectu r a l Desi gn IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on exploration of architecture in the urban context and exami nation of topological form and cultural cons t ructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city . Emphasis is placed on methodological study of si t e, program, and elements of architecture which are used to facility work. ARCH. 6601 6 (former ly ARCH. 601). A r chitectura l Desi gn Studio V. The fina l intermediate studio sequence focuses on examination of impacts of large-scale urban projects that include commercial, office, and residential uses in an exist ing urban fabric. Issues such as topology, character, and monumentality are considered in relation to the design of buildings of civic significance . Emphasis is placed on rela tionship of t h e ro l e of the building to the morphology of the city and the building's expressio n in architectural form. ARCH. 6620-3 (formerly ARCH. 620). Archi t ectur e in the 15th through 18th Centuries. The third course in the his tory/theory sequence covers architecture and urbanism from the early 15th to the early 18th centuries . Late Gothic archi tecture and the Italian Renaissance, as well as the impact of the Renaissance and subsequent development of Baroque Architecture in Europe and the Colonies, are covered . Emphasis is p l aced on major archi t ects and significant build ings and the changing concepts of urban space. The socio political context, role of patrons, and architectural theory and practice are examined . ARCH. 6621-3 (forme r ly ARCH. 621) . Architecture in t he 19th a n d 20th Centuries. The last course in the history / th eory sequence focuses on the breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and the coming of classical and romantic histori cism in architecture and the birth of modem architecture. The impact of t echnology, industrialization, and social changes on architecture and urbanism, changing attitudes toward the treatment of architectural space and the forma t io n of new cri t ical concep t s, and the emergency of Art Nouveau and the roots of the "Modern Movement" in archi tecture are examined . ARCH. 6622-3 (forme r ly ARCH. 622). T heory and A nal ysis of Architecture . T his course focuses on examination of the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of se l ected writings and the evolution of ideas and design principles in architecture, landscape architecture , and urbanism . It exp l ores the pedagogic relationship between design and the cultural roots tha t influence its interpretation and production. ARCH. 6623-3 (former ly ARCH. 623) . Modern Archi t e ctur e . This course focuses on the origin and evolution of modem architectural theory through an examination of selected the oretical and critical precedents in architecture from the end of the 17th cemt ury to present. Emphasis is placed on the matic studies from fundamental roots of Modem Architec ture and Bauhaus School, to Art Nouveau and post World War II in Europe and the United States . ARCH. 6624 3 . The Built Envir onment in O th e r C ultures I. This course intends to broaden the students ' perspective by asking them to examine design within another culture . Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a state ment of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be u n dertaken, and the nature of the report produced .

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94 I School of Architecture a n d Planning ARCH. 6625 6 . T he Buil t Environment in Other Cultures II. Students will travel to their respec t ive cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help stude nts consider their own design and plan ning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective . ARCH. 6626-3 . American Architecture. This course focuses on study of the history of American architecture from the preColumbian settlements to work by rary architects . It examines t h e social and philosophical forces which interacted with the creation of architectural forms , as well as the formal and constructional problems which the builders and architects addressed . ARCH. 6630 3 ( forme r ly ARCH. 630). Structures Ill. This course examines theoretical and conceptual bases for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of indeterminat: st:uc tures. Course topics include continuity, movement distnbu tion , reinforced concrete elements, precast and prestressed elements, walls , columns, footings, earthquake loads on buildings, and detailing of structural systems . ARCH. 66 3 13 ( formerly ARCH. 631) . Environmental Con tro l Systems II. The course focuses on lighting and acoustics. illumination quantity and quality, day-lighting and electric lighting, lighting design, and applications are covered. The behavior and effect of daylight are studied through the con struction of models. Techniques such as preparation of work ing drawings and specifications are covered . ARCH. 6640-3 (formerly ARCH. 640). Introduction to Com p uter G r aphics. The course exp l ores the fundamental algo rithms of computer graphics, from point to line, plane, and symbols . The 2D and 3D operations move scale and rotate using matrix transformation are 3D structures and projections for axonometric, Isometric, and perspective also are covered . ARCH. 66 41-3 (formerly ARCH. 641) . Computer Applica tions in Ar c hitect ure . The course introduces problem-solv ing methods and the relationship between methods and the application of the computer to design problems. Introductory problems are given in BASIC using graph ics package . A high-level language such as Pascal Is to explore language in more depth, and to conclude , a senes of assignments introduces graphics with a Assignments in programming pro.blems a:e ARCH. 664 2-3. A r chitectural Des1gn w1th Macmtosh . This course intends to build upon the basic principles of drawing and composition presented in ARCH. by .intro ducing graphic reproduction methods with computer . Emphasis is on craft and preCisiOn will be stressed . ARCH. 6660-3 (fo r m erly ARCH. 660). Human and Social Dimensi ons of D esign. This course focuses on the introduc tion of basic social and psycho l ogical processes relevant to changing environmental conditions, and problems of the built IS techniques of interface problems m design, the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping, preferences and towa;d settings, the e v aluation of particular built envrronments, and developing architectural programs. ARCH. 666 1-3 (formerly ARCH. 661). Design Methods . This course focuses on a systematic review and critique of the major philosophical frameworks for decision in design. Models and theories of methods m. t . he design world will be explored, relevant to . the and adequacy to current design and plannmg. Emphasis IS placed on a broad understanding of a full range of models and the awareness of advances in social survey, data collec tion, and anal y sis techniques . ARCH. 6683 3 (forme r ly ARCH. 683) . Teaching Methods in Architectu r e . This course is designed to develop teaching and academic capabilities in the context of architecture. The student works with a faculty member in an instruction con text eight hours per week. ARCH. 6686-3 (formerly ARCH. 686). Special Topics in Architecture. Various topica l concerns are offered in archi tecture history, theor y, elements, concepts, methods, and implementation strategies and other related areas . ARCH. 6700-6 (forme r ly ARCH. 700) . Advanced Architec tural Design Studio VI. The studio focuses on students' elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercises and by critically addressing . status of contemporary architectural theory. Emphasis IS placed on a comprehensive design project that is structured to tes t students on integra t ion of structural aspects" mechanical systems, site planning , and climate consider ations within their design solutions . ARCH. 6701-6 (forme r ly ARCH. 701). Advanced Architec tural Design Studio VII. T h e final design studio continues the comprehensive approach through a full range of design investigation and strategies at all scales from program and conception to construction detail. Students must demon strate abilities to synthesize all previous work through an application of a complex architectural design project. ARCH. 69S0 6 (formerly ARCH. 702) . Thesis Research and Programming . ARCH. 6951 6 (fo r mer l y ARCH. 703) . Architecture Thesis . ARCH. 6740-3 (formerly ARCH. 740). Computer Aided Design. The course explores the relationship between design, mathematics , and The . of finite mathema t ics will be introduced usmg building design examples . Problem-solving in design and tation will be explored . The analysis of plan types will be related to topology and geometry ; symmetry and torial groups will be introduced. Computer proJects and readings will be assigned t o explore the concepts. ARCH. 67 5 0-3 (form erl y ARCH. 7 50). Profess i onal Practice I. This course introduces the student to the essential ele ments of professional prac.tice through subject . areas such as internship , licensing , services, modes of prachce,.fees, mar keting, documents , specifications , and production proce dures. One three-hour lecture per week . Prer ., final year in program or consent of instructor. ARCH. 6751-3 (formerly ARCH. 7 51) . Profess i onal Practice 11. This course addresses managerial issues that stem form architecture as a professional service activity. It addresses the economic environment of architectural practice, the rela tionship of manag emen t and design, the resources and functions of the architecture firm, and problems and oppor tunities in the profession. It pre sents several and techniques involved with solving problems typically encountered by architects and introduces new develop ments and approaches which have a bearing on practice. ARCH. 6930-3 (forme r ly ARCH. 770) ; ARCH. 6931 3 (for me r ly ARCH. 771) . A r chitecture Int ernship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to dents and is composed of eight hours per week work m a practicing professional's office during the regular The student is placed in an architectural and/or design office by the School and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course. ARCH. 6900 3 (formerly ARCH. 960 ) . Independent Study . Studies initiated by stude nts or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a specia l topic or problem related to architecture.

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INTERIOR DESIGN Program Donald J. Sherman Secretary: Cat y Reed Department 0 , fice: 1250 14th St., Second Floor Telephone: 55ft2294 Faculty: M. G. Barr Ass ociate Prof ss or: Donald J . Sherman Visiting Facul :D. Ballast , C. Lanier , M. Watts Interior Desi n is an interdisciplinary design field concerned wit the creation , development , and com pletion of spa e for human use. The gradua te pro gram in Interi Design in the School of Architecture and Planning Ef'Phasizes awareness, understanding , and ap plication of conceptua l aspects of the de sign prodess, as well as the developmen t of the necessary theoretical, and psychological skills required fan interior designer. The program is composed of major components : Design, Histor y and Theor y, T chnology, Professional Practice, and Elec tiv es. The rogram is designed for students who wish to enter p ofessional practice in the field of inte rior design, t advance their prof essiona l studying through the po. t-professional focus, and/or to prepare them to teach I the university l evel. Master of 11 erior Design (first profes l ional degree) Three year pliogram The first professional Master of Interior Design degree is a 96 se me ster hour program requiring three ye ars of full-time study. The curricu-lum consists o a core of four related course components and 24 SE mes t er hours of e lecti ves. COURSE SEOL ENCE COU RSE HJSTORY / SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY YEAR I Ff-L ID. 5500 (6) ARCH. 5520 (3) ID. 5501 (6) ID . 5521 (3) Ff-L ID . 6600 (6) ID. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) YEAR fl !D . 660 1 (6) FALL ID. 6700 (6) YEAR Til SPJ,UNG m . 6701 (6l 36 12 Interior De sign I 95 Major groups: De sign, 36 c redit hours; Histor y and Theor y, 12; Science and Technology, 21; Profes siona l Practice , 6; total: 75 credi t hours . The core curr iculum is an absolute requirement, regardless of any individual's educa t ional back ground. The core curriculum consists of the following courses: THE CURRICULUM -THREE YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN: 36 se mester hours ID . 5500 (6) ID . 5501 (6) ID. 6600 (6) ID. 6601 (6) ID . 6700 (6) ID . 6701 (6) Introductio n to Interior De sign Studio I Introduction to Interior Design Studio II Interior Design Studio III Interior Design Studio IV Advanced Interi or De s ign Studio V Advanced Interior Design Studio VI HISTOR Y AND THEORY: 12 semester hours ID . 5521 (3) ID . 6620 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) A RCH. 6660 (3) History of Int erior Design I History of Interi or Design II Introductio n to Design Theor y and Criticism Human and Social Dimen sions of Design SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 21 semes ter hour s ID . 6630 (3) ID . 6631 (3) ID. 6632 (3) ID . 6633 (3) ARCH. 5530 (3) ARCH . 5533 (3) Finish Materials and Textiles Construction D etailing Interior Lighti n g Advanced Interior Lighting D esign Structures I Environme ntal C ontrol Systems I PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 3 t h : semes e r ours ARCH. 6750 (3) Professional Practice I ARCH . 6751 (3) Professional Pract ice II PROFESSCIENCE & SIONAL CREDIT TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS . ARCH. 5530 (3) 15 ARCH . 5533 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15 ID . 6630 (3) 18 ID. 6632 (3) !D. 663 1 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 1 8 m . 6633 (3l ARCH. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15 ARCH . 6751 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15 18 6 24 96

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96 I School of Architecture a n d P l arming Master of Interior Design (Post-professional degree) Two year program. The post-professional Master of Interior Design degree re quir es a minimum of two years of full-time study and 60 credit hours. The core curriculum consists of four groups: Design, or Design and Thesis 24 credit hours ; History and Theory, 6; Science and Technology, 9; Profes sional Practice, 3; totaling 45 credit hours. The core curriculum is an absolute requirem ent, regardless of any individual's educational background. Thesis is available only by petition to the Program D irector and upon his/her approval. THE CURRICULUM-TWO-YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN OR THESIS: 24 semes t er hours ID. 6600 (6) Interior De sign Studio III ID. 6601 (6) Interior Design Studio IV ID. 6700 (6) Advanced Int erior Design Studio V ID . 6701 (6) Advanced Interior Design Studio VI ID. 6950 (6) Thesis Research and Programming ID . 6951 (6) Interior Design Thesis COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE HISTORY/ HISTORY AND THEORY: 6 semester hours ARCH. 6660 (3) Human and Social Dimensions ARCH. 6661 (3) Design Methods SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 9 semester hours ID. 6630 (3) Finish Materials and Textiles ID. 6632 (3) Interior Lighting ID . 6633 (3) Advanced Interior Lighting PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours ARCH. 6751 (3) Professional Practice II PROFES-SCIE CE & SIONAL CREDIT SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS. FALL ID. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6660 (3) YEAR I SPRING ID. 660 1 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6661 ( S ) ID. 6700 (6 ) FALL or YEAR II ID . 69SO (6 ) ID. 670 1 (6 ) SPRING or ID. 6951 ( 6 ) 24 6 AREAS OF CONCENTRATION AND ELECTIVES Four areas of concentration are offered in the Inte rior Design Program: Facili ti es Management; History, Theory, and Criticism; Interior Design Education; Lighting Studies. There are no set requiremen t s in each of the above areas . Students are required to develop a plan of study with their advisor at the beginning of the course of study. ELECTIVES ID . 6640 (3) 10. 6641 (3) ID . 6650 (3) ID. 6686 (3) ID. 6930 (3) ID. 6900 (3) Facilities Management I Facilities Management II Furniture Design Special Topics in Interior De sign Int erior De sign Internship Independent Study ID . 6630 ( 3 ) IS ID . 6632 ( 3 ) ID. 66 33 (3) ELECTIVES ( 3 ) IS ELECTIVES (9 ) IS ARCH. 6 751 ( 3 ) ELECTIVES ( 6 ) IS 9 3 1 8 60 COURSES ID. 5500-6 (formerly ID. 500). Introduction to Interior Design Studio I. This introductory studio focuses on the analysis of two-and three-dimensional design principles, and basic and interior design fundamental theori es . Empha sis is placed on concept and elements of proportion, bal ance , rhythm, color, move ment , form, and light. A modular component of the course consists of mechanical graphics tools used to illustrate the design studio projects. IN. 5501-6 (formerly ID. 501). Introduction to Interio r Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the fundamental theories and design princip le s explored in th e first semester, and applies them to objective interior design projects. Emphasis is placed upon anthropometries and aesthetics, as related to the design of furnishings and interior spaces. A modular component of the course consists of basic freehand graphics tools used to illu strate the design studio projects .

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ID. 5521-3 (fo r merly ID. 521) . History of Interior Design 1. The first of this of lecture courses is a survey and critical analysis _20th interiors. It begins the process of relatin mtenor envrronments from antiquity to contemporary by focusing on furnishings, the decorative arts, int erior arc itectural detailing, and interior architec tural spaces . ID. 6600-6 (fo r m rly ID. 600) . Interior Design Studio Ill . This is t he first of the intermediate studio-seminar sequence in which the focu is on the analysis of spatial definition and human behavior, and t h e impleme nt a t ion of design and problemolving skills . Emphasis is placed on prac and issues , leading to creative design solu tions to current r sidential and non-residential pro bl ems . A modu l ar compollj nt of this course consists of advanced graphics tools to illustrate the design studio projects . ID. 66016 (formerly ID. 601). Interior Design Studio IV. This is the sec nd of the intermediate studio-seminar sequence . The fo, us is on a comprehensive non-residential space planning and human factors The application of the professional process of programming, schematic design , d_evelop_ ent, constructio n d ocumentatio n , and speC1flcahon wn g are studied . ID. 6620 3 ID. 620) . History of Interior Design 11. The of seq u ence of lecture courses continues the comparative and evaluation process of period pieces and to cofemporary with special focus on a critical analys t s of those esponsible for interior environmen t s, the art of c r eating h bitab l e spaces, and interior design as a discipline. ID. 6624-3. The B ilt Environment in Other Cultures I. This intends to l broaden the students' perspec t ive by ask mg them to ex e design within another culture . Each student will pre are a proposal of study including a state men t of the pro lem t o be addressed, the type o f field research to be der t aken , and the nature of the report prod u ced. ID. 6625 -6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures 11. Students will tra el to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. T h e course intends not onl y t o help stu ents consider their own design and plan ning att itudes, b t also to help them see the world from a more balanced rspec t ive . I D._ 6630-3 I D._ Finish Materials and Textiles . co';ll"se _ts. an mvestigation of materials commonly used as m teno: flrush s and t he study of t extiles . It provi d es the oppor tu ruty to st dy th e composition and charac t e ri s t ics of individual the various applications of each , the process used to transform the raw materials int o a fin ished product, _ a d the governmental r egulations and toler the specification of them. The study of textiles ts from finish materials and focuses on env_ir?n mental t tiles, examining th e development of fiber to gohasts ts placed on a n interdisciplinary design proJ_ect that ts t? test students on investigation of envrronmenta l , humanistic/cu ltur a l , and aest h etic dimen sions within their design solutions. ID. 6701-6 (formerly ID. 701) . Advanced Interior Design Studio VI . T h is i s the secon d of the adva n ced studio the opportunity for students to proJects m whic h the full range of design mveshgation are de m onstrated . Students must confirm ability to synthesize all p r evious course work and acc u mulate knowledge in this final design project. ID. 6950-6 (formerly ID. 702). Thesis Research and Pro gramming . ID. 6951-6 (formerly ID. 703). Interior Design Thesis. ID . . 6930-3 (f?rmeri . Y ID. 770) . Interior Design Internship. This ts destgned to provi d e professional practice expenence t? is com posed of eight hours per week work m a practicmg professional ' s office duririg the semester: The s.tudent works iri an interior design or architectural design office and receives credit instead of pay . Students must complete second year level before taking this course . ID. 6900-3 (formerly ID. 960) . Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investiga t e a specia l topic or problem related t o interior design .

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98 I School of Architecture and Planning LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN Program Director: Harry L. Garnham Secretary: Kathy R eed Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Second Floor Telephone: 556-3475 Faculty: Professor: Hamid Shirvani Associate Professor: Harry L. Garnham Assistant Professors: Lauri M. Johnson , Gail W. Kam Adjunct: M. Hatami , M. Johnson , T. Johnson Visiting Faculty: G . Barnhart, D . Cooper, D . Farley, J . Heid, G .W. Jame son, A.E . Rollin ger, S. Specht , G. Vogt Landscape Architecture Program The Land scape Architecture Program offers both first and post-professio nal Master of Land scape Architecture degrees. Landscape Architecture in th e School of Architecture and Planning is a professional de sign pro gra m leading t o a nationally accredited degree, Master of Landscape Architecture (M. L.A.). The first professional Master of Landscape Architec ture (M.L.A.) de gree program is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accredi t a tion Board of the American Soci ety of Land scape Architects and is recognized by the Council of Landscape Architecture Educators. The program is designed to offer knowledge, advanced technic a l skills, and research directed toward the design and proper management of the urban landsc ape and its region. This degree will pre pare the student for practice in the curren t and evo lving profession of l andscape architecture, and allows th e graduate to t ake the Uniform National Exam (UNE) for licensing as a landscape architect. The primary objective with the M . L.A. program is the educatio n of stude nts to be effective professional landscape architects in private, public, and academic practice. More specific all y, the objectives of the pro gram are to dev e l op: an intens e concentration upon design and de s ign process wi thin the urban environ mental contex t ; an awareness of landscape architectu re's environmen t al et hic and land stewardship; an understanding of history, contemporary theory, criti cism, and experience of place; an understanding of natural, social/ cultural, and visual va lues required by the successful design process, with a special emphasis upon plant materials and basic ecology ; an awareness of technology and the required technical ability to achieve implement ation of design expression; broad based communication skills such as writing, speak ing, and graphics inclu ding the use of the computer as a design and planning tool ; unders tanding of the institutional framework within w hich design is exe cu t ed; skills in professional practice including man agement, market ing, ethical conduct, and legal issues; a strong commitment to, and preparation for, inter disciplinary practice. The ultima t e objective of the program is to provide the student with a deep appreciation for the natural, social, and aesthetic landscape and the holistic theo retical and techni cal knowledge required to design high quality e n vironme nts and s pecial places . Master of Landscape Architecture (First professional degree) Three yea r program. The first professional M.L.A. degree program requires 96 se me s ter hours and three years of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of four related course componen ts: De sign, 42 credit hours; Histor y and Theory, 15; Science and

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Technology, 18; and P rofessional Practice , 3, totalin g 78 credit hours , nd 18 semes ter hours of electives that ma y be used fo a concentration . THE CURRICUL I M THREE YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN 42 t h seme r;1er ours : LA. 5500 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architecture Studio I LA. 5501 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architecture Studio II LA. 6600 (6) Landscape Archi tec ture Studio II LA. 6601 (6) Landscape Architecture Studio IV LA. 6700 (6) A d vanced Landscape Architec ture Stu-dioV LA. 6701 (6) Advanced Landscap e Archi t ec ture S tu dio VI LA. 5510 (3) Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I LA. 5511 (3) Elements of De sign Expression and Presentation II COURSE SEOU CO URSE HISTORY / SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY F LL LA. 5500 ( 6 ) ARCH . 5520 (3) LA. 5510 (3) YEAR I SPfmG LA. 5501 (6) LA.552 1 (3) LA. 5511 (3) Ff-L LA. 6600 (6) LA. 6620 {3) YEAR II ARCH . 6660 (3) SPiiNG LA. 6601 (6) ARCH. 666 1 (3) FALL LA. 6700 (6) YEAR II1 LA . 6701 (6) 42 1 5 Master of LCljndscape 1n Architecture degree) Two year p )ogra m. The post-professional de gree program 60 semester hours and two years of full-time study The program offers both design or thesis opti ons a part of the core requirements. The core consis ts of four groups: Design, 24 ere 't hour s (or D es ign 12 and Thesis 12); Historyffheory 9; Science and Te chnology, 3; and Profession al Prttice, 3, totalling 36 credi t hours. Advanced st nding is offered students with the five yea r B . L.A. de ee. For this group of students the degree i s reduc d to 36 to 42 credit hours. THE CURRICU UM -TWO YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN: 24 sem ster h ours LA. 6600 (6)1 Landscape Architecture Studio III LA. 6601 (6)1 I Landsc ape Architecture Studio IV 1 Not required for stude nts h olding the B.L. A. Landscape Archi t ec tur e I 99 I HISTORY AN9 THEORY: 15 semester hours LA. 5521 (3) Landscape Architecture Histor y LA. 6620 (3) Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism ARCH . 5520 (3) Introduction t o Design T heo ry and Criticism ARCH . 6660 (3) Human and Social Dimensions of Des lgn A RCH . 6661 (3) Design Theory SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 18 semes ter hours LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning LA. 5570 (3) Introduction of Plants in Design LA. 5571 (3) Plants in Design LA. 5572 (3) L andsca pe Ecology LA. 6630 (3) Landscape Technology I LA. 6631 (3) Landscape Technology II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours LA. 6750 (3) Professional Pr actice ELECTIVES: 18 se mester hours SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LA . 5570 (3) LA. 5572 (3) LA. 5530 (3) LA. 557 1 (3) LA. 6630 (3) LA. 6631 (3) 1 8 LA. 6700 (6) LA. 6701 (6) LA. 6950 (6) LA. 6951 (6) PROFES SIONAL CREDIT PRACTICE ELECTIVES H RS. 1 8 18 15 ELECTIVES (3) 15 LA. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15 ELECTIVES (9) 15 3 1 8 96 Advanced Landscape Archi t ec tu re Studio V Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio VI Thesis Research and Programming Landscape Architecture T h esis HISTORY AND THEORY: 9 se mester hours LA. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) A RCH . 6661 (3) Land sc ape Architecture Theory and Criticism Human and Social Dimension s of Design De sign Methods SCIENCE ANID TECHNOLOGY: 3 semester hour s LA. 5572 (3) Landscape Ecology P ROF ESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hour s LA. 6750 (3) Professional Practice

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100 I School of Ardutecture and Planning COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE SEQUENCE YEAR l YEAR II ELECTIVES LA. 6621 (3) LA. 6641 (3) LA. 6686 (3) LA. 6930 (3) LA. 6900 (3) HISTORY/ DESIGN THEORY FALL LA. 6600 (6) LA. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) SPRING LA. 6601 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6661 (3) FALL LA. 6700 (6) SPRING LA. 6701 (6) 24 9 Visual Quality Analysis Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics in Landscape Architec ture Landscape Architecture Internship Independent Study AREAS OF CONCENTRATION Four areas of concentration are offered in the Land scape Architecture Program: Education in Landscape Architecture; History, Theory, and Criticism; Land and Real Estate De velopment; Urban Design . There are no set requirements in each of the above areas . Students are required to develop an initial plan of study with their advisor. Urban Design Program The Urban Design Program in the School of Archi tecture and Planning is an advanced professional degree program designed for students who wish to specialize in urban design. The field of urban design is a complex, interdisciplinary areas of study which encompasses architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, real estate development, and several other support fields such as law, civil and transporta tion engineering , psychology, and other social scienc es. The program focuses on creative and analytical design processes and simultaneously deals with socio economic, political, and physical factors affecting the urban built and natural environment. How do these factors work and how are the y perceived? How do they fit into an overall framework, and how can we design environments within the framework of both public interest and demands of private capital? The program is focused on analytical study of a dialogue between element and entity. It provides students with an understanding of how to cope with the scope of issues among varying social values. The goal of the program is to acquaint students with an analytical understanding of the urban-built environment and to develop an ability to synthesize creative design direc tions into responsive implementation stra tegies . The objectives of the program are to develop: awareness of and sensitivity to urban form, structure, PROFESSCIENCE & SIONAL CREDIT TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS. LA. 6630 (3) ELECTIVES (3) IS LA. 6631 (3) IS LA. 67SO (3) ELECTIVES (6) IS ELECTIVES (9) IS 6 3 1 8 60 and function; an understanding of the complex nature and interdependence of the built, the human, and the natural environmental dimensions of urban design; and understanding of the institutional framework within which urban design policies, plans , programs, and guidelines are evolved and implemented ; and analytic problem -solving competence for syn thesis and urban design programming. The program has three basic components: Theories of Urban Form and Structure , Element s of Urban Design and its financia l/institutional framework , Methods of Urban Design programming and implementation. Master of Architecture in Urban Design The Master of Architecture in Urban Design Pro gram offers both a one-year post-professional master of Architecture in Urban Design degree and a two year program. The one-year Master of Archi t ecture in Urban Design degree program is suited for students who have completed a first professional design degree in Architecture, Landscape Architecture , i.e. B.Arch., B. L.A., M.Arch ., M.L.A., etc. The twoyear Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree program is open to students with a four-year B.S. in Architecture, Environmental Design, Landscape Architecture and Planning. The one-year program requires completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, and the two-year program, a minimum of 48 credit hours.

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THE CORE CU RICULUM The core cu ric ulu m consis t s of four graduate courses for a total of 18 credit hours for the one-year program and * graduate courses for a total of 30 credi t h ours for th e two-year program. The core cur riculum is an a so lute requirement, regardless of any individual's batground. Some students entering the program may r advised to take additional courses COURSE SEOU,ENCE FOR TWO YEAR PROGRAM COURSE SEQUENCE CORE FALL UD. 6601 (3) UD. 6620 ( 6 ) YEAR I SPRJ G UD. 6610 (3) UD. 6621 ( 6 ) I FALL UD. 6720 (6) YEAR 11 SPRING UD. 6721 (6) 30 COURSE SEOL ENCE FOR ONE-YEAR PROGRAM COURSE I CREDIT SEQUENCE CORE ELECTIVES HRS. I UD. 6601 ( 3 ) FALL UD. 6620 ( 6 ) OR ELECTIVES (9) 1 8 YEAR I UD. 6720 ( 6 ) UD. 6610 ( 3 ) SPRI G UD. 6621 ( 6 ) OR ELECTIVES (9) 1 8 UD. 6721 ( 6 ) 1 8 1 8 36 COURSES UD. 6611 (3) Urban Design Case Studies UD. 6710 (3) Experiencing the Cityscape UD. 6711 (3) Advanced Urban Design Seminar UD. 6686 (3) Special Topics in Urban Design UD. 6730 (3) Urban Design Intern ship UD . 6900 (3) Independent Study LANDSCAPE AR r HITECTURE COURSES LA. 5500-6 (forn erly LA. 500) . Introduction to Landscape Landscape Archi t ec tur e I 101 depending on th eir educationa l backgrounds. The core curriculum consists of the following cours es: UD. 6601 (3) UD. 6610 (3) UD. 6620 (6) UD. 6621 (6) UD. 6720 (6) UD. 6721 (6) The Architecture of the City Urban Design Theory and Methods Site Analysis and Design Studio Land Development Studio Urban Reconstruction Studio Advanced Urban Design Studio CREDIT ELECTIVES HRS. ELECTIVES ( 3 ) 12 E LECTIVES (3) 12 ELECTIVES ( 6 ) 12 ELECTIVES (6) 1 2 1 8 48 design expression techniques for a smoother transition into the design and drawing studios. LA. 5510-3 (formerly LA. 510). Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers free-hand draw ings of various spaces and objec ts. Emphasis is placed on abs t ract forms and real objects in term s of light , shade, and shadow. Design thinking , visualization and presentation, and techniques are explored through a variety of methods. LA. 5511-3 (formerly LA. 511). Elemen t s of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course emphasizes mechani -cal drawing means. Students are introduced to a wide range of basic techniques, conventions, and means in the design fields , as well as selection of drawing instruments and surface, typograp h y, and organization of graphic material to achieve the most effective presentation . The subjects covered are : principles of graphic communication; lettering and ort ho graphies; diametric, obliq ue, and perspective projections; three-di.Q1en siona1 forms empl oying light, shade, and shadow ; gradation/value distinction in flat and curved surfaces; and graphic reproduction. LA. 5521-3 (formerly LA. 521). History of Landscape Architecture . This course emphasizes the study of significan t Architecture St dio I. This introductory design studio man-made landscapes from pre-history to contemporary focuses on the a 1alytical study of principles and theory of times. These places will be investigated and discussed wit h landscape archit cture. It covers concepts and elements of respect to the period in history, design style, and the cui landscape archit ctura l design, manipulation of land form , tural influences of the area and time. Throughout thi s invesspace, and twpa n d three-dimensional composition. tigation of historical landscapes, the art and architecture of Emphasis is plac upon an awareness of the role of landthe period wiU also be introduced as the interconnections of scape architectur theory and history in the design process. these creative ac tiviti es must be viewed as a part of t he LA. 5501-6 (for rnerly LA. 501). Introduction Landscape design of the landscape . Within each period in history rele-Architecture Stl dio II. The second introductory design stuvant contemporary designs will be discussed in an effort to dio con t inues th examination of the issues raised in th e first reinforce the importance and application of the study of semes ter and b gins investigation of the more complex environments < nd the application of design process. l andscape architectural history. Emphasis is plac d upon natural, physicaUcultura1, and aes-LA. 5530-3 (formerly LA. 530). Site Planning. The course th etic aspects a socia ted with the design of contex t and focuses on the site planning process, including: resear ch design within cc [ntext. and data gathering; data analysis and synthesis; design LA. 5509-3 . Basi Graphics. This course is recommended for ana l ysis and its relationship to building program and conindividuals who ihave h ad a limited design or drawing backcept; and design synthesis of s it e and preparation of si te ground. Fundar hental drawing materials and techniques plan. Emphasis is placed on design through grading, reprewill be explored withi n a studio setti n g . The course aims to sentation, mal;lipulation and calculation of road work, utili-p rovide the stu ent with a basic understandin g of ties, and otlner site features. Vertical and horizonta l

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102 I School of Architecture and Planning alignment, earthwork and cost computation, and integra tion with existing and proposed features or systems are all covered. LA. 5531-3. Small Space Design. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the requirements and problems encountered when designing actual sites of one acre or less. Emphasis is placed on space p l anning, grades and drainage, plant material usage, cost estimating, and designer/client relationships. LA. 5570-3 (formerly LA. 570). Introduction of Plants in Design . Rocky Mountain native and introduced trees, shrubs, and groundcovers are field identified and studied for botanical traits, physical requirements, and design appli cation. The primary focus of study is a horticultural approach, as Latin names are learned and used in specific plant identification. The seconda ry focus of study is design methods used in planting design . Formal design principles, spatial sequencing, and plan t functions are applied in design studies. LA. 5571-3 (formerly LA. 571). Plants in Design. Planting design is the primary focus of study as several projects require that students apply the knowledge of the plant materials and design methods learned in the preparation of planting plans. The secondary focus to this class is the study of additional plant materials as the spring bloom occurs. LA. 5572-3 (formerly LA 572). Landscape Ecology. This course is focused on the study of physiography, cultural factors, and aesthetic criteria in relation to landscape , spatial organization, and urban organization, and urban and regional structure. Emphasis is placed on continuity and change in and ecology of both natural and man-made land scape. LA. 5573-3 . Planting Design for Architects. This course is designed to give a basic understanding of planting design composition and theory. Through a series of planting projects the student will be encouraged to develop a sense for planting feasibilities and limitations and to solve prob lems creatively. LA. 6600-6 (formerly LA. 600). Landscape Architecture Stu dio Ill. The first intermediate studio will focus upon the exploration of larger urban and regional environments, landscape elements, the examination of the interrelationship of physical space, and cultural constructs of place. Empha sis is placed upon design process, the creation of place, and the analytical and compositional aspects which lead to cre ative design solutions of curren t urban and regional prob lems. LA. 6601-6 (formerly LA. 601 ). Landscape Architecture Stu dio IV. The second intermediate studio will focus upon land scape analysis, design , and management studies in the context of urban places, Field work in recmmaissance map ping, spatial analysis, data organization , and s ite and socio cultural inventory and analysis will result in the design synthesis of projects based upon the complete understand ing of field data. De sign problem emphasis is placed upon the relationship of buildings and objects to the morphology of the city, the cities spatial organization, and the design expression of special place wit h the landscape context. LA. 6609-3. Special Graphics . This course emphasizes th.ree dimensional drawing for the disciplines of architecture, inte rior design , planning, and landscape archi t ecture. Students will prepare many perspective drawings from real-life scenes to strengthen drawing recall, three-dimen sional design visualiza tion skills, an d illustrative presentation techniqu es. Within a studio setting, students will investi gate the characteristics of vario u s drawing medias and explore and refine personal drawing styles. LA. 6615 -3. Selected Design Issues. The primary course emphasis will be the exec ution of design studies available through the Center for Built Environment Studies . This stu dio will stress design process, organization, communica tion , public presentations, public service, leadership, and intellectual design innovation. LA. 6620-3 (formerly LA. 620). Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism . This course focuses on exploration and assessment of the current state of theor y in landscape architecture and related design disciplines, and the ideas undergoing contemporary design approaches. Narrative and explanatory theories are the objects of study. Emphasis is placed on history and pedagogic theories and their rela tion ships to other disciplines such as art, ecology, geogra phy, architecture, and anthropology. LA. 6621-3 (formerly LA. 621). Visual Quality Analysis. This course introduces studen ts to a range of philosophies, meth ods , and techniques in visua l land scape analysis. Emphasis is placed on application of methods and techniques to urban and regional context and sca le , and visual impact assess ment and simulation . LA. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I.This course intends to broaden the students' perspective by ask ing them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a state ment of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced . LA. 6625-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II. Students will travel to their respective cit ies and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consi der their own design and plan ning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. LA. 6630-3 (formerly LA. 630). Landscape Technology I . The course focuses on application of surveying, grading, road design and site construction principles, and their appli cation to site d evelopme nt. Emphasis is placed on site design, layout plan, grading plan, and drainage calculations for specific projects . LA. 6631-3 (formerly LA. 631). Landscape Technology II. This course is a continuation of landscape Technology I and focuses on the study of materials and methods employed in construction of site featu.res and evolution of palette, tech niques and theory of detailed design including pavements, fences, walk, stairs, revetmen ts , basins, and fountains. LA. 6641-3 (formerly LA-641). Computer applications in Landscape Architecture . The course introduces problem solving methods and the re l ationship between those meth ods, and the application of a computer to design problems. Introduct ory problems a.re given in BASIC using the graph ics package, a high-level language such as Pascal is used to explore language in more depth, and to conclude, a services of assignments introduces the graphics unit or high-level langua ge . Assignments in programming CAD problems are required . LA. 6686 -3 (formerly LA. 686) . Special Topics in Landscape Architecture. Various topical concerns are offered in Land scape Architecture history, theory, elements, concepts, method s, implementation strategies, and other related areas. LA. 6700-6 (formerly LA. 700). Advanced Landscape Archi tecture Studio V . This studio will focus upon the students elaboration and substantia tion of personal ideas through complex design exercises which critically address contem porary landscape architectural theory . Emphasis is based upon a comprehensive urban or regional landscape

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design project st uctured to test student ability to investi ga te eco l ogical, h anistidsocio cultural factors, aes th etics , and complex ensions in the development of c re a t ive design so luti ons . LA. 6701-6 (form rly LA. 701). Advanced Landscape Archi tecture Studio V . The final studio i s comprehensive in its approac h . Them jor goal is to present a full range of com plex design inves igations and implementation stra t egies a t vario u s scales, w e allowing the students to demonstrate their ability to sy1 the size all previo u s academic work. LA. 67S0-3 (for erly LA. 750). Professional Practice. The course focuses o studies in the professional practice of land sca p e archit cture and related professions, and case prob lems in initia ing and managing a professiona l practic e. It explore s the eEential e l ements of professional practice and equips stude ts with the fundamental knowledge and skills requisite to n understanding of, and participation in , the conduct of pr ctice in landscape archi tecture . T he cour se covers of the landscape architectura l office, professional serv ces of landscape architects , fee s tructures and fee manag ment, contracts, and legal rights and responsibilities, 1anagement, marketing, delivery, of pro fessional services LA. 6900-3 LA. 960). Independent Study. Studies initiated b y stud nts or faculty and sponsored by a facult y member t o inves igate a special top i c or problem related to landscape archite ture or urban design. LA. 6930 3 (for erly LA. 770) . Landscape Architecture Internship. This ourse is designed to provide professional practice experie ce to students and i s composed o f eight hours per week ork in a practicing professional's office, during th e regu ar semester. The student is placed in a landscape archit ctural and/or design office by the School and receive s ere it instead of pay. S tudent s must complet e the second year 1 ve l b efore taking thi s course. LA. 6950-6 (for erly LA. 702). Thesis Research and Programming. LA. 6951-6 (for erly LA. 703). Landscape Architecture Thesis. URBAN DES GN COURSES UD. 6601-3 (for erly UD. 601). The Architecture of the City. Thi s course is focused on soc ial and political histor y of design in s ideology, instrumen t ality, and in t erests. Drawin g from h storical, literary, artistic, and arc hi t ectural sources it attem ts to reconstruct the discourse that l ay the production of fo s, the proposal of reforms, and the imag ining of utopias . UD. 6610-3 (for erly UD. 610). Urban Design Theory and Methods . This c urse examines the elements, concep t s, and methods of urb a design with emphasis give n to the visual and spatial pro ! ems, Emphasis is placed on methods of analyzing urban orm, organization and structural conc epts, human, n atural nd physical elements of urban design, and methods of imp! mentation . UD. 6611-3 (for r erly UD . 611). Urban Design Case Studies. This course fpcuses on present practices of urban de sign in var iou s cities and presents the lessons learned from the se prac ices. Emphasis is placed on me th o d s and processe s devel ed and applied, their compara tive anal y sis, and their ap licabilities to different cities. UD. 6620-6 (for erly UD. 620). Site Analysis and Design. The first studio f a tw o-studio sequence introduces methods and eleme ts of design of an objec t w ithin context, Urban Design I 103 method s of analysis and composi tion , properties of the con t ex t , and s patial and fun ctio n a l iss ue s empl oyed in the cre at ion of a landscape or place, Emphasis is placed upon natura l , physical/cultural, and aes th etic issues associa t e d wi th analytical, compositional, and physical co ncern s relat ing to the placement of struc ture s and objec ts. UD. 6621-6 (formerly UD. 621) . Land Development Process. The course examine s the l and development process in urbanizing areas and explores alternative approaches and s t ra t egies for de v elopin g a site in an eco nomicall y, socially, and environmentally responsible manner. Special emphasis w ill b e given to the diagnostic p rocess and production of planning and de si gn studies including market and desig n product -type study and a nal ys is. UD. 6686-3 (formerly UD. 686) . Special Topics. Vario us topical concerns are offered in urban design history , the ory, e l ements, co n cepts, methods and implemen t ation stra te g ies , and o ther related areas. UD. 6710-3 (formerly UD. 710). Experiencing the Cityscape. This course explores the scope of the city form as well as exploring individual examples t o interpret urb an architec tur e in i t s con te xt. Emph as i s is placed on public needs and quali ty of spaces for public and pri va te use. Relat ionships w ithin activities, circulation , climate, and landscape are a nal yzed from an aesthetic view po int. UD. 6711-3 (formerly UD. 711). Advanced Urban Design Seminar . This seminar is developed to follow UD. 6601 an d 6610, as an attemp t to synthesize the topics covered in these courses and s tudie s, and to build upon the students' under s tandin g of a nal y tic technique s t o pro t otype design process es . Emphasis is placed on connection between analysis an d design , a bility to communicate ideas verbally, orally and graphically, and learning how to be a good au thor , ability to find selec t , ana l yze , and compare informa t io n. UD. 6950-6 (formerly UD. 702) . Urban Design Thesis Research and Programming . UD. 69516 (formerly UD. 703) . Urban Design Thesis. UD. 6720-6 (formerly UD. 720). Urban Reconstruction Stu dio. This studio focuses on th e search for appro priat eness of urb an form , struc ture, and organization based upon design problem studies, in conte xt, at different scales, ranging from s mall of buildings t o ne ighborhood reconstructio n t o in t erpre tation of large areas of cities; wi th concern for , and aware n ess of, s uccessful and unsuccessful mode l s of urb an development throughout history. Evaluation of project s, both physically and soc i ally, will b e s tr essed . UD. 6721-6 (formerly UD. 721) . Advanced Urban Design Studio . This studio examines approaches an d models to reconstruct urban areas and regenerate the urban life using de s i gn programs, guidelines, and policies. Using a real project in d owntown D enver, students ana l yze and evaluate social and eco n omic infrastructural conditions, l egal con s t raints, and opportuni ties for redevelopmen t a nd/ or main tenanc e. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship between broad urban policies and physical d esi gn . UD. 6930-3 (formerly UD. 770). Urban Design Internship. This course is designed to provide professio nal practice experience to f tudent s interes ted i n the urb a n design pro gra m . The em;phasis is on ac tu a l work experience, in settin gs with clieJ;lt groups , upon the students t o assis t them in determining sol ution s to their problem s. Program Director approval is required . UD. 6900-3 (formerly UD. 960). Independent Study. Stud ies initiated b y students or faculty and spon sored by a facul ty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to urban desi gn.

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104 I School of Architecture and Planning URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING Program Director: Peter V . Schaeffer Secretary: Peggy McKinney Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Second Floor Telephone: 556-3479 Faculty: Professors: Yuk Lee, Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: Thomas A. Clark, David R. Hilt Bernie Jones, Peter V . Schaeffer , Frederick R. Steiner Visiting Faculty: R. Bliss, S . Foute , E. Haywood, K. Hoagland , E. Kelle y, G . F . McNeish, D.A. Stram miello Associated Faculty: R. Horn Urban and Regional Planning Program Urban and regional planning in the United States and other countries is involved in activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human settlements and provid ing housing, public services, and other crucial support systems that help support a decent urban living envi ronment. Planning encompasses not only a concern for the structure and image of the built environment, but also a desire to harness the sociat economic, polit icat and technological forces that give meaning to the everyday lives of men and women in residentiat work, and recreational settings . More specifically, urban and regional planning is concerned with: identifying social needs and design ing and providing services and facilities to meet those needs; anticipating change and its impact on how people can and do live; understanding the way plans are made, decisions implemented , and actions evalu ated and the means by which these processes can be improved; stimulating, guiding , and influencing actions of the private sector with respect to land use and land use transitions in urban, suburban, and rural areas; identifying potentially adverse impacts of human activities on the natural environment and mit igating those impacts; designing the city and the sur rounding region to facilitate activities in which people need and desire to engage. The Urban and Regional Planning Program at the University of Colorado at Denver is designed to pre pare students for professional practice in urban and regional planning as well as for more advanced aca demic training in planning and other related fields . The degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) is awarded after successful completion of a course of study normally requiring about two y ears of course work . The objectives of the Urban and Regional Planning Program are : to clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems; to foster the appropriate use of policy, planning, design, and legal devices for creating urban and regional environments responsive to human needs and ecological principles; and to develop methods for evaluating urban pro grams, policies, and plans which have important human and natural environmental consequences. Master of Urban and Regional Planning The Urban and Regional Planning Program offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.), which requires two years of full-time study and a minimum of 51 credit hours . The M. U.R.P. degree program is accred ited by the Planning Accreditation Board, the Associ ation of the Collegiate Schools of Planning, and the American Institute of Certified Planners. It consists of a core of 27 semester hours of courses in : Theory, Planning Methods , Spatial Analysis , Planning Law, History , Design and Planning Studio, and one of sev eral optional concentrations. The concentrations are: Community Development, Environmental Planning, Real Estate Development, Economic Development, Planning and Design in Developing Countries, and Phy sical Planning and Urban Design. The core curric ulum is an absolute requirement regardless of any individual's educational background. Core Courses URP . 550 1 (3) URP . 5510 (3) URP. 5511 (3) URP . 5520 (3) URP . 5530 (3) URP. 5532 (3) UD. 6610 (3) URP . 6630 (3) URP . 6631 (3) Planning Theory and Process Planning Methods I Planning Methods II Urban Spatial Analysis Planning Law Hi s torical Development of Urban Form Urban Design Theory and Methods Planning Studio I Planning Studio II A thesis option (URP . 6950 Thesis Research and URP . 6951 Thesis) is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced aca demic training in planning or related fields. Students interested in the thesis option are required to petition and the plan must be approved by the Academic Affairs Committee . COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE CREDIT SEQUENCE CORE ELECTIVES HRS . URP . 5501 (3) FALL URP . 5510 ( 3 ) ELECTIVES ( 3 ) 12 YEAR I U RP . 5530 (3) URP . 5511 (3) SPRJNG URP . 5520 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12 UD . 6610 (3) FALL URP. 5532 ( 3 ) ELECTIVES ( 6 ) 12 YEAR II URP . 6630 ( 3 ) SPRING URP. 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (12) 15 27 24 51 In addition to the 27 semester hours of core curric ulum, students are required to declare an area of con centration. Within a given area of concentration, the student must take at least 15 semester hours. The remaining 9 semester hours of the total 51 semester hours are electives .

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AREAS OF CONCENTRATION Community development. This area explores com munities holisti ! ally and addresses the question of how best to strengthen them in pursuit of local goals . Problematic issues communities face are many and varied, from to social services: from e.ducation to economic devFlopment, from housmg to highways . Tackling these woblems is made more difficult if the community is disorganized, has no sense of commu nity, or is unskiiled in collective problem solvi ng. Courses in tl!us concentration provide an under standing of coni:munities (their structures, dynamics, problems, etc.) skills for working with communi ties (group participation techniques , ing, mediatio r , etc.). Values of den:tocrahc participation and empowerment are emphasized as the student skills in synthesizing spatial and social planning. Environment 1 Planning. Work in this area addresses natural systems , urban and regional growth and land systems, environmental quality of regions, protec ion of ecological systems , the plan ning and mana ement of natural resources, and the impacts of deve opment. Emphasis is placed on envi ronmental policy, planning and design at both macro and mic;r o levels and includes: land sui tability and capability for various types of development; pres ervation of urban and regional natural amen ities; programs and major policy issues as they relate to regional and local levels ; spatial-physic models of environmental land . use planning; eval ation and of and which enhance quality of urban livmg environment; impact assessment; and urban growth/I}on-growth. Real Estate liJevelopment . The real estate develop ment industry blays a critical role shaping . the built environment through the construction of varwus Urban and Regional Planning I 105 types of buildings and development: residential, com mercial industrial, and recreational. It affects urban and regional development not only economically but in creating cultural and social environments of lasting significance. . . . . This concentration focuses on an mterd1sc1plinary approach to study the real estate development pro cess. The concen tration is coordinated to expose stu dents to all major elements of the development process: finance, marketing , political process, law, design , planning , construction , and management. Students are educated to assume responsible posi tions in the private sector real estate development industr y and the public agencies dealing with the industr y. The emphasis is to educate professionals who can s uccessfully assemble environmentally sensi tive and well-balanced real estate developments. Economic Development . This concentration addresses the variety of issues in economic develop ment and planning at the urban , regional, national, and international levels. The curriculum reflects faculty expertise in urban spatial and socio-economic structure, urban and regional economic development and planning, planning methods and analytical tech niques , and transportation planning . The course wor k develops a broad foundation in the current state of urban and regional economic development analysis and moves to a more advanced understanding of development issues , questions , and plans and policies involved . Planning and Design in Developing Countries . This concentration addresses planning and design in developing countries and international comparative planning analysis. These geographical and planning interest s directly reflect faculty research and field experience in Asia , the Middle East , and Latin America in housing, environmental planning, urban and regional development strategy, urban design, and urban and environmental spa tial perception. A planning s tudent does las t minute preparation a pre sen t a tion . on her project , an ecological inve ntor y of the North St. River. For. the proJect she analyzed geography , physiography , hydrology, soils , plants, ammals , and land use .

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106 I School of Architechzre and Planning Physical Planning and Urban Design. The concen tration provides a pragmatic framework for urban design as one of the central concerns of the planning process. Course work explores the underlying assumptions that form the framework of urban design methods and simultaneously deals with socio-eco nomic and environmental factors affecting the urban and regional built environment. It addresses the fol lowing questions: How do these factors work and how are the y perceived? How do they fit into an overall framework? How can we design environments within the framework of both public interest and the demands of private capital? Emphasis is placed on developing an analytical understanding of th e built environment and the devel opment of an ability to synthesize and orchestrate policies , plans, programs, and guidelines responsive to human and natural eleme nts . COURSES IN EACH CONCENTRATION: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT URP. 6640 (3) Community De velopment Process' URP. 6641 (3) Social Planning URP. 6642 (3) Rural and Small Town Planning URP . 6643 (3) Neighborhood Planning URP. 6675 (3) Planning and Public Finance URP . 6676 (3) Urban Housing ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING URP. 5533 (3) Theories of Urban Form URP. 6650 (3) Environme ntal Planning' URP. 6651 (3) Environmental Impact Assessment' URP. 6652 (3) Growth Management URP. 6653 (3) Natural Resource Planning and ManLA. 6620 (3) LA. 6621 (3) LA. 6670 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) ARCH. 6661 (3) agement Landscape Architecture Theor y and Criticism Visual Quality Analysis Landscape Ecology Human and Social Dimensions of Design Design Me thod s and Programming REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT URP. 6660 (3) Real Estate Devel opmen t Process URP . 6661 (3) Real Estate Devel opment Finance URP. 6662 (3) Real Estate Market Analysis URP . 6663 (3) Construction Technology and Management URP. 6676 (3) Urban Housing ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT URP. 6670 (3) Urban Economic Development URP. 6671 (3) Regional Economic Development ' URP. 6672 (3) Urban Labor Market URP. 6673 (3) Transportation Planning 1: Network Analysis URP. 6674 (3) Transportation Planning II: Urban Transportation Planning URP . 6675 (3) Planning and Public Finance 1 Courses required in th at concentrat ion . URP . 6676 (3) Urban Housing PLANNING AND DESIGN IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES URP. 6780 (3) Urbanization in Developing Countries URP. 6681 (3) Infrastructural Planning in Developing Countries URP . 6682 (3) Housing in Developing Countries PHYSICAL PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN URP. 5533 (3) Theories of Urban Form1 URP. 6673 (3) Transportation Planning I : Network URP . 6674 (3) UD. 6601 (3) UD . 6611 (3) UD. 6710 (3) UD. 6711 (3) ARCH . 6660 (3) ARCH. 6661 (3) ELECTIVES Analys i s Transportation Planning II: Urban Transpor tati on Planning The Architecture of the City Urban Design Case Studies Experie ncing the Cityscape Adva nced Urban Design Seminar Human and Social Dimensions of Design Design Methods Students may select as electives any courses from any other area of concentration. Additiona l electives include : URP . 5500 (3) URP . 6686 (3) URP . 6950 (3) URP. 6951 (3) URP . 6930 (3) URP. 6900 (3) COURSES Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning Special Topics in Planning Thesis Preparation Thesis Planning Intern ship Independent Study URP. 5500-3 (formerly URP. 500). Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning. This course focuses on the princi ples of urban and regional planning, theories of planning, community organization, basic techniques, changing phi losophies in modern society, and the process of s haping community form. URP. 5501-3 (formerly URP. 501). Planning Theory and Process. This course describes, analyzes, and evaluates con temporar y sc hools of thought on proper plan-making pro cesses. Plan makin g for society's physical form and organizational development is addressed. The philosophi cal, political, and economic roots of the var ious theories are discussed . The ideas also are placed in the context of the planning profession's history and its present ain1s, inter ests , and ethics. URP. 5510-3 (formerly URP. 510). Planning Methods I. This course focuses on the application of statistical, quantitative, and mathematical technique s, and comp uter applications for urb an and region al planning and policy development. Major topics include types of data, sampling, basic probabil ity distributions, h ypothesis testin g, regression and correla tion, and an instruction to multivariate and cluster analysis. Applications in plannin g and development are emphasized. URP. 5511-3 (formerly URP. 511). Planning Methods II. This course continues further development and applications of techniqu es introduced in URP. 5510 as well as other

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planning physical, social development lllU'"""'';:,, and dynamic URP. 5520 3 520) . Urban Spatial Analysis. of the spatial structure of the urban system is analyzed in terms of the and "city as a system." Major topics the economic theory of the origin of city , nt11nr'TTI distributions, the location pattern of cities, urban population of cities, functional classification and economic base, movement of between cities , spatial pattern of activity, spatial pattern of urban , and urban social space and urban-spaland use and Prronnm population tial cognition . URP. 5530-3 1Tn1rm1•r1v URP. 530). Planning Law. This the legal setting for urban and regional States. Major constitutional issues in planning policy. Contemporary centrocourse focuses planning in the the effectuation versies are put j udicial system I the larger context of attempts by the redefine the balance between individual power in an increasingly weakened rights and go,verrtrrtenta society. URP. 5532-3 URP. 532). Historical Development analysis of urban physical form from the origin of cities the present. The emphasis is on the cities of Western and American urban planning. Major shifts ideas , architecture , transportation, landscapes , energy systems are discussed and evaluated u sing a format. URP. 5533-3 URP. 533). Theories of Urban Form. A analysis of contemporary schools of physical form. Theories will be evaluated "rr"11r :•I"'V of their explanations of present their images of future urban form, stra for implementing their format. URP. 623). Real Estate Market Anal on various methodologies for con market analyses. The course will provide real estate developing planning process analysis plays in that process. Tech re t ail, office, industrial , and residential presented and discussed . Built Environment in Other Cultures I. This course to broaden the students ' perspective by asking them to design within another culture . Each student will pri are a proposal of study including a stateUrban and Re gional Planning I 107 ment of the p oblem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced . URP. 6625-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II. Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals . The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and plan ning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. URP. 6630-3 (f9rmerly URP. 630). Planning Studio I. This course focuses on plan design in urban and regional plan ning and explores basic concepts, techniques, and issues related to urban planning , urban design , site planning, and environmental awareness . URP. 6631-3 (formerly URP. 631). Planning Studio II. The focus of Studio II is on plan making related to urban and regional planning. An understanding of the plan-making process is emphasized . Students will have direct experience with the various steps in planning, including data-gather ing, goal-setting, identification of alternatives, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of the plan. The plan may be for a city sector, a neighborhood , an entire community , a region , or it may be a policy plan . Where possible, students will work with a community-based, actual client. URP. 6640-3 (formerly URP. 640). Community Develop ment Process. This course introduces community develop ment, a field closely allied with planning , in its devotion to working with people to strengthen their communities in accordance with l ocally determined goals. Emphasis is placed on understanding groups, organizations, and com munities and on developing skills in such areas and commu nity analysis, goal-setting , group facilitation , and problem so lvin g. URP. 6641-3 (formerly URP. 641) Social Planning . An increasingly important specialty in contemporary planning practice is social planning . This course covers the process of formulating public policies and designing, implementing, and evaluating programs in such areas as social services, housing, health care , employment, and education . Atten tion is given to the historical perspective and the present d ay social and political context within which social policy formation and social planning occurs . URP. 6642-3 (formerly URP. 642). Neighborhood Planning. An introduction to small area planning including survey of neighborhood and community theory, examination and cri tiqu e research and analytical techniques involved in neigh borhood planning, and examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighborhoods. URP. 6643-3 (formerly URP. 643). Rural and Small Town Planning. This course provides knowledge and perspective on global changes in rural areas, with particular reference to the United States . It evaluates the issues of agricultural, rural, and s5all-town development and interrelationships with the industrialization and urbanization processes and develops knowledge and skills in program planning for rural and small-town development. URP. 6650-3 <1ormerly URP. 650). Environmental Planning. There are two l objectives to this course : 1) To provide funda mental knowledge of natural resource principles as they relate to planning, and 2) to use this knowledge to develop a micro-based environmental impact/economic development model. Lotus I:L23 will be taught and used for the model. URP. 6651-3 (formerly URP. 651). Environmental Impact Assessment. The objective of this course is to provide the foundation for understanding the Environmental Impact Assessment process, its legal context, and the criteria and methods for procedural and substantive compliance.

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108 I School of Architecture a n d Planning URP. 6652-3 (formerly URP. 652). Growth Management . This course examines environme n tal and land regulations such as zoning, subclivision controls, and growth manage ment systems in the context of p ublic policy. Emphasis i s placed on case stuclies, the a n a l ysis of pas t and present prac t ices, the improvement of existing systems, and the design of new regulatory sys tems. URP. 6653 3 (formerly URP. 653). Natural Resource Plan ning and Management. This course focuses on the s tud y of the economic organization and use of natural resources a nd covers the study of property rights and their impact on resource use , optimal depletion of non-re newable and u se and management of renewab l e r esource s, applications t o fisheries, forests, mineral resources, etc., as well as develop ing criteria for evaluation of environmental amenities , and explores conflicts between grow th and environmental qual ity. URP. 6660-3 (formerly URP. 660) . Dev e lopment Process. This course is a detailed analysis of components of real es t ate proce ss and its relationship t o th e design professional as well as other key participants. URP. 66613 (fo r merly URP. 661). Real E s tate Development Finance . This course focuses o n financial ana l ysis of real estate investments . Topics include measures of value, capi talization rate, capital budgeting, debt and equity markets, and t axation. Cash flow and appraisal techniques, complex deal structuring, inn ovations in debt financing, synclica tions, tax shelters, tax exempt financing, and microcom puter applications also are cove red . URP. 6662 3 (formerly URP. 662). Rea l Estate Market Anal ysis. The course focu ses on examination of t echniques of market analysis . Topics include busine ss and construction cycles, regional and urban grow th tr ends, restructuring of urban space, commercial and industrial loca t ion theories, and demo graphic analysis and projecti on techniques . URP. 6670 3 ( f ormerly URP. 670). Urban Economic D e vel opment. This course is an a nalysi s of the publidprivate partnership in urban economic de ve lopment, inclucling analysis of potentials, problems, and projects; financing urban economic development throu gh federal grant pro grams, tax incremen t financing a n d other means; economic t h eory of urban deve l opment. URP. 66713 (formerly URP. 671) . Regional E c onomic Development . This course is an analysis of regional pat terns and processes of economic development. Theories and model s for location p atterns and processes of economic development. Theories and models for l ocatio n patterns and processes of eco nomic activities, l abor, industria l and com mercia l site requirement s, and economic development and growth strategies are emphasized . URP. 6672-3 ( f ormerly URP. 672) . U r ban Labor Market. This course provides a study of the organization and func tioning of urban labor markets and cove r s labor market segmentation, human capital theory, labor mobility , labor market signalling, and discrimination in labor markets. URP. 6673 3 ( f o r merly URP. 673). Transportation Planning 1: Transport Networ k Ana lysis. The focus of thi s course is on examination of several important aspects of the transport network: accessibility and connectivity nodes and linkages, and the volume and direction of flow of a tran sport net work. De scrip tive, predicti ve, a n d planning methods and models discussed include : grap h theor etical measures, con necti vity matrices, gravity mode l , abstract mode model, entropy-maximization , trip genera tion model, and flow allo cation models . URP. 6674 3 (formerly URP. 674). Transportation Planning II: Urban Trans portation Planning. This cou rse is a fol low-up of the transport network analysis (a recom-mended background) and invo l ves an examination of major issues of urban tran spor tation in the U.S. These include the role of transportation in urban development, the urban tr a n sportatio n system, relationship between land-u se plan ning and transportation p l a n ning, urban activity model s, data sources and collection, urban transportation planning processes, and selected case stuclies . URP. 6675 3 (fo r mer l y URP. 675) . Planning and Public Finance. This course focuses on recent trends in financing local governn1ents, revenue and expenditure analysis, bud geting for local governmen t s with particular emph asis on the capital improvement b u dget , financing capital improve ment s through bond issues, and capital improvement and it s relationship to l ong tern1 plannin g. URP. 667 6 3 (formerly URP. 676). Urban Housing. This course involves an examination of planning and o ther aspects of urban hou sing, focusing primarily on the U.S . urban housing conclitions with some references made to international conclitions and comparisons. Major topics of the course include : aggrega te trends a11d patterns , housing in spatial context, the allocation process of housing markets and submarke t s (supply/finance, demand/mobility/demo graphic change), hou sing prob lems and failures (substan dardness, inequitable distribution, specia l group needs, segregation and discrimination, market problems), the role of governme nt, and alterna t ive approaches. URP. 6680 3 (forme r ly URP. 680) . Urbanization in Develop ing Countries. A description, analysis , and evaluation of urbani za tion and planning in l ess developed countries . The special problems of planning, housing, transportation , envi ronmental quality , and eco nomic development in cities of the se countries are addresse d . Comparisons are made among cities of Third-Wor l d countries and between Third World countries and First-World urb a n areas. URP. 6681-3 (formerly URP. 681) . lnfrastructural Plann ing i n Developing Countries. The course explores traclitional and advance d model s of infra s tructure sys tems in de ve lop ing countries . Topics covered are settleme nt form and loca tion, energy and communication, streets, transportation services , water supply, sewe rage , solid waste clisposal, and other services. Emph asis is p l aced on matching the service needs and ava ilable resources to systems capabilities. URP. 6682 3 (formerl y URP. 682). Housing in Deve l oping Countries. This cour se examines housing problems in devel oping countries and explores alternative policies, programs, and plans . Emphasis is placed on population growth and the impact on hou sing and urban development , housing demand, shelter and services for the urban poor, the sq uat tin g and squat ter-built housing, and comparison of govern ment policies and programs addressing housing problems. URP. 6686 3 (formerly URP. 686) . Special Topics in Urban and Regional Plann ing. Vario u s topical concerns are offered in urban and regional planning, theor y, concepts, methods, case s tuclie s, and practice . URP. 6950 3 (forme rly URP. 700) . Thesi s Research and Pro g r ammi ng. URP. 695 13 (formerly URP. 701). Thesis. URP . 6930-3 ( f ormerly URP. 770) . Planning Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experi ence to stude n t s in urban and regional planning . The emphasis is on actual work experience in set tings with client groups as the students assis t t h em in determining so lutions t o their problems. Program direc t or's approval is required. URP. 6900-3 (forme r ly URP. 960). Independent Study. Studies initiated b y s tudents or facult y and sponsored by a faculty member t o investiga t e a specia l topic or problem re lated to urban de sign.

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D rawings performed by stud ents in ARCH. 5510, E l e m ents of Tiel'ign Expression a n d P rese ntation I , F all Semester 1 87. Professors Marvin Ha t a mi and B enne tt ,,_,,..m,•n ROBERT WALKER JACK HAGEN Stud ent Drawings I 109 KAREN HARRIS ROGER YOUEL

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"Colorado is at a turnin g point, and a great future can unfold for this region as an important partner in a world economy. Having a College of Busine ss working dosely with the business community is a key link in developing this future . Excellent faculty research and innovative teaching programs are contributing to Colorado ' s competitive stre ngth in the next century. Our students are the winners , too." -Dean Donald L. Stevens College of Business and Administra tion and Graduate School of Business Administration

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College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Dean: Donald . Stevens Associate Dean: James D. Suver Assistant Linda S. Hull College Office: 1475 Lawrence St . , Third Floor Telephone : 623 4436 Director o f ndergraduate Programs: Edward J. Conry Director of Gr duate Prog r ams: H. Michael Hayes Director of the Executive Health Administration Pro gram: Bruce . Neumann Director of th Executive M.B.A. Program: John P. Young Executive Boar of the Business Advisory Council Bob Baker , Ch man, Columbia Savings Kermit L. Dark y, President, Mountain Sates Emplo y ers Council Thomas J. Gi son, Executive Vice President, Gates Corp oration Gayle Greer, ice President of Central Operations , American T . Jevision and Communic ations Corpo ration N. Bern e Hart, Chairman of th e Board, United Banks of Colorado Del Hock , Pre ident, Public Service Company Bruce M . Roc well, Executive Director , the Colorado Trust Gail Schoettler State Treasurer Faculty Professors: Gordon G . Bamewell (Marketing), Wayne F . Cascio (Management), Michael A .. Firth (Ac counting), H. Michael Hayes (Marketing and Stra tegic Management), James R. Morris (Finance), William D . Murray (Computer Science), Bruce R. Neumann and Health Administra tion), Donal L. Steven s (Finance), James D . Suver (Accountin and Health Administration) . Associate Pro essors: Rex 0. Bennett (Marketing), Peter G. Br r,nt (Management Science and Informa tion E dward J. Conr y (Business Law and Ethics) , Lav-,rrence F. Cunningham (Transportation and Markaf g), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Leland Kaiser ((Health Administra tion), De F. Murray (Accounting), John D. Ruh nka (Manag ment and Business Law), Raymond F. Zammuto (anagement). Assistant Heidi Boerstler (Health Admin istration), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Jean C. Coop er (Ac ounting) , Richard W . Foster (Finance and HealtH Admini s t ration), James H. Gerlach (Management Science and Information Systems), Jeff E. Hey! (Operations Management), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems), Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing), Rajendra P. Khandekar (Manage ment), Feng Yang Kuo (Information Syst ems), Anne Moeller (Management), Marilyn Sargent (Management). Senior Instructors : Steven Cutler (Accoun ting), Cindy Fischer (Accounting), James H. Millevil l e (Business Administration) . Instructors: Albert S. Bowman (Management), Charles M. Franks (Sta tistic s), Marianne Hite (Finance), Rdbert D. Hockenbury (Accou nting) , Paul J. Patinka (Management), Barbara A. Rado sevich (Finance), Charles A . Rice (Management), Martin J . W yand (Management and Managerial Economics), Victoria M. Zieroth (Accounting). INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain busi ness communi t y, the College of Business and Admin istration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher educa tion is achieved by bringing to gether nationally recog nized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment. Our nation's business and corporate environment is experiencing dramatic and complex change. Your ability to understand these changes and function as a skilled manager in today' s rapidly moving business world will depend to a great extent on the quality of your business education . Because of the dynamic changes in business trends and management, research in bhese areas is crucial to a successful tran sition. The business faculty of "research institutions" provide the most current knowledge, concepts, and advances in the fields of business management. CU Denver' s Cqllege of Business is a "resea rch institu tion," and <;>ur faculty are nationally recognized for their contribMtions to scho larl y research. The information contained in university t extbooks is first conceived through faculty research and is usually published 9 textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research-oriented faculty is writing and t eaching con cepts y ears before they are t ypically seen in t extbooks. Accordingly our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practic d .

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112 I College of Business and Administration Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today' s challenging business environment. At CU Denver's College of Business, you can have the edge over your competition. Faculty Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their teaching and research. Recruited from the nation's leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, Uni versity of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania , UCLA, and Yale, many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their inter disciplinary expertise, academic achievements , schol arly research , and business experience provide students with a dynamic l earning environment, unequalled in the region . Student s Unlike the students at a traditional college campus , our students are adult, working professionals w ho maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes , a significant number are full-time stu dents attending classes offered during the day. Fol lowing the current national trend , women constitute a very high percentage of the student body . Since admission standards are among the most stringent in the region, the student body is highl y motivated and talented. This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and per spectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom inter action and keen competition among the students. Edward Conry, Associate Professor of Business Law and Ethics, shares his expertise on business ethics in the dass room and also as a regular columnist for The D enver Post . Accred ita t i on While there are approximately 800 recognized schools of business nationwide , only 237 are accred ited b y the national accreditation age ncy for university schools of business the American Assembly of Col legiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CUDenver's College of Business is one of the few schools in the State accredited b y the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently "Today , just having the degree isn't as impor tant as where you get it... As corporations become savvier buyers of... talent , they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal. .. Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its pro gram " In addition, many national fellowship pro grams accept only students from accredited programs. In a similar manner, our program in health admin istration is the onl y such program in the region accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Educa tion for Health Services Administration (ACCEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration pro grams meet demanding requirements for quality edu cation in the health administration area. Caree r Opportunities Graduates occupy positions and perform widely varied functions in: Accounting Management consulting A d vertising Marketing management Auditing Marketing research Bankin g Mortgage finance Con s ume r credi t Operations manag ement Operations research Controllership Organization management Credit administration Personnel/human resources Entrepreneurship management Financial accoun ting Public accounting Fina n cia l management Public administration General management Real esta te Health administrat ion Retailing Industrial selling and Selling and sales purchasing man agement Information sys tem s Taxation Insurance Traffic and distribution International business m a n age ment Investment s Transportation Management accounting Wholesaling Other s hold positions of responsibility in fields as diver se as business journalism, public relations, city planning, chamber of co mmerce and trade association management, college administration, and government. Schol a r s hips and F i nancial Ai d Man y programs for financial aid are administered by the Offi c e of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed information. In addition, the College of Busi ness awards some departmental and general scholar ships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year . For additional information, contact the College of Business , 623-4436.

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Each year, aumber of undergraduate students are awarded Dean ' Scholarships, Colorado Scho l arships , and Regents cholarships. These provide financial support for a pbrtion of the students' tuition and fees. The Purchasibg Management Association of Denver awards an scholarship to students interested in careers in p chasing and the Colorado Chapter of the American roduction and Inventory Control Soci ety awards up o two annual scholarships to students interested in c reers in operations management. For information tact the operations management fac ulty adviser in the College of Business. Graduate t tion awards are available to s tudents admitted to th Graduate School of Business Admin istration, base on a number of factors including financial academic performance. For addi tional inform tion contact the Graduate Programs Office at 623 . 36. The Colorad Venture Group, a non-profit Denver organization , Jeriodicall y awards $1,000 scho larship s to small businJss and entrepreneurship majors at CU Denver . Student Or anizations Opportuni for association with other College of Business and Administration students, in varied activities inte ded to stimulate professional interest and to give r cognition to scholastic attainment, is provided by t e following student organizations : Beta Gamm Sigma national honorary scholastic fraternity in b siness CSP A Society for Personnel Adminis tration (studer.t chapter) for students interested in personnel or f . dustrial relations CUAMA -student chap ter of the American Mar keting Associ tion CU Ventur Network -campus chapter of the Association Entrepreneurs , open to all CU-Den ver st dents HASOH alth Administration Student Organiza tion ISC InfOI]J:nation Systems Club MBA Association University of Colorado at Den ver of master's students in business Phi Chi The a national professional business and economics fra ernity Sigma Iota ! Epsilon professional and honorar y management GENERAL POLICIES Academic olicies which apply to all CU-Denver students are in the General Information sec tion of this bulletin. The policies described below apply to both undergraduate students in the College of Busin ess nd Administration and graduate stu dents in the raduate School of Business Administra-Business I 113 tion . Policies applying separately to undergraduate and graduat J students are described under separate headings . j Each is responsible for knowing and com plying with the academic policies and regulations es t ablished for th e College. The college cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student's failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog . Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Class es . Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism , illegitimate posses sion and disposition of examinations, alteration, forg ery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process, such as of credentials or academic s t atus, forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. Any reported act of dishonesty may be referred to the College of Business Committee on Student Faculty Relations at the discretion of the dean, a member of the instructional staff , or other appropriate University representative. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone e lse as the student's own. It is recommended that students consult with the instruc tor s as to the prope r preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order t o avoid this and similar offenses. College Advising and Records Students receive their academic counseling from a faculty member and a staff of advisers in the College of Business office. Advising is available throughout the semester by appointment, althoug h individual appointments with the advisers are generally unavail able during registration . Students are encouraged to discuss with the faculty of the College the various majors available as well as career opportunities. Non-business and prospective students are encour aged to contac t one of the advisers regarding admis sions and academic information, requirements, transfer policies, and unofficial transcript evaluations. Please call the College of Business at 623-4436 for more complete information . Career is availab le from the business fac ulty and through the Auraria Office of Career Plan ning and Placement Services, 556-3477. Admission to Business Classes Admission to business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to the business program , and to other students as described in the separate under graduate graduate policy sections. The course

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114 I College of Business and Administration admission criteria are designed to meet a nwnber of objectives . 1. To assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree. 2. To serve students in other colleges who have business-related education objectives or require ments. 3. To service non-degree students who have specific career or education goals. Att endance R egulations Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with the instructor's policy on attendance. Ad d in g and Dropping Courses See the General Information section of the bulletin for the University-wide drop/add policies. Withdrawal See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide withdrawal policies. A d m i n ist r ati ve Dro p The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the Col lege of Business and Administration office that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisi t es be dropped from the course . Generally , students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds. Appea l Proce dure Student should contact a business adviser in the College of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College. Ge n eral Gra ding Policies Plus/Minus Grading . College of Business faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading. For exam ple, B + corresponds to 3.3 credit points (for each semester hour), 8-corresponds to 2 . 7 credit points. Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student's control prevent the student from completing course requirements (exams , papers, etc.). Generally, students must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire course. Students should not reg ister for the class a second time but should make up the work with the instructor giving the IF. All IF grades must be made up within one year, or the IF will be automatically changed to the grade of F . All incomplete grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior t o graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades. Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical error s and when a student is making up an incomplete grade (JW, IF). All changes must be make within one year after the course has been taken unless highly unusual circum stances can be documented and the change has been approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee for undergraduate courses, or the Graduate Programs Director for graduate courses. Normally, grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years. ACAD E MIC CENTER FOR ENRICHMENT The Academic Center for Enrichment at CU-Denver is a learning assistance center which is designed to promote student growth and retention. The Center is dedicated to providing quality educational support services to all CU-Denver students. These services are designed to hel p students gain the most from their university experiences. The types of services provided are: 1. Courses. 1 STSK. 0700. Developmental Composition STSK. 0800 . Developmental Composition for ESL STSK. 0801. Communication Skills STSK. 0702. Developmental Reading STSK. 0802. Improving Academic Reading Skills for ESL STSK. 0703. College Preparatory Math. I STSK. 0704. College Preparatory Ma t h. II STSK. 0705. Problem Solving STSK. 0806 . Study Skills for ESL STSK. 0707. College Survival Skills STSK. 0807. College Survival Skills for ESL 2 . Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas. Sessions may be either individual or group and are held on weekdays and evenings. There is no charge to the student. 3. Workshops. Free study skills and computer workshops are provided. Workshop topics include test-taking , memory techniques, notetaking, introduction to the personal computer, and word processing. 1 For complete course d es cr i ptions s ee the S tudent Academic Ser vices s ection of this catalog.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS A carefully ! designed curriculum to prepare student s for success in business management is available for t h e student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree . The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor o Science (Business), Master of Business Administratio (M.B . A .), and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees The particular programs offered are : Areas o f Emp asis (B.S. in B usiness) Accounting En treprene ship and New Venture Development Finance H uman Res , urces Management Information Systems lnternation Business Manageme t Marketing Operations ranagement R eal Estate and Distribution Management Graduate Programs Master of B;l siness Administration (M.B.A.) Mas ter of S ience in Accounting Mas ter of S ence in Finance Master of sience in Health Administration Master of S , ience in Information S y stems Mas ter of S ence in Management Master of S ' ience in Marketing E x ecuti ve Mas ter of B siness Administration for E x ecutives Master of ' cience in Health Administration for Executives DEGREE PROGRAMS Director : EdJr,rd J. Conry Program Patricia Peckinpaugh Advi ser: Nan!Reed T h e under adu ate curriculum leading to the Bach elor of Scienc (Business) degree is intended to help the student a eve the following general objectives : 1. An unde standing of the activities that constitute a business e terprise and the principles underlying of t hose activities. 2. The abili!iY to think through logicall y and anal ytically about the kind of comple x problems encoun1 t e r e d by 3. Facility m the arts of communication. 4 . A comprehension of human relation s hips invol ved in am organization. 5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibili t ies of those ih administrative positions . 6. Skill in l the art of learning that will help the student conti ue self-education after leaving the cam p u s. Undergraduate Admissions A d viser: Juliet Pattullo Telepho ne: 623-4436 Business I 115 Admission of Freshman Students . See the Genera l Information section of this bulletin for a description of freshman admission requirements. Admission of Transfer Students. Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the discussions of transfer students in the General Information sec t ion of this bulletin. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to deter mine its appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business) . For information abou t specific pol icies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduat e business adviser. Intra-university Transfer. Students who want t o transfer to the College of B usiness and Administratio n from another college or school of the University must formall y apply at the College of Business office. A minimum grade-point average, and minimum number of academic hours (both established by the College) are required for consideration. Transfer deadlines are July 15 for Fall Semester, November 15 for Spring Semester , and April15 for the Summer term. The college will consider each application based upon the student' s academic standing, the quality of the student' s academic work and the courses completed. To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and CU-Denver transcripts to a business adviser. Transfer forms are ahilable at CU-Denver Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at CU-Denver Records. The transcript must include the student's most recent semester a t the Uni versity. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings). Second Undergraduate Degree Students may apply to the College of Bu siness and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree , provided the first undergraduat e degree is in a field other than business. The studen ts who is accepted fol! the second undergraduate degree will b e required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general educa t ion courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses . Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records. Applicants for the second undergraduat e degree are required to complete a personal interview with a busi-

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116 I College of Busin ess and Administration ness adviser . Eligible s tudents will be notified when their admissions file is complete and interviews can be sche duled . If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic recor d that justifies consider ation for the graduat e program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master's degree programs. Double Degree Programs Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a s pec ialize d field and management. For thi s reason, students may be interes ted in com bined programs of study leading to completion of de g ree requiremen t s concurrently in two fields . Com bined programs have been arranged for engineering and business , and ma y be ar ranged for other profe s sional combina t ions as well. For additional informa tion, contact an undergra duate business adviser at 623-4436. Graduation Requirements The Bachelor of Science (Business) degree requires: Total Credits. A tot al of 120 semester hours. Area of Emphasis. Completion of at least 12 semes ter hours of appro ved courses in the area of emphasis. Residence. At least 30 se mester hours of business courses must be completed af ter a student's admis sion to the College. The 30 hours for residence must include MGMT. 4110 and MGMT. 4500, the 12 hours in the area of emphasis, and 12 hours in other business courses (core and/or e lectives). Grade-Point Average Requirement . A minimum cumulative scho lastic grade-point average of 2 . 0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S . (Business) degre e, 2.0 for all business cour ses, and 2.0 for th e four courses in the s tudent's area of emphasis must be maintained. Business Program R equire ments . Satisfac tion of all the following requirements: Semester H o ur s Communications and composition ..................... .... . ... 6 Ma them atics ............. . .. . ........ ... ................................ 6 Political science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Introductor y sociology or cultu ral anthropology ........... 3 Na tur a l science ..... ..... .............................................. 6 Principles of economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 General psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Social-humanistic elective ................................... ....... 3 Bu siness core requirement s ..... . .. ...... . . ..... ... . .... .... ..... 30 Area of emph asis ....... .... .... . ......... . ....... ..... . . ...... ..... 12 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Total Semester Hours .... .... .... . . ... ... . ... . . ... . . . . .. ...... 120 Detailed descriptions of courses which satisfy the area requirements are presented belo w : Semester Hours Communic a tions ................... ................................... 6 Requir ed: One E n glish co mposition (ENGL. 1021 or 1034) and one spe ech course ( CMMU . 2021 or 2101) Mathematic s ... ......... ..................... ......... . . . . .... ........ .. 6 Require d : MAT H . 1070 A l ge bra for Business and Social Sci ence and MATH. 1080 P o lynomial Calculus . College-level algebr a may be substitute d for MATH. 1070. Six semes ter hours of se quential co lle g e-level calcu lu s (i.e., MATH . 1041, 2411) may be subs tituted for MATH. 1070 and 1080 . Political Science . .... ......... . ... .... ...... .. ... . . .............. . ..... 6 Required: P SC. 1001 and 1101. The following course s also will fulfill the P SC. 1001 req u irements : P SC. 3000, 3046, 3062, 3105, 3404 , 3532, 3554, 3656 . Intr oductory Socio l ogy or Cu ltural Anthropology . . ....... 3 Natural Science ... ......... . . ... . . ....................... ........... ... 6 Select courses s uch as biology, chemistry, or physics . Astra geophysics , ear th science, physical geography, and geo logical science also are acceptable. Mathematics and psych ology are not appropriate courses for this require ment Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Six homs of economics are required . When ECON . 2012 2022 are taken a t CUDenver for eight hours , the addi tion a l two hours apply as non-business electives . Gene ra l psycho l ogy .................. . ............... .. ... .... ....... 3 PSY. 1002 is reconm1ended. Social-humanistic elective ...... . . . ... ....... ............. . ......... 3 Sel ect from the following co urses : Hi s tor y course (1000 or 2000 level); a behavior p sy chology cour se (PSY. 3155 or 4994/4995 are s trongly recommend ed) ; PHIL. 1012, 1200, or 2200; Cultur a l Anthropology or SOC. 1001, 1190, 2500 , 300 1, 3012, 3020, 3030, 3052 (Soci ology and Cultural Anthropology courses are only accept able if the y are n ot u se d to fulfill the introductor y Sociolo gy o r Cultural An thropolo gy requirement.) Core R equiremen t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Complete all of th e following courses: ACCT. 2000 Introduction to Financial Accounting ISMG. 2000 Business Information System s and the Computer QU AN. 2010 Bu siness Statis t ics BLAW. 3000 Busine ss Law FNCE. 3300 Principles of Financial Markets and Mana ge m en t MKTG . 3000 Principles of Marketing MGMT . 3300 Management and Organiz ation Behavior OMGT . 3000 Operations Management MGMT. 4110 Bu siness and Society MGMT. 4500 Bu siness Policy and Strategic Management Areas of Emphas is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 (See indi vidual Areas of Em phasis in this section) E l ectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Busin ess electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 (any undergrad u a t e academic course offered b y the College of Bu sine s o th er than business core courses and the 12 hours for the area of e mphasis ; MGMT. 1000 is not required but recommended for freshmen and sopho mores) Non-bu siness e l ective s . ........ ..... .. ............... . ........... . 15 (m ust include 9 hours of upper di v i sion 3000or 4000-level work) Free electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 (ma y be either busine ss or non-business undergraduate aca demi c courses)

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Guideline s t or Elective Credits. Elective credi t s should be sel t cted carefully as not all classes are accep t able. Ge erally, to b e accep t able , electives must be t aught b y University of Colorado faculty , must h ave a fohn of assessmen t such as a term paper and/or e xamin, tions, and must be regular classroom type classe s . coverage mus t be college level , not repetitiou • of other work applied toward the degree, must e aca demic as opposed to voca t ional / t echnical , and,must be part of the regular Universi ty offerings . Specificall y ,Jhe Colle ge wi ll accept: a. A maxim m of 6 hours of the theor y of physical education , re d eation, and dance, and b. A maxim J m of 6 hours of approved independent study, exper e ntal studies, choir, band, music les sons, art lesso s, and c. A maxim of 12 hours of advanced R O TC providing student is enrolled in the program and com pletes th e total program. The Colle g e ill n o t accept: Activity ph sical education classes , recreation , workshop s, in t rnships, orien tations , dance , teaching methods, prac icums, and courses reviewing basic skills in comp ters, English composition, ma t hemat ics , and chemi tr y . Summar y Required C ours Elective Cour s e s Total R e quir e The folio regis t ration . oo oo ooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 81 oOoooooooooOoo ooooo o oOOoOOooOoOOOOOOOOOoOooOoooOOoooo 39 120 e Prog ram sequence of courses is a guide to Fres hman Year Semes t er Hour s ENGL. 1021 o r 1 3 4. English Composition 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 3 CMMU . 20 2 1 o r 101. Communication Theory or Public S p ea kin g 00 00 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 •• 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 3 MATH . 1070. for Social Scie nce and Busi ne ss ... 3 MATH. 1080. C culus for Social Science and Bus iness 00 3 P SC. 1001. I n tr duction t o Political Science 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 3 P SC. 1101. Political Sys t e m 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 3 SOC. 1 0 01. to Sociology 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 3 MGMT. 10 00. In roduction to Business 00000000000000000000000 3 a tural S cie nce 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0000 00 00 00 00 00 00. 6 Tota l 30 Sopho m ore Year ECON. 2012 a n 2022. Principles of Economics (macro / micro) . . . 00 •••• •••• 00 •••••••• • ••• •••••• 00 ••••• • 00 •••••••••••• 6 PSY. 1002 . Intro 1 uction to Ps y c h o lo gy 00 0000000000000000000000 3 .. ::: QUAN . 20 10 . B iness Statistics 00000000 ooOOooooooooOOooOOOOooOO 3 ACCT . 20 00. Int oduction to Financia l Accounting oooooo 3 o nbu si n ess e l e tiv e s ........ 00 • • • • • •••••••• • 00 00 ••••• ••••••••••••• :....2. ThW junior Yea r MKTG. 30 00. Pri ciples of Marke ting 00000000000000 oooooooooo 3 FNCE . 3300 . Basic Finance 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 .. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 3 Busine ss I 117 MGMT. 3300. Management and Organiza tional B ehavior .. , ....... . 00 • ••••• ••••• 00 • • •••••••• 00 •••••••••••••••••••••• 00. 3 OMG T . 3000. Operations Management OOOOOOoooooooooooooooo• 3 BLAW. 3000. Busi ne ss Law oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo• 3 Business e l ec ti ves .... . . .............. .... . .... 00 • • •••••••••••••••• 00. . 3 Nonbusiness electives 00 ••• ••••• 00 • • 00 • • • • 00 00 ••••••••••••••••••••••• 6 Either business or n onbusiness e l ectives .. . . . ........ ......... 6 ThW Senior Year MGMT . 4110. Business and Society ooOOOOoooooooooooooooooooooo 3 MGMT. 4500. Bus ine ss Policy and Strategic Managen1ent ...... 00 •••••• 00 • •••• ••••• 00 00 • •••••• 00 00 • •••••••••••••• 3 Area of empha s i s 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 12 Business elective . 00 •••••••••••••• • ••••••••• 00 • • • • • • • • 00 • • • •••• ••• 00.. . 3 Either business or nonbusiness electives ........... . . ......... 9 Total Areas o f Emphasis Each candi date for the B.S. (Business) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of empha sis comprising a minimum of 12 semester hou rs tak e n at the Unive r si t y of Colorado at Denver . A 2.0 average is required for the four required area courses. Typical ly , students se lect an area of emphasis after taking several of the "co re " courses. The y then complete the hours req uired for their selec ted area. Av ai lable areas of emphasis are : Accounting Entrepreneurship and new venture development Finance Human reso urce s management Inform ation sys tem s Int ernationa l business Management Ma rke t ing Opera ti o n s manage m ent Rea l es tate Transportation and distribution management Students so desirin g may compl e t e a dual area of emphasis by carefully se lection of course s and u se of elective hours for the second area. Information about each area of emphasis is given in this College of Bu sin ess section of the catalo g . ACADEMic; POLICIES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS Advising. o arrange an undergraduate advi s ing appointment , , call 623-4436. Admissions. Admission requirements to th e Col lege of Business and Administration for ne w freshmen and fov transfer s tudents are described i n the General Information sectio n of thi s bulletin. Require ments for U niver sity of Colorado students seeking a dmi ssions to the College are in thi s se ction under IntraU niversj ty Transfer. Re gistra tion. In s truction for regi s ter ing for courses i s contained in another publica t ion called the Schedule

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118 I College of Bu siness and Administration of Classes, which is availab le before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs, the place, and the courses offered. Scholastic Load. The normal scholas ti c load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours during the FaWSpring Semesters and 12 hours during Summer Term . A maximum of 3 hours can be taken during the interim /vacation session. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Educa tion , whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student's load. Repeatin g Courses. A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the F will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the tr anscript. A course in whic h a grade of D-or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the business adviser . Courses repeated without an adviser's approval may not be used in the grade-point average calculation. Undergraduate Honors Program. Upon recommen dation of the faculty , student who demonstrate s upe rior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall Univer sity of Colorado grade-poin t average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall Univer sity of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude. Filing for Graduation . Students must file an Under graduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card , and request a graduation evalua tion (senior audit) from a business adviser prior to registering for their final semes ter. Failure to do so may delay graduation . Also, students desiring to change their area of empha sis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to regi s tering for the ir fina l semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation . Attendance by Non-business Majors . Space in undergraduate business courses is reserved for stu dents admitted to the College. Ce rtain other students are admitted on a space availa ble basis at the discre tion of the Director of the Undergraduate Program and the instructor . Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for course availability. Cou rses From Oth er Institu tio ns. Business students must have the wri tten approval of a business advi ser to register for courses (excluding MSC pooled cour s es) offered by other institu tion s. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval . Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree cre dit. Generally, only non-business electives or low er-division, non-business requirements are acceptable for tran sfer from other institutions once a student ha s enrolled in the College of Business. Business students who take more than six (6) seme s ter hours from another institution must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students . MSC Courses. Business students may selec t their non-business required and elective courses from those offered in the "pool" of MSC courses. Grades of Cor better must be earne d to receive business degree credit ; however the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is considered to be like other transfer credi t s. Non-poo led , MSC business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit. Graduate Level Courses . With prior wri tten approval of a business adviser, student s may take up to a maximum of six (6) semester hours of graduate level non-business e l ec tive credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to appl y the credits toward business degree require ments. Pas s/Fail. Only non-b usines s elective courses may be taken pass/fail . Required business and non-busi ness courses (natural scie nce and social-humanistic elective included) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of six (6) hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit . Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee) . Correspondence Courses. Only 6 semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Bu siness courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evalua ted b y a business adviser to determine their acceptab ility toward degree require ments, and the adviser's written approval is required prior to the student' s regis terin g for courses. Students should contact the Division of Continuing Education for course offerings and registration procedures. Independent Study . Junior or senior business s tu dents desiring to work beyond regular course cover age ma y take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hams) under the direc tion of a n instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. Both business and non-business independent study courses may be taken. A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study courses may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semes ter hours may be applied toward degree requirements. An independent study request form (available from a business a dvi ser) must be signed b y the student, instructor, area coordinator, and the Undergraduate Program Director. Study A broad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs is generall y limited to non-business elective credit. Students must meet with a business adviser to determine course accep tability and for written appro v al prior to the semes ter in which the y intend to

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Accounting/Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development I 119 I study abroad. [nformation on the various programs is available at th Office of International Education on the Boulder cap:1-pus. Stale Work olicy. Students newl y admitted to the College of Bu ess and former business students re admi tted to t e College after an absence of three semesters rna apply credits up to five (5) years old toward busine s degree requirements. Courses more than five year old will be evaluated individually for their current r levance to the degree program . Stu dents ma y be required to update their knowledge by taking additi nal courses in an area where past courses are oilit dated; in such cases, credit will be given for courses. Generally, business courses more than ei$ht years old will not apply toward degree creditfhen presented by newly admitted or re-admitted s dents. AREAS OF MPHASIS ACCOUNTING Adviser: Prof. Bruce R. Neumann Telephone: 62 -4436 Accounting ourses are offered in several fields of profession al accountancy at the intermediate , advanced and raduate levels . They provide prepara tion for practic in one or more of the following fields: Accounting nd management control systems Auditing Financial ac ounting Manag erial ccounting Tax account ng Teaching an research In all of the e fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal , e anomie, and political environment is needed . A hig degree of analytical ability and com munication is indispensable. Courses in glish composition, speech, ethics and logic are desir ble . Courses in statistics and informa tion systems, qeyond the required College of Business core courses , ajre highly recommended. ACCT. 331q (Managerial Cost Accounting) is a required for the accounting area and applies as a usiness elective. Accounting majors should not tak ACCT . 2020. Required Cours . s Semester Hours ACCT. 3220. Int rmediate Financial Accounting I .... ... . . 3 ACCT . 3230. Int rmediate Financial Accounting II . ....... 3 ACCT. 3320. Int rmediate Cost Accounting . ........... . .... 3 Accounting elec ive (at the 4000 level) ......................... 3 Students to pursue accounting as a career usually take ore than the above required hours. Many student take a total of about 30 hours of accounting, of en taking two courses each semester in their junior a d senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisers in planning their accounting programs. Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting beyond the core. Examples of these specializations include the following recommended courses: Financial Accounting and Auditin g ACCT. 4240 . Advanced Financial Accounting ACCT . 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Advanced Income Ta x Accounting ACCT . 4620. Auditing Managerial Accounting and Systems ACCT. 4330. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases ACCT. 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Advanced Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4540. Accounting Systems and Data Processing ACCT . 4620. Auditing ACCT. 4800. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations Graduate study in accoun tin g is receiving increas ing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. qtudents meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURE DEVELOPMENT Adviser: Prof. Rajendra Khandekar Telephone: 623-4436 The entrepreneurship and new venture development major is designed for students who wish to pursue careers as either owners of independent busi nesses , work in small independent businesses , or work for corporations whose clients are primaril y new businesses and entrepreneurs, such as CPA firms, underwriters, consultants, venture capi t alists , and financial ana lysts . The program emphasizes under standing and acquiring skills in the broad range of activities required to become an effective entrepreneur in today's business environment. It is highly recommended that students majoring in entrepreneurship and new venture development also pursue a second area of emphasis in accounting, finance, or marketing. Course requirements of the second area can be included as part of the student's busines s or free electives. Additional courses in accounting, finance, or marketing sho uld be planned in consultati n with the adviser to serve individual career needs . Required Courses Semester Hours MGMT. 4520. Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management ....... . .............................................. .. 3 MGMT. 4700. New Venture Strategies ........................ 3 (Two of the following four courses) FNCE . 4310. Bus ines s Finance I ................................. 3 ACCT . 3310. Managerial Cost Accounting ................... 3 MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment ....... ........ ..................... 3 MKTG. 4800. Marketing Strategies and Policies ............ 3

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120 I College of Business and Administration Recommended Electives ACCT. 3220. Intermediate Financial Accounting I ......... 3 ACCT. 3320. Intermediate Cost Accounting ................. 3 FNCE . 4320. Business Finance II ........ ...................... .. 3 MKTG. 3100. Salesmanship ........ .......................... ..... 3 MKTG. 3300. Marketing Research ...... ........ .... ............ 3 MKTG. 3500. Principles of Advertising .................. ..... 3 BLAW. 4120. Advanced Business Law .......... .... .......... 3 MGMT . 4340. Labor and Employee Relations ............... 3 OMGT. 4400. Planning and Control System ................. 3 FINANCE Adviser: Prof . James R. Morris Telephone: 623-4436 The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, monetary policy, banking, and invest ments. The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of fundamental theory pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about finan cial problems and to formulate sound financial deci sions and policies. It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the func tions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, pric es, money markets, and financial institutions . Emphasis is placed on financial policy , management, control, analysis, and decision making . Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. ACCT. 2020 (or ACCT. 3310) is a required prerequisite for the finance area, and applies as a business elective. Required Cour ses Semester Hour s FNCE. 4310. Business Finance I ................................. 3 FNCE . 4320. Busin ess Finance II ................................ 3 FNCE . 4330. In ves tment and Portfolio Management ...... 3 FNCE. 4350. Monetary and Fiscal Policy ..................... 3 Recommended Electives FNCE. 4370. International Financial Management ......... 3 FNCE. 4340. Security Analysis ................................... 3 FNCE. 4360. Bank Management ................................. 3 FNCE. 4430. Real Estate Inves tments .......................... 3 FNCE. 4440. Real Estate Finance ........ ........................ 3 Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester. Finance majors are encour aged to take additional accounting courses as business electives. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Adviser: Prof. Wayne F. Cascio Telephone: 623-4436 Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and labor rela tions. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and union -ma nagement rela tions. Required Courses Semester Hours MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee Relations ............... 3 MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment .. ....... ......... ...... ... . ............ .... ....... ...... .......... 3 MGMT . 4390. Human Resources Management: Legal and Social I ss ues . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. . . .. . .. .. . .. . . . . .. . .. . 3 MGMT . 4410. Human Resources Management: Compensa tion Administration . .. .. . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . .. . .. .. . 3 Recommended Electives MGMT. 3350. Managing Work Groups .................... .. . 3 MGMT. 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations ..... 3 MGMT. 4370. Organization Design ...... ................ ...... 3 PSY. 3135. Organizational Psychology ......................... 3 PSY. 3155. Industrial Psychology ........ ................ .. ...... 3 PSY. 4405. Theories of Social Psychology .... ................. 3 OMGT . 4440. Quality and Productivity .... ............ ....... 3 ACCT. 2020. Introduction to Managerial Accounting .... 3 ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures and Data Base Management Systems . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. . . . . .. .. .. .. . .. 3 OMGT . 3000. Intermediate Statistics ........................... 3 SOC. 3052. Sociology of Work .......... .......... ............... 3 ECON . 4610. Labor Economics ................................... 3 INFORMATION SYSTEMS Adviser: Prof. William D. Murray Telephone: 623-4436 The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as profes sional data processing managers in business and gov ernment. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management informa tion systems systems for the collection, organiza tion, accessing, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations . The automation of data processing is also studied extensively . Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG. 2200 and ISMG. 2210 are required prerequisites for the information systems area and apply as business electives. Required Courses Semester Hours (The following two courses) ISMG. 4650. System s Analysis and Design I ................ 3 ISMG. 4660. Systems Analysis and Design II ............... 3 (At least two of the following five courses) QUAN. 3000. Intermediate Statistical Analysis for Deci s ion Support (infrequently offered) .................... 3 ISMG. 3300. Operation s Research for Decision Support . 3 ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures and Database Management S ys tem s . . . . . . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . .. .. .. . . 3 ISMG. 4700. Computer and Information Technology ... .. 3 OMGT. 4400. Planning and Control Systems .......... .... . 3 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Adviser: Prof. H . Michael Hayes Telephone: 623-4436 Increasingly , businesses are reorienting their think ing, planning, and operations to capitalize on oppor-

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tunities that xist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals wth the appropriate skills, training, and interest, business provides excellent career opportUruhes. The busine ss curriculum is designed to enhance a d build on thorough training in basic business skills nd to provide students with additional skills and kniwledge appropriate to international business . ECON . 441 (International Trade and Finance) is a required prer quisite for the international busine ss area and appli i1 s as a non-business elective. Required Cours s Semes ter Hours FNCE. 4370. Int mational Financial Management . ... .... . 3 TRMG. 4580. In emational Transpor tation ...... .......... .. . 3 MKTG. 4900. In emational Marketing .......... .......... ..... 3 MGMT. 4400. 1 temational Management ........ ...... ...... 3 Students sh uld see an academic adviser for course scheduling . A second a ea of emphasis in business is highl y recommended. The course requirements for a second area can be intuded as part of the business and free elective hours In addition, serious consideration should be giv to eithe r a minor or a certificate in international a fairs, offered b y the Coll ege of Liberal Arts and Scien es, and to the study of a foreign lan guage . MANAGEMEN Adviser: Prof. aymond F . Zammuto Telephone: 62t36 The manage ' ent curriculum provide s the founda tion for career in supervision and general manage ment in a wid i variety of organizations. It develop s skills in manag . ment practic e through an understand ing of general rha nagement principles, individual and group behavio ! . organizational change and design, and human res urces management. Required Course Semester Hours MGMT . 3350. Work Groups .. .................. ... 3 MGMT. 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations ..... 3 MGMT. 4370. 0 anization Design ........ .... ...... .......... 3 MGMT. 4380. H man Resources Management: Employment .......... .. .. .. . ....... . ...... . ............ . .... . .... . 3 Recommended E ectives MGMT . 4340. La rand Employee Relations ............... 3 MGMT . 4390. H man Re sources Management : Legal and Social Issue s .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . 3 MGMT . 4400. lntl'!mational Management .......... .... ...... 3 MGMT . 4520. Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management .! .. .......................... ........................... 3 MGMT. 4700. Ne Venture Strategies ........................ 3 MGMT . 4950. To 1 ics in Busin ess ....... .......... ...... .. .... ... 3 Operations Management I 121 MARKETING Adviser: Prqf. Lawrence F. Cunningham Telephone: 623-4436 Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the orgaljlization toward the satisfac tion of c us tomer wants and needs. This involves understanding customers, identifying tho se wants and need s which the organization can best serve, guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market , sec uring the cus tomer ' s ord er , and finally, monitorin g customer response in order to guide future activities. In most organizations, marketing is a major func tional area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management , advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distri bution , product management , market management, marketing information systems, and retail manage ment. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in ser vice businesses and not-for-profit organizations. Required Courses Semester Hours (The follow ing two c o urses) MKTG. 3300. Market R esearc h ........................ ..... ...... 3 MKTG. 4800. Marketing Strategies and Policies .. ...... .... 3 (Choose two of the following courses) ........ .. . ...... .... .. MKTG. 3100. Personal Selling ......... . ....... ... .. ... ..... ...... 3 MKTG. 3200. Consumer Behavior ............................ ... 3 MKTG. 3500. Pri nciple s of Adv ertisin g .. ............ ......... 3 MKTG . 4500. 4\dvertising Management .......... .......... ... 3 MKTG. 4600. Business Market ing . .............. .. .. ....... ..... 3 MKTG. 4700. Sales Force Management ........... ...... ....... 3 MKTG. 4850. Physical Distribution Management .......... 3 MKTG. 4900. International Marketing ...... . ...... .. .......... 3 In additio:q to the four required courses, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particu lar career orientations. The marketing adviser can assist the student in choos ing an appropriate set of electives to fit the career objectives. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Adviser: Prof. Jeff E. Heyl Telephone: 623-4436 Operations management studies are designed to prepare students for careers as production manager, operations manager , management analyst, or systems analyst in suc h private sec tor organizations as manu facturing, bahking, insurance, hospitals, and con struction , as as in a var iety of municipal, state, and federal organizations. Production or operations managers may be charged with the design, implementation, operation, and main tenance of the production systems. Managerial activ ities could include forecasting demand, productio n planning and inventory control, scheduling labor and equipment, job design and labor standards, quality control , purchasing, and facilities location and layo ut.

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122 I College of Busine ss and Administration The outlook for jobs in this area continues to be strong in the 1980s. This placement is aided by the student chapter of t he American Production and Inventory Control Society and work intern programs provided to qualified students. participation in live case research and consulting pro jects wi th l ocal orga nizations is usually an integral part of thi s course of study. Stud ents whose major areas of emphasis are infor mation sys t ems, tran spor t a tion management, or engi neerin g will find the op erations/management 4000-level courses to be particul arly well related to their courses of study. Students shou ld plan their schedules carefully as require d courses are not offered every semester. Required Courses Semester Hours (The following three courses) ISMG. 3300. Operations Research for Decision Support . 3 OMGT. 4400. Planning and Con trol Systems 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 3 OMGT. 4440. Quality and Prod uct ivity 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 3 (One of the following courses) 00000000 00000000000000000000000000 OMGT . 4470. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management ............ ....... ... . ...... . .. 00 00. 00................. 3 OMGT . 4600. Purchasing, Materials Management , and Negotiation 00 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00. 00 00 00. 00 00 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00 3 Recommended Elect ives ISMG. 2200. Business Programming I : Structured COBOL ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooo 3 MGMT. 3350. Ma n aging Work Group s 0000 00 00 00 oooo 00 00 00 00. 3 MGMT . 4370. Organization Design 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 000000 00 00 00 3 MGMT. 4340. Labor and Emp loyee R elations 00 00000000 00 00. 3 MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Man ageme nt: Employment 00. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ........... 3 QUAN . 3000. Intermediate Statis t ics ........................... 3 TRMG. 4500. Tra nsport ation Operation and Management ..... . . . 00 .......... 00 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 GEOG. 3411. Economic Geograp hy: Manufacturing ...... 3 GEOG. 4650. Location Analysis ................................. 3 Students planning to take the APICS (American Production and Inventor y Control Society) or NAPM (National Assoc iation for Purch asing Management) certification examinations s h ould cons ult with an adviser to determine which elective should be taken. REAL ESTATE Adviser: Prof. James R. Morris Telephone: 623-4436 Real estate careers require kno wledge of real estate investment, urban land economics, real estate law , appraising, fina nc e, taxes, managemen t , sales, and accoun t ing. Real estate is one segmen t of the economy in which it is still possib le for persons t o be th eir own boss w h ether as a broker, appraise r, deve l oper, syndicator or property manager. FNCE . 3400 (Principles of Real Estate Practice) is a require d prerequisite for the real estate area. Reqllired Courses Semester Hours FNCE . 4420. Residential and Incom e Property Appraisal ...... 00 ........................................ , •••••••••••• 3 FNCE. 4440. Real Estate Finance ................................ 3 FNCE . 4450. Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions . 3 FNCE. 4410. Real Estate Deve l opment or .................. 00 .. FNCE. 4430. R eal Estate In ves tment s ........ .................. 3 It is strong l y recommended that any student plan ning to sit for the Colorado b roker's examination take all six of the real estate courses. Additi onal prepara tory courses for a real es t a t e career are: Suggested Cowses Semester Hours ACCT . 4410. I nc ome Tax Accounting ...... 00 .. 00 ...... 00 ...... 3 FNCE. 4350. Financial Marke t s and Institu t ions ........ oo. 3 FNCE . 4330. Inve stment and Portfolio Management .. . . . . 3 MKTG. 3100. Sal esmanship ................ 00 00 00 00 ............ 00. 3 MKTG. 3200. C onsumer Behavior ................ 00 ............. 3 MKTG. 4700. Sales Management ............ 00 .................. 3 TRANSPORTATION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT Adviser: Prof. Lawrence. F. Cunningham Telephone: 623-4436 The curric ulu m in tr ansportation management includes the role of transportation in society and th e problems of traffic management within specific indus tries as well as the management of firms in the trans portation industry. Such as airlines, trucking firms, railroad s, and urban transit firms. International trans portation management problems and policies are ana l yzed. One of the recommended elective courses may be substituted with consen t of the adviser for one of the required co urse s if there is a schedule conflict, if the course is not available , or if a student demonstrates a career need for such a course. Required Cou rses Semester Hours (Any four of the following s ix courses) TRMG. 4500. Transportation Operation and Management .......................... 00 ............ 00 ........... 00. 3 TRMG. 4520. Probl ems in Surface Transportation Managemen t .............. 00 ••• 00................................... 3 TRMG. 4560. Air Transportation .. 00 .. 00 ............ 00 .......... 3 TRMG. 4570. Urban Transpor t ation ............................ 3 TRMG. 4580. Int ernationa l Tran spor t a tion ................... 3 MKTG. 4850. Ph ysical Dis tribution Management 3 R ecomn1ended Electi ves MGMT . 4340. Labor and Employee Relations ............... 3 TRMG. 4510. Survey of Transportation: Law and Freight Claims . ... . ............... . . . . ...... 00 00 00.................. 3 OMGT . 4600. Pur chasing, Materials Management and ego tiation ........................ 00 ....... .................. 3 . MKTG. 4900. International Marketing ........ 00 ........ 00 .. 00. 3 GEOG . 4610. Urban Geography : Economic 00 00 00 ...... 00 00 00 3 GEOG. 4630. Transportation Ge ography oOOOOOOO .... 00 00 ..... 3

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UNDERGRAD iATE COURSES-ACCOUNTING ACCT. 2000-3 (formerly ACCT. 200) . Introduction to Financial Accou ting. Fall, Spring, Summer. The prepara tion and interpr tation of the principal financial statements of the business nterprise , with emphasis on asset and lia bili ty valuation pro bl ems and the determination of net income. Prer., s phomor e standing. ACCT. 2020-3 (f , rmerly ACCT. 202) . Introduction to Mana gerial Fall, Spring. The analysis of cost behav ior and the role f accounting in the planning and control of bu si n ess enterp ses, with emphasis on management deci sion-making us of accounting information . Note: Finance majors m ust ta e this course and accounting majors may not tak e this corrse to satisfy degree requirements. Prer., ACCT. 2000. ACCT. 3220-3 (f rmerly ACCT. 322). Intermediate Financial Accounting I. F.Jll, Sprint? Summer. Intensive analysis of ge ner ally accept d accounting principles, accounting theo ry, and preparat on of annual financial statements for public corporations . Pr r., ACCT . 2000 and junior standing. ACCT. 3230-3 (f rmerly ACCT. 323). Intermed iate Financial Accounting II. )Fail, Spring, Summer. Continuation of ACCT. 3220. ACCT. 3220. ACCT. 3310 3 formerly ACCT. 331). Managerial Cost Accounting. Fa , Spring , Summer. Measurement and repor tin g of rna ufacturing and service costs. Identifies and analyzes the rol1of production costs in income determina tion. Includ es c mputer processing of cost data . Non-ma jor s ma y take eit er ACCT . 2020 or 3310. Prer. , ACCT . 2000 and ISMG. 2000. ACCT. 3320-3 ( ormerly ACCT. 332). Intermediate Cost Accounting . FaJt Spring , Swnmer. Cost analysis for pur poses of control and deci sion making. Analysis of cost behavior , role o accounting in planning and control, and managerial uses of cost accounting data . Includes use of computer assiste decision models. Prer ., ACCT . 3310 and Q UAN. 2010 . ACCT. 4240-3 (f rmerly ACCT. 424). Advanced Financial Accounting . Fall Spring. Advanced financial accounting concepts and prait ice with emphasis on accounting for part ner ships, busine s combinations , and consolidations. Prer., ACCT. 3220. ACCT. 4250-3 (f rmerly ACCT. 425). Financial Accounting Issues and Ca 1es. In-depth analysis of contemporar y accounting issu s and problems, the development of accounting thou ht and principles, and critical review of gene r ally accept d accounting principles. Prer., ACCT . 3230. ACCT. 4330 3 (fo merly ACCT. 433). Manage rial Account ing Problems nd Cases. Spring. Critical ana l ysis of adva nc ed topics i managerial accounting. Considerable use of cases and curr n t readings. Prer., ACCT. 3320. ACCT. 4410-3 ACCT. 441). Income Tax Account ing . Fall, Sprin Summer. Provisions and procedures of federal in come ta laws and requirements affecting individ uals and busines organizations , including the management problems of tax ) planning and compliance . Prer., ACCT. 2020 or 3310 . ACCT. 4420-3 (formerly ACCT. 442). Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring. Continuation of ACCT. 4410 , with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partner ships and corporations. Prer ., ACCT. 4410 . ACCT. 4540-3 (fq rmerly ACCT. 454). Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall. The design and analysis of accounting info 1 ation systems, automated data processing Undergraduate Courses-Finance I 123 methods with special emphasis on computers and computer prograrnnling ( and the role of accounting in the manage ment process.1 Prer. , ACCT. 3310 and 6 additional semester hour s of accot!t.nting . ACCT. 4620-3 (formerly ACCT. 462). Auditing. Fall, Spring, Summer. Generally accepted auditing s tandards and the philosoph y supportin g them; auditing techniques availab le to th e independent public accountant. Pertinent publica tions of the AICPA reviewed.Prer., ACCT . 3230. ACCT. 4800 3 (formerly ACCT. 480). Accounting for Gov ernment and Nonprofit Organizations . Spring. Planning and control qf government and nonprofit organizations . Include s program budgets, responsibility accounting, and fun accounting. Prer ., ACCT. 2020 or 3310. ACCT. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. ACCT. 4950 3 (formerly ACCT. 495) . Special Topics in Accounting. Research methods and results, s p ecia l topics, and profe ss iona l de velopments in accounting. Prerequisites va ry according to topic and instructor requirements. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES BUSINESS LAW BLAW. 3000-3 (formerly BL. 300) . Business Law. Fall, Spring , Summer. Provides an understanding of basic areas of law important to business transactions and consumers. Topic s include litigation, crimina l law , torts, contracts, and sales with overviews of cons umer and employment law, and government regulation, business organiza ti ons, and the ethical implications of business ac tivities. Prer ., Junior s t anding. BLAW. 4120-3 (formerly BL. 412). Advanced Business Law . Fall, Spring. Additional legal topic s of importance to busi ness , including partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, s ecured transactions, and real and personal property. Strongly recommended for accounting and entrepreneur ship majors. Prer., BLAW. 3000. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES-FINANCE FNCE. 3300-3 (formerly FIN. 305}. Basic Finance. Fall, Spring , Swrun1er. Includes a study of the mo net ary syste m and other institutions comprising th e money and capital markets . Also includes a study of the financia l manager's role in bu siness, the investment of capital in assets, and financing the asset requirements of business firms . Prer., ECON . 2012 and 202; ACCT . 2000; junior sta nding . FNCE. 3400-3 (formerly RES. 300). Principles of Real Estate Practice . Fall, Spring. Activities in the current field of real estate practice . Prer., junior standing. FNCE. 4310-3 (formerly FIN. 401). Business Finance I. Fall, Spring , Summer. Basic principles and practices governing management of capital in the business firm constitute the core of this course. Determinants of capital requirements, method s of obtaining capital, problems of internal financial management, methods of financial anal ysis. Financing the bu siness q)rporation given prin1ar y emphasi s. Prer., F CE. 3300 and ACCT. 2020. FNCE. 4320-3 (formerly FIN. 402}. Business Finance II. Fall, Spring , Summer. Develops ana l ytical and decisionmaking s kills of studerts in relation to problems that confronts financial management. Areas include planning, control, and finan cing of current operations and longer term capital com nlitrnents ; martagement of income; evaluation of income producing property ; and expansion . Case method of instruction. Prer., FNCE. 4310.

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124 I College of Business and Administration FNCE. 4330-3 (formerly FIN. 433). Investment and Portfolio Management. Fall, Spring , Summer. Discusses investment problems and policies and the method ology for implement ing them. Includes portfolio analysis , selection of invest ment media, and measurement of performance. Prer., FNCE . 4310. FNCE. 4340-3 (formerly FIN. 434). Securit y Analysis. Fall. Analysis of the financial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios. Prer . , F CE. 4310. FNCE. 4370-3 (formerly FIN. 440). International Financial Management. Spring . Considers international capital move ments and balance of payments problems . Problems of international opera tion s as they affect the financial func tions. Reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange proces s. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., FNCE. 3300. FNCE. 4350-3 (formerly FIN. 455). Financial Markets and Institutions. Fall, Spring. This course focuses on the suppl y and demand for loanable funds, th e process of money cre ation, the struc ture of interest rates, and the role of the central bank. Special attention is devoted to the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on interest rates, the flow of funds, and economic activity. Prer . , FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4360-3 (formerly FIN. 463). Bank Management. Spring . An analysis of structure, markets , regulations , and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and proce dures, investment b ehavior, deposit and cap ital adequacy, liquidity , and so l ve ncy. Analytical methodo l ogy for these problems is developed . Prer., FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4410-3 (formerly RES. 401). Real Estate Develop ment Fall. Methods of analyzing real estate investment opportunities are studied . These methods include urban economic, market, and location analyses . Local government controls are studied from the developer's viewpoint. Mana gerial methods of controlling development also are studied. Prer. , FNCE. 3400. FNCE. 4420-3 (formerly RES. 430) . Residential and Income Property Appraisal. Spring. Principles and techniques of estimating the va lu e of land, residences, and inc ome prop erty are studied. Principle s and techni ques are applied b y a field problem in appraising . Prer., FNCE. 3400. FNCE. 4430-3 (formerly RES. 433). Real Estate Investments. Spring. Emphasizes problems and methodology for making the real estate investment decision. Includes real estate versus other investment; real estate user and investor require ments , decision models; local, state , and federal regulations; tax factors; and syndication. Prer., F CE. 3300 and 3400 or consent of instruc tor. FNCE. 4440-3 (formerly RES. 454). Real Estate Finance. Fall. Functions and practices of various real estate financing institutions . Embraces mortgage lending, servicing, and mortgage banking relative to all types of uses of real es t a te . Prer. , FNCE. 3300 and 3400. FNCE. 4450-3 (formerly RES. 473) . Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions. Fall. Business and legal aspects. Estates in land, purchase and sales contracts, conveyances, mortgage and trust deed transactions, property taxes, land lord and tenant, wills and inheritance. Prer., BLAW. 3000 and FNCE. 3400. FNCE. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. FNCE. 4950-3. Special Top ics in Finance . Research methods and results, specia l topic s, and professional development in finance . Prerequisites vary acco rding to topic and instructor requirements. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES INFORMATION SYSTEMS ISMG . 2000-3 (formerly IS. 200) . Business Information Sys tems and the Computer. Fall, Spring, Summer. A study of business information sys tem s focusing upon computer hardware and software as the y relate to business informa tion. Includes computer programming, computer systems, and computer applications. The purpose of the course is to introduce the students to the concepts, vocabulary, and function of business information systems and the computer. Prer., MATH. 1070 and 1080 or 6 hours of noruemedial college mathematics . ISMG . 2200-3 (forme rly IS. 220) . Business Programming 1: Structured COBAL. Fall, Spring , Summer. An introductory course intended to provide the student with a thorough programming foundation in COBOL using structured pro gramming concepts and techniqu es. The basic elements of the language are discussed and demonstrated through applications in a business environment . Prer ., ISMG . 2000 or consent of instructor. ISMG. 2210-3 (formerly IS 221). Business Programming II: Files and Data Structures . Fall, Spring . This course is a con tinuation of ISMG . 2200. The student is introduced to advanced topics in COBOL and their application in busi ness. Special emphasis is placed upon alternative phys ical data and file structures, their implementation in COBOL, and their use in a business setting. The use of system software and utilities will be integrated with the topics. Case studies may be used to illustrate applications of the materi al. Prer., ISMG. 2200 or consent of instructor; QUA . 2010 is recommended . ISMG. 3300-3 (formerly IS. 330). Operation s Research for Decision Support . Fall. Objectives and models of operations research and the ir application in a managerial setting. Includes topics such as inventory models and control, sim ulation, linear progr amming topics , network models . Prer . , QUAN. 2010. ISMG. 3500-3 (formerly IS. 350) . Logical Data Structures and Database Management Systems . Spring . This course i s an introduction to database management systems, on-line query, and management control systems. It is concerned with database structure and design and the integration of the logical view of the data with its physical storage. Exten sive use may be make of a commercial DBMS in student projects to develop an appreciation of the use and organiza tional issues as well as the technical considerations . Prer ., ISMG. 2210. ISMG . 4650-3 (formerly IS. 465) . System Analysis . Spring. This course introduces the s tudent to basic sys tem analysis tools and the procedures for conducting a system analysis. Topics to be covered may include system requirements, the initial analysis, the general feasibility study, structured anal ys is , detailed analysis, l ogical design, and general sys tem proposal. The student will gain practical experience through projects and/or case studies. Prer. , ISMG. 2210 or consent of instructor. ISMG . 4660-3 (formerly IS. 466) . Systems Design. Fall. This course is a continuation of ISMG. 4650 and discuss topics such as struc tured design; physical system design; detailed feasibility analysis; specification of input-output methods and formats; design of files , programs, and procedures ; system testing; implementation procedures ; and system life cycle management. The student will implement these con cepts through case studies and/or projects. Prer. , ISMG. 4650. or consent of instructor.

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Pr ofessor of Management Science Systems , teache s a new computer program ISMG. 4700-3 ) rmerly IS. 470). Computer and Informa tion Technolog i Fall. Thi s cour s e provid es th e IS s tudent wit h a conceptu foundation in the areas of comp uter archi tecture , operati g sys t ems, programming translators, and telecommunicati ns . It is intended to serve as a facilitatin g course to allow e IS student to more readil y comm unic ate with other technical memb ers of the data process ing com munity . Prer . , 2210 or consent of instructor. ISMG. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study . ISMG. 4905-3 Special Topics in Information Systems. Researc h metho s are result s, special topics and profes sio n a l devel opm 1 nt s in informati on sys t ems. Prerequisites vary according t topics . UNDERGRAD (TE COURSES MA NAGEMENT MGMT. 1000-3 (formerly BAD. 100). Introduction to Busi ness. Fall, Sprinlf., Summer. ature of business en t erprise. Role of business F.' our society ; problems confronting busi nes s management. Career opportunities in busi n ess. Busi ne ss s tudent s are advised to take this course during their freshman year, liut may not take it in the junior or senior years . Open o to freshmen , sophomores , non-degree st udent s, and m sic major s at all l eve l s . Unde rgraduate Courses -Ma nagement I 125 MGMT. 3300-3 (formerly MGMT. 330) . Management and Organ i zation Behavior. Fall, Spring , Summer. Emphasizes the application of behavioral sc ience know l edge t o under standing people and organizatio ns. Motivation, authority, politic s, and the role of gro up s in contemporary organiza tions are so me of the topic s covered. Studen t s are u rged to compl ete PSY. 1002 and S OC. 1001 before takin g this course . Prer . , junior standing. MGMT. 33S0-3 (formerly MGMT. 335). Managing Work Groups. Fall, Spring. Examines what makes small groups effective in organizations. Develop s the ab ility to analyze interpersonal and group behavior, and improve group func tioning. Build interper sonal and small group l eadership s kills. Prer. , MGMT . 3300. MGMT. 4110-3 (formerly BAD. 411) . Business and Society. Fall , Sprin g, Summer. An examina tion of interrelationships between bus iness , society, and the enviro nment. Topics will in clud e perspectives on the socioeco n omic-business system, c urrent public policy issues, and social respo n s ibiliti es and ethics. Prer., ECO N. 2012 and 2022 . Completion of PSC 1101 and the sociology requirement is recommended before taking this course . Open to senior business students only. MGMT . 4340-3 (formerly MGMT. 434). Labor and Employee Relations. Fall, Spring. Analysis of legal, politi cal, social , and mana gerial aspec t s of collective bargaining and employee rela t ions. Prer. , Mgmt. 3300. MGMT . 4350-3 (formerly MGMT . 435). Conflict and Change in Organizations. Spring. This course i s designed to help students unders tand conm1on t ypes of conflic t within organiza tion s and the s trate gies useful for resolving conflict. Techniques for managing change also are stressed. Prer., MGMT . 3300. MGMT . 4370-3 (formerly MGMT . 437). Organization Design. Fall. Examines how t o s tru cture organizations to perform effectively. Emphasis is pl aced on the role of the tas k , technolo gy, and environment as constraints on orga nization design. Prer ., MGMT. 3300. MGMT. 4380-3 (formerly MGMT . 438) . Human Resources Management: Employment . Fall, Spring. Study of the development and implementation of personne l systems for recruiting , se lecting , placing, devel oping, and evaluating human resources. Prer. , QUAN . 2010 and MGMT . 3300. MGMT . 4390-3 (formerly MGMT. 439). Human Resources Management: Legal and Social Issues. Fall. Study of legal issues related to equal emplo y ment oppor tunity , occupa tional safety a1;1d health , and compensation, w ith emphasis on pro gram imp lem entation and evaluation. R eviews legal questions, g uidelines and procedures, and regula t ory agen cies. It is recommended that students t ake MGMT. 4340 and 438 0 b efore this course . Prer ., MGMT. 3300. MGMT. 4400 3 (formerly MGMT. 440). International Man agement. Spring. E xamines th e international busine ss envi ronment as it affects company polici es and procedures. Integrate s all the funct ions underta ken in international operations through in-depth a n a l ysis and comprehensive case s tu dies. Prer. , any two off the following : ECO N. 4410, F CE. 4370, MKTG. 4900, TRMG. 4580. MGMT. 4410-3 (formerly MGMT . 441) . Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration. Spring. S tudy of planning and adminis tration of compe n sation sys tems, including government, union , and labor market influ ences on pay; development of pay systems and employee benefits for non-managerial , mana gerial, and overseas e mplo yees. Prer., QUA N. 2010 and MGMT. 4380 .

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126 I College of Busine ss and Administration MGMT. 4500-3 (formerly MGMT. 450) Business Policy and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring, Summer . Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, sociaVpolitical, tech nological , and competition components of the external envi ronment with the internal characteristics of the firm ; and deriving through analysis the appropriate interaction between the firm and its environment to facilitate accom plishment of the firm's objectives. Open only to business students in their graduation semester. Prer., completion of all business core courses . MGMT. 4520-3 (formerly MGMT. 452) . Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management . Fall, Spring . Utilizing theories and concep t s developed in all functional areas , stu dents will address th e differences between small bus ines s management and large corporate management. m a n ag erial problems of " lifestyle " as well as high potential growth oriented firms will be examined. A major portion of the course includes the development of a business plan for an existing business or an actual new venture. Prer., ACCT . 2000, FNCE. 3300, MKTG. 3000. MGMT. 4700-3 (formerly MGMT. 470) . New Venture Strat egies. Fall. Examines both the personal and commercial strategies which can be used to effecti v el y begin new busi ness ventures. The course focuses upon the phase of entre preneurship that occurs between the generation of the initial new venture idea throu gh the entrepreneur's first conuner cial sale . Growthoriented firms with high growth potential are the primary focus of attention as opposed to "lifestyle" businesses. Prer., ACCT. 2000. MGMT. 4950-3 (forme rly MGMT. 495). Topics in Manage ment . A number of different current topic s in management will be offered under this course number. Consult the Schedule of Classes or the area coordinator for each semester's topics. UNDERGRADUATE COURSESMARKET ING Note: MKTG . 3000 or an equivalent course in basic marketing is a prerequisite for all marketing courses except MKTG. 3100. MKTG . 3000-3 (formerly MKTG. 300). Principles of market ing. Fall, Spring, Summer. Provides a marketing manage ment approach to the consideration of product planning, pricing , promotion, and distrib ution of goods and services . Emphasizes the role of the consumer and the social respon sibility of marketing . Prer. , ACCT . 2000 and junior stand ing. MKTG. 3100-3 (formerly MKTG. 310) . Personal Selling. Fall, Spring. Principles and method s of personal se lling , with attention to de velopment and demonstration of effec tive sales presentation techniques. MKTG. 3200-3 (formerly MKTG . 320) . Consumer Behavior . Fall, Spring , Summer. Focuses on improving the student's understanding and ability to predict consumer behavior. Studies research techniques and contributions from the behavioral sciences in the context of the marketer's efforts to satisfy customer wants and needs . Prer. , MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 3300-3 (formerly MKTG. 330) . Marketing Research. Fall, Spring, Summer . Provides practical experience in research methodologies, planning the investigation, design ing the questionnaire , selecting the sample, interpreting results, and making a report, Techniques focus on product analysis, motivation research , cost analysis, and advertising effectiveness. Students will incur project expense s. Prer. , MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 3400-3 (formerly MKTG. 340) . Marketing Institu tions and Retailing. Fall. A study of the macroeconomic foundations of marketing intermediaries, middlemen, and institutional alignments . Emphasis places on development and change of institutional structures and functions and roles played by participants in moving goods to ultimate consumer, focusing on retailing functions and stra tegies . Prer. , MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 3500-3 (formerly MKTG. 350). Principles of Adver tising . Fall, Spring, Sununer. Analyzes principles and prac tices in advertising from a managerial viewpoint. Considers the reasons to advertise , product and market analysis a s the planning phase of the advertising program, media selection, creation and production of advertisements, copy testing, and development of advertising budgets . Prer ., MKTG. 3000. MKTG . 4500-3 (formerly MKTG. 450). Advertising Man agement . Spring. Studies advertising problems form a man agement point of view . Considers issues of stimulating primar y and selective demand, media selection, developing the advertising program or campaign , establishing the advertising budget , evalua ting results, and managing agency relatio n s. Prer ., MKTG. 3500. MKTG . 4600-3 (formerly MKTG. 460). Business Marketing . Considers the problems of marketing goods and services to organizations buying for their own use or for incorporation in an end product. Focuses heavily on organizational buying behavior and analysis of demand for goo ds and services in both profit and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasizes development of marketing programs in the context of orga nizational demand for goods and services. Prer . , MKTG. 3000. MKTG . 4700-3 (formerly MKTG. 470). Sales Force Manage ment. Spring . Focuses on issues in managing the filed sales force . Deals with organizing the field sales force, sales anal ysis, forecasting, budgeting, and operating with particular emphasis on recruiting , se l ection, training, compensation , supervision, and motivation. Prer., MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 4800-3 (formerly MKTG. 480) . Marketing Strate gies and Policies. Fall, Spring. Focuses on the process of formulating and implementing marketing channels and product analysis. A case approach is utilized to develop the student's analytical ability to integrate all major areas of marketing . Prer., MKTG. 3000 and six additional hours in marketing . MKTG . 4850-3 (formerly MKTG. 485). Physical Distribution Management . Investigation and analysis of logistics of dis tribution systems for firms engaged in manufacturing and marketing. Component parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting alternatives which will attain distribution goals of the firm. Prer., MKTG. 3000. MKTG . 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. MKTG. 4900-3 (formerly MKTG. 490). International mar keting. Spri11g. Studie s managerial marketing policies and practice s of firms marketing their products in foreign coun tries. Analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in international marketing . Relates marketing activitie s to market structure and environment. Prer . , MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 4950-3. Special Topics in marketing. Research methods an d results , specia l topics , and professional devel opment in marketing . Prerequisites vary according to topic .

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UND E RGRAD ATE COURSES O PERATION MANAGEMEN OMGT. 30003 OM. 300). Operations Manage ment. Fall, Summer. An introduction to the design and analysis of erating systems in manufacturing, servic es, and public s ctor organizations. Topics inclu d e facility layo u t and locati n, job design , work standards, quality and productivity, in entory planning and control , simulation, waiting line a alysis, and linear programming. Prer . , ACCT. 2000, QmN. 2010. It is impor tant to take this course in the j unior ye . OMGT. 4400-3 ( ormerly OM. 440) . Planning and Control Systems. Spring Study of the design, implementa ti on, and control of integr ted operations , scheduling, and inventory planning and systems. Topics include demand fore cas t ing, aggreg te planning , capacity planning, master sched u ling, inve tory management, material requirements planning, stock! ss systems, and operations control. Orga nizations studie 1 include manufacturing, service, and pub lic sec t or. Prer., OMGT. 3000. OMGT. 444 03 ( f ormerly OM. 444) . Q uali ty and Productiv ity. Spring . Stu ' y of the various techniques to measure quality and pro uc t ivity in organizations and the practical management iss es related to implementing quality and productivity sys ms . Topics include statistical quality con trol, total factor productivity , quality circles, total quality con trol, work d sign and measurement, and q u ality and productivity rna agement systems. Prer. , OMGT. 3000 and MGMT. 3300. OMGT. 447 0-3 ( ormerly OM . 447) . S trategic Analysis i n Operations Man a gement. Fall. Study of the ana l ysis and formu l ation of o , erations management strategy and policy . Emphasis will b on the role of the operations function in the strategic pro sses of the organization . Decision making will be stressed thro u gh the use of case studies and the analysis of actu business situations. Prer., OMGT. 4400 and 4440. OMGT. 460 0 3 x o r merly OM. 460). Purchasing, Materials Managemen t, a d Negot i a ti on. Fall Study of the Purchas ing function in ufacturing , service, and public organiza tions. Topics inc ude source selection, make-buy analysis, materia l quality tandards and specifications, value analy sis, negotiations , and l egal aspects. Prer., OMGT. 3000. OMGT. 4840 -v artabl e credit. I ndependent Study. OMGT. 49503 (fbr merly OM . 495). Special Topics in Oper a tions manage;,.jent. A number of different current topics in operations will be discussed in the course . Consu lt the of Classes or contact the area coordi nator for further nformation. UNDERGRADU TE COURSES -QUANTITATIVE M ETHODS ouAN. 2o1o 3 < r rmerly o u AN. 2o1) . B usiness stat istics. Fall, Spring . Sta istical applications in business. Includes descriptive statis ic, time series analysis, index n u mbers, probability and s mpling distributions, statistical inference, simp l e regressioft and decision analysis without sampling. Prer . , MATH. 10 0 and 1080 and ISMG. 2000. Students are encouraged to t e QUAN. 2010 in the semester following completion of IS G . 2000. I Undergr r du ate Courses Transpo rt a t ion I 127 QUAN. (formerly QUAN. 300) . I ntermed i ate S tatis tics. Intermedia t e treatment of regression and forecasting models in and researc h , statistical quality control in manufacturing, sampling a n d analysis of variance, para metric and nonparametric statistical inferences, decision analysis with sampling . Prer., QUAN. 2010. UNDERGRADUATE COUR S E S T RANSPORTATION TRMG. 4500 3 (fo r merly TRMG. 450). Transpo rt a tion Operation and Management. Fall, Spring. Economics of t ra n sportation service and ra t es . History and patterns of reg ul ation . Exp l a n ation of various forms in common use in freight and passenger transporta t ion. Introduc t ion to tariffs and their use . Service and management problems of indus tria l traffic managers. Prer., ECON. 2012 and 2022 or con se n t of instructor . TRMG. 4520-3 (formerly T RMG. 452) . P r oblems i n S urface Transpo rt ation Management Spring. Analysis of surface modes with emphasis on the mo t or carrier industry. Topics include carrier operations, regulatory s tructure, pricing, market structure, design of services, routes and terminals, eq u ipment, and private fleets. Case analyses and field stud ies will be used t o develop decision-making skills. Prer ., TRMG . 4500 or consent of ins t ructor. TRMG. 4 5603 (forme rly TRMG. 456) . Air T ransportation. Spring . Particular reference to operating costs and methods, passenger and cargo rates, air routes, sc hedules , safety , regulation , and airport management. Prer ., senior standing. TRMG. 4570-3 (formerly TRMG. 457 ) . Urban T ranspo rt a tion . Fall Analysis of the two aspects of urban transporta tion freight and people. Issues in policy , modes, governmental actions and structure, investment and costs, and effect upon urban environment. Prer. , senior standing. TRMG. 4580-3 i (tormer l y TRMG. 458) . I n t ernational Tran s portation. Fall. Anal ysis of international tran sporta tion (primarily sea and air) in world economy. Detailed study of cargo documentation and freight rate patterns. Included are lia b ility patterns, logistic s, economics , and national policies of transportation . Prer., senior standing .

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128 I Graduate Sc h ool of Business Administration GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M.B.AJM.S.) Director : Prof. H . Michae l Hayes Coordinator s : Sarah Bowman, Patricia Hockett Student Adviser: Pete Wolfe Prog ram Specialist: Sharon Moritz The Graduate School of Busines s Administration offers programs le ading to the Master of Business Administration (M. B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S . ) in specific fields of business and health admin istration. In addit ion, the master of Business Ad,min istration for Execu t ives (Execu t ive M.B.A.) is offered as a multi-campus program of th e Graduate School of Business Adminis t ration, and t he Executive Program in Heal t h Adminis t ration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Health Administration Program. The M.B.A., the Executive M.B.A., and the M.S. degrees in business are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schoo l s of Business (AACSB). The M . S . in Health Administration is accredited b y the Accrediting Commi ssio n on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). Requirements for the Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs Admission to th e grad u a t e program in business administration (M.B.A. and M.S.) is granted only t o students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on th e following indicators of the candidate's likelihood to succeed in the program. Academic Record . The bachelor's degree must be from a regionally accredited university. The total aca demic record is considered, including the grade-poin t average, the course of study, and the qualit y of the program. Testing. The candidate's performance on the Grad uate management Admission Test (GMAT). While other tests may b e accep table , the GMAT is strong l y recommended since it is proba bl y the bes t indicator of high promise of success in graduate schools of busi ness. The GMAT test is given four times each year at numerous centers through the world. For information and to make application for th e test, write to: Gradu ate management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey, 08541. The code number for CU-Denver's graduate business pro gram is 4819. Work Experience. A record of appropriate employment at increasing le ve l s of respon s ibility is considered a positive indicator of th e likelihood of successful completion of graduate work. Seniors in this Uni vers ity who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who need no more than 6 semester hours overall to meet requirements for a bache lor's degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the Director of Graduate Programs. They must meet regular admission cri t eria and submit complete applications by deadlines listed below. Background Requirements. Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The M.B.A . program is specifically desig ned so that the required courses cover the material needed for com pletion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to enter the M.B.A. program. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the pro gram successfully. Applicants for the M . S . degree, however, may be required to take prerequisi t e courses, depending on the individual's academic and professional back ground. For more detailed informa t ion contact the graduate student adviser. THE ADMISSION PROCESS To be considered for admission, applicants for grad uate programs other than health administration and the Executive M.B.A. must: 1. Submit a completed application along with the nonrefundable application fee of $40 ($30 for M.S. applicants) prior to the ap p lication deadlines : April1 for Summer Term admission. Jul y 1 for Fall Semester admission. November 1 for Spring Semester a d mission. Early applications are recommended; early applica tions can receive early priority in registration and class enrollment. Applications received af ter these dates will not be considered for admission in that term or semester. 2. Have GMA T scores forwarded t o the College by the Educational Testing Service . The code for CU Den ver's graduate business program is 4819. 3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) sent from each college attended. Personal interviews are not required. Students applying to th e accelera ted M.B.A. pro gram may be required to s ub mit an additional nonre fundable deposit after the y have been accepted into the graduate program. T hi s deposit serves to request consideration for admission into th e accelerated pro gram and is applied against regular tuition fees at the t ime of regis tration. The mailing address for applica t ions is : Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado at Denver 1475 Lawrence Street D enver, CO 80202 Applicants for the Executive M.B.A. and health administration programs should consult the relevant sections for application information .

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Academic Policies for Graduate Students Advising. rospective graduate students are encouraged t ' discuss admissions and program requirement s ith an adviser . In addition , as soon as appointment ith a graduate adviser to discuss gen eral degree re uirements. Master of Science students should consul with the adviser to determine any background c urse work that may be required. All M.S. students eed to prepare a formal degree plan during their first term residence . All M.B.A. students must file a formal degre e plan as soon as electives are considered . Thte plan s, with appropriate signatures, will be filed ith the Graduate School of Busine ss Administratio . Course Loa . The normal course load for full-time graduate stud ts is 9 -15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis at times convenient to the individual's work schedule. Gradu ate courses are offered primarily in the evening hour s to accommoda the working student. Transfer of q redit. A maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate werk can be transferred from another master's program . Time Limit a he student must complete the curricu lum within fiv years from the data of first enrollment in the progra Courses older than 5 years generally will not be acce ted for the degree without permission of the Director p f Graduate Programs. Students wh? have not been enrolled for three con secutive semesters must reapply for admission to the program . students ma y be required to complete the degree requirements according to requirements effect at the date of their readmission. Comprehensive Examinations. A comprehensive examination isjot required for students pursuing th e M.B.A. degre . A comprehensive examina tion is required of stu ents pursing some M.S. degrees; the M.S. adviser hould be contacted regarding this requirement. tudents must be registered for the semester in the comprehensive examination is taken, normall the last semester of attendance. Graduation . tudents must file an application for Admission to C ndidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate Scho0l of Bu siness Administration prior to fort.the term in which they intend to grad-Minimum rade-Point Average. A minimum cumulative gr depoint average of 3.0 must be achieved and ll}aintained in courses taken for a grad uate busine ss degree. All grad uat e courses taken to meet the degre req uirem ents and courses taken since admission to tHe program are included in the grade point average. II the student's cumulati ve grade-point average falls be}.ow 3.0 , the student will be placed on academic probation and given two semes ter s of atten dance in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failur to achieve the required average within the allotted tim period will result in suspension. Master of Business Administration (M.B .A.) I 129 Every month a diverse group of D enver business leaders meet and netJork as CU-Denve r business breakfast associ a tes. Roger Ktkhn, at Samsonite Corp. (left), is following a meeting of the associates. Any grade belo w a C-(1. 7) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a co urse for whi ch the y have received a grade below a C-(1. 7). Both the original grade and the grade for the repeat ed course count in the computation of the grade-point To earn a grade of W (withdrawal without credit) in a course, a student must be earning a grade of C or better in the course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the semester wi thout the approval of the dean. Admission to Graduate Business Courses Admi ssion to graduate level courses is reserved for students admitted to the CU-Denver graduate pro gram in busil;less. Graduate students from other Uni versity of Colorado s chools or colleges and non-degree students may be permitted to attend only with writte n permission of the Director of Graduate Programs and on a space ava ilable basis . 6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for grad uate studen ts. 5000-level courses may be offered simultaneously with 4000-level courses. Studen ts should check wi th an advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses. MASTER Of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.) The Master of Business Administration (M. B.A.) program provides the student a general background in management and administra tion that enables the student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level in a man agement career. The program is devoted to dev elop ing the concep ts , analytical tools , and communica tions skills required for competent and responsible

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130 I Graduate School of Business Administration administration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment. The M.B .A. program is available in three differed configurations: the INDMDUALIZED M.B.A. pro gram, the COHORT M.B.A. program and the EXECUTIVE M.B.A. program. The INDMDUALIZED M . B.A. and the COHORT M.B . A. both have the same curriculum requirements, they differ only in the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program. The INDMDUALIZED M . B.A. allows the schedul ing of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace by taking as little as one class per se mester , or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenient to their work schedule. The program can be completed in as little as 16 months, or as long as 5 years. The COHORT M . B.A. enables the student to com plete the program in 3 years and one semester, taking 2 courses each regular semester and one in the summer term . Each group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, takin g pre scribed core courses two nights per week, thus shar ing their educational and profes siona l e xperience . Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives . For working professional s who can meet the time requirements of the COHORT program , it provides a unique and rewarding educational experi ence. Candidates in both the individualized and the COHORT M.B.A. programs must complete specific requirements consisting of 16 courses (48 semester hours) as follows: Core Requirements Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Manager s ...... ................ . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business Analysis ................ 3 BUSN. 6040 . Human Behavior in Organi zations ........... 3 BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management ......................... 3 BUSN. 6080. Management of Operations .................. ... 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information Systems .... ....... 3 BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics ........ . .............. ..... 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management ........................... 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethica l Envir onment of Business ......... .......... ................... ... ....... ... . . ..... .... 3 BUSN. 6180. Economic Environment of Business .......... 3 BUSN. 6200. Business Policy and Strategic Management .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total Required Core Semester Hour s 33 Electives: One graduate course from each of thre e of the four following areas: . ................ . .............................. . ............ . Accounting , Finance, Marketing, or Management ......... 9 Free electives . . . .. .. .. . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Total Elective Semester Hours .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 15 Total Required Semester Hours for M.B.A. degree 48 Like many business students, Mindy Felcman works full time while earning an M.B.A. at CU-Denvel' . She is a credit analyst for Citicol'p ' s col'pol'ate b anking division. Notes and Restrictions Core . Depending on demonstration of a strong background in one area, a maximum of one course ma y be waive d in the core, reducing the total number of program hours to 45. A maximum of 6 hours may be transferred from another AACSB accredited gradu ate school, also reducing the number of hours required. Electi ves. No more than nine hours of elective grad uate courses may be taken in any one discipline or area of emphasi s. Students ma y elect not t o take any emphasis. Three hours maximum may be taken out side the Graduate Schoo l of Business Administration, but only w ith written approval of the Director of Gradu ate Programs. Subject to the above distribution requirements, students have a wide range of opti ons available in se lect in g the 15 hours of elect ives . No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree , permitting students t o choose a combination of courses appropriate for th eir individual care er needs. If a student wishes to pursue an area of empha sis, several are available includin g accountin g, finance , management, and marketing. Areas of emph asis all require 9 semester hours of elec ti ves (5000 or 6000 level) in addition to the area core courses . No thesis is required for the M.B.A. program. For additional information about the M.B.A. pro gram contact a graduate student advisor at 623-4436.

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MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS Master of nee degrees (M.S . ) are offered in the fiel ds of accou ting, accounting and information sys tems, informat on systems, finance, health adminis tration, markettng, and management. The M.S. deiee affords the opportunity for special iza t ion and dep h of training within a particular major field and, whe e allowed or required, a minor field . The n and expertise developed with the M.S. program wrepares the student for more special ized staff ns in industry, the nonprofit sector, and governme . The course re uirements for the M.S . degree in each of the fields divided into two components common backgrou 1 d and graduate core requirements . The common requires at least 21 semester hours of busine f s courses to develop general breadth a n d competence in t he fields of business administra tion. These re 1uirements may differ among degree programs. The common background requirements may be satisfie by equivalent graduate level work, or t hro ugh undergraduate course work as approved by the adviser . Gterally, an undergraduate degree in business administration from an AACSB accredited university will 1 eet those requirements. The graduate core requires at l east 301 semes t er hours of graduate leve l courses as rescribed by the different major pro grams. MASTER OF CIENCE IN ACCOUNT NG Ad vis er: Prof. T elephone: 623 The Master o Science in Accounting is a flexible program that p ovides the student with a thorough unders t anding of both financial and managerial accounting . The combination of required and elective courses allow s t e student to design a course of study with t h e adviso 's approval , leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit or management accounting. The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of components A, , and C as shown below : A . Common B a c k ! r ound Cou rse Work Courses Required Semester Hour s ACCf. 2000. Fina cia! Accounting ............................. 3 BUSN. 6020. Qualfltitative Busine ss Anal ysis .. .. .. . .. .. . . .. . 3 BUSN. 6060. MarReting Management ................... ...... 3 BLAW. 3000. Busiress Law ................................... .... 3 BUSN . 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations .... ....... 3 BUSN. 6140. Finafcial Management ....................... .. .. 3 BUSN. 6120. Man gerial Economics ............................ 3 Total Semester ours 21 1 Of the 30 hour s, a ' nirnum of 18 hours must be at the 6000 level. Finance I 131 It may be 1 possible to sa t isfy these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work wi t h . the of the adviser . It 1s recommended that students should have a min ima l compe t ency in mathema t ics and comp u ter sof t ware applications. Possible courses at CUD enver are ACCT. 3310/3320 and MATH . 1070, 1080. The required1 courses in Parts B and C (below) will also help meet these objectives . Self-study or review (workshops) also may be used to attain minimal com petency levels . B. Account i ng Courses Backg r ound Course s Required Semester Hours ACCf. 3220 and 3230. Intermediate Financia l Accounting, I and II ........................ .. .... ... ................................ . 6 ACCf. 3310 and 3320. Managerial and Intermediate Cost Accounting ... ....................... ........ .............. .... . ..... 6 C. Graduate Core i n Accounting Courses Required Semester Hours ACCf. 6250. Seminar: Accounting Theor y .... ............... 3 ACCf. 6260. Seminar: Managerial Accounting ............. 3 ACCf. " core" f-ny 2 advanced accounting courses (numbered hig h er than ACCT. 6260) ....... . ......... ...... 6 MGMT . 6810. Human Resource Management . .... . ........ 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information Systems .. .. ...... . 3 Sub total ......... ............ . ...... ... ....... .... ............ ......... 18 Electives (4) Four elective courses may be selected ...... 12 Total Graduate Core Semester Hours 30 Certain graduate courses in accounting are offered only once a year. Consul t a current Schedule of Classes for information about current course offer ings . Note that A CCT. 5540, 6250, and 643 0 are usu ally offered in t he fall and oth er advanced co u rses are usually offered in the spring or summer. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCE A d viser: Prof. James Morris Te lepho ne: 623-4436 The M .S. degree in finance provides th e student wi t h the necessary specialized expertise in t h e field to meet the need of businesses for staff specialists, and to prepare the student for fur t her graduate work in the field of finance . 1 ACCT . 6250 a nd ACCT . 6260 are required courses. Comprehensive Examinations. No comprehensive examinations are required in the major field of accounting . Comprehensive examinations may be required for some minor areas.

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132 I Graduate School of Business Administration The M.S. program in finance consists of two com ponents the common background and the graduate core required courses. A. Common Background Course Work Courses Required Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers ....................... 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business Analysis ................ 3 BUSN . 6040. Human Beh avior in Org aniza tions ........... 3 BUSN . 6060. Marketing Management ......................... 3 BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... .... .............. .. .. .. 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business . .. ................. . ... ...................................... 3 BUSN. 6180. Economic Environment of Business ...... .... 3 Total Semester Hours Required 21 It may be possible to sa ti sfy the common background requirements by other graduate or undergrad uate course work, with the approval of the adviser. B. Graduate Core in Finance The M .S. finance core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements. A t least six of these courses must be at the 6000 level or higher. A minimum of 18 semester hours (6 courses) must be chosen from regularly scheduled graduate finance cour ses (excluding independent study); th e remaining 12 semester hours (4 courses) may be in finance or in related fields, as approved by the student's M.S. adviser in finance. A student can elect t o include a minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field adviser , but a minor is not required. The 18 hour finance requirement is met by the follo wing requiremen t s and options : 1. Required Courses BUSN . 6140. Financial Management FNCE. 6390. Advanced Finance Seminar 2 . Choose at least4 courses in finance from: FNCE. 6310. Decisions and Policies in Financial Management FNCE . 6320. Special Topics in Finance FNCE. 6330. Investment Management and Anal ysis FNCE . 6350. The Financial System FNCE . 5400. International Financial Management FNCE . 5630. Bank Management Notes and Restrictions If a student has taken at l east 9 semester hours of upper division undergraduate finance courses wi thin the last 5 years from an AACSB accredited university, those courses may be s ubstituted for BUSN . 6140. However, the student must s till take at least 18 hours in finance at the graduate l evel. The 12 semester hours (4 course) requirement can include courses related to the finance major as approved by t he M.S. adviser . Areas of study that normall y would enhance the study of finance would include eco nomi cs, mathematics, statistics, account ing, information systems, and computer science. Other field also could be approved based on the student's needs and objectives. All M .S. students in finance must pass a compre hensive examination in finance during the last semes ter of their program. M.S. student s may choose to complete a thesis that is original research as approved by a committee of fac:ulty members appoin ted by the M.S . adviser. Up to 6 semester hours of credit of independent study could be earned from thesis work. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Adviser: Prof. Bruce R. Neumann Telephone : 623-4436 The goal of the Master of Science in health admin istration (M.S.H .A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in responsible managerial positions, are capable of assuming positions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex , multi-service health care organizations. The curriculum is a synthesis of management con cepts and techniques that are applicable to any eco organization and tool s that can be specifically apphed to health and health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which heighten basic ana l y tic and decision-making processes used by top level managers in selecting broad strategies for the institu tions and by junior managers in administering sub units of their organiza t ions . The faculty guide the students in their mastery of theoretical, conceptual, and quanti t ative topics. The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission of Edu cation for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970. The typica l course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work. The curriculum is based on a ser ies of structured learning sequences with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supplemented by severa l core health admin istration courses . The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration . Within the 57 semes ter hours, the student must choose 9 semester hours of elective courses.

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Members of the 1987 graduating class of the Exec utive Prog r a m in Healtl1 A dmini stration come from as far awa y as California , Miss ssippi , and Canada . They include h ospital adnlinistrat o rs, phy sidan , director of nws ing, medical director , physic i's assi s tant , and materials manager . Required Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Ac ounting for Managers ....................... 3 BUSN. 6020. Qu ntitative Business Analysis .. ...... . . . .... . 3 BUSN. 6060. Ma keting Management .......... ... ............ 3 BUSN . 6080. Ma age men t of Opera tion s ..................... 3 BUSN. 6100. M age ment Information Systems ....... . ... 3 BUSN. 6120. Mapagerial Economics ....... . ... ..... .. .... .. .. .. 3 B USN. 6140. Management ...... .... ............ .... . 3 HLTH. 6010. Care Organization . .. .......... ...... .. 3 HL TH. 6020. Economics .... ........... ...... .. . ......... 3 HLTH. 6200. He f lth Sciences . . .... . . ... . ... ........... . . ... ...... . HLTH. 6210. Ge era l Systems Theory .... ......... ........ .... 3 HLTH . 6220. Str tegic Planning and Polic y .... ............ .. 3 . .... . ........... . . 3 HLTH. 6640. He lth C are Management Accounting ...... 3 HLTH . 6700. In s itutional Managemen t I ..................... 3 HEAL. 6710. In s itutional M a nagement II .................... 3 Electives . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Total Seme s te 57 Elec ti ves. El tive courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, human resources management , ganizational development, health pol icy and pla g, and community h ealth . In addition , e l ec tive course are available that focus on practice se tting s such a ho s pit al administration , ambulato ry care administra ion, or long-term care adminis tration. Managemen Residenc y A management residency is optional, bu recommended for all student s, espe cially those wi limited heal th care e x perie n ce. The faculty of the p ogram provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consulta tion during the resi d enc y period. Inf orma t io n on the full range of lo al, re gional, and national residencies is available in program office. Comprehens ve Examinations . Each candidate must pass a compre ensive examina tion . Hea lth Administra ti on I 133 Length of Program. The didactic portion of the degree will take a t least two academic years since H.A. cours!:is are offered onl y once each y ear and many require prerequisites. Parttime study is facili t a ted b y mary courses being scheduled for late af ternoon or eveJ,Ung hours . Admissions Process Requirement s for Admiss ion . Selection of student s is a multis tep proc ess. When makin g application to the progra m for the M.S . H . A., candi dates sho uld send their applications to : Graduate Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Administration Uni ve rsity of Colorado a t Denver 1475 Lawrence Str ee t Denver , CO 80202-2219 C REDE N TIALS OR REQUIREME NTS 1. Compl e ted Application for Graduate Admissio n Part s I and U. 2. Four letters of recommendation from profes sional or aca demi c acquain tance s who are familiar wi th the applicant's academidprofessional compe tence. 3. Satisfactory test score Graduate Managemen t Admission Tfst (GMA T) preferred . When registering for th e GMAT; use code #4819 (Den ve r , MBA) to have score report sent to the University of Co l orado at Denver Graduate School of Busin ess Administration. 4. Application fee. 5. Two (2) official transcripts from each college or university attended. Minimum baccalaureate degree required. 6. A well formulated career plan articula ted in a brief e ssay, and summarizing th e applicant's reason(s) for seeking th e de gree . 7 . A persona l inter view with members of t he Health A dmini s t ration Student Se lect ion Committee may be s cheduled . 8. Experience in the field of health services admin is t ration (prefe rred but not absolutely necessar y). Admissio n to th e M.S.H.A. de gree program is on a competitive basis . Therefo re , the se a dmission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expecte d of all student s. After the applications , recommendations, and essay have been eva lu ated, the candidate may be schedule d for a perso nal interview w ith th e Student Selection Committee . The personal int ervie w addresses moti va tion, potentia l l eadership capacity, experie nce in the field, maturity, and judgement of each applicant. The applicant will be n o tifi e d of the Student Selection Committee's decision af ter the interview.

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134 I Graduate School of Business Administration Deadlines. All credentials should be submitted at the latest by April 1 for Fall Semester and October 1 for Spring Semester. Applications will be reviewed in the order they are received. Early application increases t he probability of acceptance . For further information, brochures , and application materials contact the Graduate Program in Health Administration , Graduate School of Business Admin istration, University of Colorado at Denver, 1475 Law rence St . , Denver, CO 80202-2219 (303) 623-4436. Health Administrat i on Scholarships/Loans Financial assistance is available for continuing student directly from the Graduate Program in Health Administration. Each year the following scholarships /loans ma y be awarded: Eugenie Sontag Award Kaiser-Permanente Scholarship/Residency Foster G . McGaw Scholarship Loan Fund Foster G . McGaw Scholarship Federation of American Hospitals' Foundation Colorado Health Administration alumni Associa tion Scholarship Fund U.S. Dept . of Health and Human Services Trainee ships MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS Ad viser: Prof. William Murray Teleph one: 623-4436 The Master of Science degree in information sys tems (M.S. in I.S.) prepares students for management roles in the information systems field and for such careers as systems analysts, software engineers, data base administrators, and data processing managers . The curriculum emphasizes the application of computer technology within the business context. The M.S. in I.S. requires the student to complete the common background courses and the graduate core described below. A . C o mmon Backgr o und C o ur s e Work Course s Required Semester Hours BUSN . 6000. Acco unting for Managers ............ ..... . .. ... 3 BUSN. 6010. Quantitative Business Analysis ....... ....... . . 3 BUSN . 6040. Human Beha vio r in Organizations . .......... 3 BUSN . 6060. Marketing Management .... ..................... 3 BUSN . 6120. Managerial Economics ..... ... ... . . . . . ..... . ...... 3 BUSN . 6140. Financial Management . ... . . ... ... ...... ... .. .... 3 BUSN . 6160. Legal and Ethical Environment of Busine ss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total Semester Hours 21 It may be possible to satisfy the common background requirements with other graduate or under graduate course work, with the approval of the adviser. B . Grad u a t e Cor e i n Info r mation Sys t ems Thirty semester hours of approved graduate work are required. Each student's plan of study is devel oped by the student and the faculty adviser, consider ing the student's interests and background. The 30 semester hour may be taken entirely in information systems and closely related areas or may be divided between a major field (21 hours) and a minor field (9 hours) . Courses available for the information systems major include: ISMG. 6020. Busines s Programming and Data Structures ISMG. 6060. Systems Analysis ISMG. 6080. Data Base Management Systems ISMG. 6100. Computer Technology ISMG. 6120. Data Communication ISMG . 6140. Systems Design ISMG. 6160. Decision Support Systems/Expert S ys tem s ISMG. 6180. Information Systems Policy ISMG. 6200. Special Projects ISMG. 6800. Special Topics ISMG. 6840. Independent Study ISMG. 6950. Master ' s Thesis (All are 3 semester hours except ISMG. 6840, which is variable credit.) Minor fields may be chosen from a variety of business and non-business areas, in consul tation with the student's adviser . A maximum off 6 semester hours of approved graduate work at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours. For business-related courses, the program must be accredited by the AACSB . Candidates for the M.S. degree must pass a comprehensive examination over their entire program during the last semester of study. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT Adviser: Prof. Raymond F. Zammuto Telephone: 623-4436 The objective of the master of Science in management program is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant managerial responsi bilities in private and public sector organizations. The degree is particularl y appropriate for students having an undergraduate degree in a functional area of busi ness , such as accounting, finance, information sys tems, or in a technical area, such as engineering or computer science. The Master of Science in management consists of two components: the common background and the specialized courses that constitute the graduate core of the M.S. in management.

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Students in he M.S. in management program can satisfy the co on background requirements by taking the follo g courses: Semester Hour s BUS . 6000. Ac ounting for Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Qu ntitative Business Analysis . ....... ..... ... 3 BUSN. 6060. Ma keting Management ................... ..... . 3 BUSN. 6100. M agement Information Systems ........... 3 BUSN. 6120. M age rial Economics ............................ 3 BUSN. 6140. Fin ncial Management ........................... 3 BUSN. 6160. Le I and Ethical Environment in Busine ss .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . 3 Total Semester ours 21 It may be ppssible to satisfy the common background requirer,ents by other graduate or undergrad uate course wo k, with the approval of the adviser. B. Graduate Cor in Management The manage ent core will consist of 30 se me ster hours (10 cour es) beyond the common background requirements. At least six o the courses must be 6000-level cours es. A minimu of 21 semester hours must be chosen from regularly scheduled management courses (ex cluding indepe dent study). The remainin 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in management or in related fiel ds, as approved by the student's M .S. }dviser in management. A student can elect to includ a single minor field with at least 9 semes te r hours pproved by a minor field adviser, but a minor is not quired. The 21-hour anagement requirement is met by the following and options: Required Cotiise Semester Hours BUSN. 6040. H an Behavior in Organizations ........... 3 MGMT. 6320. Or anizational Development ................. 3 MGMT. 6360. De igning Effective Organizations .... .. .... 3 MGMT. 6810. H an Resources Management ...... .. ..... 3 C. Management lectives Choose at le st 9 hours of co urse work from the selections offe ed under the course designation MGMT. 6800, ecial Topics in Management. Usual ly, two MGM . 6800 sections will be offere d each semester. Cons t with the management area coordi nator for the ye r's special topics offerings. Students can ubstitute a 6000-level MGMT. course for BUSN . 6040 they have taken an equivalent upper division org tiona! behavior course within the last five years from an AACSB accredited university. In that case, stud ts must comp lete 21 hours of man agement course . The nine minor, if a student should choose to complete a min r, ma y be taken in another functional area of busine ss s uch as marketing, finance, of infor mation systems or in another related discipline, such Marketing I 135 as sociology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved based on a student's needs and career objec tives. Students ate not required to take a comprehensive examination br complete a thesis in the major field . MASTER df SCIENCE IN MARKETING Adviser: Pro. Lawrence F. Cunningham Telephone: 623-4436 The objective of the Master of Science in marketing is to prepare individuals wi th prior work experience for the significan t management responsibilities in the field of marketing, either in the private or the public sec t or. The degree is particularly appropriate for indi viduals who ,have an undergraduate degree in busi ness. The degree consists of two components: the common body of knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the core of the M.S. in marketing. A. Common Body of Knowledge Students in th e program must satisfy the AACSB Common Body of Knowledge requirements. These are met b y the following courses: Courses Required Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business Analysis ................ 3 BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations ...... . .... 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information Systems ........... 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management ........................... 3 BUSN . 6160. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . .. 3 BUSN. 6180. The Economic Environment of Business .... 3 Total Semester Hours 21 It may be possible to sa tisfy these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work. Contact the graduate student adviser for information. B. Graduate Core in Marketing The M.S. in marketin g requires 30 semes ter hours beyond the Common Body of Knowledge. Twenty one (21) semes t er hours must be in marketing at the 5000 or 6000 level. The remaining 9 semes ter hours may be in marke t ing or in re l ated fields as approved by the student's adviser. A student may e l ect to take these 9 semester hours in a single minor field. A minor is not required, however. (Note: a minimum of 18 of the required 30 semester hours must be taken in courses reserved exclusively for graduate students.)

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136 I Graduate School of Business Administration The 21 semester hour marketing requirement is met by the following requirements and electives: Required Courses1 BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management MKTG. 6010. Marketing Strategy MKTG. 6030. Sales Force Management MKTG. 6050. Marketing Research MKTG. 6070. M.B.A. Seminar in Marketing Marketing Electives Choose at least 6 additional hours of 5000or 6000level marketing course work. Currently offered courses are: MKTG. 5500. Advertising Management MKTG. 5900. International Marketing MKTG. 6800. Topics in Marketing PSY. 6710. Quantitative Methods II Note: Subject to the approval of an adviser, and on a space available basis, the following elective courses may be taken at the Boulder or Colorado Springs campuses: MKTG. 6100. Seminar: Marketing MKTG. 7000. Seminar: Consumer Behavior MKTG. 7300. Multivariable Methods in Marketing The 9 hour minor, should a student choose to com plete one, may be taken in another functional area of business such as management, finance, or informa tion systems . Alternatively, it may be taken in a related discipline such as international affairs, eco nomics, social psychology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved, based on the student's needs and career objectives. Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis. EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FOR EXECUTIVES Administrative Director: Dennis Becker Telephone : 623-1888 The Executive M . B .A. Program is a multi-campus program of the Graduate School of Business Adminis tration. It provides executive-level students with a broad, rigorous two-year academic experience leading to the Master of Business Administration degree . The program is designed for persons who hold managerial positions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these execu1 Other courses may be required for students who have taken sim ilar courses as undergraduate s. tives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which can be pursued simultaneously with a manage ment career. The Executive M.B.A. Program emphasizes corpo rate planning, the business/government interface, and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of methods. Case studies, lectures, and computer simulation are combines with research projects and other teacJ:Ung to stu dents with tools useful m therr present posthons and applicable to more advanced responsibilities as they progress in their management careers. The Executive Program comprises four semesters over a twenty-two month time period. It begins the last week of August and runs through mid-June for two years. Classes meet for a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it for those who live outside the Denver area to parbct pate. Two courses are taken simultaneously throughout the program. The program is supplemented by inten sive in-residence orientation at the beginning, and a two-day retreat at the conclusion. Faculty and Resources The faculty for the program are members of regular faculty of Graduate School of Business Administration from all three of the University's campuses Boul der, Colorado Springs, and Denver. They are selected to conduct these courses because their backgrounds enable them to make the strongest contribution to the program. Many of the faculty members are nationally recognized, and all possess both practical managerial experience and a demonstrated ability to work effec tively with executive level students. Admission Requirements The executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have ten years of business or admin istrative experience, including at least three years in a managerial position. They should be part of senior management in a small organization or senior or mid dle management in a larger one, hold at least a bacca laureate degree, and have the ability to do graduate work. In the selection process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate's managerial experience, progression in job responsibil ity, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative classroom/work environment. The Admissions Committee will base its decision on the application, former academic record, relevant test scores, the employer's nominating letter, other letters of recommendation, and if deemed desirable, per sonal interviews with the committee . For further information, contact the Program Direc tor, Executive M . B .A. Program, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado, 1200 Larimer St., Campus Box 149, Denver, CO 80204, (303) 623-1888.

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EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Adviser: Prof. Bruce R. Neumann Telephone: 623f4436 PROGRAM SP NSORS The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative of the University of Colorado at Denver and the Western Network for Education in Health Admini tration . The Universify of Colorado at Denver serves as the degreegrantn}g institution for the Executive Pro gram. The of Colorado's Graduate Program in Health AdTstration is located in the Graduate School of ess Administration . The Wester Network for Education in Health Administration is a regional educational consortium representing care executives and academic faculty from major health administration graduate pro grams in the 1"'estern United States, including the University of California at Berkeley, University of Cal ifornia at Los ngeles, San Diego State University, University of Wtashington, Arizona State University, and University of British Columbia. Distinctive F1 atures of the Executive Program in r ealth Administration 1. Dra wing or the expertise represented by the faculties of conso tium of western universities, the pro gram offers th highest quality course content and instructors tha typically are not available from a sin gle university . 2 . The Exec tive Program facilitates learning for professionals ho have continuing career and family responsibilities The program is especially tailored for working allowing students to remain on their job s completing their educational program. 1 3. The program employs innovation in the technol ogy of educ tional delivery. Learning methods include: • instruction and self-paced learning packages . • Compute conferencing and electronic case anal yses . • On-camp s sessions. For Applicat on and Additional Information Executive Pr ' gram in Health Administration Graduate Sciltool of Business Administration University o Colorado at Denver 1475 Lawrence Street Denver , CO 0202-2219 (303) 623-443 Executive Programs I 137 DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS MBAIBA This progrF enables qualified students to earn a bachelor's from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), and a Master of Business Adminis tration from the Graduate School of Business Admin istration in five years. The program combines undergraduate general education wi th the graduate business Bachelor's candidates may major in any CLAS field (English , political science, biology , or fine arts are examples), and they must fulfill all the requirements for graduation from CLAS. During the senior year , the student begins taking graduate level courses in the M.B.A. progfam; these courses count as electives in the bachelor's program . For further information about this program and the admission requirements , contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office , 556-2555. MBAIMA INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY This proposed program will enable the student to earn two degrees -an M.B.A. from the Graduate School of Business Administration and a master of Arts (M.A.) i:h psychology from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Contact the program director, Department of Psychology, 556-2965 , for information. MBAIMS NURSING ADMINISTRATION The goal of the dual degree program (M.B.A./M.S. Nursing Administration) is to prepare nurses who are capable of assuming senior level and CEO health administration positions in government, consulting, traditional health care organizations , and alternative delivery systems. The 66 credit curriculum is a synthe sis of advanced management , health administration, and nursing content. For information contact the program director in nursing administration, 394-8136.

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138 I Graduate School of Business Administra ti on GRADUATE COURSES M.B.A CORE OR M.S. COMMON BACKGROUND COURSES The following graduate courses are open only to admitted graduate degree students BUSINESS BUSN. 6000-3 (formerly BUS. 606). Accounting for Manag ers. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on the use of accounting information in managerial decision making. Pri mary emphasis for the first half of the course will be on interpretation of financial statements, understanding accounting conventions and principles underlying the prep aration of the statements, and current controversies regard ing generally accepted accounting principles. The remainder of the course will stress managerial uses of accounting tech niques such as budgeting, cos t , volume, profit model s, and performance measurement. BUSN. 6020-3 (formerly BUS. 602). Quantitative Business Analysis. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course will provide the student with basic quantitative analysis t ools and tech niques nece ssary for the ana l ysis of business related prob lems. Topics covered include statistics, probability , sampling, regression, inference testing , and additional top ics such as correla ti on, contingency tables, non-parametric techniques, and time series ana l ysis . BUSN. 6040-3 (formerly BUS. 604). Human Behavior in Organizations . Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on applications of behavioral science concepts to the man agement of organizations. This course emphasizes ana lysis and understanding of human behavior in organizations, and using the results of such analyses to se lect appropriate strategies for managing . The course includes topic s such as motivation , le ade r ship, power and conflict, group dynam ics, technolo gy, organizational design, and other factors affecting human performance. Special emphasis is placed on concepts used b y managers in all functional areas of organizat i on, including accoun tin g , production, finance, marketing, engineering , and so on. BUSN. 6060-3 (formerly BUS. 600) . Marketing Manage ment. Fall, Spring, Summer. T h e course has two major objectives for the students : (1) understanding basic market ing concepts invo l ving buyer behavior, product planning, pricing, channels for distribution and promotion, and (2) developing market in g decision-making capabilities based on strategic management and a n a l y ti cal skills. The overall objective is to integra t e all the functional aspects of market ing with other fu n ctional areas of the firm and with the environment, parti cularly consumption markets, competi tion, the economy, le gal and regulatory environment, and social evolution . Prer. , BUSN. 6000. BUSN. 6080-3 (formerly BUS. 612). Management of Oper ations. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course will study the tools and techniq u es of the management of the operations functions in business organizations . Topics covered will include resource management, linear programming, deci sion trees, scheduling and control systems, quality assur ance tech niques, productivity measurement, simula t ion, and the international elements of th e operations function . Significant atten tion will be devoted to the study of the application of these t ools to service and institutional organi zations. Prer., BUSN . 6020. BUSN. 6100-3 (formerly BUS. 610). Management Informa tion Systems. Fall, Spring , Surruner. This cour se provides an introduction t o information systems from a managerial perspective. Topics include basic computer concepts such as hardware, software, data file de sign, s tructured computer languag es, sys tem s ana l ys is and design, and decision sup port systems . Managerial, organizational and decision-mak ing implications are stressed. BUSN. 6120-3 (formerly BUS. 614). Managerial Economics. Fall, Spring , Summer. This course has two objectives. A primary objective is to expose the student to the u sefu lness of microeconomic the ory at the firm level. Through eco nomic analysis, output demand and cost characteristics can be evaluated thereb y allowing for production and marketing decisions consistent with overall firm goals. Topics include cost and price theory and estin1ation, forecasting, produc tion theory, and pricing practice s. The course is also designed to aid students' unders tanding of the business manager's role in light of organizational and socie tal objec tives. Thus, we will consider the managerial implications of structure, regulation , antitrust policy, etc. Prer., BUSN. 6000 and BUSN 6020 . BUSN. 6140-3 (former ly BUS. 618). Financial Management. Fall, Spring , Summer. The purpose of this course is to intro duce the student to the tools and technique s for making a firm's investment and financing decisions. These tools and techniques include the mathematics of interest, risk analy sis, financial theor y of val uation , cap ital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial ana lysis. The emphasis is on develop ing an analytic framework for financial decision making . The class utilizes current literature , text, and cases. Prer., BUS . 6000, 6020, and 6120. BUSN 6160 3 (forme rly BUS. 608). Legal and Ethical Envi ronment of Business. Fall, Spring , Sumn1er. This course focuses on public , adminis tr a ti ve, and regulatory law; and on the relation of busin ess to the legal structure and ethical va lue systems which determine the parameters of business decisions. Topics include litigation , domestic and multina tional trade regulation, the allocation of liability for products and environmental injuries, consumer and employee pro tection , regulation of capita l market s, and business torts. BUSN. 6180-3 (forme rly BUS. 616). Economic Environment of Business. Fall, Spring , Summer. The objective of this course is to provide the student with a n understanding of how economic polic y affec ts and is affected b y the national and international economic environment of bus iness. As such, it focuses on th e interaction of business and gove rn ment as it re l ates to broader societal objectives. Measures of aggregate economic activity are introduced as a basis for discussion of monetar y and fisca l policy . Concerns over economic grow th , employment, prices, and inter es t rates are seen as motivations for s tabi lization and industrial policy. Market power , economic externalities, and other market failures are studied as motivation s for antitrust policy and regulation of industry entry conditions, product pricing, and production meth ods. Prer., BUS . 6120. BUSN 6200-3 (formerly BUS. 620). Business Policy and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. The goal of thi s course is to de velop a general management perspective on issues of management of th e total enterprise . An impor tant objective is the integration of knowledge acquired across functional area courses. Objectives of the course include the inhoduction of strategic concepts, analytical tools, and methodolo gy. The prim ary focus is to provide the s tudent with both strategy formulation an d implementation sk ills. Prer. , BUSN. 6000, 6020, 6040, 6060, 6080, 6100, 6120, 6140, 6160, and 6180 .

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140 I Graduate School of Business Administration FNCE. 5400-3 (formerly BUS. 540). International Financial Management. Spring. Considers internati onal capital move ments and balance of payments problems. Probl ems of international operations as they affect the financial func tions. Review s foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., BUS . 6140. FNCE. 5410 (formerly RES. 501). Real Estate Development. Fall. Methods of analyzing real estate investment opportu nities are studied . These methods include urban economic, market, and location analyses. Local government controls are studied from th e developer's viewpoint. Managerial methods of contro lling development also are studied . Prer., FNCE . 3400. FNCE. 5420-3 (formerly RES. 530). Residential and Income Property Appraising. Spring. Pri nci ples and techniqu es of es ti ma tin g the va lu e of land, residences, and income prop erty are studied . Principles and technique s are applied by a field problem in a pprai sing. Prer., F CE. 3400. FNCE. 5430-3 (formerly RES. 533). Real Estate Investments . Spring. Emphasizes problems and methodology for making the real estate investment decision. Includes real estate versus other investments; real esta te user and investor require ments, decision models; local, s tate, and federal regulations; tax factors; and sy ndic ation. Prer ,. FNCE. 3400 and BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 5440-3 (formerly RES. 554). Real Estate Finance . Fall. Functions and practices of various real estate financing institutions. Embraces mortgage l ending, servicing , and mortgage banking relative to all types of uses of real estate. Prer . , F CE. 3400 and BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 5450-3 (formerly RES. 573). Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions. Fall. Business and legal aspects . Estates in land , purchase and sa le s contracts, conve y ances , mort gage and trust deed transactions, property taxes, land lord and tenant , wills and inheritance. Prer., F CE. 3400 and BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 5500-3 (formerly INS. 584) . Risk Management and Insurance. Fundamental princip l es of insurance and their application to life, disability, property, and liability insur ance. Provides the basic knowledge for intelligent solution of personal and business insurance problems as well as for further specialized study of insu r ance. Prer., BUS . 6140. FNCE. 6310-3 (formerly FIN. 631). Decisions and Policies in Financial Management. Fall, Spring. Emphasizes invest ment and financing deci sions, and the analysis of the finan cial condition of the firm. Specific topics include capital budgeting, cost of capital, financing mix and strategy, firm valua t ion, and managem en t of working capital. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6320-3 (formerly FIN. 632) . Seminar in Finance. Fall, Spring. This course will treat varying topics that are of special intere st. Topics and emph asis could include subjects such as capital budgeting , capita l structure theory, valuation of firms , mergers , bankruptcy, financial modeling , option valuation, etc. Prer., BUSN . 6140. FNCE. 6330-3 (formerly FIN. 633). Investment Manage ment Analysis . Spri n g. The theory of investment manage ment and security val u es; portfolio management, including the analysis of investment risks and constraints on invest ment policies and objectives; the a n alysis and u se of i nvestment informati on; and th e development and application of the tools for determining security values. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6340-3 (formerly FIN. 960). Security Analysis. Fall. Analysis of the financial condition of the firm , valuation of debt and equity securities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios. Prer., BUS . 6140. FNCE. 6350 3 (formerly FIN. 635) . The Financial System. Fall. This course analyzes the role of financial institutions and financial markets in allocating credit to the various sectors of the economy . The course covers the financial system's respons i veness to economic activity and changing regulatory co ndit ions , the processe s by which risk is assessed and priced , and the behavior of interest rates. Prer., BUS . 6140. FNCE. 6360-3 (formerly FIN. 563). Management of Financial Institutions. Spring . An analysis of structure , markets, regulation , and chartering commercial banks . Problems and policies of the internal management of funds , loan practices and procedures, investment behavior, deposit and capita l adequacy , liquidity , and so lven cy. Analytical methodology for these problems is developed . Prer. , BUSN . 6140. FNCE. 6370 3 (formerly FIN. 540) . International Financial Management. Spring . Consi d ers international capital move ments and balance of payments problems . Problems of internation a l operations as they affect the financial ftmc tions . Reviews foreign and international institution s and the foreign e x change proce ss. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources , and policies of firms doing bus iness internationally. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6390-3 (formerly FIN 639) . Advanced Finance Semi nar . Fall. This course i s an advanced survey of the theory of finance and the empirical research developed from the the ory. The student will s tudy the quantitative model s that are the basis for theory , and the empirical methods that have been used to confirm or disp r ove the hypotheses presented by the theory. The material will be presented through lec tures and will be supplemented with student rese a rch , pre sentation s, and recitation. Prer., BUSN . 6140. FNCE. 6800-3 (formerly FIN. 695). Special Topics in Finance . Experimental course offere d irr egularl y for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in finance. Prerequisites will vary, depending upon topics covered. FNCE. 6840-variable credit (forme rly FIN. 618) . Indepen dent Study. With the consent of instructor under whose direction the study i s undert aken . FNCE. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis. HEALTH ADM INIST RATION HLTH. 6010 3 (forme rly HA . 601) . Medical Care Organiza tion. Fall. An introduction to the structure and function of the medical care delivery sys t em. Includes basic concepts and measures of health, disease, quality , values, needs , and utilization ; issues in health care manpower, institutions, and system organization ; general issue s in polic y, reim bursement , and regulation; and broad community and orga nizational considerations in medical care organization. HLTH. 6015-3 (formerly HA. 621) . General Systems Theory. Fall. General system s theory is presented as a conceptual tool in health admini s tration . Health is viewed as a subsy stem of society, and interfaces among health and other social sub sys tems are analyzed . Broad s ocial and cultural issues form a conte x t for meaningful di s cussion of health planning and administration in the current and future decades .

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HL TH. 6020-3 (formerly HA . 602). Healt h Economics. Fall. An intensive amtiysis of issues in health economics . Partic ular a tt ention to "market failure" in hea lt h insur ance and to alte ative methods of containing hea lt h care costs, including both regulatory and market approaches . Prer . , BUSN. 61 0. HL TH. 6025 3 (fp rmerly HA . 670). Institutiona l Manage ment I. Fall . Thif course is the study of human actions in organizations , E ' phasis is placed on the analysis of both individ u al and oup processes and characteristics in orga nizatio n settings The course includes topics such as organi za t io n s t ructure nd c u lture; task and job design; individual behavior; motiv tion; stress; group formation, develop ment, structure, and dynamics; communications; decision making; conflict ; rfluence and power; leadership; and orga nizatio nal change . HLTH. 6026 3 (f b rmerly HA . 671). Institutional Manage ment II. Spring. colloquium designed to integrate major topics in the genhal management curriculum into relevant health tion issues. Current policies, problems, and issues aero s the board spectrum of health service administration a e covered. Prer., HLTH. 6010, 6020, 6030, 6015, a n d 6025 . HL TH. 60303 (f rmerly HA. 620). Health Sciences. Fall. This course intro uces the student to principles of epidemi ology. The studeht will demonstrate the application of epi demiology analy es to the prediction off health care service needs of a popul tion: to identify and integrate con t empo rary service deli ery issues such as access , quality of care , cost of care, pro ram and system development , and evalu ation . The cours will assist the student in the development of program planEg and evaluation skills . Prer. , HLTH . 6010 and BUSN . HL TH. 6040-3 (fqrmerly HA . 664) . Management Account ing for He a lth C are Organizations . Spring. Designed to build o n the acco p nting concepts introduced in BUSN. 6000 and to develop in the decision-making process or health care p oviders. Problems, case s, and computer software progra s will be used to develop the practical application of m nagement accounting techniques s u ch as and standard cost models , budgeting, and analysis of ariances. Prer. , BUSN. 6000 , 6020 or con sent of instructo . HL TH. 6050 3 (fl rmerly HA . 644). Legal and Ethical Prob lems in Heal t h ' are Administration. Spring. Designed to acquaint the stu ent with legal iss u es experienced by the hea l th admini tr tor. Special emphasis is placed on issues such as malpr ctice, informed consent , medical staff appoin t ments, ]' ectors ' and administrators ' liability, medi cal records, and refusal of treatment. The course should make the studen aware of the multitude of legal and ethical prob l ems which onfront the health administrator on a daily basis. Prer., HL . 6010. HL TH. 60903 HA . 622). Strategic Pla nning and Policy. Spring . T e primary focus of t his course is on strat egy formulation and implementa t ion skills, Objectives incl u de the intrqduc t ion of strategic concepts, analytical too l s, and methcbdo l ogy . Prer. , HLTH. 6010 , 6020, 6025 , 6030, 6015 and 6q4o. HL TH. 6620 3 (formerly HA. 662) . Financial Manageme n t for NonProf it An introduction to the finan cial managemen 1 function in non-profit organizations . It includes a disc sion of basic accounting requirements, ma n agerial acco ting techniques, working capita l require-Hea lth Administr ation I 141 me n ts, and capi t a l investment . This survey course will pri marily focus on non-profit organizations. Pro bl ems and cases will be Jsed t o emphasize t he decision-making point of view . HL TH. 6630-3 formerly HA . 663). Management Contro l in NonProfit Organizat ions. This course is designed to develop a basic understanding of the management control p r ocess and the unique characteristics of non-profit organi za t ions. Topic areas include budgeting, programming, oper ational control, a n d pricing policies . Cases will be the primary means t o int egrate didac t ic materials w it h practica l ap p lications. Prer. , HLTH . 6040 or equivalent or consent of ins t ructor . HL TH. 6650-3 (formerly HA. 665). A dvanced Topics in Health Care Financial Management. The primary focus of t his course will b e a n in-depth research report on a current problem in hea lth care financia l m anagement. S tu dents will be responsible for identifying t heir own research area and will brief both th e client and t he class on the interim progress and the final recommendations. A health care sim ulation exercise will be utilized to integra t e the financia l management concepts introduced in the preceding account ing and fina nce courses. Prer., HLTH . 6040. or consent of ins t ructor. HL TH. 6720-3 (formerly HA. 672) . Ambulatory Care Admin i stration. T h e health administration student is exposed to the rapidly developing field of ambu l atory care and HMO maljlagement. By examination of various ambu latory care and HMO settings , problems in th e planning, imp l ementation, administration, and evaluation of ambula tory care are deve l oped. Prer., HLTH . 6010 , 6025, or con sent of instructor. HL TH. 6740 3 (formerly HA. 674) . Mul ti-institutional Man agement . Multi-in s t itutional management is a developi n g trend in health l a d ministration. S tu dents are exposed to bot h profit and nonprofit hospita l , nursing home, etc., net works. Shared services, merger, management contracts, hospital acquisitions, and satellite clinics are shtdied and discussed. Prer., HLTH. 6010 , 6025 or consent of instructor. HL TH. 6760 3 (formerly HA. 676). Rural Hea l th Systems I. In t roduces the student to the history and evol u tion of rura l health care in t he United States. Also to be examined are pas t attempts to i m prove rural health and the impact of past national programs affecting rural health. The present status of rural health i n the U.S. will b e explored. T h e course will en d with a rev i ew of private, l oca l , state, a n d f ederal pro grams directed toward solutions for rural hea l t h problems. Prer . , consent of ins t ructor. HL TH. 6780-3 (formerly HA. 678). Health Care Marketing. T h e Application of marketing concepts and techniques to health care delive r y . Discussion will focus on t h e implica tio n s of a cha n ging regulatory/competitive enviro nment for marketing services. The use of specific concepts and too ls, and an u n d erstanding of th e variety of marketing applications to th e planning of health delivery systems. Prer., BUSN. 6060 or consent of instructor. HLTH. 6800 3 ( formerly HA. 695). Special Topics in Health Administration. R esearch met h ods and resu lt s, special top ics, and professional developments in health administra tion . Offered irregularly. Prerequisites vary according to topics and instr u ctor requirements. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for semester offerings. HLTH. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study . HL TH. 6950-variable credit . Master's Thesis.

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142 I Grad uate School of B usiness Administration INFORMATION SYSTEMS ISMG. 6020-3 (formerly IS. 602) . Business Programming and Data System . Fall, Spring. An accelerated introductory course on programming business applications, with empha sis on fil e processing. Topics include the COBOL and PASCAL programming l anguages. 6060-3 606). Systems Analys is. Spring. Th1s course emphasizes mforma t ion systems analysis and t he logical specification of the system. The life cycle concep t is used as the basic framework for development, but there is a recognition of alternati v es in this development process . Management, organization, technology , and economic per spec t ives are cons i dered . Prer . or coreq . , ISMG. 6020 and BUSN . 6100. ISMG . 6080-3 (formerly IS. 608). Databa s e Management Systems . Spring . T h e database management course focuses on t h e a n a l ysis, d esign, and imp l ementation of database systems to support t oday's business operations . Current database models and database administration issues will be discussed in detail. Prer . or coreq., ISMG. 6020. ISMG . 6100 (formerly IS. 610) . Computer Technology. Fall. This course provides a conceptua l foundation in the areas of computer architecture, operating systems, programming translators, and fou rth-generation languages. Students will study various compu ter architec t ures ranging from micro to minicomputers to mainframe computers and operatmg systems such as Unix , VMS, DOS , and OSNS. Prer. or coreq ., ISMG . 6020. ISMG. 6120 3 (formerly IS. 612) . Data Communications . Spring . D evelops skill and know l edge for communication system d esign , dealing with network protocols, wide-area local-area network, and management implica tions. C ourse has a project orien t ation . Prer., ISMG. 6100. ISMG. 6140-3 (formerly IS. 614). Systems Design . Fall. This course. integrates the areas of computer technology , systems and. S_YStems design in designing large-scale appli cation or s u pport sys t ems . The course emphasizes . techruques . for the measurement, specification, design, rmplemen t ation , and t esting of information sys t ems . Prer. , ISMG. 6060. ISMG . 6160-3 (formerly IS. 616). Decision Support System Systems . Fall. An introductory course in how to design and construct decision support systems and expert representation and decision-making t echruques will be discussed along with artificial intelligence lang u ages such as Lisp and Pro l og. Prer. , IS. 6020. !SMG. 6 . 180 3 (formerly IS. 618). Information Systems PolIcy. Sprrng. Capstone course to understand the overall infor mation needs of an organiza t ion and the role of the comp uter based inf ormation sys t ems. Topics considered are stra t egic planning of information systems, management of compu ter center and technical personnel, sys t ems develop management, the informa t ion systems exclusive, and soc ial and legal issues. Prer ., BUSN. 6100. ISMG. 6200-3 (formerly IS. 620). IS Projects . Fall. Students on projects in the information systems area. mdude the design and implementation of an applicatiOn program or surveys of the managerial , beha vioral/ t echnical issues in a particular area. Prer., consent of instruc t or ; prerequisites will vary depending on topics and ins t r ucto r require m ents. ISMG . 6800-3 (formerly IS. 680). Special Topics in Informa tion Systems . A variety of advanced topics are offered in this course. Consult the current Schedule of Classe s or the area coordinator for current offerings. ISMG. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study . ISMG . 6950 variable credit. Master's Thesis. MANAGEMENT MGMT. 6320-3 (formerly MGT. 632). Organizational Devel Fall. Ins t ruc t ion in tfte analysis, diagno SIS, and resol u tion of pro bl ems in organizing peop l e at work. Models of orgarJizational change are e x amined . Group experiences, analyses of cases and readings are stressed. Prer., BUSN. 6040. MGMT. 6360 3 (formerly MGT. 636) . Designing Effective Summer. Examines how to design orgamzations within the con t ext of environmental techno logical , and task constraints. The emphasis is on 'teaming how to recognize and correct structural problems through the analysi s of existing organizations in which the students are involved . Prer., BUSN. 6 040. MGMT. 6810-3 (formerly MGT . 681). Human Resources Management . Fall, Spring . This course focuses on the man ag.ement of human resources in organized settings. It is onented toward the prac t ical application of human resources management principles in the following areas: equal employment opportunity/affirmative action, human resource s planning, recruitment, managerial selection, com pensation and benefit s, labor relations, training, career management, performance appraisal , and occupational health and safety. MGMT. 6800-3 (formerly MGT . 695) . Special Topics in Man A number of different curren t topics in manage ment will be offered eac h semester under this course num?er . the Schedule of Classes for specific course offenngs and trmes , or contact the area coordinator for fur will vary depending on topICS and mstruc t or reqwrements. The following topics have been scheduled for the 1988-89 year: Power and Politics in Organizations . Fall, Spring . Political processes are examined: h ow people in organiza t ions get keep power , ,and use p ower. This course is designed to mcrease students capacity t o analyze, understand, and use power effec t ively in organizations. Participation of class member is stressed. Turnaround Management. Fall, Spring . Examines why orgarJizations experience performance downturns had how to rev7rse of and strategies for reversmg decline, 1mprovmg deCISIOn making under crisis conditions , avoiding dysfunctional organizational and in t er personal .dynamics, and techniques for managing cutbacks m operations and personnel. and New Business Formation . Spring. This course examines charac t eristics of the successful entre exploration of e n trepreneurial opportunities within large organizations, training in the motives of suc cessful entrepreneurs, exp l oring the decision to go into busi ness for one's self, and development of a procedural systems for establishing a new business. MGMT. 6940-variable credit. Independent Study . MGMT. 6950 variable credit. Master's Thesis. MARKETING MKTG. (formerly MK. 5SO). Advertising Manage ment. Spnng. problems from a manage ment pomt.of view. Considers Issues of stimulating primary and demand , media selection, developing the or campaign, establishing the advertis budget, evaluatmg res u lts, and managing agency rela tions . Prer ., BUSN . 6060.

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I MKTG. 5900-3 f formerly MK. 590). International Market ing. Fall. Studi s managerial marke tin g policies and prac tices of firms m rketing their products in foreign countries. Ana l ytical sur y of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in terna t ional marketing. Relates marketing activ iti es to arket structure and environme nt. Prer ., BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6010-3 (formerly MK. 601). Marketing Strategy, Evaluation, a d Development . Fall, Spring , Summer. Foc u ses on m keting strategy and marketing planning. Ad dresses the orm ul ation and imp l ementation of market in g pl ans wit th e context of the overall s tr a tegie s and objectives of b th profit and not-for-profit organizations. There is heavy emphasis on group projects and presenta ti o ns. Prer. , B N. 6060. MKTG. 6030 3 formerly MK. 603). Sales Force Manage ment. Spri11g. cuses on issues in managing the field sales force . D eals wit orga n izing the field sales force, sales anal ysis, f orecastin , budgeting and operating , with particular emphasis on re ruiting , selection, training , compensation, supervision, an motivation . Prer . , BUS . 6060. MKTG. 6050 3 (formerly MK. 605). Marketing Research. Fall . The object" es of this course re l ate to effective market in g infor mation management. Objectives include: (1) devel o pin g an unde tanding of the techniques and procedures that can be use to generate timely and relevant marketing information ; (2) gaining experience in developing and ana lyzing informa 'on that is decision oriented ; and (3) gaining experience in making recommendations and decisions based on releva t and timel y information . Computer anal ysis and project are employed . Prer ., BUS . 6060. MKTG. 6070-3 formerly MK. 607). MBA Seminar in Mar keting. Survey f current problems and issues in marketing and in-depth in estigation of selected topics. Prer., BUS . 6060. MKTG. 6800-v riable credit (formerly MK. 695). Special Topics in Marketing. Experimental course offere d irregu l arly for the pu pose of presenting new subject matter in marketing . Prer quisites will vary dependin g upon th e par ticular topic . MKTG. 6840-va iable credit . Independent Study. MKTG. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT OMGT. 5400-3 formerly OM. 540). Planning and Control Systems. Sprin . Study of the design, implemen t a tion , and control of integ a ted operations, sc hed uling, an d inventory planning and c ntro l systems. Top ics include demand fore cas ting, aggre ate pl anning, capacity planning, master sc hed uling, inv ntory manageme nt, material requirements planning, sto ess systems, and operations control. Orga nizations studie include manufacturing, service, and pub lic se ct or. Prer., BUSN. 6080. OMGT. 5600-3 formerly OM. 560). Purchasing, Materials Management, f d Negotiation. Fall. Study of the purchas i n g fun ction in anuf acturing, service, and public organiza tions. Topic s in tude source selection, make-buy analysis , material quality s tandards and specifications, val ue analy sis, negotiation , and l egal aspec ts. Prer. , BUSN. 6080. OMGT. 6400-3 OM. 540). Planning and Control Systems. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integfated operations , sc hedulin g and inventory planning and c9ntrol systems . Topics include demand fore cas tin g, aggre te plannin g, capacity planning, master sc h e duling, inv ntory management, material requirements Quantitative Methods I 143 planning, st0ck less systems, and operations control. Orga nizations stuJl ied include manufacturing , service, and pub lic sector. BUSN. 6080. 6440 (formerly OM . 544). Quality and ProductivIty . Spring . tud y of the various techniques to measure qualit y and productivity in organizations and the practical management iss ues related to implementing quality and productivity systems. Topics include s tatistical quality con trol , t otal factor productivity , quality circles, total quality control, work design and measurement, and quality and producti vity management systems. Prer ., BUSN. 6080 and BUSN. 6040. 1 OMGT. 6470 3 (formerly OM. 547). Strategic Analysis in Operations Management. Study of the analysis and formu lation of opera tion s management strategy and policy . Emphasis will be on the role of the operatio n s function in the strategic processes of the organization . Decision making will be stressed through the use of case studies and the analysis of actua l business s ituations . Prer ., OMGT. 6400 and 6440 and BUSN. 6000. OMGT . 6600-3 (formerly OM. 560) . Purchasing, Materials Management, and Negotiation. Fall. Study of the purchas ing function in manufacturing, service, and public organiza tions . Topics include source selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, va lue ana ly sis, negotiati d ns , and legal aspects. Prer ., BUSN . 6080. OMGT . 6800 ; variable c r edit (formerly OM. 695). Special Topics in Operations Management. Fall. A number of dif ferent current topics in operatio ns management will be dis cussed in tNs course. Consult the curren t Schedule of Clas ses or contact the adviser for further information. Prerequi si tes will vary depending on topic and instru c tor requirements, OMGT . 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. QUANTITATIVE METHODS QUAN . 6010-3 (formerly MGSC. 601). Deterministic Mod els. Linear programming and its application, network a nal ys i s, including scheduling models , dynamic programming, integer programming, nonlinear programming. Prer. , BUSN . 6020 and 6080. QUAN . 6020-3 (formerly MGSC. 602). Stochastic Models. Probabili ty theory , queuing theor y, inventory theory, Marko v decision proce sses, sim ul ation, decision analysis. Prer. , BUSN . 6020 and 6080. QUAN . 6030-3 (formerly MGSC. 675). Seminar: Quantita tive Methods. Application of quantitative method s t o prob lems of business and industry, with emphasis on the functional fields of marketing, financial management , and producti on. Prer., QUAN . 6010 and QUAN. 6020 or con sent of instn.1,ctor. One of the prerequi s ite courses ma y be taken as a corequisite . QUAN. 6040-3 (formerly QM. 620) . Multivariate Analysis. Topic in multivariate data analysis of particular interest to those engaged in business research . Includes techniques s uch as multivariate discriminate analysis, factor analysis, and multiple regression , and the use of stan dard multiva riate s t a tistical packages such as the SPSS package . Prer., BUSN . 6020. QUAN . 6800-3. Special Topics in Quantitative Methods. A number o f different t opics in quantitative methods will be discu ssed in this course . Consult the current Schedule of Classes or co ntact the adviser for further information . Pre requisites w ill vary depending on topic and instructor requirements. QUAN. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study.

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. ;:\ \. ,, ,. ,.. .. .(• ,q ... , "In this exciting high tech society , our students must learn new rules to be effec tive citizen . High tech requires high lev els of knowledge and compe tenc e." Professor Minaruth Galey CU-Denver Education Professor Kaoru Yamamoto interviews a stu dent for one of his studies on childrens fears. For his study "Voices in Unison : Stressful Events in the Lives of Children in Six Catrntries," Dr. Yamamoto and his colleagues inter viewed 1 ,814 children and found that they fear losi11g a parent the most.

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Dea n : William F. Grady Assis tant Dea, : Duane K. Troxel Sch ool Office: 1200 Larimer St., Fifth Floor T elepho ne: 55 -2717 Dean's Advis ry C o uncil Paul Albright, Director of Communications, WICilli Dr. Pat Callan, Vice President , Education Commission of the States Dr. Roscoe Superintendent, Englewood School Distr ct #1 Dr. Gerry Diff rd, Executive Director , C.A.S.E. Ed Garner , ember, Board of Education, Denver Public Scho ls Jack Hale , Exe utive Director , BOCES Dennis Jone s, President, CHEMS I Sister Cecilia I(.inne nbrink , Executive Director, Adult Learning Source Russell Loftho se, Holly Ridge Center The Hon. Al eiklejohn, Colorado Staff Senate Rachel Noel, F , rmer Chair , African American Studies , MSC , and F rmer Member, CU Board of Regents Dr . John Pep r, Superintendent, Jefferson County Schools Bea Romer William G. Sweeney and Ross Steven Seay, resident, International Bank of Englewood Ken Tonning, eneral Manager, KUSA CH 9 J. Ben Trujillo, President, Hispanic Chamber of Com merce Richard Walke , Chairman and Chief Executive Offic er, PublicS vice Company INFORMA TI N ABOUT THE S CHOOL The School ' f Education offers master's degree s in 11 educational specialties and Ph.D.s in Educational Curriculum and Supervision and Instructional echnology. The School is fully accred ited by the No th Central Association of Colleges and Secondar y Sch ols. The Teacher Education Program is fully accredite by the Colorado State Board of Educa tion and theN tiona) Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Every facul member in the School holds the doc torate and is member of the graduate faculty. The faculty has a distinguished record of research, publi cation, and t aching. Since 1980 the faculty has authored over !200 refereed journal articles, as well as some 100 boo .sand chapters in books . Currently the Educational R rum, an internationally recognized journal in education, is housed wi thin the School and its editor is a member of the faculty. The School also is home base for the new coordinated degree program mandated by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Coordinated degree s are offered across all three CU Schools of Education at Denver, Boulder, and Colorado Springs. Dr. William F. Grady, who is Dean of all coordinated degree programs in education also is Dean at CU-Denver. The School also prepares a large percentage of teachers certified to teach in Colorado's K-12 schools. The Teacher Certification Program is a graduate level program designed to prepare elementary and second ary teachers for a variety of school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teach ing experiences, and community field experiences. Teacher Certification Programs are available at CU Denver in: Elementary Education (Kindergarten-6th grade) Secondary Education (7th-12th grade) (English, German, French, Spanish, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies) Bilingual Education Endorsement English as a Second Language Endorsement CU-Denver offers a certification program for students with a baccalaureate degree and for seniors earning degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. certification course work is at the gradu ate level. Much of the work is accep ted toward a master's degree in education. AFFILIA TED PROGRAMS For more complete information on the following programs, see Center s and Institutes for Rese arch, Service, and Training in the General Information sec tion of this aatalog. Colorado Partne rshi p for E d ucationa l Renewal The purpose of the Partnership is to stimulate change in the K-12 public school system and simul ta neously in the education of educators. The Partner ship seeks solutions to persistent issues such as minority achievement, at-risk youth, dropouts, teacher education, the common curriculum, research and evaluation, and educational leadership.

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146 I School of E du cation Area principa l s and reporters attend a workshop on the press and the public schools sponso:ed by the Colorado Principals ' Center. The Cen t er provides inservice education for principals and other schoo l Site managers. Colorado Principals' Center The primary mission of the Center is to enable prin cipals t o shape t h eir professional intellectual develop m e nt. Activities include t o p ical seminars, panel di sc u ssions, round t able disc u ssions, and ongoing special interest gro u ps. Storytelling Conference T h e Sch oo l spon s o rs an annua l S t ory t e llin g Conference, which presents poets, ar ti s t s, and yarnspinners from throughout th e U.S. United States Department of Education, Project L.E. A.D. P roject L.E.A.D. is a federal l y funded project which pro vides coordin at ion of vario u s school l eadership efforts throughout th e sta te. Through t h e project, a c oalit ion invo l vin g the Co l ora do D epartmen t of Edu cat ion, th e Co l o rado Associa tion of Schoo l Executives, and the Department of Ed ucational Administration, C urriculum, and S u pervision at CU-Denver has been d ev e loped . ADMISSION A prospective master's candidate should request a ppli cation forms from the Office of Student Services, Scho o l o f Educa t ion, Unive r si ty o f Colorado a t Denver and r e turn t he f orm t o tha t offic e wit h a $30 application fee. The fee should be in the form of a check or money order payable to the University of Colorado. Two copies of official transcripts of all previous col lege and university study should be ordered by the applicant to be sent to the O ffice of Student Services. Four recommendations on th e forms provided, or by letter, should be furnished. It is preferred that at least two of these should be from college or university pro fessors who can write wi t h assurance about the appli cant's acade mi c and p rofessional achievemen t promise. One or two recommendations from supervi sors or employers are acceptable with reference to an applicant's ability and contribution to the enterprise with which he/s h e was or is associated. Application papers and all s upporting documents (including GRE scores or MAT scores, see below) must be in the Office of Student Services on March 1 for summer, May 1 for fall, and October 1 for spring admission. Applicants s h ould request the Educational Testing Service to send th eir scores on the aptitude test (verbal and quantit a t ive ) of t he Graduate Record Examina t io n (GRE), or scores from the Miller's Analogy Test, t o t h e Office of Student Services. If an applicant has not taken the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller's Analogy Test, he/she should arrange to do so. The GRE or MAT is administered at many centers throughout the country. Information about the GRE may be obtained from The Graduate School office, the Student Academic Services office at CU-Denver, the Educational Tes ting Service, 20 assau Street, Prince ton, New Jersey 08540, or the graduat e office of a university in the applican t' s area.

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DEGREES jND AREAS OF SPECIALIZATIO N The programs, offered by the School of Education, c ver a wide range of professional and academic inte ests. M.A. Counseling and personnel services (element ry, secondary, agency settings, and col lege stu ent personnel services, and human resources and development) Early chil ood education Early chil ood education/special education (infant sp cialization track) Educational administration Educational psychology (school p ychology certification) Elementary education (bilingual education, English as a Second Lan guage, Ia guage and culture) Foundations Instructional technology (corporat instructional development and train ing, instr ctional computing specialist, instruc tional tee nologist , library media specialist) Reading an writing Secondary ducation (bilingual education, English as a Second Lan guage, E glish education, language and culture , mathema1ics education, science education, social studies e ucation, technology in education) Special edu ation (educatio ally handicapped) Ed. S. Educational administration Ph.D. Educational administration (emphasi in educational technology) Instruction technology Outlines of ach graduate program are listed in the following pagt s of the School of Education secti.on . Since many o the graduate degree plans are fleXIble and can be de igned around individual student needs, it is highly d sirable that the prospective candidate discuss tentati e programs of studies with appropriate facu1ty memb rs prior to submitting applications. Two Master of Arts degree plans are available , each comprising one academic year or more of graduate work beyond the bachelor's degree. The minimum Degrees and Areas of Specialization I 147 residence requirement for any master's degree is one academic y ar or the equivalent, and it may be satis fied by two semesters in residence, or three full sum mer sessions, or any combination equal to two semesters. 1. M.A. Plan I (With Thesis). The program con sists of 36 semester hours or more , including 4 semes ter hours fm; the master's thesis. While the inclusion of a minor field is not required by The Graduate School, a student and adviser may agree on a minor, in which 4 to 8 semester hours can be applied toward degree requirements. The M.A. thesis is written in accordance with the specifications set by The Graduate School and under the supervision of the student's adviser. When a com plete first draft is ready for final typing, the thesis must be re d by a second reader appointed by the dean's office. If the second reader approves the thesis, both the rea,der and the adviser will sign it when it is presented for filing with The Graduate School. If the reader does not approve, the reader and the student's adviser will confer and suggest appropriate changes. Two copies are required by The Graduate School. 2. M .A. Plan II (Without Thesis). The Plan H program indudes 36 or more semester hours of grad uate credit, and may include 4 to 10 hours for a minor. The minor is highly recommended in some fields of study. Tra n s f er Cred it Credit earned before formal admission is transfer credit. Nine transfer hours may be counted toward the M.A. degree . Education as a Minor Field In M .A. programs for majors outside the School of Education , students may include education as a minor if both their major department and the dean's office of the School of Education approve. For master's degrees, a minor in education consists of at least 6 semester hours of study in related courses. Not more than 2 semester hours may be transferred from another institution. Students who propose to minor in education must have had sufficient undergraduate work in education to prepare them for graduate study in the field. Appraisal of undergraduate preparation will be made by the dean's office and the coordinator of the program area in which the proposed minor courses will be taken .

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148 I School of Education Programs of Study TEACHER CERTIFICAT I ON PROG RAMS Program Director: Marc Mahlios Director of Advising and Student Teaching: Marilyn Scamman Office: 1200 Larimer St., Room 4001 Telephone: 556-4387 Academic Advising Students are encouraged to visit the School of Edu cation Office of Student Services for information regarding teacher certification. Students seeking initial teacher certification must attend an orientation session. These sessions are held twice weekly and are designed to acquaint students with Colorado state requirements as well as Univer sity requirements . Call 556-2717 for information regarding the time and place of orientation sessions. After attending an orientation, students may make an appointment with an advisor . Appointments may be made through the Office of Student Services at 556-2717 , or by contacting individual faculty mem bers . New students should bring a completed advis ing sheet and copies of transcripts to their advising session. Students who are already certified in Colo rado and are seeking a second endorsement need not attend an orientation sessions. These students may make an appointment directly with a faculty advisor . Out-of-State Teachers Individuals who have a teaching license from another state and are seeking certification in Colorado should appl y for licensure with the Colorado Teacher Education and Certification Office, 201 E. Colfax Ave. (866-6623). This office will evaluate transcripts, expe rience, etc., and determine if an applicant is eligible for certification in Colorado. Colorado Law Regard ing Tea c h e r Certification: Pre-Ad mi ssio n or First Semester Requirements According to Colorado law the following require ments must be met "prior to or no later than during the first class in the educational sequence." 1. Documented evidence of having worked success fully with children or young people. Students with no experience must register for FNDS.500 as the first course in the professional sequence. This course includes 30 hours of field work in an education setting for student with no experience . (The course is required for all students. The lab is required only for students with no documentation of working with chil dren or youth.) 2. Evidence of passing all sections of the Colorado Teacher Competency Tests in English mechanics/us age, mathematics, spelling, and oral English. Docu mentation of having taken a college level oral speech course with a B-or higher grade will waive the oral English requirement. The California Achievement Test (CAT) is currently given for the written portions of the competency requirement. 3. Evidence of academic competence. CU-Denver's approved program requires that teacher candidates have at least a 2. 75 GPA on all college work. Students seeking secondary certification also must have a 2.75 GPA in their teaching field. Education courses or teaching field courses with a D grade will not count toward certification. P r ovisio na l Admi ssion Ini t i a l Certific a t i on and Second Endorsement S t u dents) Students seeking initial t eacher certification or a second endorsement must be at least provisionally admitted to the CUDenver School of Education Teacher Certification Program before taking course work in the professional sequence. A maximum of nine semester hours, taken as a non-degree student, may apply toward certification. Application deadlines for provisional admission: Fall Semester Spring Semester Summer Term July 15 December 15 May 1 REQUIREMENTS FOR PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 1. Baccalaureate degree or at least 90 semester hours completed in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at CUDenver. 2. A completed application (both the internal Teacher Certification Application and Part I of the Graduate School Application). 3. A $30 nonrefundable application fee. 4. A two page autobiography listing educational background and professional goals. 5. Transcripts from each college/university attend ed. Unofficial transcripts (transcripts issued directly to the student) are acceptable for provisional admission. Official transcripts (sent directly from the issuing institution) are required for FORMAL admission. 6. A GPA of at least 2.5 (overall). Students seeking secondary certification also must have a 2.5 in their subject field (all courses in the teaching field).

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FORMAL ADMI SION In requiremen t s specified for PRO VISIONAL a ' ssion, the following must b e met before formal a mission and before applying for student teaching. I 1. Document41tion of passing all sections of t h e Col orado Teacher Competency Tests at the 75th percen tile or higher . 2. Document tion of passing the Oral Compe t ency Examination OJ having completed an oral speech course with a l:t or higher grade . 3 . Two ofEl'al transcripts mailed directly t o the School of Edu ation from each college or university attended. 4. A copy of he student' s Co l orado Teac h er C ertif icate (if seeking a second endorsement). 5. of an advising sheet for area of endorsement. his should be comp leted wi t h a n advi sor and signed, indicating that a p lanned program has been develope and is being followed. 6 . Success completion of TED. 5750 (Exp l oring Education). 7. Documen ation of passing the oral/wri tten lan guage examin tion given by the Modern Language Department (f r s tudents s eeking an endorsement in French, Spanis , or German). Non Deg ree Students Most int he Teacher Certification Program are open only to students who are at leas t PR OVI SIONALL Y a mitted to the CU-Denver School of Education Te cher Certifica t ion Progra m . Non degree studen need department approval t o r egister for TED . 5750, EPSY. 5000, FNDS. 5000, ELED. 5130, 5140, 5150, 51 0. No more than nine semes ter h ours, taken as a n -degree student, may count t oward certification. Foreig n L an uage Endorsement Students s . eking a teaching endorsement in French, Germ n, or Spanish must pass bo th the oral and written c mpetency tests given by the D epartment of Mo ern Languages. These examinations must be passe ' before applying t o student teac h . This requirement a!1 plies to all student s seeking foreign language end rsement, regardless of w h ere their degree was ob ained. Gradu ate L . vel Courses For studen s with a bacca l aurea t e degree, all courses in the School of Education are gradua t e l eve l courses and r quire graduate tuition . Studen t s who wish to use certification course work toward a mdster' s degrie should apply ea rl y for admission to the master' s program. Applying to The Gradua t e Teacher C e r tifi cation Programs I 149 School maste(s program is a separate process from applying to the Teacher Certification Program . No more than nfue semester hours taken before admis sion to The Graduate Schoo l master's program will apply toward a master's degree. Elementary Education The faculty of the School of Education at CU-D enver advocates that the most ap p ropriate education for a professional educator is base d upon a liberal arts tra dition. The faculty also believes that preparation for t he teacher of young children must be conceptu alized differently from t he prepara t ion for t h e subject spe cialist in the secondary sc h ool. The teacher in the elementary school is truly a generalist and must be aware of the basic structure o f a wide variety of disci plines. Students with a baccalaurea t e degree who seek ele mentar y certification must have a liberal arts under graduate major (i.e., a major in arts and humanities, natural/ph ys ical sciences, or social sciences). Undergraduate Students Students who seek elementary certification and do not have a baccalaureate degree should obtain a B.A . from the College of Liberal A r ts and Sciences (CLAS) in a major of their choice. Some certification courses are accepted b y CLAS. CLAS students must appl y for admission t o the School of Education and meet all s t a t e and university requiremen t s as specified under t he section on Colorado Law and Teacher Cert ifica t ion and the sections concerning provisional and for mal admission to the Teacher Certifica tion Program. at tary in ferson Co. participate in a n experiment led b y CU -Denver student teach er Paul Shushan. The purpose: to determine which parts of the tongue respond to tas tes tha t are bitter , sweet, or salty.

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150 I School of Education Unapproved Majors Students who have a baccalaureate degree but do not have an approved liberal arts major (i.e., majors in PE, business, communicative disorders, or elementary education are not approved) must develop a broad field liberal arts major. Such students should meet with an advisor early in their program to prepare a program of study. Professional Sequence for Elementary Certification FNDS. 5000-3 (formerly FNDS. 500). Teaching as a Profes sion. Includes a lab for those students without documen tation of having worked with children/youth . Student s with no documentation of working s ucce ss fully with chil dren/youth must take this course plu s lab the first semes ter . TED . 5750-2 (f ormerly TED. 575). Exploring Education . Includes 40 hours of field experience in a school se tting. Cannot be w aived for prior experience . EPSY. 5000-3 (formerly EPSY. 500). P sycho logical F oun dations of Education. 1PED. 5000-3 (formerly SPED. 500). Education of Excep tional Child. or 'SPED . 5010-3 (formerly SPED . 501). Mainstreaming the Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom . 1ELED. 5170-3 (formerly ELED. 517). Community and Inter personal Relations. MATH . 3040-4 (formerly MATH. 304). Math for Elementary Teachers . 1IT. 5180-3 (formerly ELED./SECE. 518). Instruction a l Tech nology for Teachers. 'ELED. 5210-3 (formerly ELED. 521). Models of Teaching . 1RDG. 5000-3 (formerly RDG . 500). Effective Reading and Writing Instruction . 5140-3 (formerly ELED. 514). Elementar y Curriculum Lan guage Arts and Children 's Literature . ELED. 5150-6 (formerly ELED. 515). Elementary Curriculum Science, Mathematics, Social Studies . 1ELED. 5160-3 (formerly ELED. 516). Expressive Arts: Art, Music, Health, P.E . TED . 5130-3 (formerly ELED/SECE. 513). Microteaching. (In cludes 60 hours of field experience in school setting.) TED. 5700-8 (formerly TED . 570). Student Teaching in the Elementar y School. (Twelve Weeks of teaching full time in school setting.)' SECONDARY EDUCATION Requirements 1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institu tion of higher education. 1 Will count for master's credit if enrolled in a mas te r's degree program . Although 18 hour s of the Teacher Certification Program will count for ma s ter's credit , only 9 h ours taken befor e being admitted to th e master ' s degree program m ay b e a pplied toward a degree . 2 . A major or equivalent in the discipline of endorsement. 3. Additional courses as prescribed by state certifi cation standards. Students preparing for certification in the secondary school should acquire a broad liberal arts background and specialize in the discipline area in which they plant to be endorsed. This specializa tion must meet the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements for a major and may include additional requirements specified by state certifica tion standards. Advisors in the College and in the School of Education should be consulted on a regular basis. Some cer t ifi cation courses, taken during the senior year, are accepted by CLAS toward the baccalaureate degree. CLAS students must apply for admission to the School of Education and must meet all state and Uni versity requirements as specified under the section on Colorado Law and Teacher Certification and the sec tions concerning provisional and formal admission to the Teacher Certification Program. Professional Sequence for Secondary Certification FNDS . 5000-3 (formerl y FNDS. 500). Teaching as a Profes sio n . Includes a lab for those students without documen tation of having worked with children/youth. Students with no documentation of working successfully with chil dren/youth must take this course plus lab the first semes ter . TED . 5750-2 (formerly TED. 575). Exploring Education. Includes 40 hours of field experience in a school setting. Cannot be waived for prior experience. EPSY. 5000-3 (formerly EPSY. 500). Psychological Founda tions of Education. 'SPED. 5000-3 (formerly SPED. 500). Education of Excep tional Child. or 'SPED . 5010-3 (formerly SPED . 501). Mainstrearning the Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom. 1SECE. 5170-3 (formerl y SECE. 517). Community and Inter personal Relations . 1 IT. 5180-3 (formerly ELED./SECE . 518). Instructional Tech nology for Teachers . 1SECE. 5210-3 (formerly SECE. 521). Mo dels of Teaching. TED. 5130-3 (formerly ELED./SECE. 513). Microteaching. (Includes 60 hours of field experience in school setting. 1RDG. 5020-3 (formerly RDG. 502). Reading and Writing Strategies: Secondary Content Areas. 1SECE. xxxx-3 (in development) . Methods Course for Area of Certification . TED. 5710-8 (formerly TED. 571). Student Teaching in the Secondary School. (Twelve Weeks of teaching full time in school se tting .)'

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STUDENT j ACHING Student provides the student an opportunity to experie ce, in depth, the full role and meaning of teachin g in sc hool setting. Requireme ts for Student Teaching 1. Form al dmission Status. Documentation of being formall admitted to the School of Education. 2. Completi n of all course work in education or advisor's writen permission to postpone a course until after stu ent te aching. No course work should b e planned fo the semester of student teaching. 3. Comple ti n of all co u rse work in the teachin g field (endorserent area) or advisor's writte n permis sion to postpone a particular course until after student t eaching. 4 . Completi n of TED. 5750 (Exploring Education) and ELED./SE E. 5130 (Micro t eaching), fie ld experi ence courses r quired by s t a t e law, after admission to the program but before student tea ching. 5. An advising shee t indicating that all REQUIREMENTTS have been met. 6. A com leted student t eaching applic ation, received and igned by the Coordinator of Student Teaching by: March 1 October 1 February 1 for Fall for Spring for Summer (second endorsement only)1 7. documen atio n of the negati ve TB test, required of public scho l empl oyees, including student teach ers. (Mu s t be ubmitted with student teaching appli cation.) University credit for student teaching ranges from four to eight k:redit hours, depending on length of assignment. S dents seeking an initial endorsement are required t student teach for 12 weeks, full time (8 credits). Tea c her ce ification students seeking a second endorsement ust complete a minimum of 8 weeks of student (4 credits). Student s seeking a second endorse ent who are currently teaching a t the same le vel (e .. , teaching secondary math and wish ing to add sci nee) may student teach for a minimum of 4 weeks, if approved by the Coordinator of Student Tea chin g. A student ho withdraws from student teaching after a schoof placement has been made, or who receives a stuaent t eaching grade below C must be recommended! for a subsequent student te aching placement by the Coordinator of Student Teaching f o llowing con ulta tio n with the Faculty Review Com mittee for Tea her Certification. 1 Late application will not be accep t ed. Student Teaching I 151 S tudent teachers prepare a pro j ect on creati vi t y for childre n in their dasses. COURSES Any course with a TED prefix may not be applied toward a gradu a t e degree. T h e following courses may not be applied toward graduat e degrees: TED. 5130-3 (formerly ELEDJSECE. 513). Microteaching. Taken after or concurrently wi th ELED./SECE . 5210, Mode l s of Teaching . Cannot be taken during first semes te r in pro gram or as a nonde gree student. Provide s ex t ensive clinical supervision through analysis of peer teaching and video taped presentations in schools. Extensive field placement required. TED. 5700-8 (formerly TED. 570). Student Teaching-Elementary School. Kindergarten and grades one through six. St udent teacher attends an elementary school in Denver metrop olitan area. TED. 5710-8 ( formerly TED. 571). Student Teaching Secondary School. Student teacher attends a senior or junior high school in Denver metropoli tan area. TED. 5750-2 (formerly TED. 575). Field Experience : Explor ing Education. Teaching experience in small groups in a sc h ool setting. Observations in various schoo l settings. EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION, CURRICULUM, AND SUPERVISION Program Chair: W . Michael Martin Office : 1200 Larimer St. Telephone: 556-4857 Faculty: Profes sor: Richard Koeppe, Bob L. Taylor Associate W. Mic h ael Martin, Russell W. Meyers Assistant Professors: Jo Roberts, Lance V. Wright The major responsibility of the educational adminis t ration, curriculum, and supervision program fac ul ty is to tprepare leaders for public schools in Colorado and the nation. In addition, the programs may help individuals prepare for other education related administrative and academic positions. Cur rently , the Type D Administrator Certificate is required for people seeking buil ding-leve l and distric t level administrative positions.

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152 I School of Education THE PROGRAM The University of Colorado at Denver offers three degree programs in addition to or as a part of the Adminis t rator Cer t ification Program. Certification Only: available for those who hold a graduate degree and who seek onl y Colorado admin istrator certification; Master of Arts: designed for those who hold no graduate degree and who seek Colorado administra tor certification or a specialized program in educa tional administration , curriculum, or supervision; Spedalist in Education: available to those who hold a M.A. and now seek Colorado administrator certifi cation or a specialized program; and Doctor of Philosoph y: primaril y an academic degree, although a limited number of courses that satisfy certification requiremen t s may be included in the doctoral degree plan. Doctor of Philosophy Depending on graduate work completed beyond the M.A., students seeking the Ph.D . will be expected to complete 40 semester hours of course work leading up to the comprehensive examination and admission to candidacy. In addition , 30 dissertation credits are required for the dissertation . The course plan will be developed in consultation with professors in the student's proposed area(s) of concentration and with the approval of the student's advisor and committee. The degree plan ma y include a limited number of courses that are included in the Colorado principal and/or superintendent certification programs . Trans fer of doctoral work may be accomplished with the approval of The Graduate School and advisor. Stu dents may take e l ective course work in related Univer sity departments with adviser approval . Required Courses 1. Introduction to Research Methods. 2 . Intermediate Statistics (REM. 5100: Basic Statis tics is a prerequisite and is not included in the degree plan). 3. Experimental Design , Survey Methods, Policy Studies, Naturalistic Research , or other advanced research methods course. 4. EDUC. 6800-3 (formerly EDUC. 680). Doctoral Research Seminar: Administration , Curriculum, and Supervision. Specialist i n Education (ED. S.) The Ed.S. degree program affords opportunity for advanced graduate study or administrator certifica tion. Thirty semester hours of graduate credit beyond the M.A. degree are required. The program is intended to serve individuals who have a graduate degree but who now seek administrator preparation or certification, but who do not wish t o purse a doc torate . The Specialist in Educa t io n degree requires no the sis, but a final written comprehensive examina t ion is required. Master of Arts The M .A. requires course work totaling 36 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree. Completion of the master's degree program DOES NOT automati cally qualify persons for the Building Level Principal/ Administrator Certificate. Students must develop a certification plan with their adviser . Course Plan Level I. Core (9 semester hours total) Students may select at least one course in each of the following three areas: 11. Advanced Psychological Foundations of Educa tion or Multicultural Educa t ion. 12. Social/Philosophical Foundations Most founda tions courses are acceptable (after approval from advi sor) except fnds. 5000 (formerly FNDS. 500). 3 . Orienta t ion t o Researc h and Evalua t ion Method ology or Basic Statistical Me t hods . 1 Level II . General Educational Administration (12 semester hours) EDUC. 5100 (formerly EDUC. 510). Curriculum/Program Development Evaluation . EDUC. 5830 (formerly EDUC. 585). Governance and Administration of Education. EDUC. 5831 (formerly EDUC. 586). School Law. EDUC. 5832 (formerly EDUC. 587). Group Development and Training. Level III. Administrative Skills and Techno l ogy (17 semester hours from the following) EDUC. 5050 (formerly EDUC. 505). Computer Applications to Educational Management. EDUC. 5833 (formerly EDUC. 588). School Business Man agement. EDUC. 5835 (formerly EDUC. 591). Education Supervision . EDUC. 7420 (formerly EDUC. 642). Personnel Administra tion . EDUC. 7430 (formerly EDUC. 643). School and Community Relations. EDUC. 5834 (formerly EDUC. 589). Seminar: School Admin istration . The Master of Arts degree requires to thesis, but a final written comprehensive examination is required . Colorado Administrator Certification Principals: Certification endorsement as a building level principal is available for elementary, middle, and senior high school levels . Current Colorado Department of Education regula t ions require a total of 45 1 R equired for Certification.

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semester hou • S of study beyond the B.A. degree, including am ster's degree. The following courses (in addition to th se listed under the M .A. degree) are required for e dorsement at each of the three school levels. Students ]st develop a special plan with their advisors. Senior High S ool EDUC. 5090 (f rmerly EDUC. 509). Curriculum of the Senior High Sphool. EDUC. 7370 (f[merly EDUC. 637). Administration and Supervision o the Senior High School. EDUC. 9931 (fo erly EDUC. 980). Internship in the Senior High School. Middle Level Sc ool EDUC. 7120 (fotrnerly EDUC. 612). Curriculum of the Mid dle Level EDUC. 7560 (formerly EDUC. 656). Administration and Supervision! ohe Middle Level School. EDUC. 9931 (fo erly EDUC. 980). Internship in the Middle School. Elementar y Sch I EDUC. 5832 (foF,erly EDUC. 507). Curriculum of the Elementary Scho pl. EDUC. 7350 EDUC. 635). Elementary Principal s hip Intensiv . EDUC. 7360 (f' rmerly EDUC. 636). Administration and Supervision o the Elementary School EDUC. 9931 (for,nerly EDUC. 980). Internship in the Elementary Schll. Superin ten en t: Administrator certification endorse ment for the uperintendency is also available . Such endorsement equires: 1. 60 semest;er hours beyond the B.A. degree . 2. Coloradoj Administrator Certification, building level endorse{ofent. 3. Completi n of at least the following courses in addition to a building level administrator endorsement: EDUC. 9931 (f9 rmerly EDUC. 980). Internship in Central Office Admirustration . Eouc. 7400 (for merly Eouc. 640). school Finance. EDUC. 7410 (f rmerly EDUC. 641). Educational Facilities Planning . 4. Completi n of 5 courses or 12 semester hours at the University of Colorado. 5. Formal a mission to the ACS program. 6. Master ' s t egree . Access Prodram in Educational Administra,ion, Curriculum and Supervision) The Educational Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision program at CU-Denver has recently cre ated a special model for the Colorado Type 0 Administrators Certificate. Front Range Community College and Arapa hoe Community College are serv ing as locatio 1s for these new off-campus programs. Doctor of Philosoph y (Ph.D.) I 153 Individuals with strong leadership backgrounds and potential are encouraged to enroll in these access programs . Requirements are identical to those in tine on-campus program . For further infor mation, please call 556-4857. Admission Criteria/Guidelines MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) , SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION (ED.S.) , AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS 1. Grade-Point A v erages. Undergraduate 2.75 or better on a 4-point scale ; Graduate 3 .0. 2. Examination Scores. (either , not both); Miller Analogy Test (MAT)-44 or higher; Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 900, or higher, combined verbal and quantitative scores. 3. Review of letters of recommendation and of response to item 6 on the Application for Graduate Admission Part II Form. 4 . A writing sample may be required . DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PH.D. ) The criteria/guidelines are the same as those above, except: 1. GRE scores must be submitted. A minimum of 1,000 is required for consideration for regular admis sion (combined verbal and quantitative scores) . 2 . Grade-Point A v erage (GPAs) . Graduate CPA's above 3 . 0 are required and expected. Degree of suc cess in previous graduate studies is given careful con sideration . Undergraduate GPAs also are considered. 3 . Considerable weight will be given to the quality of the written responses submitted with the Part II (6) Application for Graduate Admission form , as above . 4. A writing sample may be required. (For information about and to make arrangements for taking ejther the MAT or GRE, all the Testing Office at 556-2861.) Please Note. These are cri te ria/guidelines to be con sidered by the faculty committee which reviews appli cations for admission to these programs. Neither failing to meet any one of the criteria nor meeting the minimum standards of all criteria automatically results in recommendations to admit or to deny admission. All application materials are reviewed together to determine the likelihood of success in the programs, and admission decisions are made only after reviewing the material as a whole. Program Information Individuals interested in any of the programs are encouraged to contact program area faculty to discuss these programs. Conferences prior to application are encouraged and welcomed. Following admission, stu dents are to maintain frequent conferences with assigned advisers to plan and develop programs of study.

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154 I Sd10ol of Education COURSES EDUC. 5050-3 (formerly EDUC. 505) . Computer Applica tions to Educational Management. A study of t he theoret ical a n d applied k n owledge of central and school-based administrative edu cational applications of modem com puter technology. EDUC 5070 3 (formerly EDUC. 507). Elementary School Curriculum . An integrating cour e dealing with the history, development, problems, and practice of the curriculum of the elementary school. EDUC. 5090-3 (formerly EDUC. 509) . Senio r High School Curriculum. This course is concerned with the history, development , princ i ples, problems , practices , and trends of the curriculum of the senior high school. EDUC. 5100-3 (formerly EDUC. 510). Curric ulum/Program Development and Evaluat i on. F u ndamentals of curriculum and program development, including theoretical founda tions of U.S. curric u lum , practica l criteria to guide deci sion making, specific models and proces ses for curriculum/ program development and appraisal, emerging is ues, problems and trends. EDUC. 5830 3 (formerly EDUC. 585). Governanc e and Administration of Education . Development of governance structures and of administration as a field of study in edu cation. Influence of governance and views of administration on educational organizations' goa l s, functions, and person nel. Required for Masters and Type D Cer t ification stu dents. EDUC. 58313 (formerly EDUC. 586) . School Law . Recent developments incl u ding administrative implications of sig nificant court decisions pertaining to school operations. For superintendents, principals , school board members, pro spective administrators, and teachers . EDUC. 5832 3 (formerly EDUC. 587) . G r oup De v e l opment and Training. Organizational theory and practice for school leadership persmmel with emph asis on group and organi zation developmen t , group prob l em identification and solu tions, and conflic t m anagement skills and processes , ro l e behaviors , and goa l se t ting. EDUC. 5833 3 (formerly EDUC. 588) . School Business Man a gement. Emphasizes sc hoo l -site level management. Include instruction in planning, budgeting, evaluation, and management. EDUC. 5834 2 (formerly EDUC. 589) . Seminar: School Adm i nistration . Knowledge and insight into organizational behavior drawing upon education and related social science concepts. EDUC. 5835-3 (formerly EDUC. 591). Supervision of Instruction . A study of instructiona l supervision concepts with exercises of prac t ical application. Effec t ive instruc t ion, supervision, and program eva luat ion in relation to school wide improvement. Leadership skills of staff development, curriculum development , group development, direct obser vation, and action research . EDUC. 5836-1 to 4 (fo r merly EDUC. 593). Wo r kshop in Educational Administration, Curriculu m and Superv i s i on. EDUC. 69514 (formerly EDUC. 700) . Master's Thes i s . EDUC. 7120 3 (formerly EDUC. 612) . Cur riculum o f Middle Level School. The course deals with the history, develop ment, principles, problems, prac t ices , and trends of the curriculum of the mi ddle leve l sc h ool. EDUC. 7140-2 (formerly EDUC. 614). Student Activities Curriculum . P r inciples, problems, and proced u res for improvement of extra class activities, s tudent councils, home rooms i n th e secondary school, etc. EDUC. 7150-3 (formerly EDUC. 615) . Doctoral Seminar: Curricular Theories. Intens i ve study of current th eories of public schoo l curriculum re l a ted to trends in actua l practices in elementary and secondary schools. EDUC. 7160-3 (formerly EDUC. 616) . Processes and Materials in Curriculum Appraisal. Designed to provide curricu lum workers with skills in t he process of assessment of curriculum programs and skill in the appraisal of curriculum materials . Incl u des work in the theory of evaluation, t h e methodology of evaluation, and practicum in evaluation of curricula . Prer., one course i n curriculum. EDUC. 7340-2 (formerly EDUC. 634) . Doctoral Seminar: Problems and Trends in Education. A broa d overv iew of current proble m s i n schools and schoo l systems and co n sid eration of prac t ices and polic i es in U.S. sc h ools for so lut ion of such problems. Evaluates procedures for solving educa tional problems. EDUC. 7350-2 (formerly EDUC. 635) . Elementary Principal ship Intensive. Offered summers only. Two-week in-dept h examination of the elementary chao! principalship. Required for Type D administrative certification, elemen tary school. Consent of instructor required. EDUC. 7360-3 (formerly EDUC. 636). Administration and Supervision of the Elementary School. For administrato r s a n d teachers. Purposes , practices , and t ren d s i n adminis t ra tion and educa t ional leadership. EDUC. 7370-3 (formerly EDUC. 637). Administration and Supervision of the Senior High School. Current administra tive principles and practices essential to effective organiza tion and management , with emphasis on the educational leadership of the principal . EDUC. 7380-3 (formerly EDUC. 638). Doctoral Seminar : Theory of Educational Administration. Study of organ